WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural items university

  1. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center....

  2. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, University of... affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Carla Sinopoli, Museum of...

  3. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona... animal hair, 1 bag of sand, 1 lump of earth, 2 animal tails, 1 bundle of sticks, 2 carved wooden symbols...

  4. 76 FR 73663 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... the cultural items should contact Mary Collins, Director of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  5. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... the cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  6. 78 FR 50091 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Shannon, Curator of Cultural Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, 218 UCB... Museum of Natural History have determined that: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the five cultural items... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum...

  7. 75 FR 30427 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... Laboratory of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural items... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice...

  8. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of unassociated.... Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture are...

  9. 78 FR 36243 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... History. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the...

  10. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology... with the sacred objects may contact the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology....

  11. 77 FR 48532 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Diego State University, San Diego, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The San Diego State University... Diego State University Archaeology Collections Management Program. DATES: Representatives of any Indian...

  12. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by...

  13. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1930, cultural items were removed from Queen Creek Ruin... donated to the Arizona State Museum. The 30 unassociated funerary objects are 12 ceramic bowls, 8 ceramic jars, 1 ceramic ladle, 3 ceramic pitchers, 5 ceramic scoops, and 1 ceramic sherd. Queen Creek Ruin...

  14. 75 FR 36666 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ..., Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance... to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI..., Kohala,'' is in the possession of the Hamilton Library, University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI....

  15. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  16. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-1100-665] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined... Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: David Phillips, Curator of...

  17. 77 FR 52056 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items The unassociated funerary objects are six ceramic bowls, four ceramic jars, two ceramic pitchers, and three ceramic sherds. The funerary objects were removed... reported in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (73 FR 8356-8357, February 13,...

  18. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items At an unknown date, a basket (item 1-3-42/86) was donated to... bracken fern root. There are no records at the Treganza Museum concerning acquisition of this item. Based... of 44 cm and is made of deer grass, saw grass, redbud and bracken fern root. A tag attached to...

  19. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that... University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it...

  20. 78 FR 13889 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...) to the Arizona Historical Society. In 1991, the object was transferred to the Arizona State Museum as... through identification by Hopi cultural specialists. Specific knowledge provided by the Society Priests of... by the Momngwit in the Hopi villages for the practice of the Hopi Religion. The Hopi...

  1. 76 FR 9049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... the determinations in this notice. In this notice there are eight Tlingit objects that were purchased by Louis Shotridge, a Tlingit curator employed by the University of Pennsylvania Museum to conduct research and make museum collections. Tlingit objects affiliated with the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan...

  2. 78 FR 13890 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... California). At an unknown date, 1 cultural item, a pestle, was removed from site CA-SON-UNK (Dry Creek) in Sonoma County, CA. At an unknown date, the pestle labeled ``Dry Creek near Healdsburg, CA'' was donated... consultation and ethnographic research, the pestle is an object of cultural patrimony. The age of site CA-SON...

  3. 77 FR 5839 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology....

  4. 78 FR 50107 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any... meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This..., former University of Colorado art and art history professor, bequeathed to the University of...

  5. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  6. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native... the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control...

  7. 77 FR 59643 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... unknown person. The 1 object of cultural patrimony is a single pestle. The age of site CA-MRN-74 is... improvement project. The 4 objects of cultural patrimony are 2 obsidian tools, 1 chert tool, and l pestle. A... mica pendant, 1 medicine pestle fragment, and 1 quartz crystal. The 147 objects of cultural patrimony...

  8. 76 FR 14048 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by... the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah... sacred object/ object of cultural patrimony to the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah...

  9. 75 FR 433 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Seton Hall University Museum, Seton Hall...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... leaders, as well as being objects of cultural patrimony that have ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural significance to the group and could not have been alienated by a single individual. The... above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for...

  10. 75 FR 58424 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern... (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture), University of Washington, and the State College of Washington...

  11. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  12. Cultural Interchangeability? Culture-Specific Items in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajtony Zsuzsanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the results of the translation work carried out within an international project aiming to develop the language skills of staff working in hotel and catering services. As the topics touched upon in the English source texts are related to several European cultures, these cultural differences bring about several challenges related to the translation of realia, or culture-specific items (CSIs. In the first part of the paper, a series of translation strategies for rendering source-language CSIs into the target language are enlisted, while the second part presents the main strategies employed in the prepared translations.

  13. Evaluation of Northwest University, Kano Post-UTME Test Items Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichi, Ado Abdu; Hafiz, Hadiza; Bello, Samira Abdullahi

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes testing is used for the purposes of providing results that have important consequences. Validity is the cornerstone upon which all measurement systems are built. This study applied the Item Response Theory principles to analyse Northwest University Kano Post-UTME Economics test items. The developed fifty (50) economics test items was…

  14. Are Inferential Reading Items More Susceptible to Cultural Bias than Literal Reading Items?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate a seven-step process for determining whether inferential reading items were more susceptible to cultural bias than literal reading items. The seven-step process was demonstrated using multiple-choice data from the reading portion of a reading/language arts test for fifth and seventh grade Hispanic,…

  15. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  16. 75 FR 65028 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001... University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army...

  17. 75 FR 26785 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, WA and Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park... Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in...

  18. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended repatriation by...

  19. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University on an unknown...

  20. Differential Weighting of Items to Improve University Admission Test Validity

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Backhoff Escudero; Felipe Tirado Segura; Norma Larrazolo Reyna

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives an evaluation of different ways to increase university admission test criterion-related validity, by differentially weighting test items. We compared four methods of weighting multiple-choice items of the Basic Skills and Knowledge Examination (EXHCOBA): (1) punishing incorrect responses by a constant factor, (2) weighting incorrect responses, considering the levels of error, (3) weighting correct responses, considering the item’s difficulty, based on the Classic Measur...

  1. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the Science and Mathematics Items in the University Entrance Examinations in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycioglu, Dilara Bakan; Berberoglu, Giray

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed to detect differential item functioning (DIF) items across gender groups, analyze item content for the possible sources of DIF, and eventually investigate the effect of DIF items on the criterion-related validity of the test scores in the quantitative section of the university entrance examination (UEE) in Turkey. The reason…

  2. 77 FR 23500 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items The five cultural items are a water drum, a... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, WI... consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition...

  3. Differential Weighting of Items to Improve University Admission Test Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Backhoff Escudero

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an evaluation of different ways to increase university admission test criterion-related validity, by differentially weighting test items. We compared four methods of weighting multiple-choice items of the Basic Skills and Knowledge Examination (EXHCOBA: (1 punishing incorrect responses by a constant factor, (2 weighting incorrect responses, considering the levels of error, (3 weighting correct responses, considering the item’s difficulty, based on the Classic Measurement Theory, and (4 weighting correct responses, considering the item’s difficulty, based on the Item Response Theory. Results show that none of these methods increased the instrument’s predictive validity, although they did improve its concurrent validity. It was concluded that it is appropriate to score the test by simply adding up correct responses.

  4. 78 FR 2428 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture... & Culture, also known as the Eastern Washington State Historical Society, in consultation with the... cultural items may contact the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture. DATES: Representatives of any Indian...

  5. 77 FR 23497 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Description of the Cultural Items The nine cultural items include: 1 basket hat; 1 drum; 1 wild celery root; 1... items (the hat, the drum, the wild celery root, the elk horn purse, the projectile point, and the hair... Barrett, the daughter-in-law of Mrs. James Edmond Barrett. According to the 1934 catalog cards,...

  6. 75 FR 8740 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meets the definition of... California; and Wilton Rancheria, California. Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and...

  7. 75 FR 14459 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... possible cultural affiliation of the objects with the Tlingit and Haida. Photographs of the items and... Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes further identified the Double bladed dagger as ``Shak... consultation the museum reasonably believes these cultural items are culturally affiliated with the...

  8. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Monterey Museum of Art, in... cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony....

  9. 77 FR 5838 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest... believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the USDA Forest Service...

  10. 77 FR 11569 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest... believes itself to be culturally affiliated ] with the cultural items may contact the USDA Forest Service...

  11. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Item The cultural item is a wooden hat (AC.11506) in the shape of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science... & Science, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribe, has determined that a cultural item meets...

  12. 77 FR 23496 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... ring. All of the items are from the Horner Museum which was established in 1925 on the campus of what is now Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR. In 2005, items from the Horner Museum were acquired... requirements for items from the Horner Museum. In the transfer agreement with OSU, the BCHS took...

  13. 78 FR 34130 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Field Museum, in consultation with the... these cultural items should submit a written request to the Field Museum. If no additional...

  14. 77 FR 13622 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items These items came into the possession and... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office... Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items listed below meet the definition of sacred...

  15. 76 FR 80388 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Battlefield National Monument. History and description of the cultural items The two cultural items are a rattle made of rawhide with attached horse hair tail, eagle feather, and buffalo wool; and a grass seed...

  16. Exploring differential item functioning in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Beth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC is a widely used patient reported outcome in osteoarthritis. An important, but frequently overlooked, aspect of validating health outcome measures is to establish if items exhibit differential item functioning (DIF. That is, if respondents have the same underlying level of an attribute, does the item give the same score in different subgroups or is it biased towards one subgroup or another. The aim of the study was to explore DIF in the Likert format WOMAC for the first time in a UK osteoarthritis population with respect to demographic, social, clinical and psychological factors. Methods The sample comprised a community sample of 763 people with osteoarthritis who participated in the Somerset and Avon Survey of Health. The WOMAC was explored for DIF by gender, age, social deprivation, social class, employment status, distress, body mass index and clinical factors. Ordinal regression models were used to identify DIF items. Results After adjusting for age, two items were identified for the physical functioning subscale as having DIF with age identified as the DIF factor for 2 items, gender for 1 item and body mass index for 1 item. For the WOMAC pain subscale, for people with hip osteoarthritis one item was identified with age-related DIF. The impact of the DIF items rarely had a significant effect on the conclusions of group comparisons. Conclusions Overall, the WOMAC performed well with only a small number of DIF items identified. However, as DIF items were identified in for the WOMAC physical functioning subscale it would be advisable to analyse data taking into account the possible impact of the DIF items when weight, gender or especially age effects, are the focus of interest in UK-based osteoarthritis studies. Similarly for the WOMAC pain subscale in people with hip osteoarthritis it would be worthwhile to analyse data taking into account the

  17. 78 FR 11680 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Description of the Cultural Items Traditional religious leaders from the Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York) have identified six wampum items as being... the Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New...

  18. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, in consultation with the appropriate...

  19. 75 FR 58425 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York..., or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is...

  20. 77 FR 52055 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    .... 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Natural History Museum of Los... this notice. ] History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1926, three unassociated funerary... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture,...

  1. 76 FR 28067 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum... History acquired the cultural items as a gift from the Kalamazoo Valley Museum, and accessioned them...

  2. 75 FR 52013 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum..., institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is...

  3. 78 FR 21413 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History.... History and Description of the Cultural Items The 90 cultural items consist of Western Apache ceremonial... History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations,...

  4. Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    This article features "Pop Culture Universe," which received the 2009 Dartmouth Medal honoring the creation of a reference work of outstanding quality. School librarians will find "Pop Culture Universe" a wonderful resource for assisting middle school and high school students with research projects on significant historical events that focus on…

  5. Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    This article features "Pop Culture Universe," which received the 2009 Dartmouth Medal honoring the creation of a reference work of outstanding quality. School librarians will find "Pop Culture Universe" a wonderful resource for assisting middle school and high school students with research projects on significant historical events that focus on…

  6. 78 FR 72710 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Art Museum, in consultation with the... this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal...

  7. Item Transformation for Computer Assisted Language Testing: The Adaptation of the Spanish University Entrance Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborda, Jesus Garcia; Bakieva, Margarita; Gonzalez-Such, Jose; Pavon, Ana Sevilla

    2010-01-01

    Since the Spanish Educational system is changing and promoting the use of online tests, it was necessary to study the transformation of test items in the "Spanish University Entrance Examination" (IB P.A.U.) to diminish the effect of test delivery changes (through its computerization) in order to affect the least the current model. The…

  8. Collisions of Culture: Academic Culture in the Neoliberal University

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCompte, Margaret D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how different constituencies in a major research university tried to initiate change despite disagreements over common goals, norms and principles. The context was a culture war. The university administration wanted to impose a corporatising and privatising philosophy which it felt was crucial to preserving the…

  9. The University in a Corporate Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Eric

    This book examines how the liberal democratic principles driving higher education often conflict with the market pressures to credential students and other knowledge that has a clear exchange value. The chapters are: (1) "A Complex Mission in a Market Culture"; (2) "The Consumerist Culture of the University"; (3) "A Corporate Ethos"; (4) "Faculty…

  10. Should Universalism Trump Cultural Relativism in Counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnier, Richard T.; Dixon, Andrea L.; Barratt, Tyler M.; Moyer, Erika L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain cultural customs and practices are viewed as abhorrent by many people, yet contemporary American counselors rarely criticize any specific culture. In this article, the authors explore why counselors abstain from such criticism. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that universalism, often regarded as a politically incorrect and an…

  11. 78 FR 19305 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... Natural History. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address...

  12. 77 FR 25738 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... Natural History. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address...

  13. 77 FR 15798 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs..., Colorado College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, telephone... as the Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center) and the Denver Museum of...

  14. 78 FR 53783 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO..., Chief of Staff, President's Office, Colorado College, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903... Springs, CO, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This...

  15. 77 FR 23498 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs..., Colorado College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, telephone... Fine Arts Center (formerly known as the Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center)...

  16. 78 FR 19304 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Colorado College, Colorado Springs... College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, telephone (719) 389... Center (formerly known as the Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center) and the...

  17. Using Multiple-Variable Matching to Identify Cultural Sources of Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amery D.; Ercikan, Kadriye

    2006-01-01

    Identifying the sources of differential item functioning (DIF) in international assessments is very challenging, because such sources are often nebulous and intertwined. Even though researchers frequently focus on test translation and content area, few actually go beyond these factors to investigate other cultural sources of DIF. This article…

  18. 76 FR 14056 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... described in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items (72 FR 48677-48678, August 24, 2007). Since... Register (72 FR 48677-48678, August 24, 2007), paragraph three is corrected by substituting the following... Register in a Notice of Inventory Completion (66 FR 51060-51062, October 5, 2001), and have since...

  19. Translating Culture-Specific Items: From the Perspective of Relevance Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施蒙

    2012-01-01

      This paper offers an exploratory analysis of translating culture-specific items from the angle of relevance theory in terms of semantic level, syntactic level and contextual level. It was revealed that due to the translation dilemma in the translation process, seman-tic meaning and syntactic structure are usually sacrificed for optimal relevance in contextual level.

  20. 75 FR 52364 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Memphis Pink Palace Museum, Memphis, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Cultural Items: Memphis Pink Palace Museum, Memphis, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Memphis Pink Palace Museum, Memphis, TN, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under... objects from the site. Officials of the Memphis Pink Palace Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25...

  1. Greater learnability is not sufficient to produce cultural universals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Anna N; Griffiths, Thomas L; Ettlinger, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Looking across human societies reveals regularities in the languages that people speak and the concepts that they use. One explanation that has been proposed for these "cultural universals" is differences in the ease with which people learn particular languages and concepts. A difference in learnability means that languages and concepts possessing a particular property are more likely to be accurately transmitted from one generation of learners to the next. Intuitively, this difference could allow languages and concepts that are more learnable to become more prevalent after multiple generations of cultural transmission. If this is the case, the prevalence of languages and concepts with particular properties can be explained simply by demonstrating empirically that they are more learnable. We evaluate this argument using mathematical analysis and behavioral experiments. Specifically, we provide two counter-examples that show how greater learnability need not result in a property becoming prevalent. First, more learnable languages and concepts can nonetheless be less likely to be produced spontaneously as a result of transmission failures. We simulated cultural transmission in the laboratory to show that this can occur for memory of distinctive items: these items are more likely to be remembered, but not generated spontaneously once they have been forgotten. Second, when there are many languages or concepts that lack the more learnable property, sheer numbers can swamp the benefit produced by greater learnability. We demonstrate this using a second series of experiments involving artificial language learning. Both of these counter-examples show that simply finding a learnability bias experimentally is not sufficient to explain why a particular property is prevalent in the languages or concepts used in human societies: explanations for cultural universals based on cultural transmission need to consider the full set of hypotheses a learner could entertain and all of

  2. 75 FR 9925 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: The Cleveland Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given...

  3. 78 FR 48902 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that the 56 cultural items described in this... Field Museum of Natural History has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the...

  4. 77 FR 11571 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest...; and Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service... Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in...

  5. Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Yang

    Full Text Available Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older. All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.

  6. Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Li, Juan; Spaniol, Julia; Hasher, Lynn; Wilkinson, Andrea J; Yu, Jing; Niu, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older) and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older). All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.

  7. 77 FR 34984 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ...The San Diego Museum of Man, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the San Diego Museum of Man.

  8. Exhaustive measurement of food items in the home using a universal product code scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, June; Bryant, Maria; Wang, Lily; Borja, Judith; Bentley, Margaret E

    2011-01-01

    Objective We aimed to develop, test and describe the Exhaustive Home Food Inventory (EHFI), which measures foods in the home using scanning of the universal product code (UPC) and EHFI software to link codes to food identities and energy values. Design Observational design with up to three repeated measures in each household yielded a total of 218 inventories. Setting Eighty private households in North Carolina. Subjects Low-income African-American women with an infant between the ages of 12 and 18 months. Recruitment rate was 71%. Results Approximately 12 200 different food items were successfully recorded using the EHFI method. The average number of food items within a household was 147. The time required for the first measurement in a home declined from 157 to 136 min (P<0·05) for the first third compared to the last third of homes measured. In the sixty-four households in which three assessments were performed, the time required decreased from 145 to 97 min as did the time per item from 1·10 to 0·73 min. Conclusions It is feasible to record all foods and drinks in the home using UPC scanning. Further development and enhancement of databases linking UPC to food identification, nutrients and other information are needed. PMID:20602866

  9. 77 FR 11568 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... Cultural History (UO-MNCH), Eugene, OR, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army...

  10. Organizational Culture and Performance of Paith-Based Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organizational Culture and Performance of Paith-Based Universities. ... Journal of Research in National Development ... This study examines the impact of organizational culture on the performances of faith-based Universities in Ogun State, ...

  11. Adapting Item Format for Cultural Effects in Translated Tests: Cultural Effects on Construct Validity of the Chinese Versions of the MBTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlind, Steven J.; Miao, Danmin; Sheng, Yanyan; Chia, Rosina C.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction between different cultural groups and item type, and the ensuing effect on construct validity for a psychological inventory, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI, Form G). The authors analyzed 94 items from 2 Chinese-translated versions of the MBTI (Form G) for factorial differences among groups of…

  12. 75 FR 58426 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American History and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... American History and Art (Gilcrease Museum), Tulsa, OK, that meet the definition of objects of cultural... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American History and Art, Tulsa, OK AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here...

  13. 78 FR 50094 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History... Museum of Natural History. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural... Field Museum of Natural History has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the...

  14. 12 item Allodynia Symptom Checklist/Brasil: cross-cultural adaptation, internal consistency and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Lima Florencio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since there was no Portuguese questionnaire to evaluate cutaneous allodynia, which has been pointed out as a risk factor of migraine, we aimed to perform the cross-cultural adaptation of the 12 item Allodynia Symptom Checklist for the Brazilian population and to test its measurement properties. It consisted in six stages: translation, synthesis, back translation, revision by a specialist committee, pretest and submission the documents to the committee. In the pretest stage, the questionnaire was applied to 30 migraineurs of both sexes, who had some difficulty in understanding it. Thus, a second version was applied to 30 additional subjects, with no difficulties being reported. The mean filling out time was 3'36", and the internal consistency was 0.76. To test reproducibility, 15 other subjects filled out the questionnaire at two different times, it was classified as moderate (weighted kappa=0.58. We made available to Brazilian population an easy, quick and reliable questionnaire.

  15. Cultural considerations and child maltreatment: in search of universal principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Gauri; Berkowitz, Carol

    2014-10-01

    Cultural diversity poses challenges within the health care setting, particularly regarding the question of how health professionals can resolve the tension between respecting cultural norms or child-rearing practices and the importance of determining what constitutes harm and child maltreatment. Cultural competency and respect for cultural diversity does not imply universal tolerance of all practices. The United Nations provides a standard of universal child rights, protecting them from harmful practices. Pediatric providers must respect cross-cultural differences while maintaining legal and ethical standards of safety and wellbeing for children, promoting evidence-based prevention of maltreatment, and advocating for child wellness across all cultures.

  16. University - industry collaborations: models, drivers and cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrismann, Dominic; Patel, Dhavalkumar

    2015-01-01

    The way academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies have been approaching collaborations has changed significantly in recent years. A multitude of interaction models were tested and critical factors that drive successful collaborations have been proposed. Based on this experience the current consensus in the pharmaceutical industry is to pursue one of two strategies: an open innovation approach to source discoveries wherever they occur, or investing selectively into scientific partnerships that churn out inventions that can be translated from bench to bedside internally. While these strategies may be intuitive, to form and build sustainable relationships between academia and large multinational healthcare enterprises is proving challenging. In this article we explore some of the more testing aspects of these collaborations, approaches that various industrial players have taken and provide our own views on the matter. We found that understanding and respecting each other's organisational culture and combining the intellectual and technological assets to answer big scientific questions accelerates and improves the quality of every collaboration. Upon discussing the prevailing cooperation models in the university - industry domain, we assert that science-driven collaborations where risks and rewards are shared equally without a commercial agenda in mind are the most impactful.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Dalgaard, Vita Ligaya; Nielsen, Kent Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to (i) cross-culturally adapt a Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and (ii) evaluate its psychometric properties in terms of agreement, reliability, validity, responsiveness, and interpretability among patients...

  18. 77 FR 13624 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ....S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, that meet the definition of sacred objects... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, Lakewood, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice....

  19. 78 FR 50093 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY, that meet the definition of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior....

  20. 77 FR 13623 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, that meet the definition of sacred... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, Lakewood, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ]...

  1. 78 FR 19307 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    .... Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS that meet the definition... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior....

  2. 75 FR 45654 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado Springs, CO, that meets the definition of object...

  3. 77 FR 48533 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ..., National Park Service, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park... consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of... Superintendent, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, P.O. Box 39, Crow Agency, MT 59022-0039, telephone...

  4. 78 FR 27996 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, in consultation with the... these cultural items should submit a written request to the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology....

  5. 78 FR 13888 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items At unknown dates prior to and during... are 144 beads, 60 ceramic bowls, 4 figurines, 51 ceramic jars, 3 mortars, 1 pipe, 11 ceramic plates, and 9 ceramic scoops. Archeological, biological, historical, kinship, linguistic, and oral...

  6. 77 FR 34985 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... appropriate Indian tribes, have determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated... Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This... Register (66 FR 15741-15742, March 20, 2001; 69 FR 76779-76780, December 22, 2004; and 71 FR...

  7. 75 FR 14460 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... three cultural items are two medicine masks and one turtle rattle. The two masks are carved from wood, painted, and have white horsehair attached. The rattle is made from a turtle shell. Its handle is made from the head and neck of the turtle, which are braced with wooden splints and wrapped with leather...

  8. 76 FR 75901 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Description of the Cultural Item The snapping turtle rattle was purchased by Kingman Museum Inc. in January of... hna ``City'' for the Deer Clan of the Onondaga Nation of New York. The head and neck of the turtle acts as the handle while the shell acts as the rattle. According to information given at the time of...

  9. Corporate culture of modern university: approaches to definition essence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Horbenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of corporate culture of the university; found to relate concepts as «corporate culture» and «organizational culture» and discovered the last function: cognitive, value­education, communication, legal and regulatory, motivational, innovative and Stability; singled structural elements of corporate culture: artifacts, values, norms, goals and mission of the organization; and signs of the university as a corporation: nadorhanizatsiynist, polisub’yektnist, competitive environment, as the value of social identity formation and contrast to other organizations; noted that the characteristics of the corporate culture of the University is directly dependent on its public tasks, including such as meeting the needs of the individual in the intellectual, cultural and moral development through vocational education, science through research and creative activity of scientific and pedagogical staff training retraining and advanced training of employees with higher education, the formation of students’ citizenship, ability to work and life, spreading knowledge among the population, improving its educational and cultural level; indicated on the approaches to the definition of «corporate culture», including phenomenological and pragmatic, rational and genetic, and eksternalistskyy internalistskyy, guiding and limiting; peculiarities of formation and development of the corporate culture of the university in the context of competitiveness; the conclusions noted that the level of corporate culture depends not only on internal motivational guidance of employees of the University, but the resulting performance indicators ­ profitability, profitability and competitiveness.

  10. Psychometric properties of WHOQOL-BREF in clinical and health Greek populations: incorporating new culture-relevant items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginieri-Coccossis, M; Triantafillou, E; Tomaras, V; Soldatos, C; Mavreas, V; Christodoulou, G

    2012-01-01

    Τhe present study examines main psychometric properties of the World Health Organisation (WHO) quality of life (QoL) instrument, the WHOQOL-BREF with the inclusion of four national items. Participants were 425 adult native Greek speaking, grouped into patients with physical disorders, psychiatric disorders and healthy individuals. Participants were administered WHOQOL-BREF and 23 national items, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and the Life Satisfaction Index (LSI). Confirmatory factor analysis produced acceptable fit values for the original model of 26 items within the four WHOQOL domains: physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment. Testing for the fit of national items within this model, the results indicated four new items with the most satisfactory fit indices and were thus included forming a 30-items version. The national items refer to: (a) nutrition, (b) satisfaction with work (both loaded in the physical health domain), (c) home life and (d) social life (both loaded in the social relationships domain). Statistical tests were applied to the 26- and 30-items versions producing satisfactory results, with the 30-items version showing slightly better values. Furthermore, results on the 30-items version included: (a) internal consistency, which was found satisfactory, with alpha values ranging from α=0.67-0.81, while the inclusion of new items produced higher alpha values in physical health and social relationships domains, (b) construct validity with good item-domain correlations, as well as strong correlations between domain scores, (c) convergent validity, which was very satisfactory, showing good correlations with GHQ-28 and LSI, (d) discriminant validity, showing instrument's ability to detect QoL differences between healthy and unhealthy participants, and between physically ill and psychiatric patients, and (e) test-retest reliability, with ICC scores in excess of 0.80 obtaining for all domains. The WHOQOL

  11. [Healthcare and culture, between diversity and universality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Interrelations exist between people's behaviour and the reasons for it as explained by culture. The healthcare theory put forward by the American nurse Madeleine Leininger, at the end of the 1970s, integrates anthropology Identifying and understanding the patient's culture enables nursing care to be adapted to the patient's own view of his/her disease.

  12. 76 FR 14047 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology by Mary Felton in 1868. At an unknown date, a string of glass beads and a mirror... from these interments. The presence of trade items, such as the iron fish spear, mirror, glass...

  13. Cultural competence education in university rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteliano, Mary A; Stone, John H

    2014-01-01

    The Center of International Rehabilitation Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE) has prepared curriculum guides for rehabilitation professionals in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech language pathology, and rehabilitation counseling. The objective is to provide a resource to faculty who wish to include or strengthen cultural competency education in their program and courses. CIRRIE assessed students'cultural needs, and solicited assistance from experts in the field to assist with the development of the guides. After the guides were published CIRRIE conducted surveys to assess their usefulness. Survey responses were highest among occupational therapy faculty. Among faculty who responded, most intended to use the cultural competence activities, case studies, and resources that the guides offer throughout their curriculum.

  14. Intangible Culture, Cooperation and Intercultural Dialogue among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Susana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on intercultural competence and dialogue across cultural borders between university students from different Portuguese-speaking countries. Various principles and strategies for intercultural education are summarised, and the project "cultures@esec", based on such principles and strategies, is described. The project was…

  15. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  16. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  17. Analysing the Organizational Culture of Universities: Two Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, Marina Tomas; Ion, Georgeta

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the findings of two research projects, examining organizational culture by means of two different models of analysis--one at university level and one at department level--which were carried out over the last four years at Catalonian public universities (Spain). Theoretical and methodological approaches for the two…

  18. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  19. Developing Quality Assurance Culture for Sustainable University Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, Emmanuel Chisa

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of any university education depends on quality parameters that should be specified, adhered to and sustained. The development of quality assurance culture in Nigerian university education is imperative, considering the fact that globalization, mobility of labour, competition and the quest for best practices have subjected…

  20. Are medical ethics universal or culture specific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furqaan; Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In our society and culture where family is of utmost importance,sometimes I wonder how much of a doctor’s duty is to the patient and how much is to the whole family.As a medical student,I remember being told by my professors that we should treat the patient as a whole and not focus on just one problem or organ system.Similarly when practicing medicine in Pakistan,one cannot treat the patient alone and ignore the family.How much should relatives’ wishes be taken into account when dealing with a patient? Don’t patients have a right to their medical information? When,how,and by whom can that right be waived? What role does culture play when debating medical ethics?

  1. How Universal Are Universal Symbols? An Estimation of Cross-Cultural Adoption of Universal Healthcare Symbols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy Lo, Chih-Wei; Yien, Huey-Wen; Chen, I-Ping

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of universal health symbol usage and to analyze the factors influencing the adoption of those symbols in Taiwan. Universal symbols are an important innovative tool for health facility wayfinding systems. Hablamos Juntos, a universal healthcare symbol system developed in the United States, is a thoughtful, well-designed, and thoroughly tested symbol system that facilitates communication across languages and cultures. We designed a questionnaire to test how well the selected graphic symbols were understood by Taiwanese participants and determined factors related to successful symbol decoding, including participant-related factors, stimulation factors, and the interaction between stimulation and participants. Additionally, we further established a design principle for future development of localized healthcare symbols. (1) Eleven symbols were identified as highly comprehensible and effective symbols that can be directly adopted in Taiwanese healthcare settings. Sixteen symbols were deemed incomprehensible or confusing and thus had to be redesigned. Finally, 14 were identified as relatively incomprehensible and could thus be redesigned and then have their effectiveness evaluated again. (2) Three factors were found to influence the participants' differing levels of comprehension of the Hablamos Juntos symbols. In order to prevent the three aforementioned factors from causing difficulty in interpreting symbols, we suggest that the local symbol designers should (1) use more iconic images, (2) carefully evaluate the indexical and symbolic meaning of graphic symbols, and (3) collect the consensus of Taiwanese people with different educational backgrounds. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. 77 FR 40897 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Items In 2002, the Buddy Calvin Jones collection, a privately held collection of Native American human remains and artifacts, was donated to the Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX. Buddy Calvin Jones... Master of Arts thesis (Buddy Calvin Jones, ``The Kinsloe Focus: A Study of Seven Historic Caddoan...

  3. The concept of anger: universal or culture specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kövecses, Z

    2000-01-01

    I will suggest that the English word 'anger' and its counterparts in diverse languages of the world are based on concepts of anger that have a great deal of complexity. This conceptual complexity derives from several sources: (1) the metaphors and metonymies that apply to the concepts in various languages; (2) the prototypes of anger that people share in these cultures, and (3) the many different senses that the word anger and its counterparts have in different languages. We can ask: Are there any universal aspects of the concept(s) of anger? On the basis of linguistic evidence from English, Chinese, Japanese, Hungarian, Zulu and Wolof, I will suggest that there are, but I will also claim that some of the aspects are culture specific. This raises the further important question of why there is both universality and culture specificity in the conceptualization of this emotion. At stake is the issue of which of the following two contradictory claims is valid: (1) that anger is conceptualized in the same way universally, or (2) that anger is a social construction and thus varies considerably from culture to culture. I will propose a compromise view, which can be called 'body-based social constructionism', that enables us to see anger and its counterparts as both universal and culture specific.

  4. The impact of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence In Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Parcham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Culture is one of the most important factors that can change the climate of silence. The main aim of this research was to investigate the influence of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This research was a descriptive-correlation one. The target population was chosen from 1900 staff of the University of Medical sciences and Health Care headquarter in Shiraz. Thus 311 employees were selected using the Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The instrument used in this research was Denison (2006 organizational culture questionnaire and Dimitris Buratas and Maria Vacula (2007 organizational culture. Cornbrash’s alpha method was used to calculate the reliability. The Item analysis and expert consensus were applied to calculate the validity of instruments. All gathered data analyzed with PLS software. Results: The results showed that the four dimensions of organizational culture include organizational involvement, organizational adaptability, organizational concistency and organizational mission was moderate and the mean scores obtained for each factor were 2.85, 2.82, 2.94 and 2.93 respectively. Structural equation model showed Organizational culture has a significant positive impact on organizational silence (β=0.68; P<.001. Conclusion: Based on the results and impact of organizational culture on organizational silence that is positive and significant; The organization further efforts to strengthen various aspects of organizational culture, especially the employees’ involvement in decision making; Employees can better express their opinions and thus reduced their organizational silence. In other words strengthening corporate culture is combined with the reduction of organizational silence. Medical organizations can establish appropriate reward system for creative ideas and suggestions to encourage people express their ideas As a result, reduced

  5. Translation of Culture-Specific Items in Self-Help Literature: A Study on Domestication and Foreignization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volga Yılmaz-Gümüş

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have witnessed a boom in self-help materials in both global and local markets. This self-help trend, growing rapidly in our modern day, should be an area of interest for Translation Studies as an increasing number of self-help materials have been translated particularly from English every year. Self-help books involve a great deal of references to the material and social culture of the original country. One of the key issues in the translation of self-help books is the choice between foreignizing and domesticating these culture-specific items. This paper aims to discuss the procedures used for the translation of culture-specific items with regard to the particular function that these books assume in the target society. The analysis on the example of Outliers, a self-help book of sorts written by Malcolm Gladwell, has shown that the translator mostly adopted foreignizing strategies in translating the text into Turkish. The study also discusses whether these foreignizing strategies contribute to the fulfillment of target-text function, which is to provide quick-fix remedies to people struggling with modern-day challenges and demands.

  6. Improving the research culture at historically black universities : The situation at the University of the North

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelen, J

    2003-01-01

    An important part of the transformation of higher education in South Africa concerns the professionalisation of historically black universities (HBUs). A vital element in this process forms the enhancement of a research culture that was hardly alive at these universities during the apartheid era. In

  7. The Networked University: The Structure, Culture, and Policy of Universities in a Changing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The universities in Europe are finding themselves in a turbulent environment. They are exposed to global and European developments. This article links changes in the structure, culture, and policy of universities to these developments and changes in the broader-than-national environment. The central question is, in short: what is globalisation…

  8. Improving the research culture at historically black universities : The situation at the University of the North

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelen, J

    An important part of the transformation of higher education in South Africa concerns the professionalisation of historically black universities (HBUs). A vital element in this process forms the enhancement of a research culture that was hardly alive at these universities during the apartheid era. In

  9. First "Chinese Culture Day" Held In Lebanese University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong; Liang

    2013-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Lebanese University,a 10-member Chinese University Students Delegation,sent by the CPAFFC visited Lebanon and held the first "Chinese Culture Day" in cooperation with the university’s Tourism and Hotel Management Department from November 14 to 20,2012. The university’s president,Dr. Adnan Hassan,a former Minister of State,met the delegation and expressed

  10. 75 FR 11554 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their... between the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah.... Repatriation of the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony to the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New...

  11. 78 FR 50108 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... no additional provenience information. Based on consultation with the Central Council of the Tlingit... culturally affiliated with the Tlingit. Furthermore, the museum was also informed during consultation that... between the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Central Council of the Tlingit &...

  12. Cross Cultural Perspectives of Gender and Management in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.; Riordan, S.; Ozkanli, O.; Neale, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This article presents preliminary results of a cross cultural study of gender and management in universities. Methodology: Qualitative interviews with senior managers in each country were analysed in relation to key concepts of career paths, support, gate keeping, management skills, disciplinary factors, gendered leadership styles and…

  13. Social and Cultural Factors That Effect University Women Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Sabo, Helena Maria; Siyli, Nese Aysin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, social and cultural effects of the low rate of woman managers at universities are tried to be identified. Women have been increasingly appearing in every field of business; on the other hand, although women compared to men constitute majority in educational organisations, they appear in the positions other than management. We will…

  14. Teaching Popular Culture in a Second Language University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson-Smith, Anne; Chik, Alice; Miller, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an established course on Popular Culture which is framed within the general educational model in an English-medium university. The article is organized into three parts: the underlining educational rationale for general educational courses, the course description, and the students' perspectives of their learning experience.…

  15. Teaching Popular Culture in a Second Language University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson-Smith, Anne; Chik, Alice; Miller, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an established course on Popular Culture which is framed within the general educational model in an English-medium university. The article is organized into three parts: the underlining educational rationale for general educational courses, the course description, and the students' perspectives of their learning experience.…

  16. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  17. How Universal Is Beethoven?: Music, Culture, and Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whale, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Daniel Barenboim, conductor of the Arab/Israeli West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, claims that "everywhere in the world … [Beethoven's Ninth Symphony] speaks to all people." But just how universal is Beethoven? Does his music exceed cultural boundaries or is Barenboim's idea of a "utopian republic," built, in part, upon Beethoven's…

  18. Facial expressions of emotion are not culturally universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Rachael E; Garrod, Oliver G B; Yu, Hui; Caldara, Roberto; Schyns, Philippe G

    2012-05-08

    Since Darwin's seminal works, the universality of facial expressions of emotion has remained one of the longest standing debates in the biological and social sciences. Briefly stated, the universality hypothesis claims that all humans communicate six basic internal emotional states (happy, surprise, fear, disgust, anger, and sad) using the same facial movements by virtue of their biological and evolutionary origins [Susskind JM, et al. (2008) Nat Neurosci 11:843-850]. Here, we refute this assumed universality. Using a unique computer graphics platform that combines generative grammars [Chomsky N (1965) MIT Press, Cambridge, MA] with visual perception, we accessed the mind's eye of 30 Western and Eastern culture individuals and reconstructed their mental representations of the six basic facial expressions of emotion. Cross-cultural comparisons of the mental representations challenge universality on two separate counts. First, whereas Westerners represent each of the six basic emotions with a distinct set of facial movements common to the group, Easterners do not. Second, Easterners represent emotional intensity with distinctive dynamic eye activity. By refuting the long-standing universality hypothesis, our data highlight the powerful influence of culture on shaping basic behaviors once considered biologically hardwired. Consequently, our data open a unique nature-nurture debate across broad fields from evolutionary psychology and social neuroscience to social networking via digital avatars.

  19. University and place branding: The case of universities located in ECC (European Capital of Culture cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Rekettye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the globalising landscape of higher education more and more universities are going international. These universities are facing growing competition, especially in enrolling international students. International competition forces them to use marketing and especially branding activity. University branding requires that the higher education institutions clearly define their differentiating features. One of the most important differentiating features is the place where the institution is located. University and place branding should work together to help the potential students in their decisions to choose the place of their study. The ECC (European Capital of Culture program which started in 1985 has helped many cities to identify their values and to develop their place branding activities. The study examines how the European Capital of Culture designation of the city helped the marketing activities of the universities located in these cities. The study attempts to explore to what extent universities located in ECCs used this special feature of their cities in their international marketing communication. The paper also attempts to analyse the effects the European Capital of Culture title could have on the international student enrolment activity of the concerned universities.

  20. Exploring Plausible Causes of Differential Item Functioning in the PISA Science Assessment: Language, Curriculum or Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoting; Wilson, Mark; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, large-scale international assessments have been increasingly used to evaluate and compare the quality of education across regions and countries. However, measurement variance between different versions of these assessments often posts threats to the validity of such cross-cultural comparisons. In this study, we investigated the…

  1. 75 FR 23801 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... to poles ``and carried by the Leader in the Seneca False Face Ceremonies.'' Museum documentation indicates that these medicine faces are culturally affiliated with the ``Seneca.'' NAGPRA representative consultants from the Tonawanda Seneca Nation informed the Rochester Museum & Science Center that...

  2. 75 FR 434 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Coroner's Office to the Burke Museum in 1965 (Burke Accn. 1966-77). All human remains are now missing. No... language group of Salish cultures. The Duwamish people primarily occupied this area, specifically the Lake people (Swanton 1952:423). In the 1870s, as the City of Seattle developed, the Lake people were...

  3. Cross-cultural Education at the International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.; Peeters, W.; Hill, H.

    2006-12-01

    A typical nine-week summer session of the International Space University includes 100 graduate students and young professionals from as many as thirty countries. In addition to lectures and team projects covering a variety of space-related disciplines, the curriculum contains several modes of cross-cultural education. In role- playing workshops, students (asked to behave in accord with known cultural norms of various countries) engage in negotiations on problems such as the rescue and return of astronauts as mandated in international agreements and treaties. Culture shock that could derail such negotiations in actual practice is observed, and the participants come away with heightened sensitivity to cultural differences. This technique could be extended to other educational settings, such as the activities of the UN's Regional Centres in developing countries and the outreach efforts associated with the International Heliophysical Year.

  4. 77 FR 23499 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Indian Arts & Culture/Laboratory of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... bowl fragments, four Agua Fria glaze- on-red bowls, one Cieneguilla glaze-on-yellow cup, one Santa Fe.../Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Tisdale, Director, Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Museum of New Mexico, P.O. Box 2087, Santa Fe,...

  5. Investigation of Theoretical Exams in Medical Faculties in Terms of Differential Item Functioning: Sample of Mersin University Medical Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Selvi

    2014-04-01

    Results: It was observed as a result of analyses via the method of Mantel Haenszel based on 7 exams that contained 100 multiple choice items each that only 6 items out of 700 included significant levels of Differential Item Functioning. It was also seen that item averages of foreign national students for the rest of all 694 items were lower compared to other students; however this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: According to the expert opinion for 6 items; long sentence structure, negative item root structure and some words that regarded as traditional play a role in the formation of Differential Item Functioning was found. It can be offered that we must not use long sentence structure, negative item root structure and some words that regarded as traditional for preparing exams to ensure validity of exams. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 240-247

  6. Tolerance as dialogical universals: philosophical aspects of cultural area enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Troitska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Non­violence world forming requires the polycultural world dialogueness which becomes the necessary tool of interaction subjects’ relationship harmonization. On the basis of research result analysis the author reveals the significant possibilities of tolerance in modern intercultural interaction and emphasizes its potential for dialogue. By analysis logics it is proposed to transfer tolerance into the area of dialogical universals which consist of general definitions, ideas in the philosophical meaning and also have life­oriented sense for a man. In the article dialogue and tolerance are considered as natural features of a man and tolerance meaning is explicated in cultural universals, and praxeological area of spiritual­practical perception and re­construction of the world. The article aim realization with the help of the phenomenological approach, the theoretical re­construction and the analytics concerning tolerance make possible the search of useful constructs of its more efficient implementation in scientific­educational and social­cultural area as in the modern philosophy universals are often considered as universals of culture. As the basis of the world comprehension, as the conceptual foundation of its remaking by a human or its adaption to him they are formed implicitly in the personality’s cultural­educational area and they become, on the one hand, an orientation basis in choosing the life strategies and a certain tool of reality phenomena perception and, on the other hand, an intellectual combination of images into the integral picture of the universe.

  7. Cultural Resources Survey of the Burnside Revetment Item, Ascension and St. James Parishes, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-27

    Louisiana’s archeological and architectural heritage from destruction by channel migration. Although no surface or subsurface cultural remains were found...National Register of Historic Places criteria. Archival research focused on historic land use and on historic architectural improvements to each of...Bringier, Tulane). In about 1800, Bringier built the mansion from which the plantation name "White Hall" derived. The residence was a French Gothic

  8. Performance Anxiety: Audit Culture and the Neoliberal New Zealand University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Stahl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the role of audit culture and research output measurement regimes in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It explores the nature of neoliberalism and how it has worked its way into research and publishing, as well as departmental and teaching, contexts. This forms an important part of what Alison Hearn has called the promotional university, complete with bibliometrics and the attendant disciplinary mechanisms that work to produce 'productive' researchers.

  9. Developing a qualitative research culture in university psychology departments

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Nollaig; Barry, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We are academics in the Department of Psychology, Middlesex University. Nollaig’s research is primarily qualitative and Richard’s primarily quantitative. We form part of a team responsible for developing and delivering Research Methods modules to students at undergraduate and postgraduate level. In this paper, we draw on our experiences and those of colleagues to discuss some challenges (and possible solutions) to changing the research culture in a psychology department.

  10. Economic Globalization, Politico-Cultural Identity and University Autonomy: The Struggle of Tsinghua University in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Su-Yan

    2006-01-01

    A great deal of research has addressed the tension between economic globalization and local cultural identity, and the tension between convergence in global policy objectives and divergence in local practices, but research has not explored the impact of the complex interactions between these tensions on an individual university, especially in…

  11. Women and culture. The case for universal rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruether, R R

    1996-01-01

    As the movement for women's human rights has become globalized, the charge that feminism is a form of Western cultural imperialism has emerged. An African Anglican priest used this as a response to the author's lecture on Christian feminism and added that "you can't challenge culture." The author responded that since racism could be considered a part of traditional White culture, does this mean that racism can't be challenged. The priest's argument is a common one used by Third World men, Third World women, and First World men to denounce the concept of human rights as women's rights. The Vatican used this argument during recent international conferences to oppose such things as the international approval of family planning and safe abortion, the diversity of notions of family, and an acknowledgement of homosexuality. In UN forums, Islamic nations also argue against women's rights and against the universalization of human rights, which they feel are properly superseded by local cultures. These concepts translated into debates at the Fourth World Conference on Women on topics such as conflicts between religious laws and women's inheritance rights. The culture-human rights argument is also used to defend the practice of female genital mutilation, which is used to control female sexuality in some traditional societies. Western feminist theory must guard against postmodernist critiques of modernity in the name of cultural diversity, since such critiques can make women vulnerable to right-wing male exploitation under premodern patriarchal norms. Classical philosophies of natural law, on the other hand, assume that the cosmos is a whole and that its nature implies ethical norms which govern human well-being. In this tradition, culture is a particular version of the common whole and must constantly be tested against discernment of the universals of human nature in order to be corrected. Feminists must temper their zeal for cultural diversity with an underlying acceptance

  12. Towards an Inclusive Pedagogical Culture: Experiences from University Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana María Fernández-Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with conceptual and methodological elements to develop the pedagogical inclusive competence of the professors of higher education in Ecuador. We analyze the current conceptions and the main drawbacks related to the inclusion process in the university environment nowadays. We support a theoretical procedural model, and from the practical standpoint, we implemented the methodological procedures structured in a map of processes to reach an inclusive formative process. The main results are given in the development of the pedagogical inclusive competence and the increase of the inclusion culture at the university, and revealed in the improvement of university curriculum from an inclusive approach, the betterment of the physical and technological infrastructure, the permanent upgrading of professors and putting into practice policies of affirmative action.

  13. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  14. ITEM - agro-food microbial culture collection: The importance of toxigenic fungi in the fight against mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelli Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal culture collections are important to biologists, microbiologists, epidemiologists and others involved in health and natural sciences. The improvement of techniques and methods for fungal isolation and preservation has contributed to maintain large microbial collections, which represent a rich source of biological sciences research, especially taxonomic, pathological and biodiversity studies as well as industrial applications. The collection centers are responsible for repository reference strains and for the maintenance of these microorganisms. The ITEM Microbial Culture Collection of ISPA (Institute of Sciences and of Food Production includes more than 10,000 strains belonging to various agro-food microorganisms with phytopathological and toxicological significance. These microorganisms are mainly fungal pathogens belonging to toxigenic genera of Fusarium, Aspergillus, Alternaria, and Penicillium. This collection is a remarkable resource in the fight against mycotoxins: the increasing number of toxigenic fungi included in this collection ensures an original genetic source for biotechnological applications in several fields of research, contributing to knowledge improvement about fungal biology and strategies development for reducing mycotoxin contamination.

  15. Development of a cross-cultural item bank for measuring quality of life related to mental health in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Auquier, Pascal; Baumstarck, Karine; Pelletier, Jean; Loundou, Anderson; Ghattas, Badih; Boyer, Laurent

    2015-09-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measurements are considered important outcome measures both for research on multiple sclerosis (MS) and in clinical practice. Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can improve the precision of measurements made using QoL instruments while reducing the burden of testing on patients. Moreover, a cross-cultural approach is also necessary to guarantee the wide applicability of CAT. The aim of this preliminary study was to develop a calibrated item bank that is available in multiple languages and measures QoL related to mental health by combining one generic (SF-36) and one disease-specific questionnaire (MusiQoL). Patients with MS were enrolled in this international, multicenter, cross-sectional study. The psychometric properties of the item bank were based on classical test and item response theories and approaches, including the evaluation of unidimensionality, item response theory model fitting, and analyses of differential item functioning (DIF). Convergent and discriminant validities of the item bank were examined according to socio-demographic, clinical, and QoL features. A total of 1992 patients with MS and from 15 countries were enrolled in this study to calibrate the 22-item bank developed in this study. The strict monotonicity of the Cronbach's alpha curve, the high eigenvalue ratio estimator (5.50), and the adequate CFA model fit (RMSEA = 0.07 and CFI = 0.95) indicated that a strong assumption of unidimensionality was warranted. The infit mean square statistic ranged from 0.76 to 1.27, indicating a satisfactory item fit. DIF analyses revealed no item biases across geographical areas, confirming the cross-cultural equivalence of the item bank. External validity testing revealed that the item bank scores correlated significantly with QoL scores but also showed discriminant validity for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. This work demonstrated satisfactory psychometric characteristics for a QoL item bank for MS in multiple

  16. Translation of Culture Specific Items: A Case Study of Persian Architecture Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Bagheridoust

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Architectural texts involve a great deal of CSIs that reflect the culture of a country.  Translating these CSIs from Persian into English seems one of the key issues in the translation of architectural texts.  This source-oriented descriptive study tried to investigate CSIs of the Persian architecture in order to examine the extent to which the translators/writers have succeeded in rendering CSIs, while translating them from Persian architecture into English or writing on the Persian Architecture in English.  In addition, it tried to investigate the most frequently used strategies by writers/translators according to Van Doorslaer’s (2007 model.  To serve research purposes, two textbooks on Iranian architecture (i.e., Introducing Persian Architecture by Pope and Abbasid Guest House by Ouliaienia were sampled.  The findings indicated that the translator (Ouliaienia and the writer (Pope were successful in finding appropriate equivalents for SL architectural terms.  The comparison of Pope’s textbook and Ouliaienia’s translation demonstrated that they had made use of four of the strategies (i.e., Direct Transfer, Word for Word Translation, Interpretation, and Domestication.  Accordingly, in pope’s book, Interpretation was the most frequently used strategy, while Direct Transfer was the most frequently utilized one in Ouliaienia.  On the other hand, Word for Word Translation was the least frequently used strategy in Pope’s work, whereas Domestication was the least frequently utilized one in Ouliaienia’s work.  The findings of the present study may have some significant implications for translation theory and practice. Keywords: Translation, CSIs, Persian Architecture, Terminology

  17. 75 FR 77897 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... notice. The eight Tlingit objects are one wooden box drum (catalogue number NA6828); one hide robe... approximately 20.0 cm high and 14.5 cm wide. In 1924, Louis Shotridge, a Tlingit Curator employed by the... from a Tlingit individual, Archie White (Dimitri Tukk'axaaw), the Mt. Fairweather/Snail...

  18. Cultural competency of health-care providers in a Swiss University Hospital: self-assessed cross-cultural skillfulness in a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Alejandra; Paroz, Sophie; Green, Alexander R; Wolff, Hans; Weber, Orest; Faucherre, Florence; Ninane, Françoise; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2014-01-30

    As the diversity of the European population evolves, measuring providers' skillfulness in cross-cultural care and understanding what contextual factors may influence this is increasingly necessary. Given limited information about differences in cultural competency by provider role, we compared cross-cultural skillfulness between physicians and nurses working at a Swiss university hospital. A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed in November 2010 to front-line providers in Lausanne, Switzerland. This questionnaire included some questions from the previously validated Cross-Cultural Care Survey. We compared physicians' and nurses' mean composite scores and proportion of "3-good/4-very good" responses, for nine perceived skillfulness items (4-point Likert-scale) using the validated tool. We used linear regression to examine how provider role (physician vs. nurse) was associated with composite skillfulness scores, adjusting for demographics (gender, non-French dominant language), workplace (time at institution, work-unit "sensitized" to cultural-care), reported cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem-awareness. Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) returned the survey: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses, reflecting institutional distribution of providers. Physicians had better mean composite scores for perceived skillfulness than nurses (2.7 vs. 2.5, p diverse populations (β = 0.11, p = 0.04). In stratified analyses among physicians alone, having French as a dominant language (β = -0.34, p diversity efforts in the work force, particularly among physicians.

  19. Organizational Silence in Universities as the Predictor of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan YAMAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the sense of organizational silence and the organizational culture the instructors perceived. In this study, the scale for determining organizational culture developed by İpek (1999 and the scale for measuring organizational silence developed by Çakıcı (2007 and adapted by Soycan (2010 are used. No remarkable difference was found in the academic staff's sense of organizational silence degree according to their genders and educational backgrounds. It was seen that the instructors' sense of organizational silence had remarkable differences according to their age group, faculty, sense of administration type in their institutions, frequency of their face-to-face communication with their administrators and their thoughts of speaking clearly with their administrators. It was observed that research assistants had a significantly higher sense of organizational silence than the lecturers in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience'. It was seen that academicians who had 1-5 years of employment period had the highest sense of organizational silence while those who had 21 years or more employment period had the lowest sense of organizational silence in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience' of organizational silence. When the points that participant academicians got from organizational silence and organizational culture scales analyzed in the correlation table, it was found out that there was a remarkable relationship between the academicians' sense of organizational silence and sense of organizational culture. This relationship was a medium-level negative relationship between subdimensions of two scales. A medium-level negative relationship between the organizational silence (total and the organizational culture was also seen. Based on the findings, university administrators were proposed to create a participant culture in their institutions as well as to encourage instructors to speak clearly and

  20. Research on university culture construction in the view of ecological idea

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinggang; Jia Mingwei; Peng Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    With the progress of times, our spiritual pursuit becomes higher and higher, and it is especially true among modern youth. Therefore, establishment of university culture has gradually become the focus of attention. This paper firstly quantized university culture construction into four parts: material culture construction, spiritual culture construction, system culture construction, and behavioral culture construction. It then analogized each part as one population in ecological system; establ...

  1. Prosocial spending and well-being: cross-cultural evidence for a psychological universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknin, Lara B; Barrington-Leigh, Christopher P; Dunn, Elizabeth W; Helliwell, John F; Burns, Justine; Biswas-Diener, Robert; Kemeza, Imelda; Nyende, Paul; Ashton-James, Claire E; Norton, Michael I

    2013-04-01

    This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: Human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). In Study 1, survey data from 136 countries were examined and showed that prosocial spending is associated with greater happiness around the world, in poor and rich countries alike. To test for causality, in Studies 2a and 2b, we used experimental methodology, demonstrating that recalling a past instance of prosocial spending has a causal impact on happiness across countries that differ greatly in terms of wealth (Canada, Uganda, and India). Finally, in Study 3, participants in Canada and South Africa randomly assigned to buy items for charity reported higher levels of positive affect than participants assigned to buy the same items for themselves, even when this prosocial spending did not provide an opportunity to build or strengthen social ties. Our findings suggest that the reward experienced from helping others may be deeply ingrained in human nature, emerging in diverse cultural and economic contexts.

  2. [Portuguese-language cultural adaptation of the Items Banks of Anxiety and Depression of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Natália Fontes Caputo de; Rezende, Carlos Henrique Alves de; Mendonça, Tânia Maria da Silva; Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins da; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa

    2014-04-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS), structured in Itens Banks, provides a new tool for evaluating results that apply to various chronic diseases through advanced statistical techniques (TRI) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The aim of this study was to culturally adapt the Items Banks of Anxiety and Depression of PROMIS to the Portuguese language. The process followed the recommendations of PROMIS through the advanced translation, reconciliation, back-translation, FACIT review, independent review, finalization, pre-test, and incorporation of the results from the pre-test. The translated version was pre-tested in ten patients, and items 3, 46, and 53 of the Bank of Anxiety and item 46 of the bank of Depression had to be changed. Changes affected equivalence of meaning, and the final version was consistent with the Brazilian population's linguistic and cultural skills. In conclusion, for the Brazilian population the translated version proved semantically and conceptually equivalent to the original.

  3. Cross-cultural development of an item list for computer-adaptive testing of fatigue in oncological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberguggenberger Anne S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Within an ongoing project of the EORTC Quality of Life Group, we are developing computerized adaptive test (CAT measures for the QLQ-C30 scales. These new CAT measures are conceptualised to reflect the same constructs as the QLQ-C30 scales. Accordingly, the Fatigue-CAT is intended to capture physical and general fatigue. Methods The EORTC approach to CAT development comprises four phases (literature search, operationalisation, pre-testing, and field testing. Phases I-III are described in detail in this paper. A literature search for fatigue items was performed in major medical databases. After refinement through several expert panels, the remaining items were used as the basis for adapting items and/or formulating new items fitting the EORTC item style. To obtain feedback from patients with cancer, these English items were translated into Danish, French, German, and Spanish and tested in the respective countries. Results Based on the literature search a list containing 588 items was generated. After a comprehensive item selection procedure focusing on content, redundancy, item clarity and item difficulty a list of 44 fatigue items was generated. Patient interviews (n = 52 resulted in 12 revisions of wording and translations. Discussion The item list developed in phases I-III will be further investigated within a field-testing phase (IV to examine psychometric characteristics and to fit an item response theory model. The Fatigue CAT based on this item bank will provide scores that are backward-compatible to the original QLQ-C30 fatigue scale.

  4. Cultural competency of health-care providers in a Swiss University Hospital: self-assessed cross-cultural skillfulness in a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As the diversity of the European population evolves, measuring providers’ skillfulness in cross-cultural care and understanding what contextual factors may influence this is increasingly necessary. Given limited information about differences in cultural competency by provider role, we compared cross-cultural skillfulness between physicians and nurses working at a Swiss university hospital. Methods A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed in November 2010 to front-line providers in Lausanne, Switzerland. This questionnaire included some questions from the previously validated Cross-Cultural Care Survey. We compared physicians’ and nurses’ mean composite scores and proportion of “3-good/4-very good” responses, for nine perceived skillfulness items (4-point Likert-scale) using the validated tool. We used linear regression to examine how provider role (physician vs. nurse) was associated with composite skillfulness scores, adjusting for demographics (gender, non-French dominant language), workplace (time at institution, work-unit “sensitized” to cultural-care), reported cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem-awareness. Results Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) returned the survey: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses, reflecting institutional distribution of providers. Physicians had better mean composite scores for perceived skillfulness than nurses (2.7 vs. 2.5, p cultural training (β = 0.14, p = 0.01) and lack of practical experience caring for diverse populations (β = 0.11, p = 0.04). In stratified analyses among physicians alone, having French as a dominant language (β = −0.34, p cultural competency improvement among providers. These results support the need for cross-cultural skills training with an inter-professional focus on nurses, education that attunes provider awareness to the local issues in cross-cultural care, and increased diversity efforts in the work force

  5. Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Tanya; Enfield, N. J.; Brown, Penelope; Englert, Christina; Hayashi, Makoto; Heinemann, Trine; Hoymann, Gertie; Rossano, Federico; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Yoon, Kyung-Eun; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Informal verbal interaction is the core matrix for human social life. A mechanism for coordinating this basic mode of interaction is a system of turn-taking that regulates who is to speak and when. Yet relatively little is known about how this system varies across cultures. The anthropological literature reports significant cultural differences in the timing of turn-taking in ordinary conversation. We test these claims and show that in fact there are striking universals in the underlying pattern of response latency in conversation. Using a worldwide sample of 10 languages drawn from traditional indigenous communities to major world languages, we show that all of the languages tested provide clear evidence for a general avoidance of overlapping talk and a minimization of silence between conversational turns. In addition, all of the languages show the same factors explaining within-language variation in speed of response. We do, however, find differences across the languages in the average gap between turns, within a range of 250 ms from the cross-language mean. We believe that a natural sensitivity to these tempo differences leads to a subjective perception of dramatic or even fundamental differences as offered in ethnographic reports of conversational style. Our empirical evidence suggests robust human universals in this domain, where local variations are quantitative only, pointing to a single shared infrastructure for language use with likely ethological foundations. PMID:19553212

  6. An Organizational Culture Study of Missouri State University Faculty/Staff in Relation to the University's Public Affair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Marissa LeClaire

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address a problem of practice of the public affairs mission through the perceptions of faculty and staff members at Missouri State University of the University's organizational culture. The design included a phenomenological study with a set of organizational culture procedural questions related to the perceptions…

  7. Universality of Man as a Cultural and Historical Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the grounds of theoretical synthesis, the paper reveals the phenomenon of human being in its creative dimension. The present research is aimed at exploring the prospective opportunities for academic processes. The basics of universal essence of man as a cultural historic being with unlimited potential of self- development are defined; the man being mirrored by the basic philosophic concepts: naturalistic, orthodox-oriented, bio-social or bio-socio-cultural. There are two opposing views on human nature: the anthropological essentialism holding that individuality is predetermined by essence; and the anthropological existentialism claiming the opposite – human existence precedes the essentiality, the latter being constituted by the acts of choice, self-development and self-responsibility for personal choice and projecting. In the first case, the subjective side of human existence is ignored, while in the second – the objective socially conditioned side is left behind. Both theories are antihistorical as it is the history that conditions the essence of man according to the ancestral determination, the latter being modified by way of human activity and communication in a particular historical period. The components of human universal essence are defined as follows: possession of organic body, social heritage, free will, self-activity, creativity, social and rational human nature, absence of antagonistic programs of social behavior. According to the author, for the adequate realization of human universality, it is necessary to move from the profit oriented speculative market economy to the creative one oriented on social effectiveness, quality of life and reproduction of wholesome individuals. The research output can be used for devising the methodology of philosophic and pedagogic anthropology, as well as pedagogic practices of teaching philosophy and pedagogic theory in higher school. 

  8. A new cultural adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; Doty, Richard L; Santos, Clayson Alan dos; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Voegels, Richard Louis

    2013-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a test of olfactory function that is widely used by otolaryngologists, geriatricians, and neurologists, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. In some instances, cultural and socioeconomic factors have necessitated changes in the odorant items or the response alternatives to make the test scores congruent with North American norms. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of Brazilian subjects on a new Portuguese language version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test with their performance on an earlier Portuguese language version of the test, as well as to assess the influences of gender, age, ethnicity, and economic status on the test scores. Based on pilot data, several response alternatives of the earlier Portuguese language version of the test were altered in an effort to improve test performance. Forty-nine healthy Brazilian volunteers, who represented several economic classes, were tested. The test scores of the study cohort who received the newer version of the test were compared with those of a group of 25 subjects who received the earlier version of the test. The mean score for the new version [35 (2.1)] was significantly (p = 0.002) higher than that for the earlier version [32.5 (3.5)]. Although no apparent influence of socioeconomic status was observed, the female participants outperformed the male participants in the current subject cohort. The changes made in the new cultural adaptation of the Portuguese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test were effective in increasing the average test scores of the participants. Overall, the female subjects outperformed the male subjects on the test.

  9. 78 FR 11679 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Binghamton University, State University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; and Tuscarora Nation met privately after the open consultation. On July...; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York);...

  10. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  11. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  12. Universidade pública e identidade cultural Public university and cultural identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto A. Salmeron

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Elogiamos a atitude dos professores na defesa das universidades públicas e damos ênfase ao papel dessas universidades em nossa identidade cultural como povo. Analisamos a pressão do FMI para que o ensino nas universidades públicas venha a ser pago e o perigo de que isto venha a acontecer em vista de declarações do próprio ministro da Educação. Resumimos as pressões exercidas pela OMC em setores industriais e comerciais e para a privatização do ensino, considerado como mercadoria. Descrevemos a preocupação da UNESCO com essa pressão. Analisamos a penetração cada vez maior das universidades privadas no ensino superior brasileiro, com seu caráter quase sempre comercial, e a diferença de mentalidade cultivada nessas universidades relativamente às universidades públicas.Praise is bestowed on the attitude of lectures in defense of the public universities and emphasis is given to the role these universities play in shaping our cultural identities as a people. We analyse the pressure by the IMF to make public universities charge fees, and the danger that this may happen vis a vis the statements by the Minister of Education. We summarize the pressure exerted by the World Commerce Organization on industrial and commercial sectors, and for the privatization of teaching seen as a commodity. We describe UNESCO's concern about this pressure. We analyse the growth of the private universities in Brazilian higher education, with its ever commercial character, and the difference in the mentalities cultivated there relative to that in the public universities.

  13. Teoria de Resposta ao Item na análise de uma prova de estatística em universitários Item Response Theory to analyze a statistics test in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudette Maria Medeiros Vendramini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou aplicar a Teoria de Resposta ao Item na análise das 15 questões de múltipla escolha de uma prova de estatística apresentada na forma de gráficos ou de tabelas estatísticas. Participaram 413 universitários, selecionados por conveniência, de duas instituições da rede particular de ensino superior, predominantemente do curso de Psicologia (91,5%. Os universitários foram 80% do gênero feminino e do período diurno (69,8%, com idades de 16 a 53 anos, média 24,4 e desvio padrão 7,4. A prova é predominantemente unidimensional e os itens são mais bem ajustados ao modelo logístico de três parâmetros. Os índices de discriminação, dificuldade e correlação bisserial apresentam valores aceitáveis. Os resultados mostram as dificuldades apresentadas pelos estudantes com relação aos conceitos matemáticos e estatísticos, dificuldades essas observadas em outras pesquisas desde o ensino fundamental. Sugere-se que esses conceitos sejam tratados mais profundamente no ensino superior.This study aimed to use the Item Response Theory to analyze the 15 multiple-choice questions of a statistics test presented in the statistics graphics or tables form. The 414 university students were selected by convenience from two private universities, predominantly psychology students (91.5%. The university students were 80% female and with 16-53 years old, mean 24.4 and standard deviation 7.4. The test has predominantly one dimension and the items can be better fitting to the model of three parameters. The indexes of difficulty, discrimination and bisserial correlation presented acceptable values. The results indicate the difficulties of university students in the mathematic and statistic concepts, that difficulties are observed in the other studies since the elementary education. One suggests making more profound studies of these concepts in higher education.

  14. 78 FR 34131 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... the Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores, CO, where they are currently located. Additionally, in 1999..., these items were transferred into the custody of the Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores, CO....

  15. 75 FR 44808 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... vessels, 10 arrow shafts, 4 arrow foreshafts, 12 arrows, 3 quivers, 2 bows, 9 items of clothing, 3 textile... materials, technology, and architecture indicate the affiliation of Southern Sinaguan sites in...

  16. Brazilian cross-cultural translation and adaptation of the "Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mansueto Mourao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To translate and to perform the cross-cultural adaptation of the “Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items” (MG-QOL15. Method The original English version of the questionnaire was translated into Portuguese. This version was revised and translated back into English. Later, both English versions were compared and the divergences were corrected in the Portuguese text. At a second stage, ten patients with MG followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic from the University Hospital, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais answered the questionnaire. The authors analyzed the difficulties and misunderstandings in the application of the questionnaire. Results The questions 8, 13 and 15 were considered difficult to understand and were modified in the final Portuguese version. Most patients (70% had a total score above 25, and the statements 3, 8 and 9 showed the highest scores. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the questionnaire MG-QOL15 seems to be a promising tool for the assessment of Brazilian patients with MG.

  17. Culture And Universal Professional Values In Global Organizations: Is There A Divergence Or Convergence Of Cultural Values?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nieves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses the theory of universal human values, the universal human values of people across cultures, and how culture and values impact organizations. This article reviews the history and research into human values, culture, and behavior, followed by reviews of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions and Schwartz and Bilky’s Theory of Universal Human Values.A strong connection exists between these theories and their related empirical research, not only chronologically, but also theologically and methodologically. The subjects are presented in a temporal sequence. Thus, the work of Professor Gert Hofstede is presented first; the work of Schwartz, Bilsky, is more recent, but strongly linked to prior research by Hofstede on values and culture. The objective is to improve ones understanding of work-related values, culture, and the impact that values may have on individuals in different cultural environments that are found in international organizations. This study tests to see if there is a difference in individualism scores of Mexican and American engineers when compared to Hofstede’s original study in 1980. This study also looks at the Mexican and American engineer samples to see if their scores on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions show a correlation with the scores on Schwartz’s culture-level dimensions. The study attempts to determine if there is a divergence or convergence of cultural values. Findings of the study are reported.

  18. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Awareness and Professional Growth through a School-University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Theresa M.; Eick, Charles J.; Womack, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing in-service and pre-service teachers to effectively work with culturally diverse students is an ongoing challenge for schools and universities alike. This article reports on a University-Professional Development School (PDS) initiative designed to enhance an awareness of culturally responsive pedagogy. This article describes a yearlong…

  19. Universality and Cultural Diversity in Professional Ethical Development: From Kohlberg to Dynamic Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkang

    2012-01-01

    Upholding ethical standards is part of what it means to be a professional and therefore part of professional education, but to what extent is the development of ethical reasoning universal across cultures, or is it highly dependent on culture? If universal, how can we explain the unique patterns of moral reasoning and behaviour in Asia, which…

  20. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test: phases I-III of a cross-cultural item bank development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, E.M.; Groenvold, M.; Petersen, M.; Young, T.; Constantini, A.; Aaronson, N.; Giesinger, J.; Meraner, V.; Kemmler, G.; Holzner, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item b

  1. 76 FR 73660 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... unassociated funerary objects: 2 adzes, 4 antler wedges, 1 awl, 2 bear teeth, 20 beaver incisors, 6 bifaces, 3... transferred from UI to WSU. The seven funerary objects are: 2 chert projectile points, 1 basalt adze blade, 1... points, 4 ground stone items, 2 shell pendants, 1 nephrite adze, 3 digging stick handles, 5 lots of...

  2. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test: phases I-III of a cross-cultural item bank development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Gamper; M. Groenvold; M. Petersen; T. Young; A. Constantini; N. Aaronson; J. Giesinger; V. Meraner; G. Kemmler; B. Holzner

    2013-01-01

    Background: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item b

  3. Cultural factors influencing Eastern and Western engineering students' choice of university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hua-Li; Eika Sandnes, Frode; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2010-05-01

    Insight into factors that affect students' choice of university is useful when designing study programmes, especially in global competition for students. This study focuses on Taiwanese and Norwegian students' preferences for university, study programme, course qualities and future career qualities. Hofstede's model was used to predict culture-related differences. A pair-wise decision questionnaire was used to conduct measurements. Cultural differences were observed in relation to choice of university, course qualities and future careers. Discipline of study had only minor impact on students' preferences. The results suggest that a career-relevant curriculum is culture-neutral. Moreover, personal advice is the most preferred factor among Taiwanese students when choosing university.

  4. 78 FR 36241 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional requestors... Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the address in this notice by July 17, 2013. ADDRESSES:...

  5. 75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... funerary object in the possession of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon... Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology professional staff in... Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, it is likely that these are from...

  6. Organizational Culture at the University Level: A Study Using the OCAI Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralinger, Barbara; Olson, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Organizational culture is a primary component of functional decision making in universities. In order for administrators, faculty, and staff to effectively coordinate an efficient academic environment for health education, continuing cultural assessment and change are necessary. The purpose of this study was to explore the concept of culture at…

  7. An Organizational Culture Assessment Using the Competing Values Framework: A Profile of Ohio State University Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrio, Angel A.

    2003-01-01

    Current and preferred culture of Ohio State University Extension was assessed by 297 extension staff categorized by gender, location, program area, title, age, and years employed. Most categories selected a Clan culture type as dominant in both the current and preferred situations. The Clan culture portrays an organization that concentrates on…

  8. Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Dennis G.; Hunt, Gilbert H.; Zhukov, Vassiliy I.; Mardahaev, Lev V.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in what constitutes effective teaching in Pre-K-12 and higher education is nearly universal. This important text explores this interest at the college and university level from a unique, international perspective. "Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia" brings to one…

  9. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the ASAS Health Index and ASAS Environmental Factors Item Set into European Portuguese Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Eduardo B; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Sousa, Sandra; Aguiar, Renata; Sepriano, Alexandre; Manica, Santiago Rodrigues; Kiltz, Uta; Branco, Jaime C; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of outcome measures to assess the impact of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) on health, function and quality of life. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) group developed the ASAS Health Index (ASAS-HI) and the ASAS Environmental Factors Item Set (ASAS-EF) to measure functioning and health across all aspects of health that are typically affected and relevant for patients with axSpA, based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The aim of this paper was to describe the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of both questionnaires into European Portuguese among patients with radiographic and non-radiographic axial SpA (nr-axSpA) and test the conceptual equivalence of the translated version in the Portuguese context. The ASAS-HI and ASAS-EF were firstly translated into European Portuguese and then back-translated into English, following forward-backward procedure. After the review of the Portuguese version by an expert committee, the field test with cognitive debriefing involved a sample of 10 axSpA patients with different gender, age, disease duration, and educational background. Minor difficulties arose from the translation process of the ASAS-HI. The EF Item Set offered more difficulties indicating that concepts underlying the contextual factors may be more culture-dependent. A total of 10 patients with axSpA [8 males, mean age of 41.4 (±13.7)] participated in the field test. Cognitive debriefing showed that items of the ASAS-HI and EF Item Set of the Portuguese version are clear, relevant, understandable and easy to complete. As a result of cognitive debriefing, the wording of four items had to be changed to avoid misunderstandings or unintended interpretations, and a new response option "not applicable" was added to two items of the ASAS-HI to improve appropriateness. The resulting Portuguese version of the ASAS-HI and ASAS-EF showed acceptable linguistic validity and has

  10. Researching Cultures in the Convergence’s University (Introduction)

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This issue of the Revista Electrónica Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado (REIFOP) offers a range of articles focused on the plurality of researchs in the Spanish university, in times of reforms and Europe Convergence.The authors of the articles are university professors who carry out their academic activity at Spanish and Foreing universities: Leiden, Salamanca, Haifa, Valladolid, Madrid, Huesca, Gerona, Málaga, Barcelona, Extremadura, Gipuzkoa, Granada y Huelva.

  11. Researching Cultures in the Convergence’s University (Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henar Rodríguez Navarro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This issue of the Revista Electrónica Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado (REIFOP offers a range of articles focused on the plurality of researchs in the Spanish university, in times of reforms and Europe Convergence.The authors of the articles are university professors who carry out their academic activity at Spanish and Foreing universities: Leiden, Salamanca, Haifa, Valladolid, Madrid, Huesca, Gerona, Málaga, Barcelona, Extremadura, Gipuzkoa, Granada y Huelva.

  12. Cultural self-efficacy of graduating baccalaureate nursing students in a state funded university in the Silicon Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Mao, Chia-Ling; Barnes-Willis, Lou Ellen A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the level of cultural self-efficacy of graduating baccalaureate nursing students using Bernal and Froman's Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). A convenience sample of 48 nursing students from an ethnically diverse community completed an 8-item demographic questionnaire and a 26-item CSES. The subjects of this study were found to have an increased level of cultural confidence in comparison with previous studies. Exposure to cultural concepts and to ethnically diverse populations may play an important role in this unique finding. This study also suggests nurse educators continue to incorporate cultural concepts and skills in the nursing curriculum.

  13. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, that meets the... Humboldt County, CA. The belt was donated to the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the...

  14. Analysis of controversial items in the theoretical design of the undergraduate's thesis at the Cuban University of Informatics Sciences (UIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Quintana Aput

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper encloses the analysis of some troubles related to the development of theoretical design concerning the undergraduate thesis at the Cuban University of Informatics Sciences (UIS. This analysis proves to be decisive due to the existing demand for improving professionals training in the fields of investigation related to computing world.

  15. The Invention Studio: A University Maker Space and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Craig R.; Moore, Roxanne A.; Jariwala, Amit S.; Fasse, Barbara Burks; Linsey, Julie; Newstetter, Wendy; Ngo, Peter; Quintero, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Creativity, invention, and innovation are values championed as central pillars of engineering education. However, university environments that foster open-ended design-build projects are uncommon. Fabrication and prototyping spaces at universities are typically "machine shops" where students relinquish actual fabrication activities to…

  16. University Students' Depression: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Santos, Maria Luisa R.; Habibi, Mojtaba; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Australian, Iranian and Portuguese university students ("n"?=?967) completed the University Students Depression Inventory (USDI) in English, Persian and Portuguese languages, respectively. A series of MANOVA analyses were used to examine differences in depression symptoms as an effect of the country and demographic variables.…

  17. Audit Cultures, Labour, and Conservative Movements in the Global University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    I want to use this essay -- basically a commentary -- as a context for some political reflections on what is happening to the governance and the labour processes at universities internationally. In the process, in addition to my critical reflections on the neoliberal impulses affecting universities, I want to do two other things. First, I shall…

  18. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AS CUSTOMER-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Demenenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of formation and development of organizational culture of the University as customer-centric technology. The phenomenon of organizational culture is an essential resource for improving the competitiveness of the University, innovative development, indicators of international and research activities of the University. Stream organizational culture external (students, parents, employers and internal (students, faculty, University administration, staff/employees customers of the University determines the integration of elements of organizational culture of University in business environment of enterprises, through the involvement of graduates in professional environment. Organizational culture plays a very active role in the governance of higher education institution. At the present level of development of the market of educational services with the introduction of the national project of modernization of the education system organizational culture becomes a significant part of the formation of the University as an economic entity. It is a powerful factor in increasing the attractiveness of higher education institutions for potential consumers of educational and other services, as well as his staff. Organizational culture affects each student during his adaptation and socialization, psychological growth and learning at the University. Organizational culture and, after graduation, is in a symbiotic relationship with the employee as the object of professional activity. Potential employee during the period of study at the University “consumes” the historically established values of the University, participates in the established and developing its traditions, abides by the norms and rules of behavior, adapts to the society through various kinds of symbolism of the University, etc. In turn, the organizational culture of the University, as a basis for the development and socialization of a young man, becoming an

  19. Age differences in personal values: Universal or cultural specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H; Ho, Yuan Wan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Noels, Kimberly A; Tam, Kim-Pong

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies on value development across adulthood have generally shown that as people age, they espouse communal values more strongly and agentic values less strongly. Two studies investigated whether these age differences in personal values might differ according to cultural values. Study 1 examined whether these age differences in personal values, and their associations with subjective well-being, showed the same pattern across countries that differed in individualism-collectivism. Study 2 compared age differences in personal values in the Canadian culture that emphasized agentic values more and the Chinese culture that emphasized communal values more. Personal and cultural values of each individual were directly measured, and their congruence were calculated and compared across age and cultures. Findings revealed that across cultures, older people had lower endorsement of agentic personal values and higher endorsement of communal personal values than did younger people. These age differences, and their associations with subjective well-being, were generally not influenced by cultural values. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. 75 FR 23802 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ..., kinship, linguistics, and oral tradition sources was considered in determining the cultural affiliation of... communities in what is now northern Mexico, shared vocabulary and syntax with Yuman language groups along...

  1. The role and the place of the Institute of Culture within a classical university structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern culture, having refused the generality of culture norms and ideals and offering plurality of their samples, confronts social institutes with a problem of choosing the ones, which they are intended to serve. Uppermost, this concerns such a social and educational institute as a university. Where, to what norms and ideals does the modern university lead the student if by opening the world in front of them, it offers a reality of cultural pluralism? How to show the truth if it is seen in its heterogeneous state? What culture and truth does the professor choose to orientate himself/herself in his/her teaching path? May the Institute/ Department of Culture help answer all these questions as being the one that started the history of university? To answer these questions the comparative-historical method of research has been used: the contradiction has been displayed against the background of culture problem solving in the history of the university. The article justifies the need for the development of the philosophical-culturological concept of forming and keeping culture values performed by the institutionalized organizations of the university. The problem of replacing the concept of ‘the graduate model’ with that of ‘the profession model’ as a goal of innovative university education has been justified.

  2. The Cross-Cultural Interaction Inventory: Development of Overseas Criterion Measures and Items That Differentiate Between Successful and Unsuccessful Adjusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    for field test implementation: (1) Bafa Bafa : A cross-cultural simulation, (2) Greek Language Games and Aids, (3) Japanese Contact and Communica- tion...of the Military Testing Association, in Press; (4) A Cross-Cultural Simulation, Ccumuni- que, December 1973, (5) BAFA BAJA, a communication exercise...lection decisions. It could also be used by Human Resource Management Centers as a personal feedback instrument. 161 REFERENCES Bafa Bafa , a

  3. Culture's Consequences on Student Motivation: Capturing Cross-Cultural Universality and Variability through Personal Investment Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Culture influences basic motivational processes; however, Western theories of achievement motivation seem to have neglected the role of culture. They are inadequate when trying to explain student motivation and engagement across a wide range of cultural groups because they may not have the conceptual tools needed to handle culturally relevant…

  4. Culture's Consequences on Student Motivation: Capturing Cross-Cultural Universality and Variability through Personal Investment Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Culture influences basic motivational processes; however, Western theories of achievement motivation seem to have neglected the role of culture. They are inadequate when trying to explain student motivation and engagement across a wide range of cultural groups because they may not have the conceptual tools needed to handle culturally relevant…

  5. 大学的文化使命%Cultural Mission of Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱庆葆

    2012-01-01

    In the current era, the innovation of cultural heritage has become the fourth function and mis- sion of the universities. At present, university culture in China is confronted with two major problems, one is considering university culture as pragmatism and utilitarianism, the other is simplifying university culture as ideology and socialist core value system. University culture is a dynamic system, which mainly consists of four interrelated levels, national culture, organizational culture of universities, inherent culture and campus culture respectively. In the current period of social transition, to fulfill its cultural mission, it is necessary for the uni- versities in China to adhere to idealism and theoretical innovation, implement cultural innovation and education and provide good service for the society.%当今时代,文化传承创新已成为大学的第四大职能和使命。当前,我国的大学文化面临着把大学文化建设简单地理解成实用主义、功利主义和把大学文化简单地等同于意识形态化这两大问题。大学文化是一个动态系统,主要包含相互关联的四个层面的文化,即国家文化、作为整体的大学组织文化、大学自身的特定文化和大学校园文化。在当今社会转型时期,我国大学要切实履行自己的文化使命,就要坚持理想主义,进行理论创新,坚持文化综合创新,实施文化育人,服务好社会。

  6. A Totem Pole Represents Native Culture at Seattle Pacific University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Kenneth

    1980-01-01

    The article describes a totem pole carved by a Tlingit artist using traditional symbols to illustrate the history and mission of Seattle Pacific University. The article also reports the 1979 dedication ceremony. (SB)

  7. Laterality of facial expressions of emotion: Universal and culture-specific influences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mandal, Manas K; Ambady, Nalini

    2004-01-01

    .... In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others are culturally influenced...

  8. Beijing University,a Blend of Chinese and Foreign Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    BEIJING Universityls one ofthe better-known Institutesof higher learning in China,an educational and research centerdealingwith a variety of subjects,Including science and technology,the humanities,sociology,adminis-tration and pedagogy.Founded 95years ago,it is alma mater to severalgenerations of fine scholars.The Birth of BeijingUniversityImperial College,the predecessor of Beliing University,founded inthe Reform Movement of 1898,wasa combination of Chinese and West-

  9. The role of leadership in bridging the cultural divide within university-industry cooperative research centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdad, Maral; Bogers, Marcel; Piccaluga, Andrea

    The purpose of this study is to understand the role of leadership in bridging the cultural gap within university-industry cooperative research centres. Many different aspects of university-industry collaborations have been researched, but the role of leadership in such organizations has not been...... deeply investigated. In order to advance our understanding in this context, our multiple case study addresses the question of how leadership bridges the cultural divide within university-industry joint laboratories. Our results are derived from 53 in-depth interviews with laboratory directors...... by distributed leadership practices at the collective level as being crucial in bridging the cultural divide between individuals within university-industry research centres. Our qualitative analysis draws on an analytical framework for leadership of university-industry cooperative research centres. Our findings...

  10. What Does "International University" Mean at a European Bilingual University? the Role of Languages and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiz, Aintzane; Lasagabaster, David; Sierra, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Internationalisation has brought about remarkable changes at universities all over the world. In the case of the University of the Basque Country (Spain) this is reflected in the increasing presence of English-medium instruction. This paper examines two issues: the university community's perception of (1) the term "international…

  11. The Role and Mission of the University in Cultural Development and Education: Diversity within Universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarukhan, Jose

    The university in Latin America has always been a dynamic and changing institution. One of the university's roles is to produce free and universal individuals, who are capable of thinking, deciding, and acting on their own, and are possessors of an inner freedom that liberates them of all types of prejudice. In its role as intellectual…

  12. University and place branding: The case of universities located in ECC (European Capital of Culture) cities

    OpenAIRE

    Gábor Rekettye; Gyöngyi Pozsgai

    2015-01-01

    In the globalising landscape of higher education more and more universities are going international. These universities are facing growing competition, especially in enrolling international students. International competition forces them to use marketing and especially branding activity. University branding requires that the higher education institutions clearly define their differentiating features. One of the most important differentiating features is the place where the institution is loca...

  13. Corporate Culture in a University Setting: An Analysis of Theory "X," Theory "Y" and Theory "Z" Cultures within University Academic Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semlak, William D.; And Others

    A study used M. Cuffe and J. F. Cragan's three-dimensional model for understanding corporate culture within an organization to describe the managerial styles of chairpersons at Illinois State University. Case studies were completed for 18 chairpersons, who then sorted 60 statements on leadership style on a forced choice continuum from most…

  14. 论大学组织文化%rganization Culture of the University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代芳芳; 兰云贵

    2012-01-01

    The obvious and unique characteristic of the univer- sity organization is concentratedly reflected by the organization culture of the university.The organizational rational culture,co- ntaining culture,humanistic culture,and perpetual dynamic cul- ture of the university organization gives the university perman- ently sincere and the vitality.This paper analyzed the present organization culture situation of the university,and proposed the strategy to spread the academic supreme value idea,to standard the behavior of the university and pay great attention to organi- zational spirit in view of how to fully display the positive role the organization culture of the university.%大学组织文化是大学组织根本属性及其独特性的集中反映。大学组织的理性文化、包容文化、人本文化、恒动文化共同赋予了大学以厚重与朝气。分析了大学组织文化的现状,并就如何充分发挥大学组织文化的积极作用,提出了倡扬学术至上的价值理念,规范大学组织行为及注重组织精神的培育之策略。

  15. 78 FR 64436 - Disposition of Unclaimed Human Remains and Other Cultural Items Discovered on Federal Lands After...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Office of the Secretary 43 CFR Part 10 RIN 1024-AE00 Disposition of Unclaimed Human Remains and Other... human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony discovered on Federal... the Secretary of the Interior to: (1) Promulgate regulations for disposition of human remains...

  16. On the Cultural Schema and Iranian EFL Learners' Reading Performance: A Case of Local and Global Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Farzaneh; Sadighi, Firooz

    2011-01-01

    Reading skill has taken on an important role in most EFL teaching situations. While linguistic knowledge is only one aspect of this skill, background knowledge including culture can also play an important role (Alptekin, 2006; Johnson, 1981; Pritchard, 1990; Steffensen, Chitra, & Anderson, 1979). This study investigated the effect of cultural…

  17. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... specific clans to the Mogollon region. Hopi cultural advisors have also identified medicinal and culinary... have found ceramic evidence at shrines in the Upland Mogollon region that confirms these reports. Zuni... human remains and associated funerary objects from this ancestral Upland Mogollon site. As reported...

  18. 78 FR 5197 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    .... Tribal cultural authorities of the Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto... Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by...

  19. 76 FR 62833 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... to be culturally affiliated with the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes... traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian... Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes may proceed after that date if no...

  20. Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at a South Florida University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multidisciplinary creative and research project at a South Florida public university. "Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at FAU" has explored and presented tattoos as a shared cultural experience, rather than as a symptom, or a fad. Considering relevant scholarship in various disciplines, tattoo emerges as a…

  1. Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at a South Florida University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multidisciplinary creative and research project at a South Florida public university. "Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at FAU" has explored and presented tattoos as a shared cultural experience, rather than as a symptom, or a fad. Considering relevant scholarship in various disciplines, tattoo emerges as a…

  2. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Culture and Collegiality at Protestant Christian Universities in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on faculty perceptions of organizational culture and collegiality at denominationally affiliated Christian colleges and universities in the Pacific Northwest. It was found that while faculty members perceive tension around their experience of organizational culture, the extent of their relationships as cultivated through formal…

  3. University Organizational Culture through Insider Eyes: A Case Study of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Haley; Conley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors examined university administrator and instructor perspectives about a writing program's organizational culture. In so doing, members of the writing program were invited to participate in interviews over a three-year period. This qualitative case study suggests that examples of culture through a three-lens…

  4. The Influence of Academic Culture on Quality Management System ISO 9001 Maintenance within Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, Siti Arni; Davies, John; Douglas, Jacqueline; Douglas, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of the elements of academic culture on quality management system ISO 9001 maintenance within Malaysian universities. There is a dearth of empirical studies on maintaining ISO 9001, particularly in the higher education context. From the literature review, academic culture was classified according to four…

  5. When Culture and Learning Styles Matter: A Canadian University with Middle-Eastern Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke-Westcott, Tracey; Johnson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Transnational branch campuses of universities are a growing phenomenon, particularly in the Middle-East. The cultures of home institutions and host countries are often foreign to each other. The result is a cultural and learning style gap between faculty and students impacting students' learning and teachers' effectiveness. A pilot study of the…

  6. Organisational Cultures in Public and Private Portuguese Universities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aristides I.; Hill, Manuela M.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptions of organisational culture made by three categories of staff playing managerial roles in each of two Portuguese Universities (one public and the other private) were compared using a questionnaire adapted from the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument and translated into Portuguese. The four scales of the questionnaire, designed…

  7. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  8. Beyond the Corporate University: Culture and Pedagogy in the New Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A., Ed.; Myrsiades, Kostas, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection show how and why the critical functions of democratically informed civic education must become the core of the universitys mission. Part 1, "Higher Education and the Politics of Corporate Culture," contains; (1) "Franchising the University" (Jeffrey J. Williams); (2) "Vocationalizing Higher Education: Schooling and…

  9. Teaching in Offshore Programmes: An Assessment of University Faculty's Self-Efficacy, Cultural Competence and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine the teacher self-efficacy and cultural competence of university faculty in the context of offshore programmes, and the impact of these two constructs on teaching satisfaction, intention and preparedness. A questionnaire survey collected data from the faculty members of universities in Taiwan, a non-English-speaking…

  10. Study of a Russian University's Organisational Culture in Transition from Planned to Market Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushnykh, Victor; Chemeris, Valeriy

    2006-01-01

    The transition from a planned centralist economy to a market economy over the last decade of the 20th century has presented Russian universities with many profound challenges. These challenges require universities to review and consider their organisational culture and deserve careful study. This paper describes the changes that have taken place…

  11. Monitoring Educational Organizations' Culture of Sustainable Consumption: Initiating and Evaluating Cultural Change in Schools and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Patterns of consumption are considered as a main driver of unsustainable development. In the debate, education and educational organizations are unisonous considered as a key player to contribute to a more sustainable socialization of young consumers. Both schools and universities are challenged to become places and life-worlds in which sustainable consumption can be learned and experienced. The objective of this paper was to explore how educational organizations can effectively engage their members in bringing about the aspired transformations and monitoring their effects. Approach: The study used a conceptual approach that included three steps. Firstly, the concept of an educational organization’s Culture Of Consumption (COC was adopted as an analytical frame of reference. In a second step, methodological propositions for changing the organizational COC were discussed drawing on the concepts of mode-2 knowledge production and participatory change management. In a third step, existing tools and approaches to sustainability auditing in the educational context were screened and critically discussed against the background of recent innovations in mode-2 approaches to sustainability evaluation. Results: The findings revealed that while existing sets of indicators did adequately account for key consumption-related organizational operations and to some extent for educational goals and aspirations, they failed to tap the realm of underlying and tacit basic assumptions that substantiate the essence of an organizational COC. To remedy this shortcoming, additional indicators and modifications were proposed. As a synthesis, a synoptic framework of a monitoring system for an educational organization’s COC was presented. Conclusion: The study’s results highlighted the need to develop monitoring frameworks that go beyond assessing operative performances and pay greater attention to reflective, interpretative and deliberative

  12. Plagiarism in the Japanese Universities: Truly a Cultural Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Although plagiarism is considered among western academic circles as one of the worst "crimes" a student can commit, many scholars suggest that these attitudes do not apply to students from areas outside this sphere. They believe that in many countries, plagiarism is considered culturally acceptable. As such, ESL or EFL instructors in…

  13. Plagiarism in the Japanese Universities: Truly a Cultural Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Although plagiarism is considered among western academic circles as one of the worst "crimes" a student can commit, many scholars suggest that these attitudes do not apply to students from areas outside this sphere. They believe that in many countries, plagiarism is considered culturally acceptable. As such, ESL or EFL instructors in…

  14. University Safety Culture: A Work-in-Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Safety management systems in Australian higher education organisations are under-researched. Limited workplace safety information can be found in the various reports on university human resources benchmarking programs, and typically they show only descriptive statistics. With the commencement of new consultation-focused regulations applying to…

  15. Cross-Cultural Knowledge Management of University Professors in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, Mamilla

    2005-01-01

    To be consistent with WTO promulgations at Cancun 2003 meet, India as one of the founding members has made open to foreign and private universities to enter into India to do trade in higher education services from January, 2005 onwards. To withstand this imminent competition, the author in this survey based research article tries to suggest…

  16. Stigmatised Learners: Mature-Age Students Negotiating University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Research on the socially-situated nature of learning shows how practices and identities are affected by participation in communities, but very little is known about how mature-age students experience the relational dynamics of university. Based on data from a qualitative study of first-year students, we consider written accounts by older learners…

  17. Exploring the Heterogeneity of Class in Higher Education: Social and Cultural Differentiation in Danish University Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between social background, choice of university programme and academic culture among Danish university students. Statistically and sociologically, university students are often treated as a homogeneous group, but the ever-increasing number of students in higher...... education demands a closer examination of the hidden heterogeneity in the students’ social origin and educational strategies. Using a mixed-method approach (register data and ethnographic observations and interviews) the paper focuses on the students’ class origins and on different cultural practices...

  18. Laterality of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Universal and Culture-Specific Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas K. Mandal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that (a the perception and expression of facial emotion are lateralized to a great extent in the right hemisphere, and, (b whereas facial expressions of emotion embody universal signals, culture-specific learning moderates the expression and interpretation of these emotions. In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others are culturally influenced. We suggest that the left side of the face is more expressive of emotions, is more uninhibited, and displays culture-specific emotional norms. The right side of face, on the other hand, is less susceptible to cultural display norms and exhibits more universal emotional signals.

  19. Laterality of facial expressions of emotion: Universal and culture-specific influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Manas K; Ambady, Nalini

    2004-01-01

    Recent research indicates that (a) the perception and expression of facial emotion are lateralized to a great extent in the right hemisphere, and, (b) whereas facial expressions of emotion embody universal signals, culture-specific learning moderates the expression and interpretation of these emotions. In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others are culturally influenced. We suggest that the left side of the face is more expressive of emotions, is more uninhibited, and displays culture-specific emotional norms. The right side of face, on the other hand, is less susceptible to cultural display norms and exhibits more universal emotional signals. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  20. Linguistic and Cross-Cultural Complexities of A Specialized Legal Item: The ‘True And Fair’ Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Zanola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our contribution is that of analysing the possible linguistic and cross-cultural contexts where the hendiadys true and fair was born, and exploring the meaning implications of the same ‘formula’ during the centuries. We start from the hypothesis that true and fair is a hendiadys, to show that the two terms take strength and completeness one from the other, so as to generate an only complex meaning, whose original usage was, last but not least,  a literary and poetical one. The analysis of the hendiadys moves from the non-legal to the legal context, following steps of the etymological and lexical research methodology.

  1. Measuring impairments of functioning and health in patients with axial spondyloarthritis by using the ASAS Health Index and the Environmental Item Set: translation and cross-cultural adaptation into 15 languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiltz, U; van der Heijde, D; Boonen, A; Bautista-Molano, W; Burgos-Vargas, R; Chiowchanwisawakit, P; Duruoz, T; El-Zorkany, B; Essers, I; Gaydukova, I; Géher, P; Gossec, L; Grazio, S; Gu, J; Khan, M A; Kim, T J; Maksymowych, W P; Marzo-Ortega, H; Navarro-Compán, V; Olivieri, I; Patrikos, D; Pimentel-Santos, F M; Schirmer, M; van den Bosch, F; Weber, U; Zochling, J; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Assessments of SpondyloArthritis international society Health Index (ASAS HI) measures functioning and health in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) across 17 aspects of health and 9 environmental factors (EF). The objective was to translate and adapt the original English version of the ASAS HI, including the EF Item Set, cross-culturally into 15 languages. Methods Translation and cross-cultural adaptation has been carried out following the forward–backward procedure. In the cognitive debriefing, 10 patients/country across a broad spectrum of sociodemographic background, were included. Results The ASAS HI and the EF Item Set were translated into Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai and Turkish. Some difficulties were experienced with translation of the contextual factors indicating that these concepts may be more culturally-dependent. A total of 215 patients with axial SpA across 23 countries (62.3% men, mean (SD) age 42.4 (13.9) years) participated in the field test. Cognitive debriefing showed that items of the ASAS HI and EF Item Set are clear, relevant and comprehensive. All versions were accepted with minor modifications with respect to item wording and response option. The wording of three items had to be adapted to improve clarity. As a result of cognitive debriefing, a new response option ‘not applicable’ was added to two items of the ASAS HI to improve appropriateness. Discussion This study showed that the items of the ASAS HI including the EFs were readily adaptable throughout all countries, indicating that the concepts covered were comprehensive, clear and meaningful in different cultures. PMID:27752358

  2. Examining a Paradigm for Cultural Development at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

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    Mohammad Bakhtazmay Bonab

    2016-12-01

    Results: Assessing the effective factors on cultural development indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between current and optimal status (p<0.001 (95% CI: 1.435.00. Results indicated that there is a significant difference in cultural development between current status and optimal state among the staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Conclusion: The results of the research show that cultural education in its optimal state is of higher rank than other indicators. Thus it seems necessary to pay more attention to cultural development and sustainable development.

  3. We Say "Culture" and Students Say What? University Students' Definitions of Foreign Language Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Definitions of culture of 212 first-, second-, and third-year German students are presented and discussed. Results sow that--in terms of the national standards--students overall prefer practices and perspectives over products. Students views on the teachability of culture and its appropriate place in the foreign language classroom are explored.…

  4. The New University President: Communicating a Vision, Cultural Competency, and Symbolic Cultural Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, Elizabeth Anne

    2009-01-01

    University presidents are the institutional leaders responsible for guiding the direction of an institution. The president serves both as the symbolic leader of a university and as one responsible for directing change. When a new president arrives, the institution assumes and prepares for change and a new direction. One measure of presidential…

  5. A Research about Attitudes and Behaviors of University Students with Having Different Cultures towards the Environment through Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the environmental attitudes and behaviors of the university students with different cultures. This research was prepared in accordance with survey model. The population of the research is composed of 300 university students with different cultures studying at Near East University in 2015-2016 academic…

  6. Vigilance as a caring expression and Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J M

    1998-01-01

    Vigilance, or the close, protective involvement of families caring for hospitalized relatives, was explored in this study using holistic ethnography. Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality provided direction for the researcher to generate substantive data about the meanings, patterns, and day-to-day experience of vigilance. Five categories of meaning were derived from the data: commitment to care, emotional upheaval, dynamic nexus, transition, and resilience. The research findings expand understanding of vigilance as a caring expression, suggest direction for nursing practice, and contribute to Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality and the development of nursing science.

  7. THE PREPARATION OF A SPECIALIST IN NETWORKING CULTURAL-EDUCATIONAL SPACE OF UNIVERSITY

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    Zinaida Kekeeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with specialist preparation problems in networking cultural-educational space of the University. The authors consider the role of networking technologies in quality improvement of educational services in the conditions of the international cooperation. They also substantiate the process of entering the future experts in the working environment, the formation of their professional and personal competencies. The article reveals priority areas of training new generation specialists in the cultural and educational space of the university taking into account modern educational trends in the world.

  8. Laterality of Facial Expressions of Emotion: Universal and Culture-Specific Influences

    OpenAIRE

    Manas K. Mandal; Nalini Ambady

    2004-01-01

    Recent research indicates that (a) the perception and expression of facial emotion are lateralized to a great extent in the right hemisphere, and, (b) whereas facial expressions of emotion embody universal signals, culture-specific learning moderates the expression and interpretation of these emotions. In the present article, we review the literature on laterality and universality, and propose that, although some components of facial expressions of emotion are governed biologically, others ar...

  9. 76 FR 73658 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... pipes; three projectile points; two chert flakes; cloth fragments; one wooden fire horn plug; one conch...; botanical remains including burned wood and seven cloth fragments; two lots of vermillion; one piece of lead...; six shell pendants; three pieces of glass; three samples of red ochre; three mink skull fragments; one...

  10. 77 FR 15799 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's... recognized Indian group, the basket has been identified as a treasure basket or Osa. This type of basket...

  11. 75 FR 8741 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. The ceramic and arrow point styles were identified as Caddo, dating..., pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be...

  12. The culture of peace in the context of university education in Venezuela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Coromoto Sánchez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation addresses the management of the culture of peace in the educational environment, specifically from the context of university education. The aim is to present the treatment of this subject, from different theoretical and the realization of a culture of peace in science teaching, from the educational space, valuing the inclinations from the optics, of holism, interdisciplinary, integration of education, contemporary critical approach on violence and conflict, and analysis of adaptation to the concrete realities to the cultural, social and geographical.

  13. Developing General Cultural Literacy through Teaching English in a Russian University: Competence and Semiotic Approach

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    Svetlana A. Zolotareva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some of the issues of teaching English in a Russian university, which arouse as a result of introducing new educational standards and it discusses the ways of forming students’ general cultural competence by using authentic curricula, in order to meet the requirements of those standards. It also shows the importance of semiotics for acquisition a foreign language and culture, and reveals the worth of “personalia” as a culture language sign, as well as peculiarity of its functioning, which lies in its ability to represent social and cultural values and priorities in personal-precedential form, thus making a contribution to developingan individual’sconcept scheme and, consequently, general cultural literacy.

  14. The Integrated Curriculum, University Teacher Identity and Teaching Culture: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Israel Alonso; Sancho, Naiara Berasategi

    2017-01-01

    The results of an investigative process are reported that centre on the impact that modular curricular organization and its interdisciplinary activity are having on the teaching culture in the Degree in Social Education at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/ EHU). This understanding of the curriculum is a seminal change for teaching staff…

  15. The Science-Humanities Program (NEXA) at San Francisco State University: The 'Two Cultures' Reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Michael S.

    1980-01-01

    The origin of the NEXA Program at San Francisco State University is described. A historical summary is offered of the 'two-cultures' dilemma, whose origins are traced to the seventeenth century and whose consequences for the nineteenth and twentieth century experience are examined. (Author/MLW)

  16. Cultural Navigators: International Faculty Fathers in the U.S Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret; Hart, Jeni

    2015-01-01

    Based on interviews with 16 international tenure-track and tenured faculty fathers from collectivist cultures at 2 U.S. research universities, this study explores how these men reconcile the demands of parenting with those of the academic career. Adding to a robust body of literature on the concerns of domestic faculty parents, this study focuses…

  17. Universality, Diversity and Legal Certainty: Cultural Diversity in the Dialogue between the CEDAW and States Parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Vleugel, V.; Kanetake, M.; Nollkaemper, A.

    2016-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that the universal value and application of international human rights norms does not imply a uniform implementation of these rights, thereby leaving room for local and culture specific implementation at the national level. The question remains, however, what the precise scope

  18. Towards a Campus Culture of Environmental Sustainability: Recommendations for a Large University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Brett L. M.; Marans, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors led an interdisciplinary team that developed recommendations for building a "culture of environmental sustainability" at the University of Michigan (UM), and the purpose of this paper is to provide guidance on how other institutions might promote pro-environmental behaviors on their campuses.…

  19. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  20. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  1. Towards a Campus Culture of Environmental Sustainability: Recommendations for a Large University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Brett L. M.; Marans, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors led an interdisciplinary team that developed recommendations for building a "culture of environmental sustainability" at the University of Michigan (UM), and the purpose of this paper is to provide guidance on how other institutions might promote pro-environmental behaviors on their campuses.…

  2. Organizational Culture and University Responses to Parenting Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Biederman, Donna J.; Gringle, Meredith R.

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines implications of a university's culture on advocating for supportive policies and programs for parenting students. Four themes illuminated several key tensions within the institution that affected support for parenting students: the lack of formal policy, an emphasis on faculty practices around accommodations, concerns…

  3. RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS TO EVALUATE THE DEVELOPMENT OF INCLUSIVE CULTURE AT UNIVERSITIES

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    E. L. Tikhomirova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of inclusive education at Russian universities that is widely regarded as the strategy of supporting and satisfying the needs of diverse  groups  of learners  and educators.  In  order  to introduce the idea of inclusion as a resource of individual development it is necessary to create an inclusive culture at every institution of higher education. In this paper the authors define the concept of «inclusive culture at university», describe its structure and explain its significance for the development of university’s image. The article presents the description of the research instrument enabling the evaluation of the existence and the level of inclusive culture. This research instrument includes two content parts that allow evaluating the creation of «inclusive community» and the establishment of «inclusive values». Besides, the authors describe the indicators for each of the content parts. The research has been conducted in the Vologda state university and the data received allowed the authors to test the questionnaires and to analyze the findings. The authors conclude that it might be possible to apply this method not only to assess the level of inclusive culture but also to reveal its «strengths» and «weaknesses» allowing university authorities to plan activities for their development and/or correction.

  4. Anthropological Methods of Formation of University Students' Spiritual and Moral Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, Rashad A.; Nikonova, Elina I.; Gurbanov, Ramin A.; Svechnikova, Natalia V.; Tumarov, Konstantin B.; Marin, Evgeniy M.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is reasoned by the increasing complexity of life activity in modern society, which results in distortion of the moral and value criteria and norms. The purpose of the article is to reveal anthropological methods of formation of university students' spiritual and moral culture. The leading approach to the study is the…

  5. Commentary: Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University--1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, author John Byrne reflects on his 1998 "Journal of Public Service & Outreach" article, "Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University" reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement." Byrne's 1998 article was a call to modify…

  6. Collegiality and Culture: General Education Curriculum Reform at Western Protestant University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrow, Greg

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the process of general education curriculum reform at Western Protestant University (WPU), a pseudonym for a religiously affiliated liberal arts college in the western United States. The theoretical framework for describing the process comes from two areas: institutional culture and a typology of academic change developed by…

  7. Cultural Diversity in Introductory Psychology Textbook Selection: The Case for Historically Black Colleges/Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Clay, William A. L.; Broussard, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes a culturally relevant approach to introductory psychology textbook selection for students attending a historically Black college/university (HBCU). The following multistage procedure was used: (1) a survey of HBCU psychology departments was conducted to ascertain how they selected their introductory psychology…

  8. Crossing Cultural Borders: "La Clase Magica" as a University-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Lucila D.; Machado-Casas, Margarita; Sanchez, Patricia; Alanis, Iliana

    2010-01-01

    As informed by scholarship on transformative leadership, cultural work in educational leadership, and preK-20 collaborations, this article draws from a qualitative research project between a university that is a Hispanic-serving institution and an elementary school located in a Latino/a area. We examine the perspectives of a Latino principal and a…

  9. The Effect of the Research Assessment Exercise on Organisational Culture in English Universities: Collegiality versus Managerialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the effect of the research assessment exercise (RAE) on the balance between collegiality and managerialism in English universities. The article examines the institutional strategies for the 2001 RAE and its effect on organisational culture, identifying change in governance, management and leadership in…

  10. Cross-Cultural Leader Development in a University Club: An Autoethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Edward Lewis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of research on the organization, effectiveness, and strategies of leadership teams. Less research exists on such aspects in cross-cultural teams. Little is known about how team leadership can be used in cross-cultural university clubs and how such settings foster leader development. Within the framework of existing literature, this analytic autoethnography examines how I develop leadership skills in university students cross-culturally through a student choir club by utilizing a team leadership model. This study provides an understanding of how leader development can occur in university clubs in cross-cultural settings through employing a team leadership model. Student club advisors may benefit from knowing the benefits of consciously developing leadership skills with club members and some strategies of how to develop such skills. Students might recognize the advantages of clubs that can help them become better leaders. Current club leaders can see that leadership skills can be developed in all types of clubs, especially within a choir. University administrators can see the practical value of extra-curricular student clubs in developing leaders.

  11. Local University Students and Intercultural Interactions: Conceptualising Culture, Seeing Diversity and Experiencing Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Cassandra; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the intercultural interaction experiences of local, first-year students (n?=?25) in their first few weeks at university. The focus on local students complements existing intercultural interaction literature, which has tended to concentrate on the experience of the "cultural other" student. Employing qualitative…

  12. How National Foreign Language Week Promotes Cultural Awareness at a Historically Black University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan-Cobb, Irma; Lassiter, Linda E.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how celebrating National Foreign Language Week has increased cultural awareness and appreciation among students enrolled in foreign language courses at one of the largest historically Black universities in the United States. In addition, more students have expressed an interest in pursuing minors in foreign languages. (Author/VWL)

  13. 新时期大学文化建设探讨%Discussion on University Cultural Construction in New Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石海英; 吕艾芹

    2011-01-01

    大学文化是社会文化的重要组成部分,有三种形态:物质文化、精神文化和制度文化。大学文化具有独特的功能,树立正确的大学文化观,可以推动大学的健康发展。%University culture is an important part of social culture, there are three forms:material culture, spiritual culture and institutional culture. University culture has its unique features. Establish a correct concept of university culture is good to promote healthy development of the University.

  14. 藏族地区祭祀物的转变及文化意义%The Cultural Significance of the Changing Sacred Items in Tibetan Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜亮

    2012-01-01

    藏族作为一个宗教信仰浓厚的民族,在其宗教发展历史上拥有种类庞杂的祭祀仪式,早期的活人祭祀、牺牲祭祀、后来的模拟祭祀以及演化出的静态祭祀物,每一类祭祀物都隐含着藏民族特有的文化内涵,代表着他们对于自身有限性的认知以及对外在无限性探索的神性诉求。%There is a variety of rituals in the religious history of Tibetans who have a strong faith in the religion. From the early human sacrifice, sacrificial rituals, to the later simulative sacrifice and the static sacred items evolved, each takes a unique cultural connotation of Tibetan people, and repre sents their divine aspirations of the limited self-cognition and the limitless external quest.

  15. Kövecses, Zoltán. Metaphor in culture: universality and variation Kövecses, Zoltán. Metaphor in culture: universality and variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Teixeira Diniz Faraco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Zoltán Kövecses is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of American Studies, Eötvös Loránd University. He is also the author of Language, Mind and Culture: A practical introduction (2006, Metaphor and Emotion (2002 and Metaphor: A Practical Introduction (2000. The author’s major goal in this work is to develop a theory of metaphor variation, based on the cognitive linguistic view of metaphor. According to Kövecses, cognitive linguists who share the contemporary view of metaphor have carried out important studies concerning the universal aspects of metaphor

    Zoltán Kövecses is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of American Studies, Eötvös Loránd University. He is also the author of Language, Mind and Culture: A practical introduction (2006, Metaphor and Emotion (2002 and Metaphor: A Practical Introduction (2000. The author’s major goal in this work is to develop a theory of metaphor variation, based on the cognitive linguistic view of metaphor. According to Kövecses, cognitive linguists who share the contemporary view of metaphor have carried out important studies concerning the universal aspects of metaphor

  16. The interface between bioethics and cultural diversity under the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chang-fa

    2008-06-01

    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights has made clear its aims to provide a universal framework of principles and procedures to guide States in the formulation of their legislation, policies or other instruments in the field ofbioethics and also to guide the actions of individuals, groups, communities, institutions and corporations so as to promote appreciation for human dignity and to protect human rights. It also sets up 15 principles to be applied. One of the principles in the Declaration is about the recognition of cultural diversity as an important element of bioethics. Thus it is clear that bioethics has its relativeness and is susceptible to different cultures. However, in order not to have the bioethics principles being defeated because of the cultural factor, the Declaration set forth conditions to limit the application of the cultural diversity element. This approach is called "qualified absoluteness" by the author. The paper discusses these conditions and the problems arising from their applications. Basically, there is a clear line drawn to limit the application of cultural diversity in setting up and in applying bioethical rules. The line drawn is based on the concept of human rights, the principles and concepts of which have not only been set forth in the Human Rights Convention, but have also been prescribed in other provisions in the Declaration. From conceptual viewpoint, the Declaration has listed a number of soft-law rules, which in turn also provide authorization for the government or private or public groups to take cultural diversity into account. Although the rules set forth in most of the parts in the Declaration are of soft but absolute mandates in nature, the requirement of paying due regard to cultural diversity is in fact providing governments as well as groups a possibility to enact or apply their bioethical rules to reflect their cultural uniqueness. The term "qualified absoluteness" is used in this paper to reflect

  17. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  18. Measuring Culture Effect size Differences in Slovenian and Portuguese Leadership Practices: Cross-Cultural Leadership Universality or Contigency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašković Matevž

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper measures the cultural effect size across five types of leadership practices by using the Leadership Practice Inventory (LPI instrument and drawing on the GLOBE research project framework. It tests cultural universality vs. contingency in five LPI leadership practices in an East-West EU comparison, both with an ex-socialist past. It employs four different effect size statistics. The paper contributes to the narrowing of the empirical gap in researching leadership practices in a small, East-West European country context. Only two of the five leadership practices show statistically significant effect sizes. Furthermore, the leadership practice Encouraging the heart is the only one to display a relatively moderate effect size. Thus, the evidence seems to support the universalist perspective over the contingency perspective.

  19. Is Male Androphilia a Context-Dependent Cross-Cultural Universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Raymond; Garfield, Zachary; Garfield, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The cross-cultural ethnographic literature has traditionally used the label male "homosexuality" to describe sexual relationships between biological males without considering whether or not the concept encompasses primary sexual attraction to adult males. Although male androphilia seems to be found in all national populations, its universal existence in tribal populations has been questioned. Our goal is to review previous cross-cultural classifications and surveys of male same sex behavior to present a system that does justice to its varied expressions, especially as it is informed by contemporary sexuality research. Previous comparative research does not effectively distinguish male same sex behavior from male androphilia. Using the standard cross-cultural sample (SCCS) as a sampling frame and the ethnographic sources in the human relations area files and elsewhere, we present distributional data on various forms of male same sex behavior. The SCCS is useful because it is designed to be representative of all historically known social formations and the sample is designed to reduce similarities as a consequence of common descent or historical origin as well as reduce the probability of diffusion of sociocultural practices from one culture to another. Our results show that male same sex behavior as well as male androphilia is much more common than previously estimated in the SCCS. With our findings, we make an argument that male androphilia is a context-dependent cross-cultural universal.

  20. A Study of the Organizational Culture at a Higher Education Institution [Case Study: Plekhanov Russian University of Economics (PRUE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyakin, Bogdan S.; Ivleva, Marina I.; Pozharskaya, Yelena L.; Shcherbakova, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    The article offers an analysis of the organizational culture at a higher education institution as in the case of the Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, conducted in order to study the students' involvement in this culture and to draw conclusions as to what organizational culture principles are internalized by the students. The study used…

  1. Exploring the Convergence of the Liberal Arts Model and the Ecuadorian Culture in a Latin American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Paredes, Matias

    2013-01-01

    The replication of the U.S. cultural models in business and social organizations is a common practice in Latin America. In Ecuador, a university operates under the liberal arts model, understanding it as a replication of an U.S. cultural model, in an environment where the Ecuadorian cultural beliefs and values constitute the national cultural…

  2. E-learning in University: a case of study on cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available How much important and fundamental instruments, formation and information methods, different from the traditional ones in the different fields of human and experimental sciences, are today and will be in the future, is highlightened in this article. According to this, some problems typical of our instructive institutions (such as universities, public administrations, factories and their relevant possible solutions are underlined. These solutions can be achieved thanks to the introduction of the "e-learning" i.e. the possibility of learning through the web. It is important to note that the usage of data processing systems and telecom technologies could improve the access to the learning resources and to meet the different requirements. A case that can be considered emblematic, with reference to our specific experience, is represented by the cultural heritage field and by the university teledidactic and telecom courses as "Cultural heritage Operator".

  3. Cross-cultural and cross-ecotype production of a killer whale `excitement' call suggests universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Nicola; Filatova, Olga A.; Durban, John W.; Foote, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Facial and vocal expressions of emotion have been found in a number of social mammal species and are thought to have evolved to aid social communication. There has been much debate about whether such signals are culturally inherited or are truly biologically innate. Evidence for the innateness of such signals can come from cross-cultural studies. Previous studies have identified a vocalisation (the V4 or `excitement' call) associated with high arousal behaviours in a population of killer whales in British Columbia, Canada. In this study, we compared recordings from three different socially and reproductively isolated ecotypes of killer whales, including five vocal clans of one ecotype, each clan having discrete culturally transmitted vocal traditions. The V4 call was found in recordings of each ecotype and each vocal clan. Nine independent observers reproduced our classification of the V4 call from each population with high inter-observer agreement. Our results suggest the V4 call may be universal in Pacific killer whale populations and that transmission of this call is independent of cultural tradition or ecotype. We argue that such universality is more consistent with an innate vocalisation than one acquired through social learning and may be linked to its apparent function of motivational expression.

  4. 论大学生文化%On university student culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱勋春

    2000-01-01

    本文着重论述了大学生文化的涵义,阐明了大学生文化具有高层次性、敏感性、丰富性、超前性、创造性、选择性、统一性、吸收性和辐射性等特征。论述了大学生文化具有导向、思想教育、促进知识接受和能力培养、满足和调适、激励和超越、内化等功能;认为大学生文化是沟通社会与大学生的桥梁、是未来文化的缩影、能为社会提供生机和活力、是文化变迁的传播者、它直接制约着校园文化等,提出了要确定大学生文化建设的目标、加强大学生文化建设特别是大学生现代化意识的培养等方面来加强大学生文化建设。%This paper discusses mainly about the connotation of university student culture, describing its features such as elevation, sensitiveness, richness, leading, creativeness, selectiveness, unity, absorption, spreding, etc. The article analyzes that the culture has the function of direction, spiritual education, promotion of knowledge acquisition and ability development, satisfaction, adaptation, stimulation, surmounting and internal digestion,maintaining and that it is a bridge between the society and university students, a miniature of the future culture and a propagator of the culture transformation and it can provide the society with livelinese and regulate campus culture. The paper also suggests the necessity to establish the goal of university student culture and to strengthen its construction, particularly in the aspect of developing sense of modemization in university students.

  5. Selected personality traits and achievement motivation in university students of physical culture, education and natural sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sigmund

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding personality variables and other important psychological traits in the university population appears topical particularly with respect to personality, motivation, health as well as overall academic achievement. A significant role is played by correlations of the monitored variables in relation to selected study specialization. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge on selected personality traits and the level of achievement motivation in a specific group of university students with respect to the diversity of their study specialization. METHODS: The study included a total of 522 students from Palacký University. These were students from the Faculty of Physical Culture (n = 118, Faculty of Education (n = 218 and Faculty of Science (n = 186. In terms of age, the study focused on young adults aged 19 to 26. In the research, psychodiagnostic methods were used to perform diagnostics and to fulfil the overall research plan. All diagnostic methods used are fully standardized and contain domestic normative values. We monitored variables such as personality, achievement motivation and achievement anxiety. Statistical result processing was conducted using the Statgraphics programme v. 9.0. Result processing was made using parametric as well as non-parametric statistical methods (Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman’s correlation. RESULTS: University students specialized in physical culture showed the highest values of extraversion and psychoticism, and clearly the lowest values of neuroticism compared to the students of education and natural sciences. The highest values of openness were observed in the students specialized in sports. In terms of the overall achievement motivation related to study specialization, almost identical values were observed. However, the students of physical culture showed significantly lower values of achievement debilitating anxiety

  6. Cultural Resources Intensive Survey and Testing of Mississippi River Levee Berms, Crittenden and Desha Counties, Arkansas and Mississippi, Scott, Cape Girardeau and Pemiscot Counties, Missouri Item R-618 Knowlton; Desha County, Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    distribucion of cultural resources within the project area . In addition, information obtained in the background and literature search should be of such scope...DAC0W66-83-C-0030, Item R-618, to conduct a background, archi- val and literature search, and an intensive resources survey of teroject area of proposed...seepage through the levee during periods of flooding. The area surveyed included: 152.4 meters (500 feet) right-of-way perpen- dicular and landside frow

  7. Bioethics of Universal Knowledge: How Space Science is Transforming Global Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kala

    A new universal culture is championing the human race; never before has immersion in the cosmological environment been so clearly presented nor invited as revolutionary a sense of participatory identity to the human race. We are delving into the awareness of a complex relatedness with the expanse of spatial architectures and life that astrophysics and cosmology are revealing. History is marked by waves of interest and inquiry into the possibilities of the existence of other worlds. Since the Renaissance, building of telescopes has been pursued in their quest; now Kepler and other space missions are leading us into direct apprehension of these worlds, scattered across the cosmological landscape. This affords a unique repertoire of dimensionalities in which to re-construe our global cultural evolution and identity. Spatial education, with related social science and humanities, are facilitating the actualization of a universal culture, redefining the collective global heritage, with infinity as our home. The potential significance of space sciences to the human cognitive environment is yet to be fully ascertained. We now understand that the entire history of the universe informs each and every particle and spin of the fabric of existence. The implications of this knowledge have the power to facilitate our overcoming many social diseases such as racism, nationalism and the ideological delusions that tolerate such activities as warfare. Space sciences may help to purge the human cognitive atmosphere of those ills and ignorance that sap global resources, challenging global sustainability, from the economic to the psychosocial. Were the full implications of our united origins and destiny as a cosmic organism to be applied to how we live as a species on the Earth, there would be adequate funds for all manner of science and education such as to transform the global human and ecological landscape in ways as yet only dreamt or fictionalized. The bioethics of universal

  8. Youth Culture and Globalization: The Articulation of Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in the Youth Culture of Students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry M. Lanuza

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In my study of youth culture among the students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, I was surprised to find out that despite the steady phase of modernization in the larger Philippine society, the youth culture of the students still betrays dominant traditional values and traits. I was surprised, that, given the fact that the university is a spatial field where modernization has its very likely stronghold, the students are very much attached to family values and traditional values associated with it. This paper is an attempt to explain this phenomenon, while at the same time connecting my analysis to the wider issue of globalization. My analysis is very tentative and is based mainly on my study of youth culture of the University of the Philippines. The analysis therefore can only be considered as preliminary and may not necessarily be applied to other forms of youth culture and subculture in other localities without further qualifications.

  9. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  10. Australian Item Bank Program: Social Science Item Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    After vigorous review, editing, and trial testing, this item bank was compiled to help secondary school teachers construct objective tests in the social sciences. Anthropology, economics, ethnic and cultural studies, geography, history, legal studies, politics, and sociology are among the topics represented. The bank consists of multiple choice…

  11. Assessment of patient safety culture among personnel in the hospitals associated with Islamic Azad University in Tehran in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Moussavi, Fatemeh; MOGHRI, Javad; Gholizadeh, Yavar; Karami, Atiyeh; Najjari, Sedigheh; Mehmandust, Reza; Asghari, Mehdi; Asghari, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is an essential element in the quality of healthcare, and a clear knowledge of its culture in healthcare organizations will lead to both improved healthcare and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess the patient safety culture at Islamic Azad University hospitals in Tehran, Iran, in 2013. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on clinical and diagnostic staff in all Islamic Azad University hospitals in Tehran in June 2013. The international “...

  12. State of the level of physical preparedness of students of the Kiev National University of Culture and Art

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya Batieieva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: analysis of physical fitness of students of the Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Material and Methods: the study involved students I-st and II-nd courses of Kiev National University of Culture and Arts studying in institutions: "Film and Television", "hotel and restaurant business", "journalism and international relations." The total number of students was 136 persons aged 17–18 years, of which 107 girls and 29 boys. We used methods of theoretical analysis and synthesis ...

  13. TYPOLOGIZATION OF SOCIO-CULTURAL EXERCISES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AUDIO-VISIAL RECEPTION SKILLS OF NON-LINGUISTIC UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Наталья Владимировна Базина

    2014-01-01

    The article describes principles of building a complex of socio-cultural exercises intended for the materials of German TV to be used in training students of non-linguistic universities with under-threshold level of German language skills. Besides that the types of German language exercises for the students of non-linguistic universities are given where students study German as second language in the context of socio-cultural and competence approach for preparation of international journalist...

  14. [Cultural diversity and pluralism in the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2011-01-01

    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights represents a significant milestone in the history of Law, particularly in the application of International Law to an important area of human activity, namely the medical sciences, the life sciences and the technologies which, linked to both, can be applied to human relations. In parallel with this, and as will be analysed in this article, the Declaration has involved adopting a clear position regarding cultural diversity and pluralism in relation to Biomedicine. In this paper the author highlights the fact that perspectives have been opened which have hardly been explored concerning Biomedicine, such as the recognition of the value and respect which cultural diversity (multiculturalism), economic and social diversity deserve in relation to the issues covered by the Declaration, and the acceptance that the owners of the rights are not only individuals, but can also be groups.

  15. Structure and state of the university of physical culture students’ professional-pedagogical motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N. I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The state and dynamics of the university of physical culture students’ motivation was determined. The complex of diagnostic methods was used to determine the level of professional-pedagogical motivation, which was directed on outlining motivation components and its development levels determination. The research involved 232 students. It was found that for the 1 st year students the first place was obtained by the professional-cognitive interest, second by achievement motive and third by professional intention. For the 4 th year students, the first place is possessed by professional cognitive interest, then followed by motives referred to professional and then – motives of achievement. The diagnostics have outlined absence of certain professional intentions. Also from first to fourth year of studies the tendency of increasing the amount of students interest of which is not connected either to physical culture, sports nor to pedagogical activity is followed.

  16. Universal happiness? Cross-cultural measurement invariance of scales assessing positive mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieda, Angela; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Schönfeld, Pia; Brailovskaia, Julia; Zhang, Xiao Chi; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Research into positive aspects of the psyche is growing as psychologists learn more about the protective role of positive processes in the development and course of mental disorders, and about their substantial role in promoting mental health. With increasing globalization, there is strong interest in studies examining positive constructs across cultures. To obtain valid cross-cultural comparisons, measurement invariance for the scales assessing positive constructs has to be established. The current study aims to assess the cross-cultural measurement invariance of questionnaires for 6 positive constructs: Social Support (Fydrich, Sommer, Tydecks, & Brähler, 2009), Happiness (Subjective Happiness Scale; Lyubomirsky & Lepper, 1999), Life Satisfaction (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), Positive Mental Health Scale (Lukat, Margraf, Lutz, van der Veld, & Becker, 2016), Optimism (revised Life Orientation Test [LOT-R]; Scheier, Carver, & Bridges, 1994) and Resilience (Schumacher, Leppert, Gunzelmann, Strauss, & Brähler, 2004). Participants included German (n = 4,453), Russian (n = 3,806), and Chinese (n = 12,524) university students. Confirmatory factor analyses and measurement invariance testing demonstrated at least partial strong measurement invariance for all scales except the LOT-R and Subjective Happiness Scale. The latent mean comparisons of the constructs indicated differences between national groups. Potential methodological and cultural explanations for the intergroup differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Transforming and Managing the Organisational Culture of a University To Meet the Challenges of a Changing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses issues in bringing about change in a higher education institution, including required changes in organizational culture, processes involved in effecting them, and continued management of organizational culture. Constructs a conceptual framework for such change, and discusses actual changes and management practices at the University of…

  18. The Reliability and Validity of the Cultural Congruity and University Environment Scales with Chicana/o Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Herrera, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Following the calls for increased research on the educational experiences of Chicana/o community college students, and the development of culturally applicable measures for communities of color, this study examined the utility and the applicability of the Cultural Congruity Scale (CCS) and University Environment Scale (UES) for use with Chicana/o…

  19. Chinese Students' Adaptation of Social Intercourse Influenced by Different Cultural Contexts of China and America in American Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于乐群

    2012-01-01

    1 Statement of the Purpose (1) Statement of the purpose The purpose of the research isto study Chinese studends' adaptation of social intercourse influenced by different cultural contexts of China and America in American universities.And the study will also try to find out the exact problems and obstacles during Chinese students' adapting period in American universities.

  20. The role of nuclear microprobes in the study of technology, provenance and corrosion of cultural heritage: The case of gold and silver items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, M.F., E-mail: maria.guerra@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France and UMR 8220 CNRS, Palais du Louvre – 14, Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Tissot, I., E-mail: isabel.tissot@archeofactu.pt [Archeofactu, Rua do Cerrado das Oliveiras n°14, 2°Dto., 2610-035 Alfragide (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    This work gives an overview of the main questions raised by gold and silver items kept in museum collections and of the role of nuclear microprobes in their study and conservation. The different approached questions are illustrated by examples; analytical data is given and discussed; and the advantages of IBA are considered: spatial resolution, penetration depth, limits of detection, mapping, etc.

  1. Leadership and culture of data governance for the achievement of higher education goals (Case study: Indonesia University of Education)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putro, Budi Laksono; Surendro, Kridanto; Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Data is a vital asset in a business enterprise in achieving organizational goals. Data and information affect the decision-making process on the various activities of an organization. Data problems include validity, quality, duplication, control over data, and the difficulty of data availability. Data Governance is the way the company / institution manages its data assets. Data Governance covers the rules, policies, procedures, roles and responsibilities, and performance indicators that direct the overall management of data assets. Studies on governance data or information aplenty recommend the importance of cultural factors in the governance of research data. Among the organization's leadership culture has a very close relationship, and there are two concepts turn, namely: Culture created by leaders, leaders created by culture. Based on the above, this study exposure to the theme "Leadership and Culture Of Data Governance For The Achievement Of Higher Education Goals (Case Study: Indonesia University Of Education)". Culture and Leadership Model Development of on Higher Education in Indonesia would be made by comparing several models of data governance, organizational culture, and organizational leadership on previous studies based on the advantages and disadvantages of each model to the existing organizational business. Results of data governance model development is shown in the organizational culture FPMIPA Indonesia University Of Education today is the cultural market and desired culture is a culture of clan. Organizational leadership today is Individualism Index (IDV) (83.72%), and situational leadership on selling position.

  2. 模因论视阈下毛泽东诗词中文化专有项翻译%Translation of Culture-specific Items in Mao Zedong’s Poems from the Perspective of Memetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田希波; 李文革

    2014-01-01

    翻译过程既是一种跨文化交际活动,又是模因传播过程,是对源语模因进行重新解码、编码、重组的信息流通过程。模因论为中国文化专有项的翻译提供了一定的理论依据,译者作为传播模因的宿主,可以通过音译、直译及变体模因等方式将汉语模因引入目的语,从而将中国文化专有项传播给译语读者。翻译过程中,译者应该使源语模因在译语文化中得到最大限度地保真。%Translation is not only a process of intercultural communication, but also a process of meme transmission. It is a process of decoding, encoding and restructuring of memes of the source language. Memetics lays a theoretical foundation for the translation of culture-specific items, and the translator can use transliteration memes, literal memes as well as variation of memes to render the culture-specific items. In this way, the culture-specific items are transferred to readers of the target language. The translators should keep in mind that they should make the source language culture reproduced in the target language to the utmost.

  3. A General Education Course in Cultural Astronomy: Exploring the Universe Through Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Astronomy courses for non-science majors (often referred to as Astro 101) are the bread and butter of the general education service obligation of astronomy faculty and programs across the US. Their content has traditionally been a general survey of the solar system, stars and galaxies, or even the entire universe. However, because the audience is students who will not be continuing on in astronomy, there is actually no need to cover a broad range of specific topics. Rather, it is more important to concentrate on the scientific process, and hopefully leave the student with an understanding of the relevance of science in everyday life, regardless of his or her major. As a result, some faculty prefer a more interdisciplinary focus for their Astro 101 classes, for example courses on the search for extraterrestrial life. Another option for general education astronomy courses is what has become known as cultural astronomy. Cultural astronomy focuses on the ways in which astronomical knowledge and belief influences human behavior and social structures. Under this umbrella fall two important areas of study, archaeoastronomy (concentrating on ancient cultures) and enthoastronomy (focusing on extant cultures). Such interdisciplinary courses draw heavily upon archaeology, history, anthropology, art, and other fields more traditionally aligned with the humanities and social sciences than the natural sciences, and therefore can be attractive to students in these non-science majors. In such courses, students experience the “humanity” of science: the important connections between science and the human experience, and how experts in myriad fields contribute in meaningful ways to our understanding of how astronomical knowledge has been constructed and disseminated across time and space. This poster describes the content and pedagogy of a general education course in cultural astronomy for non-science majors that stresses hands-on and experiential learning, including the use of

  4. INFLUENCE OF UNIVERSITY CORPORATE CULTURE ON «ADORNATION» OF GRADUATES’ COMPETENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Dremina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to identify the phenomenon and to describe the concept forming the competences of university graduates provided with signs of corporate identity.Methods. Methods of the system and comparative analysis, synthesis, generalisation, analogy are used in the presented paper.Results. The key role of corporate culture of high school in formation of actual competences providing future graduates success is proved on the basis of materials of the Russian and foreign researches. The social and pedagogical contradictions which are that the declared accounting of features of corporate culture in pedagogical process isn't provided with mechanisms of design of the competences provided with signs of corporate identity are revealed. Missions of modern leading high schools are analysed for the purpose of definition of these signs. The necessity of changing the model of corporate culture at the stage preceding the design of learning outcomes is justified.Scientific novelty. The concept of application of the model of HEI (Higher Education Institutions corporate culture as a key reference point for forming competences provided with signs of corporate identity is offered. The concept considers features of transition of the Russian HEI to work in conditions fulfilling requirements of the Bologna agreement. The concept is caused also by an indicator «Success of university graduates, achievements of HEI in the process of selection of elite at national and international levels» by criterion «brand» in the model of National Universities Ranking. The new concept «adornation» (derived from a verb “to adorn” in relation to process of forming the competences provided with signs of corporate identity is introduced. According to the offered concept, semantic filling of a mission and system of values allows adorning competences taking into account requirements of the social role of a graduate as a mission performer of HEI and helps the graduate

  5. Towards the Development of Objective, Universal Criteria of Cultural Evaluation: The Challenges Posed by Anti-Foundationalism, Culturalism and Romanticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Over the course of the last century, it has become increasingly unfashionable in the social sciences to make cross-cultural evaluations. The advance of cultural relativism has ensured that criticisms of other cultures are regarded as subjective and ethnocentric. There remain, however, cultural beliefs, practices and traditions which appear, "prima…

  6. Towards the Development of Objective, Universal Criteria of Cultural Evaluation: The Challenges Posed by Anti-Foundationalism, Culturalism and Romanticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Over the course of the last century, it has become increasingly unfashionable in the social sciences to make cross-cultural evaluations. The advance of cultural relativism has ensured that criticisms of other cultures are regarded as subjective and ethnocentric. There remain, however, cultural beliefs, practices and traditions which appear, "prima…

  7. Traditional living and cultural ways as protective factors against suicide: perceptions of Alaska Native university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. DeCou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Native peoples living in Alaska have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. This represents a significant health disparity for indigenous populations living in Alaska. This research was part of a larger study that explored qualitatively the perceptions of Alaska Native university students from rural communities regarding suicide. This analysis explored the resilience that arose from participants’ experiences of traditional ways, including subsistence activities. Previous research has indicated the importance of traditional ways in preventing suicide and strengthening communities. Method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 university students who had migrated to Fairbanks, Alaska, from rural Alaskan communities. An interview protocol was developed in collaboration with cultural and community advisors. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Participants were asked specific questions concerning the strengthening of traditional practices towards the prevention of suicide. Transcripts were analysed using the techniques of grounded theory. Findings. Participants identified several resilience factors against suicide, including traditional practices and subsistence activities, meaningful community involvement and an active lifestyle. Traditional practices and subsistence activities were perceived to create the context for important relationships, promote healthy living to prevent suicide, contrast with current challenges and transmit important cultural values. Participants considered the strengthening of these traditional ways as important in suicide prevention efforts. However, subsistence and traditional practices were viewed as a diminishing aspect of daily living in rural Alaska. Conclusions. Many college students from rural Alaska have been affected by suicide but are strong enough to cope with such tragic events. Subsistence living and traditional practices were perceived as important social and

  8. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Jamili; Hossein Ebrahimipour; Elaheh Hooshmand; Habibollah Esmaeli; Ali Vafaee Najar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient safety culture plays a pivotal role in the improvement of patient safety level in health centers. This study aimed to assess patient safety culture in the pharmacies affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran using a standard questionnaire developed by the American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Materials and Methods This analytic, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 108 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in Mashha...

  9. Epistemic cultures in complementary medicine: knowledge-making in university departments of osteopathy and Chinese medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Caragh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing pressure on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to follow the evidence-based approach promoted in allied health and medicine, in which the randomised control trial represents the evidence gold standard. However, many CAM advocates see these methods as undermining the holism of CAM practice. This paper explores how such tensions are managed in CAM university departments – settings in which particular forms of knowledge and evidence are given ‘official’ imprimatur by CAM educators and researchers. By comparing two types of CAM, the paper also unpacks differences within this broad category, asking whether CAM academic disciplines comprise different ‘epistemic cultures’ (Knorr-Cetina, K. (1999). Epistemic cultures: How the sciences make knowledge. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press). Interviews were conducted with 20 lecturers in Chinese medicine and osteopathy, across five Australian universities, and augmented with observation in two degree programs. Findings reveal contrasting ontological and epistemological perspectives between the two academic fields. Chinese medicine lecturers had largely adopted bioscientific models of research, typically conducting laboratory work and trials, although teaching included traditional theories. Osteopathy academics were more critical of dominant approaches and were focused on reframing notions of evidence to account for experiences, with some advocating qualitative research. The study illustrates CAM’s ‘epistemic disunity’ while also highlighting the particular challenges facing academic CAM.

  10. The Influencing Factors of Cultural Knowledge in Translating Cultural Specific Concepts from Arabic into the English at Jazan University in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ali Almubark

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was set out to explore and evaluate the importance of having mastered the cultural knowledge throughout the process of depicting the culture-specific concepts involving two languages namely Arabic and English. In doing so, the participants sampled in this study were a group of final year Bachelor’s degree students majoring in Translation in ALAradha College at the Jazan University. The findings of the study method employed in this study statistically confirmed that the students of the Translation at AL AlAradh college- Saudi Arabia faced considerable difficulties throughout the process of translating cultural concepts owing to inadequate mastery of knowledge in relation to the culture involved. Among the measures which can be taken in addressing the issues in this context are training the learners by means of exposure to real cases involving culture-specific concepts which may help them deal with such difficulties in the translation process.

  11. Explaining Differences in Subjective Well-Being Across 33 Nations Using Multilevel Models: Universal Personality, Cultural Relativity, and National Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Mike W-L; Montasem, Alex

    2016-02-01

    This multinational study simultaneously tested three prominent hypotheses--universal disposition, cultural relativity, and livability--that explained differences in subjective well-being across nations. We performed multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships at both individual and cultural levels in 33 nations. Participants were 6,753 university students (2,215 men; 4,403 women; 135 did not specify), and the average age of the entire sample was 20.97 years (SD = 2.39). Both individual- and cultural-level analyses supported the universal disposition and cultural relativity hypotheses by revealing significant associations of subjective well-being with Extraversion, Neuroticism, and independent self-construal. In addition, interdependent self-construal was positively related to life satisfaction at the individual level only, whereas aggregated negative affect was positively linked with aggregate levels of Extraversion and interdependent self-construal at the cultural level only. Consistent with the livability hypothesis, gross national income (GNI) was related to aggregate levels of negative affect and life satisfaction. There was also a quadratic relationship between GNI and aggregated positive affect. Our findings reveal that universal disposition, cultural self-construal, and national income can elucidate differences in subjective well-being, but the multilevel analyses advance the literature by yielding new findings that cannot be identified in studies using individual-level analyses alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  13. Language and cultural translation: some thoughts from the point of view of Ticuna universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Facó Soares

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article follows the current formal developments of chomskyan grammar which takes into consideration the cognitive systems with which language interfaces. Based on Ticuna universe and on its expression through Ticuna language, it aims to show that some grammar domains can interface with encyclopedia knowledge, viewed as extra-linguistic knowledge. It shows new horizons to the study of the relation between culture and language and it relates the analysis to the field of sense production. In its way to conclusion, it suggests that the study of special meanings related to specific linguistic expressions is a good way to understand or try to understand the issues related to translation and interpretation.

  14. Heavenly Mathematics & Cultural Astronomy: A Course at the National University of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    2010-10-01

    I have introduced a general education course called Heavenly Mathematics and Cultural Astronomy [2] at the National University of Singapore. The goal of this course is to study astronomy in a cultural context with a tropical emphasis. Most astronomy books are written from a high northern latitude point of view, but Singapore is almost on the equator, so I aim to be ``hemispherically-correct''. Singapore is also a multi-racial society, where public holidays are determined using the Gregorian, Chinese, Islamic and Indian calendars. The course starts with an introduction to observational astronomy with an emphasis on the appearance of the Sun and the Moon from different parts of the world. I then give a fairly detailed description of the Gregorian, Chinese, Islamic and Indian calendars [1, 4, 5], and finish with a thorough discussion of the analemma, equation of time and navigation [3]. Being a mathematician, my approach is quite mathematical, but my emphasis is on geometrical reasoning. Formulas and computations may scare some students away, but they are surprisingly willing to struggle with complicated spatial visualization.

  15. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eRedies

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom-up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top-down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel (aesthetics of perception, and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel (aesthetics of cognition. I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed.In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of

  16. Combining universal beauty and cultural context in a unifying model of visual aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I propose a model of visual aesthetic experience that combines formalist and contextual aspects of aesthetics. The model distinguishes between two modes of processing. First, perceptual processing is based on the intrinsic form of an artwork, which may or may not be beautiful. If it is beautiful, a beauty-responsive mechanism is activated in the brain. This bottom-up mechanism is universal amongst humans; it is widespread in the visual brain and responsive across visual modalities. Second, cognitive processing is based on contextual information, such as the depicted content, the intentions of the artist or the circumstances of the presentation of the artwork. Cognitive processing is partially top-down and varies between individuals according to their cultural experience. Processing in the two channels is parallel and largely independent. In the general case, an aesthetic experience is induced if processing in both channels is favorable, i.e., if there is resonance in the perceptual processing channel ("aesthetics of perception"), and successful mastering in the cognitive processing channel ("aesthetics of cognition"). I speculate that this combinatorial mechanism has evolved to mediate social bonding between members of a (cultural) group of people. Primary emotions can be elicited via both channels and modulate the degree of the aesthetic experience. Two special cases are discussed. First, in a subset of (post-)modern art, beauty no longer plays a prominent role. Second, in some forms of abstract art, beautiful form can be enjoyed with minimal cognitive processing. The model is applied to examples of Western art. Finally, implications of the model are discussed. In summary, the proposed model resolves the seeming contradiction between formalist perceptual approaches to aesthetic experience, which are based on the intrinsic beauty of artworks, and contextual approaches, which account for highly individual and culturally dependent aspects of aesthetics.

  17. Scientific Spirits and the Existence of University Culture%科学精神与大学文化生存

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐双俊

    2014-01-01

    Scientific spirits are the inherent cultural awareness and ideological power of university culture. They are the combination of the life, cohesion power, emotional appeal and creativity of universities, and reveal the existence of u-niversity culture. However, a retrospection on the existence of university culture shows that scientific spirits in universities are confronted with crisis. The administrative system, ideological cultures and educational modes have caused the deficien-cy of scientific spirits. Therefore, the rationality of university culture should be realized by the enhancement of scientific spirits, and it is the essential requirements and an important task to cultivate scientific spirits through various methods.%科学精神是当代大学文化内在的文化自觉和思想动力,汇聚着大学的生命力、凝聚力、感召力和创造力,是大学文化生存的内在规定,反映着大学文化的生存境界。当今,对大学文化的生存状况进行反思,大学科学精神面临着失落的危机,管理体制、思想文化、教育模式等原因导致的科学精神缺失已突显为影响当今时代中国大学文化生存的一个关键问题。因此,当代大学文化生存的价值理性应体现在科学精神的增益上,多途径培育科学精神是中国大学文化实践生存的本质要求和重要任务。

  18. The Investigation of the effect of Emotional Intelligence and Spiritual Intelligence Components on the Organizational Culture of Ilam University Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidmehdi Mehdi Veiseh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual intelligence has been defined as a framework for identifying and organizing skills and competencies necessary to use adaptive spirituality. The present study seeks to investigate the effect of the components of emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence on the organizational culture of staff of Ilam University. The population under study was the staff of Ilam University, who was 400 people. The sample size was 110, which were randomly selected. To collect the data, Bar-on Emotional Intelligence (EQ scale and Amram and Dryer‟s Integrated Spiritual Intelligences Scale (ISIS were used. The obtained data were then analyze dusing Pearson correlation and simultaneous multiple regression analysis. The results showed that there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational culture, also spiritual intelligence and organizational culture. The results also revealed that among the components of emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence, intrapersonal skills, interpersonal skills, adaptability, Transcendence, dignity and Meaningful are significant predictors for organization culture, respectively.

  19. A cross-cultural investigation of multiple intelligences in university-level nutrition students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Joy E.

    Effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body in undergraduate nutrition and dietetics programs are needed in order for graduates to effectively meet the health and nutrition needs of a diverse clientele. One way to promote diversity and improve teaching methods in dietetics education is through a framework based on Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). The theory suggests that individuals possess varying degrees of eight different intelligences which are shaped by genetics and cultural context. Relatively little research has been conducted to investigate MI approaches in the areas of higher education, cross-cultural education, or dietetics education. Therefore, this study investigated the MI profiles of students within undergraduate nutrition programs at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, Mexico and Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Data were collected through the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS). The findings provide a profile of the intellectual dispositions for the study population and suggest that dietetics students in this cross-cultural study population score highest for the MIDAS scale measuring interpersonal intelligence, with significant differences occurring between scores for the eight intelligences measured by the MIDAS. Not only were there significant differences between scale scores when analyzing the population as a whole, there were also significant differences in scale scores when comparing American and Mexican students. This phenomenon was also true when scores were grouped into five ordinal categories. In addition, the findings suggest that differences exist among the particular skills associated with the intelligences for the students at each university. Results indicate that skills related to social sensitivity and persuasion are significantly higher than many other skills for dietetics students. Further, when comparing the

  20. Building Rapport Between International Graduate Students and Their Faculty Advisors: Cross-Cultural Mentoring Relationships at the University of Guelph

    OpenAIRE

    Faiza Omar; James P. Mahone; Jane Ngobia; John FitzSimons

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring graduate students is very challenging, even when both the student and faculty have similar cultural values. Many international students have a different culture from that of Canadian. Their challenge is adapting to their new environment, and for their faculty advisors to understand and work well with them. This research explored the relationships, experience, and challenges of international graduate students and their faculty advisors at the University of Guelph, through focus group...

  1. Perceptions and practices of commensality and solo-eating among Korean and Japanese university students: A cross-cultural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Wookyoun; Takeda, Wakako; Oh, Yujin; Aiba, Naomi; Lee, Youngmee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Commensality, eating together with others, is a major representation of human sociality. In recent time, environments around commensality have changed significantly due to rapid social changes, and the decline of commensality is perceived as a serious concern in many modern societies. This study employs a cross-cultural analysis of university students in two East Asian countries, and examines cross-cultural variations of perceptions and actual practices of commensality a...

  2. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  3. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  4. Attitudes Toward Oral Contraception Among Canadian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardis, Panos D.

    The author conducted a cross-cultural survey of attitudes toward the pill among university students, part of this international sample being a group of young Canadians. The subjects were students from a southwestern Canadian university and were stratified as to sex and amount of education. The author employed his Pill Scale, a 25-item Likert type…

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish version of the 19-item return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeager Momsen, Anne-Mette; Rosbjerg, Rikke; Stapelfeldt, Christina Malmose;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) scale into Danish and test the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the final version. METHODS: The adaptation process followed standard guidelines and the pretest...... was confirmed. High baseline RTWSE-19 level was associated with being at work after ten weeks odds ratio (OR) 3.24, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.48-7.07. CONCLUSIONS: The RTWSE-19 cross-cultural translation to Danish was performed satisfactorily. A modified final version was produced, and the test...

  6. The Influence of University Library Culture on Campus Culture%谈高校图书馆文化对高校校园文化的促进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀举

    2009-01-01

    University library culture and campus culture are inseparable.At present, the cultural construction is increasingly important.How to promote the construction of campus culture is a long and complicated problem.Making full use of the influence of library culture construction on campus culture to establish long-term library service consciousness, in order to promote the development of campus culture, is worthy of consideration.%高校图书馆文化与高校校园文化的关系密不可分,在文化建设日益重要的今天,如何促进高校校园文化的建设是一个长期且复杂的问题.而充分利用图书馆文化的建设对校园文化的影响,建立长期的图书馆服务意识,以促进高校校园文化的发展,则是一个值得考虑的思路.

  7. 76 FR 14050 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... American religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau.../object of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Representatives of... Arizona, New Mexico and Utah may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The...

  8. Individual biases, cultural evolution, and the statistical nature of language universals: the case of colour naming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Loreto, Vittorio; Puglisi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Language universals have long been attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive or perceptual biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of colour naming patterns, and producing results in quantitative agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate the role of an individual perceptual bias in the framework of the model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias influences the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the pressure for uniformity arising from the individual bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces.

  9. Enhancing University Cultural Construction under the ;Guidance of Modern Culture%以现代文化为引领,加强高校文化建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏比努尔·阿里木

    2015-01-01

    高校是现代文化引领的主阵地,不仅有人才培养、科学研究、服务社会的功能,还具有一批有影响力的文化传播者,对于现代文化起到至关重要的引导作用。然而,近年来,随着“三股势力”将渗透重点转移到新疆高校青年学生群体,高校文化建设、意识形态领域建设及思想政治教育工作遇到了许多新情况、新问题。中央新疆工作座谈会议提出了“以现代文化为引领”,大力发展一体多元、融合开放、具有新疆特色的现代文化,推动新疆文化大发展大繁荣,这对于新疆高校文化的建设具有建设性的引导作用。在这种大背景下,高校文化创建、思想政治教育工作又具有特殊意义,必须以高校文化建设为切入点,改进和加强思想政治教育工作,从加强高校文化的培育、注重文化建设的落实、管理方法的创新和典型榜样的树立四个方面为抓手,以加强校园精神文化建设、校园制度文化建设和校园物质文化建设。以现代文化为引领的高校文化与高校的思想政治教育工作紧密结合,开创新疆高校思想政治教育工作的新局面,促进新疆高校教育事业的发展与进步,为新疆经济发展、政治进步、社会稳定、民生幸福夯实基础。%The university, the main position under the guidance of modern culture, not only plays a role in talent cultivation, scien-tific research and social service, but also possesses a group of in-fluential cultural communicators who play a vital guiding role in modern culture. However, in recent years, with the focus of the infiltration of the"three forces"shifting to university students in Xinjiang, university cultural construction, ideological construc-tion and ideological and political work have encountered many new situations and problems. Xinjiang Work Forum of the Central Committee proposed that we should vigorously develop

  10. Gender Equality, Patriarchal Cultural Norms, and Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence: Comparison of Male University Students in Asian and European Cultural Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Reiko; Otis, Melanie D

    2016-07-03

    This study examined the relationship between patriarchal cultural norms and violence perpetration by male partners using a subsample of university students in Asia (n = 784) and Europe (n = 575) from the International Dating Violence Study (IDVS) data set. Bivariate analyses indicated Asian students scored significantly higher than Europeans on dominance, hostility to women, jealousy, negative attribution, and violence approval as well as perpetration of severe physical assault in dating relationships. Logistic regression models demonstrated that dominance and violence approval were significant predictors of severe physical and psychological aggression against dating partners. Implications for culturally relevant programming for intimate partner violence prevention are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Do Major Field of Study and Cultural Familiarity Affect TOEFL[R] iBT Reading Performance? A Confirmatory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia

    2011-01-01

    The TOEFL[R] iBT has increased the length of each reading passage to better approximate academic reading at North American universities, resulting in a reduction in the number of passages on the reading section of the test. One of the concerns brought about by this change is whether the decrease in topic variety increases the likelihood that an…

  12. Do Major Field of Study and Cultural Familiarity Affect TOEFL[R] iBT Reading Performance? A Confirmatory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia

    2011-01-01

    The TOEFL[R] iBT has increased the length of each reading passage to better approximate academic reading at North American universities, resulting in a reduction in the number of passages on the reading section of the test. One of the concerns brought about by this change is whether the decrease in topic variety increases the likelihood that an…

  13. Effects of Parental Expectations and Cultural-Values Orientation on Career Decision-Making Difficulties of Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S. Alvin; Hou, Zhi-Jin; Gati, Itamar; Li, Xixi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cultural-values conflict and parental expectations on the career decision-making difficulties of university students in three cities in China (Beijing, Wuhan, and Hong Kong, N = 1342). The Multidimensional Scales of Individual Traditionality and Modernity (Yang, Yu, & Ye, 1989) were used as a measure of…

  14. Adolescent Decision-Making Processes regarding University Entry: A Model Incorporating Cultural Orientation, Motivation and Occupational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup

    2013-01-01

    This study tested a newly developed model of the cognitive decision-making processes of senior high school students related to university entry. The model incorporated variables derived from motivation theory (i.e. expectancy-value theory and the theory of reasoned action), literature on cultural orientation and occupational considerations. A…

  15. Effects of Parental Expectations and Cultural-Values Orientation on Career Decision-Making Difficulties of Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S. Alvin; Hou, Zhi-Jin; Gati, Itamar; Li, Xixi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cultural-values conflict and parental expectations on the career decision-making difficulties of university students in three cities in China (Beijing, Wuhan, and Hong Kong, N = 1342). The Multidimensional Scales of Individual Traditionality and Modernity (Yang, Yu, & Ye, 1989) were used as a measure of…

  16. Building Cultural Capital in ­First-Year ­Students at ­Residential Colleges and ­Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Matthew S.; Erb, Natalee M.; Braxton, John M.

    2016-01-01

    College student persistence continues to be a vexing problem for colleges and universities. In Rethinking College Student Persistence (2014), Braxton, Doyle, Hartley, Hirshy, Jones, and McLendon explored the indirect role between cultural capital and first-year student persistence. The significance of this role becomes more important when one…

  17. Designing Gain- and Loss-Framed Messages to Increase Physical Activity among University Students Living in two Different Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Ozgur Polat

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of this project is to gather information through using different methods and investigate the determinants of message persuasiveness in university students from the British and Turkish cultures in order to design effective physical activity messages leading intention, attitude and behaviour change. The results of the finalized studies showed the importance of using both qualitative and quantitative methods in message design process.

  18. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  19. Adolescent Decision-Making Processes regarding University Entry: A Model Incorporating Cultural Orientation, Motivation and Occupational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup

    2013-01-01

    This study tested a newly developed model of the cognitive decision-making processes of senior high school students related to university entry. The model incorporated variables derived from motivation theory (i.e. expectancy-value theory and the theory of reasoned action), literature on cultural orientation and occupational considerations. A…

  20. A Cross-Cultural Study of ICT Competency, Attitude and Satisfaction of Turkish, Polish and Czech University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Serkan; Sahinkayasi, Yunis

    2011-01-01

    Due to various factors, countries begin to have different levels of information and communication technologies (ICT) and they have their own unique culture of ICT usage. This case appears interesting especially when we consider university students' proficiency, attitudes and satisfaction in use of ICT. The purpose of this study is to examine the…

  1. A Study of the Relationship between Institutional Policy, Organisational culture and E-Learning Use in Four South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniewicz, Laura; Brown, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between policy (conceptualised as goals, values and resources), organisational culture and e-learning use. Through both qualitative and quantitative research methods, we gathered data about staff and student perspectives from four diverse South African universities representing a selection of ICT in…

  2. Developing Cross-Cultural Awareness through Foreign Immersion Programs: Implications of University Study Abroad Research for Global Competency Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkesmoe, Karen J.; Kuchinke, K. Peter; Ardichvili, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of foreign immersion programs in terms of increasing cross-cultural awareness among university students in business, accounting, human resources and agriculture. The authors extrapolate from their population to the practice of developing business professionals on international…

  3. Promoting culturally targeted chronic disease prevention research through an adapted participatory research approach: The Qassim-Stanford Universities project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sandra J; King, Abby C; Stafford, Randall S; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Haskell, William L; Farquhar, John W

    2011-06-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), similar to other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean, has been experiencing a recent rapid increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and associated risk factors. To begin to take advantage of the chronic disease prevention and health promotion (CDPHP) knowledge available from other nations, researchers at a newly established University in the Qassim Province of the KSA have partnered with Stanford University in the United States of America. To ensure that CDPHP research and interventions are culturally relevant and appropriate, a participatory research approach has been adopted where local researchers are the target "community." Contextual challenges of conducting CDPHP research in the KSA, at the individual, social/cultural, organizational and environmental/policy levels, are identified, as well as examples of CDPHP intervention strategies that may be culturally appropriate at each level.

  4. Digital preservation of cultural and scientific heritage: involving university students to raise awareness of its importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Redweik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is a relevant issue in contemporary society. While its preservation is a challenge, its dissemination, can contribute for an economic balance between costs and benefits.  Scientific  heritage  can  be  considered  as  a  special domain  of  cultural  heritage, not yet sought  by  the  mass  tourism, but worth being preserved as the roots of today’s knowledge.  Considering  that  university  students  of  engineering  and computer  science traditionally  do  not  address cultural or scientific heritage issues in their syllabus, and that they constitute a layer of young citizens that will come to be influential  in  the  future  of  society,  an  effort  was  undertaken  to  focus  on  this  theme  in  disciplines  of  different  courses, allying  the  learning  of  technical  skills  with  the  natural  interest  of  younger  people  for  3D  and  animation  for  the  profit  of heritage. The goal was to raise the awareness of this particular group to the importance of maintaining heritage issues, in particular,  in  a  virtual  way,  both  for  documentation  and  for  divulgating  their  existence.  Raising  funds  for  buildings’ restoration, attracting the public to visit buildings and collections that are outside the usual tourism routes, contributing to revenue  generation,  or  allowing  virtual  visits  of  not  accessible  issues,  complementing  physical  visits  on  site,  were  the general  aims of  the  proposed  projects.  A survey was undertaken under the participating students to evaluate how the projects influenced their attitude towards heritage. The obtained feedback was very positive: 76% agreed that the project alerted them for the importance of preserving historical and cultural heritage, while 72% considered it was interesting that the topic of digital cultural heritage was used for the assessments of

  5. Wastewater treatment by artificial wetlands in the Museum of Popular Culture of the National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals in terms of sustainable access to sanitation requires increasing the development of research programs that promote simple and low cost technological options, appropriate to the social, economic, and environmental conditions of each population. These processes must be accompanied by actions of environmental and sanitation education, which allow appropriation of these systems by the communities. In this sense, there are two projects in the National University converging on this subject. The Museum of Popular Culture together with the Public Service Company of Heredia develop an environmental education project that promotes the protection of water, from an historical perspective of its management, which has an artificial wetland as the main teaching unit. On the other hand, the Waste Management Laboratory at the School of Chemistry evaluates the performance of this artificial wetland as part of a research project that promotes this type of alternative sanitation. This paper presents results of the monitoring of this artificial wetland, showing average removal percentages of 93% BOD5,20 , 95% COD, 73% P-PO4, and 95% for SS.

  6. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  7. The historical universal: the role of cultural value in the historical sociology of Pierre Bourdieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tony

    2005-03-01

    Best known for his pioneering study Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, in which the aesthetic attitude of disinterestedness is accounted for as the expression of a class ethos, Bourdieu has become something of an icon of relativism. In thus effecting a Bakhtinian 'discrowning' of official hierarchies of the arts, he is often celebrated for his concern to place all tastes, popular and high, on a similar footing, equally rooted in specific class practices. Only a careless inattention could support such a conclusion. From his early interventions in French cultural policy debates up to and including The Rules of Art and Pascalian Meditations (1996), Bourdieu has consistently repudiated the view that a sociological approach to questions of aesthetic judgment must result in a levelling form of relativism. In exploring why this should be so, this paper considers the issues at stake in the forms of 'historical universalism' that are associated with Bourdieu's account of the autonomy of the aesthetic sphere. It does so with a view to identifying some of the difficulties underlying his understanding of sociology as a historical practice.

  8. 大学特色文化探析%Several Basic Problems about Analysis of the Characteristic Culture in University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昌民; 王凌

    2016-01-01

    The attribute of characteristic culture in university could be confirmed by idea, system, academic structure, training mode, values and characteristics of relationships between teachers and students, which are formed in the different periods of univer-sity history. As one of the historical forms, characteristics culture in university has a series of the inner related basic characteristics and corresponding concepts, which include organizational cultural characteristics, culture precipitation, the uniqueness of running autonomy, competition, social needs and social reputation. Characteristic culture in university has four values including promoting the personality development, promoting the cultural heritage and innovation, promoting the organizational identity and cohesion, and promoting the quality improvement. The value of characteristic culture in university has a common side to perform the functions of the university, and a unique side of the specific university. The analysis about the related links includes the elements of cognition, value realization, discrimination relations and environmental adaptation which could be based on the perspective of the formation and de-velopment of characteristic culture in university, and two side include the formation element and the practical form of characteristic culture, which in order to build up the analysis framework of characteristic culture in university.%大学特色的文化属性,可由大学历史上各个时期形成的理念、制度、学术结构、人才培养模式、师生的价值观念和人际关系特征等得到实证。大学特色作为历史凝结成的一种文化,具有一系列内在关联的基本特性及相应概念:组织文化个性、文化积淀、办学自主权、竞争的独特性、社会需要、社会声誉等。大学特色文化有促进人的个性发展、促进文化传承创新、促进学校组织认同和凝聚力、促进质量提升等四种价值。大学特色文

  9. Development and evaluation of a teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination in university nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Brown, Lucinda; Duff, Carmel; Nesbitt, Pat; Hepner, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination are vital to ethical effective health systems. Nurses require quality educational preparation in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination. Limited evidence-based research is available to guide teachers. To develop, implement and evaluate an evidence-based teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination for undergraduate nursing students. A quantitative design using pre- and post-survey measures was used to evaluate the teaching and learning approach. The Bachelor of Nursing program in an Australian university. Academics and second year undergraduate nursing students. A literature review and consultation with academics informed the development of the teaching and learning approach. Thirty-three students completed a survey at pre-measures and following participation in the teaching and learning approach at post-measures about their confidence to practice cross-cultural nursing (Transcultural Self-efficacy Tool) and about their discriminatory attitudes (Quick Discrimination Index). The literature review found that educational approaches that solely focus on culture might not be sufficient in addressing discrimination and racism. During consultation, academics emphasised the importance of situating cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination as social determinants of health. Therefore, cross-cultural nursing was contextualised within primary health care and emphasised care for culturally diverse communities. Survey findings supported the effectiveness of this strategy in promoting students' confidence regarding knowledge about cross-cultural nursing. There was no reported change in discriminatory attitudes. The teaching and learning approach was modified to include stronger experiential learning and role playing. Nursing education should emphasise cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination. The study describes an evaluated teaching and learning approach and demonstrates how evaluation

  10. How Organizational Culture as Perceived by Senior Administrators Influences the Adoption of Information Technology Systems in Two 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, David Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between university culture, organizational characteristics, and central IT systems adoption within two four-year public universities. A qualitative multi-case methodology was used to examine the influence of organizational cultures and characteristics on personal perceptions, actions,…

  11. How Organizational Culture as Perceived by Senior Administrators Influences the Adoption of Information Technology Systems in Two 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, David Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between university culture, organizational characteristics, and central IT systems adoption within two four-year public universities. A qualitative multi-case methodology was used to examine the influence of organizational cultures and characteristics on personal perceptions, actions,…

  12. Watching Politics: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Impact of Visual Cultures on Politics, University of Warwick, 31 May 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gallimore

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jointly hosted by the Institute of Advanced Study and the Department of Film and Television Studies at the University of Warwick, the Watching Politics symposium brought together a range of disciplines to explore the social, cultural, aesthetic, historical, theoretical and political impacts of visual cultures on politics - and vice versa.  With such a wide remit, it was interesting to identify how links between the various papers were established, frequently relating to this interdependence of influence and transmission between the two systems.  Devoting attention across a diverse range of contemporary and past media, culture and politics opened up the event to consider a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and methodologies, encouraging a more holistic view of the relationship between visual cultures and politics.

  13. A New Perspective on the Demand of the Cross-cultural Audiences:Lacuna and Universal Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lacuna and Universal Model provides a new terminology and classification for the factors behind the success and failure of cross-cultural media content,and thus forms an analysis framework for the study of the cross -cultural audiences’need. According to this model,the audience will dislike or not select foreign media content under these circumstances:(1)audiences find that the content is irrelevant or unsuitable;(2)audiences cannot compre-hend the content;3)they do not like the style of such content. This model also argues that cross-cultural media content is successfully spread under these circumstances:( 1 )the media content shows attractive attribute to cross-cultural audience;( 2 )the media content is open to alternative readings.

  14. Writing better test items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, Julia W

    2005-01-01

    Professional development specialists have had little opportunity to learn how to write test items to meet the expectations of today's graduate nurse. Schools of nursing have moved away from knowledge-level test items and have had to develop more application and analysis items to prepare graduates for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This same type of question can be used effectively to support a competence assessment system and document critical thinking skills.

  15. The Two Cultures of Science:Implications for University-Industry Relationships in the U.S. Agriculture Biotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William B. Lacy; Leland L. Glenna; Dina Biscotti; Rick Welsh; Kate Clancy

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between U.S. universities and industries have existed for several decades and in recent years have become generally more varied, wider in scope, more aggressive and experimental and higher in public visibility. In addition, in the last few decades, public and private interests have advocated for government policies and laws to globally promote the commercialization of university science. This paper examines the persistence or convergence of the two cultures of science and the implications of this commercialization for university-industry relationships in agriculture biotechnology. The perceptions and values of over 200 U.S. university and industry scientists, managers and administrators who participate in or oversee research collaborations in agricultural biotechnology were analyzed. The ifndings revealed that the participants in these research relationships continue to perceive very distinct cultures of science and identify a wide range of concerns and disadvantages of these partnerships. Several actions were discussed to ensure that the two cultures serve complementary roles and that they maximize the public beneifts from these increasing collaborations.

  16. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Michel

    2016-10-01

    This communication presents the situation regarding astronomical and archaeoastronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention through recent years up until today. Some parallel events and works were promoted strongly within the IAU-UNESCO Initiative during the International Year of Astronomy (2009). This was followed by a joint program by the IAU and ICOMOS-an official advisory body assisting the World Heritage Committee in the evaluation of nomination dossiers. The result of that work is an important publication by around 40 authors from 20 different countries all around the world: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the Context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (Ruggles & Cotte 2010). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives such as the ``Windows to the Universe" organisation and the parallel constitution of local ``Starlight Reserves''. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied the global trend for astronomical heritage. WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. A key phrase is ``demonstration of Outstanding Universal Value'' to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. This communication first examines the requirements and evaluation practices about of demonstrating OUV for a given place in the context of astronomical or archaeoastronomical heritage. That means the examination of the tangible attributes, an inventory of the property in terms of immoveable and moveable components and an inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in the context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). This is also related to the application to the site of the concept of integrity and authenticity, as regards the place itself and in comparison with other similar places (WH sites already listed, sites on national WH Tentative Lists

  17. Marketing Culture. Summary of the conference Marketing culture in modern organization held on 1 June 2001 at Warsaw University.

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Modzelewski

    2001-01-01

    What do we mean when we refer to "marketing"? Are they the same thing as "marketing culture", but in a people context? Is "marketing the same as salels"? How can we find an acceptable balance between the strategy and the tactics? These are important questions, because our answers have important implications.

  18. Marketing Culture. Summary of the conference Marketing culture in modern organization held on 1 June 2001 at Warsaw University.

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Modzelewski

    2001-01-01

    What do we mean when we refer to "marketing"? Are they the same thing as "marketing culture", but in a people context? Is "marketing the same as salels"? How can we find an acceptable balance between the strategy and the tactics? These are important questions, because our answers have important implications.

  19. Development of University Dormitory Culture%大学生宿舍文化建设探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 张军霖

    2013-01-01

      Construction of university dormitory culture is system engineering; it requires sustained, long-term ongoing construction. It plays a very important role in the system of spiritual civilization construction in colleges and universities. Good dormitory culture and positive atmosphere plays an important role in students' growth and accomplishment. Educators should understand the connotation of dormitory culture in colleges and universities and attach importance to the active role of dorm culture on students ' comprehensive ability, study the measures and methods of the construction of dorm culture, and work hard to create a positive atmosphere of college dormitory culture.%  大学宿舍文化建设是一个系统工程,需要持之以恒、长期不断的建设,它在高校精神文明建设体系中起着十分重要的作用。良好的宿舍文化,积极向上的宿舍氛围对学生的成长成才有着不可低估的作用,作为高校教育工作者应该认识宿舍文化的内涵,重视宿舍文化对学生综合素质培养的积极作用,研究宿舍文化建设的措施和方法,努力营造积极向上的大学宿舍文化氛围。

  20. Study of frequency of bacteria isolated from blood culture and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern in a university hospital in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorieh Saderi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Determining frequency of bacteria, isolated from blood culture and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns, has epidemiological significance and can help in selecting empirical therapy. This study was aimed to assess, the frequency of bacteria isolated from blood culture of patients suspected to bacteremia and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Methods: Culture of blood and determination of antibiotic susceptibility was done by standard methods. In this study, a variety of isolated bacteria types, antibiotic susceptibility, as well as age, sex and type of admission of patients were analyzed in a university hospital from 21 March, 2006 to 20 March, 2007. Results: During one year, blood culture was done for 5116 patients and bacteria were isolated in 912 cases (17.8%. Three most frequently groups of bacteria in blood cultures of patients were non-fermentative gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas and Acintobacter spp, coliforms (Escherichia coli and enterobacter and klebsiella spp. and coagulase negative staphylococci, respectively, which were isolated in 63.4%, 17.0% and 12.8% of patients, and constituted 93.2% of positive blood cultures. Higher resistance was shown in bacteria isolated from inpatients compare to outpatients. Conclusion: This study showed the influence of age, sex and type of admission (outpatient or inpatient in a variety of isolated bacteria in blood culture. The result of this study were the same as the other studies in Iran and other countries in respect of the variety of isolated bacteria and antibiotic susceptibility and show increase of antibiotic resistance in these bacteria.

  1. Politics and care: a study of Czech Americans within Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1997-01-01

    The domain of inquiry for this study was the influence of the American political environmental context on professional and generic care patterns, expressions, and meanings of Czech American immigrants. The purpose of the research was to document, describe, interpret, and analyze the diversities and universalities of professional and generic care for this cultural group, to provide culturally congruent care to Czech Americans, and to explicate the role of politics as an influence on care patterns, health, and well being. The researcher's former transcultural ethnonursing study in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1991 served as a stimulus for this in-depth study on politics and care. Twelve key and twenty general informants were interviewed. Five major themes were identified. The researcher discovered that the capitalist economic market structure of the United States influenced informant lifeways in all dimensions of Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality, as depicted in the Sunrise Model. Specific care patterns discovered included care as choice, care as responsibility, and care as helping each other. Findings related to professional and generic care supported researcher predictions that generic culture care patterns would be important to immigrants. Provisions for culturally congruent nursing care were articulated based on research findings.

  2. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  3. A Study of Awareness of Cultural Heritage among the Teachers at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Cultural Heritage means to inherent and cultivate the cultural disinclinations from one generation to next generation. It is possible by education as well as following the traditional livelihood of ours; it is conducted formal/consciously or informal/unconsciously. One of the traits of education is to hand on the cultural values and behaviour…

  4. Understanding and Influencing Teaching and Learning Cultures at University: A Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxa, Torgny; Martensson, Katarina; Alveteg, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Academic cultures might be perceived as conservative, at least in terms of development of teaching and learning. Through a lens of network theory this conceptual article analyses the pattern of pathways in which culture is constructed through negotiation of meaning. The perspective contributes to an understanding of culture construction and…

  5. Cross-culturally modified University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test for a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Tekeli, Hakan; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Yasar, Halit; Kendirli, Mustafa T; Saglam, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is a well-developed and popular olfactory test, which has been validated in various populations. However, there was only one study in a Turkish population, and this study indicated that the North American version of the UPSIT was not enough to evaluate the olfactory functions of Turkish population. So, we developed a cross-cultural adaptation of the UPSIT, the UPSIT-Turkish (UPSIT-T). Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the applicability of the UPSIT-T in healthy Turkish subjects. The study included 51 healthy individuals who reported having normal olfactory function. The participants were administered the North American version of the UPSIT firstly, and then, after a day UPSIT-T was applied to the participants. The results of two smell tests were compared, and the applicability of UPSIT-T was evaluated. The mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 27.2 ± 5.7 (range, 14-38) with the UPSIT application, whereas the mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 35.9 ± 3.1 for UPSIT-T. There was a statistically significant increase in the scores of the participants when UPSIT-T was performed (p < 0.001). The identification rates of 10 test odorants were <80% for our study group, and 2 of 10 were <70% for the UPSIT-T. The UPSIT-T modification is an adequate olfactory test for clinical use in a Turkish population.

  6. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The communication will present the today situation of astronomical and archaeo-astronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention along the past years till today. Some parallel events and works promoted strongly as the IAU - UNESCO initiative for the “year of astronomy” (2009). It was followed by a joint program by IAU and ICOMOS who is an official advisory body assessing the World Heritage Committee for the evaluation of nomination dossiers. Result of that works is an important publication by around 40 authors coming from 20 different countries all around the World: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (2010-2011). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives like “Windows to the Universe” organisation and parallel constitution of local “Starlight Reserves”. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied global trend for astronomical heritage.WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. Key word is “demonstration of an Outstanding Universal Value” to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. Communication first examines requirements and evaluation practices about of the OUV demonstration for a given place in context of astronomical or archaeo-astronomical heritage. That means examination of the tangible attributes, inventory of the property in terms of unmoveable and moveable components and inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). That is also related to apply to the site concept of integrity and authenticity level of the place and comparison with other similar places (WH site already listed, national WH Tentative List, other similar places in the region).Second issue of the communication is to give a glimpse on the

  7. 地方高校图书馆文化建设的现状分析%Current Situation of Cultural Construction of Local University Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨月; 费晶

    2015-01-01

    地方高校图书馆文化建设是高校校园文化建设的的重要组成部分。因此,应加强图书馆文化建设。%The cultural construction of local university library is an important part of the construction of university campus culture. So, the cultural construction of library should be strengthened.

  8. The Culture of Business Education and Its Place in the Modern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers believe that the modern university is in a state of crisis like never before. One of the main reasons cited for this decline is that the modern university has a closer resemblance to a transnational corporation than to a traditional scholarly institution (Lewis, 2005). This paper attempts to define the term "university"…

  9. Discussion on University Library and Construction of Campus Culture%论高校图书馆与校园文化建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐春英

    2015-01-01

    高校图书馆是校园文化的中心,在校园文化建设过程中,图书馆应该处于引领地位,在校园物质文化、精神文化和行为文化各方面发挥重要作用,高校在校园文化建设中要充分重视图书馆文化建设。%Culture is the soul of a university. University library should be the center for the construction of campus culture, playing important role in the leading position of campus material culture, spiritual culture and behavior culture. Colleges and Universities should give full attention to the construction of library culture in the construction of campus culture.

  10. 高校学生会组织文化研究*%Study on Organizational Culture for University Student Union

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永春

    2013-01-01

    The organizational culture for university student union is very necessary for the management of student union,organizational cul-ture is the important content of the modern student union management.Organizational culture for university student union includes three as-pects:material culture,system culture and spiritual culture,should abide the common idea,highlight their own characteristics,alleviating student union department boundaries, strengthening student union common goals, strengthening team learning, constructing learning student union,establishing student union growing knowledge base,realizing the sharing and innovation of the student union knowledge and skill,is the only way to construct advanced organizational culture of college .%学生会组织文化对学生会管理是十分必要的,组织文化是现代学生会高效管理的组成部分。高校学生会组织文化包括物质文化、制度文化和精神文化三个方面,应信守共同理念,突出各自特色,淡化学生会各部门界限,强化学生会共同目标,加强团队学习,构建学习型学生会,建立学生会成长知识库,实现学生会知识技能共享与创新,只有这样才能构建起先进的高校学生会组织文化。

  11. Cross- cultural validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: study of the items and internal consistency Validação transcultural da versão para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: estudo dos itens e da consistência interna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Lima Osório

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to carry out the cross- cultural validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Social Phobia Inventory, an instrument for the evaluation of fear, avoidance and physiological symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder. METHOD: The process of translation and adaptation involved four bilingual professionals, appreciation and approval of the back- translation by the authors of the original scale, a pilot study with 30 Brazilian university students, and appreciation by raters who confirmed the face validity of the Portuguese version, which was named " Inventário de Fobia Social" . As part of the psychometric study of the Social Phobia Inventory, analysis of the items and evaluation of the internal consistency of the instrument were performed in a study conducted on 2314 university students. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that item 11, related to the fear of public speaking, was the most frequently scored item. The correlation of the items with the total score was quite adequate, ranging from 0.44 to 0.71, as was the internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory proved to be adequate regarding the psychometric properties initially studied, with qualities quite close to those of the original study. Studies that will evaluate the remaining indicators of validity of the Social Phobia Inventory in clinical and non-clinical samples are considered to be opportune and necessary.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar a validação transcultural para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory, um instrumento para avaliação e mensuração dos sintomas de medo, evitação e sintomas fisiológicos associados ao transtorno de ansiedade social. MÉTODO: O processo de tradução e adaptação envolveu quatro profissionais bilingües, apreciação e aprovação da back

  12. Systematic approach to the foundation of healthy way of life and popularization of physical culture in modern university.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharuk S.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The factors of popularization of physical culture are considered among students young people. Directions of development of optimum method of employments are shown by a physical culture, which will provide the systematic going and attaching near the healthy way of life. 815 students took part in research. It is set that optimization of educational process of student and creation of educational base will allow students to get necessary for the maintenance of optimum health level physical loading. Directions of technologism of an educate work are offered with students. Possibilities of university are shown in conditioning for forming for the students of positive motivation to the healthy way of life. Directions organization of relaxation measures are recommended for students. Attention is accented on the financial skilled providing of employments in the sporting halls of university.

  13. TYPOLOGIZATION OF SOCIO-CULTURAL EXERCISES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AUDIO-VISIAL RECEPTION SKILLS OF NON-LINGUISTIC UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Владимировна Базина

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes principles of building a complex of socio-cultural exercises intended for the materials of German TV to be used in training students of non-linguistic universities with under-threshold level of German language skills. Besides that the types of German language exercises for the students of non-linguistic universities are given where students study German as second language in the context of socio-cultural and competence approach for preparation of international journalists on the Bachelor level. The author also has analyzed opportunity to use proposed types of exercises for improvement of professional competences of future international journalists by the means of German language in accordance with new state standards of professional education. Proposed system of exercises is intended for the classes of German language taught through German TV of Galileo series and was successfully tested in practice.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-2-17

  14. Estimation of incident solar radiation on the roof of the cultural and sports university centre of the Foundation University Los Libertadores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, S. A.; Carrillo, V. M.; Rátiva, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    This document shows the estimate of the total solar irradiance incident for the set of solar collectors to be located on the roof of cultural and sports university centre (CSUC) of the Foundation University Los Libertadores (FULL) in Bogotá, Colombia, and they will be part of the climate control system of the pool built inside. The calculation was based on experimental data of global solar radiation on the horizontal surface on March, July, October, November and December, through the three most commonly models used to determine the total solar radiation on tilted surfaces: isotropic sky, HDKR and Perez. The results show differences of less than 5% between the values calculated by the three models for December, the month with lower irradiance. For this month, reductions up to 15% and 19% were observed in the estimated irradiance, relative to those obtained on a horizontal surface on a surface under ideal orientation and inclination, respectively.

  15. On the Operation Mechanism of the University Culture Construction%大学文化建设运行机制分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振鹏

    2012-01-01

    大学文化建设运行机制是一个有机体系,在大学文化建设中起着基础性作用。其中,核心价值体系的引导机制是大学文化建设的灵魂,切实有效的组织调控机制是大学文化建设的核心架构,文化互动机制是大学文化建设共融互动、协同发展的基础,创新激励机制是大学文化建设的动力源泉,舆情反馈机制是对大学文化建设的基本策略和必要补充。大学文化建设运行机制只有实现整体性的结合,才能发挥出调控大学文化建设的集合效应。%The operation mechanism of the university culture construction is an organic system, it plays a fundamen tal role in the cultural construction of the university. Among them, the guiding mechanism of the core value system is the soul of the university culture building, the effective and organizational control mechanism is the core architec ture of the building of the university culture, the cultural interaction mechanism is the basis for the interactive and collaborative development of university culture, the innovative and incentives operation mechanism is the power source of the university cultural construction, the public opinion feedback mechanism is the basic strategy and a necessary complement to the construction of university culture. University culture construction and operation mecha nism is the organic combination in order to play out the collection effect of regulation of the university cultural con struction.

  16. La Alhambra in Granada: a universal paradigm of architecture that has helped to generate peace and reconciliation between cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. García Pérez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There are examples of architectural works that transcend their geographical and historical setting to become true universal symbols of peace and reconciliation. One such example is La Alhambra in Granada: the mythical meeting place. Throughout its history, it has been a stage that has hosted disputes and conflicts between different civilizations and political positions. As a result of the cultural synthesis it represents, it has been converted into an efficient instrument used by the people for arbitration.

  17. Effect Of Leadership Function And Organization Cultural On The Performance Of Employees In The Field Of Academic University Ichsan Gorontalo

    OpenAIRE

    Zuchri Abdussamad; Swastiani Dunggio

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify and analyze the level of influence the function of leadership and organizational culture on employee performance in academic areas at the University of Gorontalo Ichsan either simultaneously or partially. The analytical method used is multiple linear regression. The sampling technique used in this research is purposive sample that is making the subject based on their specific purpose and techniques of data collection through questionnaire observation interview. The...

  18. Developing cultural competence through self-reflection in interprofessional education: Findings from an Australian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Rebecca; Bidewell, John; Dune, Tinashe; Lessey, Nkosi

    2016-05-01

    Interprofessional education and cultural competence are both necessary for health professionals working in interprofessional teams serving diverse populations. Using a pre-post-survey case series design, this study evaluates a novel learning activity designed to encourage self-reflection and cultural competence in an Australian interprofessional education context. Undergraduate health professional students in a large subject viewed three 7-15 minute videos featuring interviews with persons of a minority cultural, linguistic, or sexual group who were living with a disability or managing a health condition. Immediately afterwards, students in interprofessional groups completed a structured activity designed to promote interprofessional and cultural reflection. A localised version of a validated scale measured cultural competence before and after the learning activity. Results suggest the value of video-based learning activities based on real-life examples for improving cultural competence. Despite initially rating themselves highly, 64% of students (n = 273) improved their overall cultural competence, though only by M = 0.13, SD = 0.08, of a 5-point rating-scale interval. A nuanced approach to interpreting results is warranted; even slight increases may indicate improved cultural competence. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness of video-based cultural competence learning activities, based on qualitative findings, are provided. Overall the findings attest to the merit of group discussion in cultural competence learning activities in interprofessional education settings. However, the inclusion of group discussions within such learning activities should hinge on group dynamics.

  19. 高校图书馆文化建设研究%On Construction of University Library Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓胤龙; 赵维平

    2012-01-01

    校园文化建设是高校发展、繁荣的一项重要工作。图书馆要以校园文化建设为契机,加强图书馆精神文化、制度文化、行为文化、馆藏等方面的建设,充分发挥图书馆文化在图书馆建设、发展、服务中的引领作用,不断提高办馆质量,提升馆员素质,完善服务水平。%The construction of campus culture is an important work for the development and prosperity of the university. Li- brary should take the opportunity of the construction of campus culture, strengthen the building of the library spirit culture, system culture, behavior culture, collection and other aspects. The library also should make full use of the leading role in building library culture, development and service, and constantly improve the quality of library, raise librarians quality and im- prove the service level.

  20. The uniqueness of cultures, universality and normativity – with special reference to the normative meaning of differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F.M. Strauss

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The inevitable presence of similarities between different cultures sets a limit to the (irrationalist claim that the uniqueness of every culture precludes the comparability of cultures. Investigating the background of this untenable view opens up the way to arrive at a reassessment of the role of continuity and universality. This provides the basis of an account of the normative meaning of biotical analogies within the various normative aspects of reality. The characterization of undifferentiated societies in a contrasting way highlights the normative meaning of societal differentiation. Examples of an excessive expansion of the power of particular societal spheres, such as the domain of the church or the scope of science (during the Middle Ages and the modern development of society, demonstrate that the course of factual events frequently does not observe the normative (sphere-sovereign structural boundaries for differentiated societal collectivities.

  1. Knowledge transfer through university-industry relations: some aspects of organizational culture. Teadmussiire ülikoolide ja majanduspraktika suhete abil: mõned organisatsioonikultuurilised aspektid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaja Vadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of national universities and other higher education institutions in knowledge transfer in countries with post-Soviet economies has been studied in very modest extent, especially in the context of small countries. This paper concentrates on the organizational culture aspects playing important role in the commercialization of university research within the university knowledge transfer and knowledge based society framework in Estonia. Knowledge sharing and commercialization depend on nature of organizational culture, as a part of internal environment. Two largest Estonian universities (University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology are compared in various factors influencing knowledge transfer using document analysis and interviews. The present study has shown that knowledge transfer faces numerous issues, and in particular soft issues (individual mindsets and organizational values may differ from university to university

  2. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  3. The Relationship of Centralization, Organizational Culture and Performance Indexes in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ashkan Nasirpour

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30. Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval. Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no

  4. The Relationship of Centralization, Organizational Culture and Performance Indexes in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ashkan Nasirpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nOne of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30. Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval. Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture

  5. Construction of University Students' Dormitory Culture%大学生宿舍文化的构建探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭碧海; 黄诗仪

    2015-01-01

    College dormitory is one of the leading universities college students studying and living spaces, and therefore the College dormitory culture and is living in one of the college students for far-reaching, together they form an important part of the campus culture, but also with universities the development and dissemination of advanced socialist culture ideological and political education are closely linked. This paper describes the importance of this on college dormitory culture construc-tion status of construction were analyzed, and on this basis, proposed building college dormitory culture-related measures, hoping to provide useful reference for the construction of dormitory culture of college students.%高校宿舍是大学生学习和生活的最主要的场所之一,因此高校宿舍文化的构建对于身处其中的大学生来说影响深远,它们在一起形成了大学校园文化的一个重要组成部分,同时也与高校思想政治教育工作的开展和社会主义先进文化的传播有着紧密的联系.本文在此就阐述了大学生宿舍文化建设的重要意义,对其建设现状进行了分析,并在此基础上提出了相关大学生宿舍文化的构建措施,希望能为高校大学生宿舍文化的构建提供有益的借鉴.

  6. Using a cognitive architecture for addressing the question of cognitive universals in cross-cultural psychology: The example of awalé

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A central theme in cross-cultural psychology is the extent to which cognitive mechanisms are universal, or, alternatively, are specific to a given culture. We propose a new way to tackle this question: to use the same cognitive architecture, implemented as a computer program, for simulating phenomena in which individuals from different cultures perform a task familiar to their own culture. The CHREST architecture (Gobet et al., 2001; Gobet & Simon, 2000) has simulated a number of empirical ph...

  7. An Investigation of the role of Cyber Networks in Cultural Identity of Students at the University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Barat Dastjerdi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The fast growth of cyber networks has exposed students to various kinds of information and applications. It has also created numerous changes in different aspects of their lives, including their identity and culture. In today's Iranian society, cyber networks have created a new situation for users and defined new boundaries with respect to the formation of youths' subcultures, values and identity. Anonymity, communication speed and fluidity of cyber networks have conveyed broad messages with regard to the communication patterns of youths (Zokaee, 2010: 2-3. Students are regarded as the biggest group of cyberspace users and audience. They become familiar with the cyberspace at university since they have access to the internet there. The cyberspace affects cognitive, emotional, cultural and practical orientation of students, influencing all aspects of their lives. This fact has led to putting the focus on the cultural identity of students exposed to the cyberspace. Given the pivotal role of cyber networks in changing the identity of youths, especially their cultural identity, the current study seeks to examine the relationship between exposure to the cyberspace and cultural identity of students at Isfahan University. The study will also examines the relationship between reasons and goals behind using cyber networks and the cultural identity of students. Material & Methods The research method is descriptive .The study population is consisted of all students of Isfahan University, of whom 200 individuals were selected using random sampling method. The questionnaire used for gathering information was made by the researcher herself and its validity and reliability was confirmed. The data was analyzed by SPSS software in descriptive and inferential fashions. Discussion of Results & Conclusion The results of descriptive analysis show that research subjects visit the cyberspace 1-2 hours per week on average. Social, communicative, personal

  8. Neoliberalism, Corporate Culture, and the Promise of Higher Education: The University as a Democratic Public Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the corrosive effects of corporate culture on the academy and society, arguing that neoliberal discourses of privatization and commercialization reduce citizenship to self-interest. Maintains that corporate culture ignores social injustices while emphasizing unfettered market forces, threatening understanding of democracy and the meaning…

  9. Female Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Culture in EFL Classrooms at a Saudi University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amir, Bayan Al-Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    In the literature of second language teaching and learning, culture and language have always been assumed to be interdependent. Their interdependence comes from the fact that language is not a code free from culture, but an embodiment of it. However, there is still a need, from the part of teachers, to realize the importance of integrating culture…

  10. Developing the University of the Philippines Loneliness Assessment Scale: A Cross-Cultural Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Davis Porinchu

    2012-01-01

    As the existing scales to measure loneliness are almost all Western and there is no single scale developed cross-culturally for this purpose, this study is designed to develop a reliable and valid scale to measure the experience of loneliness of individuals from individualistic or collectivistic cultures. There are three samples for this study…

  11. Teaching Sociolinguistics: A Medium for Cultural Awareness of Indonesian University Foreign Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Herawati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to show the evidences that indicate how teaching Sociolinguistics can result in a number of valuable outcomes, including helping students understand and appreciate other cultures different from theirs. Sociolinguistics provides useful examples of language usage in different genres, including how culture influences people in using a language. The opportunities of learning other cultures through language will take the students to the higher level of appreciation of the culture of the target language. To determine how this outcome can be achieved in the language classrooms, this paper provides a review of closely connected literature about how to bridge the gap between cultures in particular. However, to increase its completeness and relevance, this paper also provides some research results that reveal how teaching Sociolinguistics has taken its new applicability and importance, and furthermore adds the effects on how students become more proficient and enthusiastic about their learning. 

  12. Sports culture heritage of modern Chinese Christian universities Sports culture heritage of modern Chinese Christian universities%近代中国教会大学体育文化的传承研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀强; 孙麒麟

    2016-01-01

    运用文献资料和逻辑分析等方法,从体育经费和场馆设施、体育制度及组织、体育竞赛和课外活动、体育思想及价值观等方面对近代中国教会大学体育文化进行挖掘和整理,提出近代中国教会大学体育的历史贡献,得出主要结论:教会大学体育历经发端、巅峰和衰退阶段,受西方体育文化的影响较大;教会大学体育对中国近代体育进行了思想启蒙,促进了体育理论研究,引领和示范了国立和私立大学体育,历史贡献不容忽视;教会大学体育印证了体育在强健学生体魄、完善学生人格、提升学生综合素质方面不可替代的作用;教会大学体育的精神财富将继续为新时期大学体育文化建设提供借鉴和启示。%Modern Chinese Christian universities played an important role in promoting school sports development, introducing western sport concepts, and enhancing exchange between East and West in the history of Chinaˊs modern sports. This study uses the methods of literature review and logical analysis to study the finance, facilities, organization, intramural athletics and extracurricular sports activities, and sports ideology and values, of the Christian universities in modern China. We recognize the historical contributions of Christian universities on this basis and draw the following conclusions:Christian universitiesˊsports experienced beginning, peak and decline stages under the influence of the Western sports culture;Christian universities sports enlightened China modern sports and promoted sports theory research thus playing a leading role in sports of both public and private universities; its historical contribution in building students ˊ physique, improving students ˊpersonality , and improving studentsˊ comprehensive quality should not be under-estimated; the heritage of Christian universitiesˊsports will continue to serve as a valuable reference for university sports

  13. Development and validation of 26-item dysfunctional attitude scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Samouei, Rahele; Mousavii, Sayyed Ghafour; Bornamanesh, Ali Reza

    2013-06-01

    Dysfunctional Attitude Scale is one of the most common instruments used to assess cognitive vulnerability. This study aimed to develop and validate a short form of Dysfunctional Attitude Scale appropriate for an Iranian clinical population. Participants were 160 psychiatric patients from medical centers affiliated with Isfahan Medical University, as well as 160 non-patients. Research instruments were clinical interviews based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV-TR, Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and General Heath Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Data was analyzed using multicorrelation calculations and factor analysis. Based on the results of factor analysis and item-total correlation, 14 items were judged candidates for omission. Analysis of the 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Evidence for the concurrent criterion validity was obtained through calculating the correlation between the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale and psychiatric diagnosis (r = 0.55), GHQ -28 (r = 0.56) and somatization, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression subscales (0.45,0.53,0.48, and 0.57, respectively). Factor analysis deemed a four-factor structure the best. The factors were labeled as success-perfectionism, need for approval, need for satisfying others, and vulnerability-performance evaluation. The results showed that the Iranian version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) bears satisfactory psychometric properties suggesting that this cognitive instrument is appropriate for use in an Iranian cultural context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Swedish University, Alleging Culture Clash, Forces out 2 Tenured Foreign Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labi, Aisha

    2007-01-01

    When Oleg Viro and Burglind Joricke resigned in February from their tenured positions at Sweden's Uppsala University, administrators hoped that their departure would restore tranquility to the strife-riven mathematics department. Instead the manner in which the highly regarded university brought about the professors' departure, for reasons that…

  15. Methods and Strategies for Creating a Culture of Collections Assessment at Comprehensive Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath; Robles-Smith, Kimberley; Garrison, Julie; Way, Doug

    2009-01-01

    Differing from those of their liberal arts and Association of Research Libraries counterparts, today's comprehensive universities face a variety of unique challenges and opportunities when it comes to assessing their collections. This article looks at the different needs and interests of comprehensive universities and focuses on the challenges…

  16. Cultural Factors Influencing Eastern and Western Engineering Students' Choice of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2010-01-01

    Insight into factors that affect students' choice of university is useful when designing study programmes, especially in global competition for students. This study focuses on Taiwanese and Norwegian students' preferences for university, study programme, course qualities and future career qualities. Hofstede's model was used to predict…

  17. Language Universals and Socio-Cultural Implications in Deviant Usage: Personal Questions in Swedish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Christina Bratt

    1975-01-01

    This paper investigates the address avoidance of second person personal pronouns in Swedish in terms of language universals and the relationship between deviation from a universal linguistic feature and social structural change. Available from Liber Laeromedel, Box 1205, S-22105 Lund, Sweden. (Author)

  18. Across Borders and across Cultures: Vietnamese Students' Positioning of Teachers in a University Twinning Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha; Doyle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    How do teachers and teaching appear to international students moving from the home country component of a twinning programme to the overseas partner university? This narrative study explored the perspectives of five Vietnamese students in their first months of studying for a commerce degree at a New Zealand university, having completed the first…

  19. Language Universals and Socio-Cultural Implications in Deviant Usage: Personal Questions in Swedish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Christina Bratt

    1975-01-01

    This paper investigates the address avoidance of second person personal pronouns in Swedish in terms of language universals and the relationship between deviation from a universal linguistic feature and social structural change. Available from Liber Laeromedel, Box 1205, S-22105 Lund, Sweden. (Author)

  20. The Network University? Technology, Culture and Organisational Complexity in Contemporary Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tania; Marginson, Simon; Snyder, Ilana

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of the network organisation in relation to the technologised university. Drawing upon the early findings of a study that examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on both organisational and teaching and learning issues in five Australian universities, the authors discuss the way in…

  1. Cultural Capital, Family Background and Education: Choosing University Subjects in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    This article employs Bourdieu's conceptual tools to unpack family influences on students' subject and university choices in China. This empirical study employed mixed research approaches, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, to examine students' choices of subjects and universities in a sample of secondary school students from the age…

  2. Reading Cultures, Christianization, and Secularization: Universalism and Particularism in the Swedish History of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    In the organization and ideology of the Lutheran state churches, Tim Knudsen has identified the roots of universalism in the Nordic welfare states. This article applies a similar perspective to the aims and contents of early modern Nordic popular education. Historiographically, universalism was emphasized by Egil Johansson, who recognized the…

  3. The use of an item response theory-based disability item bank across diseases: accounting for differential item functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees A; Vermeulen, Marinus; De Haan, Rob J

    2010-05-01

    There is not a single universally accepted activity of daily living (ADL) instrument available to compare disability assessments across different patient groups. We developed a generic item bank of ADL items using item response theory, the Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Scale (ALDS). When comparing outcomes of the ALDS between patients groups, item characteristics of the ALDS should be comparable across groups. The aim of the study was to assess the differential item functioning (DIF) in a group of patients with various disorders to investigate the comparability across these groups. Cross-sectional, multicenter study including 1,283 in- and outpatients with a variety of disorders and disability levels. The sample was divided in two groups: (1) mainly neurological patients (n=497; vascular medicine, Parkinson's disease and neuromuscular disorders) and (2) patients from internal medicine (n=786; pulmonary diseases, chronic pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and geriatric patients). Eighteen of 72 ALDS items showed statistically significant DIF (P<0.01). However, the DIF could effectively be modeled by the introduction of disease-specific parameters. In the subgroups studied, DIF could be modeled in such a way that the ensemble of the items comprised a scale applicable in both groups.

  4. Evaluation of item candidates: the PROMIS qualitative item review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, Darren A; Rothrock, Nan; Yount, Susan; Stone, Arthur A

    2007-05-01

    One of the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) network's primary goals is the development of a comprehensive item bank for patient-reported outcomes of chronic diseases. For its first set of item banks, PROMIS chose to focus on pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical function, and social function. An essential step for the development of an item pool is the identification, evaluation, and revision of extant questionnaire items for the core item pool. In this work, we also describe the systematic process wherein items are classified for subsequent statistical processing by the PROMIS investigators. Six phases of item development are documented: identification of extant items, item classification and selection, item review and revision, focus group input on domain coverage, cognitive interviews with individual items, and final revision before field testing. Identification of items refers to the systematic search for existing items in currently available scales. Expert item review and revision was conducted by trained professionals who reviewed the wording of each item and revised as appropriate for conventions adopted by the PROMIS network. Focus groups were used to confirm domain definitions and to identify new areas of item development for future PROMIS item banks. Cognitive interviews were used to examine individual items. Items successfully screened through this process were sent to field testing and will be subjected to innovative scale construction procedures.

  5. The regional component of university courses of “Russian language and culture of speech” at the national branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhmutova A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the formation of linguistic, communicative and cultural competence among students bilinguals in teaching Russian language and speech culture. The authors put forward the thesis that the training of specialists in the conditions of bilingualism re quires not only a higher level of learning a second language, but also a qualitatively different level of comprehension. It is proved that the discipline “Russian and the culture of speech” assumes formation of communicative and culturological competence of the higher education institutions, which are trained on two-profile offices taking into account a regional component. Relevance of research in this area is increasing each year since the treatment of the person as the center of all systems of cognition highlights in the pedagogical University the formation of the modern language personality, capable of effective professional activity. The functional approach provides detection of features of functioning of language units in different spheres of public work. The communicative principle means that acquisition of Russian as a means of communication happens in the course of speech practice most approached to process of communication in Russian. The detection of similarity and distinctions between languages, interlingual comparison promotes establishment and a lexical interference. The linguistic-cultural principle provides understanding of language as the phenomena of culture and is connected with ability to define national-cultural components of linguistic units - words, phraseological combinations, grammatical categories of the text. Involvement of regional component as a basis in practice of teaching Russian and culture of speech increases efficiency of all process of training of students of national branch.

  6. Brief Analysis on the Cultural Competitive Advantage of University Library%高校图书馆文化竞争优势刍议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丽艳; 王怀诗

    2012-01-01

    Under the background of the construction of public cultural service system,university library should give full play to their material culture,spiritual culture,management culture,and service culture advantages,effectively participates in the construction of public cultural service system,and puts forward the effective measures to construct the university library culture competence.%在建设公共文化服务体系背景下,高校图书馆应充分发挥自身物质文化、精神文化、管理文化和服务文化的竞争优势,有效参与公共文化服务体系建设,并据此提出了构建高校图书馆文化竞争力的相应措施。

  7. Statistical Development and Application of Cultural Consensus Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-31

    1988), the full GCM was developed that allowed heterogeneity in informants, guessing bias as well as heterogeneity in item difficulty (cultural...Research Associates ( ARA ) and includes faculty researchers from several universities. Batchelder is a researcher on this grant, and Mark Steyvers is...using that software. First, as mentioned, it only applies to a special case of the GCM for T/F items, where there is no informant heterogeneity in

  8. D'un univers culturel a l'autre (From One Cultural Universe to Another).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinie, Muriel

    1988-01-01

    It is possible to develop an intermediate cultural system much like the interlanguage developed at the intermediate stage by a language learner. Techniques used by one teacher of French are described and discussed. (MSE)

  9. Academic Globalization: Universality of Cross-Cultural And Cross-Disciplinary LMR Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper suggests that previous research underscoring cross-cultural differences may be misleading, when in fact it is cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences that should be emphasized. Employing the LMR framework, this paper concludes that business or non-business predisposition has a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than does nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons not involved in business typically employ less linear and more multi-active/hybrid modes of communication. The linkages among individual characteristics, communication styles, work behaviors, and the extent to which the LMR constructs can facilitate and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc. are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders.

  10. Teaching Sociolinguistics: A Medium for Cultural Awareness of Indonesian University Foreign Language Learners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agnes Herawati

    2014-01-01

    This paper tries to show the evidences that indicate how teaching Sociolinguistics can result in a number of valuable outcomes, including helping students understand and appreciate other cultures different from theirs...

  11. Influencing Factors for Developing Managerial Behaviours That Encourage a Work-Family Culture in the University Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Álvarez-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article develops and tests a theoretical model to find out which factors influence the behaviour of supervisors in terms of promoting a work-family culture. This model explains to what extent the factors studied are relevant to encourage deans to promote this type of culture at Spanish universities. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression analysis. Data were obtained through a questionnaire to deans. The results yield five key factors: (1 the personal work-family conflict of managers; (2 the transformational leadership style of managers; (3 the identification with subordinates in need of work-family cares; (4 the perceived institutional support; and (5 the perceived support from other supervisors in the centre. The findings have practical implications for human resources management (HRM practices. Human resources management practices such as (a providing deans and other supervisors with training about the importance of work-family programs; (b promoting deans’ training in order to develop transformational leadership skills; or (c increasing institutional support can be useful when implementing a work-family culture in Spanish universities.

  12. Evaluating the effect of organization culture on the successful execution of strategies: Case study of Payam-e-Noor university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Monzavi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we use Hofstede method and Noble’s framework in strategy execution to evaluate the effect of organization culture on the successful implementation of strategies in a case study of Payam-e-Noor University of Iran. Data Collection is performed with the standard Hofstede survey, an evaluation tool for organization culture, and researchers’ survey tool to evaluate the effective implementation of strategies. The reliability coefficient was calculated as 0.846 using the Cronbach alpha. The target population includes 600 senior managers of Payam-e-Noor university of Iran at the time of data collection Cochran formula was used to calculate the required sample number of 120 individuals. The results show that according to the Hofstede dimensions, the dominant cultural aspects of high power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism, and femininity were identified. The first two have a direct influence on effectiveness of strategies. While individualism is known to have an invert effect on effectiveness of strategies, no connection was identified between masculinity and effectiveness of strategies, and thus, this theory was not confirmed in this research.

  13. A Study of the Inter-Cultural Sensitivity among the Faculty of English Language Centre of Jazan University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available study explored intercultural sensitivity of 103 faculty members of the English Language Centre (ELC of Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. A quantitative and non-experimental design was adopted for this study in which intercultural sensitivity of the English language teachers was evaluated on five demographic variables (e.g. gender, education, religion, total teaching experience, and experience of teaching in intercultural context. The results revealed that the international faculty of ELC abreast the basic canons of Intercultural adjustments. This suggests that the teachers are not only familiar with different cultural patterns (like beliefs, values and communication styles they are willing to minimize these differences and adopt universal set of values for effective educational practices. The results indicate the participants’ higher level of empathy, respect for others’ culture, tolerance on differences and high willingness to integrate with other cultures. The data reveals no statistically significant difference between the two groups in three variables, i.e. gender (Male & Female, qualification (Masters' & Ph.D and religion (Muslims & Non-Muslims. However, there was found a statistically significant difference in the two groups (Less than ten years & More than ten years in two variables, i.e. total teaching experience and teaching experience in intercultural context. Keywords: Adaptability, English Teaching, Intercultural Sensitivity

  14. 走向浪漫主义的西方大学文化%Culture of Western University Heading for Romanticism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冉

    2012-01-01

    起源于德国的浪漫主义深刻影响了西方社会的政治、经济和文化。浪漫主义反对启蒙运动对真理和单一模式的唯一追求,认为人的本质是自由意志,世界上并不存在事物的固定不变的结构和一个必须适应的模式。浪漫主义的这种核心观点同样影响了西方大学文化的当代走向。近代的英国纽曼模式和现代的德国洪堡模式均体现了启蒙运动的主要特征,当代的美国克尔模式则通过强调人的自由意志,反对大学的结构化和模式化,充分体现了浪漫主义的特征。在后浪漫主义的当代大学文化中,对理想人和大学本身的界定是大学发展不能回避的问题。大学只有和社会进行永恒的对话,才能促进两者的和谐发展。%Romanticism that originated from Germany has deeply influenced the politics, economy and culture of Western societies. Romanticism opposes the emphasis by Enlightenment on truth and one singular pattern and argues that the nature of humanity is free will, that there doesn' t exist one fixed structure, and that the all-adaptable singular pattern is non-existent. This essential philosophy of Romanticism influences the modern trend of Western university culture. If British Newman pattern and German Humboldt pattern represented the essential characteristics of Enlightenment, then the American Kerr pattern emphasized the free will of man and fully embodied the characteristics of Romanticism against the university being structured and modeled. In the post-Romantic university culture, the definition of the ideal person and the university itself are unavoidable questions in the face of university evolution. Only by eternally conversing with the society, can universities facilitate mutual development.

  15. Manifestations of Differential Cultural Capital in a University Classroom: Views from Classroom Observations and Focus Group Discussions in a South African University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based predominantly on Pierre Bourdieu’s social and cultural reproduction theory, particularly his notions of cultural capital and symbolic violence, this paper explores how first year post graduate Diploma in Higher Education (PGDHE university students from diverse socio-linguistic backgrounds differ in the levels at which they understand and express themselves in classroom activities. The paper’s thesis is that the diverse nature of South African classrooms presents a number of challenges not only for students but also for educators in terms of the use of English as a medium of instruction or the language for learning and teaching (LOLT. Owing to the fact that the South African Language in Education Policy (LiEP of 1997 empowers both learners and educators in schools to use any of the eleven South African official languages as a LOLT wherever that is reasonably possible, students whose English backgrounds were deficient in enculturating them in the use of English as a learning tool often encounter challenges in expressing their ideas in the classroom, whether in writing or in oral presentations. The discussion is anchored in the data elicited through two data collection methods, lesson observations in a Diploma in Higher Education, Research class composed of students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and through focus group discussion sessions with 40 multi-ethnic Diploma in Higher Education students from the same classroom. The data management and analysis for this study was done thematically, with views emerging from the observations and focus group discussions being clustered into superordinate themes for convenience of the discussion of the findings. The findings of this study were that students from affluent socio-economic backgrounds who enter university with a rich and relevant English linguistic capital, values and attitudes enjoy an enormous advantage compared to their counterparts whose social class and linguistic

  16. Change processes in the university : a diagnosis of institutional culture and social dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to explore relationships and dynamics affected by the change and innovation processes in higher education institutions, in order to contribute to the comprehension of innovation in the university at a time when important changes are taking place within higher education in Europe. Six innovations from three universities in Catalonia (Spain) were studied using were focus interviews, focus groups and document analysis. The main results are the following: in relation to the degr...

  17. Frequency of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from blood culture, Gondar University teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jemal; Kebede, Yenew

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, with up to one-quarter of affected patients dying as a result of their infection. Up-to-date information on blood culture isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern is very important as guide for immediate prescription of antimicrobial agents and monitoring of emergence of drug resistant strains. To determine the frequency of blood culture isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolates in Gondar University teaching hospital. This was retrospective analysis of records of blood culture results for febrile patients seen at Gondar University teaching hospital, bacteriology section from March 2001 to April 2005. During the four years period, blood cultures were done for a total of 472 febrile patients. Among these, 233 (49.4%) were females and 239 (50.6%) were males. The median age was 20.5 years (age range of 2 hours to 78 years). Out of these, total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated with culture positivity rate of 24.2%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated with the highest frequency in 38 (33.3%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 34 (29.8%), Salmonella species other than Salmonella typhi in 12 (10.5%), Klebsiella species in 10 (8.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae in 6 (5.3%), Salmonella typhi in 4 (3.5%), Enterobacter species in 3 (2.6%), Escherichia coli in 2 (1.7%). The gram positive and gram negative bacteria constituted 80 (70.2%) and 34 (29.8%) of the culture isolates, respectively. Culture positivity rates vary as for neonates, 63% (17 out of 27);followed by 25.6% (36 out of 141) in children and 20% (61 out of 304) in adults. The isolates especially gram negative bacteria showed multiple drug resistance, to Ampicillin and penicillin. However, ciprofloxacin is fairly effective against both gram negative and gram positive isolates. An effective documented data may serve as a guide for initial empirical treatment of bloodstream infections

  18. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  19. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  20. Ordaining for Learning Culture: Educational Conservation and Development of Buddhist Monk Universities for Isan People with Limited Opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanit Sumhiram

    2012-01-01

    present provides education at certificate, bachelors degree, masters degree and doctoral degree levels at 3 locations. Khon Kaen Campus offers 15 majors, Nakhon Ratchasima Campus offers 10 majors and Roi Et Classroom offers 7 majors. Mahamakut Buddhist University provides education at certificate, bachelors degree and masters degree levels at 3 locations. Isan Campus offers 18 majors, Roi Et Campus offers 13 majors and Koraj Education Center offers 15 majors. As for the problem conditions, both of the Buddhist monk universities in Isan were not supported by the government agency as they should be. There were limitations of curricular offering. There were problems of monks travelling and appropriate behaviors, these could cause people in general to decrease their faith in monks. They did not like ordaining for learning. The process of conservation and development of ordaining for leaning at Buddhist monk universities in Isan could be made by supporting each Buddhist monk university in Isan and enhancing people to be more interested in ordaining for learning to be a choice of education. It would be creation of educational opportunity. Different resources concerning education of people with limited opportunity could be accessed. Conclusion: Buddhist monk universities in Isan provide education at certificate, bachelors degree, masters degree and doctoral degree levels. It is educational opportunity extension, education for developing monks education, social development, economic development and dissemination of ordaining for learning culture at Buddhist monk universities in northeast Thailand to be widely known. Buddhist monks and novices can not have to travel to study further outside their domiciles.

  1. Universal Probe Library based real-time PCR for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens from positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Ding-Xia; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chao-Jun; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A set of real-time PCR based assays using the locked nucleic acid probes from Roche Universal ProbeLibrary were developed for rapid detection of eight bacterial species from positive blood culture bottles. Four duplex real-time PCR reactions targeting to one Gram-positive bacterium and one Gram-negative bacterium were optimized for species identification according to Gram stain results. We also included mecA-specific primers and probes in the assays to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The analytical sensitivity was in the range of 1-10 CFU per PCR reaction mixture. The specificity and cross reactivity of the assay was validated by 28 ATCC reference strains and 77 negative blood culture specimens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these samples thus demonstrating 100 % specificity. 72 previously characterized clinical isolates were tested by the real-time PCR assay and validated the accuracy and feasibility of the real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, 55 positive blood culture samples were tested using real-time PCR and 50 (90.9 %) of them were identified as the same species as judged by biochemical analysis. In total, real-time PCR showed 98.2 % consistent to that of traditional methods. Real-time PCR can be used as a supplement for early detection of the frequently-occurred pathogens from the positive blood cultures.

  2. Effect Of Leadership Function And Organization Cultural On The Performance Of Employees In The Field Of Academic University Ichsan Gorontalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchri Abdussamad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and analyze the level of influence the function of leadership and organizational culture on employee performance in academic areas at the University of Gorontalo Ichsan either simultaneously or partially. The analytical method used is multiple linear regression. The sampling technique used in this research is purposive sample that is making the subject based on their specific purpose and techniques of data collection through questionnaire observation interview. The results showed that the leadership function variable X1 significantly influence employee performance dependent variable Y to the direction of a positive coefficient of 0.298. The value of each additional 1 meaningful leadership function the performance of employees increased by 0.298 or 29.80. Variable organizational culture X2 significantly influence employee performance dependent variable Y to the direction of a positive coefficient of 0.530. The value of each additional 1 means the culture of the organization the performance of employees increased by 0.530 or 53.00. testing the R2 value of 0.586 58.60 indicated that the contribution of independent variables consisting of a leadership function and organizational culture on employee performance.

  3. "Learning Is an Endless Journey for Anyone": Undergraduate Awareness, Experiences and Perceptions of the Research Culture in a Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel; Mirosa, Romain; Darrou, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Our study explored undergraduates' experiences of the research culture at a research-intensive university in southern New Zealand. In 2009, 1281 students responded to a survey that probed aspects of the research culture. Data were analysed through descriptive statistics and an inductive analysis of comments. Survey results for final-year students…

  4. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  5. A Study of Federal Academic Earmarks and Research Funding in Relation to the Institutional Research Culture of Research University/High (RU/H) Institutions in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James Hubert, III

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, reductions in public funding for higher education, a stagnate economy, looming sequestration, and a divisive political culture present a complex and challenging dynamic for research universities in pursuit of external funding for their research programs and infrastructure needs. These universities and their research initiatives have…

  6. A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Impact of Social, Organisational and Individual Factors on Educational Technology Acceptance between British and Lebanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Hone, Kate; Liu, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the social, organisational and individual factors that may affect students' acceptance of e-learning systems in higher education in a cross-cultural context. A questionnaire was developed based on an extended technology acceptance model (TAM). A total sample of 1173 university students from two private universities in Lebanon…

  7. Research and Teaching Cultures in Two Contrasting UK Policy Contexts: Academic Life in Education Departments in Five English and Scottish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Rosemary; Lucas, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The paper explores academic staff and departmental research and teaching cultures in the Education Departments of five universities in Scotland and England, countries with increasingly diverging public policies in respect of education. The relationship between research and teaching, how the purposes of universities are defined and the status of…

  8. "The Fire Below": Towards a New Study of Literatures and Cultures (in English?)--A Letter from a Literary Scholar in a South African University in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis-Buthelezi, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    This letter was first read as a seminar paper in the Institute for the Humanities in Africa at the University of Cape Town in which I offer a series of provocations about what our current moment asks of us. It is concerned with the future of literary and cultural studies (in English) at that university and in South Africa in the wake of the…

  9. Cultural Diversity, Relocation, and the Security of International Students at an Internationalised University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Nyland, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The notion of "security" is an elusive concept that attracts varying interpretations. In this article, the authors adopt a definition that views security as a broadly applicable term that encompasses physical, social, and economic dimensions that relate to human rights, cultural difference, and relocation. The approach embraces the…

  10. The Ideal Worker or the Ideal Father: Organizational Structures and Culture in the Gendered University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2012-01-01

    While literature has focused on the ways in which organizational structures exclude women from the workplace, this article suggests that the inverse is also true: organizational structures and culture prevent men from being involved in the home. Using theories of gendered organizations as a guide, this article draws on interviews with 70 faculty…

  11. Immersion in Another Culture: Paradoxical Experiences Considered for Teachers and Students in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Russell, Catherine; Russell, Roger

    2009-01-01

    We have worked, learned, and lived in Indonesia. These experiences prompted Roger's PhD dissertation entitled: "Expatriate Managers' Immersion in Another Culture: A Phenomenological Study of Lived Experiences." The findings of this research uncovered eight paradoxical experiences that were lived by persons who were immersed in another…

  12. The Role of University Branches in the Formation of Common Cultural Competences of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina Albertovna; Rimskaya, Tatyana Grigoryevna

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the capabilities and potential of educational institutions in the formation of common cultural competences of students studying at regional municipalities of the Russian Far East. The study offers the directions and methods of interaction between government and local self-government authorities and training institutions…

  13. Third Culture Kids: Transition and Persistence When Repatriating to Attend University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennison Smith, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This qualitative study used heuristic phenomenology and involved 20 interviews at 3 different sites, 2 focus groups, formal and informal observations, and the analysis of various artifacts including photos, drawings, and documents. Findings and Conclusions. Third culture kids are a diverse group of individuals who spent…

  14. The Aalborg University PO-PBL Model from a Socio-cultural Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carola Hernández; Ravn, Ole; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    of learning. One of the theoretical frameworks underpinning the understanding of learning is the socio-cultural perspective. This paper aims at exploring and analyzing the PO-PBL model from this theoretical perspective. In addition, this reading may also open a new viewpoint in science teaching for other...

  15. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  16. Violence, Genocide, and Captivity: Exploring Cultural Representations of Sacajawea as a Universal Mother of Conquest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author aims to "discover" the actual Sacajawea. She intends to produce work that critiques colonialism in history and museums and to return the focus of the colonial gaze back to the colonizer. In this article, she talks about how colonial narratives of Sacajawea in popular culture justify conquest, heteropatriarchy, and the…

  17. Promoting Entrepreneurial Culture in the University: The Institutional Collaborative Model at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Isidro; Alfaro, Fernando; Rodriguez, Miriam; Valdes, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case of collaboration between different types of public services and the private sector for the promotion of an entrepreneurial culture. This collaboration is achieved by means of a centre established and developed by the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, the Centro de Iniciativas Emprendedoras (the Centre for Entrepreneurial…

  18. Institutional Types, Organizational Cultures, and Innovation in Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Alice M.; Johnson, William C.; Dion, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Relative to the many types of higher education institutions, Christian institutions face extreme operating conditions. Specifically, they are highly tuition dependent, face extreme pressure for funding, and struggle to preserve the history, tradition, and distinctive cultures of their organizations (Dockery and Gushee, 1999). At the same time,…

  19. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  20. The Ideal Worker or the Ideal Father: Organizational Structures and Culture in the Gendered University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2012-01-01

    While literature has focused on the ways in which organizational structures exclude women from the workplace, this article suggests that the inverse is also true: organizational structures and culture prevent men from being involved in the home. Using theories of gendered organizations as a guide, this article draws on interviews with 70 faculty…

  1. Yangshao Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Yangshao culture was born in the Neolithic Age. In 1921, archaeologists unearthed a number of chipped stone implements such as knives and axes; bone objects and everyday ceramic items. Thus Yangshao Village and its matriarchal society have

  2. Is West Really Best? Social and Cultural Tensions International Students Experience Having Studied at British Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to consider the consequences that overseas students experience having studied at a university in the United Kingdom. With the implementation of the United Kingdom policies, the number of international students studying in the United Kingdom is increasing. A study of Thai students studying in the United Kingdom has been used to…

  3. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  4. University ESL Teachers' Socialization in School Workplace toward Teaching Culturally Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Employing interpretive theory, this study investigated 331 university ESL teachers' socialization in language programs for international students. Looking beyond teacher preparatory education, in-service teachers' workplace experiences are essential to study because experience is instrumental in the shaping of belief systems (Wu and Shaffer,…

  5. Creating More "Elbow Room" for Collaborative Reflective Practice in the Competitive, Performative Culture of Today's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, Robert; McCormack, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    We live in "a world of clashing interests" [Zinn, H. (1991). "Declarations of independence: Cross-examining American ideology." Toronto: Harper Collins, p. xx]. In a grapple for survival, universities choose to spend less money and time on teaching and learning, less time on robust evaluation of student learning and…

  6. Educational Research Culture and Capacity Building: The Case of Addis Ababa University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on several projects over sixteen years which attempted to develop capacity in educational research at Addis Ababa University. It identifies what might be considered indicators of a thriving research environment as defined from a UK perspective, not simply the necessary skills and infrastructure requirements but also what might be…

  7. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  8. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  9. Creating a Culture of Student Philanthropy to Address Financial Challenges in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottick, Kathleen J.; Giordano, Stephanie; Chirico, Danielle E.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the cost of higher education and student loan debt have resulted in increasing efforts by policymakers and university administrators to find alternative ways to support the financing of higher education for students. The authors present a case study of a student-led philanthropy campaign to generate funding for social work student…

  10. Prosocial Spending and Well-Being : Cross-Cultural Evidence for a Psychological Universal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aknin, Lara B.; Barrington-Leigh, Christopher P.; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Helliwell, John F.; Burns, Justine; Biswas-Diener, Robert; Kemeza, Imelda; Nyende, Paul; Ashton-James, Claire E.; Norton, Michael I.

    This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: Human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). In Study 1, survey data from 136 countries were examined and showed that prosocial

  11. Postmodern Cultural Narratives for Science, Engineering, and Design Students at a Mexican University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee; Zoreda, Juan Jose

    1996-01-01

    Describes an English-language reading course for science and engineering students at a Mexican university. The course used science and cyberpunk fiction to address moral and ethical issues concerning technological advancement. Synthesizes students' commentaries and includes lists of reading materials, films, and discussion questions. (MJP)

  12. Issues in Marketing Enterprise Initiatives within a University Culture and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Amanda; Robertson, Martyn

    2003-01-01

    Enterprise initiatives come in a number of guises but, whether they are grant-funded or a commercial aspect of a university's business, the key driver is output. This usually means numbers--of students, of businesses, of ideas developed and sold, of financial gain and reputations made. A critical element impeding progress to the successful…

  13. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of internationaliz

  14. Creating More "Elbow Room" for Collaborative Reflective Practice in the Competitive, Performative Culture of Today's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, Robert; McCormack, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    We live in "a world of clashing interests" [Zinn, H. (1991). "Declarations of independence: Cross-examining American ideology." Toronto: Harper Collins, p. xx]. In a grapple for survival, universities choose to spend less money and time on teaching and learning, less time on robust evaluation of student learning and…

  15. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  16. Reading, Listening and Feeling: Audio Feedback as a Component of an Inclusive Learning Culture at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Feedback on student performance is an important part of university assessment procedures. However, effective feedback is hampered by various obstacles. The growing heterogeneity of the student body increases these barriers, particularly with regard to the reception of feedback. One strategy to overcome these obstacles can be to communicate…

  17. (No) Harm in Asking: Class, Acquired Cultural Capital, and Academic Engagement at an Elite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony Abraham

    2016-01-01

    How do undergraduates engage authority figures in college? Existing explanations predict class-based engagement strategies. Using in-depth interviews with 89 undergraduates at an elite university, I show how undergraduates with disparate precollege experiences differ in their orientations toward and strategies for engaging authority figures in…

  18. University ESL Teachers' Socialization in School Workplace toward Teaching Culturally Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Employing interpretive theory, this study investigated 331 university ESL teachers' socialization in language programs for international students. Looking beyond teacher preparatory education, in-service teachers' workplace experiences are essential to study because experience is instrumental in the shaping of belief systems (Wu and Shaffer,…

  19. "Laughing with/at the Disabled": The Cultural Politics of Disability in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the film-maker Michael Noonan embarked on a project initially entitled "Laughing at the Disabled" (a title then changed to "Laughing with the Disabled"), a collaboration between himself and three people with intellectual disabilities. A doctoral candidate in the Creative Industries at Queensland University of Technology…

  20. 高校档案资源融入大学文化建设的途径%Approaches to the Integration of University Archives Resources into the Construction of University Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程娟

    2016-01-01

    University archives are a kind of unique resources in the construction of university culture.Along with the construction of traditional media,campus network,social media,and university history exhibition hall,university archives resources will effectively integrate into the construction of university culture,consequently promote the university culture all-round, multi-channel communication and publicity,and ultimately realize the own value of archives re-sources,and the inheritance and innovation of university culture.%高校档案资源是大学文化建设中的一种独特资源。随着传统媒体、校园网络、社交媒体及校史馆等平台建设的推进,高校档案资源必将有效地融入大学文化建设,促使大学文化得到全方位、多途径的传播和宣传,最终实现高校档案资源自身的价值,促进大学文化的传承和创新。

  1. Exploring EFL Pre-Service Teachers’ Experience with Cultural Content and Intercultural Communicative Competence at Three Colombian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaya Alba

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a qualitative research project that explored pre-service English teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes toward the aspects of culture and intercultural competence addressed in their English classes in the undergraduate programs at three Colombian universities. Findings reveal that pre-service teachers are mainly taught elements of surface culture and lack full understanding of intercultural competence. They also see culture as a separate aspect of their future teaching career. We provide alternatives so that pre-service teachers might overcome limitations of the teaching of culture as preparation for their future teaching career in the foreign language classroom.Este artículo reporta los hallazgos de una investigación cualitativa que indagó sobre las percepciones y las actitudes de los profesores en formación en el área de inglés respecto a los contenidos culturales y la competencia cultural que se abordan en las clases de inglés, en tres universidades colombianas. Los hallazgos revelan que los docentes en formación primordialmente tratan aspectos de la cultura superficial y no tienen total claridad de qué es la competencia comunicativa intercultural. También conciben la cultura como un aspecto desligado de su futura profesión docente. Se sugieren algunas alternativas para que los profesores en formación puedan superar las limitaciones de la enseñanza de la cultura y se preparen para su futura carrera docente en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera.

  2. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  3. Defining scholarship at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences School of Medicine: A study in cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, E S

    2000-09-01

    Medical schools' long-awaited recognition of the varied contributions of their faculty has caused active dialogue and debate. The discourse centers on the best approach for incorporating a broader definition of scholarship, including professional service, into the traditional promotion and tenure processes. At the School of Medicine of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), the majority of the clinical faculty also serve as active-duty uniformed medical officers, and the subject of how to appropriately recognize their varied contributions has long been contended. Concerns have been raised from all constituent groups that broadening the definition of scholarship at the USUHS has the potential to lower the standards of the academy and thus devalue faculty positions. The USUHS has viewed this challenge as a study in the integration of cultures. Institutional cultures include those of the academy, the military, government, basic science, and clinical science, and all the resulting permutations. A nine-year review of scholarship, promotion, and tenure at the USUHS has resulted in a document that supports the diverse missions of the university and appropriately rewards the accomplishments of its faculty. The dialogue continues, as the new document is subject to continuing review and ongoing critical analysis.

  4. Research on Implementation of University Library Value Based on University Library Culture%基于大学图书馆文化的图书馆价值实现研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何宜强

    2016-01-01

    论文通过对文化和大学图书馆文化内涵的了解,阐述大学图书馆文化视角下的图书馆价值,以及大学图书馆文化与大学图书馆价值之间的关系,提出大学图书馆通过营造文化氛围,以多种途径实现大学图书馆的文化价值、社会价值和服务价值。图书馆文化与图书馆价值的关系表明,图书馆价值的实现必须立足于图书馆文化建设,图书馆文化是图书馆价值实现的基础与前提。%Through the understanding of culture and the cultural connotation of university library, this paper elaborates the library value from the perspective of the university library culture and the relationship between university library culture and the value of university library, and puts forward to create a cultural atmosphere to achieve university library’s cultural value, social value and service value in a variety of ways. The relationship of library culture and the value of library indicates that the library value is based on the construction of library culture and library culture is the basis and premise to realize the value of library.

  5. Item Banking with Embedded Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Robert G.; Stanley, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An item banking method that does not use Item Response Theory (IRT) is described. This method provides a comparable grading system across schools that would be suitable for low-stakes testing. It uses the Angoff standard-setting method to obtain item ratings that are stored with each item. An example of such a grading system is given, showing how…

  6. Item Banking with Embedded Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Robert G.; Stanley, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An item banking method that does not use Item Response Theory (IRT) is described. This method provides a comparable grading system across schools that would be suitable for low-stakes testing. It uses the Angoff standard-setting method to obtain item ratings that are stored with each item. An example of such a grading system is given, showing how…

  7. 新疆高校图书馆文化建设初探--以石河子大学图书馆为例%An exploration on Xinjiang university library culture construction--Take Shihezi University as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周亚丽

    2016-01-01

    本文以石河子大学图书馆为例,从精神文化、物质文化、制度文化三个层次,介绍其在构建图书馆文化方面的实践,以期为高校图书馆文化的建立与发展提供依据与借鉴。%In order to provide the basis and reference for the establishment and development of university library culture, taking Shihezi university library as an example, this paper introduces its practices in the construction of library culture from three levels including spiritual culture, material culture, and constitutional culture.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood cultures in two Japanese university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Uetera, Yushi; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has rapidly spread worldwide. This study investigated antibiotic susceptibility and genotypic resistance of 123 consecutive blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species collected between 2003 and 2011 in two Japanese hospitals. The isolates were assigned to 13 species. Carbapenem resistance was detected in four isolates. Only one A. baumannii isolate had blaOXA-23 together with ISAba1; the remaining three isolates had IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase. Quinolone resistance was detected in five isolates that had point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region. The predominance of various non-A. baumannii species and low prevalence of carbapenem resistance among blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species in two Japanese hospitals were confirmed.

  9. Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer a comparison of university students in six countries

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, Lesley; Handy, Femida; Cnaan, Ram A; Brudney, Jeffrey L; Pessi, Anne Birgitta; Yamauchi, Naoto

    2010-01-01

    Although participation in volunteering and motivations to volunteer (MTV) have received substantial attention on the national level, particularly in the US, few studies have compared and explained these issues across cultural and political contexts. This study compares how two theoretical perspectives, social origins theory and signalling theory, explain variations in MTV across different countries. The study analyses responses from a sample of 5794 students from six countries representing di...

  10. Material Culture and Anthropology-An Interview with Anthropologist Michael Rowlands of the University College London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL Rowlands; BIAN Simei; ZHAO Xiuyun

    2014-01-01

    Prof.Michael Rowlands discusses how to use material culture to explore the for-mation and use of objects , the history of objects , and the relationship between objects and histo-ry .He uses examples drawn from his academic background , and his fieldwork done in Africa and China .He further gives an in-depth discussion on the relationship between material culture and anthropology as well as archaeology and anthropology .He proposes specific views on how to de-velop historical anthropology by using material culture , and the combination of archaeology with anthropology .He states that in the future , the focus of anthropology will shift or move away from America and Europe to the rest of the world , and that it is possible that the current understand-ing of anthropology that comes from European and American Anthropology will no longer be ac-cepted as being the truth .Therefore, finding new ways of thinking is necessary for the future de-velopment of anthropology .

  11. The socio-cultural and learning experiences of music students in a British university

    OpenAIRE

    Dibben, N.

    2006-01-01

    Research into student experience in Higher Education has largely focused on students' role as learners. However, the student experience encompasses a much wider range of behaviours and beliefs than can be captured through a focus on teaching and learning alone. I report the findings of a research project which explored student experience in the music department of a British red-brick university. Music presents a particularly interesting case study given the presence of extra-curricular musica...

  12. The socio-cultural and learning experiences of music students in a British university

    OpenAIRE

    Dibben, N.

    2006-01-01

    Research into student experience in Higher Education has largely focused on students' role as learners. However, the student experience encompasses a much wider range of behaviours and beliefs than can be captured through a focus on teaching and learning alone. I report the findings of a research project which explored student experience in the music department of a British red-brick university. Music presents a particularly interesting case study given the presence of extra-curricular musica...

  13. Consuming an edge: ADHD, stimulant use, and psy culture at the corporate university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Jack; McKinney, Kelly A

    2013-06-01

    We examine "psy" on the college campus. Psy refers to ways of knowing and acting on ourselves that shape everyday life psychologically. We suggest that there is an "elective affinity" between psy and the neoliberal management strategies that now dominate the "corporate university." We describe ways that psy organizes college life by drawing on the history of college health services; interviews about mental health and services at a university in Canada; and historical, social, and media accounts of student mental health and pharmaceutical drug use-both prescribed and not-on campus in the US and Canada. By the 1990s, for the first time, many students were arriving at college as already experienced consumers of psy with diagnoses and prescriptions. We approach this and the increased use of medication as an aspect of the psy-campus. We focus on stimulants, using ADHD to illustrate the blurring line between treatment and enhancement. Students who use stimulants-with or without prescription-do so in the same way: instrumentally in relation to academic demands. The blurred line between academic stress and psychiatric distress is further illustrated by "clinic notes," an institutionalized practice that enables all students to act on academic pressure as a matter of mental health. We describe the links between psy and institutional branding and marketing to illustrate the role of mental health and wellness services in the corporate university.

  14. The university as an encounter for deliberative communication - creating cultural citizenship and professional responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Englund

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available How can higher and professional education contribute to the development of responsible citizenship and professional responsibility? In recent discussions on the role of the educational system, the idea of “deliberative communication” has been brought into focus and stands for communication in which different opinions and values can be set against each other in educational settings. It implies an endeavour by each individual to develop his or her view by listening, deliberating, seeking arguments and valuing, coupled to a collective and cooperative endeavour to find values and norms which everyone can accept, at the same time as pluralism is acknowledged. Within higher education deliberative communication might explicitly be used to develop professional responsibility and analysing consequences of different ways of solving problems. To what extent are and can universities become public spaces for encounters dealing with controversial questions of how to solve different problems and analyse different ways of professional acting? Can universities recreate their selective traditions, “institutionalize dissensus”, and “make the university a site of public debate” through deliberative communication?

  15. 加强高校学生宿舍文化建设的思考%Thinking of strengthening the construction of dormitory culture in colleges and universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沁芳

    2013-01-01

      高校学生宿舍文化是校园文化的重要组成部分。宿舍文化的内涵体现在物质文化、制度文化、行为文化和精神文化四个方面。本文首先浅析了当前高校宿舍文化建设中存在的主要问题,并结合问题从宿舍文化内涵的四个方面,探讨了加强高校学生宿舍文化建设的思路,以期为教育与管理工作提供参考。%The university student's dormitory culture is an important part of campus culture. The connotation of dormitory culture is embodied in four aspects of material culture, institutional culture, behavior culture and spirit culture. This paper first analyzes the main problems existing in current college dormitory culture construction, and combining the problem from four aspects of dormitory culture, to discuss the thought to strengthen the construction of dormitory culture in colleges and universities, in order to provide reference for the education and management.

  16. Jazz and its Social Meanings in Iran: From Cultural Colonialism to the Universal

    OpenAIRE

    Nooshin, L.

    2016-01-01

    July 10, 2000. A hot summer evening. An excited crowd, mainly young people including many fashionable young women, heavily made up and wearing the latest “Tehran Chic,” wait outside the Ebn- e Sina Cultural Centre in Shahrak- e Qarb, a well- to- do neighborhood in west Tehran. The “jazz” concert by the band Imaj is scheduled to start at 7:00 p.m., but at 7:15 p.m. the doors are still closed. Eventually, the doors are opened and the audience streams in to the small concert hall. The sense of a...

  17. Partnering International Universities to Enhance Climate Literacy through Interdisciplinary, Cross-Cultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, L. A.; Polk, J.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    The climate change phenomenon will present complex, far-reaching challenges and opportunities, which will require leaders well-versed in interdisciplinary learning and international understanding. In an effort to develop the next generation of future leaders prepared for these challenges and opportunities, faculty from Western Kentucky University (WKU) and the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland partnered to co-teach a course in climate change science and communication in Iceland. Students from both Institutions participated in the course to further enhance the cross-learning opportunity presented to the students. The 11-day course stationed out of three cities in Iceland, including Reykjavík, Vik, and Akureyri, the Icelandic gateway to the Arctic. In addition to undertaking field experiences such as hiking on glaciers, exploring ice caves, and touring geothermal plants, the group also hosted forums to discuss climate change with members of the Icelandic community, and completed The $100 Solution™ service-learning projects. A culminating point of the study abroad experience was a presentation by the students to persons from the University of Akureyri and representatives from the neighboring Icelandic communities about what they had learned about climate change science and communication during their travels. Through this experience, students were able to share their knowledge, which in turn gave them a deeper understanding of the issues they were learning throughout the study abroad program. In short, the program combined interdisciplinary learning, service-learning, and international understanding toward the goal of preparing the leaders of tomorrow with the skills to address climate change challenges.

  18. The effect of glucocorticoids on sex steroid synthesis in cultured Taenia crassiceps Wake Forest University (WFU) cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, L; Valdez, R A; Salvador, V; Rodríguez, A G; Willms, K; Romano, M C

    2012-12-01

    We have shown previously that cultured Taenia crassiceps Wake Forest University (WFU) and Taenia solium cysticerci, as well as the adult worms, synthesize sex steroid hormones from [3H]steroid precursors and that androgens and oestrogens influence the in vitro development of the parasites. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to control the inflammation caused by T. solium cysticerci in the brain. These steroids stimulate oestrogen synthesis in several tissues. Since there is no information on the effect of GC on the endocrine function of cysticerci, we investigated the effect of natural and synthetic GCs on the synthesis of oestrogens in cultured T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci. The cysticerci were obtained from the peritoneal cavity of infected female BALB/c mice; the cysts were washed extensively and pre-cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) plus antibiotics for 5 days. The parasites were further cultured with different doses of corticosterone, dexamethasone or the vehicle for 5 days. [3H]Dehydroepiandrosterone (3H-DHEA) was added to the media and the cysticerci were further incubated for 6 or 24 h. Media were then removed and the steroids ether-extracted. Aliquots of the media were seeded on silica gel plates and developed in solvent systems. Parasites incubated in the presence of 3H-DHEA synthesized [3H]androstenediol, [3H]testosterone and [3H]17β-oestradiol ([3H]17β-E2). The addition of 100 nm or higher corticosterone doses to the media increased [3H]17β-E2 synthesis fourfold after 24 h. Dexamethasone also increased [3H]17β-E2 synthesis. The experiments presented here show for the first time that corticosterone and the synthetic GC dexamethasone modulate the synthesis of oestrogens by cysticerci.

  19. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate, preparation of the package and related paperwork). Large and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  20. Tradução e adaptação cultural do Modified-University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale para a língua portuguesa Translation and cultural adaptation of the Modified-University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale to portuguese language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Oku

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: os objetivos deste estudo foram traduzir a versão original da avaliação funcional de ombro Modified-University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale da língua inglesa para a portuguesa e adaptar culturalmente à população brasileira. MÉTODOS: a escala foi traduzida e adaptada culturalmente para a população brasileira de acordo com a metodologia internacionalmente aceita descrita por Guillemin et al(28. A versão traduzida e revisada pelo comitê foi aplicada em dois grupos (indivíduos leigos com idade entre 45 e 75 anos e profissionais da saúde para avaliação do nível de compreensão das alternativas. Encontrando 15% ou mais de alternativas "não-compreendidas", os termos foram substituídos por palavras equivalentes de modo que não fossem alterados conceito, estrutura e propriedade de base do instrumento, e reaplicadas até que valores menores que 15% fossem alcançados. RESULTADOS: foram necessárias três aplicações. Cada grupo continha 20 indivíduos selecionados consecutivamente, totalizando 120 pessoas. Para obtenção da versão final, foram modificadas cinco alternativas do domínio dor e quatro alternativas do domínio função. Além dessas alterações, foram identificados problemas, por ambos os grupos, quanto à estrutura da escala, sugerindo a continuação do estudo de sua validade e possíveis modificações desta.OBJECTIVES: the aims of this study were to translate into Brazilian-Portuguese the Modified - University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale and to cross-culturally adapt it to the Brazilian environment. METHODS: the scale was translated to Portuguese and back translated into English according to internationally recommended process described by Guillemin et al(28. The translated and revised version was administered to two groups (patients between 45 and 75 years old and health professionals to evaluate the comprehension level of the items. If 15% or more of health

  1. Conspiracy Theories as Alternative Regimes of Truth and as a Universal Socio-Cultural Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Diković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the universal phenomenon of conspiracy theories, which, depending on specific social or political circumstances and on the social context in general, exist as alternative regimes of truth. In both the institutional and private spheres, conspiracy theories represent a kind of cognitive apparatus by means of which individuals and groups gain certain "information" and interpretations of those levels of reality that seem exclusive, hidden and controlled by supposed centers of power. The ultimate implications of conspiracy theories can be seen in the forming of prejudices, which, particularly in certain political circumstances and in combination with populist doctrines, can have a great impact on the public and private spheres. The potential of conspiracy theories, therefore, goes beyond mere intellectual intrigue and diversion for the masses, as they lend themselves to all kinds of political instrumentalization.

  2. 汽车文化进高校的价值分析%The Value Analysis of Automobile Culture Entering the Colleges and Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建珍; 李璇

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of automobile era, the public is increasingly demanding the knowledge about the automobile culture. The essay firstly analyzes the necessity of introducing the automobile culture into universities. It will be a great measure for popularizing the automobile cuture, improving the cultural quality among the college students and even the public's cultural quality on cars. Then, the essay further elaborates how to introduce the automobile cuture into universities. The purpose of the essay is to strengthen the construction of the relative courses and the university culture and the propaganda team of the automobile culture. Moreover, the essay can help the theoretical study on the car culture.%  随着汽车时代的到来,人们对汽车文化知识的需求日益增长。首先分析了汽车文化进高校的必要性,汽车文化进高校是推进汽车文化普及,提高大学生文化素质,提升社会汽车文化素养的有力举措。进一步阐述了汽车文化进高校的方式,有利于加强课程建设,校园文化建设,汽车文化宣传的队伍建设和理论研究。

  3. Development of L. Kohlberg's idea of moral formation of cross-cultural universality of judgments in modern research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Baykovskaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the ideas of foreign researchers (J. Gibbs, K. Basinger, J. Flavel, J. Snarey, who reconsider L. Kohlberg's statements on cognitive development, which forms the basis of moral judgments formation, recognizable usually across cultures. We show the intersection points for various contemporary approaches. We describe the results of empirical studies of moral judgments development in children of primary school age. The sample consisted of Moscow secondary schools students and students of National Jewish Education Center (total 367 people: 198 girls and 169 boys aged 8 to 10 years. We used method of presentation of moral dilemma situations. The study results confirm the relevance of L. Kohlberg main statements on the content of pre-conventional level of moral reasoning in children, on the laws of transition to conventional level. They also demonstrate the features of interpretation of crosscultural universality, discussed by modern foreign authors.

  4. Faculty development on item writing substantially improves item quality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeem, N.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Alfaris, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The quality of items written for in-house examinations in medical schools remains a cause of concern. Several faculty development programs are aimed at improving faculty's item writing skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a faculty development program in item develo

  5. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  6. Cross-cultural and socio-demographic correlates of homophobic attitude among university students in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, G; Niolu, C; Déttore, D; Antonelli, P; Conte, S; Tuziak, B; Limoncin, E; Mollaioli, D; Carosa, E; Gravina, G L; Di Sante, S; Di Lorenzo, G; Fisher, A D; Maggi, M; Lenzi, A; Siracusano, A; Jannini, E A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate homophobic attitudes in three European countries: Italy, Albania, and Ukraine. One thousand and forty-eight students were recruited in Italian (n = 766), Albanian (n = 180), and Ukrainian (n = 102) university centers. A socio-demographic questionnaire and Homophobia Scale (HS) were administered by our staff. Cross-cultural and significant differences among Italian, Albanian, and Ukrainian students were found on the Homophobia Scale (HS; Italy: mean = 22.26 ± 16.73; Albania: mean = 38.15 ± 17.28; Ukraine: mean = 59.18 ± 16.23). The analysis of socio-demographic characteristics revealed that the male gender emerged as main predictor of homophobic attitude in all the three countries, although also a conservative political orientation and the religious belief predict higher homophobia levels in Italy and Albania, particularly. This study revealed that in these European countries assessed, attitudes toward homosexuality are different. Ukrainians display higher levels of homophobia than Albanians and Italians, confirming the central role of cultural differences in homophobic attitudes. Nevertheless, some socio-demographic aspects such as identification as male have a similar influence on homophobic attitudes in all assessed populations.

  7. A study of the IC~2 Culture Exploring Project of Shanghai Jiao Tong University(SJTU) Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Youhua; CHEN; Jin

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyzes the environments confronted with academic libraries and the evolving characteristics of Shanghai Jiao Tong University that give shape to the conception and implementation of an IC2Culture Exploring Project.This innovative model of SJTU Library operation is not only in concert with the strategic goals of SJTU but also with two other conspicuous developmental trends in the larger academic library circle;namely,1)a trend toward the deepening of library service support in academic arena on the one hand and 2)the trend of diversifying library outreach services on the other hand.Based on our first-hand involvement in all phases and aspects of this project and its subsequent review and analysis undertakings,this paper expatiates upon the IC2Culture Exploring Project of SJTU Library in terms of its vision,its specific mission objectives,its program design,its unique characteristics,its launching process,its salient case studies,its initial results and its strategies for a sustainable development in the future.

  8. Body weight concern among female university students in five Arab countries – a preliminary cross-cultural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Musaiger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available [b][/b]Objective. The aim of this study was to explore some body weight concerns among females at university in five Arab countries. Methods. The sample comprised 1,134 females aged 17–32 from universities in five Arab countries: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Oman and Syria. A pretested questionnaire was used to determine the aspects of body weight concern. Results. Approximately 32% – 39% of females were dissatisfied with their weight, 17% – 31% wanted their body shape to be similar to Western fashion models, and 5% – 16% believed that men preferred plump women. Of the females, 22–37% had dieted to lose weight during the six months prior to the study, and 8–15% performed exercises to improve body shape most of the time. The differences in body weight concerns were statistically significant between countries. Conclusions. Body weight concern is relatively highly prevalent among young Arab women; however the prevalence varied between countries, mainly due to differences in socio-cultural background between countries.

  9. Increasing student diversity and cultural competence as part of Loma Linda University School of Dentistry's service mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Margie R; Forde, Ron

    2012-06-01

    For many years, studies have identified a need for greater racial and ethnic diversity among dental professionals. However, the ability of the field to collectively address the problem has been hindered by the low numbers of underrepresented minority students who apply to dental school. Over the past two decades, college attendance rates have increased and U.S. dental school applications have tripled, but the number of underrepresented minority dental applicants has remained about the same. With the increasing diversity of the U.S. population and specifically that of the state of California, the dental workforce would be enhanced by the presence of more underrepresented minority dentists. Additionally, curricular changes should be implemented to better prepare dental students to meet the oral health care needs of diverse populations. There is general agreement that these workforce and curricular changes would enhance access to care for underserved populations. For seven years, Loma Linda University School of Dentistry participated in the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program. The first phase of this national program addressed deficiencies in diversity in dentistry and in access to oral health care. In the second phase, Loma Linda University continued to collaborate with other California dental schools on specific state initiatives. This article provides an overview of the school's efforts to enroll a more diverse student body, enhance all its students' cultural competence, and expand care to underserved populations.

  10. With Denison organizational culture model to analyze Anhui University campus culture%用丹尼森组织文化模型分析安徽大学校园文化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志强

    2015-01-01

    本文运用丹尼森组织文化模型四大特征来分析安徽大学校园文化,通过问卷调查形式来获取有关安徽大学校园文化特点,并在此基础上对其提出建设性意见。%In this paper, with the four characteristics of Denison organizational culture model to analyze Anhui University campus culture, through the form of a questionnaire survey to obtain the relevant characteristics of Anhui University campus culture, and on this basis puts forward constructive suggestions for the campus culture.

  11. Cultural universality and specificity of student engagement in school: The results of an international study from 12 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong; Jimerson, Shane; Shin, Hyeonsook; Cefai, Carmel; Veiga, Feliciano H; Hatzichristou, Chryse; Polychroni, Fotini; Kikas, Eve; Wong, Bernard P H; Stanculescu, Elena; Basnett, Julie; Duck, Robert; Farrell, Peter; Liu, Yi; Negovan, Valeria; Nelson, Brett; Yang, Hongfei; Zollneritsch, Josef

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the contextual factors that are linked to student engagement requires research that includes cross-cultural perspectives. This study investigated how student engagement in school is associated with grade, gender, and contextual factors across 12 countries. It also investigated whether these associations vary across countries with different levels of individualism and socio-economic development. The participants were 3,420 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students from Austria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Malta, Portugal, Romania, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The participants completed a questionnaire to report their engagement in school, the instructional practices they experienced, and the support they received from teachers, peers, and parents. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to examine the effects at both student and country levels. The results across countries revealed a decline in student engagement from Grade 7 to Grade 9, with girls reporting higher engagement than boys. These trends did not vary across the 12 countries according to the Human Development Index and Hofstede's Individualism Index. Most of the contextual factors (instructional practices, teacher support, and parent support) were positively associated with student engagement. With the exception that parent support had a stronger association with student engagement in countries with higher collectivism, most of the associations between the contextual factors and student engagement did not vary across countries. The results indicate both cultural universality and specificity regarding contextual factors associated with student engagement in school. They illustrate the advantages of integrating etic and emic approaches in cross-cultural investigations. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Is Bloom's Taxonomy reflected in the response pattern to MCQ items?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxham, G J; Naeraa, N

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether taxonomic classification of MCQ items reflected differences in student behaviour. The data from one of this University's official open-book exams, in which students answer sixty MCQ items distributed over twelve content-areas of physiology were examined. The responses from all 153 candidates were then subjected to factor analysis. Analysis of individual item scores was unrewarding. Analysis of scores for item-groups based on taxonomy and content resulted in the identification of three factors, which carried predominant loadings from recall or look-up items, interpretation items, and problem-solving items, respectively.

  13. The Functions and Construction of Multi-culture In the University and College%论大学多元文化及其建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏虎

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays,University has become an organization with multi-culture,which compri-ses the spirits of freedom,equality,harmony and mutualism.The coexistence of multi-culture can not only give power and strength to the development of the university,but also promotes the exertion of university function.Therefore,in the process of university culture construction, multi-culture should be given attention.As the key part of society culture,the building of univer-sity culture should also choose the outstanding culture in line with socialist core values,so that it can lead the social ideological trend and aggregate social consensus.%大学发展到今天已成为一个多元文化组织。大学的多元文化体现在崇尚自由、主张平等、倡导和谐、强调共生等。多元文化的存在不仅能够使得大学彰显活力,而且对大学三大职能的发挥起着促进作用。在多元文化建设的基础上,大学文化建设还应选择符合我国社会主义核心价值观的优秀文化,进而使得大学文化起到引领社会思潮、凝聚社会共识的作用。

  14. Research on university campus culture and landscape planning%大学校园文化与景观规划的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海蓉

    2012-01-01

    通过对校园文化与景观规划进行关联分析,以山西大学作为研究对象,将大学校园文化与景观规划之间的关系进行梳理研究,总结经验,提出大学校园景观规划的依据与策略,为大学校园建设提供指导。%Based on interactive analysis of campus culture and landscape planning, taking Shanxi University as the research target, the paper studies the relationship between university campus culture and landscape planning, summarizes experience, and puts forward the basis and strat- egies of university campus landscape planning, which has provided guidance for the construction of university campus.

  15. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  16. Cultural Socialization and Its Relation to the Attitude of Religious Tolerance among Muslim and Buddhist Students in Prince of Songkhla University

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffary Awang; Mutsalem Khareng

    2012-01-01

    Interaction and communication between religions often develop a harmony culture. Without a good interaction and communication, it can emerge prejudice. It means that interaction in the context of a different culture and religion plays an important role in shaping the integration value. In the context of students at Prince of Songkhla University consisting of Muslims and Buddhists who often interact among each other. The question is how far the conflict in Southern Thai has influenced the comm...

  17. Item Overexposure in Computerized Classification Tests Using Sequential Item Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Huebner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Computerized classification tests (CCTs often use sequential item selection which administers items according to maximizing psychometric information at a cut point demarcating passing and failing scores. This paper illustrates why this method of item selection leads to the overexposure of a significant number of items, and the performances of three different methods for controlling maximum item exposure rates in CCTs are compared. Specifically, the Sympson-Hetter, restricted, and item eligibility methods are examined in two studies realistically simulating different types of CCTs and are evaluated based upon criteria including classification accuracy, the number of items exceeding the desired maximum exposure rate, and test overlap. The pros and cons of each method are discussed from a practical perspective.

  18. Terminal values and meaning in life among university students with varied levels of altruism in the present period of socio-cultural change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Głaz Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The author of this paper, interested in the issues of values preference, meaning in life and altruism among university students has attempted to show a relation between them in the present period of clearly noticeable socio-cultural change. The study was conducted in 2009-2010 in Kraków among university students. The age of the respondents ranged from 21 to 25. 200 sets of correctly completed questionnaires were used for the results analysis.

  19. 组织文化视野下开放大学文化建设的认同%Identification of Cultural Construction of Open University with the View of Organizational Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓晴

    2014-01-01

    开放大学作为新出现的一种教育组织模式,其文化符合组织文化的涵义、特征和功能表现。开放大学文化是对原广播电视大学文化的继承和超越发展。开放大学文化建设中,文化认同在于制度、故事、仪式、物质象征、语言等的认同。%The Open University as a new type of educational organization model has its culture that accords with the meaning, feature and functional performance of its organizational culture. The culture of the Open University is the inheritance and transcending development of the culture of former Radio and TV Universi-ty. In its cultural construction, its cultural identification lies in the identification of its system, stories, rituals, material symbols and language.

  20. A Brief Discussion on Nurturing and Innovating the Culture of University City%浅论大学城文化的孕育与创新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁

    2012-01-01

    A university city is difficult to develop without the cultural support. As the cultural core, spir- itual culture includes school - running idea, mission, spirit and motto, etc. and it has its own characteris- tics. In order to make culture become the large enginery for showing the image of university city and promoting its innovative development, we should master the necessary principle, give play the whole function of univer- sity city culture, and improve the cultural force of university city.%一座大学城的发展离不开文化的支撑。作为其文化核心的精神文化,包含着办学理念、办学宗旨、校风、校训等多个方面,并具其自身特色。把握必要的原则,发挥大学城文化的整体功能,提升大学城的文化力,方能使文化成为展示大学城形象、推动大学城创造性发展的巨大能源。