WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural items university

  1. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY... the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center. DATES: Representatives of... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Stanford University Archaeology Center that...

  2. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13042; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by Rev...

  3. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, that meet the definition of unassociated... funerary objects should contact Carla Sinopoli, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor...

  4. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the... Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural...

  5. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that...

  6. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico... Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined that a collection of... cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the...

  7. 77 FR 48532 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Management Program, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items... itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact San Diego State University Archaeology Collections Management Program. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  8. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural items may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  9. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian... Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item...

  10. 75 FR 8741 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ...: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the control of Stephen F... of Oklahoma, which was under contract with Stephen F. Austin State University. In 1957, 15 cultural...

  11. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of..., Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice... mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture are consistent with the Hohokam...

  12. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with... contact the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that...

  13. 78 FR 13889 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... the Hopi Tribe gives a positive identification to substantiate ownership of these sacred and religious... and religious items as described. These items are identified as sacred and religious objects, and are... definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony, and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated...

  14. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ..., has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... the control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition... material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archaeological tradition and indicate occupation between...

  15. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any...

  16. 78 FR 11679 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Binghamton University, State University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of sacred... the definition of sacred object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National... item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious...

  17. 77 FR 5839 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes...

  18. 76 FR 73663 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of... ethnographic collection from the Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated funerary items in the museum storage area and...

  19. 78 FR 50107 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred... Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should... tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural...

  20. 78 FR 50091 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred... History, Boulder, CO that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is..., religious, and ceremonial items, through gifts, purchases, and items left for collateral by Mandan, Hidatsa...

  1. 75 FR 77897 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ..., Philadelphia, PA, that meet the definitions of sacred objects and/or objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S... pieces of cedar wood, called Old-Man-of-War Box Drum. One narrow side is carved to represent the ``old-man-of-war'' and the opposing side is open; the broad sides are painted in geometric figures in red...

  2. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definitions of unassociated... 4 eagle feathers, 1 stone purifying bowl, 3 medicine man's baskets, 1 medicine basket lid, 4 medicine man's basket fragments, 1 animal bone, 2 carved animal effigies, 1 carved human effigy, 1 feather...

  3. 76 FR 14048 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... sacred object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of... item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious... relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object/object of...

  4. 77 FR 15799 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... no records at the Treganza Museum concerning acquisition of this item. Based on ethnographic research... rattlesnake dance during both Yokut and Tubatulabal spring ceremonies. Based on consultation, ethnographic research, and museum records, the basket is culturally affiliated with the Santa Rosa Indian Community of...

  5. 78 FR 13890 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... ethnographic research, the sacred object and object of cultural patrimony is 1 clay pipe fragment. Based on consultation and ethnographic research, the objects of cultural patrimony are 4 obsidian tools or flakes, 5... ethnographic research, the pestle is an object of cultural patrimony. The age of site CA-SON-UNK (Dry Creek) is...

  6. 75 FR 433 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Seton Hall University Museum, Seton Hall...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... identifies false face masks as being sacred objects needed by traditional Haudenosaunee religious leaders, as... ``sacred object'' and ``object of cultural patrimony'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as... above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the...

  7. 77 FR 59643 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... chert tools, 84 ground stone tools, 90 bone tools, 1 ear spool, and 4 earplugs. Radiometric dating... medicine pestle fragment, and 1 quartz crystal. The 147 objects of cultural patrimony are 12 ground stone... A.E. Treganza. The 4 sacred objects are 2 stone pestles to grind medicine or paint used in...

  8. 75 FR 36666 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ...: University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C... Manoa, Honolulu, HI. The book includes kapa (bark cloth) that originated from four known Hawaiian burial...

  9. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  10. Cultural Interchangeability? Culture-Specific Items in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajtony Zsuzsanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the results of the translation work carried out within an international project aiming to develop the language skills of staff working in hotel and catering services. As the topics touched upon in the English source texts are related to several European cultures, these cultural differences bring about several challenges related to the translation of realia, or culture-specific items (CSIs. In the first part of the paper, a series of translation strategies for rendering source-language CSIs into the target language are enlisted, while the second part presents the main strategies employed in the prepared translations.

  11. Cultural universals: So what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elaine Botha

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the elusive "cultural universal s” in a variety of academic disciplines has been motivated b y the spectre of relativism in its diverse guises. The problem of relativism has been thrust upon us inter alia by the inability of our epistemological models to account for social and cultural, moral and cognitive diversity and to provide us with criteria by means of which to judge aberrations like ideologies. Contrary to the general trend I would like to argue that it is not the spectre of relativism in its various guises which necessitates the search for cultural universals, nor is this the only motivation for a Christian to argue in favour of the recognition of cultural universals. Various authors have suggested that such universal structures do exist; that they condition human and societal behaviour and that it would in principle be possible to construct a theory of these structural universals or a "biogrammar" or "geography ” of the universal cultural acquisition device of humankind (cf. Harre,1976, 32; Johnson, 1987: xxxvii ; Tige r and Fox, 1974:17,30. Cross -cu ltural research in both psychology and anthropology has pointed to the existence of such traits, and in recent philosophical discussions Apel and others have pointed to the necessity of recognizing the existence of some sort of " transcendentalia" . These arguments emphasize elements that are common to diverse approaches to the problem of cultural universals. Christian scholars could accept most of these arguments as valid and yet argue in favour of a very specifically modified version of the notion of cultural universals. This essay attempts to develop such a position.

  12. Evaluation of Northwest University, Kano Post-UTME Test Items Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichi, Ado Abdu; Hafiz, Hadiza; Bello, Samira Abdullahi

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes testing is used for the purposes of providing results that have important consequences. Validity is the cornerstone upon which all measurement systems are built. This study applied the Item Response Theory principles to analyse Northwest University Kano Post-UTME Economics test items. The developed fifty (50) economics test items was…

  13. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  14. 76 FR 14047 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Transportation (Caltrans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Cultural Items: California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Sacramento, CA and California State University, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... (Caltrans), Sacramento, CA, and in the possession of the California State University, Sacramento, CA, that...

  15. 76 FR 58031 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

  16. Differential Weighting of Items to Improve University Admission Test Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Backhoff Escudero

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an evaluation of different ways to increase university admission test criterion-related validity, by differentially weighting test items. We compared four methods of weighting multiple-choice items of the Basic Skills and Knowledge Examination (EXHCOBA: (1 punishing incorrect responses by a constant factor, (2 weighting incorrect responses, considering the levels of error, (3 weighting correct responses, considering the item’s difficulty, based on the Classic Measurement Theory, and (4 weighting correct responses, considering the item’s difficulty, based on the Item Response Theory. Results show that none of these methods increased the instrument’s predictive validity, although they did improve its concurrent validity. It was concluded that it is appropriate to score the test by simply adding up correct responses.

  17. Cultural pathways through universal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Patricia M; Keller, Heidi; Fuligni, Andrew; Maynard, Ashley

    2003-01-01

    We focus our review on three universal tasks of human development: relationship formation, knowledge acquisition, and the balance between autonomy and relatedness at adolescence. We present evidence that each task can be addressed through two deeply different cultural pathways through development: the pathways of independence and interdependence. Whereas core theories in developmental psychology are universalistic in their intentions, they in fact presuppose the independent pathway of development. Because the independent pathway is therefore well-known in psychology, we focus a large part of our review on empirically documenting the alternative, interdependent pathway for each developmental task. We also present three theoretical approaches to culture and development: the ecocultural, the sociohistorical, and the cultural values approach. We argue that an understanding of cultural pathways through human development requires all three approaches. We review evidence linking values (cultural values approach), ecological conditions (ecocultural approach), and socialization practices (sociohistorical approach) to cultural pathways through universal developmental tasks.

  18. Universal Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) second generation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeneman, J.L.; Baumann, M.J.; Fox, L.J.; Jenkins, C.D.; Perlinsk, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is in the final stages of developing a Universal Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS). When completed, AIMS will provide applicable agencies in the US government, and those in the International arena, with a secure and convenient method of monitoring the physical status of selected items. The benefit derived from this development activity will be the commercial availability of an item monitoring system with the capability for ''quick set-up'' monitoring, as well as long-term unattended monitoring. The AIMS includes a variety of sensors, a robust and authenticated radio frequency (RF) communication link, a Receiver Processing Unit (RPU), and an inspector-friendly personal computer (PC) interface for collecting, sorting, viewing and archiving pertinent event histories. The system will provide the capability to monitor selected items in a real-time mode, a remotely interrogated mode, and a stand-alone, unattended data collection mode. The sensor suite under development includes advanced motion sensors, interior volumetric intrusion sensors, Re-usable, In-situ Verifiable Authenticated (RIVA) fiber-optic seal sensors, generic utility sensors (to accommodate contact closure inputs), and radiation and environmental sensors. A new generation authentication algorithm recently has been developed that provides a high degree of system security 121. The AIMS has potential safeguards applications in the areas of arms control and treaty verification military asset control, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Euratom safeguards verification activities, as well as domestic nuclear safeguard activities. Commercial applications could include high-value inventory control and security systems. This paper describes the second-generation AIMS along with its recently expanded sensor suite and enhanced data collection capabilities

  19. 76 FR 62833 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural item meets the definition of... University, New Haven, CT, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001... Northwest Coast culture area, the recovery of the blanket from a grave pole, and the type of object (chilkat...

  20. 77 FR 34985 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to... custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definition of..., including characteristics of portable material culture, attributes of ceramic styles, domestic and ritual...

  1. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park... possession of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the... notice. One lot of stone, bone, and glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington...

  2. 78 FR 50109 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural... organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

  3. 78 FR 34130 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this... tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural....R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National...

  4. 77 FR 13624 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural...; Items 7 and 12: eagle bone whistle; Item 15: dance club; Item 16: dance staff; Items 23-25: replica... feather headdress; Item 65: medicine bundle; and Item 69: leather tipi bag and contents. Item 16 (dance...

  5. Clusters of cultures: diversity in meaning of family value and gender role items across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vlimmeren, Eva; Moors, Guy B D; Gelissen, John P T M

    2017-01-01

    Survey data are often used to map cultural diversity by aggregating scores of attitude and value items across countries. However, this procedure only makes sense if the same concept is measured in all countries. In this study we argue that when (co)variances among sets of items are similar across countries, these countries share a common way of assigning meaning to the items. Clusters of cultures can then be observed by doing a cluster analysis on the (co)variance matrices of sets of related items. This study focuses on family values and gender role attitudes. We find four clusters of cultures that assign a distinct meaning to these items, especially in the case of gender roles. Some of these differences reflect response style behavior in the form of acquiescence. Adjusting for this style effect impacts on country comparisons hence demonstrating the usefulness of investigating the patterns of meaning given to sets of items prior to aggregating scores into cultural characteristics.

  6. 77 FR 23497 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... for all nine cultural items and that these cultural items are sacred objects that have religious... sacred objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants..., Philomath, OR, that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as...

  7. 78 FR 50108 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rochester Museum & Science Center... that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of...

  8. 78 FR 72710 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Art Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in...

  9. Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    This article features "Pop Culture Universe," which received the 2009 Dartmouth Medal honoring the creation of a reference work of outstanding quality. School librarians will find "Pop Culture Universe" a wonderful resource for assisting middle school and high school students with research projects on significant historical events that focus on…

  10. Economic and Cultural Factors Affecting University Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabnoun, Naceur

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The ranking of top universities in the world has generated increased interest in the factors that enhance university performance. The purpose of this paper is to identify economic and cultural factors that affect the number of top ranking universities in each country. Design/methodology/approach: This paper first identifies the number of…

  11. Identifying Country-Specific Cultures of Physics Education: A differential item functioning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesic, Vanes

    2012-11-01

    In international large-scale assessments of educational outcomes, student achievement is often represented by unidimensional constructs. This approach allows for drawing general conclusions about country rankings with respect to the given achievement measure, but it typically does not provide specific diagnostic information which is necessary for systematic comparisons and improvements of educational systems. Useful information could be obtained by exploring the differences in national profiles of student achievement between low-achieving and high-achieving countries. In this study, we aimed to identify the relative weaknesses and strengths of eighth graders' physics achievement in Bosnia and Herzegovina in comparison to the achievement of their peers from Slovenia. For this purpose, we ran a secondary analysis of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 data. The student sample consisted of 4,220 students from Bosnia and Herzegovina and 4,043 students from Slovenia. After analysing the cognitive demands of TIMSS 2007 physics items, the correspondent differential item functioning (DIF)/differential group functioning contrasts were estimated. Approximately 40% of items exhibited large DIF contrasts, indicating significant differences between cultures of physics education in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovenia. The relative strength of students from Bosnia and Herzegovina showed to be mainly associated with the topic area 'Electricity and magnetism'. Classes of items which required the knowledge of experimental method, counterintuitive thinking, proportional reasoning and/or the use of complex knowledge structures proved to be differentially easier for students from Slovenia. In the light of the presented results, the common practice of ranking countries with respect to universally established cognitive categories seems to be potentially misleading.

  12. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts... Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  13. 77 FR 19699 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of both sacred objects and... Rochester Museum & Science Center that meet the definition of both sacred objects and [[Page 19700

  14. Exploring differential item functioning in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Beth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC is a widely used patient reported outcome in osteoarthritis. An important, but frequently overlooked, aspect of validating health outcome measures is to establish if items exhibit differential item functioning (DIF. That is, if respondents have the same underlying level of an attribute, does the item give the same score in different subgroups or is it biased towards one subgroup or another. The aim of the study was to explore DIF in the Likert format WOMAC for the first time in a UK osteoarthritis population with respect to demographic, social, clinical and psychological factors. Methods The sample comprised a community sample of 763 people with osteoarthritis who participated in the Somerset and Avon Survey of Health. The WOMAC was explored for DIF by gender, age, social deprivation, social class, employment status, distress, body mass index and clinical factors. Ordinal regression models were used to identify DIF items. Results After adjusting for age, two items were identified for the physical functioning subscale as having DIF with age identified as the DIF factor for 2 items, gender for 1 item and body mass index for 1 item. For the WOMAC pain subscale, for people with hip osteoarthritis one item was identified with age-related DIF. The impact of the DIF items rarely had a significant effect on the conclusions of group comparisons. Conclusions Overall, the WOMAC performed well with only a small number of DIF items identified. However, as DIF items were identified in for the WOMAC physical functioning subscale it would be advisable to analyse data taking into account the possible impact of the DIF items when weight, gender or especially age effects, are the focus of interest in UK-based osteoarthritis studies. Similarly for the WOMAC pain subscale in people with hip osteoarthritis it would be worthwhile to analyse data taking into account the

  15. Explicitation in Translation: Culture-Specific Items from Persian into English

    OpenAIRE

    MORADI, Neda; RAHBAR, Muhamad; OLFATI, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Investigating the concept of explicitation has been the center of attention to many scholars recent years. A lot of studies have been carried out dealing with the exploitation of explicitation on the culture-specific items on the translation of English source text into Persian. However, few studies has been carried out investigating such culture-specific items on Persian source text translated into English. The present article aims at providing sufficient data to cover the identific...

  16. 78 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Native Hawaiian organizations, have determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the... organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written... Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a...

  17. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of... control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations... Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim the cultural item should...

  18. Should Universalism Trump Cultural Relativism in Counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnier, Richard T.; Dixon, Andrea L.; Barratt, Tyler M.; Moyer, Erika L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain cultural customs and practices are viewed as abhorrent by many people, yet contemporary American counselors rarely criticize any specific culture. In this article, the authors explore why counselors abstain from such criticism. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that universalism, often regarded as a politically incorrect and an…

  19. Assessing cross-cultural item bias in questionnaires: Acculturation and the Measurement of Social Support and Family Cohesion for Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hemert, Dianne A. van; Baerveldt, Chris; Vermande, Marjolijn

    2001-01-01

    Amethod is presented for evaluating the presence and size of cross-cultural item biases. The examined items concern parental support and family cohesion in a Likert-type questionnaire for adolescents in The Netherlands. Each evaluated item has two versions, a collectivist and an individualistic one, that measure the same theoretical construct. The standardized difference between the score means of the item versions, called the ?e score, gives an indication of the cultural bias of the item. As...

  20. 77 FR 23499 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Indian Arts & Culture/Laboratory of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and... definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... associated human remains are in the custody of the San Diego Museum of Man. Based on material culture...

  1. 78 FR 2428 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... & Culture, also the Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of... the Eastern Washington State Historical Society, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and...

  2. 77 FR 19698 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of both sacred objects and... Rochester Museum & Science Center that meet the definition of both sacred objects and objects of cultural.... Traditional religious leaders of the Seneca Nation of New York have identified these medicine faces as being...

  3. 75 FR 11554 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... continue to be used by traditional Navajo religious practitioners. Based on the sacred esoteric knowledge... Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of cultural... the area of Farmington, NM. The 29 cultural items are 4 watercolors of sacred Navajo Yei figures and...

  4. 77 FR 23496 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Society and Museum, Philomath, OR, that meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S... Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum, Philomath, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Benton County Historical Society and Museum, in consultation with...

  5. The cultural fairness of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire among diverse adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Anica

    2017-01-01

    The 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used in the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE; N = 15,770) to collect measures on adolescent mental health. Given the debate in current literature regarding the dimensionality of the GHQ-12, this study examined the cultural sensitivity of the instrument at the item level for each of the 7 major ethnic groups within the database. This study used a hybrid approach of ordinal logistic regression and item response theory (IRT) to examine the presence of differential item functioning (DIF) on the questionnaire. Results demonstrated that uniform, nonuniform, and overall DIF were present on items between White and Asian adolescents (7 items), White and Black Caribbean adolescents (1 item), and White and Black African adolescents (7 items), however all McFadden's pseudo R² effect size estimates indicated that the DIF was negligible. Overall, there were cumulative small scale level effects for the Mixed/Biracial, Asian, and Black African groups, but in each case the bias was only marginal. Findings demonstrate that the GHQ-12 can be considered culturally sensitive for adolescents from diverse ethnic groups in England, but follow-up studies are necessary. Implications for future education and health policies as well as the use of IR-based approaches for psychological instruments are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. The perception of disasters: Some items from the culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero A, Jose Humberto

    2008-01-01

    This short reflection on social perception of disasters analyses their implications in the development and evolution of public policies on disaster prevention. Perception is the result of psychological conditions of people made of socially accepted ideas that conforms local culture. Four stages in the development of social perception explain how the impact of disasters is considered. First Christian religions are connected with the idea that disasters are punishment of divinity in response to our sins. Secondly, disasters are the result of the forces of nature, which have led to the idea of constructing the denial as a form of response. Disasters occur, but it doesn't threaten me because my local environment is safe enough. Third perception of security is diminished by the excessive reliance that exists in science and technology. This tends to increase vulnerability to disaster, especially among higher social classes who imagine they can pay the cost of these developments. Lastly short consideration is given to some recent ideas regarding disasters as the result of human intervention, especially with respect to global climate change

  7. Item Analysis of Multiple Choice Questions at the Department of Paediatrics, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deena Kheyami

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current study aimed to carry out a post-validation item analysis of multiple choice questions (MCQs in medical examinations in order to evaluate correlations between item difficulty, item discrimination and distraction effectiveness so as to determine whether questions should be included, modified or discarded. In addition, the optimal number of options per MCQ was analysed. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Department of Paediatrics, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain. A total of 800 MCQs and 4,000 distractors were analysed between November 2013 and June 2016. Results: The mean difficulty index ranged from 36.70–73.14%. The mean discrimination index ranged from 0.20–0.34. The mean distractor efficiency ranged from 66.50–90.00%. Of the items, 48.4%, 35.3%, 11.4%, 3.9% and 1.1% had zero, one, two, three and four nonfunctional distractors (NFDs, respectively. Using three or four rather than five options in each MCQ resulted in 95% or 83.6% of items having zero NFDs, respectively. The distractor efficiency was 91.87%, 85.83% and 64.13% for difficult, acceptable and easy items, respectively (P <0.005. Distractor efficiency was 83.33%, 83.24% and 77.56% for items with excellent, acceptable and poor discrimination, respectively (P <0.005. The average Kuder-Richardson formula 20 reliability coefficient was 0.76. Conclusion: A considerable number of the MCQ items were within acceptable ranges. However, some items needed to be discarded or revised. Using three or four rather than five options in MCQs is recommended to reduce the number of NFDs and improve the overall quality of the examination.

  8. Greater learnability is not sufficient to produce cultural universals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Anna N; Griffiths, Thomas L; Ettlinger, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Looking across human societies reveals regularities in the languages that people speak and the concepts that they use. One explanation that has been proposed for these "cultural universals" is differences in the ease with which people learn particular languages and concepts. A difference in learnability means that languages and concepts possessing a particular property are more likely to be accurately transmitted from one generation of learners to the next. Intuitively, this difference could allow languages and concepts that are more learnable to become more prevalent after multiple generations of cultural transmission. If this is the case, the prevalence of languages and concepts with particular properties can be explained simply by demonstrating empirically that they are more learnable. We evaluate this argument using mathematical analysis and behavioral experiments. Specifically, we provide two counter-examples that show how greater learnability need not result in a property becoming prevalent. First, more learnable languages and concepts can nonetheless be less likely to be produced spontaneously as a result of transmission failures. We simulated cultural transmission in the laboratory to show that this can occur for memory of distinctive items: these items are more likely to be remembered, but not generated spontaneously once they have been forgotten. Second, when there are many languages or concepts that lack the more learnable property, sheer numbers can swamp the benefit produced by greater learnability. We demonstrate this using a second series of experiments involving artificial language learning. Both of these counter-examples show that simply finding a learnability bias experimentally is not sufficient to explain why a particular property is prevalent in the languages or concepts used in human societies: explanations for cultural universals based on cultural transmission need to consider the full set of hypotheses a learner could entertain and all of

  9. 78 FR 22282 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets [[Page 22283... Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim the cultural item should submit a... tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural...

  10. 77 FR 19700 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service..., Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here..., Sacramento CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893, before May 2, 2012. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary...

  11. 77 FR 19696 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service..., Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here..., 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893, before May 2, 2012...

  12. 77 FR 19702 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... the appropriate tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated... Department of Parks and Recreation that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C... San Diego Museum of Man. One artifact from site CA-SDI-913, a ceramic bow pipe, is in the possession...

  13. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Center) and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (formerly known as the Denver Museum of Natural History... responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items The 36... ancestral Puebloan peoples and modern Puebloan peoples based on oral tradition and scientific studies. The...

  14. 78 FR 50092 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated... Commission, Olympia, WA that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This... the site to the Eastern Washington State Historical Society (EWSHS), now known as the Northwest Museum...

  15. 78 FR 36242 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: New York State Museum, Albany, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., Rensselaer County, NY, by Reverend O.C. Auringer of Troy, NY. Museum records indicate that the cultural items..., and Saratoga Counties, NY, by Mr. Dwinel F. Thompson of Troy, NY. Museum records indicate that the... collections. From the former Laureate Grounds in Troy, Rensselaer County, NY, the 90 unassociated funerary...

  16. Application of item response theory to achieve cross-cultural comparability of occupational stress measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsutsumi, A.; Iwata, N.; Watanabe, N.; Jonge, de J.; Pikhart, H.; Férnandez-López, J.A.; Xu, Liying; Peter, R.; Knutsson, A.; Niedhammer, I.; Kawakami, N.; Siegrist, J.

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to examine cross-cultural comparability of standard scales of the Effort-Reward Imbalance occupational stress scales by item response theory (IRT) analyses. Data were from 20,256 Japanese employees, 1464 Dutch nurses and nurses' aides, 2128 representative employees from

  17. 77 FR 23498 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center) and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science... Davis, Chief of Staff, President's Office, Colorado College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La... objects, as well as other cultural items were removed from Canyon de Chelly, Apache County, AZ, under the...

  18. 77 FR 13623 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by... cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Pursuant to 25 U.S...

  19. The use of psychoactive substances by female Egyptian university students, compared with their male colleagues on selected items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueif, M I; Hannourah, M A; Darweesh, Z A; el-Sayed, A M; Yunis, F A; Taha, H S

    1987-05-01

    A standardized questionnaire, with satisfactory retake item reliabilities and well established validities, was administered to a representative sample of female university students (N = 2366), drawn from Cairo and Ein-Shams Universities, both located in Greater Cairo. Results, relevant to demographic and drug related items, are presented. Where meaningful, comparisons are made with previously published corresponding data obtained on male university students. Among the interesting findings are the following: Female students, compared with males, had better educated parents with jobs higher on social prestige hierarchy. But more boys than girls had personal sources of income and, relatively, big amounts of pocket money. Very few girls smoked cigarettes and used natural narcotics. Tranquilizers and hypnotics were taken by, almost, equal percentages of both sexes. But stimulants were consumed by more boys. Girls did not start experimentation with narcotics before the age of 16, whereas boys began such experimentation before reaching 12 years of age. Girls tried alcohol much more than they experimented with any other psychoactive substance. Among girls as well as boys we found a measurable trend for users to be more exposed than nonusers to what we call 'drug culture'. In the case of girls, close relatives have more weight than personal friends as sources of information about drugs. For boys, it is the opposite. Similarities as well as disparities were discussed and implications were emphasized.

  20. The Australian Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale (RACES): item response theory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Kaine; Manderson, Lenore

    2016-03-17

    Racism and associated discrimination are pervasive and persistent challenges with multiple cumulative deleterious effects contributing to inequities in various health outcomes. Globally, research over the past decade has shown consistent associations between racism and negative health concerns. Such research confirms that race endures as one of the strongest predictors of poor health. Due to the lack of validated Australian measures of racist attitudes, RACES (Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale) was developed. Here, we examine RACES' psychometric properties, including the latent structure, utilising Item Response Theory (IRT). Unidimensional and Multidimensional Rating Scale Model (RSM) Rasch analyses were utilised with 296 Victorian primary school students and 182 adolescents and 220 adults from the Australian community. RACES was demonstrated to be a robust 24-item three-dimensional scale of Accepting Attitudes (12 items), Racist Attitudes (8 items), and Ethnocentric Attitudes (4 items). RSM Rasch analyses provide strong support for the instrument as a robust measure of racist attitudes in the Australian context, and for the overall factorial and construct validity of RACES across primary school children, adolescents, and adults. RACES provides a reliable and valid measure that can be utilised across the lifespan to evaluate attitudes towards all racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious groups. A core function of RACES is to assess the effectiveness of interventions to reduce community levels of racism and in turn inequities in health outcomes within Australia.

  1. Assessing cross-cultural item bias in questionnaires : Acculturation and the Measurement of Social Support and Family Cohesion for Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, Dianne A. van; Baerveldt, Chris; Vermande, Marjolijn

    2001-01-01

    Amethod is presented for evaluating the presence and size of cross-cultural item biases. The examined items concern parental support and family cohesion in a Likert-type questionnaire for adolescents in The Netherlands. Each evaluated item has two versions, a collectivist and an individualistic one,

  2. Aging, Culture, and Memory for Socially Meaningful Item-Context Associations: An East-West Cross-Cultural Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Li, Juan; Spaniol, Julia; Hasher, Lynn; Wilkinson, Andrea J.; Yu, Jing; Niu, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older) and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older). All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age. PMID:23593288

  3. Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Yang

    Full Text Available Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older. All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.

  4. Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Li, Juan; Spaniol, Julia; Hasher, Lynn; Wilkinson, Andrea J; Yu, Jing; Niu, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older) and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older). All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.

  5. 75 FR 58424 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Museum of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the... Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture), University of...

  6. 78 FR 5197 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items The one cultural item is a Dilzini Gaan... Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San... Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache...

  7. Reading Culture in An African University: Problems And Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading Culture in An African University: Problems And Prospects. ... This paper examined if undergraduates of African universities have reading culture or not. To elicit the necessary information ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  8. Cross-cultural and sex differences in the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire scales: Challenges of differential item functioning analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Molander

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available University students in Croatia, Slovenia, and Sweden (N = 1129 were examined by means of the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire (Takšić, 1998. Results showed a significant effect for the sex factor only on the total-score scale, women scoring higher than men, but significant effects were obtained for country, as well as for sex, on the Express and Label (EL and Perceive and Understand (PU subscales. Sweden showed higher scores than Croatia and Slovenia on the EL scale, and Slovenia showed higher scores than Croatia and Sweden on the PU scale. In subsequent analyses of differential item functioning (DIF, comparisons were carried out for pairs of countries. The analyses revealed that a large proportion of the items in the total-score scale were potentially biased, most so for the Croatian-Swedish comparison, less for the Slovenian-Swedish comparison, and least for the Croatian-Slovenian comparison. These findings give doubts about the validity of mean score differences in comparisons of countries. However, DIF analyses of sex differences within each country show very few DIF items, indicating that the ESCQ instrument works well within each cultural/linguistic setting. Possible explanations of the findings are discussed, and improvements for future studies are suggested.

  9. 77 FR 34984 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ...The San Diego Museum of Man, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the San Diego Museum of Man.

  10. Not saying I am happy does not mean I am not: cultural influences on responses to positive affect items in the CES-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Chiriboga, David A

    2010-11-01

    Given the emphasis on modesty and self-effacement in Asian societies, the present study explored differential item responses for 2 positive affect items (5 = Hopeful and 8 = Happy) on a short form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. The samples consisted of elderly non-Hispanic Whites (n = 450), Korean Americans (n = 519), and Koreans (n = 2,030). Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause models were estimated to identify the impact of group membership on responses to the positive affect items while controlling for the latent trait of depressive symptoms. The data revealed that Koreans and Korean Americans were less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to endorse the positive affect items. Compared with Korean Americans who were more acculturated to mainstream American culture, those who were less acculturated were less likely to endorse the positive affect items. Our findings support the notion that the way in which people endorse depressive symptoms is substantially influenced by cultural orientation. These findings call into question the common use of simple mean comparisons and a universal cutoff point across diverse cultural groups.

  11. 78 FR 21413 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural... Natural History, Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony... ``Apache's Medicine-man's effigy.'' Charles Owen had previously seen the figure on the Apache Reservation...

  12. Implementing the Health Promoting University approach in culturally different contexts: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Reyes, Mónica; Van den Broucke, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Universities represent a valuable opportunity to promote health and well-being. Based on the setting approach, the Health Promoting Universities concept has been developed in different countries and contexts. However, the implementation process remains poorly documented. This systematic review aims to describe how universities have implemented the Health Promoting University concept in different cultural contexts. Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs and Scielo were searched for articles on Health Promoting Universities, published between 1995 and 2015. Studies detailing the implementation of a Health Promoting University approach were included. Selected articles were content analysed paying attention to: (a) the definition of a Health Promoting University; (b) priority areas of action; (c) items of work; (d) coordination of the project; (e) evaluation; and (f) adaptation to the cultural context. Twelve studies were identified for in-depth analysis. Of those, three were theoretical papers, and nine were intervention studies. The programmes described in the selected studies are mostly based on the guidelines of the Edmonton Charter. They incorporated the main areas of action and items of works proposed by the Health Promoting University framework. The implementation of healthy policies and incorporation of health promotion in the curriculum are remaining challenges. Strategies to facilitate adaptation to context include: stakeholder participation in planning and implementation, adaptation of educational material and analysis of needs. The review suggests that most of the universities work towards similar goals, relying on the Health Promoting University framework, yet that the way in which initiatives are implemented depends on the context. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Phase I Marine and Terrestrial Cultural Resources Survey of 13 Project Items Located on Marsh Island, Iberia Parish, Louisiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barr, William

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of Phase I cultural resources survey and archeological inventory of two marine and 11 terrestrial project items on and near Marsh Island in Iberia Parish, Louisiana...

  14. 78 FR 22283 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... were repatriated after the 30 day waiting period expired. The two cultural items were mentioned in the... one carbide lamp and one incomplete boat lantern. Archeological and ethnographic information indicates...

  15. Translation of Neologisms and Culture-Bound Items Based on The Witcher: A Sample Introductory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the investigation is the translation of neologism and culture-bound items based on the first chapter of the third book of The Witcher Saga, entitled Baptism of Fire. The analyzed fragment abounds in neologisms and nomenclature; therefore, the processes of word formation are briefly described. Furthermore, some of Hejwowski’s ([2004] 2009, pp. 76–83 procedures are cited to present methods of dealing with the creativity resulting from word formation processes. It is shown that a translator, when translating culture-bound items, is not always able to find an equivalent in the target language and may try either to describe a certain phenomenon or to use a literal translation. The way in which neologisms are coined in a fictional novel may differ from the coinage of words in the standard language; nevertheless, the word formation processes are the same as in Standard English or Standard Polish. Moreover, there is still little evidence of what makes a borrowed word catch on in the standard language.

  16. University - industry collaborations: models, drivers and cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrismann, Dominic; Patel, Dhavalkumar

    2015-01-01

    The way academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies have been approaching collaborations has changed significantly in recent years. A multitude of interaction models were tested and critical factors that drive successful collaborations have been proposed. Based on this experience the current consensus in the pharmaceutical industry is to pursue one of two strategies: an open innovation approach to source discoveries wherever they occur, or investing selectively into scientific partnerships that churn out inventions that can be translated from bench to bedside internally. While these strategies may be intuitive, to form and build sustainable relationships between academia and large multinational healthcare enterprises is proving challenging. In this article we explore some of the more testing aspects of these collaborations, approaches that various industrial players have taken and provide our own views on the matter. We found that understanding and respecting each other's organisational culture and combining the intellectual and technological assets to answer big scientific questions accelerates and improves the quality of every collaboration. Upon discussing the prevailing cooperation models in the university - industry domain, we assert that science-driven collaborations where risks and rewards are shared equally without a commercial agenda in mind are the most impactful.

  17. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Indian Tribe, has determined a cultural item meets the definitions of sacred object and object of..., that meets the definitions of sacred object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This... ceremonial object needed by Ho-Chunk religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American...

  18. 77 FR 52055 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary... and under the control of the Coconino National Forest that meet the definition of unassociated... material culture, Elden Pueblo (site NA 142) has been identified as a Northern Sinagua site, comprised of a...

  19. 77 FR 51562 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary... the Coconino National Forest that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C... evidence and material culture, Elden Pueblo (site NA 142) has been identified as a Northern Sinagua site...

  20. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, that meets the definition of an object of cultural... Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science, in consultation with the appropriate...

  1. Cross-cultural differences in item and background memory: examining the influence of emotional intensity and scene congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Sturkie, Charlee M; Rochester, Nina M; Liu, Xiaodong; Gutchess, Angela H

    2018-07-01

    After viewing a scene, individuals differ in what they prioritise and remember. Culture may be one factor that influences scene memory, as Westerners have been shown to be more item-focused than Easterners (see Masuda, T., & Nisbett, R. E. (2001). Attending holistically versus analytically: Comparing the context sensitivity of Japanese and Americans. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 922-934). However, cultures may differ in their sensitivity to scene incongruences and emotion processing, which may account for cross-cultural differences in scene memory. The current study uses hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to examine scene memory while controlling for scene congruency and the perceived emotional intensity of the images. American and East Asian participants encoded pictures that included a positive, negative, or neutral item placed on a neutral background. After a 20-min delay, participants were shown the item and background separately along with similar and new items and backgrounds to assess memory specificity. Results indicated that even when congruency and emotional intensity were controlled, there was evidence that Americans had better item memory than East Asians. Incongruent scenes were better remembered than congruent scenes. However, this effect did not differ by culture. This suggests that Americans' item focus may result in memory changes that are robust despite variations in scene congruency and perceived emotion.

  2. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  3. Cultural Postmodernism and Universalism among Youth in City of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Afrasiabi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Universalism in the context of information and communication technology has lead to fading of the boundaries of time and place.This process is allowed to enter a new era called postmodernism. Postmodernism has challenged modern characteristics such as reason and progress. The cultures of postmodern societies are surface and moving that is greatly influenced by media. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between universalism and cultural postmodernism among Youth in city of Yazd. Research method was survey and sample contained 384 youth aged 16-29 in city of Yazd. Sampling method was random stratified multistageand data collected by a researcher designed questionnaire. Results showed that there is a significant relationship between universalism and cultural postmodernism. There was a significant relationship between transnational norms of universalism with other aspects of cultural postmodernism, except consumerism. Multiple regression results showed that two dimensions of universalism explain 22 percent of cultural postmodern variance.

  4. Corporate culture of modern university: approaches to definition essence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Horbenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of corporate culture of the university; found to relate concepts as «corporate culture» and «organizational culture» and discovered the last function: cognitive, value­education, communication, legal and regulatory, motivational, innovative and Stability; singled structural elements of corporate culture: artifacts, values, norms, goals and mission of the organization; and signs of the university as a corporation: nadorhanizatsiynist, polisub’yektnist, competitive environment, as the value of social identity formation and contrast to other organizations; noted that the characteristics of the corporate culture of the University is directly dependent on its public tasks, including such as meeting the needs of the individual in the intellectual, cultural and moral development through vocational education, science through research and creative activity of scientific and pedagogical staff training retraining and advanced training of employees with higher education, the formation of students’ citizenship, ability to work and life, spreading knowledge among the population, improving its educational and cultural level; indicated on the approaches to the definition of «corporate culture», including phenomenological and pragmatic, rational and genetic, and eksternalistskyy internalistskyy, guiding and limiting; peculiarities of formation and development of the corporate culture of the university in the context of competitiveness; the conclusions noted that the level of corporate culture depends not only on internal motivational guidance of employees of the University, but the resulting performance indicators ­ profitability, profitability and competitiveness.

  5. Cross- cultural validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN): study of the items and internal consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to carry out the cross- cultural validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Social Phobia Inventory, an instrument for the evaluation of fear, avoidance and physiological symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder. The process of translation and adaptation involved four bilingual professionals, appreciation and approval of the back- translation by the authors of the original scale, a pilot study with 30 Brazilian university students, and appreciation by raters who confirmed the face validity of the Portuguese version, which was named ' Inventário de Fobia Social' . As part of the psychometric study of the Social Phobia Inventory, analysis of the items and evaluation of the internal consistency of the instrument were performed in a study conducted on 2314 university students. The results demonstrated that item 11, related to the fear of public speaking, was the most frequently scored item. The correlation of the items with the total score was quite adequate, ranging from 0.44 to 0.71, as was the internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. The authors conclude that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory proved to be adequate regarding the psychometric properties initially studied, with qualities quite close to those of the original study. Studies that will evaluate the remaining indicators of validity of the Social Phobia Inventory in clinical and non-clinical samples are considered to be opportune and necessary.

  6. [Healthcare and culture, between diversity and universality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Interrelations exist between people's behaviour and the reasons for it as explained by culture. The healthcare theory put forward by the American nurse Madeleine Leininger, at the end of the 1970s, integrates anthropology Identifying and understanding the patient's culture enables nursing care to be adapted to the patient's own view of his/her disease.

  7. In Search of Cultural Universals: Translation Universals. Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DIMA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the world is disclosed under various shapes, among which language is the best representative. Specific to humans, it renders feelings and thoughts concerning different communication contexts where words become dynamic primitives endowed with meanings, which recreate themes and reconfigure space and time as universal coordinates. The main objective of the paper is to provide a tentative analysis of the way in which translation universals are manifest in translating proverbs and sayings in the short novels Popa Tanda (Pope Tanda and Moara cu Noroc (The Lucky Mill by Ioan Slavici.

  8. 78 FR 22284 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a... tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

  9. 76 FR 48175 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Cultural Item: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service... Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th St., Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 215-5018... California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA, that meets the definition of unassociated...

  10. Analysis of Culture-Specific Items and Translation Strategies Applied in Translating Jalal Al-Ahmad's "By the Pen"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghoughi, Shekoufeh; Hashemian, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Due to differences across languages, meanings and concepts vary across different languages, too. The most obvious points of difference between languages appear in their literature and their culture-specific items (CSIs), which lead to complexities when transferring meanings and concepts from one language into another. To overcome the complexities…

  11. 77 FR 48533 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of sacred objects and..., Crow Agency, MT, that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is... Priest and leading headman in the Northern Cheyenne Crazy Dog Society. Alex Brady, who was involved in...

  12. 76 FR 75901 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... determined that a cultural item meets the definition of sacred object and repatriation to the Indian tribe... Museum, Inc. that meets the definition of sacred object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as... Society. Through consultation with representatives on the Haudenosaunee Standing Committee on Burial Rules...

  13. 75 FR 44280 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U... Museum of Natural History, New York City, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice..., ethnographic materials, technology and architecture indicate that the prehistoric peoples of the upper Verde...

  14. Analysis of sensitive questions across cultures : An application of multigroup item randomized response theory to sexual attitudes and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.G.; Pieters, R.; Stremersch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Answers to sensitive questions are prone to social desirability bias. If not properly addressed, the validity of the research can be suspect. This article presents multigroup item randomized response theory (MIRRT) to measure self-reported sensitive topics across cultures. The method was

  15. Cultures of Undergraduate Teaching at Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serow, Robert C.; Van Dyk, Pamela B.; McComb, Errin M.; Harrold, Adrian T.

    2002-01-01

    Data from five campuses revealed an explicitly oppositional culture among faculty committed to undergraduate teaching, which questions both the Scholarship of Teaching model and the ethos of competitive achievement. The views echo the longstanding populist tradition within U.S. higher education and represent a potential counterforce to the recent…

  16. Cultural considerations and child maltreatment: in search of universal principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Gauri; Berkowitz, Carol

    2014-10-01

    Cultural diversity poses challenges within the health care setting, particularly regarding the question of how health professionals can resolve the tension between respecting cultural norms or child-rearing practices and the importance of determining what constitutes harm and child maltreatment. Cultural competency and respect for cultural diversity does not imply universal tolerance of all practices. The United Nations provides a standard of universal child rights, protecting them from harmful practices. Pediatric providers must respect cross-cultural differences while maintaining legal and ethical standards of safety and wellbeing for children, promoting evidence-based prevention of maltreatment, and advocating for child wellness across all cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between Future Time Orientation and Item Nonresponse on Subjective Probability Questions: A Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; Liu, Mingnan; Hu, Mengyao

    2017-06-01

    Time orientation is an unconscious yet fundamental cognitive process that provides a framework for organizing personal experiences in temporal categories of past, present and future, reflecting the relative emphasis given to these categories. Culture lies central to individuals' time orientation, leading to cultural variations in time orientation. For example, people from future-oriented cultures tend to emphasize the future and store information relevant for the future more than those from present- or past-oriented cultures. For survey questions that ask respondents to report expected probabilities of future events, this may translate into culture-specific question difficulties, manifested through systematically varying "I don't know" item nonresponse rates. This study drew on the time orientation theory and examined culture-specific nonresponse patterns on subjective probability questions using methodologically comparable population-based surveys from multiple countries. The results supported our hypothesis. Item nonresponse rates on these questions varied significantly in the way that future-orientation at the group as well as individual level was associated with lower nonresponse rates. This pattern did not apply to non-probability questions. Our study also suggested potential nonresponse bias. Examining culture-specific constructs, such as time orientation, as a framework for measurement mechanisms may contribute to improving cross-cultural research.

  18. Culture and individual performance management in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their success depends not only on socio-economic and political factors but also on cultural values that influence their activities. In this article, we draw upon the case of one Ghanaian university to illustrate the extent to which cultural values that individuals bring to the workplace pose challenges to performance management ...

  19. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  20. Developing Quality Assurance Culture for Sustainable University Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, Emmanuel Chisa

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of any university education depends on quality parameters that should be specified, adhered to and sustained. The development of quality assurance culture in Nigerian university education is imperative, considering the fact that globalization, mobility of labour, competition and the quest for best practices have subjected…

  1. Organizational Culture and Performance of Paith-Based Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the impact of organizational culture on the performances of faith-based Universities in Ogun State, Nigeria. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of the study is the entire employees of the selected faith-based Universities in Ogun State. Primary data were used for the study.

  2. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  3. 75 FR 44808 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary... are considered to be unassociated funerary objects. Based on material culture, architecture and site...

  4. Arab and Japanese Universities : The "Culture-bound" vs. the "Culture-free" Position

    OpenAIRE

    Dedoussis, Vagelis; Czerkawski, Chris J.; Vagelis, Dedoussis; Chris J., Czerkawski

    2004-01-01

    Aspects of the organizational culture of four universities, two in Japan and one each in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon, are discussed and compared. The paper argues that organizations established in countries sharing similarities in national cultures are likely to be characterized by similar values, beliefs, and assumptions, in short, that similarities in national cultures are likely to nurture similarities in organizational cultures. Japan and Arab countries are similar with respect to several cu...

  5. 77 FR 34986 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Museum of the Plains Indian... with the cultural item may contact the Museum of the Plains Indian, Indian Arts and Crafts Board. DATES...

  6. An Assessment of Culturally Appropriate Design: A Malaysian University Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of mobile devices, together with the constant technological improvement of mobile websites and applications informed about the quality of the user interface design. However, the particularities of mobile devices require special attention in terms of their usability aspects, such as culture. Therefore, this study evaluated the use of culturally appropriate design guidelines for a mobile learning web site. The research methodology used comprised a survey from heuristic evaluation questionnaires with undergraduate students. This research captured the students’ experiences in using the MLearn website of Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia.  From the study, the lowest ranking is realistic error management at 3.5, and the highest is suitable content for local culture at 4.6.  This study affirmed that general usability and cultural principles in design are important for a usable mobile learning website system in a local university context.

  7. Developing a Model for Assessing Public Culture Indicators at Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Latifi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed to develop a model for assessing public culture at universities and evaluating its indicators at public universities in Mashhad. The research follows an exploratory mixed approach. Research strategies in qualitative and quantitative sections are thematic networks analysis and descriptive- survey method, respectively. In the qualitative section, document analysis and semi-structured interviews with cultural experts are used as research tools. In this section, targeted sampling is carried out. In the quantitative section, a questionnaire which is developed based on the findings of the qualitative section is used as the research tool. Research population of the quantitative section consists of all the students who are admitted to public universities in Mashhad between 2009 and 2012. Sample size was calculated according to Cochran’s formula. Stratified sampling was used to select the sample. The results of the qualitative section led to the identification of 44 basic themes which are referred to as the micro indicators. These themes were clustered into similar groups. Then, 10 organizer themes were identified and recognized as macro indicators. In the next phase, importance factor of each indicator is determined according to the AHP method. The results of the qualitative assessment of indicators at public universities of Mashhad show that the overall cultural index declines during the years the student attends the university. Additionally, the highest correlation exists between national identity and revolutionary identity. The only negative correlations are observed between family and two indicators including social capital and cultural consumption. The results of the present study can be used to assess the state of public culture among university students and also be considered as a basis for assessing cultural planning.

  8. Perceptions of Emotion from Facial Expressions are Not Culturally Universal: Evidence from a Remote Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Maria; Roberson, Debi; van der Vyver, Jacoba Marietta; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    It is widely believed that certain emotions are universally recognized in facial expressions. Recent evidence indicates that Western perceptions (e.g., scowls as anger) depend on cues to US emotion concepts embedded in experiments. Since such cues are standard feature in methods used in cross-cultural experiments, we hypothesized that evidence of universality depends on this conceptual context. In our study, participants from the US and the Himba ethnic group sorted images of posed facial expressions into piles by emotion type. Without cues to emotion concepts, Himba participants did not show the presumed “universal” pattern, whereas US participants produced a pattern with presumed universal features. With cues to emotion concepts, participants in both cultures produced sorts that were closer to the presumed “universal” pattern, although substantial cultural variation persisted. Our findings indicate that perceptions of emotion are not universal, but depend on cultural and conceptual contexts. PMID:24708506

  9. The impact of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence In Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Parcham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Culture is one of the most important factors that can change the climate of silence. The main aim of this research was to investigate the influence of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This research was a descriptive-correlation one. The target population was chosen from 1900 staff of the University of Medical sciences and Health Care headquarter in Shiraz. Thus 311 employees were selected using the Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The instrument used in this research was Denison (2006 organizational culture questionnaire and Dimitris Buratas and Maria Vacula (2007 organizational culture. Cornbrash’s alpha method was used to calculate the reliability. The Item analysis and expert consensus were applied to calculate the validity of instruments. All gathered data analyzed with PLS software. Results: The results showed that the four dimensions of organizational culture include organizational involvement, organizational adaptability, organizational concistency and organizational mission was moderate and the mean scores obtained for each factor were 2.85, 2.82, 2.94 and 2.93 respectively. Structural equation model showed Organizational culture has a significant positive impact on organizational silence (β=0.68; P<.001. Conclusion: Based on the results and impact of organizational culture on organizational silence that is positive and significant; The organization further efforts to strengthen various aspects of organizational culture, especially the employees’ involvement in decision making; Employees can better express their opinions and thus reduced their organizational silence. In other words strengthening corporate culture is combined with the reduction of organizational silence. Medical organizations can establish appropriate reward system for creative ideas and suggestions to encourage people express their ideas As a result, reduced

  10. Universals and cultural variations in 22 emotional expressions across five cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Daniel T; Sun, Rui; Keltner, Dacher; Kamble, Shanmukh; Huddar, Niranjan; McNeil, Galen

    2018-02-01

    We collected and Facial Action Coding System (FACS) coded over 2,600 free-response facial and body displays of 22 emotions in China, India, Japan, Korea, and the United States to test 5 hypotheses concerning universals and cultural variants in emotional expression. New techniques enabled us to identify cross-cultural core patterns of expressive behaviors for each of the 22 emotions. We also documented systematic cultural variations of expressive behaviors within each culture that were shaped by the cultural resemblance in values, and identified a gradient of universality for the 22 emotions. Our discussion focused on the science of new expressions and how the evidence from this investigation identifies the extent to which emotional displays vary across cultures. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Interpreting Authentic Leadership: A Cross Cultural Comparison of A New Zealand University and Ghanaian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justice Owusu-Bempah

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available National culture theory proponents have argued that due to differences in national cultures, expectations and preferences differ and this affect prioritizations in value systems. However, the authentic leadership (AL theory presents an authentic leader as honest, transparent and behaves with integrity regardless of culture. By presenting AL this way, the proponents of the AL theory are discounting the effects of contexts/culture in the subjective interpretations and prioritizations of individuals in explaining constructs and concepts. This study, therefore, explored and compared the preferred authentic leadership attributes from leaders' and followers' perspectives using respondents from a Ghanaian university and a New Zealand university. The Q method was used to gather information from 60 respondents, 30 in each university. The findings show that the subjects, though in different cultural contexts, have some common shared preferences for certain authentic leadership attributes. However, there were some attributes that were country specific. This suggests that though certain authentic leadership attributes are universal whereas some are context specific and therefore in defining authenticity in leadership context specific preferences cannot be overlooked. The findings of study apart from being useful in the design of training programs to training practicing and upcoming leaders in universities, has also contributed a cross cultural dimension of authentic leadership attributes to the authentic leadership theory.

  12. Cultural transmission results in convergence towards colour term universals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Dowman, Mike; Griffiths, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    As in biological evolution, multiple forces are involved in cultural evolution. One force is analogous to selection, and acts on differences in the fitness of aspects of culture by influencing who people choose to learn from. Another force is analogous to mutation, and influences how culture changes over time owing to errors in learning and the effects of cognitive biases. Which of these forces need to be appealed to in explaining any particular aspect of human cultures is an open question. We present a study that explores this question empirically, examining the role that the cognitive biases that influence cultural transmission might play in universals of colour naming. In a large-scale laboratory experiment, participants were shown labelled examples from novel artificial systems of colour terms and were asked to classify other colours on the basis of those examples. The responses of each participant were used to generate the examples seen by subsequent participants. By simulating cultural transmission in the laboratory, we were able to isolate a single evolutionary force—the effects of cognitive biases, analogous to mutation—and examine its consequences. Our results show that this process produces convergence towards systems of colour terms similar to those seen across human languages, providing support for the conclusion that the effects of cognitive biases, brought out through cultural transmission, can account for universals in colour naming. PMID:23486436

  13. Teaching Popular Culture in a Second Language University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson-Smith, Anne; Chik, Alice; Miller, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an established course on Popular Culture which is framed within the general educational model in an English-medium university. The article is organized into three parts: the underlining educational rationale for general educational courses, the course description, and the students' perspectives of their learning experience.…

  14. Social and Cultural Factors That Effect University Women Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Sabo, Helena Maria; Siyli, Nese Aysin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, social and cultural effects of the low rate of woman managers at universities are tried to be identified. Women have been increasingly appearing in every field of business; on the other hand, although women compared to men constitute majority in educational organisations, they appear in the positions other than management. We will…

  15. Things Fall Apart Across Cultures: The Universal Significance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Things Fall Apart Across Cultures: The Universal Significance of Chinua Achebe's 1958 Reconstruction of the African Heritage. ... There may be variations here and there in different social settings, but the novel portrays people in a communal environment grappling with survival on a daily basis on planet earth.

  16. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  17. Cross Cultural Perspectives of Gender and Management in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.; Riordan, S.; Ozkanli, O.; Neale, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This article presents preliminary results of a cross cultural study of gender and management in universities. Methodology: Qualitative interviews with senior managers in each country were analysed in relation to key concepts of career paths, support, gate keeping, management skills, disciplinary factors, gendered leadership styles and…

  18. 77 FR 11569 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. Between 1938 and 1940, eight..., one ceramic ladle, one stone scraper, one stone pendant and one bone tool. Based on the ceramic... the items were removed from a burial context. The human remains were either left in the ground or are...

  19. Facial expressions of emotion are not culturally universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Rachael E; Garrod, Oliver G B; Yu, Hui; Caldara, Roberto; Schyns, Philippe G

    2012-05-08

    Since Darwin's seminal works, the universality of facial expressions of emotion has remained one of the longest standing debates in the biological and social sciences. Briefly stated, the universality hypothesis claims that all humans communicate six basic internal emotional states (happy, surprise, fear, disgust, anger, and sad) using the same facial movements by virtue of their biological and evolutionary origins [Susskind JM, et al. (2008) Nat Neurosci 11:843-850]. Here, we refute this assumed universality. Using a unique computer graphics platform that combines generative grammars [Chomsky N (1965) MIT Press, Cambridge, MA] with visual perception, we accessed the mind's eye of 30 Western and Eastern culture individuals and reconstructed their mental representations of the six basic facial expressions of emotion. Cross-cultural comparisons of the mental representations challenge universality on two separate counts. First, whereas Westerners represent each of the six basic emotions with a distinct set of facial movements common to the group, Easterners do not. Second, Easterners represent emotional intensity with distinctive dynamic eye activity. By refuting the long-standing universality hypothesis, our data highlight the powerful influence of culture on shaping basic behaviors once considered biologically hardwired. Consequently, our data open a unique nature-nurture debate across broad fields from evolutionary psychology and social neuroscience to social networking via digital avatars.

  20. Culture and the quest for universal principles in moral reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Sonya; Singh, Purnima; Medin, Douglas

    2011-06-01

    The importance of including cultural perspectives in the study of human cognition has become apparent in recent decades, and the domain of moral reasoning is no exception. The present review focuses on moral cognition, beginning with Kohlberg's model of moral development which relies heavily on people's justifications for their judgments and then shifting to more recent theories that rely on rapid, intuitive judgments and see justifications as more or less irrelevant to moral cognition. Despite this dramatic shift, analyses of culture and moral decision-making have largely been framed as a quest for and test of universal principles of moral judgment. In this review, we discuss challenges that remain in trying to understand crosscultural variability in moral values and the processes that underlie moral cognition. We suggest that the universalist framework may lead to an underestimation of the role of culture in moral reasoning. Although the field has made great strides in incorporating more and more cultural perspectives in order to understand moral cognition, theories of moral reasoning still do not allow for substantial variation in how people might conceptualize the domain of the moral. The processes that underlie moral cognition may not be a human universal in any simple sense, because moral systems may play different roles in different cultures. We end our review with a discussion of work that remains to be done to understand cultural variation in the moral domain.

  1. 78 FR 11680 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may... the definitions of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice... religious leaders from the Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca...

  2. Translation of Culture-Specific Items in Self-Help Literature: A Study on Domestication and Foreignization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volga Yılmaz-Gümüş

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have witnessed a boom in self-help materials in both global and local markets. This self-help trend, growing rapidly in our modern day, should be an area of interest for Translation Studies as an increasing number of self-help materials have been translated particularly from English every year. Self-help books involve a great deal of references to the material and social culture of the original country. One of the key issues in the translation of self-help books is the choice between foreignizing and domesticating these culture-specific items. This paper aims to discuss the procedures used for the translation of culture-specific items with regard to the particular function that these books assume in the target society. The analysis on the example of Outliers, a self-help book of sorts written by Malcolm Gladwell, has shown that the translator mostly adopted foreignizing strategies in translating the text into Turkish. The study also discusses whether these foreignizing strategies contribute to the fulfillment of target-text function, which is to provide quick-fix remedies to people struggling with modern-day challenges and demands.

  3. Signs of universality in the structure of culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Băbeanu, Alexandru-Ionuţ; Talman, Leandros; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of opinions, preferences and of culture as whole requires more use of empirical data than has been done so far. It is clear that an important role in driving this dynamics is played by social influence, which is the essential ingredient of many quantitative models. Such models require that all traits are fixed when specifying the "initial cultural state". Typically, this initial state is randomly generated, from a uniform distribution over the set of possible combinations of traits. However, recent work has shown that the outcome of social influence dynamics strongly depends on the nature of the initial state. If the latter is sampled from empirical data instead of being generated in a uniformly random way, a higher level of cultural diversity is found after long-term dynamics, for the same level of propensity towards collective behavior in the short-term. Moreover, if the initial state is randomized by shuffling the empirical traits among people, the level of long-term cultural diversity is in-between those obtained for the empirical and uniformly random counterparts. The current study repeats the analysis for multiple empirical data sets, showing that the results are remarkably similar, although the matrix of correlations between cultural variables clearly differs across data sets. This points towards robust structural properties inherent in empirical cultural states, possibly due to universal laws governing the dynamics of culture in the real world. The results also suggest that this dynamics might be characterized by criticality and involve mechanisms beyond social influence.

  4. The multi-dimensional model of Māori identity and cultural engagement: item response theory analysis of scale properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G; Houkamau, Carla A

    2013-01-01

    We argue that there is a need for culture-specific measures of identity that delineate the factors that most make sense for specific cultural groups. One such measure, recently developed specifically for Māori peoples, is the Multi-Dimensional Model of Māori Identity and Cultural Engagement (MMM-ICE). Māori are the indigenous peoples of New Zealand. The MMM-ICE is a 6-factor measure that assesses the following aspects of identity and cultural engagement as Māori: (a) group membership evaluation, (b) socio-political consciousness, (c) cultural efficacy and active identity engagement, (d) spirituality, (e) interdependent self-concept, and (f) authenticity beliefs. This article examines the scale properties of the MMM-ICE using item response theory (IRT) analysis in a sample of 492 Māori. The MMM-ICE subscales showed reasonably even levels of measurement precision across the latent trait range. Analysis of age (cohort) effects further indicated that most aspects of Māori identification tended to be higher among older Māori, and these cohort effects were similar for both men and women. This study provides novel support for the reliability and measurement precision of the MMM-ICE. The study also provides a first step in exploring change and stability in Māori identity across the life span. A copy of the scale, along with recommendations for scale scoring, is included.

  5. Psychiatric diagnosis – is it universal or relative to culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino, Glorisa; Alegría, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little consensus on the extent to which psychiatric disorders or syndromes are universal or the extent to which they differ on their core definitions and constellation of symptoms as a result of cultural or contextual factors. This controversy continues due to the lack of biological markers, imprecise measurement and the lack of a gold standard for validating most psychiatric conditions. Method Empirical studies were used to present evidence in favor of or against a universalist or relativistic view of child psychiatric disorders using a model developed by Robins and Guze to determine the validity of psychiatric disorders. Results The prevalence of some of the most common specific disorders and syndromes as well as its risk and protective factors vary across cultures, yet comorbid patterns and response to treatments vary little across cultures. Cross-cultural longitudinal data on outcomes is equivocal. Conclusions The cross-cultural validity of child disorders may vary drastically depending on the disorder, but empirical evidence that attests for the cross-cultural validity of diagnostic criteria for each child disorder is lacking. There is a need for studies that investigate the extent to which gene–environment interactions are related to specific disorders across cultures. Clinicians are urged to consider culture and context in determining the way in which children’s psychopathology may be manifested independent of their views. Recommendations for the upcoming classificatory system are provided so that practical or theoretical considerations are addressed about how culture and ethnic issues affect the assessment or treatment of specific disorders in children. PMID:18333929

  6. Nuclear security culture: a generic model for universal application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khripunov, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear security culture found its way into professional parlance several years ago, but still lacks an agreed-upon definition and description. The February 2005 U.S.-Russian Joint Statement, issued at the presidential summit meeting in Bratislava, referred specifically to security culture, focusing renewed attention on the concept. Numerous speakers at the March 2005 International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) international conference on nuclear security referred to security culture, but their visions and interpretations were often at odds with one another. Clearly, there is a need for a generic model of nuclear security culture with universal applicability. Internationally acceptable standards in this area would be invaluable for evaluation, comparison, cooperation, and assistance. They would also help international bodies better manage their relations with the nuclear sectors in various countries. This paper will develop such a model. It will use the IAEA definition of nuclear security, and then apply Edgar Schein's model of organizational culture to security culture at a generic nuclear facility. A cultural approach to physical protection involves determining what attitudes and beliefs need to be established in an organization, how these attitudes and beliefs manifest themselves in the behavior of assigned personnel, and how desirable attitudes and beliefs can be transcribed into formal working methods to produce good outcomes, i.e., effective protection. The security-culture mechanism I will propose is broken into four major units: facility leadership, proactive policies and procedures, personnel performance, and learning and professional improvement. The paper will amplify on the specific traits characteristic of each of these units. Security culture is not a panacea. In a time of mounting terrorist threats, it should nonetheless be looked upon as a necessary organizational tool that enhances the skills of nuclear personnel and ensures that

  7. Women and culture. The case for universal rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruether, R R

    1996-01-01

    As the movement for women's human rights has become globalized, the charge that feminism is a form of Western cultural imperialism has emerged. An African Anglican priest used this as a response to the author's lecture on Christian feminism and added that "you can't challenge culture." The author responded that since racism could be considered a part of traditional White culture, does this mean that racism can't be challenged. The priest's argument is a common one used by Third World men, Third World women, and First World men to denounce the concept of human rights as women's rights. The Vatican used this argument during recent international conferences to oppose such things as the international approval of family planning and safe abortion, the diversity of notions of family, and an acknowledgement of homosexuality. In UN forums, Islamic nations also argue against women's rights and against the universalization of human rights, which they feel are properly superseded by local cultures. These concepts translated into debates at the Fourth World Conference on Women on topics such as conflicts between religious laws and women's inheritance rights. The culture-human rights argument is also used to defend the practice of female genital mutilation, which is used to control female sexuality in some traditional societies. Western feminist theory must guard against postmodernist critiques of modernity in the name of cultural diversity, since such critiques can make women vulnerable to right-wing male exploitation under premodern patriarchal norms. Classical philosophies of natural law, on the other hand, assume that the cosmos is a whole and that its nature implies ethical norms which govern human well-being. In this tradition, culture is a particular version of the common whole and must constantly be tested against discernment of the universals of human nature in order to be corrected. Feminists must temper their zeal for cultural diversity with an underlying acceptance

  8. Cultural Elements and Universality in the Process of Globalization : A Tentative Approach to a Theorization of Culture in sociology

    OpenAIRE

    丸山, 哲央

    2002-01-01

    "The main purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual scheme for the analysis of cultural globalization in accordance with the Parsonian notion of culture, and to point out some problematic issues caused by cultural globalization: the unbalanced development of cultural elements and the prevalence of the pseudo universality of a dominant particular culture. With respect to the recent trend of ‘cultural turn’ in social sciences, this is a tentative approach to a theorization of culture as ...

  9. 75 FR 14459 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects... consultation that the objects are considered to be both sacred and objects of cultural patrimony. Officials of... American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day...

  10. 75 FR 25289 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meet the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of...- 9). They are of Onondaga origin and were made circa 1970. Onondaga Nation traditional religious... that these medicine faces are culturally affiliated with the Onondaga Nation, and are both sacred...

  11. 75 FR 9428 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of cultural patrimony'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This... presented during consultation identifies the false face masks as being sacred objects needed by traditional Haudenosaunee religious leaders. False Face masks and corn husk [[Page 9429

  12. 78 FR 53783 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives... Springs, CO, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice... adaption of Huhugam and has become known in the larger society as an archeological culture. Determinations...

  13. Exploring Plausible Causes of Differential Item Functioning in the PISA Science Assessment: Language, Curriculum or Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoting; Wilson, Mark; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, large-scale international assessments have been increasingly used to evaluate and compare the quality of education across regions and countries. However, measurement variance between different versions of these assessments often posts threats to the validity of such cross-cultural comparisons. In this study, we investigated the…

  14. 77 FR 74866 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: New York State Museum, Albany, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... object of cultural patrimony as it relates to the civil functions of a Council. The Blacksnake Mourning.... Gibson purchased the Blacksnake Mourning Belt with the assistance of his Seneca friend, Louis Plummer... that the wampum belt was a mourning or condolence belt formerly in the possession of the Seneca chief...

  15. Towards an Inclusive Pedagogical Culture: Experiences from University Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana María Fernández-Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with conceptual and methodological elements to develop the pedagogical inclusive competence of the professors of higher education in Ecuador. We analyze the current conceptions and the main drawbacks related to the inclusion process in the university environment nowadays. We support a theoretical procedural model, and from the practical standpoint, we implemented the methodological procedures structured in a map of processes to reach an inclusive formative process. The main results are given in the development of the pedagogical inclusive competence and the increase of the inclusion culture at the university, and revealed in the improvement of university curriculum from an inclusive approach, the betterment of the physical and technological infrastructure, the permanent upgrading of professors and putting into practice policies of affirmative action.

  16. Cross-cultural invariance of NPI-13: Entitlement as culturally specific, leadership and grandiosity as culturally universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żemojtel-Piotrowska, Magdalena; Piotrowski, Jarosław; Rogoza, Radosław; Baran, Tomasz; Hitokoto, Hidefumi; Maltby, John

    2018-04-15

    The current study explores the problem with the lack of measurement invariance for the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) by addressing two issues: conceptual heterogeneity of narcissism and methodological issues related to the binary character of data. We examine the measurement invariance of the 13-item version of the NPI in three populations in Japan, Poland and the UK. Analyses revealed that leadership/authority and grandiose exhibitionism dimensions of the NPI were cross-culturally invariant, while entitlement/exploitativeness was culturally specific. Therefore, we proposed NPI-9 as indicating scalar invariance, and we examined the pattern of correlations between NPI-9 and other variables across three countries. The results suggest that NPI-9 is valid brief scale measuring general levels of narcissism in cross-cultural studies, while the NPI-13 remains suitable for research within specific countries. © 2018 International Union of Psychological Science.

  17. Universals and cultural diversity in the expression of gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Simeon; Rossi, Giovanni; Baranova, Julija; Blythe, Joe; Dingemanse, Mark; Kendrick, Kobin H; Zinken, Jörg; Enfield, N J

    2018-05-01

    Gratitude is argued to have evolved to motivate and maintain social reciprocity among people, and to be linked to a wide range of positive effects-social, psychological and even physical. But is socially reciprocal behaviour dependent on the expression of gratitude, for example by saying 'thank you' as in English? Current research has not included cross-cultural elements, and has tended to conflate gratitude as an emotion with gratitude as a linguistic practice, as might appear to be the case in English. Here, we ask to what extent people express gratitude in different societies by focusing on episodes of everyday life where someone seeks and obtains a good, service or support from another, comparing these episodes across eight languages from five continents. We find that expressions of gratitude in these episodes are remarkably rare, suggesting that social reciprocity in everyday life relies on tacit understandings of rights and duties surrounding mutual assistance and collaboration. At the same time, we also find minor cross-cultural variation, with slightly higher rates in Western European languages English and Italian, showing that universal tendencies of social reciprocity should not be equated with more culturally variable practices of expressing gratitude. Our study complements previous experimental and culture-specific research on gratitude with a systematic comparison of audiovisual corpora of naturally occurring social interaction from different cultures from around the world.

  18. Organizational Silence in Universities as the Predictor of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan YAMAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the sense of organizational silence and the organizational culture the instructors perceived. In this study, the scale for determining organizational culture developed by İpek (1999 and the scale for measuring organizational silence developed by Çakıcı (2007 and adapted by Soycan (2010 are used. No remarkable difference was found in the academic staff's sense of organizational silence degree according to their genders and educational backgrounds. It was seen that the instructors' sense of organizational silence had remarkable differences according to their age group, faculty, sense of administration type in their institutions, frequency of their face-to-face communication with their administrators and their thoughts of speaking clearly with their administrators. It was observed that research assistants had a significantly higher sense of organizational silence than the lecturers in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience'. It was seen that academicians who had 1-5 years of employment period had the highest sense of organizational silence while those who had 21 years or more employment period had the lowest sense of organizational silence in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience' of organizational silence. When the points that participant academicians got from organizational silence and organizational culture scales analyzed in the correlation table, it was found out that there was a remarkable relationship between the academicians' sense of organizational silence and sense of organizational culture. This relationship was a medium-level negative relationship between subdimensions of two scales. A medium-level negative relationship between the organizational silence (total and the organizational culture was also seen. Based on the findings, university administrators were proposed to create a participant culture in their institutions as well as to encourage instructors to speak clearly and

  19. Corporate Culture and University Goal Achievement in South-West Zone, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Rasaq L.; Sheu, Adaramaja A.; Kayode, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between culture and university goal achievement in South west geo-political zone, Nigeria. Specifically, the purpose was to find out the nature of the corporate culture and university goal achievement as well as to determine the relationship between corporate culture and university goal achievement in South…

  20. Cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the EQ-5D-5L items for English-speaking Asians in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, N; Wang, Y; How, C H; Wong, K Y; Shen, L; Tay, E G; Thumboo, J; Herdman, M

    2015-06-01

    To investigate how the response labels of the 5-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) items are interpreted and used by English-speaking Chinese and non-Chinese Singaporeans, as a means to assessing whether those items are cross-culturally equivalent health-status measures in this Asian population. In face-to-face interviews, Chinese, Malay and Indian visitors to a primary care institution in Singapore were asked to rate the relative severity conveyed by EQ-5D-5L response labels, each containing the keyword of 'no(t),' 'slight(ly),' 'moderate(ly),' 'severe(ly),' or 'unable'/'extreme(ly),' using a 0-100 numerical rating scale. Participants were also asked to describe 25 hypothetical health states using the EQ-5D-5L response labels. Differences between Chinese and Malay/Indian participants in label interpretation and selection were examined using multivariate regression analysis to adjust for participant characteristics. The differences in adjusted mean severity scores for individual EQ-5D-5L labels between Chinese (n = 148) and non-Chinese (Malay: n = 53; Indian: n = 56) participants ranged from 0.0 to 9.0. The relative severity of the labels to the participants supported the ordinality of the EQ-5D-5L response labels and was similar across ethnic groups. Chinese and non-Chinese participants selected similar response labels to describe each hypothetical health state, with the adjusted odds ratios of selecting any type of the five response labels for non-Chinese versus Chinese participants ranging from 0.92 to 1.15 (p > 0.05 for all). The EQ-5D-5L items are likely to generate equivalent health outcomes between English-speaking Chinese and non-Chinese Singaporeans.

  1. Explanation and elaboration of the Standards for UNiversal reporting of patient Decision Aid Evaluations (SUNDAE) guidelines: examples of reporting SUNDAE items from patient decision aid evaluation literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Aubri S; Abhyankar, Purva; Sheridan, Stacey; Bekker, Hilary; LeBlanc, Annie; Levin, Carrie; Ropka, Mary; Shaffer, Victoria; Stacey, Dawn; Stalmeier, Peep; Vo, Ha; Wills, Celia; Thomson, Richard

    2018-01-01

    This Explanation and Elaboration (E&E) article expands on the 26 items in the Standards for UNiversal reporting of Decision Aid Evaluations guidelines. The E&E provides a rationale for each item and includes examples for how each item has been reported in published papers evaluating patient decision aids. The E&E focuses on items key to reporting studies evaluating patient decision aids and is intended to be illustrative rather than restrictive. Authors and reviewers may wish to use the E&E broadly to inform structuring of patient decision aid evaluation reports, or use it as a reference to obtain details about how to report individual checklist items. PMID:29467235

  2. Dutch translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the PROMIS® physical function item bank and cognitive pre-test in Dutch arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, Martijn Ah; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Taal, Erik; Krishnan, Eswar; van de Laar, Mart Afj

    2012-03-05

    Patient-reported physical function is an established outcome domain in clinical studies in rheumatology. To overcome the limitations of the current generation of questionnaires, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) project in the USA has developed calibrated item banks for measuring several domains of health status in people with a wide range of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the PROMIS physical function item bank to the Dutch language and to pretest it in a sample of patients with arthritis. The items of the PROMIS physical function item bank were translated using rigorous forward-backward protocols and the translated version was subsequently cognitively pretested in a sample of Dutch patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Few issues were encountered in the forward-backward translation. Only 5 of the 124 items to be translated had to be rewritten because of culturally inappropriate content. Subsequent pretesting showed that overall, questions of the Dutch version were understood as they were intended, while only one item required rewriting. Results suggest that the translated version of the PROMIS physical function item bank is semantically and conceptually equivalent to the original. Future work will be directed at creating a Dutch-Flemish final version of the item bank to be used in research with Dutch speaking populations.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Dalgaard, Vita Ligaya; Nielsen, Kent Jacob

    2015-01-01

    with work-related stress complaints. METHODS: A consensus-building process was performed involving the authors of the three previous Danish translations and the consensus version was back-translated into English and pilot-tested. Psychometric properties of the final version were examined in a sample of 64...... patients with work-related stress complaints. RESULTS: The face validity, reliability, and internal consistency of the Danish consensus version of the PSS-10 were satisfactory, and convergent construct validity was confirmed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the change scores showed......OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to (i) cross-culturally adapt a Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and (ii) evaluate its psychometric properties in terms of agreement, reliability, validity, responsiveness, and interpretability among patients...

  4. Research on university culture construction in the view of ecological idea

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinggang; Jia Mingwei; Peng Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    With the progress of times, our spiritual pursuit becomes higher and higher, and it is especially true among modern youth. Therefore, establishment of university culture has gradually become the focus of attention. This paper firstly quantized university culture construction into four parts: material culture construction, spiritual culture construction, system culture construction, and behavioral culture construction. It then analogized each part as one population in ecological system; establ...

  5. 77 FR 52056 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Eusebio Kino visited the O'odham village of Bac in 1692 and established Mission San Xavier. He reported the presence of 800 inhabitants at the time of his first visit. O'odham people have continued to... the region and present day O'odham and Puebloan peoples is supported by continuities in settlement...

  6. 76 FR 14049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: California State University, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... of shifting among populations, especially among the Miwok and Nisenan, who were impacted by disease..., have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity...

  7. 76 FR 9049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... piece, from the root of the red cedar, and is painted with greenish-blue, red, black, and white pigment...). It is a basketry hat, woven of spruce tree roots, which has been painted white. A design representing...

  8. An Organizational Culture Study of Missouri State University Faculty/Staff in Relation to the University's Public Affair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Marissa LeClaire

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address a problem of practice of the public affairs mission through the perceptions of faculty and staff members at Missouri State University of the University's organizational culture. The design included a phenomenological study with a set of organizational culture procedural questions related to the perceptions…

  9. Cultural competency of health-care providers in a Swiss University Hospital: self-assessed cross-cultural skillfulness in a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Alejandra; Paroz, Sophie; Green, Alexander R; Wolff, Hans; Weber, Orest; Faucherre, Florence; Ninane, Françoise; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2014-01-30

    As the diversity of the European population evolves, measuring providers' skillfulness in cross-cultural care and understanding what contextual factors may influence this is increasingly necessary. Given limited information about differences in cultural competency by provider role, we compared cross-cultural skillfulness between physicians and nurses working at a Swiss university hospital. A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed in November 2010 to front-line providers in Lausanne, Switzerland. This questionnaire included some questions from the previously validated Cross-Cultural Care Survey. We compared physicians' and nurses' mean composite scores and proportion of "3-good/4-very good" responses, for nine perceived skillfulness items (4-point Likert-scale) using the validated tool. We used linear regression to examine how provider role (physician vs. nurse) was associated with composite skillfulness scores, adjusting for demographics (gender, non-French dominant language), workplace (time at institution, work-unit "sensitized" to cultural-care), reported cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem-awareness. Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) returned the survey: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses, reflecting institutional distribution of providers. Physicians had better mean composite scores for perceived skillfulness than nurses (2.7 vs. 2.5, p cross-cultural training (β = 0.14, p = 0.01) and lack of practical experience caring for diverse populations (β = 0.11, p = 0.04). In stratified analyses among physicians alone, having French as a dominant language (β = -0.34, p cultural competency improvement among providers. These results support the need for cross-cultural skills training with an inter-professional focus on nurses, education that attunes provider awareness to the local issues in cross-cultural care, and increased diversity efforts in the work force, particularly among physicians.

  10. 77 FR 13622 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of.... Upon review, the USFWS determined that two sacred objects (Item 6: Crow lumpwood dance wand and Item 46...

  11. Cultural competency of health-care providers in a Swiss University Hospital: self-assessed cross-cultural skillfulness in a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As the diversity of the European population evolves, measuring providers’ skillfulness in cross-cultural care and understanding what contextual factors may influence this is increasingly necessary. Given limited information about differences in cultural competency by provider role, we compared cross-cultural skillfulness between physicians and nurses working at a Swiss university hospital. Methods A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed in November 2010 to front-line providers in Lausanne, Switzerland. This questionnaire included some questions from the previously validated Cross-Cultural Care Survey. We compared physicians’ and nurses’ mean composite scores and proportion of “3-good/4-very good” responses, for nine perceived skillfulness items (4-point Likert-scale) using the validated tool. We used linear regression to examine how provider role (physician vs. nurse) was associated with composite skillfulness scores, adjusting for demographics (gender, non-French dominant language), workplace (time at institution, work-unit “sensitized” to cultural-care), reported cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem-awareness. Results Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) returned the survey: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses, reflecting institutional distribution of providers. Physicians had better mean composite scores for perceived skillfulness than nurses (2.7 vs. 2.5, p cross-cultural training (β = 0.14, p = 0.01) and lack of practical experience caring for diverse populations (β = 0.11, p = 0.04). In stratified analyses among physicians alone, having French as a dominant language (β = −0.34, p cross-cultural skills training with an inter-professional focus on nurses, education that attunes provider awareness to the local issues in cross-cultural care, and increased diversity efforts in the work force, particularly among physicians. PMID:24479405

  12. Marketing Management and Cultural Learning Center: The Case Study of Arts and Cultural Office, Suansunandha Rajabhat University

    OpenAIRE

    Pirada Techaratpong

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research has 2 objectives: to study marketing management of the cultural learning center in Suansunandha Rajabhat University and to suggest guidelines to improve its marketing management. This research is based on a case study of the Arts and Culture Office in Suansunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok. This research found the Art and Culture Office has no formal marketing management. However, the marketing management is partly covered in the overall bu...

  13. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  14. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12 for the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna E. M. Marangoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gait impairment is reported by 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS as main complaint. In 2003, Hobart et al. developed a scale for walking known as The 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12, which combines the perspectives of patients with psychometric methods. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt and validate the MSWS-12 for the Brazilian population with MS. METHODS: This study included 116 individuals diagnosed with MS, in accordance with McDonald's criteria. The steps of the adaptation process included translation, back-translation, review by an expert committee and pretesting. A test and retest of MSWS-12/BR was made for validation, with comparison with another scale (MSIS-29/BR and another test (T25FW. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of MSWS-12/BR was shown to be similar to the original. The results indicate that MSWS-12/BR is a reliable and reproducible scale. CONCLUSIONS: MSWS-12/BR has been adapted and validated, and it is a reliable tool for the Brazilian population.

  16. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Detailed Assessment of Speed of Handwriting 17+ to Brazilian Portuguese: conceptual, item and semantic equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Monique Herrera; Capellini, Simone Aparecida

    2018-02-19

    Perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Detailed Assessment of Speed of Handwriting 17+ (DASH 17+) for Brazilians. Evaluation of (1) conceptual, item and (2) semantic equivalence, with assistance of four translators and application of a pilot study to 36 students. (1) The concepts and items are equivalent in the British and Brazilian cultures. (2) Adaptations were made concerning the English language pangram used in copying tasks and selection of the lower-case, cursive handwriting in the alphabet-writing task. Application of the pilot study verified acceptability and understanding of the proposed tasks by the students. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the DASH 17+ was presented after finalization of the conceptual, item and semantic equivalence of the instrument. Further studies on psychometric properties should be conducted with the purpose of measuring the speed of handwriting in youngsters and adults with greater reliability and validity to the procedure.

  17. An Analysis of University of Ibadan Undergraduates' Attitudes Toward Issues Incidental to the Yoruba Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoniyi, Adede

    1986-01-01

    Presents data on Yoruba undergraduates' attitudes towards their traditional culture and the Western culture institutionalized at a Nigerian university. In general, the students are ambivalent towards both cultures--they adopt customs and values of both cultures, but not in any particular pattern. The students are caught up in the upheaval of a…

  18. Research on university culture construction in the view of ecological idea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinggang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of times, our spiritual pursuit becomes higher and higher, and it is especially true among modern youth. Therefore, establishment of university culture has gradually become the focus of attention. This paper firstly quantized university culture construction into four parts: material culture construction, spiritual culture construction, system culture construction, and behavioral culture construction. It then analogized each part as one population in ecological system; established multi-population ecological model; and analyzed the interactional relations between each part. At last, this paper reached conclusions based on multi-population ecological model and analyzed the correlations among various factors of university culture construction, so as to obtain a comprehensive, scientific and healthy scheme for university culture construction.

  19. Loss and Gain in Translation of Culture-Specific Items in Ahmad Tohari’s Lintang Kemukus from Indonesian Into English: A Semantic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Tiwiyanti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture-specific items (CSIs are difficult to translate since they are related to cultural knowledge and cultural background of the given culture. The distance and differences between two different cultures determine the extent of the gain or loss that will be exprienced by the CSIs as they are translated. The purposes of this research were to identify the translation procedures applied in translating CSIs which caused loss and gained in the translation process and to identify how the translator compensated the loss in translating CSIs. The method used was qualitative descriptive method. The result shows that loss is more prevalent than gain although the translator has enough knowledge on the source text culture as he has spent some years doing some researches in Banyumas society. There are two kinds of losses found in this study; inevitable and avertable losses. Translation procedures used which result in loss in translation are translation by a more general word (subordinate, translation by a more neutral/less expressive word and translation by cultural substitution. Gain was realized mostly through the creativity of the translator when they are able to explain the culture-specific items for effective communication. In order to compensate the loss that might have occurred, translator uses some translation procedures. They are translation by loan word with explanation, translation by paraphrase using related word, and translation by paraphrase using unrelated word. In short, gain in translation for better communication is not easy to achieve especially in the case of translating CSIs.

  20. Cultural Orientation and Its Associations with Alcohol Use by University Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyuan; Shell, Duane F.

    2016-01-01

    Cultural orientation is defined as an individual’s cultural preferences when encountering imported culture while still living in the native culture. Data was analyzed from 1305 Chinese university students attending universities in Beijing, Kunming, and Wuhan. Cultural orientation was assessed with the Chinese Cultural Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses both Western and Traditional Chinese cultural orientations. The analysis used hierarchical logistic regression with nondrinkers as the reference group and controlling for demographic factors (age, gender, and urban/rural background). Western cultural orientation was found to significantly increase the odds of recent drinking. The results indicated that higher Western cultural orientation was, after gender, the second most important factor associated with Chinese college student drinking frequency. Traditional Chinese cultural orientation was not associated with drinking frequency. This study highlights an unexpected outcome of globalization on students who have not left their home cultures. PMID:27806096

  1. Researcher’s Academic Culture in the Educational Space of the University: Linguo-Axiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Semenog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the nature of the concepts “classic University”, “cultural and educational space of the University”, “research activity of future professional”, “researcher’s academic culture” and approach to academic culture as the basis of research culture in a university. It is defined that the concept of academic culture is complex. We are talking in general about the culture at the university, values, traditions, norms, rules of scientific research, and the scientific language culture, the culture of spirituality and morality, the culture of communication between science tutors and students, a culture of unique pedagogical action of master and his social, moral responsibility for the studying results. The formation of academic culture and own style, is better to develop on the positions of personal-activity, competence, axiological, cultural, acmeological approaches.

  2. Cultural Orientation and Its Associations with Alcohol Use by University Students in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Cultural orientation is defined as an individual's cultural preferences when encountering imported culture while still living in the native culture. Data was analyzed from 1305 Chinese university students attending universities in Beijing, Kunming, and Wuhan. Cultural orientation was assessed with the Chinese Cultural Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses both Western and Traditional Chinese cultural orientations. The analysis used hierarchical logistic regression with nondrinkers as the reference group and controlling for demographic factors (age, gender, and urban/rural background. Western cultural orientation was found to significantly increase the odds of recent drinking. The results indicated that higher Western cultural orientation was, after gender, the second most important factor associated with Chinese college student drinking frequency. Traditional Chinese cultural orientation was not associated with drinking frequency. This study highlights an unexpected outcome of globalization on students who have not left their home cultures.

  3. Simultaneous administration of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in 53 nations: exploring the universal and culture-specific features of global self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, David P; Allik, Jüri

    2005-10-01

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was translated into 28 languages and administered to 16,998 participants across 53 nations. The RSES factor structure was largely invariant across nations. RSES scores correlated with neuroticism, extraversion, and romantic attachment styles within nearly all nations, providing additional support for cross-cultural equivalence of the RSES. All nations scored above the theoretical midpoint of the RSES, indicating generally positive self-evaluation may be culturally universal. Individual differences in self-esteem were variable across cultures, with a neutral response bias prevalent in more collectivist cultures. Self-competence and self-liking subscales of the RSES varied with cultural individualism. Although positively and negatively worded items of the RSES were correlated within cultures and were uniformly related to external personality variables, differences between aggregates of positive and negative items were smaller in developed nations. Because negatively worded items were interpreted differently across nations, direct cross-cultural comparisons using the RSES may have limited value.

  4. On the Borders: Adjusting to Academic, Social and Cultural Practices at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John; Ljungdahl, Lesley; Maher, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Adjustment to university is challenging for students as they navigate a path through new academic, social and cultural practices. Some may feel on the borders, marginalised by their background. Issues such as adjustment to university life, independence, performance expectations, establishing friendships, technological competence, cultural capital,…

  5. Universality and Cultural Diversity in Professional Ethical Development: From Kohlberg to Dynamic Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkang

    2012-01-01

    Upholding ethical standards is part of what it means to be a professional and therefore part of professional education, but to what extent is the development of ethical reasoning universal across cultures, or is it highly dependent on culture? If universal, how can we explain the unique patterns of moral reasoning and behaviour in Asia, which…

  6. The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongxiu; Cai, Weibin; Wang, Hongjing; Zhang, Qing; Qian, Ling; Shell, Duane F.; Newman, Ian M.; Yin, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. Methods In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, Pstudent being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, Pstudents (OR = 2.59, Pstudents from urban areas (OR = 1.79, Pstudents attending key universities (OR = 0.48, Pattending general universities. Conclusions Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender, hometown and university attendance is partially moderated through the influence of cultural orientation. The relationship between a traditional cultural orientation and alcohol drinking suggests that traditional Chinese cultural values should be examined for their role in possibly reducing alcohol-related risks through education and policy initiatives. PMID:23359611

  7. 75 FR 23800 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself... of cultural and historic importance to the L[uacute]kaax.[aacute]di clan, and this Kingfisher Fort... continues to have - ongoing, historical, traditional, and cultural importance central to the Tlingit society...

  8. Incorporating Assessment into the Culture of a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Overdorf, Virginia G.

    2004-01-01

    William Paterson University (WPUNJ) is a midsize, public, comprehensive university in northern New Jersey, seventeen miles from New York City. The university offers thirty undergraduate and nineteen graduate degree programs in five colleges, has 350 full-time faculty members, and enrolls approximately 11,000 students. While faculty and staff at…

  9. 76 FR 80388 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... from a flour sack. The two items belonged to Isaac Grasshopper, who resided on the Northern Cheyenne...; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation...

  10. Brazilian cross-cultural translation and adaptation of the "Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mansueto Mourao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To translate and to perform the cross-cultural adaptation of the “Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items” (MG-QOL15. Method The original English version of the questionnaire was translated into Portuguese. This version was revised and translated back into English. Later, both English versions were compared and the divergences were corrected in the Portuguese text. At a second stage, ten patients with MG followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic from the University Hospital, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais answered the questionnaire. The authors analyzed the difficulties and misunderstandings in the application of the questionnaire. Results The questions 8, 13 and 15 were considered difficult to understand and were modified in the final Portuguese version. Most patients (70% had a total score above 25, and the statements 3, 8 and 9 showed the highest scores. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the questionnaire MG-QOL15 seems to be a promising tool for the assessment of Brazilian patients with MG.

  11. Literature Review: Is the Emotional Expression of Contempt Recognized Universally or Culturally?

    OpenAIRE

    Phoukhao, Julianna

    2017-01-01

    The universal facial expression of contempt is often described as one lip corner raised and tightened. This literature reviews whether or not this expression is recognized universally. After examining theories and methods, low agreement of this expression recognized as contempt was found across cultures. Evidence so far is not sufficient enough to support the unilateral lip corner as an universal expression for contempt. The expression and recognition of contempt is highly dependent on cultur...

  12. Creating and Sustaining a Culture of Excellence: Insights from Accomplished University Team-Sport Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso-Morales, Daniela; Bloom, Gordon A.; Caron, Jeffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Winning several national championships is an extraordinary feat that very few university coaches have accomplished. The objective of this study was to investigate how some of Canada's most accomplished university team-sport coaches created and sustained a culture of excellence in their programs. Method: Six university coaches who had won…

  13. Age differences in personal values: Universal or cultural specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H; Ho, Yuan Wan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Noels, Kimberly A; Tam, Kim-Pong

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies on value development across adulthood have generally shown that as people age, they espouse communal values more strongly and agentic values less strongly. Two studies investigated whether these age differences in personal values might differ according to cultural values. Study 1 examined whether these age differences in personal values, and their associations with subjective well-being, showed the same pattern across countries that differed in individualism-collectivism. Study 2 compared age differences in personal values in the Canadian culture that emphasized agentic values more and the Chinese culture that emphasized communal values more. Personal and cultural values of each individual were directly measured, and their congruence were calculated and compared across age and cultures. Findings revealed that across cultures, older people had lower endorsement of agentic personal values and higher endorsement of communal personal values than did younger people. These age differences, and their associations with subjective well-being, were generally not influenced by cultural values. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Cross-cultural differences in knee functional status outcomes in a polyglot society represented true disparities not biased by differential item functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Daniel; Hart, Dennis L; Crane, Paul K; Dickstein, Ruth

    2010-12-01

    Comparative effectiveness research across cultures requires unbiased measures that accurately detect clinical differences between patient groups. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and impact of differential item functioning (DIF) in knee functional status (FS) items administered using computerized adaptive testing (CAT) as a possible cause for observed differences in outcomes between 2 cultural patient groups in a polyglot society. This study was a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data. We evaluated data from 9,134 patients with knee impairments from outpatient physical therapy clinics in Israel. Items were analyzed for DIF related to sex, age, symptom acuity, surgical history, exercise history, and language used to complete the functional survey (Hebrew versus Russian). Several items exhibited DIF, but unadjusted FS estimates and FS estimates that accounted for DIF were essentially equal (intraclass correlation coefficient [2,1]>.999). No individual patient had a difference between unadjusted and adjusted FS estimates as large as the median standard error of the unadjusted estimates. Differences between groups defined by any of the covariates considered were essentially unchanged when using adjusted instead of unadjusted FS estimates. The greatest group-level impact was <0.3% of 1 standard deviation of the unadjusted FS estimates. Complete data where patients answered all items in the scale would have been preferred for DIF analysis, but only CAT data were available. Differences in FS outcomes between groups of patients with knee impairments who answered the knee CAT in Hebrew or Russian in Israel most likely reflected true differences that may reflect societal disparities in this health outcome.

  15. University Students' Depression: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Santos, Maria Luisa R.; Habibi, Mojtaba; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Australian, Iranian and Portuguese university students ("n"?=?967) completed the University Students Depression Inventory (USDI) in English, Persian and Portuguese languages, respectively. A series of MANOVA analyses were used to examine differences in depression symptoms as an effect of the country and demographic variables.…

  16. The Invention Studio: A University Maker Space and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Craig R.; Moore, Roxanne A.; Jariwala, Amit S.; Fasse, Barbara Burks; Linsey, Julie; Newstetter, Wendy; Ngo, Peter; Quintero, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Creativity, invention, and innovation are values championed as central pillars of engineering education. However, university environments that foster open-ended design-build projects are uncommon. Fabrication and prototyping spaces at universities are typically "machine shops" where students relinquish actual fabrication activities to…

  17. A Survey of Cultural Infrastructure and Performance in Medical Sciences Universities of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Feizi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives: Recently, the role of universities in developing and education of culture is considered increasingly but Iranian universities have great distance in achieving the desired objectives in this context. So, this study aimed to survey the cultural infrastructure and performance in medical sciences universities of Iran. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was done using researcher-made checklist which its face and content validity were approved by the cultural experts' opinion via statistical indicators. The study was conducted in census method by responses of 25 managers of cultural affairs in medical sciences universities of Iran. The obtained data were analyzed descriptively and results were reported as frequency (percentages for qualitative and mean (standard deviation for quantitative variable. Results: The study results were presented in four areas: “the general status of universities in cultural affairs”, “cultural facilities of the universities”, “the activity of cultural organizations and publications in universities” and “performance of cultural deputies”. The results showed that although there are considerable strengths, the significant weaknesses are evident in all areas. The results of the present study were focused solely on the quantity of functions, and quality evaluation of each activity requires special attention and further investigations and interventions. Conclusion: Researchers hope that the authorities and planners use the results of this study and similar studies especially in quality of cultural practices of universities and move towards improving the status of culture in medical sciences universities in developing Iranian-Islamic culture.

  18. Culture's Consequences on Student Motivation: Capturing Cross-Cultural Universality and Variability through Personal Investment Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Culture influences basic motivational processes; however, Western theories of achievement motivation seem to have neglected the role of culture. They are inadequate when trying to explain student motivation and engagement across a wide range of cultural groups because they may not have the conceptual tools needed to handle culturally relevant…

  19. Teaching University Students Cultural Diversity by Means of Multi-Cultural Picture Books in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Fen

    2017-01-01

    In a pluralistic society, learning about foreign cultures is an important goal in the kind of multi-cultural education that will lead to cultural competency. This study adopted a qualitative dominant mixed-method approach to examine the effectiveness of the multi-cultural picture books on: (1) students' achieving awareness towards cultural…

  20. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meets the definition of..., a copper pendant was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended...

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AS CUSTOMER-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Demenenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of formation and development of organizational culture of the University as customer-centric technology. The phenomenon of organizational culture is an essential resource for improving the competitiveness of the University, innovative development, indicators of international and research activities of the University. Stream organizational culture external (students, parents, employers and internal (students, faculty, University administration, staff/employees customers of the University determines the integration of elements of organizational culture of University in business environment of enterprises, through the involvement of graduates in professional environment. Organizational culture plays a very active role in the governance of higher education institution. At the present level of development of the market of educational services with the introduction of the national project of modernization of the education system organizational culture becomes a significant part of the formation of the University as an economic entity. It is a powerful factor in increasing the attractiveness of higher education institutions for potential consumers of educational and other services, as well as his staff. Organizational culture affects each student during his adaptation and socialization, psychological growth and learning at the University. Organizational culture and, after graduation, is in a symbiotic relationship with the employee as the object of professional activity. Potential employee during the period of study at the University “consumes” the historically established values of the University, participates in the established and developing its traditions, abides by the norms and rules of behavior, adapts to the society through various kinds of symbolism of the University, etc. In turn, the organizational culture of the University, as a basis for the development and socialization of a young man, becoming an

  2. The role and the place of the Institute of Culture within a classical university structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern culture, having refused the generality of culture norms and ideals and offering plurality of their samples, confronts social institutes with a problem of choosing the ones, which they are intended to serve. Uppermost, this concerns such a social and educational institute as a university. Where, to what norms and ideals does the modern university lead the student if by opening the world in front of them, it offers a reality of cultural pluralism? How to show the truth if it is seen in its heterogeneous state? What culture and truth does the professor choose to orientate himself/herself in his/her teaching path? May the Institute/ Department of Culture help answer all these questions as being the one that started the history of university? To answer these questions the comparative-historical method of research has been used: the contradiction has been displayed against the background of culture problem solving in the history of the university. The article justifies the need for the development of the philosophical-culturological concept of forming and keeping culture values performed by the institutionalized organizations of the university. The problem of replacing the concept of ‘the graduate model’ with that of ‘the profession model’ as a goal of innovative university education has been justified.

  3. What Does "International University" Mean at a European Bilingual University? the Role of Languages and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiz, Aintzane; Lasagabaster, David; Sierra, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Internationalisation has brought about remarkable changes at universities all over the world. In the case of the University of the Basque Country (Spain) this is reflected in the increasing presence of English-medium instruction. This paper examines two issues: the university community's perception of (1) the term "international…

  4. Fish Philosophy and School Culture: A School and University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardieck, Sherrie; Bussan, Beth; Bond, Ann; Greer, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    In the fall of 2004, an early childhood education center in the Midwest experienced a period of transition resulting from a significant turnover in administration and staff. Seeking strategies to improve and sustain a positive school culture, a newly formed Leadership Team looked to the business community for improvement strategies. The Team…

  5. Universities--Drivers for Regional Innovation Culture and Competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresan, Mihaela; Gogu, Emilia

    2010-01-01

    The actual infrastructure of the information society sustains the globalization trend and increases the importance of the information and knowledge. The development of the knowledge society is the direct consequence of the mix of economic, social and cultural processes, which involve the knowledge creation and its equitable distribution, access…

  6. Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stivers, Tanya; Enfield, N. J.; Brown, Penelope; Englert, Christina; Hayashi, Makoto; Heinemann, Trine; Hoymann, Gertie; Rossano, Federico; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Yoon, Kyung-Eun; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Informal verbal interaction is the core matrix for human social life. A mechanism for coordinating this basic mode of interaction is a system of turn-taking that regulates who is to speak and when. Yet relatively little is known about how this system varies across cultures. The anthropological

  7. Cross-cultural differences for adapting translated five-item version of International Index of Erectile Function: results of a Korean study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Hyeon; Park, Dal Woo; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2005-06-01

    To assess whether the translated Korean version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) developed by Rosen et al. (RIIEF-5) may be adapted for a Korean population to have cross-cultural equivalency to the original version. A total of 151 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and 156 controls were prospectively studied. All the patients and controls had had sexual activity or attempted sexual intercourse within the 4-week period before completing the questionnaire. The Classification and Regression Trees program was used to select an optimal set of five items from the IIEF-15 (KIIEF-5) to discriminate between men with and without ED. Then, the optimal cutoff score for the diagnosis of ED was determined using the receiver operating characteristic curve. The optimal cutoff score, sensitivity, and specificity were also calculated using the RIIEF-5. The KIIEF-5 consisted, in order of importance, of items 15, 5, 13, 4, and 2 from the IIEF-15. Item 7 in the original RIIEF-5 was replaced with item 13 in the new KIIEF-5. The optimal cutoff score proved to be 21, with a corresponding sensitivity and specificity of 0.97 and 0.91, respectively. For the original RIIEF-5, the optimal cutoff score was 21 and the corresponding sensitivity and specificity was 0.94 and 0.90, respectively. Although the RIIEF-5 may be adapted for a Korean population, the KIIEF-5 can aid in decreasing the incidence of an incorrect diagnosis of ED and decreasing the number of undiagnosed cases of ED in this population. In addition, our findings suggest that the equivalence of psychometric properties does not imply cross-cultural equivalence.

  8. Exploring the Heterogeneity of Class in Higher Education: Social and Cultural Differentiation in Danish University Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    education demands a closer examination of the hidden heterogeneity in the students’ social origin and educational strategies. Using a mixed-method approach (register data and ethnographic observations and interviews) the paper focuses on the students’ class origins and on different cultural practices......This paper examines the relationship between social background, choice of university programme and academic culture among Danish university students. Statistically and sociologically, university students are often treated as a homogeneous group, but the ever-increasing number of students in higher...... in three Danish university programmes. It is shown that the Danish university field is characterized by a significant variation in social selectivity from programme to programme, and it is argued that these different social profiles correspond with distinctively different cultural practices...

  9. Validating the 11-Item Revised University of California Los Angeles Scale to Assess Loneliness Among Older Adults: An Evaluation of Factor Structure and Other Measurement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonyup; Cagle, John G

    2017-11-01

    To examine the measurement properties and factor structure of the short version of the Revised University of California Los Angeles (R-UCLA) loneliness scale from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Based on data from 3,706 HRS participants aged 65 + who completed the 2012 wave of the HRS and its Psychosocial Supplement, the measurement properties and factorability of the R-UCLA were examined by conducting an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on randomly split halves. The average score for the 11-item loneliness scale was 16.4 (standard deviation: 4.5). An evaluation of the internal consistency produced a Cronbach's α of 0.87. Results from the EFA showed that two- and three-factor models were appropriate. However, based on the results of the CFA, only a two-factor model was determined to be suitable because there was a very high correlation between two factors identified in the three-factor model, available social connections and sense of belonging. This study provides important data on the properties of the 11-item R-UCLA scale by identifying a two-factor model of loneliness: feeling isolated and available social connections. Our findings suggest the 11-item R-UCLA has good factorability and internal reliability. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Designing and Implementing the Model of Public Assessment of Social and Cultural Progress in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khaje Sarvi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementing Investigations, analyzes and performance measurements in special and qualitative social/cultural arena in our country, needs local and special methodologies. Thus the aim of present article is investigating these issues: the concept of culture, classification of cultural organizations in Islamic Republic of Iran, the Pyramidal structure of cultural hierarchy, the process of development and mutual influences of institutions, reviewing related literature of policy making in cultural issues, compatibility of strategies to existing realities in cultural performance structure, double division in measures and analyzing and elaborating suggested measures in elaborating weighting model and assessment method and investigating progress measures by focusing on Islamic-Iranian pattern of progress and investigating the effects of implementing this pattern plus weighting method and using related measures and studying some university cases which are implemented in three phases in universities and high education centers overall the country. This research has shown a linear model by considering weighting coefficients.

  11. Analysis of controversial items in the theoretical design of the undergraduate's thesis at the Cuban University of Informatics Sciences (UIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Quintana Aput

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper encloses the analysis of some troubles related to the development of theoretical design concerning the undergraduate thesis at the Cuban University of Informatics Sciences (UIS. This analysis proves to be decisive due to the existing demand for improving professionals training in the fields of investigation related to computing world.

  12. University Safety Culture: A Work-in-Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Safety management systems in Australian higher education organisations are under-researched. Limited workplace safety information can be found in the various reports on university human resources benchmarking programs, and typically they show only descriptive statistics. With the commencement of new consultation-focused regulations applying to…

  13. Stigmatised Learners: Mature-Age Students Negotiating University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Research on the socially-situated nature of learning shows how practices and identities are affected by participation in communities, but very little is known about how mature-age students experience the relational dynamics of university. Based on data from a qualitative study of first-year students, we consider written accounts by older learners…

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Culture and Collegiality at Protestant Christian Universities in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on faculty perceptions of organizational culture and collegiality at denominationally affiliated Christian colleges and universities in the Pacific Northwest. It was found that while faculty members perceive tension around their experience of organizational culture, the extent of their relationships as cultivated through formal…

  15. The Influence of Academic Culture on Quality Management System ISO 9001 Maintenance within Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, Siti Arni; Davies, John; Douglas, Jacqueline; Douglas, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of the elements of academic culture on quality management system ISO 9001 maintenance within Malaysian universities. There is a dearth of empirical studies on maintaining ISO 9001, particularly in the higher education context. From the literature review, academic culture was classified according to four…

  16. Organisational Cultures in Public and Private Portuguese Universities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aristides I.; Hill, Manuela M.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptions of organisational culture made by three categories of staff playing managerial roles in each of two Portuguese Universities (one public and the other private) were compared using a questionnaire adapted from the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument and translated into Portuguese. The four scales of the questionnaire, designed…

  17. University Faculty Perceptions and Utilization of Popular Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Jessica; Covino, Ralph; Auchter, Jessica; Boyd, Jennifer; Klug, Hope; Laing, Craig; Irvin, Lindsay

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses results of a survey on the utilization of and attitudes and beliefs towards the use of popular culture among faculty in higher education. A total of 212 faculty members from a mid-sized public regional university provided responses, with the majority indicating that they utilize popular culture in their classroom teaching…

  18. University Organizational Culture through Insider Eyes: A Case Study of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Haley; Conley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors examined university administrator and instructor perspectives about a writing program's organizational culture. In so doing, members of the writing program were invited to participate in interviews over a three-year period. This qualitative case study suggests that examples of culture through a three-lens…

  19. When Culture and Learning Styles Matter: A Canadian University with Middle-Eastern Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke-Westcott, Tracey; Johnson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Transnational branch campuses of universities are a growing phenomenon, particularly in the Middle-East. The cultures of home institutions and host countries are often foreign to each other. The result is a cultural and learning style gap between faculty and students impacting students' learning and teachers' effectiveness. A pilot study of the…

  20. Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at a South Florida University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multidisciplinary creative and research project at a South Florida public university. "Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at FAU" has explored and presented tattoos as a shared cultural experience, rather than as a symptom, or a fad. Considering relevant scholarship in various disciplines, tattoo emerges as a…

  1. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  2. Internationalization Management in Japanese Universities: The Effects of Institutional Structures and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Yukako

    2017-01-01

    This study examines approaches to the internationalization of Japanese universities by focusing on the effects of institutional structures and cultures. Using a qualitative case study method, the research examines the following question: "How do institutional structures and cultures affect the internationalization of education in Japanese…

  3. University ESL Learners' Cross-Cultural Transitions through Web-Based Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Migyu; Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to account for East Asian learners' cross-cultural transitions to US university Intensive English classroom culture within a technology-mediated language teaching approach, PrOCALL (Project-Oriented Computer Assisted Language Learning). It explored the influence of this approach on classroom interaction patterns acquired in the…

  4. The association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students in Wuhan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Tang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. METHODS: In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, P<0.05 and marginal orientation (OR = 1.64, P<0.05 increased the likelihood of the student being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than females, graduate students (OR = 2.59, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than undergraduates, students from urban areas (OR = 1.79, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than those from towns/rural areas, and students attending key universities (OR = 0.48, P<0.05 had a lower likelihood of regular drinking than those attending general universities. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender

  5. 75 FR 45654 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... the definition of object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part... traditional Haida longhouse in Alaska. The pole was bought by a man from Los Angeles around 1908. The pole and...

  6. A Comparison on the Consumption of Cultural Goods among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Batvandi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of culture and cultural goods can be defined as an economic and political activity. The activity in its pure and creative form can lead to the creation of culture. Based on the new developments in the world, the role of the university and the student has changed. In these new roles, cultural element is very important. In other words, cultural consumption and lifestyle are based on the students’ cultural life and promote them to a level that can play the expected role. This study aimed to compare the amount and type of cultural goods consumption in Marine Science and Technology University students, by taking three variables into account: gender, field of study and location. These findings could lead to cultural politics and communications in such a way that provide proper distribution of cultural products and cultural knowledge of students based on personal consumption data and regard necessary measures in the field of distribution of goods between different groups of students to create more opportunities to students that they are interested in. The results suggest a significant difference among students regarding academic, cultural, and social life. This study depicts these differences.

  7. Muslim Students' Cultural and Religious Experiences in City, Suburban and Regional University Campuses in NSW, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Adam; Dunn, Kevin; Hopkins, Peter; Worthington, Lisa; Amin, Faroque

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been much research about the growing ethnic and religious diversity on university campuses across the world, relatively little is known about the religious and cultural experiences of Muslim students on university campuses in Australia. We draw upon an analysis of a questionnaire that was completed by 323 Muslim students who…

  8. Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

  9. How We Do Things Around Here : The Polish-Dutch Comparison Of The University Organisational Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieter van Nispen tot Pannerden; A. Glińska-Neweś

    2014-01-01

    Analyses and international comparisons of university organisational cultures are rare or even non-existing in management studies. Our paper fills this gap, presenting the results of a pilot study conducted in two units representing a Polish and a Dutch university. The survey has been carried out on

  10. Study of a Russian University's Organisational Culture in Transition from Planned to Market Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushnykh, Victor; Chemeris, Valeriy

    2006-01-01

    The transition from a planned centralist economy to a market economy over the last decade of the 20th century has presented Russian universities with many profound challenges. These challenges require universities to review and consider their organisational culture and deserve careful study. This paper describes the changes that have taken place…

  11. Beyond the Corporate University: Culture and Pedagogy in the New Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A., Ed.; Myrsiades, Kostas, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection show how and why the critical functions of democratically informed civic education must become the core of the universitys mission. Part 1, "Higher Education and the Politics of Corporate Culture," contains; (1) "Franchising the University" (Jeffrey J. Williams); (2) "Vocationalizing Higher Education: Schooling and…

  12. Cultural Differences in the Health Information Environments and Practices between Finnish and Japanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askola, Kreetta; Atsushi, Toshimori; Huotari, Maija-Leena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify cultural differences in the information environment and information practices, namely active seeking and encountering, of web-based health information between Finnish and Japanese university students. Method: The data were gathered with a Web-based survey among first-year university students at…

  13. A Meaningful Meaninglessness: Canadian University Culture as Gendered and Class-Based Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Melissa Rae; Cormack, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Recent Canadian university student misbehaviour (rape chants, harassment, sexual assault, and anti-social media posts) has garnered much attention in the media and from university administrations. Most research concerned to address these issues focuses on sexual attitudes, gender, and party culture. In this study, we analyse student interviews…

  14. The role of leadership in bridging the cultural divide within university-industry cooperative research centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdad, Maral; Bogers, Marcel; Piccaluga, Andrea

    The purpose of this study is to understand the role of leadership in bridging the cultural gap within university-industry cooperative research centres. Many different aspects of university-industry collaborations have been researched, but the role of leadership in such organizations has not been...... and employees representatives from both the company and the university within eight joint laboratories of Telecom Italia. We find that leadership theories help to shed light on the performance of university-industry collaboration. We specifically identify charismatic leadership at the individual level followed...... provide specific insights that advance the literature in management of university-industry collaborations as well as leadership theories....

  15. Laterality of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Universal and Culture-Specific Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas K. Mandal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that (a the perception and expression of facial emotion are lateralized to a great extent in the right hemisphere, and, (b whereas facial expressions of emotion embody universal signals, culture-specific learning moderates the expression and interpretation of these emotions. In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others are culturally influenced. We suggest that the left side of the face is more expressive of emotions, is more uninhibited, and displays culture-specific emotional norms. The right side of face, on the other hand, is less susceptible to cultural display norms and exhibits more universal emotional signals.

  16. Laterality of facial expressions of emotion: Universal and culture-specific influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Manas K; Ambady, Nalini

    2004-01-01

    Recent research indicates that (a) the perception and expression of facial emotion are lateralized to a great extent in the right hemisphere, and, (b) whereas facial expressions of emotion embody universal signals, culture-specific learning moderates the expression and interpretation of these emotions. In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others are culturally influenced. We suggest that the left side of the face is more expressive of emotions, is more uninhibited, and displays culture-specific emotional norms. The right side of face, on the other hand, is less susceptible to cultural display norms and exhibits more universal emotional signals. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  17. Using Cognitive Testing to Develop Items for Surveying Asian American Cancer Patients and Their Caregivers as a Pathway to Culturally Competent Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Lu, Fengxin; Colten, Mary Ellen; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from cognitive interviews with Asian American patients and their caregivers. We interviewed seven caregivers and six patients who were all bilingual Asian Americans. The main goal of the cognitive interviews was to test a survey instrument developed for a study about perspectives of Asian American patients with advanced cancer who are facing decisions around end-of-life care. We were particularly interested to see whether items commonly used in White and Black populations are culturally meaningful and equivalent in Asian populations, primarily those of Chinese and Vietnamese ethnicity. Our exploration shows that understanding respondents' language proficiency, degree of acculturation, and cultural context of receiving, processing, and communicating information about medical care can help design questions that are appropriate for Asian American patients and caregivers, and therefore can help researchers obtain quality data about the care Asian American cancer patients receive. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. A Cultural Resources Survey of Arlington Revetment and LSU Berm Levee Improvement Item, East Baton Rouge Parish Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Light gm Slas 14 14 Lis Smm pmlew aumk Simm Milk glass 1 Modern brown glass I Olive glass _ Tin cm key 11 Shotg cartridge 1 Slate 1 Mortar 1 1 Piece of...Parish, Louisiana. Anthropological Report No. 1. Archaeological Survey and Antiquities Commission, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism , Baton

  19. 75 FR 23800 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meets the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of... responsibility within the Haudenosaunee Confederacy to bring back national cultural patrimony and sacred objects... not have the authority to do so. Furthermore, Onondaga Nation traditional religious leaders have...

  20. 78 FR 48902 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... published, the Field Museum staff determined that the objects meet the NAGPRA definitions for sacred objects... sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. In the Federal Register (72 FR... notice are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the...

  1. 75 FR 23799 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY, that meets the definitions of ``sacred object'' and object of... responsibility within the Haudenosaunee Confederacy to bring back national cultural patrimony and sacred objects... not have the authority to do so. Furthermore, Onondaga Nation traditional religious leaders have...

  2. 78 FR 72710 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or... Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under... Bering Sea culture.'' The excavation was done by, or under authority of, Dr. Otto Geist, who was...

  3. Danish Translation and Cultural Adaption of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) patient version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulbæk, Mette; Jørgensen, Marianne Johansson; Primdahl, Jette

    Background and aims Measure instruments that measure the extent to which patients are involved in the process of decision-making are developed and validated and being used worldwide. So far, no validated self-report instrument for the shared decision making (SDM) process is available in Denmark....... The German 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9, patient version) is used to measure the extent to which patients are involved in the process of decision-making. The questionnaire can be used in both research and clinical practice. It can be used when there are several treatment options...... conclusion A forward and backward translation were completed by four different translators and followed by an adjustment made by the expert panel. The expert panel included the three of the four translators, experts in health, instrument development and translation and an expert in the field of gynecology...

  4. 78 FR 34131 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ..., USDA Forest Service Law Enforcement seized a hide robe from Flora's daughter that had been collected by Flora at the Falls Creek Rock Shelters. Subsequently, in 2009, Bureau of Land Management Law Enforcement..., Cambridge, MA, and by the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder, CO. In February 2009...

  5. 77 FR 11571 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ..., University of Arizona, AZ. In the Federal Register (70 FR 31510, June 1, 2005), paragraph number six is..., 8 shell bracelets, 5 shell pendants, 3 pebbles, 1 piece of shell, 4 pieces of bone, 8 projectile points, 2 projectile point fragments, 2 stone awls, 1 stone axe, 75 pieces of chipped stone, 7 pieces of...

  6. Analysis of University Organizational Culture Perceptions and Demographic Variables as Predictors of Perceived Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KESEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been seen that it is inevitable for individuals to be exposed to stress in their student lives as in their work lives. The aim of this study is to measure perceived stress levels of university students in the university organizational culture setting. To this end, it is investigated the relationship between perceived stress levels of university students and university organizational culture perceptions. By using questionnaire method it is measured that the perceptions of organizational culture in different stress levels and it is analyzed that the differences in students' perceived stress levels according to socio-demographic variables. The population of the study is comprised of randomly chosen 286 students who receive training at Bayburt University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences. According to the results, it has been found that there is a significant difference between students' perceived stress and gender. While the students stating that they experience low level of stress give maximum points to the variable of adaptation to change, other students expressing that they are exposed high level of stress give minimum score to the variable of cooperation. Besides, it has been found that different demographic variables by various combinations have different effects on perceived stress and university organizational culture.

  7. Cultural misconceptions and public stigma against mental illness among Lebanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ahmad; Fawaz, Mirna

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cultural misconceptions about mental illness and how they are associated with the public stigma against mental illness among Lebanese university students. A sample of 203 participants completed the study. Data about cultural misconceptions, attitudes about mental illness, and public stigma of mental illness were obtained. The researchers examined the mean difference in public stigma according to cultural beliefs about mental illness. The majority of students believe that mental health professionals have inadequate knowledge and expertise to treat mental disorders. Various cultural misconceptions about mental illness were reported. Public stigma significantly differed based on these cultural misconceptions. Psychiatric nurses should play a vital role in reshaping the inappropriate cultural view about mental illness. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Variation is the universal: making cultural evolution work in developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Michelle Ann; Shamsudheen, Rubeena; Broesch, Tanya

    2018-04-05

    Culture is a human universal, yet it is a source of variation in human psychology, behaviour and development. Developmental researchers are now expanding the geographical scope of research to include populations beyond relatively wealthy Western communities. However, culture and context still play a secondary role in the theoretical grounding of developmental psychology research, far too often. In this paper, we highlight four false assumptions that are common in psychology, and that detract from the quality of both standard and cross-cultural research in development. These assumptions are: (i) the universality assumption , that empirical uniformity is evidence for universality, while any variation is evidence for culturally derived variation; (ii) the Western centrality assumption , that Western populations represent a normal and/or healthy standard against which development in all societies can be compared; (iii) the deficit assumption , that population-level differences in developmental timing or outcomes are necessarily due to something lacking among non-Western populations; and (iv) the equivalency assumption , that using identical research methods will necessarily produce equivalent and externally valid data, across disparate cultural contexts. For each assumption, we draw on cultural evolutionary theory to critique and replace the assumption with a theoretically grounded approach to culture in development. We support these suggestions with positive examples drawn from research in development. Finally, we conclude with a call for researchers to take reasonable steps towards more fully incorporating culture and context into studies of development, by expanding their participant pools in strategic ways. This will lead to a more inclusive and therefore more accurate description of human development.This article is part of the theme issue 'Bridging cultural gaps: interdisciplinary studies in human cultural evolution'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of a European Portuguese version of the 8-item Morisky medication adherence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Ana C; Moura-Ramos, Mariana; Castel-Branco, Margarida; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Figueiredo, Isabel V

    2018-04-01

    The 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) is one of the most widely used instruments to assess medication adherence, but a validated European Portuguese version of MMAS-8 does not exist. Our aim was to develop and validate a European Portuguese version of the MMAS-8. A process of translation and back-translation of the original MMAS-8 was performed. The questionnaire was administered in nine community pharmacies and one public hospital between March 2014 and September 2015. Adult patients taking at least one antihypertensive drug were invited to participate. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed and internal consistency, convergent validity and concurrent validity were examined. A total of 472 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean MMAS-8 score obtained was 6.74±1.39. One hundred and thirty-two patients were classified as low adherers (28%), 181 (38.3%) as medium adherers and 159 (33.7%) as high adherers. For the factorial structure of the Portuguese version of the MMAS-8, the fit indices of the final model (chi-square [18] 48.465, pPortuguese version of the MMAS-8 was created that maintained a similar structure to the original MMAS-8 and good psychometric properties. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A Research about Attitudes and Behaviors of University Students with Having Different Cultures towards the Environment through Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the environmental attitudes and behaviors of the university students with different cultures. This research was prepared in accordance with survey model. The population of the research is composed of 300 university students with different cultures studying at Near East University in 2015-2016 academic…

  11. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Abolghasem, Farhang; Amin, Dadgar Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Organizations effort is to achieve a common goal. There are many constructs needed for organizations. Organizational culture and organizational commitment are special concepts in management. The objective of the current research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment among the personnel of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive- correlational study. The statistical population was whole tenured staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences that worked for this organization in 2012-2013. Random sampling method was used and 165 samples were chosen. Two standardized questionnaires of the organizational culture (Schein, 1984) and organizational commitment (Meyer & Allen, 2002) were applied. The face and construct validity of the questionnaires were approved by the lecturers of Management and experts. Reliability of questionnaires of the organizational culture and organizational commitment were 0.89 and 0.88 respectively, by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient. All statistical calculations performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The level of significance was set at Porganizational culture and organizational commitment (P value=0.027). Also, the results showed that there was a significant relation between organizational culture and affective commitment (P-value=0.009), organizational culture and continuance commitment (P-value=0.009), and organizational culture and normative commitment (P-value=0.009). PMID:26925884

  12. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Abolghasem, Farhang; Mohammad Amin, Dadgar

    2015-12-14

    Organizations effort is to achieve a common goal. There are many constructs needed for organizations. Organizational culture and organizational commitment are special concepts in management. The objective of the current research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment among the personnel of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.  This is a descriptive- correlational study. The statistical population was whole tenured staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences that worked for this organization in 2012-2013. Random sampling method was used and 165 samples were chosen. Two standardized questionnaires of the organizational culture (Schein, 1984) and organizational commitment (Meyer & Allen, 2002) were applied. The face and construct validity of the questionnaires were approved by the lecturers of Management and experts. Reliability of questionnaires of the organizational culture and organizational commitment were 0.89 and 0.88 respectively, by Cronbach's Alpha coefficient. All statistical calculations performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The level of significance was set at Porganizational culture and organizational commitment (P value=0.027). Also, the results showed that there was a significant relation between organizational culture and affective commitment (P-value=0.009), organizational culture and continuance commitment (P-value=0.009), and organizational culture and normative commitment (P-value=0.009).

  13. Evidence for universality and cultural variation of differential emotion response patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, K R; Wallbott, H G

    1994-02-01

    The major controversy concerning psychobiological universality of differential emotion patterning versus cultural relativity of emotional experience is briefly reviewed. Data from a series of cross-cultural questionnaire studies in 37 countries on 5 continents are reported and used to evaluate the respective claims of the proponents in the debate. Results show highly significant main effects and strong effect sizes for the response differences across 7 major emotions (joy, fear, anger, sadness, disgust, shame, and guilt). Profiles of cross-culturally stable differences among the emotions with respect to subjective feeling, physiological symptoms, and expressive behavior are also reported. The empirical evidence is interpreted as supporting theories that postulate both a high degree of universality of differential emotion patterning and important cultural differences in emotion elicitation, regulation, symbolic representation, and social sharing.

  14. Social Networking Sites Use and Cross Cultural Adaptation of Muslim Indonesian Students in Australian Universities: Valuing Cultural Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Nuraryo, Imam

    2016-01-01

    Muslim Asian students have diverse specific needs when undertaking education in western country universities. Many international students use social networking sites as media for distance communication and helping in their adjustment.This study attempts to investigate the impact of using new social networking sites on the cross cultural adaptation process. Qualitative methodology was used for the study. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted for data collection. The study investigates ...

  15. Linguistic and Cross-Cultural Complexities of A Specialized Legal Item: The ‘True And Fair’ Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Zanola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our contribution is that of analysing the possible linguistic and cross-cultural contexts where the hendiadys true and fair was born, and exploring the meaning implications of the same ‘formula’ during the centuries. We start from the hypothesis that true and fair is a hendiadys, to show that the two terms take strength and completeness one from the other, so as to generate an only complex meaning, whose original usage was, last but not least,  a literary and poetical one. The analysis of the hendiadys moves from the non-legal to the legal context, following steps of the etymological and lexical research methodology.

  16. Vigilance as a caring expression and Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J M

    1998-01-01

    Vigilance, or the close, protective involvement of families caring for hospitalized relatives, was explored in this study using holistic ethnography. Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality provided direction for the researcher to generate substantive data about the meanings, patterns, and day-to-day experience of vigilance. Five categories of meaning were derived from the data: commitment to care, emotional upheaval, dynamic nexus, transition, and resilience. The research findings expand understanding of vigilance as a caring expression, suggest direction for nursing practice, and contribute to Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality and the development of nursing science.

  17. THE PREPARATION OF A SPECIALIST IN NETWORKING CULTURAL-EDUCATIONAL SPACE OF UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida Kekeeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with specialist preparation problems in networking cultural-educational space of the University. The authors consider the role of networking technologies in quality improvement of educational services in the conditions of the international cooperation. They also substantiate the process of entering the future experts in the working environment, the formation of their professional and personal competencies. The article reveals priority areas of training new generation specialists in the cultural and educational space of the university taking into account modern educational trends in the world.

  18. Cross-cultural comparison of lack of regular physical activity among college students: Universal versus transversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Jiang, Nan; Fernandez-Rojas, Xinia; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-01-01

    This study examined cultural influence on personal and behavioral correlates of lack of regular physical activity (PA) among college students in four countries, i.e., the United States, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. Public universities were randomly chosen among the four countries. A total of 4,685 students participated in the study during the 2006-2007 academic year with a response rate of 90.1%. The vast majority of the questions on the instrument were adopted from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System questionnaires. The instrument was translated into Spanish and Korean and then back-translated into English to check accuracy of the translation. Low fruit consumption was a culture-universal predictor of lack of regular PA. Gender, perceived body weight, vegetable consumption, and cigarette smoking were culture-specific predictors, indicating PA might be a transversal value. Body mass index, binge drinking, and TV/video watching were not associated with lack of regular PA in any of the four countries. While PA is valued across different segments of many cultures, given the several culture-specific predictors, PA appears to be more transversal than universal. Therefore, culturally sensitive interventions are necessary to promote PA among young adults.

  19. The culture of peace in the context of university education in Venezuela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Coromoto Sánchez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation addresses the management of the culture of peace in the educational environment, specifically from the context of university education. The aim is to present the treatment of this subject, from different theoretical and the realization of a culture of peace in science teaching, from the educational space, valuing the inclinations from the optics, of holism, interdisciplinary, integration of education, contemporary critical approach on violence and conflict, and analysis of adaptation to the concrete realities to the cultural, social and geographical.

  20. Teaching Cultural Astronomy: On the Development and Evolution of the Syllabus at Bath Spa University and the University of Wales, Lampeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Nick

    TheMaster of Arts in CulturalAstronomy andAstrology at the University of Wales, Lampeter, formerly taught at Bath Spa University in England, is the first degree of its kind in the world. (I shall refer to the discipline as Cultural Astronomy, with initial letters as upper case, and the phenomena which it studies as cultural astronomy, all lower case). My definition combines both the discipline and the phenomenon; 'Cultural astronomy: the use of astronomical knowledge, beliefs or theories to inspire, inform or influence social forms and ideologies, or any aspect of human behaviour. Cultural astronomy also includes the modern disciplines of ethnoastronomy and archaeoastronomy' (Campion 1997: 2).

  1. Developing General Cultural Literacy through Teaching English in a Russian University: Competence and Semiotic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Zolotareva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some of the issues of teaching English in a Russian university, which arouse as a result of introducing new educational standards and it discusses the ways of forming students’ general cultural competence by using authentic curricula, in order to meet the requirements of those standards. It also shows the importance of semiotics for acquisition a foreign language and culture, and reveals the worth of “personalia” as a culture language sign, as well as peculiarity of its functioning, which lies in its ability to represent social and cultural values and priorities in personal-precedential form, thus making a contribution to developingan individual’sconcept scheme and, consequently, general cultural literacy.

  2. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... ethnographic research, the basket has been identified as a stair-step coming of age basket. This type of basket... Rancheria, California, (Tachi Yokut Tribe) and ethnographic research, the basket has been identified as a... Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California, (Tachi Yokut Tribe) and ethnographic research...

  3. 76 FR 73658 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ...; six shell pendants; three pieces of glass; three samples of red ochre; three mink skull fragments; one... made from iron, brass, pewter, silver and lead; three glass mirrors or mirror fragments; six glass... piece of smelted lead; four steatite pipes; one catlinite pipe; two clay siltstone pipes; three...

  4. A Cross-Cultural Study of Anxiety among Chinese and Caucasian American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Leong, Frederick T. L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the cross-cultural differences on state, trait, and social anxiety between Chinese and Caucasian American university students. Chinese students reported higher levels of social anxiety than did Caucasian American students. Correlations between trait and state anxiety were compared in light of the trait model of…

  5. Organizational Culture and University Responses to Parenting Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Biederman, Donna J.; Gringle, Meredith R.

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines implications of a university's culture on advocating for supportive policies and programs for parenting students. Four themes illuminated several key tensions within the institution that affected support for parenting students: the lack of formal policy, an emphasis on faculty practices around accommodations, concerns…

  6. Global Culture, Learning Style, and Outcome: An Interdisciplinary Empirical Study of International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2010-01-01

    The study examined 2500 business degree students from 21 countries, enrolled at an Australian university, using a survey to assess learning style, which was integrated into a global culture taxonomy. The research hypothesis was that academic outcome could be explained through an interdisciplinary model, by integrating proven theories from…

  7. The Integrated Curriculum, University Teacher Identity and Teaching Culture: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Israel Alonso; Sancho, Naiara Berasategi

    2017-01-01

    The results of an investigative process are reported that centre on the impact that modular curricular organization and its interdisciplinary activity are having on the teaching culture in the Degree in Social Education at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/ EHU). This understanding of the curriculum is a seminal change for teaching staff…

  8. Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monty, Randall William

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental purpose of "Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone" is to investigate the situatedness of Writing Center Studies, defining it as an autonomous (sub)discipline and interdisciplinary contact zone within the larger discipline of Rhetoric and Composition. In order to meet…

  9. Cross-Cultural Leader Development in a University Club: An Autoethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Edward Lewis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of research on the organization, effectiveness, and strategies of leadership teams. Less research exists on such aspects in cross-cultural teams. Little is known about how team leadership can be used in cross-cultural university clubs and how such settings foster leader development. Within the framework of existing literature, this analytic autoethnography examines how I develop leadership skills in university students cross-culturally through a student choir club by utilizing a team leadership model. This study provides an understanding of how leader development can occur in university clubs in cross-cultural settings through employing a team leadership model. Student club advisors may benefit from knowing the benefits of consciously developing leadership skills with club members and some strategies of how to develop such skills. Students might recognize the advantages of clubs that can help them become better leaders. Current club leaders can see that leadership skills can be developed in all types of clubs, especially within a choir. University administrators can see the practical value of extra-curricular student clubs in developing leaders.

  10. The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at a Large Texas University: A Cultural Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curette, Alvin R.

    2016-01-01

    This single, holistic, instrumental case study investigated the organizational history of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) at Lone Star University. The study included an examination of changes to ODI's cultural identity. This study was guided by two principal research questions: a) Why was the office created and how has its cultural…

  11. Culture-Based Contextual Learning to Increase Problem-Solving Ability of First Year University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samo, Damianus Dao; Darhim; Kartasasmita, Bana G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the differences in problem-solving ability between first-year University students who received culture-based contextual learning and conventional learning. This research is a quantitative research using quasi-experimental research design. Samples were the First-year students of mathematics education department;…

  12. The Effect of the Research Assessment Exercise on Organisational Culture in English Universities: Collegiality versus Managerialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the effect of the research assessment exercise (RAE) on the balance between collegiality and managerialism in English universities. The article examines the institutional strategies for the 2001 RAE and its effect on organisational culture, identifying change in governance, management and leadership in…

  13. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  14. Commentary: Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University--1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, author John Byrne reflects on his 1998 "Journal of Public Service & Outreach" article, "Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University" reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement." Byrne's 1998 article was a call to modify…

  15. Internationalization of Higher Education in University Institution Rankings: The Influence of National Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Márquez, Blanca L.; Hurtado-Torres, Nuria E.; Bondar, Yaroslava

    2012-01-01

    Internationalization constitutes a widespread concept in the management literature and has recently begun to be applied to higher education institutions. While previous research has analyzed the relationship between national culture and corporate profit-oriented behavior, in this study, we focus on university institutions to investigate the…

  16. Cultural Influences on Chinese Students' Asynchronous Online Learning in a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Naxin; McDougall, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This study explored six Chinese graduate students' asynchronous online learning in a large urban Canadian university. Individual interviews in Mandarin elicited their perceptions of online learning, their participation in it, and the cultural factors that influenced their experiences. In general, the participants had a positive attitude towards…

  17. Universality, Diversity and Legal Certainty: Cultural Diversity in the Dialogue between the CEDAW and States Parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Vleugel, V.; Kanetake, M.; Nollkaemper, A.

    2016-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that the universal value and application of international human rights norms does not imply a uniform implementation of these rights, thereby leaving room for local and culture specific implementation at the national level. The question remains, however, what the precise scope

  18. Cultural Diversity in Introductory Psychology Textbook Selection: The Case for Historically Black Colleges/Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Clay, William A. L.; Broussard, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes a culturally relevant approach to introductory psychology textbook selection for students attending a historically Black college/university (HBCU). The following multistage procedure was used: (1) a survey of HBCU psychology departments was conducted to ascertain how they selected their introductory psychology…

  19. Assessing Differential Item Functioning on the Test of Relational Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dumas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The test of relational reasoning (TORR is designed to assess the ability to identify complex patterns within visuospatial stimuli. The TORR is designed for use in school and university settings, and therefore, its measurement invariance across diverse groups is critical. In this investigation, a large sample, representative of a major university on key demographic variables, was collected, and the resulting data were analyzed using a multi-group, multidimensional item-response theory model-comparison procedure. No significant differential item functioning was found on any of the TORR items across any of the demographic groups of interest. This finding is interpreted as evidence of the cultural fairness of the TORR, and potential test-development choices that may have contributed to that cultural fairness are discussed.

  20. Measuring impairments of functioning and health in patients with axial spondyloarthritis by using the ASAS Health Index and the Environmental Item Set: translation and cross-cultural adaptation into 15 languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiltz, U; van der Heijde, D; Boonen, A; Bautista-Molano, W; Burgos-Vargas, R; Chiowchanwisawakit, P; Duruoz, T; El-Zorkany, B; Essers, I; Gaydukova, I; Géher, P; Gossec, L; Grazio, S; Gu, J; Khan, M A; Kim, T J; Maksymowych, W P; Marzo-Ortega, H; Navarro-Compán, V; Olivieri, I; Patrikos, D; Pimentel-Santos, F M; Schirmer, M; van den Bosch, F; Weber, U; Zochling, J; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Assessments of SpondyloArthritis international society Health Index (ASAS HI) measures functioning and health in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) across 17 aspects of health and 9 environmental factors (EF). The objective was to translate and adapt the original English version of the ASAS HI, including the EF Item Set, cross-culturally into 15 languages. Methods Translation and cross-cultural adaptation has been carried out following the forward–backward procedure. In the cognitive debriefing, 10 patients/country across a broad spectrum of sociodemographic background, were included. Results The ASAS HI and the EF Item Set were translated into Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai and Turkish. Some difficulties were experienced with translation of the contextual factors indicating that these concepts may be more culturally-dependent. A total of 215 patients with axial SpA across 23 countries (62.3% men, mean (SD) age 42.4 (13.9) years) participated in the field test. Cognitive debriefing showed that items of the ASAS HI and EF Item Set are clear, relevant and comprehensive. All versions were accepted with minor modifications with respect to item wording and response option. The wording of three items had to be adapted to improve clarity. As a result of cognitive debriefing, a new response option ‘not applicable’ was added to two items of the ASAS HI to improve appropriateness. Discussion This study showed that the items of the ASAS HI including the EFs were readily adaptable throughout all countries, indicating that the concepts covered were comprehensive, clear and meaningful in different cultures. PMID:27752358

  1. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  2. Embryo quality and implantation rate in two different culture media: ISM1 versus Universal IVF Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xella, Susanna; Marsella, Tiziana; Tagliasacchi, Daniela; Giulini, Simone; La Marca, Antonio; Tirelli, Alessandra; Volpe, Annibale

    2010-04-01

    To compare the outcome of two different culture media marketed by the MediCult AS Company (Jyllinge, Denmark)-Universal IVF Medium and ISM1 Medium culture-which, in addition to glucose, pyruvate, and energy-providing components, also contain amino acids, nucleotides, vitamins, and cholesterol. Laboratory and retrospective clinical study. University teaching hospital. A total of 726 patients, undergoing IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedure, comparable in mean age range, oocyte retrieval, and infertility indication, were included in the study. Laboratory quality and standard procedures were maintained unaffected. Oocyte retrieval, different embryo culture media. Embryo quality, ongoing pregnancy, and implantation rate. The frequency of good-quality embryos (79% vs. 74%) and the percentages of ongoing pregnancy (27.5% vs. 18%) and implantation rate (15% vs. 10%) were significantly higher in the group treated with ISM1 Medium rather than Universal IVF Medium. ISM1 Medium culture seems to improve the performance of embryonic growth and development, as well as increasing the percentage of pregnancy. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultural Adaptation of Erasmus Students in Latvia and Host University Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vevere Velga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Internationalisation of education and student mobility (incoming and outgoing has become a significant factor in the sphere of higher education. These processes lead to interaction between local students and exchange students, as well as between exchange students and host universities. Being in the foreign country for a certain period (one or two semesters requires some cultural and social adaptation that could or could not be problematic for various reasons. In order to maximise benefits for the exchange students and host universities, it is important to identify existing problems and to offer possible solutions. The aim of the current paper is to research the critical aspects of cultural adaptation process of ERASMUS students in Latvia. The international group that consists of a professor of the University College of Economics and Culture and three exchange students from Italy and Spain carried out the research. The empirical methods used were the following: a survey of ERASMUS students (non-probability purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews with the host university ERASMUS coordinators. The data processing methods were the descriptive statistics as well as the thematic content analysis. On the basis of critical issues identified during the research process, the authors worked a set of practical solutions aimed at the host institutions.

  4. University and workplace cultures: their impact on the development of lifelong learners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, J.; Zadnik, M.G.; Radloff, A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Literature has shown the importance of lifelong learning in the education of today's workforce and the crucial role of Higher Education in preparing graduates for lifelong learning. A national study on lifelong learning in the medical radiation science (MRS refers to all aspects of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy) profession in Australia and undergraduate courses was conducted in 1999. Based on the results of this study, this paper focuses on the relationship between university and workplace culture and evaluates how these cultures impact on the development of lifelong learners in the profession. Methods: Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were used to determine the importance of lifelong learning amongst stakeholders in the universities and the workplace. These included conducting a survey of heads of MRS schools, focus group discussion and interviews with MRS academics, and nationwide surveys of MRS students, practitioners and heads of clinical departments. Results: While Australian MRS schools are supportive of lifelong learning in terms of their course objectives, teaching approaches and assessment methods, the workplace culture in MRS for lifelong learning was not supportive. This is evidenced in the failure to provide a supportive learning environment, inadequate support for research initiatives and the exclusion of lifelong learning attributes from the job selection criteria for new graduates entering the workforce. Conclusions: The discrepancy between university and workplace culture represents a major obstacle in the development of lifelong learning attributes amongst MRS students and practitioners. Universities assume a vital role in the development and promotion of lifelong learning among students. However, it is equally important that the workplace culture also provides an environment that supports lifelong learning

  5. Universal and culture-specific factors in the recognition and performance of musical affect expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukka, Petri; Eerola, Tuomas; Thingujam, Nutankumar S; Yamasaki, Teruo; Beller, Grégory

    2013-06-01

    We present a cross-cultural study on the performance and perception of affective expression in music. Professional bowed-string musicians from different musical traditions (Swedish folk music, Hindustani classical music, Japanese traditional music, and Western classical music) were instructed to perform short pieces of music to convey 11 emotions and related states to listeners. All musical stimuli were judged by Swedish, Indian, and Japanese participants in a balanced design, and a variety of acoustic and musical cues were extracted. Results first showed that the musicians' expressive intentions could be recognized with accuracy above chance both within and across musical cultures, but communication was, in general, more accurate for culturally familiar versus unfamiliar music, and for basic emotions versus nonbasic affective states. We further used a lens-model approach to describe the relations between the strategies that musicians use to convey various expressions and listeners' perceptions of the affective content of the music. Many acoustic and musical cues were similarly correlated with both the musicians' expressive intentions and the listeners' affective judgments across musical cultures, but the match between musicians' and listeners' uses of cues was better in within-cultural versus cross-cultural conditions. We conclude that affective expression in music may depend on a combination of universal and culture-specific factors.

  6. Neither Here nor There: Transformational Leadership and Cultural Intelligence in Presidents of U.S. Accredited Universities in Foreign Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The role of a university president combines the symbolism of an institutional ambassador with the leadership responsibilities of a private-sector executive. When considering the cultural context of the university and the culture of the surrounding community, the demands of the presidential position become far more complex. The Council for Higher…

  7. Universal, Developmental, and Variable Aspects of Young Children's Play: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Pretending at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Wendy L.; Wang, Xiao-lei; Fung, Heidi Han-tih; Williams, Kimberley; Mintz, Judith

    1999-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data from five Irish American families and nine Chinese families in Taiwan, in conjunction with cultural psychology research evidence, to propose universal, culturally variable, and developmental dimensions of children's pretend play. Findings raise the theoretical issue of how universal and variable dimensions of…

  8. Is Male Androphilia a Context-Dependent Cross-Cultural Universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Raymond; Garfield, Zachary; Garfield, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The cross-cultural ethnographic literature has traditionally used the label male "homosexuality" to describe sexual relationships between biological males without considering whether or not the concept encompasses primary sexual attraction to adult males. Although male androphilia seems to be found in all national populations, its universal existence in tribal populations has been questioned. Our goal is to review previous cross-cultural classifications and surveys of male same sex behavior to present a system that does justice to its varied expressions, especially as it is informed by contemporary sexuality research. Previous comparative research does not effectively distinguish male same sex behavior from male androphilia. Using the standard cross-cultural sample (SCCS) as a sampling frame and the ethnographic sources in the human relations area files and elsewhere, we present distributional data on various forms of male same sex behavior. The SCCS is useful because it is designed to be representative of all historically known social formations and the sample is designed to reduce similarities as a consequence of common descent or historical origin as well as reduce the probability of diffusion of sociocultural practices from one culture to another. Our results show that male same sex behavior as well as male androphilia is much more common than previously estimated in the SCCS. With our findings, we make an argument that male androphilia is a context-dependent cross-cultural universal.

  9. The Impact of the University Culture on the Profesional Motivation of the Future Pedagogues

    OpenAIRE

    Gunta Kraģe

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Doctoral thesis by Gunta Kraģe in management science, in the education management sub-branch „The Impact of the University Culture on the Professional Motivation of the Future Pedagogues” has been worked out at the Department of Educational Science, Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia under the supervision of professor Dr. phys. Andris Grīnfelds from 2006 till 2012. The topicality of the research is determined by the trends in higher education th...

  10. Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy of University Students: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Basol

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the entrepreneurial self-efficacy perceptions among university students across two countries, i.e., Poland and Turkey. Data were obtained through questionnaires designed to assess the perceptions of entrepreneurial self-efficacy. In all, 365 Polish and 278 Turkish students completed the questionnaires. Results indicated that Polish and Turkish students did not differ significantly in regard to the overall measure of entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Our study contributed to the entrepreneurship literature by performing a cross-cultural comparison of the perceptions of entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Thus, it provided recommendations for fostering entrepreneurial self efficacy among university students.

  11. A Study of the Organizational Culture at a Higher Education Institution [Case Study: Plekhanov Russian University of Economics (PRUE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyakin, Bogdan S.; Ivleva, Marina I.; Pozharskaya, Yelena L.; Shcherbakova, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    The article offers an analysis of the organizational culture at a higher education institution as in the case of the Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, conducted in order to study the students' involvement in this culture and to draw conclusions as to what organizational culture principles are internalized by the students. The study used…

  12. Exploring the Convergence of the Liberal Arts Model and the Ecuadorian Culture in a Latin American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Paredes, Matias

    2013-01-01

    The replication of the U.S. cultural models in business and social organizations is a common practice in Latin America. In Ecuador, a university operates under the liberal arts model, understanding it as a replication of an U.S. cultural model, in an environment where the Ecuadorian cultural beliefs and values constitute the national cultural…

  13. E-learning in University: a case of study on cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available How much important and fundamental instruments, formation and information methods, different from the traditional ones in the different fields of human and experimental sciences, are today and will be in the future, is highlightened in this article. According to this, some problems typical of our instructive institutions (such as universities, public administrations, factories and their relevant possible solutions are underlined. These solutions can be achieved thanks to the introduction of the "e-learning" i.e. the possibility of learning through the web. It is important to note that the usage of data processing systems and telecom technologies could improve the access to the learning resources and to meet the different requirements. A case that can be considered emblematic, with reference to our specific experience, is represented by the cultural heritage field and by the university teledidactic and telecom courses as "Cultural heritage Operator".

  14. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Lopes, Fabio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada]. E-mails: appoloni@uel.br; parreira@uel.br; bonn@uel.br

    2007-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  15. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Lopes, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  16. Economic and cultural factors and illegal copying in the university textbook market

    OpenAIRE

    Scorcu, Antonello Eugenio; Vici, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The role of economic factors, such as family income, the price of illegal reproductions of books, the enforcement rules and the expected penalties are considered the main determinants of the possible infringements of the copyright law. However, the comparison between individual economic gains and losses offers only a partial explanation, as also cultural individual habits and peer effects exert important influences. Using a unique dataset based on a survey conducted at the University of Bolog...

  17. The teaching of therapeutic Physical Culture to asthmatic students in the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Alejandro Romero-León

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of therapeutic physical culture asthmatic students has proved to be an excellent therapeutic method in physical rehabilitation. However, in the university students need a developer education that gives them theoretical, methodological tools. a historical analysis of the therapeutic teaching Physical Culture, in order to expose the way he has dominated his teaching was done. In addition, the elaboration of its concept in order to meet the social demand for the formation of a subject becomes heir and transmitter of a culture of physical activity that achieves deal with ailments of all kinds, increasing each time more life expectancy, the apprehension of all kinds of techniques that allows an individual to be increasingly prepared.

  18. COMMUNITY INTERVENTION IN THE UNIVERSITY CONTEXT TO RAISE THE CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT OF FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Amalia Rodríguez-Barrera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The modern university has the mission of training of competent professionals, able to preserve, develop and promote the strengthening of cultural development of students and the community through academic, research and social work practice processes. This paper aims to present the results of Community action in the university context Career Early Childhood Education, to raise the cultural development of families. The intervention was designed according to three basic processes: planning, implementation, evaluation and control, and to ensure, as previous steps, the study programs of disciplines and subjects of the race, for determining the didactic treatment of the required content Community intervention from academic, scientific and practical work; of the main needs of the community and preparing students for the fulfillment of the tasks. The research was conducted with the application of a quasi-experiment Teaching and the use of theoretical, empirical (interview, observation, document analysis and for the collection and statistical data processing methods. The comparison of results between the experimental and control groups before and after application of the Community intervention allowed to check their effectiveness from raising the cultural development of families in the experimental group, in the motivational-regulative dimensions, cognitive, attitudinal and communication. The essential differences in the results of each dimension not only differ significantly between the groups, but all of them is able to distinguish very well the cultural development of families applied after the intervention actions.

  19. Cross-cultural and cross-ecotype production of a killer whale `excitement' call suggests universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Nicola; Filatova, Olga A.; Durban, John W.; Foote, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Facial and vocal expressions of emotion have been found in a number of social mammal species and are thought to have evolved to aid social communication. There has been much debate about whether such signals are culturally inherited or are truly biologically innate. Evidence for the innateness of such signals can come from cross-cultural studies. Previous studies have identified a vocalisation (the V4 or `excitement' call) associated with high arousal behaviours in a population of killer whales in British Columbia, Canada. In this study, we compared recordings from three different socially and reproductively isolated ecotypes of killer whales, including five vocal clans of one ecotype, each clan having discrete culturally transmitted vocal traditions. The V4 call was found in recordings of each ecotype and each vocal clan. Nine independent observers reproduced our classification of the V4 call from each population with high inter-observer agreement. Our results suggest the V4 call may be universal in Pacific killer whale populations and that transmission of this call is independent of cultural tradition or ecotype. We argue that such universality is more consistent with an innate vocalisation than one acquired through social learning and may be linked to its apparent function of motivational expression.

  20. Embedding the Organizational Culture Profile into Schwartz’s Universal Value Theory using Multidimensional Scaling with Regional Restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Borg (Ingwer); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); K.A. Jehn (Karen); W. Bilsky (Wolfgang); S.H. Schwartz (Shalom)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPerson-organization fit is often measured by the congruence of a person’s values and the values that he or she ascribes to the organization. A popular instrument used in this context is the Organizational Culture Profile (O’Reilly, Chatman, & Caldwell, 1991). The OCP scales its 54 items

  1. Youth Culture and Globalization: The Articulation of Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in the Youth Culture of Students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman

    OpenAIRE

    Gerry M. Lanuza

    2000-01-01

    In my study of youth culture among the students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, I was surprised to find out that despite the steady phase of modernization in the larger Philippine society, the youth culture of the students still betrays dominant traditional values and traits. I was surprised, that, given the fact that the university is a spatial field where modernization has its very likely stronghold, the students are very much attached to family values and traditional values ...

  2. A comparison of Rasch item-fit and Cronbach's alpha item reduction analysis for the development of a Quality of Life scale for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, M; Hagquist, C; Auquier, P; Rajmil, L; Power, M; Ravens-Sieberer, U

    2010-07-01

    This study compares item reduction analysis based on classical test theory (maximizing Cronbach's alpha - approach A), with analysis based on the Rasch Partial Credit Model item-fit (approach B), as applied to children and adolescents' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) items. The reliability and structural, cross-cultural and known-group validity of the measures were examined. Within the European KIDSCREEN project, 3019 children and adolescents (8-18 years) from seven European countries answered 19 HRQoL items of the Physical Well-being dimension of a preliminary KIDSCREEN instrument. The Cronbach's alpha and corrected item total correlation (approach A) were compared with infit mean squares and the Q-index item-fit derived according to a partial credit model (approach B). Cross-cultural differential item functioning (DIF ordinal logistic regression approach), structural validity (confirmatory factor analysis and residual correlation) and relative validity (RV) for socio-demographic and health-related factors were calculated for approaches (A) and (B). Approach (A) led to the retention of 13 items, compared with 11 items with approach (B). The item overlap was 69% for (A) and 78% for (B). The correlation coefficient of the summated ratings was 0.93. The Cronbach's alpha was similar for both versions [0.86 (A); 0.85 (B)]. Both approaches selected some items that are not strictly unidimensional and items displaying DIF. RV ratios favoured (A) with regard to socio-demographic aspects. Approach (B) was superior in RV with regard to health-related aspects. Both types of item reduction analysis should be accompanied by additional analyses. Neither of the two approaches was universally superior with regard to cultural, structural and known-group validity. However, the results support the usability of the Rasch method for developing new HRQoL measures for children and adolescents.

  3. Selected personality traits and achievement motivation in university students of physical culture, education and natural sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sigmund

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding personality variables and other important psychological traits in the university population appears topical particularly with respect to personality, motivation, health as well as overall academic achievement. A significant role is played by correlations of the monitored variables in relation to selected study specialization. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge on selected personality traits and the level of achievement motivation in a specific group of university students with respect to the diversity of their study specialization. METHODS: The study included a total of 522 students from Palacký University. These were students from the Faculty of Physical Culture (n = 118, Faculty of Education (n = 218 and Faculty of Science (n = 186. In terms of age, the study focused on young adults aged 19 to 26. In the research, psychodiagnostic methods were used to perform diagnostics and to fulfil the overall research plan. All diagnostic methods used are fully standardized and contain domestic normative values. We monitored variables such as personality, achievement motivation and achievement anxiety. Statistical result processing was conducted using the Statgraphics programme v. 9.0. Result processing was made using parametric as well as non-parametric statistical methods (Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman’s correlation. RESULTS: University students specialized in physical culture showed the highest values of extraversion and psychoticism, and clearly the lowest values of neuroticism compared to the students of education and natural sciences. The highest values of openness were observed in the students specialized in sports. In terms of the overall achievement motivation related to study specialization, almost identical values were observed. However, the students of physical culture showed significantly lower values of achievement debilitating anxiety

  4. In and out of the Cross-Cultural Classroom Closet: Negotiating Queer Teacher Identity and Culturally Diverse Cohorts in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca; Hill, Braden; Jones, Angela

    2015-01-01

    There is a gap in queer theory and higher education literature, regarding how queer university teachers negotiate their sexuality in cross-cultural classrooms. This article moves to address this gap by examining the complex intersection between gay teacher identity and cross-cultural sensitivity, evident in the stories of two queer academics.…

  5. Stereotype content model across cultures: Towards universal similarities and some differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Amy J. C.; Fiske, Susan T.; Kwan, Virginia S. Y.; Glick, Peter; Demoulin, Stéphanie; Leyens, Jacques-Philippe; Bond, Michael Harris; Croizet, Jean-Claude; Ellemers, Naomi; Sleebos, Ed; Htun, Tin Tin; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Maio, Greg; Perry, Judi; Petkova, Kristina; Todorov, Valery; Rodríguez-Bailón, Rosa; Morales, Elena; Moya, Miguel; Palacios, Marisol; Smith, Vanessa; Perez, Rolando; Vala, Jorge; Ziegler, Rene

    2014-01-01

    The stereotype content model (SCM) proposes potentially universal principles of societal stereotypes and their relation to social structure. Here, the SCM reveals theoretically grounded, cross-cultural, cross-groups similarities and one difference across 10 non-US nations. Seven European (individualist) and three East Asian (collectivist) nations (N = 1, 028) support three hypothesized cross-cultural similarities: (a) perceived warmth and competence reliably differentiate societal group stereotypes; (b) many out-groups receive ambivalent stereotypes (high on one dimension; low on the other); and (c) high status groups stereotypically are competent, whereas competitive groups stereotypically lack warmth. Data uncover one consequential cross-cultural difference: (d) the more collectivist cultures do not locate reference groups (in-groups and societal prototype groups) in the most positive cluster (high-competence/high-warmth), unlike individualist cultures. This demonstrates out-group derogation without obvious reference-group favouritism. The SCM can serve as a pancultural tool for predicting group stereotypes from structural relations with other groups in society, and comparing across societies. PMID:19178758

  6. Bioethics of Universal Knowledge: How Space Science is Transforming Global Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kala

    A new universal culture is championing the human race; never before has immersion in the cosmological environment been so clearly presented nor invited as revolutionary a sense of participatory identity to the human race. We are delving into the awareness of a complex relatedness with the expanse of spatial architectures and life that astrophysics and cosmology are revealing. History is marked by waves of interest and inquiry into the possibilities of the existence of other worlds. Since the Renaissance, building of telescopes has been pursued in their quest; now Kepler and other space missions are leading us into direct apprehension of these worlds, scattered across the cosmological landscape. This affords a unique repertoire of dimensionalities in which to re-construe our global cultural evolution and identity. Spatial education, with related social science and humanities, are facilitating the actualization of a universal culture, redefining the collective global heritage, with infinity as our home. The potential significance of space sciences to the human cognitive environment is yet to be fully ascertained. We now understand that the entire history of the universe informs each and every particle and spin of the fabric of existence. The implications of this knowledge have the power to facilitate our overcoming many social diseases such as racism, nationalism and the ideological delusions that tolerate such activities as warfare. Space sciences may help to purge the human cognitive atmosphere of those ills and ignorance that sap global resources, challenging global sustainability, from the economic to the psychosocial. Were the full implications of our united origins and destiny as a cosmic organism to be applied to how we live as a species on the Earth, there would be adequate funds for all manner of science and education such as to transform the global human and ecological landscape in ways as yet only dreamt or fictionalized. The bioethics of universal

  7. Cross-cultural differences in female university students' attitudes toward homosexuals: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Span, Sherry A; Vidal, Lourdes A

    2003-04-01

    62 Caucasian, 61 Hispanic, and 44 Asian female undergraduates completed the Index of Homophobia by Hudson and Ricketts, seven items from the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale by Herek, and three questions on Affectional Orientation toward homosexuals from D'Augelli and Rose. Overall, familiarity with homosexuals as measured by self-reported number of homosexual friends correlated negatively with scores on the homophobia measures, but there were no significant differences among the groups' reported number of homosexual friends. Asian students scored significantly higher on the homophobia measures than Caucasian students. Both Asian and Hispanic students endorsed the statement significantly more often than Caucasian students that the university would be better if only heterosexuals attended. No significant differences in scores were found regarding attitudes toward lesbians versus gay men.

  8. University Education Of Specialists In International Affairs As A Way Of Passing Cultural Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Shepeleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the cultural code approach to the process of higher education requires global understanding and awareness of the integrity of academic studies at the university, comprising both professional and humanitarian disciplines, such as philosophy, history, ethnography, psychology etc. International communication playing the key role in the development of the world community presupposes systemic and interdisciplinary approach to solving problems and facing challenges arising in the modern times. Language is the most essential component of communication whose organization is based on the principles of interaction, cooperation and politeness ensuring the molding of communicative norms of social behavior. Compliance with these norms creates conditions for effective exchange of opinions, shapes an environment for positive interaction and implementation of communicative strategies by participants in verbal disquisition. On the other hand, national pictures of the world, implanted in the conscience of a child by their family and society serve as natural limits to international communication and understanding cross-cultural peculiarities. They often prevent people from reaching rapport with their foreign counterparts, as their worldviews come into contradiction. National and cultural distinctions cause main differences between systems, norms and uses. National stereotypes, focusing on most typical features of a nation, could serve as a tool for overcoming this discrepancy. Holistic approach to studying a foreign language as an integral part of the culture, alongside with other humanitarian and social disciplines, involves a deep insight into core mental and spiritual values of the society. So, the guiding role of the university teacher consists in dealing with professional issues while addressing the wide cultural content and intercultural objectives.

  9. UNIVERSITY EDUCATION OF SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AS A WAY OF PASSING CULTURAL CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Shepeleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the cultural code approach to the process of higher education requires global understanding and awareness of the integrity of academic studies at the university, comprising both professional and humanitarian disciplines, such as philosophy, history, ethnography, psychology etc. International communication playing the key role in the development of the world community presupposes systemic and interdisciplinary approach to solving problems and facing challenges arising in the modern times. Language is the most essential component of communication whose organization is based on the principles of interaction, cooperation and politeness ensuring the molding of communicative norms of social behavior. Compliance with these norms creates conditions for effective exchange of opinions, shapes an environment for positive interaction and implementation of communicative strategies by participants in verbal disquisition. On the other hand, national pictures of the world, implanted in the conscience of a child by their family and society serve as natural limits to international communication and understanding cross-cultural peculiarities. They often prevent people from reaching rapport with their foreign counterparts, as their worldviews come into contradiction. National and cultural distinctions cause main differences between systems, norms and uses. National stereotypes, focusing on most typical features of a nation, could serve as a tool for overcoming this discrepancy. Holistic approach to studying a foreign language as an integral part of the culture, alongside with other humanitarian and social disciplines, involves a deep insight into core mental and spiritual values of the society. So, the guiding role of the university teacher consists in dealing with professional issues while addressing the wide cultural content and intercultural objectives.

  10. Supporting students of diverse cultures and faiths - Experiences from a University perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Jill; Thalitaya, Madhusudan Deepak

    2017-09-01

    University of Bedfordshire is a large University with over 24000 students from over 100 countries. The main religions recorded are Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jewish and Sikhism amongst others. Around 45% of them do not have any recorded religion. The Mental Health Advisor will come across a wide range of students from different backgrounds each with their own unique presentation of mental health distress. It is well known that people of different communities and cultures experience signs and symptoms of mental distress in different ways. This is very important for clinicians to be aware of the nuances around cultures and traditions in the context of mental illness in order to assist clinicians more accurately diagnose, support and manage them. In an effort to improve diagnosis and care to people of all backgrounds, the 5 th edition of the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) incorporates a greater cultural sensitivity throughout the manual. This includes a reflection of cross-cultural variations in presentations and cultural concepts of distress. The mental Health Advisor is available to help with practical support to assist students to manage their mental health and study. This includes support with an initial assessment, structures support, assisting with making reasonable adjustments under the Equality Act (2010), support students to access Disabled Student's Allowances and reasonable adjustments to enable them to study effectively and achieve their potential and where necessary, making appropriate referrals to internal and/or external services. One of the main roles of the advisor is to support students with mental health difficulties which are impacting on their studies. This support may include anxiety management, motivation, relaxation techniques, study plans and understanding the impact of medication. This paper will look at some of the experiences faced by the mental health advisor and will also reflect on

  11. Testing the Emotional Vulnerability Pathway to Problem Gambling in Culturally Diverse University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Sandra; Carr, Sherilene M

    2018-02-12

    Loneliness and adapting to an unfamiliar environment can increase emotional vulnerability in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) university students. According to Blaszczynski and Nower's pathways model of problem and pathological gambling, this emotional vulnerability could increase the risk of problem gambling. The current study examined whether loneliness was associated with problem gambling risk in CALD students relative to their Australian peers. Additionally, differences in coping strategies were examined to determine their buffering effect on the relationship. A total of 463 female and 165 male university students (aged 18-38) from Australian (38%), mixed Australian and CALD (23%) and CALD (28%) backgrounds responded to an online survey of problem gambling behaviour, loneliness, and coping strategies. The results supported the hypothesis that loneliness would be related to problem gambling in CALD students. There was no evidence of a moderating effect of coping strategies. Future research could test whether the introduction of programs designed to alleviate loneliness in culturally diverse university students reduces their risk of developing problem gambling.

  12. Youth Culture and Globalization: The Articulation of Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in the Youth Culture of Students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry M. Lanuza

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In my study of youth culture among the students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, I was surprised to find out that despite the steady phase of modernization in the larger Philippine society, the youth culture of the students still betrays dominant traditional values and traits. I was surprised, that, given the fact that the university is a spatial field where modernization has its very likely stronghold, the students are very much attached to family values and traditional values associated with it. This paper is an attempt to explain this phenomenon, while at the same time connecting my analysis to the wider issue of globalization. My analysis is very tentative and is based mainly on my study of youth culture of the University of the Philippines. The analysis therefore can only be considered as preliminary and may not necessarily be applied to other forms of youth culture and subculture in other localities without further qualifications.

  13. Universal happiness? Cross-cultural measurement invariance of scales assessing positive mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieda, Angela; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Schönfeld, Pia; Brailovskaia, Julia; Zhang, Xiao Chi; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Research into positive aspects of the psyche is growing as psychologists learn more about the protective role of positive processes in the development and course of mental disorders, and about their substantial role in promoting mental health. With increasing globalization, there is strong interest in studies examining positive constructs across cultures. To obtain valid cross-cultural comparisons, measurement invariance for the scales assessing positive constructs has to be established. The current study aims to assess the cross-cultural measurement invariance of questionnaires for 6 positive constructs: Social Support (Fydrich, Sommer, Tydecks, & Brähler, 2009), Happiness (Subjective Happiness Scale; Lyubomirsky & Lepper, 1999), Life Satisfaction (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), Positive Mental Health Scale (Lukat, Margraf, Lutz, van der Veld, & Becker, 2016), Optimism (revised Life Orientation Test [LOT-R]; Scheier, Carver, & Bridges, 1994) and Resilience (Schumacher, Leppert, Gunzelmann, Strauss, & Brähler, 2004). Participants included German (n = 4,453), Russian (n = 3,806), and Chinese (n = 12,524) university students. Confirmatory factor analyses and measurement invariance testing demonstrated at least partial strong measurement invariance for all scales except the LOT-R and Subjective Happiness Scale. The latent mean comparisons of the constructs indicated differences between national groups. Potential methodological and cultural explanations for the intergroup differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. [Cultural diversity and pluralism in the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2011-01-01

    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights represents a significant milestone in the history of Law, particularly in the application of International Law to an important area of human activity, namely the medical sciences, the life sciences and the technologies which, linked to both, can be applied to human relations. In parallel with this, and as will be analysed in this article, the Declaration has involved adopting a clear position regarding cultural diversity and pluralism in relation to Biomedicine. In this paper the author highlights the fact that perspectives have been opened which have hardly been explored concerning Biomedicine, such as the recognition of the value and respect which cultural diversity (multiculturalism), economic and social diversity deserve in relation to the issues covered by the Declaration, and the acceptance that the owners of the rights are not only individuals, but can also be groups.

  15. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member’s career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. PMID:29196430

  16. Item response theory analysis of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale for Students (UWES-S) using a sample of Japanese university and college students majoring medical science, nursing, and natural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubakita, Takashi; Shimazaki, Kazuyo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Nobuo

    2017-10-30

    The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale for Students has been used internationally to assess students' academic engagement, but it has not been analyzed via item response theory. The purpose of this study was to conduct an item response theory analysis of the Japanese version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale for Students translated by authors. Using a two-parameter model and Samejima's graded response model, difficulty and discrimination parameters were estimated after confirming the factor structure of the scale. The 14 items on the scale were analyzed with a sample of 3214 university and college students majoring medical science, nursing, or natural science in Japan. The preliminary parameter estimation was conducted with the two parameter model, and indicated that three items should be removed because there were outlier parameters. Final parameter estimation was conducted using the survived 11 items, and indicated that all difficulty and discrimination parameters were acceptable. The test information curve suggested that the scale better assesses higher engagement than average engagement. The estimated parameters provide a basis for future comparative studies. The results also suggested that a 7-point Likert scale is too broad; thus, the scaling should be modified to fewer graded scaling structure.

  17. Website Preferences of Finnish and Mexican University Students: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on understanding Internet use and comparingcross-cultural differencesaccording tothe contents and preferences of the websites that are most visited bytwogroupsof university students from Finland (n=30 and Mexico (n=30.The following research is anexploratory qualitative study with some basic statistics. A questionnairewas used in this study as a data collection instrument. The findings show that in both groups, university students prefer websites about social networking (Facebook, sending email (MSN, videos (YouTube, multiplatform applications (Google, educational sites (UniversityofOulu, and wikis (Wikipedia. Thisdemonstratedthat both groups have an interest in sharing ideas and meetingfriends.The differences reveal that Finnish students use their university’swebsite more regularly thanthe Mexican student respondents and that theytend to implementtheirideas more often.Furthermore, thisstudyexplored how university students use the Internet and whattype of influencethe Internet has onthem.The emotional effects suggest thatalmost quarter ofstudents reportedusing the internet to escapenegativefeelings, such as depression or nervousness.The findings provide information for university teachers about students’habitsand prior knowledge regarding Internetusefor educational purposes. The informationwill behelpful when designing learning and teaching in multicultural student groups.

  18. Error Management Practices Interacting with National and Organizational Culture: The Case of Two State University Departments in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktürk, Söheyda; Bozoglu, Oguzhan; Günçavdi, Gizem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Elements of national and organizational cultures can contribute much to the success of error management in organizations. Accordingly, this study aims to consider how errors were approached in two state university departments in Turkey in relation to their specific organizational and national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  19. Education, Culture and Politics: The Evolution of Chinese Education at the University of Hong Kong, 1911-1941

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The University of Hong Kong (HKU), following its establishment in 1911, has assumed the mission of bridging British and Chinese cultures, to prepare European and Chinese elite youth for political and other professional careers, and thus to improve Britain's cultural influence in competition with other western powers with regard to China. Dominated…

  20. Dialoguing, Cultural Capital, and Student Engagement: Toward a Hip Hop Pedagogy in the High School and University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2009-01-01

    Hip hop culture is typically excluded from conventional educational spaces within the U.S. Drawing on the experiences of an educator who works with urban high school students and university level pre- and in-service educators, this article examines the role of hip hop culture for student engagement in two settings--an alternative high school…

  1. Cross-cultural comparisons of bullying among university students : perspectives from Argentina, Estonia, Finland and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pörhölä, Maili; Cvancara, Kristen; Kaal, Esta; Tampere, Kaja; Torres, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The chapter compares bullying experiences among university students between four countries and aims to provide an understanding of the cultural features which might affect these experiences. We start by providing a summary of the results from a cross-cultural survey conducted among undergraduate students in Argentina, Estonia, Finland and the United States. We continue discussing the ways in which the current cultural, political, historical and economic status and challenges in...

  2. Towards the Development of Objective, Universal Criteria of Cultural Evaluation: The Challenges Posed by Anti-Foundationalism, Culturalism and Romanticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Over the course of the last century, it has become increasingly unfashionable in the social sciences to make cross-cultural evaluations. The advance of cultural relativism has ensured that criticisms of other cultures are regarded as subjective and ethnocentric. There remain, however, cultural beliefs, practices and traditions which appear, "prima…

  3. A General Education Course in Cultural Astronomy: Exploring the Universe Through Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Astronomy courses for non-science majors (often referred to as Astro 101) are the bread and butter of the general education service obligation of astronomy faculty and programs across the US. Their content has traditionally been a general survey of the solar system, stars and galaxies, or even the entire universe. However, because the audience is students who will not be continuing on in astronomy, there is actually no need to cover a broad range of specific topics. Rather, it is more important to concentrate on the scientific process, and hopefully leave the student with an understanding of the relevance of science in everyday life, regardless of his or her major. As a result, some faculty prefer a more interdisciplinary focus for their Astro 101 classes, for example courses on the search for extraterrestrial life. Another option for general education astronomy courses is what has become known as cultural astronomy. Cultural astronomy focuses on the ways in which astronomical knowledge and belief influences human behavior and social structures. Under this umbrella fall two important areas of study, archaeoastronomy (concentrating on ancient cultures) and enthoastronomy (focusing on extant cultures). Such interdisciplinary courses draw heavily upon archaeology, history, anthropology, art, and other fields more traditionally aligned with the humanities and social sciences than the natural sciences, and therefore can be attractive to students in these non-science majors. In such courses, students experience the “humanity” of science: the important connections between science and the human experience, and how experts in myriad fields contribute in meaningful ways to our understanding of how astronomical knowledge has been constructed and disseminated across time and space. This poster describes the content and pedagogy of a general education course in cultural astronomy for non-science majors that stresses hands-on and experiential learning, including the use of

  4. Leadership and culture of data governance for the achievement of higher education goals (Case study: Indonesia University of Education)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putro, Budi Laksono; Surendro, Kridanto; Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Data is a vital asset in a business enterprise in achieving organizational goals. Data and information affect the decision-making process on the various activities of an organization. Data problems include validity, quality, duplication, control over data, and the difficulty of data availability. Data Governance is the way the company / institution manages its data assets. Data Governance covers the rules, policies, procedures, roles and responsibilities, and performance indicators that direct the overall management of data assets. Studies on governance data or information aplenty recommend the importance of cultural factors in the governance of research data. Among the organization's leadership culture has a very close relationship, and there are two concepts turn, namely: Culture created by leaders, leaders created by culture. Based on the above, this study exposure to the theme "Leadership and Culture Of Data Governance For The Achievement Of Higher Education Goals (Case Study: Indonesia University Of Education)". Culture and Leadership Model Development of on Higher Education in Indonesia would be made by comparing several models of data governance, organizational culture, and organizational leadership on previous studies based on the advantages and disadvantages of each model to the existing organizational business. Results of data governance model development is shown in the organizational culture FPMIPA Indonesia University Of Education today is the cultural market and desired culture is a culture of clan. Organizational leadership today is Individualism Index (IDV) (83.72%), and situational leadership on selling position.

  5. L'Universite du 21e siecle: culturelle ou "excellente"? = The 21st Century University: Cultural or "Excellent"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Yves

    2000-01-01

    When the nation-state was the dominant political and economic entity, the university was an institution of culture, essential for forming the national identity. In this era of globalization, universities teach economic liberalism and serve the interests of supranational corporations with little regard for democratic principles. Academics must…

  6. University-Community Partnerships: Bridging People and Cultures in an HIV/AIDS Health Intervention in an African American Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Maxine Seaborn; Head, Rachel; Rikard, R. V.; McNeil, Carlotta; White, Caressa

    2012-01-01

    As universities become more involved in real-world problems that affect racial and ethnic communities, university members are identifying strategies to effectively work with culturally diverse community partners. The Communities and Health Disparities Project described in this article is an example of collaborative scholarship that engages the…

  7. The environmental self-management in the university community: a road to propitiate desirable changes in the environmental behaviors of the university youths, from their own cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio García-Tejera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cuban Education System power to the school as a promoter of development center, its social projection includes meeting the educational needs of the community, and community environmental education for sustainable development is inserted into the educational management of the school as cultural center of Higher Education. Consider the space as a community college gives the possibility of self-management actions, with the aim of improving environmental way the university community, using experiences that characterize the cultural practices of the university. For non-formal way contributes to environmental training, to stimulate responsibility for the planning and implementation of methods that characterize the management of their environment.

  8. Cross-cultural validity of the Spanish version of PHQ-9 among pregnant Peruvian women: a Rasch item response theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiuyue; Gelaye, Bizu; Fann, Jesse R; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2014-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the validity of the Spanish language version of the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression scale in a large sample of pregnant Peruvian women using Rasch item response theory (IRT) approaches. We further sought to examine the appropriateness of the response formats, reliability and potential differential item functioning (DIF) by maternal age, educational attainment and employment status. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 1520 pregnant women in Lima, Peru. A structured interview was used to collect information on demographic characteristics and PHQ-9 items. Data from the PHQ-9 were fitted to the Rasch IRT model and tested for appropriate category ordering, the assumptions of unidimensionality and local independence, item fit, reliability and presence of DIF. The Spanish language version of PHQ-9 demonstrated unidimensionality, local independence, and acceptable fit for the Rasch IRT model. However, we detected disordered response categories for the original four response categories. After collapsing "more than half the days" and "nearly every day", the response categories ordered properly and the PHQ-9 fit the Rasch IRT model. The PHQ-9 had moderate internal consistency (person separation index, PSI=0.72). Additionally, the items of PHQ-9 were free of DIF with regard to age, educational attainment, and employment status. The Spanish language version of the PHQ-9 was shown to have item properties of an effective screening instrument. Collapsing rating scale categories and reconstructing three-point Likert scale for all items improved the fit of the instrument. Future studies are warranted to establish new cutoff scores and criterion validity of the three-point Likert scale response options for the Spanish language version of the PHQ-9. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Culture specific and cross-culturally generalizable implicit leadership theories: Are attributes of charismatic/transformational leadership universally endorsed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, D.N.; House, R.J.; Ruiz-Quintanilla, S.A.; Dorfman, P.W.; Koopman, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on culturally endorsed implicit theories of leadership (CLTs). Although crosscultural research emphasizes that different cultural groups likely have different conceptions of what leadership should entail, a controversial position is argued here: namely that attributes associated

  10. The Influencing Factors of Cultural Knowledge in Translating Cultural Specific Concepts from Arabic into the English at Jazan University in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ali Almubark

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was set out to explore and evaluate the importance of having mastered the cultural knowledge throughout the process of depicting the culture-specific concepts involving two languages namely Arabic and English. In doing so, the participants sampled in this study were a group of final year Bachelor’s degree students majoring in Translation in ALAradha College at the Jazan University. The findings of the study method employed in this study statistically confirmed that the students of the Translation at AL AlAradh college- Saudi Arabia faced considerable difficulties throughout the process of translating cultural concepts owing to inadequate mastery of knowledge in relation to the culture involved. Among the measures which can be taken in addressing the issues in this context are training the learners by means of exposure to real cases involving culture-specific concepts which may help them deal with such difficulties in the translation process.

  11. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K; Martin, James D; Moldwin, Mark B; O'Dowd, Diane K; Posey, Lynmarie A; Smith, Tobin L; Miller, Emily R

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of undergraduate teaching across all disciplines, not only STEM fields, requires creating an environment wherein continuous improvement of teaching is valued, assessed, and rewarded at various stages of a faculty member's career. This requires consistent application of policies that reflect well-established best practices for evaluating teaching at the department, college, and university levels. Evidence shows most teaching evaluation practices do not reflect stated policies, even when the policies specifically espouse teaching as a value. Thus, alignment of practice to policy is a major barrier to establishing a culture in which teaching is valued. Situated in the context of current national efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education, including the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, this essay discusses four guiding principles for aligning practice with stated priorities in formal policies: 1) enhancing the role of deans and chairs; 2) effectively using the hiring process; 3) improving communication; and 4) improving the understanding of teaching as a scholarly activity. In addition, three specific examples of efforts to improve the practice of evaluating teaching are presented as examples: 1) Three Bucket Model of merit review at the University of California, Irvine; (2) Evaluation of Teaching Rubric, University of Kansas; and (3) Teaching Quality Framework, University of Colorado, Boulder. These examples provide flexible criteria to holistically evaluate and improve the quality of teaching across the diverse institutions comprising modern higher education. © 2017 M. Dennin et

  12. Explaining Differences in Subjective Well-Being Across 33 Nations Using Multilevel Models: Universal Personality, Cultural Relativity, and National Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Mike W-L; Montasem, Alex

    2016-02-01

    This multinational study simultaneously tested three prominent hypotheses--universal disposition, cultural relativity, and livability--that explained differences in subjective well-being across nations. We performed multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships at both individual and cultural levels in 33 nations. Participants were 6,753 university students (2,215 men; 4,403 women; 135 did not specify), and the average age of the entire sample was 20.97 years (SD = 2.39). Both individual- and cultural-level analyses supported the universal disposition and cultural relativity hypotheses by revealing significant associations of subjective well-being with Extraversion, Neuroticism, and independent self-construal. In addition, interdependent self-construal was positively related to life satisfaction at the individual level only, whereas aggregated negative affect was positively linked with aggregate levels of Extraversion and interdependent self-construal at the cultural level only. Consistent with the livability hypothesis, gross national income (GNI) was related to aggregate levels of negative affect and life satisfaction. There was also a quadratic relationship between GNI and aggregated positive affect. Our findings reveal that universal disposition, cultural self-construal, and national income can elucidate differences in subjective well-being, but the multilevel analyses advance the literature by yielding new findings that cannot be identified in studies using individual-level analyses alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Role of Cultural and Identity Differences in Self-expression of Iranian Users of Social Networking Sites; A Case Study of Students of Tehran University, Amirkabir University, and Sharif University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Molaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media with their features such as interactivity, participatory, and user-generated content have provided a great opportunity for self-expression of the users. However, cultural differences affect the extent and modality of users’ self-expression. This study aims to investigate the modality of self-expression of Iranian users of the social networking sites. In doing so, an online survey was conducted among the students of three Iran universities: University of Tehran, Amirkabir University of Technology, and Sharif University of Technology. A total of 371 students participated in the study. Having conducted quantitative analysis, the study results showed that women and ethnic minorities are more inclined to support their cultural differences compared to men and ethnic majority group. Supporting cultural differences was observed more among Shia religious majority group. Religious minorities expressed less tendency to create content in social networking sites and as a result support their religious identity.

  14. Color categories are not universal: new evidence from traditional and western cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Debi D.; Davidoff, Jules; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2002-06-01

    Evidence presented supports the linguistic relativity of color categories in three different paradigms. Firstly, a series of cross-cultural investigations, which had set out to replicate the seminal work of Rosch Heider with the Dani of New Guinea, failed to find evidence of a set of universal color categories. Instead, we found evidence of linguistic relativity in both populations tested. Neither participants from a Melanesian hunter-gatherer culture, nor those from an African pastoral tribe, whose languages both contain five color terms, showed a cognitive organization of color resembling that of English speakers. Further, Melanesian participants showed evidence of Categorical Perception, but only at their linguistic category boundaries. Secondly, in native English speakers verbal interference was found to selectively remove the defining features of Categorical Perception. Under verbal interference, the greater accuracy normally observed for cross-category judgements compared to within-category judgements disappeared. While both visual and verbal codes may be employed in the recognition memory of colors, participants only make use of verbal coding when demonstrating Categorical Perception. Thirdly, in a brain- damaged patient suffering from a naming disorder, the loss of labels radically impaired his ability to categorize colors. We conclude that language affects both the perception of and memory for colors.

  15. MODERNISM AND CULTURAL EXPRESSION IN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS DESIGN: THE NIGERIAN EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola O Asojo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early to mid-20th century as a result of colonialism and independence across Africa, modernism became prominent as urbanization rapidly affected major Nigerian cities and towns. Modernism was reflected in the public projects designed and executed by expatriate firms of modernist architects and designers for the colonialists. In literature, most of the discussion on modernism has predominantly been focused on Europe and the Americas. There is very limited information available about the African continent, especially West Africa and Nigeria. In this paper, we discuss the designs of the first generation Nigerian Universities. Our goal is to introduce audiences to cultural expression and diverse perspectives of Nigerian spaces of this era, and thus contribute to the global design discourse. We will illustrate how the designers and architects acculturated the international style into the tropical climate and sociocultural context of Nigeria. We will discuss the impact of Nigerian indigenous cultures on the site layout, building form, spatial configuration, interior and exterior relationships, materials, construction techniques, symbols and aesthetics.

  16. The role of nuclear microprobes in the study of technology, provenance and corrosion of cultural heritage: The case of gold and silver items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, M.F.; Tissot, I.

    2013-01-01

    This work gives an overview of the main questions raised by gold and silver items kept in museum collections and of the role of nuclear microprobes in their study and conservation. The different approached questions are illustrated by examples; analytical data is given and discussed; and the advantages of IBA are considered: spatial resolution, penetration depth, limits of detection, mapping, etc

  17. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom-up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top-down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel ("aesthetics of perception"), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel ("aesthetics of cognition"). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of aesthetics.

  18. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom–up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top–down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel (“aesthetics of perception”), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel (“aesthetics of cognition”). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of

  19. Universal, developmental, and variable aspects of young children's play: a cross-cultural comparison of pretending at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, W L; Wang, X L; Fung, H H; Williams, K; Mintz, J

    1999-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from five Irish American families in the United States and nine Chinese families in Taiwan, in conjunction with an emerging body of evidence in the cultural psychology literature, we propose universal, culturally variable, and developmental dimensions of young children's pretend play. Possible universal dimensions include the use of objects, and the predominantly social nature of pretend play. Developmental dimensions include increases in the proportion of social pretend play initiated by the child, the proportion of partner initiations elaborated upon by the child, and caregivers' use of pretend play initiations to serve other, nonplay social functions. Culturally variable dimensions include the centrality of objects, the participation of specific play partners, the extent of child initiations of social pretend play with caregivers, the various functions of social pretend play in interaction, and specific themes. These findings raise the theoretical issue of how universal and variable dimensions of pretend play interact in specific communities to create distinctive development pathways.

  20. A cross-cultural investigation of multiple intelligences in university-level nutrition students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Joy E.

    Effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body in undergraduate nutrition and dietetics programs are needed in order for graduates to effectively meet the health and nutrition needs of a diverse clientele. One way to promote diversity and improve teaching methods in dietetics education is through a framework based on Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). The theory suggests that individuals possess varying degrees of eight different intelligences which are shaped by genetics and cultural context. Relatively little research has been conducted to investigate MI approaches in the areas of higher education, cross-cultural education, or dietetics education. Therefore, this study investigated the MI profiles of students within undergraduate nutrition programs at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, Mexico and Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Data were collected through the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS). The findings provide a profile of the intellectual dispositions for the study population and suggest that dietetics students in this cross-cultural study population score highest for the MIDAS scale measuring interpersonal intelligence, with significant differences occurring between scores for the eight intelligences measured by the MIDAS. Not only were there significant differences between scale scores when analyzing the population as a whole, there were also significant differences in scale scores when comparing American and Mexican students. This phenomenon was also true when scores were grouped into five ordinal categories. In addition, the findings suggest that differences exist among the particular skills associated with the intelligences for the students at each university. Results indicate that skills related to social sensitivity and persuasion are significantly higher than many other skills for dietetics students. Further, when comparing the

  1. The relationship between cultural intelligence and social compatibility in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Soltani, Batoul

    2014-01-01

    Cultural intelligence and social compatibility are two acquired processes that their education and reinforcement between dormitory's students who have inter cultural interactions with each other can conclude with results that tension diminution, inter cultural contrast and conflict, social divisions and consequently healthy and peaceful relationships and governance and finally mental peace, and health are of its most important. Hence, the research has been occurring in order to the determination of cultural intelligence relationship with the social compatibility of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students in 2012. The research method is descriptive-correlation, and its population is composed of all Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students in 2012 that were totally 2500 persons. The two steps sampling method have been used, group sampling and random sampling has been occurring at first and second steps and totally 447 persons were selected. Research data were collected via Earley and Ang cultural intelligence questionnaire with 0.76 Cronbach's alpha Coefficient and California social compatibility standard questionnaire with higher than 0.70 Cronbach's alpha factor. Questionnaire data have been analyzed with the SPSS software and results have been presented in the shape of descriptions and statistics. Results showed that there is a direct significant relationship (P intelligence and the social adjustment in students living in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories and also there is a direct significant relationship in the level of (P intelligence; however, there is no significant relationship between cognitive and behavioral dimensions of cultural intelligence and social adjustment (P > 0.05). Cultural intelligence and cognitive and motivational addition in dimensions of students living in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories increase their social integration, therefore, cultural

  2. Cultural variation is part of human nature : Literary universals, context-sensitivity, and "shakespeare in the bush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michelle Scalise

    2003-12-01

    In 1966, Laura Bohannan wrote her classic essay challenging the supposition that great literary works speak to universal human concerns and conditions and, by extension, that human nature is the same everywhere. Her evidence: the Tiv of West Africa interpret Hamlet differently from Westerners. While Bohannan's essay implies that cognitive universality and cultural variation are mutually exclusive phenomena, adaptationist theory suggests otherwise. Adaptive problems ("the human condition") and cognitive adaptations ("human nature") are constant across cultures. What differs between cultures is habitat: owing to environmental variation, the means and information relevant to solving adaptive problems differ from place to place. Thus, we find differences between cultures not because human minds differ in design but largely because human habitats differ in resources and history. On this view, we would expect world literature to express both human universals and cultural particularities. Specifically, we should expect to find literary universality at the macro level (e.g., adaptive problems, cognitive adaptations) and literary variation at the micro level (e.g., local solutions to adaptive problems).

  3. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  4. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  5. An abbreviated Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale for Chinese-speaking population with colorectal cancer after surgery: cultural adaptation and item reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, L-F; Hung, C-L; Kuo, L-J; Tsai, P-S

    2017-09-01

    No instrument is available to assess the impact of faecal incontinence (FI) of quality of life for Chinese-speaking population. The purpose of the study was to adapt the Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale (FIQL) for patients with colorectal cancer, assess the factor structure and reduce the items for brevity. A sample of 120 participants were enrolled. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent and contrasted-groups validity were assessed. Construct validity was analysed using an exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). The internal consistency (Cronbach's α of the total scale and four subscales = 0.98 and 0.97, 0.96, 0.92, 0.82 respectively), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ≥.98 for all scales with p < .001) and significant correlations of all scales with selected subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the Wexner scale suggested satisfactory reliability and validity. The severe FI group (with a Wexner score ≥9) scored significantly lower on the scale than the less severe FI group (with a Wexner score <9) did (p < .001). The CFA supported a two-factor structure and demonstrated an excellent model fit of the 15-item abbreviated version of the FIQL-Chinese. The FIQL-Chinese has satisfactory validity and reliability and the abbreviated version may be more practical and applicable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Implications of student mobility at the University of Granada: culture shock, education shock and “hosting shock”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Soriano García

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The University of Granada heads the latest statistics in absolute figures in students’ mobility in Spain. Taking this assertion as a starting point, this paper shows the implications of culture shock for student mobility as well as the impact of student mobility for the different education levels and for host institutions. Furthermore, this paper presents the results obtained from the Temcu project (Teacher Training for the MulticulturalClassroom at the University, a European project based on the implications of the multicultural classroom at the University of Granada.

  7. Digital preservation of cultural and scientific heritage: involving university students to raise awareness of its importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Redweik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is a relevant issue in contemporary society. While its preservation is a challenge, its dissemination, can contribute for an economic balance between costs and benefits.  Scientific  heritage  can  be  considered  as  a  special domain  of  cultural  heritage, not yet sought  by  the  mass  tourism, but worth being preserved as the roots of today’s knowledge.  Considering  that  university  students  of  engineering  and computer  science traditionally  do  not  address cultural or scientific heritage issues in their syllabus, and that they constitute a layer of young citizens that will come to be influential  in  the  future  of  society,  an  effort  was  undertaken  to  focus  on  this  theme  in  disciplines  of  different  courses, allying  the  learning  of  technical  skills  with  the  natural  interest  of  younger  people  for  3D  and  animation  for  the  profit  of heritage. The goal was to raise the awareness of this particular group to the importance of maintaining heritage issues, in particular,  in  a  virtual  way,  both  for  documentation  and  for  divulgating  their  existence.  Raising  funds  for  buildings’ restoration, attracting the public to visit buildings and collections that are outside the usual tourism routes, contributing to revenue  generation,  or  allowing  virtual  visits  of  not  accessible  issues,  complementing  physical  visits  on  site,  were  the general  aims of  the  proposed  projects.  A survey was undertaken under the participating students to evaluate how the projects influenced their attitude towards heritage. The obtained feedback was very positive: 76% agreed that the project alerted them for the importance of preserving historical and cultural heritage, while 72% considered it was interesting that the topic of digital cultural heritage was used for the assessments of

  8. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  9. Developing Cross-Cultural Awareness through Foreign Immersion Programs: Implications of University Study Abroad Research for Global Competency Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkesmoe, Karen J.; Kuchinke, K. Peter; Ardichvili, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of foreign immersion programs in terms of increasing cross-cultural awareness among university students in business, accounting, human resources and agriculture. The authors extrapolate from their population to the practice of developing business professionals on international…

  10. A Study of the Relationship between Institutional Policy, Organisational culture and E-Learning Use in Four South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniewicz, Laura; Brown, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between policy (conceptualised as goals, values and resources), organisational culture and e-learning use. Through both qualitative and quantitative research methods, we gathered data about staff and student perspectives from four diverse South African universities representing a selection of ICT in…

  11. Designing Gain- and Loss-Framed Messages to Increase Physical Activity among University Students Living in two Different Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Ozgur Polat

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of this project is to gather information through using different methods and investigate the determinants of message persuasiveness in university students from the British and Turkish cultures in order to design effective physical activity messages leading intention, attitude and behaviour change. The results of the finalized studies showed the importance of using both qualitative and quantitative methods in message design process.

  12. Adolescent Decision-Making Processes regarding University Entry: A Model Incorporating Cultural Orientation, Motivation and Occupational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup

    2013-01-01

    This study tested a newly developed model of the cognitive decision-making processes of senior high school students related to university entry. The model incorporated variables derived from motivation theory (i.e. expectancy-value theory and the theory of reasoned action), literature on cultural orientation and occupational considerations. A…

  13. An Exploration of Cultural Factors and Their Influence on Saudi Arabian University Deans’ Leadership Perceptions and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Abu Alsuood

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an investigation into societal and organizational cultural influences on academic leadership in Saudi Arabian higher education, a previously underexplored area. In Saudi Arabia, it is currently unclear how university deans are negotiating the balance between organizational cultural values and contemporary influences, and how the values they embrace may influence their leadership practices and effectiveness. The study has been conducted in eight main governmental universities under the Ministry of Education. Qualitative data has been collected, involving interviews with fifteen university deans, with data scrutinized by an interpretive thematic analysis. The deans’ responses indicated dissatisfaction with the broad societal culture around them and the negative influence this had on leadership practices. Tensions were apparent between traditional values and change, and the influence of family and tribal backgrounds. Five organizational cultural themes were identified as influences on deans’ leadership—a centralized environment, strict regulations, the authority of top management, selection and promotion issues, and reputational factors. The study’s outcomes contribute to the understanding of leadership perceptions and practices within a particular cultural context.

  14. The Role of Cultural and Identity Differences in Self-expression of Iranian Users of Social Networking Sites; A Case Study of Students of Tehran University, Amirkabir University, and Sharif University of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    H. Molaei; Z. Majdizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Social media with their features such as interactivity, participatory, and user-generated content have provided a great opportunity for self-expression of the users. However, cultural differences affect the extent and modality of users’ self-expression. This study aims to investigate the modality of self-expression of Iranian users of the social networking sites. In doing so, an online survey was conducted among the students of three Iran universities: University of Tehran, Amirkabir Universi...

  15. Scholarship as Cultural Production in the Neoliberal University: Working Within and Against ‘Deliverables’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Elizabeth Luka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the idea of scholarly work as cultural production to help understand how the tensions of precarious, early-career academic employment are articulated on a day-to-day basis in the context of pressures to efficiently produce monetizable ‘deliverables.’ Using a political economy of communication framework and an iterative methodological approach, the authors mobilize examples drawn from a collaborative set of activities they undertook as part of a broader research group of emerging Canadian scholars working in different international contexts between 2012 and 2015. The research conversation began in academic roundtables in 2013, and was furthered through a content analysis of articles collected from scholarly and general interest blog posts, newsletters, and magazines published online from July 2012 to April 2014. In this article, the authors explore emerging themes and document pressures to conform to neoliberal practices within the corporatized university, as well as suggest pathways for dissent and reinvention of academic labour.

  16. Universal Capacitance Model for Real-Time Biomass in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Konakovsky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance probes have the potential to revolutionize bioprocess control due to their safe and robust use and ability to detect even the smallest capacitors in the form of biological cells. Several techniques have evolved to model biomass statistically, however, there are problems with model transfer between cell lines and process conditions. Errors of transferred models in the declining phase of the culture range for linear models around +100% or worse, causing unnecessary delays with test runs during bioprocess development. The goal of this work was to develop one single universal model which can be adapted by considering a potentially mechanistic factor to estimate biomass in yet untested clones and scales. The novelty of this work is a methodology to select sensitive frequencies to build a statistical model which can be shared among fermentations with an error between 9% and 38% (mean error around 20% for the whole process, including the declining phase. A simple linear factor was found to be responsible for the transferability of biomass models between cell lines, indicating a link to their phenotype or physiology.

  17. Wastewater treatment by artificial wetlands in the Museum of Popular Culture of the National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals in terms of sustainable access to sanitation requires increasing the development of research programs that promote simple and low cost technological options, appropriate to the social, economic, and environmental conditions of each population. These processes must be accompanied by actions of environmental and sanitation education, which allow appropriation of these systems by the communities. In this sense, there are two projects in the National University converging on this subject. The Museum of Popular Culture together with the Public Service Company of Heredia develop an environmental education project that promotes the protection of water, from an historical perspective of its management, which has an artificial wetland as the main teaching unit. On the other hand, the Waste Management Laboratory at the School of Chemistry evaluates the performance of this artificial wetland as part of a research project that promotes this type of alternative sanitation. This paper presents results of the monitoring of this artificial wetland, showing average removal percentages of 93% BOD5,20 , 95% COD, 73% P-PO4, and 95% for SS.

  18. The historical universal: the role of cultural value in the historical sociology of Pierre Bourdieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tony

    2005-03-01

    Best known for his pioneering study Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, in which the aesthetic attitude of disinterestedness is accounted for as the expression of a class ethos, Bourdieu has become something of an icon of relativism. In thus effecting a Bakhtinian 'discrowning' of official hierarchies of the arts, he is often celebrated for his concern to place all tastes, popular and high, on a similar footing, equally rooted in specific class practices. Only a careless inattention could support such a conclusion. From his early interventions in French cultural policy debates up to and including The Rules of Art and Pascalian Meditations (1996), Bourdieu has consistently repudiated the view that a sociological approach to questions of aesthetic judgment must result in a levelling form of relativism. In exploring why this should be so, this paper considers the issues at stake in the forms of 'historical universalism' that are associated with Bourdieu's account of the autonomy of the aesthetic sphere. It does so with a view to identifying some of the difficulties underlying his understanding of sociology as a historical practice.

  19. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  20. Is the bias for function-based explanations culturally universal? Children from China endorse teleological explanations of natural phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Adena; Zhu, Liqi; Li, Jing; Kelemen, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Young children in Western cultures tend to endorse teleological (function-based) explanations broadly across many domains, even when scientifically unwarranted. For instance, in contrast to Western adults, they explicitly endorse the idea that mountains were created for climbing, just like hats were created for warmth. Is this bias a product of culture, or a product of universal aspects of human cognition? In two studies, we explored whether adults and children in Mainland China, a highly secular, non-Western culture, show a bias for teleological explanations. When explaining both object properties (Exp. 1) and origins (Exp. 2), we found evidence that they do. While Chinese adults restricted teleological explanations to scientifically warranted cases, Chinese children endorsed them more broadly, extending them across different kinds of natural phenomena. This bias decreased with rising grade level across first, second and fourth grade. Overall, these data provide evidence that children’s bias for teleological explanations is not solely a product of Western Abrahamic cultures. Instead, it extends to other cultures including the East Asian secular culture of modern-day China. This suggests that the bias for function-based explanations may be driven by universal aspects of human cognition. PMID:28110152

  1. An Analysis of the Factors Influencing the Political Culture of the Students of Parsabad Islamic Azad University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Hatami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Political culture is one of the most important phenomena of social life in modem era, with an undeniable influence on the political conduct of the members of the society. It is also one of the main pillars and principles of the growth and development of society. Belief in political equality, trust, feeling of security, and national and ethnic loyalty, are among significant elements closely related to political culture and society development pattern. The present study aims to analyze the factors influencing the political culture of the students of Parsabad Islamic Azad University. The main question addressed in this study concerns the factors which influence the political culture of the students of Parsabad Islamic Azad University. The hypotheses of the study suggest that variables such as ethnicism, religiousness, political motivation, personality and socioeconomic status have a significant relationship with political culture. The survey methodology - correlation between variables - and interview, as the means for collecting data to answer the questions, are utilized in this study. Also the statistical method and the SPPS software are used to analyze the data. The results of the study indicate that none of the hypotheses of the research was confirmed except for the relationship between the political motivation and the political culture. This shows that the temporal and spatial condition of Parsabad and, consequently, that of the students are different from the temporal and spatial conditions of the theories presented in this study.

  2. In the eye of the beholder? Universality and cultural specificity in the expression and perception of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Klaus R; Clark-Polner, Elizabeth; Mortillaro, Marcello

    2011-12-01

    Do members of different cultures express (or "encode") emotions in the same fashion? How well can members of distinct cultures recognize (or "decode") each other's emotion expressions? The question of cultural universality versus specificity in emotional expression has been a hot topic of debate for more than half a century, but, despite a sizeable amount of empirical research produced to date, no convincing answers have emerged. We suggest that this unsatisfactory state of affairs is due largely to a lack of concern with the precise mechanisms involved in emotion expression and perception, and propose to use a modified Brunswikian lens model as an appropriate framework for research in this area. On this basis we provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature and point to research paradigms that are likely to provide the evidence required to resolve the debate on universality vs. cultural specificity of emotional expression. Applying this fresh perspective, our analysis reveals that, given the paucity of pertinent data, no firm conclusions can be drawn on actual expression (encoding) patterns across cultures (although there appear to be more similarities than differences), but that there is compelling evidence for intercultural continuity in decoding, or recognition, ability. We also note a growing body of research on the notion of ingroup advantage due to expression "dialects," above and beyond the general encoding or decoding patterns. We furthermore suggest that these empirical patterns could be explained by both universality in the underlying mechanisms and cultural specificity in the input to, and the regulation of, these expression and perception mechanisms. Overall, more evidence is needed, both to further elucidate these mechanisms and to inventory the patterns of cultural effects. We strongly recommend using more solid conceptual and theoretical perspectives, as well as more ecologically valid approaches, in designing future studies in emotion

  3. Development and evaluation of a teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination in university nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Brown, Lucinda; Duff, Carmel; Nesbitt, Pat; Hepner, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination are vital to ethical effective health systems. Nurses require quality educational preparation in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination. Limited evidence-based research is available to guide teachers. To develop, implement and evaluate an evidence-based teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination for undergraduate nursing students. A quantitative design using pre- and post-survey measures was used to evaluate the teaching and learning approach. The Bachelor of Nursing program in an Australian university. Academics and second year undergraduate nursing students. A literature review and consultation with academics informed the development of the teaching and learning approach. Thirty-three students completed a survey at pre-measures and following participation in the teaching and learning approach at post-measures about their confidence to practice cross-cultural nursing (Transcultural Self-efficacy Tool) and about their discriminatory attitudes (Quick Discrimination Index). The literature review found that educational approaches that solely focus on culture might not be sufficient in addressing discrimination and racism. During consultation, academics emphasised the importance of situating cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination as social determinants of health. Therefore, cross-cultural nursing was contextualised within primary health care and emphasised care for culturally diverse communities. Survey findings supported the effectiveness of this strategy in promoting students' confidence regarding knowledge about cross-cultural nursing. There was no reported change in discriminatory attitudes. The teaching and learning approach was modified to include stronger experiential learning and role playing. Nursing education should emphasise cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination. The study describes an evaluated teaching and learning approach and demonstrates how evaluation

  4. Marketing Culture. Summary of the conference Marketing culture in modern organization held on 1 June 2001 at Warsaw University.

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Modzelewski

    2001-01-01

    What do we mean when we refer to "marketing"? Are they the same thing as "marketing culture", but in a people context? Is "marketing the same as salels"? How can we find an acceptable balance between the strategy and the tactics? These are important questions, because our answers have important implications.

  5. Universality of Culture and Neo-Intuitionalism: Do They Make a Difference to Comparative Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Amal Abdel Fattah

    2017-01-01

    Comparative education (CE) addresses culture through the lens of global culture which increasingly puts so much emphasis on human capital. Also, convergence of educational systems has become one of the main issues of global culture in CE, particularly with so many nationalities melting into the global society to become part and parcel of the…

  6. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  7. Culture and Leadership in a Public University Setting: Implications for Shared Governance and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Noting a lack of quantitative research on perceptions of culture, leadership and change in the shared governance environment of Higher Education, this study utilized the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (Cameron & Quinn, 2011) to measure current (now) and preferred cultural perceptions of faculty and administrative leaders.…

  8. Latina/o Achievement at Predominantly White Universities: The Importance of Culture and Ethnic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Alison; Chang, Tai

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors examined the influence of cultural fit on the achievement of Latina/o college students by testing whether cultural integration factors (i.e., cultural congruity, ethnic identity, connection with ethnic minority peers) predict college GPA (grade point average). Participants were 113 Latina/o students enrolled…

  9. Understanding and Influencing Teaching and Learning Cultures at University: A Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxa, Torgny; Martensson, Katarina; Alveteg, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Academic cultures might be perceived as conservative, at least in terms of development of teaching and learning. Through a lens of network theory this conceptual article analyses the pattern of pathways in which culture is constructed through negotiation of meaning. The perspective contributes to an understanding of culture construction and…

  10. The Application of Moral Judgments to Other Cultures: Relativism and Universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainryb, Cecilia

    1993-01-01

    Sixth and tenth graders and college students were asked to apply moral judgments which they had made about a familiar context to contexts in cultures different from their own. Most subjects contextualized their judgments with respect to cultures with different informational beliefs but made nonrelativistic judgments with respect to cultures with…

  11. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Michel

    2016-10-01

    This communication presents the situation regarding astronomical and archaeoastronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention through recent years up until today. Some parallel events and works were promoted strongly within the IAU-UNESCO Initiative during the International Year of Astronomy (2009). This was followed by a joint program by the IAU and ICOMOS-an official advisory body assisting the World Heritage Committee in the evaluation of nomination dossiers. The result of that work is an important publication by around 40 authors from 20 different countries all around the world: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the Context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (Ruggles & Cotte 2010). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives such as the ``Windows to the Universe" organisation and the parallel constitution of local ``Starlight Reserves''. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied the global trend for astronomical heritage. WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. A key phrase is ``demonstration of Outstanding Universal Value'' to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. This communication first examines the requirements and evaluation practices about of demonstrating OUV for a given place in the context of astronomical or archaeoastronomical heritage. That means the examination of the tangible attributes, an inventory of the property in terms of immoveable and moveable components and an inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in the context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). This is also related to the application to the site of the concept of integrity and authenticity, as regards the place itself and in comparison with other similar places (WH sites already listed, sites on national WH Tentative Lists

  12. How Organizational Culture as Perceived by Senior Administrators Influences the Adoption of Information Technology Systems in Two 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, David Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between university culture, organizational characteristics, and central IT systems adoption within two four-year public universities. A qualitative multi-case methodology was used to examine the influence of organizational cultures and characteristics on personal perceptions, actions,…

  13. 76 FR 14050 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of sacred object and object... information provided by traditional Navajo religious practitioners regarding the use and origin of the object... religious practitioners, jish have occasionally been placed in previously existing archeological contexts...

  14. Do Major Field of Study and Cultural Familiarity Affect TOEFL[R] iBT Reading Performance? A Confirmatory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia

    2011-01-01

    The TOEFL[R] iBT has increased the length of each reading passage to better approximate academic reading at North American universities, resulting in a reduction in the number of passages on the reading section of the test. One of the concerns brought about by this change is whether the decrease in topic variety increases the likelihood that an…

  15. Politics and care: a study of Czech Americans within Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1997-01-01

    The domain of inquiry for this study was the influence of the American political environmental context on professional and generic care patterns, expressions, and meanings of Czech American immigrants. The purpose of the research was to document, describe, interpret, and analyze the diversities and universalities of professional and generic care for this cultural group, to provide culturally congruent care to Czech Americans, and to explicate the role of politics as an influence on care patterns, health, and well being. The researcher's former transcultural ethnonursing study in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1991 served as a stimulus for this in-depth study on politics and care. Twelve key and twenty general informants were interviewed. Five major themes were identified. The researcher discovered that the capitalist economic market structure of the United States influenced informant lifeways in all dimensions of Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality, as depicted in the Sunrise Model. Specific care patterns discovered included care as choice, care as responsibility, and care as helping each other. Findings related to professional and generic care supported researcher predictions that generic culture care patterns would be important to immigrants. Provisions for culturally congruent nursing care were articulated based on research findings.

  16. The Culture of Business Education and Its Place in the Modern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers believe that the modern university is in a state of crisis like never before. One of the main reasons cited for this decline is that the modern university has a closer resemblance to a transnational corporation than to a traditional scholarly institution (Lewis, 2005). This paper attempts to define the term "university"…

  17. Developing cultural competence through self-reflection in interprofessional education: Findings from an Australian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Rebecca; Bidewell, John; Dune, Tinashe; Lessey, Nkosi

    2016-05-01

    Interprofessional education and cultural competence are both necessary for health professionals working in interprofessional teams serving diverse populations. Using a pre-post-survey case series design, this study evaluates a novel learning activity designed to encourage self-reflection and cultural competence in an Australian interprofessional education context. Undergraduate health professional students in a large subject viewed three 7-15 minute videos featuring interviews with persons of a minority cultural, linguistic, or sexual group who were living with a disability or managing a health condition. Immediately afterwards, students in interprofessional groups completed a structured activity designed to promote interprofessional and cultural reflection. A localised version of a validated scale measured cultural competence before and after the learning activity. Results suggest the value of video-based learning activities based on real-life examples for improving cultural competence. Despite initially rating themselves highly, 64% of students (n = 273) improved their overall cultural competence, though only by M = 0.13, SD = 0.08, of a 5-point rating-scale interval. A nuanced approach to interpreting results is warranted; even slight increases may indicate improved cultural competence. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness of video-based cultural competence learning activities, based on qualitative findings, are provided. Overall the findings attest to the merit of group discussion in cultural competence learning activities in interprofessional education settings. However, the inclusion of group discussions within such learning activities should hinge on group dynamics.

  18. Estimation of incident solar radiation on the roof of the cultural and sports university centre of the Foundation University Los Libertadores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez, S A; Carrillo, V M; Rátiva, L C

    2016-01-01

    This document shows the estimate of the total solar irradiance incident for the set of solar collectors to be located on the roof of cultural and sports university centre (CSUC) of the Foundation University Los Libertadores (FULL) in Bogotá, Colombia, and they will be part of the climate control system of the pool built inside. The calculation was based on experimental data of global solar radiation on the horizontal surface on March, July, October, November and December, through the three most commonly models used to determine the total solar radiation on tilted surfaces: isotropic sky, HDKR and Perez. The results show differences of less than 5% between the values calculated by the three models for December, the month with lower irradiance. For this month, reductions up to 15% and 19% were observed in the estimated irradiance, relative to those obtained on a horizontal surface on a surface under ideal orientation and inclination, respectively. (paper)

  19. Estimation of incident solar radiation on the roof of the cultural and sports university centre of the Foundation University Los Libertadores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, S. A.; Carrillo, V. M.; Rátiva, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    This document shows the estimate of the total solar irradiance incident for the set of solar collectors to be located on the roof of cultural and sports university centre (CSUC) of the Foundation University Los Libertadores (FULL) in Bogotá, Colombia, and they will be part of the climate control system of the pool built inside. The calculation was based on experimental data of global solar radiation on the horizontal surface on March, July, October, November and December, through the three most commonly models used to determine the total solar radiation on tilted surfaces: isotropic sky, HDKR and Perez. The results show differences of less than 5% between the values calculated by the three models for December, the month with lower irradiance. For this month, reductions up to 15% and 19% were observed in the estimated irradiance, relative to those obtained on a horizontal surface on a surface under ideal orientation and inclination, respectively.

  20. Systematic approach to the foundation of healthy way of life and popularization of physical culture in modern university.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharuk S.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The factors of popularization of physical culture are considered among students young people. Directions of development of optimum method of employments are shown by a physical culture, which will provide the systematic going and attaching near the healthy way of life. 815 students took part in research. It is set that optimization of educational process of student and creation of educational base will allow students to get necessary for the maintenance of optimum health level physical loading. Directions of technologism of an educate work are offered with students. Possibilities of university are shown in conditioning for forming for the students of positive motivation to the healthy way of life. Directions organization of relaxation measures are recommended for students. Attention is accented on the financial skilled providing of employments in the sporting halls of university.

  1. Culture-Based Methods and Molecular Tools for Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Detection in a Belgian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos, I.; Argudín, M. A.; Hites, M.; Ahajjam, F.; Dodémont, M.; Dagyaran, C.; Bakkali, M.; Etienne, I.; Jacobs, F.; Knoop, C.; Patteet, S.; Lagrou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing worldwide problem with major clinical implications. Surveillance is warranted to guide clinicians to provide optimal treatment to patients. To investigate azole resistance in clinical Aspergillus isolates in our institution, a Belgian university hospital, we conducted a laboratory-based surveillance between June 2015 and October 2016. Two different approaches were used: a prospective culture-based surveillance using VIPcheck on unselected...

  2. Experiences and Practices of Evolution Instructors at Christian Universities That Can Inform Culturally Competent Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E.

    2018-01-01

    Students' religious beliefs and religious cultures have been shown to be the main factors predicting whether they will accept evolution, yet college biology instructors teaching evolution at public institutions often have religious beliefs and cultures that are different from their religious students. This difference in religious beliefs and…

  3. Developing the University of the Philippines Loneliness Assessment Scale: A Cross-Cultural Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Davis Porinchu

    2012-01-01

    As the existing scales to measure loneliness are almost all Western and there is no single scale developed cross-culturally for this purpose, this study is designed to develop a reliable and valid scale to measure the experience of loneliness of individuals from individualistic or collectivistic cultures. There are three samples for this study…

  4. Social Errors in Four Cultures: Evidence about Universal Forms of Social Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Alan Page

    1993-01-01

    To test the cross-cultural generality of relational-models theory, 4 studies with 70 adults examined social errors of substitution of persons for Bengali, Korean, Chinese, and Vai (Liberia and Sierra Leone) subjects. In all four cultures, people tend to substitute someone with whom they have the same basic relationship. (SLD)

  5. Neoliberalism, Corporate Culture, and the Promise of Higher Education: The University as a Democratic Public Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the corrosive effects of corporate culture on the academy and society, arguing that neoliberal discourses of privatization and commercialization reduce citizenship to self-interest. Maintains that corporate culture ignores social injustices while emphasizing unfettered market forces, threatening understanding of democracy and the meaning…

  6. School-University-Community Pathways to Higher Education: Teacher Perceptions, School Culture and Partnership Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Enrique, Jr.; Freire, Juan A.; McKinney, Ashley; Delgado Bernal, Dolores

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot in time of teacher perceptions, school culture, and partnership building. We delineate how teachers perceive our partnership's purpose and its role in transforming school culture. Second, we describe how teachers express the life expectations they have and the possibilities they hope for their students and the…

  7. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  8. Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Impact of Institutional Culture, Policy and Process on Student Engagement in University Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There is a strong focus on the importance of student engagement in higher education, with increasing attention on how students can participate in their university's decision-making processes. Yet, although the concept appears to be almost universally accepted, it is rarely problematised. This has led some commentators to conclude that student…

  10. Cultural Capital, Family Background and Education: Choosing University Subjects in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    This article employs Bourdieu's conceptual tools to unpack family influences on students' subject and university choices in China. This empirical study employed mixed research approaches, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, to examine students' choices of subjects and universities in a sample of secondary school students from the age…

  11. Across Borders and across Cultures: Vietnamese Students' Positioning of Teachers in a University Twinning Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha; Doyle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    How do teachers and teaching appear to international students moving from the home country component of a twinning programme to the overseas partner university? This narrative study explored the perspectives of five Vietnamese students in their first months of studying for a commerce degree at a New Zealand university, having completed the first…

  12. Knowledge transfer through university-industry relations: some aspects of organizational culture. Teadmussiire ülikoolide ja majanduspraktika suhete abil: mõned organisatsioonikultuurilised aspektid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaja Vadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of national universities and other higher education institutions in knowledge transfer in countries with post-Soviet economies has been studied in very modest extent, especially in the context of small countries. This paper concentrates on the organizational culture aspects playing important role in the commercialization of university research within the university knowledge transfer and knowledge based society framework in Estonia. Knowledge sharing and commercialization depend on nature of organizational culture, as a part of internal environment. Two largest Estonian universities (University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology are compared in various factors influencing knowledge transfer using document analysis and interviews. The present study has shown that knowledge transfer faces numerous issues, and in particular soft issues (individual mindsets and organizational values may differ from university to university

  13. Academic Globalization: Universality of Cross-Cultural And Cross-Disciplinary LMR Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper suggests that previous research underscoring cross-cultural differences may be misleading, when in fact it is cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences that should be emphasized. Employing the LMR framework, this paper concludes that business or non-business predisposition has a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than does nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons not involved in business typically employ less linear and more multi-active/hybrid modes of communication. The linkages among individual characteristics, communication styles, work behaviors, and the extent to which the LMR constructs can facilitate and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc. are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders.

  14. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Sergio; Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis-a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others' world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios.

  15. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A.; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis–a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others’ world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios. PMID:29298349

  16. Influencing Factors for Developing Managerial Behaviours That Encourage a Work-Family Culture in the University Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Álvarez-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article develops and tests a theoretical model to find out which factors influence the behaviour of supervisors in terms of promoting a work-family culture. This model explains to what extent the factors studied are relevant to encourage deans to promote this type of culture at Spanish universities. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression analysis. Data were obtained through a questionnaire to deans. The results yield five key factors: (1 the personal work-family conflict of managers; (2 the transformational leadership style of managers; (3 the identification with subordinates in need of work-family cares; (4 the perceived institutional support; and (5 the perceived support from other supervisors in the centre. The findings have practical implications for human resources management (HRM practices. Human resources management practices such as (a providing deans and other supervisors with training about the importance of work-family programs; (b promoting deans’ training in order to develop transformational leadership skills; or (c increasing institutional support can be useful when implementing a work-family culture in Spanish universities.

  17. A Study of the Inter-Cultural Sensitivity among the Faculty of English Language Centre of Jazan University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available study explored intercultural sensitivity of 103 faculty members of the English Language Centre (ELC of Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. A quantitative and non-experimental design was adopted for this study in which intercultural sensitivity of the English language teachers was evaluated on five demographic variables (e.g. gender, education, religion, total teaching experience, and experience of teaching in intercultural context. The results revealed that the international faculty of ELC abreast the basic canons of Intercultural adjustments. This suggests that the teachers are not only familiar with different cultural patterns (like beliefs, values and communication styles they are willing to minimize these differences and adopt universal set of values for effective educational practices. The results indicate the participants’ higher level of empathy, respect for others’ culture, tolerance on differences and high willingness to integrate with other cultures. The data reveals no statistically significant difference between the two groups in three variables, i.e. gender (Male & Female, qualification (Masters' & Ph.D and religion (Muslims & Non-Muslims. However, there was found a statistically significant difference in the two groups (Less than ten years & More than ten years in two variables, i.e. total teaching experience and teaching experience in intercultural context.

  18. Evaluating the effect of organization culture on the successful execution of strategies: Case study of Payam-e-Noor university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Monzavi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we use Hofstede method and Noble’s framework in strategy execution to evaluate the effect of organization culture on the successful implementation of strategies in a case study of Payam-e-Noor University of Iran. Data Collection is performed with the standard Hofstede survey, an evaluation tool for organization culture, and researchers’ survey tool to evaluate the effective implementation of strategies. The reliability coefficient was calculated as 0.846 using the Cronbach alpha. The target population includes 600 senior managers of Payam-e-Noor university of Iran at the time of data collection Cochran formula was used to calculate the required sample number of 120 individuals. The results show that according to the Hofstede dimensions, the dominant cultural aspects of high power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism, and femininity were identified. The first two have a direct influence on effectiveness of strategies. While individualism is known to have an invert effect on effectiveness of strategies, no connection was identified between masculinity and effectiveness of strategies, and thus, this theory was not confirmed in this research.

  19. Managing Expectations: A Case Study of Sessional Staff in Languages and Cultures Education in Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Brown

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In light of the increasing casualisation of the academic workforce in recent years, expectations of sessional staff in Australian universities from their academic employment are becoming more poignant. Following on from a previous report by Ferrari & Hajek (2012, this paper further highlights how these workers are affected by short-term, often only semester-long, contracts. We focus on how the brevity of employment affects sessional teachers’ perceptions of their role and perceived obligations to the university, and consequently the health of languages education. We present the results of an online survey conducted at the vast majority of Australian universities, which investigated sessional staff’s expectations. This study reveals that language sessional staff have expectations of their employment which are often at odds with their role as academics in the university environment.

  20. Manifestations of Differential Cultural Capital in a University Classroom: Views from Classroom Observations and Focus Group Discussions in a South African University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based predominantly on Pierre Bourdieu’s social and cultural reproduction theory, particularly his notions of cultural capital and symbolic violence, this paper explores how first year post graduate Diploma in Higher Education (PGDHE university students from diverse socio-linguistic backgrounds differ in the levels at which they understand and express themselves in classroom activities. The paper’s thesis is that the diverse nature of South African classrooms presents a number of challenges not only for students but also for educators in terms of the use of English as a medium of instruction or the language for learning and teaching (LOLT. Owing to the fact that the South African Language in Education Policy (LiEP of 1997 empowers both learners and educators in schools to use any of the eleven South African official languages as a LOLT wherever that is reasonably possible, students whose English backgrounds were deficient in enculturating them in the use of English as a learning tool often encounter challenges in expressing their ideas in the classroom, whether in writing or in oral presentations. The discussion is anchored in the data elicited through two data collection methods, lesson observations in a Diploma in Higher Education, Research class composed of students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and through focus group discussion sessions with 40 multi-ethnic Diploma in Higher Education students from the same classroom. The data management and analysis for this study was done thematically, with views emerging from the observations and focus group discussions being clustered into superordinate themes for convenience of the discussion of the findings. The findings of this study were that students from affluent socio-economic backgrounds who enter university with a rich and relevant English linguistic capital, values and attitudes enjoy an enormous advantage compared to their counterparts whose social class and linguistic

  1. Evaluating the Comparability of PPT and CBT by Implementing the Compulsory Islamic Culture Course Test in Jordan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelnaser Sanad Alakyleh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aims to determine whether the university students' scores in the compulsory Islamic culture course test on a selected sample differ across the paper-and pencil test (PPT & computer-based test (CBT versions, and to reveal the relationship between gender and the student's level of performance in the test. Therefore, the study evaluated the comparability of two versions of a compulsory Islamic culture course test (PPTs and (CBTs. The importance of conducting the study in Jordan stems from the fact that public and private universities have begun to move away from the traditional patterns of tests such (PPTs and went towards (CBTs. In addition to detecting which model gives the best in the output and has the characteristics of the psychometric test, furthermore, indicates whether there were any differences between males and females, the study sample consisted of 120 individuals, 67 females and 53 males from scientific, health and humanities colleges. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the two versions provided to students CBT and PPT with 0.36 moderate correlation indicators in the pre-CBT test, no significant differences between the males and females in the CBT test results. Therefore, on the basis of the results of the present study, the CBT test is an option and a preferred alternative for regular students of the bachelor's level at the University of Jordan.

  2. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  3. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Performance Management Practices: A Case of University in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul Mujeeb Ehtesham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to expand the base of knowledge and empirically test the relationship between the components of organizational culture and performance management practices. The study adopted the exploratory research approach to explore the impact. In this study, primary data was collected through questionnaires from 140 employees at the COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. The sample consists of both male and female faculty members. The regression and correlation statistical analysis were used. The results from the statistical analysis show that, involvement is highly correlated with consistency and adaptability. Similarly, the other dimensions of organizational culture have a positive significant relationship with the performance management practices.

  4. Medical Disease or Moral Defect? Stigma Attribution and Cultural Models of Addiction Causality in a University Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nicole L; Dressler, William W

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the knowledge individuals use to make judgments about persons with substance use disorder. First, we show that there is a cultural model of addiction causality that is both shared and contested. Second, we examine how individuals' understanding of that model is associated with stigma attribution. Research was conducted among undergraduate students at the University of Alabama. College students in the 18-25 age range are especially at risk for developing substance use disorder, and they are, perhaps more than any other population group, intensely targeted by drug education. The elicited cultural model includes different types of causes distributed across five distinct themes: Biological, Self-Medication, Familial, Social, and Hedonistic. Though there was cultural consensus among respondents overall, residual agreement analysis showed that the cultural model of addiction causality is a multicentric domain. Two centers of the model, the moral and the medical, were discovered. Differing adherence to these centers is associated with the level of stigma attributed towards individuals with substance use disorder. The results suggest that current approaches to substance use education could contribute to stigma attribution, which may or may not be inadvertent. The significance of these results for both theory and the treatment of addiction are discussed.

  5. Adaptation to a Sibling Culture: The Satisfaction and Persistence Intentions of Mainland Chinese Postgraduate Students at a Hong Kong University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zeng

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed and tested a model of the adaptation of postgraduate students to a “sibling culture”, namely, Mainland Chinese students at the University of Hong Kong. The model was based on higher education literature combined with acculturation elements for the construct of social integration. Students’ satisfaction with their experience in this cultural setting and the likelihood of their persistence were used as the indicators of their adaptation in a model linking various background variables such as academic and social integration to adaptation. The participants were 103 current research students. Analysis showed that academic integration was more strongly related than social integration to their satisfaction and likely persistence in post-graduate study at this university. Among the background variables measured, motivation and Cantonese but not English language skills showed a significant relationship with postgraduate students’ academic and social integration. Implications for research on and assistance to mainland postgraduate students in Hong Kong are discussed.

  6. Embedding the organizational culture profile into Schwartz’s theory of universals in values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Borg (Ingwer); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); K.A. Jehn (Karen); W. Bilsky (Wolfgang); S.H. Schwartz (Shalom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Person-organization fit (P-O fit) is often measured by the congruence of a person’s values and the values that he or she ascribes to the organization. A popular instrument used in this context is the Organizational Culture Profile (O’Reilly, Chatman, & Caldwell, 1991). The OCP

  7. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  8. Teaching Culture in Chinese University EFL Classrooms: Understanding Instructors' Perspectives and Pedagogical Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    Foreign language education scholars from the West have agreed for a long time on the importance of including culture in foreign language classroom (Byram & Morgan, 1994; Fantini, 1997; Hall, 2002; Hymes, 1997; Kramsch, 1993; Seelye, 1993) and countries in the East have taken up this work, often without locally produced research. This…

  9. Promoting Entrepreneurial Culture in the University: The Institutional Collaborative Model at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Isidro; Alfaro, Fernando; Rodriguez, Miriam; Valdes, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case of collaboration between different types of public services and the private sector for the promotion of an entrepreneurial culture. This collaboration is achieved by means of a centre established and developed by the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, the Centro de Iniciativas Emprendedoras (the Centre for Entrepreneurial…

  10. From universal to local: perspectives on cultural landscape heritage in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cocks, M.; Vetter, S.; Wiersum, K.F.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of cultural landscapes relates to the multifaceted links between
    people, place and identity. From a professional perspective, the concept
    refers to a category of designated conservation areas with specific biocultural
    heritage values. From a local perspective, it may refer to

  11. Felix Adler's Universal Moral Code: Drama Activities in the Ethical Culture School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Jinni

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how Felix Adler's Ethical Culture School, through its innovative practices, impacts public education and settlement work, and plays a significant role in shaping the methodologies, practices, and content of educational drama in the United States from the inception of the field. Describes the use of story dramatization/storytelling,…

  12. Program in the Culture of Biomedicine at the University of Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, D. Heyward

    1979-01-01

    An interdisciplinary program is described that provides a humanistically-oriented education for preprofessional students, particularly those in the health sciences. The program offers new and diverse courses for the humanities student and was instrumental in the establishment of a Center for Science and Culture. (Author/MLW)

  13. The Ideal Worker or the Ideal Father: Organizational Structures and Culture in the Gendered University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2012-01-01

    While literature has focused on the ways in which organizational structures exclude women from the workplace, this article suggests that the inverse is also true: organizational structures and culture prevent men from being involved in the home. Using theories of gendered organizations as a guide, this article draws on interviews with 70 faculty…

  14. Third Culture Kids: Transition and Persistence When Repatriating to Attend University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennison Smith, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This qualitative study used heuristic phenomenology and involved 20 interviews at 3 different sites, 2 focus groups, formal and informal observations, and the analysis of various artifacts including photos, drawings, and documents. Findings and Conclusions. Third culture kids are a diverse group of individuals who spent…

  15. University Campus and Collections Combining as A Cultural Landscape – Nudging and Critical Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Laila; Lanng, Maria; Sørensen, Annette Buhl

    ? Can we make students recognize and contemplate unseen boundaries, practices and identities, which university life is installing into them? Can we turn campuses into giant teaching tools, which will confront and nudge the students as they use the spaces? The paper will also discuss how to approach...... university students as an audience. They have specialist knowledge in specific topics. Should we treat them as a unique audience type and can we use the activity, dialogue and participation tools, which are seen as important for constructing new knowledge in museums? Can we use the bodily experience...

  16. Cross- cultural validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: study of the items and internal consistency Validação transcultural da versão para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: estudo dos itens e da consistência interna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Lima Osório

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to carry out the cross- cultural validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Social Phobia Inventory, an instrument for the evaluation of fear, avoidance and physiological symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder. METHOD: The process of translation and adaptation involved four bilingual professionals, appreciation and approval of the back- translation by the authors of the original scale, a pilot study with 30 Brazilian university students, and appreciation by raters who confirmed the face validity of the Portuguese version, which was named " Inventário de Fobia Social" . As part of the psychometric study of the Social Phobia Inventory, analysis of the items and evaluation of the internal consistency of the instrument were performed in a study conducted on 2314 university students. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that item 11, related to the fear of public speaking, was the most frequently scored item. The correlation of the items with the total score was quite adequate, ranging from 0.44 to 0.71, as was the internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory proved to be adequate regarding the psychometric properties initially studied, with qualities quite close to those of the original study. Studies that will evaluate the remaining indicators of validity of the Social Phobia Inventory in clinical and non-clinical samples are considered to be opportune and necessary.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar a validação transcultural para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory, um instrumento para avaliação e mensuração dos sintomas de medo, evitação e sintomas fisiológicos associados ao transtorno de ansiedade social. MÉTODO: O processo de tradução e adaptação envolveu quatro profissionais bilingües, apreciação e aprovação da back

  17. Aligning Practice to Policies: Changing the Culture to Recognize and Reward Teaching at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Michael; Schultz, Zachary D.; Feig, Andrew; Finkelstein, Noah; Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Hildreth, Michael; Leibovich, Adam K.; Martin, James D.; Moldwin, Mark B.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Smith, Tobin L.; Miller, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for improvement in undergraduate education within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines are hampered by the methods used to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Faculty members at research universities are commonly assessed and promoted mainly on the basis of research success. To improve the quality of…

  18. University ESL Teachers' Socialization in School Workplace toward Teaching Culturally Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Employing interpretive theory, this study investigated 331 university ESL teachers' socialization in language programs for international students. Looking beyond teacher preparatory education, in-service teachers' workplace experiences are essential to study because experience is instrumental in the shaping of belief systems (Wu and Shaffer,…

  19. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of

  20. Youth, bohemia and social movements: student cultures and struggles at the University of Coimbra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elísio Estanque

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This text takes up some of its author’s recent work on student youth in Coimbra. Centered around the Coimbra university environment and an academic tradition of over 700 years of history, its primary objective is to question some current tendencies among university students, through the acute gaze of a professor who has been involved in the student and daily life of the city for over 20 years. It attempts to identify subjectivities, participatory logics and attitudes of indifference/demarcation among different segments of the student population. More than a phenomenological register of daily life in academia, the text is meant to capture of the past and the ways in which they can (or cannot be appropriated by the current generation of students. On the other hand, the profound changes of recent decades, both in Portugal itself and within the Portuguese higher educational system, have reoriented behavior, expectations and forms of action of the current university population, encouraging its distancing with regard to this past and a ‘forgetting’ of the meaning of the social movements which during the 1960s contributed to undermining the Salazar and Caetano dictatorship. The reflections that are proposed here attempt to explain this phenomenon, while at the same time looking at this particular context as an expression of other more general phenomena that affect Portugal and the European democracies as a whole today. Keywords: youth, university, Coimbra, students, student movement, social movements, tradition, bohemia.

  1. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  2. The Aalborg University PO-PBL Model from a Socio-cultural Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carola Hernández; Ravn, Ole; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970’s, Aalborg University has been developing a new pedagogical model in higher education: The Project Oriented – Problem Based Learning (PO-PBL). In particular, the Faculty of Engineering and Science has developed a pedagogical proposal that introduces students to a different type...

  3. Isolated Learners: Young Mature-Age Students, University Culture, and Desire for Academic Sociality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The differentiated experiences of "young" mature-age students are under-researched and often unacknowledged in higher education literature and university policy. This article contends that, due to their age (early 20s to early 30s), many younger mature-age students feel "out of the loop" and "alienated" from…

  4. University Pedagogy: A New Culture Is Emerging in Greek Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedraka, Katerina; Rotidi, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight University Pedagogy as a field that focuses on academics' teaching role in Greek higher education. EU has recognized the need of improvement of the teaching skills of academics and urges the member states to recognize them as an important element of their professional profile. Only recently academics in Greece…

  5. From Living Space to Cultural Space: How a Modern University Academy System Is Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingqiang; Fang, Hualiang

    2018-01-01

    The reforms on the modern university academy system that preserve certain elements of China's ancient traditional academies have currently encountered a series of difficulties. The crux of the problem is that living and educational spaces were integrated in the traditional academy, while modern school education institution has separated the two.…

  6. (No) Harm in Asking: Class, Acquired Cultural Capital, and Academic Engagement at an Elite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony Abraham

    2016-01-01

    How do undergraduates engage authority figures in college? Existing explanations predict class-based engagement strategies. Using in-depth interviews with 89 undergraduates at an elite university, I show how undergraduates with disparate precollege experiences differ in their orientations toward and strategies for engaging authority figures in…

  7. The Centrality of Aboriginal Cultural Workshops and Experiential Learning in a Pre-Service Teacher Education Course: A Regional Victorian University Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weuffen, Sara L.; Cahir, Fred; Pickford, Aunty Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a cross-cultural pedagogical approach, couched in a theory-practice nexus, used at a Victorian regional university to guide non-Indigenous pre-service teachers' (PSTs) engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and cultures. We have drawn on qualitative and statistical data, and current issues in…

  8. Awe, the diminished self, and collective engagement: Universals and cultural variations in the small self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Maruskin, Laura A; Chen, Serena; Gordon, Amie M; Stellar, Jennifer E; McNeil, Galen D; Peng, Kaiping; Keltner, Dacher

    2017-08-01

    Awe has been theorized as a collective emotion, one that enables individuals to integrate into social collectives. In keeping with this theorizing, we propose that awe diminishes the sense of self and shifts attention away from individual interests and concerns. In testing this hypothesis across 6 studies (N = 2137), we first validate pictorial and verbal measures of the small self; we then document that daily, in vivo, and lab experiences of awe, but not other positive emotions, diminish the sense of the self. These findings were observed across collectivist and individualistic cultures, but also varied across cultures in magnitude and content. Evidence from the last 2 studies showed that the influence of awe upon the small self accounted for increases in collective engagement, fitting with claims that awe promotes integration into social groups. Discussion focused on how the small self might mediate the effects of awe on collective cognition and behavior, the need to study more negatively valenced varieties of awe, and other potential cultural variations of the small self. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. "The Fire Below": Towards a New Study of Literatures and Cultures (in English?)--A Letter from a Literary Scholar in a South African University in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis-Buthelezi, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    This letter was first read as a seminar paper in the Institute for the Humanities in Africa at the University of Cape Town in which I offer a series of provocations about what our current moment asks of us. It is concerned with the future of literary and cultural studies (in English) at that university and in South Africa in the wake of the…

  10. Gendered Communication in Iranian University Classrooms: The Relationship between Politeness and Silence in Persian Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shafiee Nahrkhalaji

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined naturally-occurring university classroominteractions at Iranian universities and provided an analysis ofsilence patterns as politeness strategies used by male andfemale students. Since empirical studies of silence inclassroom settings are scarce, this paper aimed to explainsuch phenomena using participant interviews, classroomobservation and detailed discourse analysis of classroominteraction. Silence patterns and their interpretations werescrutinized in these observations and were discussed inrelation to specific conceptualization of politeness anddevices employed to exercise it. The study found that femalesseem to be the most silent in the cross-sex classrooms, whilethe distribution of silence is more nearly equal in the same sexclassrooms. Based on the comments from follow-upinterviews, reasons for intentional silence as a politenessstrategy were categorized into four groups: silence as a face savingstrategy, silence as a ‘don’t do the FTA’ strategy,silence as a power strategy, and silence as an off-recordstrategy.

  11. Prosocial Spending and Well-Being: Cross-Cultural Evidence for a Psychological Universal

    OpenAIRE

    Lara B. Aknin; Christopher P. Barrington-Leigh; Elizabeth W. Dunn; John F. Helliwell; Robert Biswas-Diener; Imelda Kemeza; Paul Nyende; Claire E. Ashton-James; Michael I. Norton

    2010-01-01

    This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). Analyzing survey data from 136 countries, we show that prosocial spending is consistently associated with greater happiness. To test for causality, we conduct experiments within two very different countries (Canada and Uganda) and show that spending money on others has a consistent, ca...

  12. Between: Capital, Culture, and the Transformation of Hong Kong’s Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Kochhar-Lindgren

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The public universities in Hong Kong are preparing for a momentous educational reform in the Fall of 2012 that will create four- instead of three-year degrees and add a strong General Education component to the curriculum. In this essay, I examine the trajectory of this reform from the point of view of an "insider-outsider" Fulbright Scholar in General Education who, based at the University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong America Center (but working with colleagues across the system, consulted on the formation of interdisciplinary courses, interactive teaching, and administrative infrastructure for the launch of the reform. I examine the change in light of the flow of global capital, the development of the "whole person" familiar to us from the discourse of the Liberal Arts, and of the demands of multinationals based in Hong Kong for a differently trained globalized workforce. The Hong Kong experiment is, I argue, an illuminating site to examine in order for us to better understand the emergence of the global university.

  13. The university as an encounter for deliberative communication - creating cultural citizenship and professional responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Englund

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available How can higher and professional education contribute to the development of responsible citizenship and professional responsibility? In recent discussions on the role of the educational system, the idea of “deliberative communication” has been brought into focus and stands for communication in which different opinions and values can be set against each other in educational settings. It implies an endeavour by each individual to develop his or her view by listening, deliberating, seeking arguments and valuing, coupled to a collective and cooperative endeavour to find values and norms which everyone can accept, at the same time as pluralism is acknowledged. Within higher education deliberative communication might explicitly be used to develop professional responsibility and analysing consequences of different ways of solving problems. To what extent are and can universities become public spaces for encounters dealing with controversial questions of how to solve different problems and analyse different ways of professional acting? Can universities recreate their selective traditions, “institutionalize dissensus”, and “make the university a site of public debate” through deliberative communication?

  14. Consuming an edge: ADHD, stimulant use, and psy culture at the corporate university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Jack; McKinney, Kelly A

    2013-06-01

    We examine "psy" on the college campus. Psy refers to ways of knowing and acting on ourselves that shape everyday life psychologically. We suggest that there is an "elective affinity" between psy and the neoliberal management strategies that now dominate the "corporate university." We describe ways that psy organizes college life by drawing on the history of college health services; interviews about mental health and services at a university in Canada; and historical, social, and media accounts of student mental health and pharmaceutical drug use-both prescribed and not-on campus in the US and Canada. By the 1990s, for the first time, many students were arriving at college as already experienced consumers of psy with diagnoses and prescriptions. We approach this and the increased use of medication as an aspect of the psy-campus. We focus on stimulants, using ADHD to illustrate the blurring line between treatment and enhancement. Students who use stimulants-with or without prescription-do so in the same way: instrumentally in relation to academic demands. The blurred line between academic stress and psychiatric distress is further illustrated by "clinic notes," an institutionalized practice that enables all students to act on academic pressure as a matter of mental health. We describe the links between psy and institutional branding and marketing to illustrate the role of mental health and wellness services in the corporate university.

  15. Perceptions and practices of commensality and solo-eating among Korean and Japanese university students: A cross-cultural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wookyoun; Takeda, Wakako; Oh, Yujin; Aiba, Naomi; Lee, Youngmee

    2015-10-01

    Commensality, eating together with others, is a major representation of human sociality. In recent time, environments around commensality have changed significantly due to rapid social changes, and the decline of commensality is perceived as a serious concern in many modern societies. This study employs a cross-cultural analysis of university students in two East Asian countries, and examines cross-cultural variations of perceptions and actual practices of commensality and solo-eating. The analysis was drawn from a free-list survey and a self-administrative questionnaires of university students in urban Korea and Japan. The free-listing survey was conducted with a small cohort to explore common images and meanings of commensality and solo-eating. The self-administrative questionnaire was developed based on the result of the free-list survey, and conducted with a larger cohort to examine reasons and problems of practices and associated behaviors and food intake. We found that Korean subjects tended to show stronger associations between solo-eating and negative emotions while the Japanese subjects expressed mixed emotions towards the practice of solo-eating. In the questionnaire, more Korean students reported they prefer commensality and tend to eat more quantities when they eat commensally. In contrast, more Japanese reported that they do not have preference on commensality and there is no notable difference in food quantities when they eat commensally and alone. Compared to the general Korean cohort finding, more proportion of overweight and obese groups of Korean subjects reported that they tend to eat more when they are alone than normal and underweight groups. This difference was not found in the overweight Japanese subjects. Our study revealed cross-cultural variations of perceptions and practices of commensality and solo-eating in a non-western setting.

  16. Assessment of safety culture within the radiotherapy department of the Bordeaux University Hospital Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysalle, A.; Vendrely, V.; Sarrade, C.; Boutolleau, J.B.; Vitry, E.; Trouette, R.; Maire, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of the safety culture within a radiotherapy department has been performed by using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). It assesses the safety environment, the team cooperation quality, the satisfaction related to professional activity, the approval of management actions, the perception of the work environment quality and of logistic support, and the acknowledgment of the influence of stress on performance. The survey has been performed before and after the support intervention of a hospital audit and expertise mission in relationship with the National cancer Institute (Inca). The comparison of results before and after this support intervention shows a general score improvement for the SAQ. Short communication

  17. Partnering International Universities to Enhance Climate Literacy through Interdisciplinary, Cross-Cultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, L. A.; Polk, J.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    The climate change phenomenon will present complex, far-reaching challenges and opportunities, which will require leaders well-versed in interdisciplinary learning and international understanding. In an effort to develop the next generation of future leaders prepared for these challenges and opportunities, faculty from Western Kentucky University (WKU) and the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland partnered to co-teach a course in climate change science and communication in Iceland. Students from both Institutions participated in the course to further enhance the cross-learning opportunity presented to the students. The 11-day course stationed out of three cities in Iceland, including Reykjavík, Vik, and Akureyri, the Icelandic gateway to the Arctic. In addition to undertaking field experiences such as hiking on glaciers, exploring ice caves, and touring geothermal plants, the group also hosted forums to discuss climate change with members of the Icelandic community, and completed The $100 Solution™ service-learning projects. A culminating point of the study abroad experience was a presentation by the students to persons from the University of Akureyri and representatives from the neighboring Icelandic communities about what they had learned about climate change science and communication during their travels. Through this experience, students were able to share their knowledge, which in turn gave them a deeper understanding of the issues they were learning throughout the study abroad program. In short, the program combined interdisciplinary learning, service-learning, and international understanding toward the goal of preparing the leaders of tomorrow with the skills to address climate change challenges.

  18. Undergraduate courses in nuclear engineering in Italian universities: Cultural and practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrini, B.; Lombardi, C.; Naviglio, A.; Oliveri, E.; Panella, B.; Sobrero, E.

    1992-01-01

    The contents of the undergraduate courses given in Italian nuclear engineering faculties are analyzed, showing the validity of this professional profile also with reference to non-nuclear applications including relevant safety issues and the management of complex projects. The role of Italian universities is stressed, in the defense of knowledge and capability in the nuclear sector, also with reference to the years of the nuclear 'moratoria' decided at the political level after public consultation. The prospects of Italian nuclear engineers are examined, with reference to the European labour market

  19. Development and validation of 26-item dysfunctional attitude scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Samouei, Rahele; Mousavii, Sayyed Ghafour; Bornamanesh, Ali Reza

    2013-06-01

    Dysfunctional Attitude Scale is one of the most common instruments used to assess cognitive vulnerability. This study aimed to develop and validate a short form of Dysfunctional Attitude Scale appropriate for an Iranian clinical population. Participants were 160 psychiatric patients from medical centers affiliated with Isfahan Medical University, as well as 160 non-patients. Research instruments were clinical interviews based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV-TR, Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and General Heath Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Data was analyzed using multicorrelation calculations and factor analysis. Based on the results of factor analysis and item-total correlation, 14 items were judged candidates for omission. Analysis of the 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Evidence for the concurrent criterion validity was obtained through calculating the correlation between the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and psychiatric diagnosis (r = 0.55), GHQ -28 (r = 0.56) and somatization, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression subscales (0.45,0.53,0.48, and 0.57, respectively). Factor analysis deemed a four-factor structure the best. The factors were labeled as success-perfectionism, need for approval, need for satisfying others, and vulnerability-performance evaluation. The results showed that the Iranian version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) bears satisfactory psychometric properties suggesting that this cognitive instrument is appropriate for use in an Iranian cultural context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Evolution of a Test Item

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaan, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This article follows the development of test items (see "Language Assessment Quarterly", Volume 3 Issue 1, pp. 71-79 for the article "Test and Item Specifications Development"), beginning with a review of test and item specifications, then proceeding to writing and editing of items, pretesting and analysis, and finally selection of an item for a…

  1. Development of L. Kohlberg's idea of moral formation of cross-cultural universality of judgments in modern research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Baykovskaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the ideas of foreign researchers (J. Gibbs, K. Basinger, J. Flavel, J. Snarey, who reconsider L. Kohlberg's statements on cognitive development, which forms the basis of moral judgments formation, recognizable usually across cultures. We show the intersection points for various contemporary approaches. We describe the results of empirical studies of moral judgments development in children of primary school age. The sample consisted of Moscow secondary schools students and students of National Jewish Education Center (total 367 people: 198 girls and 169 boys aged 8 to 10 years. We used method of presentation of moral dilemma situations. The study results confirm the relevance of L. Kohlberg main statements on the content of pre-conventional level of moral reasoning in children, on the laws of transition to conventional level. They also demonstrate the features of interpretation of crosscultural universality, discussed by modern foreign authors.

  2. Cultural Transfer and Creating Cultural Awareness in Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language: A Sample from Gaziosmanpasa University Tömer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscan, Adem; Karagöz, Beytullah; Konyar, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Culture and language are two phenomena that have existed by influencing each other for centuries. It is impossible to think independently of the culture on which the language is cultivated, nor on the language, which influences culture. One of the best signs of mastering a language is the ability to understand the cultural elements and the…

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation of the "Australian National University Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" for the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Marcus Kiiti; Jacinto, Alessandro Ferrari; Citero, Vanessa de Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a major public health problem and it is therefore crucial that modifiable risk factors be known prior to onset of dementia in late-life. The "Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" (ANU-ADRI) is one of the potential tools for primary prevention of the disease. The aim of this study was to devise an adapted version of the ANU-ADRI for use in Brazil. The instrument was translated from its original language of English into Portuguese and then back-translated into English by bilingual translators. It was subsequently reviewed and evaluated as to the degree of translation issues and equivalence. In this study, the ANU-ADRI was applied using individual (face-to-face) interviews in a public hospital, unlike the original version which is applied online by self-report. The final version (pretest) was evaluated in a sample of 10 participants with a mean age of 60 years (±11.46) and mean education of 11 years (±6.32). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (inter-rater) was 0.954 (P<0.001 for a confidence interval (CI) of 95%=[0.932; 0.969]). Cultural equivalence was performed without the need for a second instrument application step. After cross-cultural adaptation, the language of the resultant questionnaire was deemed easily understandable by the Brazilian population.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation of the "Australian National University Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" for the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kiiti Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD represents a major public health problem and it is therefore crucial that modifiable risk factors be known prior to onset of dementia in late-life. The "Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" (ANU-ADRI is one of the potential tools for primary prevention of the disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to devise an adapted version of the ANU-ADRI for use in Brazil. Methods: The instrument was translated from its original language of English into Portuguese and then back-translated into English by bilingual translators. It was subsequently reviewed and evaluated as to the degree of translation issues and equivalence. In this study, the ANU-ADRI was applied using individual (face-to-face interviews in a public hospital, unlike the original version which is applied online by self-report. The final version (pretest was evaluated in a sample of 10 participants with a mean age of 60 years (±11.46 and mean education of 11 years (±6.32. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC (inter-rater was 0.954 (P<0.001 for a confidence interval (CI of 95%=[0.932; 0.969]. Cultural equivalence was performed without the need for a second instrument application step. Conclusion: After cross-cultural adaptation, the language of the resultant questionnaire was deemed easily understandable by the Brazilian population.

  5. Cross-cultural and socio-demographic correlates of homophobic attitude among university students in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, G; Niolu, C; Déttore, D; Antonelli, P; Conte, S; Tuziak, B; Limoncin, E; Mollaioli, D; Carosa, E; Gravina, G L; Di Sante, S; Di Lorenzo, G; Fisher, A D; Maggi, M; Lenzi, A; Siracusano, A; Jannini, E A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate homophobic attitudes in three European countries: Italy, Albania, and Ukraine. One thousand and forty-eight students were recruited in Italian (n = 766), Albanian (n = 180), and Ukrainian (n = 102) university centers. A socio-demographic questionnaire and Homophobia Scale (HS) were administered by our staff. Cross-cultural and significant differences among Italian, Albanian, and Ukrainian students were found on the Homophobia Scale (HS; Italy: mean = 22.26 ± 16.73; Albania: mean = 38.15 ± 17.28; Ukraine: mean = 59.18 ± 16.23). The analysis of socio-demographic characteristics revealed that the male gender emerged as main predictor of homophobic attitude in all the three countries, although also a conservative political orientation and the religious belief predict higher homophobia levels in Italy and Albania, particularly. This study revealed that in these European countries assessed, attitudes toward homosexuality are different. Ukrainians display higher levels of homophobia than Albanians and Italians, confirming the central role of cultural differences in homophobic attitudes. Nevertheless, some socio-demographic aspects such as identification as male have a similar influence on homophobic attitudes in all assessed populations.

  6. Cultural universality and specificity of student engagement in school: The results of an international study from 12 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong; Jimerson, Shane; Shin, Hyeonsook; Cefai, Carmel; Veiga, Feliciano H; Hatzichristou, Chryse; Polychroni, Fotini; Kikas, Eve; Wong, Bernard P H; Stanculescu, Elena; Basnett, Julie; Duck, Robert; Farrell, Peter; Liu, Yi; Negovan, Valeria; Nelson, Brett; Yang, Hongfei; Zollneritsch, Josef

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the contextual factors that are linked to student engagement requires research that includes cross-cultural perspectives. This study investigated how student engagement in school is associated with grade, gender, and contextual factors across 12 countries. It also investigated whether these associations vary across countries with different levels of individualism and socio-economic development. The participants were 3,420 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students from Austria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Malta, Portugal, Romania, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The participants completed a questionnaire to report their engagement in school, the instructional practices they experienced, and the support they received from teachers, peers, and parents. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to examine the effects at both student and country levels. The results across countries revealed a decline in student engagement from Grade 7 to Grade 9, with girls reporting higher engagement than boys. These trends did not vary across the 12 countries according to the Human Development Index and Hofstede's Individualism Index. Most of the contextual factors (instructional practices, teacher support, and parent support) were positively associated with student engagement. With the exception that parent support had a stronger association with student engagement in countries with higher collectivism, most of the associations between the contextual factors and student engagement did not vary across countries. The results indicate both cultural universality and specificity regarding contextual factors associated with student engagement in school. They illustrate the advantages of integrating etic and emic approaches in cross-cultural investigations. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  7. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  8. Increasing student diversity and cultural competence as part of Loma Linda University School of Dentistry's service mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Margie R; Forde, Ron

    2012-06-01

    For many years, studies have identified a need for greater racial and ethnic diversity among dental professionals. However, the ability of the field to collectively address the problem has been hindered by the low numbers of underrepresented minority students who apply to dental school. Over the past two decades, college attendance rates have increased and U.S. dental school applications have tripled, but the number of underrepresented minority dental applicants has remained about the same. With the increasing diversity of the U.S. population and specifically that of the state of California, the dental workforce would be enhanced by the presence of more underrepresented minority dentists. Additionally, curricular changes should be implemented to better prepare dental students to meet the oral health care needs of diverse populations. There is general agreement that these workforce and curricular changes would enhance access to care for underserved populations. For seven years, Loma Linda University School of Dentistry participated in the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program. The first phase of this national program addressed deficiencies in diversity in dentistry and in access to oral health care. In the second phase, Loma Linda University continued to collaborate with other California dental schools on specific state initiatives. This article provides an overview of the school's efforts to enroll a more diverse student body, enhance all its students' cultural competence, and expand care to underserved populations.

  9. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  10. Spare Items validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Carratala, L.

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing difficulty for purchasing safety related spare items, with certifications by manufacturers for maintaining the original qualifications of the equipment of destination. The main reasons are, on the top of the logical evolution of technology, applied to the new manufactured components, the quitting of nuclear specific production lines and the evolution of manufacturers quality systems, originally based on nuclear codes and standards, to conventional industry standards. To face this problem, for many years different Dedication processes have been implemented to verify whether a commercial grade element is acceptable to be used in safety related applications. In the same way, due to our particular position regarding the spare part supplies, mainly from markets others than the american, C.N. Trillo has developed a methodology called Spare Items Validation. This methodology, which is originally based on dedication processes, is not a single process but a group of coordinated processes involving engineering, quality and management activities. These are to be performed on the spare item itself, its design control, its fabrication and its supply for allowing its use in destinations with specific requirements. The scope of application is not only focussed on safety related items, but also to complex design, high cost or plant reliability related components. The implementation in C.N. Trillo has been mainly curried out by merging, modifying and making the most of processes and activities which were already being performed in the company. (Author)

  11. Selecting Lower Priced Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Harold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program used to teach moderately to severely mentally handicapped students to select the lower priced items in actual shopping activities is described. Through a five-phase process, students are taught to compare prices themselves as well as take into consideration variations in the sizes of containers and varying product weights. (VW)

  12. In-Process Items on LCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Thyra K.

    Morris Library at Southern Illinois University computerized its technical processes using the Library Computer System (LCS), which was implemented in the library to streamline order processing by: (1) providing up-to-date online files to track in-process items; (2) encouraging quick, efficient accessing of information; (3) reducing manual files;…

  13. Terminal values and meaning in life among university students with varied levels of altruism in the present period of socio-cultural change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Głaz Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The author of this paper, interested in the issues of values preference, meaning in life and altruism among university students has attempted to show a relation between them in the present period of clearly noticeable socio-cultural change. The study was conducted in 2009-2010 in Kraków among university students. The age of the respondents ranged from 21 to 25. 200 sets of correctly completed questionnaires were used for the results analysis.

  14. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  15. Item information and discrimination functions for trinary PCM items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, Wies; Muraki, Eiji

    1997-01-01

    For trinary partial credit items the shape of the item information and the item discrimination function is examined in relation to the item parameters. In particular, it is shown that these functions are unimodal if δ2 – δ1 < 4 ln 2 and bimodal otherwise. The locations and values of the maxima are

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the Arabic version of the reduced Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Alsanawi, Hisham Abdulaziz

    2016-01-01

    We adapted the reduced Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index for the Arabic language and tested its metric properties in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and twenty-one consecutive patients who were referred for physiotherapy to the outpatient department were asked to answer the Arabic version of the reduced WOMAC index (ArWOMAC). After the completion of the ArWOMAC, the intensity of knee pain and general health status were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), respectively. A second assessment was performed at least 48 h after the first session to assess test-retest reliability. The test-retest reliability was quantified using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and Cronbach's alpha was calculated to assess the internal consistency of the Arabic questionnaire. The construct validity was assessed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The total ArWOMAC scale and pain and function subscales were internally consistent with Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.91, 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Test-retest reliability was good to excellent with ICC of 0.91, 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. SF-12 and VAS score significantly correlated with ArWOMAC index (p < 0.01), which support the construct validity. The standard error of measurement (SEM) of the total scale was 2.94, based on repeated measurements for test-retest. The minimum detectable change based on the SEM for test-retest was 8.15. The ArWOMAC index is a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating the severity of knee OA, with metric properties in agreement with the original version. Although, the reduced WOMAC index has been clinically utilized within the Saudi population, the Arabic version of this instrument is not validated for an Arab population to measure lower limb functional disability caused by OA. The Arabic version of reduced WOMAC (ArWOMAC) index is a reliable and valid scale

  17. Item Banking with Embedded Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Robert G.; Stanley, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An item banking method that does not use Item Response Theory (IRT) is described. This method provides a comparable grading system across schools that would be suitable for low-stakes testing. It uses the Angoff standard-setting method to obtain item ratings that are stored with each item. An example of such a grading system is given, showing how…

  18. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate, preparation of the package and related paperwork). Large and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  19. Crafts and Craft Education as Expressions of Cultural Heritage: Individual Experiences and Collective Values among an International Group of Women University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores relationships between crafts, craft education and cultural heritage as reflected in the individual experiences and collective values of fifteen female university students of different nationalities. The students (all trainee teachers) were following a course in crafts and craft education as part of an International Study…

  20. A Multi-Case Study of University Students' Language-Learning Experience Mediated by Mobile Technologies: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging mobile technologies can be considered a new form of social and cultural artefact that mediates people's language learning. This multi-case study investigates how mobile technologies mediate a group of Hong Kong university students' L2 learning, which serves as a lens with which to capture the personalised, unique, contextual and…

  1. Cultural Diversity and Best Practices in the Teaching and Learning of Statistics: A Faculty Perspective from A Historically Black College/University (HBCU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    The literature on the teaching and learning of statistics tend not to address issues of cultural diversity. Twenty-nine students enrolled in a statistics course at a historically Black college/university (HBCU) were the focus of this pilot study. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), the study tested models of the effects of writing…

  2. Motivational and Cultural Correlates of Second Language Acquisition: An Investigation of International Students in the Universities of the People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Baohua; Watkins, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationships among motivational factors, cultural correlates and second language proficiency. The participants, from both Western and Asian backgrounds, were learning Chinese at university level in the People's Republic of China. 115 students (35 Western students and 80 Asian students) ranging from beginning to…

  3. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  4. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jamili

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, commitment of healthcare authorities to patient safety culture is the most important factor in the promotion of organizational patient safety. Considering that the lowest score of patient safety culture belonged to the dimension of “overall perceptions of patient safety”,it is recommended that related training interventions be implemented for healthcare staff in order to establish and promote the patient safety culture in pharmacies.

  5. A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    P. Vandermeersch, A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture? In: F. VAN DE VIJVER & G. HUTSCHEMAEKERS (ed.), The Investigation of Culture. Current Issues in Cultural Psychology, Tilburg, Tilburg University Press, 1990, 43-58.

  6. Caring for a Bedouin Female Patient with Breast Cancer: An Application of Leininger’s Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qadir J. Nashwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leininger’s theory is to provide care measures that are in harmony with an individual or group’s cultural beliefs, practices, and values. In the 1960’s she coined the term culturally congruent care, which is the primary goal of Transcultural nursing practice. Recently, there is a noticeable increase in the usage of the advanced hospitals’ health services by the Bedouin; as their awareness developed in term of health issues, and this put the health care providers (especially nurses in a great chance to face this Bedouin’s culture in clinical areas. So we have to enrich our understanding of the Bedouin’s culture to deliver a culturally congruent and satisfying care. A personal experience of two oncology nurses in working with a female patient with breast cancer and her Bedouin family described, with application of Madeleine Leininger’s theory of culture care diversity and universality. Concluding that understanding, considering and valuing cultural differences when delivering nursing care are vital to ensure providing a culturally congruent nursing care as well as avoid conflicts.

  7. Caring for a Bedouin Female Patient with Breast Cancer: An Application of Leininger’s Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qadir J. Nashwan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leininger’s theory is to provide care measures that are in harmony with an individual or group’s cultural beliefs, practices, and values. In the 1960’s she coined the term culturally congruent care, which is the primary goal of Transcultural nursing practice. Recently, there is a noticeable increase in the usage of the advanced hospitals’ health services by the Bedouin; as their awareness developed in term of health issues, and this put the health care providers (especially nurses in a great chance to face this Bedouin’s culture in clinical areas. So we have to enrich our understanding of the Bedouin’s culture to deliver a culturally congruent and satisfying care. A personal experience of two oncology nurses in working with a female patient with breast cancer and her Bedouin family described, with application of Madeleine Leininger’s theory of culture care diversity and universality. Concluding that understanding, considering and valuing cultural differences when delivering nursing care are vital to ensure providing a culturally congruent nursing care as well as avoid conflicts.

  8. EFL Teachers’ Perceptions of The Place of Culture in ELT: A Survey Study at Four Universities in Ankara/Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan ÖNALAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate Turkish teachers’ opinions and beliefs on the place of target cultural information in English language teaching, as well as their related practices andapplications in EFL classrooms in Turkish higher education context. Particularly, it tries toexplore three research questions: (a How do Turkish teachers of English define culture? (bWhat are the EFL teachers’ attitudes towards incorporating cultural information into theirteaching? and (c What role do they allocate to the culture of the target language in theirclassrooms? The study shows that teachers mostly define culture in the sociological sense, suchas values and beliefs. Their definition of culture in the framework of ELT slightly shifts towardsmore visible culture, such as food and clothing. The study also reveals teachers’ positive attitudestowards incorporating cultural information in their instruction.

  9. Basic Color Terms (BCTs) and Categories (BCCs) in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Julio; González-Perilli, Fernando; Prado-León, Lilia; Melnikova, Anna; Álvaro, Leticia; Collado, José A.; Moreira, Humberto

    2018-01-01

    color in the flags and the arrival of an important number of Italian immigrants). Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants. PMID:29867702

  10. Basic Color Terms (BCTs and Categories (BCCs in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Lillo

    2018-05-01

    use of the color in the flags and the arrival of an important number of Italian immigrants. Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants.

  11. Basic Color Terms (BCTs) and Categories (BCCs) in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Julio; González-Perilli, Fernando; Prado-León, Lilia; Melnikova, Anna; Álvaro, Leticia; Collado, José A; Moreira, Humberto

    2018-01-01

    ). Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants.

  12. Item Construction and Psychometric Models Appropriate for Constructed Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    which involve only one attribute per item. This is especially true when we are dealing with constructed-response items, we have to measure much more...Service University of Ilinois Educacional Testing Service Rosedal Road Capign. IL 61801 Princeton. K3 08541 Princeton. N3 08541 Dr. Charles LeiS Dr

  13. Lift Every Voice and Sing: Constructing Community through Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the University of Illinois Black Chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Sheelagh

    2011-01-01

    For Gloria Ladson-Billings, culturally relevant pedagogy is characterized by three criteria: academic success, cultural competence and critical consciousness. Those engaged in culturally relevant pedagogy are connected by how they see themselves as teachers and how they see their students, how they view knowledge and how they structure social…

  14. Gender-Based Differential Item Performance in Mathematics Achievement Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Allen E.; Cleary, T. Anne

    1987-01-01

    Eight randomly equivalent samples of high school seniors were each given a unique form of the ACT Assessment Mathematics Usage Test (ACTM). Signed measures of differential item performance (DIP) were obtained for each item in the eight ACTM forms. DIP estimates were analyzed and a significant item category effect was found. (Author/LMO)

  15. The Universal Constitutionalism in an Age of Religious Diversity. Western Secularism Tested by “New” Cultural Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Alicino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An abridged version of this article (reported by Prof. Nicola Colaianni, University of Bari “Aldo Moro” was presented at the Seminar on “Secularism and Liberal Constitutionalism”, held at the University of LUISS “Guido Carli” (Rome on 6th July 2010.This article is due to be published in the International Review of Sociology, in 2011. SUMMARY: 1. Introduction – 2. Relation-Collaboration between the State and Churches in Constitutional Democracies – 3. The laicité à la française Tested by a Deprivatised Religious Process – 3.1. The French Rigid Secularism. Freedom (of Religion through the State – 4. Canada’s Open Secularism. The  question of Religious-Based Family Law Disputes – 4.1 Reasonable Accommodation and “New” Religious Nomoi Groups – 5. Collaboration-Relation between the State and Churches in Italy – 5.1. The Italian Secularism Tested by the New “Religious Geography” – 6. Conclusion. Abstract Under the pressing process of immigration and globalisation many Western constitutional democracies have moved from a number of religions, sharing a common culture, to today's age of diversity. As opposed to the past, the current democracies are facing the lack of overlapping consensus over the basic constitutional laws: namely, the meaning and the scope of freedom of religion, secularism, the separation Church-State, equal treatment and the rule of law. This is because individuals often come to adopt their basic values by very different ways. The nature, scope and force of such values are likely to be affected by competing and, sometimes, contested fundamental values and worldviews. From here stems the pressing tension – or dilemma – between “unity” and “diversity”. This essay starts with general considerations about the freedom of religion principle, strictly related with the “separation” as well as “collaboration” between secular States and Churches; then the author analyses three case

  16. Item-focussed Trees for the Identification of Items in Differential Item Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutz, Gerhard; Berger, Moritz

    2016-09-01

    A novel method for the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) by means of recursive partitioning techniques is proposed. We assume an extension of the Rasch model that allows for DIF being induced by an arbitrary number of covariates for each item. Recursive partitioning on the item level results in one tree for each item and leads to simultaneous selection of items and variables that induce DIF. For each item, it is possible to detect groups of subjects with different item difficulties, defined by combinations of characteristics that are not pre-specified. The way a DIF item is determined by covariates is visualized in a small tree and therefore easily accessible. An algorithm is proposed that is based on permutation tests. Various simulation studies, including the comparison with traditional approaches to identify items with DIF, show the applicability and the competitive performance of the method. Two applications illustrate the usefulness and the advantages of the new method.

  17. Community transformation through culturally competent nursing leadership: application of theory of culture care diversity and universality and tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mina L; Miller, June; White, Kathleen

    2006-04-01

    Transcultural knowledge and competency have become a critical need for nurses to accommodate the global trends in cultural diversity and health care disparities. Today, nurses are increasingly taking on leadership roles in community settings. This article addresses the application of Leininger's culture care theory with the sunrise model and Hersey and Blanchard's tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model as potential collaborating theories for capacity building and community transformation from a global, transcultural nursing perspective. The two theories, used in collaboration, view the provision of competent leadership as the delivery of effective, culturally congruent nursing care in promoting health and health equity at the community level.

  18. Reviewing gender and cultural factors associated with HIV/AIDS among university students in the South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Staden

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is in the midst of a catastrophic AIDS epidemic. HIV prevalence statistics in most countries indicate that up to 60% of all new infections occur among 15 to 24 year olds, whilst this group also boasts the highest incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs. Statistical findings among South African students predict a 10% increase in the HIV infection rate, highlighting the inability of universities to cope with societies’ demands for academically trained workers which, in the near future, will have a detrimental effect on the economy of South Africa. From the literature it is evident that HIV/AIDS is more than a health issue, it is an inter-sectoral challenge to any society. This paper explored the interplay of gender and cultural factors on South African students’ sexual behaviour by inter alia discussing the following factors that might put students at risk for HIV infection: male dominance vs. female submissiveness; age of first sexual encounter; gender-based violence; contraception; circumcision; financial status; myths and ‘othering’; demonstrating the need for effective strategies, policies and programmes to protect young people, especially females from sexual abuse/rape and its consequences, including HIV. The literature review revealed that South African students, despite adequate HIV/AIDS knowledge, demonstrated high rates of sexual practices that place them at risk for HIV infection, i.e. unprotected sex, multiple partners and ‘sugar-daddy practices’. The paper concludes with a discussion on recommendations for future HIV prevention/ intervention programmes, highlighting the fact that it acquires an inclusive approach. Such interventions should move beyond the individual level to be effective and target gender-based inequalities, human rights violations, including sexual violence and rape, as well as stigma and poverty reduction, both at community and tertiary educational level.

  19. Putting Business at the Heart of Higher Education: On Neoliberal Interventionism and Audit Culture in UK Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cruickshank

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neoliberalism is a form of interventionism that seeks to pursue elite – corporate – interests. This means constructing a market rationality and constructing markets to better meet what the state takes to be elite interests. In the first phase of neoliberal interventionism in English higher education maintenance grants were replaced with loans, the National Student Survey was introduced to measure ‘satisfaction’, and the inadvertent creation of a £9000 fee-norm all helped to construct a market rationality in students. The second phase, which concerns the proposed reconstruction of the higher education market, started in November 2015 with the publication of the ‘Fulfilling our Potential’ Green Paper. This proposes to make it less bureaucratically cumbersome for ‘for-profits’ to enter the market. In terms of audit culture, a Teaching Excellence Framework is proposed, which would include representatives from employers and professional groups, along with academic experts on teaching, and students, on the assessment panels. Further, universities need to be ‘open to involving employers and learned societies representing professions in curriculum design [and developing] a positive work ethic, so [graduates] can contribute more effectively to our efforts to boost the productivity of UK economy’ (BIS, 2015(a: 11. The Green Paper also holds that ‘at least 20% of graduates are not working in high skilled employment three and a half years after graduation and most employers of STEM graduates are concerned about shortages of high quality applicants’ (BIS 2015(a: 10–11. This contributes to prior messages from the Conservatives that non-STEM subjects are less useful for employment.

  20. Item validity vs. item discrimination index: a redundancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjaitan, R. L.; Irawati, R.; Sujana, A.; Hanifah, N.; Djuanda, D.

    2018-03-01

    In several literatures about evaluation and test analysis, it is common to find that there are calculations of item validity as well as item discrimination index (D) with different formula for each. Meanwhile, other resources said that item discrimination index could be obtained by calculating the correlation between the testee’s score in a particular item and the testee’s score on the overall test, which is actually the same concept as item validity. Some research reports, especially undergraduate theses tend to include both item validity and item discrimination index in the instrument analysis. It seems that these concepts might overlap for both reflect the test quality on measuring the examinees’ ability. In this paper, examples of some results of data processing on item validity and item discrimination index were compared. It would be discussed whether item validity and item discrimination index can be represented by one of them only or it should be better to present both calculations for simple test analysis, especially in undergraduate theses where test analyses were included.

  1. NATIONAL CULTURE AND ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENT: CASE STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TÉBESSA (ALGERIA AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CRAIOVA (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufyane BADRAOUI

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to understand and investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial intent and national culture in a post-socialist context. Currently, in Post-Socialist societies that have experienced a wave of economic reforms and a process of transition to the liberal economy, such as Algeria and Romania. The importance of entrepreneurship is in their vitality in the dynamics of development, and that is the significance of testing and understanding the entrepreneurial intentions of the students in connection with the local and/or national culture in Algeria and Romania.

  2. Cultural Intelligence and Social Adaptability: A Comparison between Iranian and Non-Iranian Dormitory Students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Batoul; Keyvanara, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    At the modern age, to acquire knowledge and experience, the individuals with their own specific culture have to enter contexts with cultural diversity, adapt to different cultures and have social interactions to be able to have effective inter-cultural relationships.To have such intercultural associations and satisfy individual needs in the society, cultural intelligence and social adaptability are deemed as inevitable requirements, in particular for those who enter a quite different culture. Hence, the present study tries to compare the cultural intelligence and its aspects and social adaptability in Iranian and non-Iranian dormitory students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2012. The study was of descriptiveanalytical nature. The research population consisted of Iranian and non-Iranian students resided in the dormitories of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences which are 2500, totally. For Iranian students, two-stage sampling method was adopted. At the first stage, classified sampling and at the second stage, systematic random sampling was conducted. In this way, 441 students were selected. To form non-Iranian students' sample, consensus sampling method was applied and a sample of 37 students were obtained. The research data was collected by using Earley & Ang's Cultural Intelligence Questionnaire with the Cronbach's coefficient α of 76% and California Social Adaptability Standard Questionnaire with the Cronbach's coefficient α of over 70%. Then, the data were put into SPSS software to be analyzed. Finally, the results were presented by descriptive and inferential statistics methods. The study findings revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between cultural intelligence and cognitive aspect of cultural intelligence in Iranian and non-Iranian students (P≥0/05). However, Iranian and non-Iranian students statistically differed in terms of the following aspects of cultural intelligence: meta-cognitive aspect (61.8% for

  3. Patterns and universals of adult romantic attachment across 62 cultural regions : are models of self and of other pancultural constructs?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, David P.; Diniz, Glaucia; Alcalay, Lidia; Durkin, Kevin; Allensworth, Melissa; Echegaray, Marcela; Allik, Juri; Eremsoy, Ekin; Ault, Lara; Euler, Harald A.; Austers, Ivars; Falzon, Ruth; Bennett, Kevin L.; Fisher, Maryanne L.; Bianchi, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    As part of the International Sexuality Description Project, a total of 17,804 participants from 62 cultural regions completed the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ), a self-report measure of adult romantic attachment. Correlational analyses within each culture suggested that the Model of Self and the Model of Other scales of the RQ were psychometrically valid within most cultures. Contrary to expectations, the Model of Self and Model of Other dimensions of the RQ did not underlie the four-cat...

  4. Cross-Cultural and Intra-Cultural Differences in Finger-Counting Habits and Number Magnitude Processing: Embodied Numerosity in Canadian and Chinese University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Richard Morrissey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent work in numerical cognition has shown-that number magnitude is not entirely abstract, and at least partly rooted in embodied and situated experiences, including finger-counting. The current study extends previous cross-cultural research to address within-culture individual differences in finger counting habits. Results indicated that Canadian participants demonstrated an additional cognitive load when comparing numbers that require more than one hand to represent, and this pattern of performance is further modulated by whether they typically start counting on their left hand or their right hand. Chinese students typically count on only one hand and so show no such effect, except for an increase in errors, similar to that seen in Canadians, for those whom self-identify as predominantly two-hand counters. Results suggest that the impact of finger counting habits extend beyond cultural experience and concord in predictable ways with differences in number magnitude processing for specific number-digits. We conclude that symbolic number magnitude processing is partially rooted in learned finger-counting habits, consistent with a motor simulation account of embodied numeracy and that argument is supported by both cross-cultural and within-culture differences in finger-counting habits.

  5. Teaching a Growing a Population of Non-Native English-Speaking Students in American Universities: Cultural and Linguistic Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cristina Fava

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of non-native English speaking students in American universities, mostly from Asian countries, presents unprecedented challenges and calls for an in-depth study on how we teach western art music history. This essay challenges some aspects of liberal multiculturalism and proposes the creation of channels of communication that allow non-native English speaking students to understand the premises of a Eurocentric system of knowledge without undermining their own cultural ba...

  6. Teaching a Growing a Population of Non-Native English-Speaking Students in American Universities: Cultural and Linguistic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Fava

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of non-native English speaking students in American universities, mostly from Asian countries, presents unprecedented challenges and calls for an in-depth study on how we teach western art music history. This essay challenges some aspects of liberal multiculturalism and proposes the creation of channels of communication that allow non-native English speaking students to understand the premises of a Eurocentric system of knowledge without undermining their own cultural backgrounds.

  7. Building Rapport between International Graduate Students and Their Faculty Advisors: Cross- Cultural Mentoring Relationships at the University of Guelph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Faiza; Mahone, James P.; Ngobia, Jane; FitzSimons, John

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring graduate students is very challenging, even when both the student and faculty have similar cultural values. Many international students have a different culture from that of Canadian. Their challenge is adapting to their new environment, and for their faculty advisors to understand and work well with them. This research explored the…

  8. La mujer responsable de la salud de la familia: Constatando la universalidad cultural del cuidado Women in charge of family health-verifying cultural universality of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Concepción Pezo Silva

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La reducida familiarización de los prestadores de cuidados a la salud sobre el proceso socio-cultural que orienta el comportamiento de los individuos en el cuidado de su salud, motivó este estudio. Objetivo: Identificar factores culturales presentes en las acciones de la mujer al cuidar al familiar con afecciones físicas y o mentales. Método: Se trata de un estudio transcultural formado por dos investigaciones que adoptaron la Antropología cultural y el método etnográfico. Uno de los estudios fue realizado con 6 mujeres que vivían en una comunidad urbano marginal de São Paulo-Brasil y otro con mujeres de 6 familias de dos provincias de Lambayeque-Perú. Resultados: Ambas investigaciones mostraron que, frente a una enfermedad física o mental del familiar, la mujer se responsabiliza de su tratamiento empleando prácticas domésticas, místicas o buscando atención médica rápida y eficaz. Mostraron que es la mujer la que percibe alteraciones en el estado de salud del familiar. Conclusión: Los diferentes contextos culturales presentan semejanzas que los aproximan y apuntan la necesidad de atención, de los profesionales de salud, al cuidado centrado en la mujer, considerando su cultura.Introduction: Health Care Providers' little familiarization with the socio-cultural process that directs the behavior of individuals concerning their health care brought about this study. Objective: To identify the cultural factors present in the woman's action when taking care of a family member with either physical or mental disability. Method: This is a transcultural study made up of two researches that adopted the Cultural Anthropology and ethnographic study as well. One of the studies was carried out with six inhabitants in a slum in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil and the other with women from six families of two provinces in Lambayeque, Peru. Results: Both researches showed that, in the face of either a physical or mental disability of

  9. Problems with the factor analysis of items: Solutions based on item response theory and item parcelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon P. De Bruin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The factor analysis of items often produces spurious results in the sense that unidimensional scales appear multidimensional. This may be ascribed to failure in meeting the assumptions of linearity and normality on which factor analysis is based. Item response theory is explicitly designed for the modelling of the non-linear relations between ordinal variables and provides a strong alternative to the factor analysis of items. Items may also be combined in parcels that are more likely to satisfy the assumptions of factor analysis than do the items. The use of the Rasch rating scale model and the factor analysis of parcels is illustrated with data obtained with the Locus of Control Inventory. The results of these analyses are compared with the results obtained through the factor analysis of items. It is shown that the Rasch rating scale model and the factoring of parcels produce superior results to the factor analysis of items. Recommendations for the analysis of scales are made. Opsomming Die faktorontleding van items lewer dikwels misleidende resultate op, veral in die opsig dat eendimensionele skale as meerdimensioneel voorkom. Hierdie resultate kan dikwels daaraan toegeskryf word dat daar nie aan die aannames van lineariteit en normaliteit waarop faktorontleding berus, voldoen word nie. Itemresponsteorie, wat eksplisiet vir die modellering van die nie-liniêre verbande tussen ordinale items ontwerp is, bied ’n aantreklike alternatief vir die faktorontleding van items. Items kan ook in pakkies gegroepeer word wat meer waarskynlik aan die aannames van faktorontleding voldoen as individuele items. Die gebruik van die Rasch beoordelingskaalmodel en die faktorontleding van pakkies word aan die hand van data wat met die Lokus van Beheervraelys verkry is, gedemonstreer. Die resultate van hierdie ontledings word vergelyk met die resultate wat deur ‘n faktorontleding van die individuele items verkry is. Die resultate dui daarop dat die Rasch

  10. Re-Empowering Academics in a Corporate Culture: An Exploration of Workload and Performativity in a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, John

    2018-01-01

    Neo-liberal reforms in higher education have resulted in corporate managerial practices in universities and a drive for efficiency and productivity in teaching and research. As a result, there has been an intensification of academic work, increased stress for academics and an emphasis on accountability and performativity in universities. The paper…

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOFSTEDE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND EMPLOYEES JOB BURNOUT IN HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Abbasi, Mahya; Foruoshani, Abbas Rahimi; Pooyan, Ebrahim Jafari

    2016-02-01

    Organizational culture plays a supportive role in modification of structure and implementation of new management systems. So, the management of organizational culture with cultural elements recognition plays an important role in improving the efficacy and effectiveness of the organization. On the other hand, the health sector requires healthy and motivated practitioners and staff to achieve these goals. Job burnout as a response to environmental stressors causes some changes in attitude and behavior towards work and work environment, and factors such as organizational culture effect on it. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between organizational culture and employee's burnout. This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study population included all clinical staff (physicians and nurses) and nonclinical (administrative and financial) in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-2015. Among them, 387 participants were selected using simple stratified random sampling. In order to collect the required data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (1981) and Hofstede's organizational cultural questionnaire (1988) were used. Also Cronbach's alpha obtained 0.836 and 0.913 for them, respectively. In order to analyze the data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, multiple regression, independent t-test and binomial test were performed using SPSS 20. Results showed that organizational culture in studied population were masculine, collectivism with high uncertainty avoidance and relatively equitable power distance. Mean score for emotional exhaustion was (31.4) and most of participants 315 (40.6%) had average emotional exhaustion. Mean score for depersonalization was (21.16) and most of participants 315 (82.1%) had high depersonalization. Mean score for personal accomplishment was (30.02) and most of participants 280 (73.2%) had high personal accomplishment. Multiple correlation coefficient showed that there is a significant relationship between

  12. The universal zulu nation in colombia, social impact of hip hop culture in the Valley of Aburrá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Arias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effervescence of organizational movements around the cultural practices of Hip Hop in the Valley of Aburrá, alternatives are thought of together and to propose structural changes to their environments, from social interventions with communities’ ways. That is why we consider it necessary to make a tour of the historical and social factors that have shaped what we now know as Hip Hop Culture, to generate with this a picture of their impact on the cultural scene at local and national level.

  13. Facilitating the development of a shared purpose in a university department: the first stage towards developing a culture of shared governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McGowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: The structure of higher education departments tends to be hierarchical or, at the other extreme, characterised as ‘a galaxy of individual stars’ (Handy, 1993 p 190. Ours was no exception. However, changes in the way nursing education was provided, internal growth and development followed by a period of austerity, presented our school with an unprecedented opportunity. We found ourselves in a position where we had the possibility to change. Aims: The aim of the paper is to share our reflections on the process and outcomes to date of a culture change project in a university department. The purpose of this opening part of the project was to enable creative and collegial opportunities to work together. Conclusions: An inclusive culture can make a difference to peoples’ lives and reflect the underpinning principles of person-centred practice. This project has enabled us to define our shared purpose, clarify our values, make commitments and set standards. Overall, though it has allowed us to see each other as people who have emerged from behind a faceless organisational structure. Implications for practice: The values of inclusiveness, integrity and professionalism are important for a shared understanding and effective collaborative functioning within university departments internationally, especially those that espouse person-centredness Staff teams can be structured around professional and personal development needs but these also provide a direct link to both departmental and organisational purposes aligned to education Managerial support, staff participation and an experienced facilitator are vital for successful cultural change. Our project has been UK based but we believe these experiences to be transferable and of interest to university departments elsewhere that aspire to create cultures that enable staff, and therefore students and the wider community, to flourish

  14. Organizational culture in an academic health center: an exploratory study using a competing values framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Buchan, Alastair M

    2012-06-01

    Implementing cultural change and aligning organizational cultures could enhance innovation, quality, safety, and job satisfaction. The authors conducted this mixed-methods study to assess academic physician-scientists' perceptions of the current and preferred future organizational culture at a university medical school and its partner health system. In October 2010, the authors surveyed academic physicians and scientists jointly employed by the University of Oxford and its local, major partner health system. The survey included the U.S. Veterans Affairs Administration's 14-item Competing Values Framework instrument and two extra items prompting respondents to identify their substantive employer and to provide any additional open-ended comments. Of 436 academic physicians and scientists, 170 (39%) responded. Of these, 69 (41%) provided open-ended comments. Dominant hierarchical culture, moderate rational and team cultures, and underdeveloped entrepreneurial culture characterized the health system culture profile. The university profile was more balanced, with strong rational and entrepreneurial cultures, and moderate-to-strong hierarchical and team cultures. The preferred future culture (within five years) would emphasize team and entrepreneurial cultures and-to a lesser degree-rational culture, and would deemphasize hierarchical culture. Whereas the university and the health system currently have distinct organizational cultures, academic physicians and scientists would prefer the same type of culture across the two organizations so that both could more successfully pursue the shared mission of academic medicine. Further research should explore strengthening the validity and reliability of the organizational culture instrument for academic medicine and building an evidence base of effective culture change strategies and interventions.

  15. ITEM LEVEL DIAGNOSTICS AND MODEL - DATA FIT IN ITEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    Item response theory (IRT) is a framework for modeling and analyzing item response ... data. Though, there is an argument that the evaluation of fit in IRT modeling has been ... National Council on Measurement in Education ... model data fit should be based on three types of ... prediction should be assessed through the.

  16. Item Response Data Analysis Using Stata Item Response Theory Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Zheng, Xiaying

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce and review the capability and performance of the Stata item response theory (IRT) package that is available from Stata v.14, 2015. Using a simulated data set and a publicly available item response data set extracted from Programme of International Student Assessment, we review the IRT package from…

  17. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  18. Cross-cultural comparisons of university students' science learning self-efficacy: structural relationships among factors within science learning self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2018-04-01

    Science learning self-efficacy could be regarded as a multi-factor belief which comprises different aspects such as cognitive skills, practical work, and everyday application. However, few studies have investigated the relationships among these factors that compose science learning self-efficacy. Also, culture may play an important role in explaining the relationships among these factors. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate cultural differences in science learning self-efficacy and examine the relationships within factors constituting science learning self-efficacy by adopting a survey instrument for administration to students in the U.S. and Taiwan. A total of 218 university students (62.40% females) were surveyed in the U.S.A, and 224 university students (49.10% females) in Taiwan were also invited to take part in the study. The results of the structural equation modelling revealed cultural differences in the relationships among the factors of science learning self-efficacy. It was found that U.S. students' confidence in their ability to employ higher-order cognitive skills tended to promote their confidence in their ability to accomplish practical work, strengthening their academic self-efficacy. However, the aforementioned mediation was not found for the Taiwanese participants.

  19. Language, culture and approaches to studying: towards a more comprehensive 3P Model; a cross-cultural study of the 3P Model in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Matthew Keen Shui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Language and culture are constructs that are difficult to quantify and measure; moreover, their effects on the process of learning and academic achievement can be difficult to determine. This thesis examined their effects using the theoretical framework of the Presage-Process-Product (3P) Model. The 3P Model allows the effects of various ‘presage’ factors on the ‘product’ of academic achievement to be mediated by the ‘process’ of approaches to learning. Aims: This thesis aime...

  20. How Universal Are Free Will Beliefs? Cultural Differences in Chinese and U.S. 4- and 6-Year-Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wente, Adrienne O; Bridgers, Sophie; Zhao, Xin; Seiver, Elizabeth; Zhu, Liqi; Gopnik, Alison

    2016-05-01

    This study explores the development of free will beliefs across cultures. Sixty-seven Chinese 4- and 6-year-olds were asked questions to gauge whether they believed that people could freely choose to inhibit or act against their desires. Responses were compared to those given by the U.S. children in Kushnir, Gopnik, Chernyak, Seiver, and Wellman (). Results indicate that children from both cultures increased the amount of choice they ascribed with age. For inhibition questions, Chinese children ascribed less choice than the U.S. children. Qualitative explanations revealed that the U.S. children were also more likely to endorse notions of autonomous choice. These findings suggest both cultural differences and similarities in free will beliefs. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.