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Sample records for cu-nb nanostructured fiber

  1. Nanostructure Core Fiber With Enhanced Performances: Design, Fabrication and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.; Yan, Min; Ren, G.B.;

    2009-01-01

    We report a new type of silica-based all-solid fiber with a 2-D nanostructure core. The nanostructure core fiber (NCF) is formed by a 2-D array of high-index rods of sub-wavelength dimensions. We theoretically study the birefringence property of such fibers over a large wavelength range. Large...

  2. High-strength high-conductivity Cu-Nb microcomposite sheet fabricated via multiple roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S. C.; Delagi, R. G.; Forster, J. A.; Krotz, P. D.

    1993-01-01

    Copper-niobium microcomposites are a new class of high-strength high-conductivity materials that have attractive properties for room- and elevated-temperature applications. Since Nb has little solid solubility in Cu, addition of Nb to Cu does not affect its conductivity. Copper-niobium microcomposites are melted and cast so that the microstructure of cast Cu-Nb ingots consists of 1-to 10 μm Nb dendrites uniformly distributed within the copper matrix. Extensive wire drawing with a true processing strain ( η > 12) of Cu-Nb alloy leads to refinement and elongation of Nb dendrites into 1-to 10 nm-thick filaments. The presence of such fine Nb filaments causes a significant increase in the strength of Cu-Nb wires. The tensile strength of heavily drawn Cu-Nb wires was determined to be significantly higher than the values predicted by the rule of mixtures. This article reports the fabrication of high-strength Cu-Nb micro-composite sheet by multiple roll bonding. It is difficult and impractical to attain high processing strains ( η > 3) by simple cold rolling. In most practical cold-rolling operation, the thickness reduction does not exceed 90 pct ( η ≅ 2). Therefore, innovative processing is required to generate high strength in Cu-Nb microcomposite sheet. Multiple roll bonding of Cu-Nb has been utilized to store high processing strain ( η > 10) in the material and refine the Nb particle size within the copper matrix. This article describes the microstructure, mechanical properties, and thermal stability of roll-bonded Cu-Nb microcomposite sheet.

  3. Nanostructured sapphire optical fiber for sensing in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Kai; Ma, Yiwei; Tian, Fei; Du, Henry

    2017-05-01

    We describe an innovative and scalable strategy of transforming a commercial unclad sapphire optical fiber to an allalumina nanostructured sapphire optical fiber (NSOF) that overcomes decades-long challenges faced in the field of sapphire fiber optics. The strategy entails fiber coating with metal Al followed by subsequent anodization to form anodized alumina oxide (AAO) cladding of highly organized pore channel structure. We show that Ag nanoparticles entrapped in AAO show excellent structural and morphological stability and less susceptibility to oxidation for potential high-temperature surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). We reveal, with aid of numerical simulations, that the AAO cladding greatly increases the evanescent-field overlap both in power and extent and that lower porosity of AAO results in higher evanescent-field overlap. This work has opened the door to new sapphire fiber-based sensor design and sensor architecture.

  4. Strong critical current density enhancement in NiCu/NbN superconducting nanostripes for optical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, N.; Pepe, G. P.; Capretti, A.; Parlato, L.; Pagliarulo, V.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Kashiwazaki, N.; Taino, T.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2010-08-01

    We present measurements of ferromagnet/superconductor (NiCu/NbN) and plain superconducting (NbN) nanostripes with the linewidth ranging from 150 to 300 nm. The NiCu (3 nm)/NbN (8 nm) bilayers, as compared to NbN (8 nm), showed a up to six times increase in their critical current density, reaching at 4.2 K the values of 5.5 MA/cm2 for a 150 nm wide nanostripe meander and 12.1 MA/cm2 for a 300 nm one. We also observed six-time sensitivity enhancement when the 150 nm wide NiCu/NbN nanostripe was used as an optical detector. The strong critical current enhancement is explained by the vortex pinning strength and density increase in NiCu/NbN bilayers and confirmed by approximately tenfold increase in the vortex polarizability factor.

  5. Synthesis of palladium dendritic nanostructures on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers through a complexing-reducing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhichuan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bo; Qian, Guixiang; Tao, Tingxian, E-mail: tingxiantao@yahoo.cn

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • We report the assembly of Pd dendritic nanostructures on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers. • The supply rate of the metallic Pd plays a critical role in the morphology of Pd nanostructures. • The possible mechanism of Pd dendritic nanostructures on fibers was proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional fern-leaf-like palladium (Pd) dendritic nanostructures were successfully synthesized on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers via a simple and efficient complexing-reducing method. The influence of reaction time, temperature, and concentrations of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} and Fe{sup 3+} on the morphology and structure of Pd nanostructures was investigated. The results indicate that the supply rate of metallic Pd atoms plays a crucial role in the formation of the dendritic nanostructures. The formation mechanism of Pd dendritic nanostructures was proposed.

  6. Cu-Nb reinforced (Nb, Ti){sub 3}Sn superconducting wire; Cu-Nb hokyo anteika (Nb, Ti){sub 3}Sn chodendo sen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, H.; Endo, S.; Kimura, A.; Wada, K.; Meguro, S. [The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2000-05-29

    The development of Nb{sub 3}Sn super-conducting wire material by combining in-Situ Cu-Nb alloy as a reinforced stabilization material in the wire inside has been carried out until now. Since the reinforced stabilization wire materials are used for cryogenic magnet of large diameter refrigerating machine, manufacture of long wire is vital. In this report, the results of investigating characteristics of Cu-Nb reinforced stabilization wire materials produced in different manufacturing scale are reported. The Cu-20wt%-Nb alloy is adopted as the reinforced stabilization material of the bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn super-conducting wire. The produced wire is heat-treated at 650 degrees C and 864ks for 240 hrs and its characteristics are investigated. The non-copper part Jc of the reinforced stabilization wire material is 551A/mm {sup 2} at 12T, 184A/mm{sup 2} at 16T, and 76A/mm{sup 2} at 18T, and rates to the non-copper part Jc of the comparison wire materials in the same magnetic field are 0.87, 0.75 and 0.61 respectively. (NEDO)

  7. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  8. Tube drawing technology for seamless pipes. Application to the Cu/Nb/Cu sandwiched pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Saburo; Ohnuki, Masao [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujino, Takeo; Saito, Kenji; Inoue, Hitoshi; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Yamazaki, Yoshishige [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Watanabe, Kakuji [Okuda Kinzoku Co. Ltd., Ota, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Tube drawing technology based on copper tubes at the Hitachi Cable Corporation was applied to manufacture Cu/Nb/Cu sandwiched seamless pipes for Nb/Cu clad superconducting RF cavities, which is being developed at KEK. This is the first application in our company. We met several problems but finally succeeded to fabricate 11 pipes needed to hydro-bulge forming for 1300 MHz single cell cavities. Here, we explain this technology and report the problems which happened during the manufacturing. (author)

  9. Study of early stages of Cu-NbC nanocomposite synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, M.T. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)]. E-mail: tmarques@ineti.pt; Livramento, V. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Almeida, A. [IST, Department of Materials Engineering, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Vilar, R. [IST, Department of Materials Engineering, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2007-05-31

    Cu-NbC nanocomposites with nominal compositions of 5, 10 and 20 vol.% of NbC were produced in situ via MA from elemental powders. The powders were milled for 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 h. The as-milled powders were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction results showed that the niobium carbide phase is formed in the early stages of milling and that the time necessary to complete the reaction ranges from 1 to about 8 h of milling.

  10. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Fe(Cu,Nb)-Si-B Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The magnetoresistance effect and magnetic properties in amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe(Cu, Nb)-Si-B ribbons have been investigated. It was observed that the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of nanocrystalline alloy is much smaller than that of amorphous alloy, indicating that the anisotropy of nanocrystalline alloy becomes smaller after crystallizing, and the smallest AMR is coincident with the excellent soft magnetic characteristics. It is believed that the smaller magnetic crystalline anisotropy is the origin of the excellent soft magnetic characteristics of nanocrystalline alloy.

  11. The study of Cu/Nb interface diffusion using molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Nelasov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarities of interfacial boundary diffusion where the boundary goes between nonmiscible metals with body-centered cubic (BCC and face-centered cubic (FCC lattices have been studied taking, as a case in point, the Cu/Nb system, and using the molecular dynamics method. The diffusion atomic displacements were shown to occur mainly near the mismatch dislocations and their intersections. The diffusion of the high-melting component was found to be characterized by high anisotropy with the predominant atomic displacement along the dense-packed direction in the interfacial boundary plane being common to FCC and BCC lattices with the Kurdyumov–Sachs mutual orientation.

  12. Preparation of in-situ Cu/NbC nanocomposite and its functionally graded behavior for electrical contact applications%Cu/NbC纳米复合材料的原位合成及其在电触头材料应用中的功能梯度行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S GHOLAMI SHIRI; P ABACHI; K POURAZARANG; M MOHAMMADI RAHVARD

    2015-01-01

    原料Cu,Nb和石墨粉末置于高能振动盘式研磨仪,在氩气气氛中研磨7 h制备Cu−5%NbC(体积分数)粉末。采用两步压制法及在真空900°C烧结1 h条件下制得Cu−NbC功能梯度材料和复合材料样品,研究样品的显微组织、物理性能和力学性能。场发射扫描电镜、能量色散 X 射线和 X 射线衍射结果表明,样品经烧结处理后,晶粒尺寸为18~27 nm的纳米结构基体中含有大小为42 nm的纳米颗粒增强相,证实了所制复合材料的高温热稳定性。Cu−15%NbC复合材料样品的硬度是纯Cu样品硬度的5倍。相对于纯Cu样品,磨损后Cu−15%NbC复合材料样品的体积磨损量减小,且电导率降低至36.68%IACS。相对于复合表面中的复合材料样品,Cu/NbC功能梯度材料样品在具有与复合材料相同的硬度和磨损性能的条件下,显示出75.83% IACS的较高电导率。因此,具有良好力学性能和电学性能的Cu/NbC功能梯度材料将成为很好的电触头材料。%Cu−15%NbC (volume fraction) powder was synthesized using the starting powders of Cu, Nb and graphite in a high energy vibratory disc mill for 7 h of milling under argon atmosphere. A composite sample and a Cu/NbC functionally graded material (FGM) sample were produced by using the two-step press and sintering at 900 °C for 1 h under vacuum. The microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of the specimens were investigated. The field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the synthesis of the nanostructure matrix of 18−27 nm with the nanoparticles reinforcement of 42 nm after sintering, verifying the thermal stability of this composite at high temperature. The hardness of Cu−15%NbC was five times greater than that of the pure Cu specimen. The volume reduction of the sample after the wear test decreased in comparison with the pure Cu specimen. The electrical

  13. Combinatorial Investigations of High Temperature CuNb Oxide Phases for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Katarzyna; Maggard, Paul A; Eichberger, Rainer; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Shahbazi, Paria; Zoellner, Brandon; Parkinson, Bruce A

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput combinatorial methods have been useful in identifying new oxide semiconductors with the potential to be applied to solar water splitting. Most of these techniques have been limited to producing and screening oxide phases formed at temperatures below approximately 550 °C. We report the development of a combinatorial approach to discover and optimize high temperature phases for photoelectrochemical water splitting. As a demonstration material, we chose to produce thin films of high temperature CuNb oxide phases by inkjet printing on two different substrates: fluorine-doped tin oxide and crystalline Si, which required different sample pyrolysis procedures. The selection of pyrolysis parameters, such as temperature/time programs, and the use of oxidizing, nonreactive or reducing atmospheres determines the composition of the thin film materials and their photoelectrochemical performance. XPS, XRD, and SEM analyses were used to determine the composition and oxidation states within the copper niobium oxide phases and to then guide the production of target Cu(1+)Nb(5+)-oxide phases. The charge carrier dynamics of the thin films produced by the inkjet printing are compared with pure CuNbO3 microcrystalline material obtained from inorganic bulk synthesis.

  14. Analysis of Microcomposite Cu-Nb Conductors Characteristics and Possibility of Their Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Mikalauskas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High magnetic fields systems is widely used in fundamental and applied research in variuos branches of science and industry. The most famous examples of such magnetic systems are tokomaks, stellators, superconducting magnets, CERN collider, ITER reactor, levitation systems. The key component of magnetic systems is inductor (solenoid. At this moment, the record magnetic fields reaches 100 T. The creation of a strong magnetic field is no longer enough just to improve designs for inductor (solenoid. Traditional electrotechnical materials and conductors can no longer withstand the huge mechanical and thermal loads, therefore, them changes to an entirely new advanced materials, for example Cu-Nb microcomposite conductors. These materials are characterized by a unique structure, excellent mechanical properties and good electrical conductivity. One of the most important and unresolved problems of high magnetic fields systems are reliable non-destructive joints and joining technologies creation. This paper reviews the strong magnetic fields systems design features, Cu-Nb conductors characteristics and structure, microcomposite conductor production specifics, application fields, joining problems and the available joining technologies.

  15. Influence of sintering time on switching of the femtosecond nonlinear optical properties of CuNb2O6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshani, N.; Sabari Girisun, T. C.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2017-04-01

    Transition of mixed phases (monoclinic and orthorhombic) to pure orthorhombic phase was achieved during the synthesis process of CuNb2O6 by varying the sintering time. The suppression of monoclinic phase and dominant formation of orthorhombic CuNb2O6 was confirmed from the XRD and FTIR data analysis. FESEM studies demonstrated that due to increase in sintering time, coarsening process initiated the grain growth and trapping of pores leading to pore-free structures. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of mixed and pure copper niobate were studied by the Z-scan technique using near-infrared (800 nm, ∼150 fs, 80 MHz) laser excitation. Mixed phases exhibited saturable absorption and self-defocusing behaviour while pure orthorhombic demonstrated reverse saturable absorption and self-focusing process. The switching of nonlinearity along with increase in NLO coefficient of O-CuNb2O6 was attributed to the decreased metal-oxygen bond length and pore free structure. The increase in nonlinear absorption coefficient with input irradiance suggests the occurrence of effective 3 PA (2 PA followed by ESA) process. The magnitudes of nonlinear absorption coefficient (2.14 × 10-23m3/W2) and nonlinear refractive index (6.0 × 0-17 m2/W) of O-CuNb2O6 were found to be higher than well-known NLO materials. Orthorhombic CuNb2O6 exhibited optical limiting action with low limiting threshold of 38.26 μJ/cm2 and favouring NLO properties suggesting that the material to be an entrant candidate for safety devices against ultrashort pulsed lasers.

  16. Ultrafast nonlinear optical studies of equiaxed CuNbO3 microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshani, N.; Sabari Girisun, T. C.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2017-08-01

    Diverse microstructures of monoclinic copper niobate (m-CuNbO3) were synthesized by solid-state reaction (900 °C, 3-12 h). FESEM data demonstrated that agglomerated clusters grew as an elongated grains which migrated to form web-shaped equiaxed structure and dissected to form individual equiaxed microstructure. With femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm, 150 fs), open aperture Z-scan data revealed the presence of two-photon absorption. The nonlinear refractive index (n2) toggled between positive and negative nonlinearity for different microstructures. Web-shaped equiaxed structure kindled both the nonlinear absorption (βeff = 2.0 × 10-12 m/W), nonlinear refraction (n2 = 3.16 × 10-17 m2/W) and a strong optical limiting action (onset limiting threshold of 22.24 μJ/cm2).

  17. Annealing effects on the microwave linewidth broadening of FeCuNbSiB ferromagnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, M. J. P.; Gonzalez-Chavez, D. E.; Sommer, R. L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bohn, F. [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2015-03-28

    We systematically investigate the annealing effects on the microwave linewidth broadening of FeCuNbSiB ferromagnetic films with thickness of 100 nm. We correlate the non-uniform residual stress obtained from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth due to effective field inhomogeneities measured from broadband ferromagnetic resonance absorption measurements. We also estimate the annealing temperature effect on the Gilbert and two-magnon scattering contributions to the total ferromagnetic resonance FMR linewidth. We show that the effective field inhomogeneities constitute the main contribution to the microwave linewidth, while this contribution is related to the non-uniform residual stress in the films which is reduced by thermal annealing.

  18. Nanostructured zirconium titanate fibers prepared by particulate sol–gel and cellulose templating techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhani, P. [Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Salahinejad, E. [Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Material Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Blvd., 7134851154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kaul, R. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Center for Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, OK 74107 (United States); Vashaee, D. [Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Tayebi, L., E-mail: lobat.tayebi@okstate.edu [Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Material Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); School of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •A method to produce zirconium titanate fibers was introduced. •The resultant structure and photocatalytic activity of the fiber were investigated. •The fiber exhibited higher photocatalytic characteristics, compared with the powders. -- Abstract: In this paper, a method for cost-effective production of nanostructured zirconium titanate (ZrTiO{sub 4}) fibers is introduced. In this method, ZrTiO{sub 4} fibers were synthesized by a sol–gel technique using cellulose fibers as the template. The resultant structures were studied by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. The photocatalytic activity of the fiber was compared to that of ZrTiO{sub 4} powders prepared by the same sol–gel method, in dark and under UVA and UVC radiations. According to the results, after calcination accompanied by the template removal, the ZrTiO{sub 4} fiber consists of uniformly-deposited, crystalline nanoparticles. This nanostructured fiber exhibited a higher surface area and a higher porosity compared with the ZrTiO{sub 4} powders, resulting in considerably higher photocatalytic characteristics, as confirmed by the experiment. The large surface area and the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the ZrTiO{sub 4} fibers also offer applications in sensors and bioactive films.

  19. Dielectric behavior of epoxy/BaTiO₃ composites using nanostructured ceramic fibers obtained by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, H A; Ramajo, L A; Góes, M S; Reboredo, M M; Castro, M S; Parra, R

    2013-02-01

    Composite materials made of epoxy resin and barium titanate (BT) electrospun nanostructured fibers were prepared. BT fibers were synthesized from a sol based on barium acetate, titanium isopropoxide, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The fibers were heat-treated at different temperatures and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Mats of BT fibers heat-treated at 800 °C were embedded in epoxy resin into suitable molds. The composites were characterized by SEM, and dielectric measurements were performed by means of dielectric spectroscopy. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric modulus of epoxy resin/BT-fiber composites were measured for two types of samples: with the electrodes parallel and perpendicular to the BT fiber layers. Interestingly, composite samples with electrodes perpendicular to the fiber layers and a BT content as low as 2 vol % led to dielectric permittivities three times higher than that of pure epoxy resin.

  20. Effects of Cu Layer Width on the Giant Magneto-impedance Effect in Sandwich FeCuNbCrSiB/Cu/FeCuNbCrSiB Films With a Meander Line Structure%Cu层宽度对弯曲型三明治结构FeCuNbCrSiB/Cu/FeCuNbCrSiB多层膜巨磁阻抗效应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚民; 陈吉安; 周勇; 丁文; 王明军; 高孝裕; 周志敏

    2005-01-01

    采用射频磁控溅射方法和微细加工工艺制备了不同Cu层宽度的弯曲型三明治结构的FeCuNbCrSiB/Cu/FeCuNbCrSiB多层膜,在频率1~40MHz下研究了Cu层宽度对多层膜的纵向和横向巨磁阻抗效应的影响.结果表明,弯曲型三明治结构多层膜的巨磁阻抗率随Cu层宽度的变化具有显著的变化,在频率10MHz、磁场12kA/m下,当Cu层宽度为0.4mm时,纵向、横向巨磁阻抗率分别达-57%、-65%.

  1. Electrodeposited manganese dioxide nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fibers: High performance materials for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Sayed Habib, E-mail: habibkazemi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Research in Climate Change and Global Warming (CRCC), Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maghami, Mostafa Ghaem [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiani, Mohammad Ali [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, P.O. Box 14335-186, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We report a facile method for fabrication of MnO{sub 2} nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fiber. • MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode shows outstanding supercapacitive behavior even at high discharge rates. • Exceptional cycle stability was achieved for MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode. • The coulombic efficiency of MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode is nearly 100%. - Abstract: In this article we introduce a facile, low cost and additive/template free method to fabricate high-rate electrochemical capacitors. Manganese oxide nanostructures were electrodeposited on electro-etched carbon fiber substrate by applying a constant anodic current. Nanostructured MnO{sub 2} on electro-etched carbon fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The electrochemical behavior of MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode was investigated by electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A maximum specific capacitance of 728.5 F g{sup −1} was achieved at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} for MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode. Also, this electrode showed exceptional cycle stability, suggesting that it can be considered as a good candidate for supercapacitor electrodes.

  2. Effect of annealing treatments on the microwave electromagnetic properties of amorphous FeCuNbSiB microwires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Di-Fei; Han Man-Gui; Yan Bo; Deng Long-Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The amorphous FeCuNbSiB microwires are fabricated by using the melt extraction method and annealed separately at temperatures T = 573, 673, 723 and 773 K for 1 h. The effect of annealing treatment on the microwave electromagnetic properties of FeCuNbSiB wires/wax composites has been investigated for the first time. It is found that in a frequency range of 0.5-4.0 GHz, the complex permittivity, permeability, magnetic and electric loss tangents of FeCuNbSiB wires/wax composites are strongly dependent on the annealing temperature and frequency. For T = 573,723 and 773K, two resonance peaks are found at frequency f = 1.2 and 3.3GHz. However, for T = 673K, only one resonance peak occurs at f = 3.3 GHz. The resonance peak at f = 1.2 GHz is believed to be due to the stress-induced anisotropy, while the resonance peak at f = 3.3 GHz is attributed to the random anisotropy.

  3. Piezoelectric Micro- and Nanostructured Fibers Fabricated from Thermoplastic Nanocomposites Using a Fiber Drawing Technique: Comparative Study and Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2017-02-28

    We report an all-polymer flexible piezoelectric fiber that uses both judiciously chosen geometry and advanced materials in order to enhance fiber piezoelectric response. The microstructured/nanostructured fiber features a soft hollow polycarbonate core surrounded by a spiral multilayer cladding consisting of alternating layers of piezoelectric nanocomposites (polyvinylidene enhanced with BaTiO3, PZT, or CNT) and conductive polymer (carbon-filled polyethylene). The conductive polymer layers serve as two electrodes, and they also form two spatially offset electric connectors on the fiber surface designed for the ease of connectorization. Kilometer-long piezoelectric fibers of sub-millimeter diameters are thermally drawn from a macroscopic preform. The fibers exhibit high output voltage of up to 6 V under moderate bending, and they show excellent mechanical and electrical durability in a cyclic bend-release test. The micron/nanosize multilayer structure enhances in-fiber poling efficiency due to the small distance between the conducting electrodes sandwiching the piezoelectric composite layers. Additionally, the spiral structure greatly increases the active area of the piezoelectric composite, thus promoting higher voltage generation and resulting in 10-100 higher power generation efficiency over the existing piezoelectric cables. Finally, we weave the fabricated piezoelectric fibers into technical textiles and demonstrate their potential applications in power generation when used as a sound detector, smart car seat upholstery, or wearable materials.

  4. CuNb3O8: A p-Type Semiconducting Metal Oxide Photoelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Upendra A; Maggard, Paul A

    2012-06-07

    A new p-type CuNb3O8 polycrystalline photoelectrode was investigated and was determined to have indirect and direct bandgap sizes of 1.26 and 1.47 eV, respectively. The p-type polycrystalline film could be prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass and yielded a cathodic photocurrent under visible-light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) with incident photon-to-current efficiencies of up to ∼6-7% and concomitant hydrogen evolution. A Mott-Schottky analysis yielded a flat band potential of +0.35 V versus RHE (pH = 6.3) and a calculated p-type dopant concentration of ∼7.2 × 10(15) cm(-3). The conduction band energies are found to be negative enough for the reduction of water under visible light irradiation. A hole mobility of ∼145 cm(2)/V·s was obtained from J(I)-V(2) measurements using the Mott-Gurney relation, which is ∼50% higher than that typically found for p-type Cu2O. DFT-based electronic structure calculations were used to probe the atomic and structural origins of the band gap transitions and carrier mobility. Thus, a new p-type semiconductor is discovered for potential applications in solar energy conversion.

  5. Nanostructural Characteristics and Interfacial Properties of Polymer Fibers in Cement Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalchy, Faezeh; Rahbar, Nima

    2015-08-12

    Concrete is the most used material in the world. It is also one of the most versatile yet complex materials that humans have used for construction. However, an important weakness of concrete (cement-based composites) is its low tensile properties. Therefore, over the past 30 years many studies were focused on improving its tensile properties using a variety of physical and chemical methods. One of the most successful attempts is to use polymer fibers in the structure of concrete to obtain a composite with high tensile strength and ductility. The advantages of polymer fiber as reinforcing material in concrete, both with regard to reducing environmental pollution and the positive effects on a country's economy, are beyond dispute. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete requires a knowledge of fiber/matrix interfaces at the nanoscale. In this study, a combination of atomistic simulations and experimental techniques has been used to study the nanostructure of fiber/matrix interfaces. A new model for calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H)/fiber interfaces is also proposed on the basis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses. Finally, the adhesion energy between the C-S-H gel and three different polymeric fibers (poly(vinyl alcohol), nylon-6, and polypropylene) were numerically studied at the atomistic level because adhesion plays a key role in the design of ductile fiber-reinforced composites. The mechanisms of adhesion as a function of the nanostructure of fiber/matrix interfaces are further studied and discussed. It is observed that the functional group in the structure of polymer macromolecule affects the adhesion energy primarily by changing the C/S ratio of the C-S-H at the interface and by absorbing additional positive ions in the C-S-H structure.

  6. Piezoelectric paper fabricated via nanostructured barium titanate functionalization of wood cellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva, Suresha K; Walus, Konrad; Stoeber, Boris

    2014-05-28

    We have successfully developed hybrid piezoelectric paper through fiber functionalization that involves anchoring nanostructured BaTiO3 into a stable matrix with wood cellulose fibers prior to the process of making paper sheets. This is realized by alternating immersion of wood fibers in a solution of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) PDDA (+), followed by poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) PSS (-), and once again in PDDA (+), resulting in the creation of a positively charged surface on the wood fibers. The treated wood fibers are then immersed in a BaTiO3 suspension, resulting in the attachment of BaTiO3 nanoparticles to the wood fibers due to a strong electrostatic interaction. Zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction, and microscopic and spectroscopic analysis imply successful functionalization of wood fibers with BaTiO3 nanoparticles without altering the hydrogen bonding and crystal structure of the wood fibers. The paper has the largest piezoelectric coefficient, d33 = 4.8 ± 0.4 pC N(-1), at the highest nanoparticle loading of 48 wt % BaTiO3. This newly developed piezoelectric hybrid paper is promising as a low-cost substrate to build sensing devices.

  7. GMI Effect Study of Amorphous FeCuNbSiB Multilayered Films%非晶FeCuNbSiB多层膜的巨磁阻抗效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oumarou M; 李晓东; 袁望治; 阮建中; 赵振杰; 杨燮龙

    2005-01-01

    研究在250℃退火温度下非晶FeCuNbSiB薄膜的巨磁阻抗效应.X-ray谱和Mossbauer谱显示样品为非晶状态.导电层的厚度为2 μm,磁性层的厚度为1 μm.三明治结构的最大阻抗效应为20%.为了提高巨磁阻抗效应,在两磁性层之间加入了绝缘层SiO2,在250℃退火温度下最大阻抗效应为62%.随着驱动电流频率的增大,磁阻抗效应曲线由随磁场的单调下降变为出现峰的结构.%Giant magneto-impedance (GMI) has been observed in amorphous FeCuNbSiB/Cu/FeCuNbSiB sandwiched films annealed at 250 ℃. The conductive layer is about 2μm while the outer magnetic layers are about 1 μm thick each. The GMI ratio of 20% has been obtained. In the goal to improve this ratio, two insulator layers have been used between the different layers followed by an annealing process at 250 ℃. A GMI ratio of 62% has been obtained. The displacement of GMI peaks with increasing of driving current frequency appears also. The amorphous state of the films was confirmed by an X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectrum.

  8. High field performance of superconducting magnets using powder metallurgy processed Cu-Nb-Sn and Nb-Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, A.J.; Foner, S.

    1984-06-01

    Small superconducting magnets were fabricated with powder metallurgy processed Nb-Al wire and with powder metallurgy processed multistrand Cu-Nb--Sn wire with 19 tin cores. Tests in a background field of up to 15 T showed that short sample characteristics were achieved for three coils. Upper limits of resistivity were established for both powder metallurgy processed wires. The reacted wires in the magnets gave upper limits of resistivity at 10 T of less than 1.4 x 10/sup -14/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb/sub 3/Sn wire, and less than 9 x 10/sup -13/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb-Al wire.

  9. A scalable pathway to nanostructured sapphire optical fiber for evanescent-field sensing and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Tian, Fei; Kanka, Jiri; Du, Henry

    2015-03-01

    We here report an innovative and scalable strategy of transforming a commercial unclad sapphire optical fiber to an all-alumina nanostructured sapphire optical fiber (NSOF). The strategy entails fiber coating with metal aluminum followed by anodization to form alumina cladding of highly organized pore channel structure. Through experiments and numerical simulation, we demonstrate the utility and benefit of NSOF, analogous to all-silica microstructured optical fiber, for evanescent-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements. We experimentally reveal the feasibility of Ag nanoparticles (NPs)-enabled NSOF SERS sensing of 10-6 M Rhodamine 6G (R6G) after thermal treatment at 500 °C for 6 h by taking advantage of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) structure to stabilize the Ag NPs. We show, via numerical simulations, that AAO cladding significantly increases the evanescent-field overlap, lower porosity of AAO results in higher evanescent-field overlap, and optimized AAO nanostructure yields greater SERS enhancement.

  10. Observation of dimension dependent magnetic ordering in bismuth ferrite particulate and fiber nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakar, M.; Bharathkumar, S.; Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 600 025 (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Nanoparticles and nanofibers of bismuth ferrite were fabricated by sol-gel and electrospinning methods respectively. The structural and morphological analysis was carried out by XRD and FESEM techniques respectively. The magnetic measurements were carried out by SQUID magnetometer. The BFO nanofibers showed an enhanced magnetic property compared to nanoparticles. The observed magnetic properties were found to be associated with their magnetic ordering in the system where the antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic core/shell like nature and ‘canted’ spin structure ordering was found to be the magnetic origin in the particulate and fiber nanostructures respectively.

  11. Low-temperature characterization of Nb-Cu-Nb weak links with Ar ion-cleaned interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabdaraghi, R. N., E-mail: robab.najafi.jabdaraghi@aalto.fi [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, 51665-163 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peltonen, J. T.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-01-25

    We characterize niobium-based lateral Superconductor (S)–Normal metal (N)–Superconductor (SNS) weak links through low-temperature switching current measurements and tunnel spectroscopy. We fabricate the SNS devices in two separate lithography and deposition steps, combined with strong argon ion cleaning before the normal metal deposition in the last step. Our SNS weak link consists of high-quality sputtered Nb electrodes that have contacted with evaporated Cu. The two-step fabrication flow enables more flexibility in the choice of materials and pattern design. A comparison of the temperature-dependent equilibrium critical supercurrent with theoretical predictions indicates that the quality of the Nb-Cu interface is similar to that of evaporated Al-Cu weak links. We further demonstrate a hybrid magnetic flux sensor based on an Nb-Cu-Nb SNS junction, where the phase-dependent normal metal density of states is probed with an Al tunnel junction.

  12. CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF Cu-Nb AND Ni-Nb AMORPHOUS FILMS PREPARED BY ION BEAM ASSISTED DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Zhao; F. Zeng; D.M. Li; F. Pan

    2003-01-01

    The Cu25Nb75 and Ni45Nb55 amorphous films with about 500nm thickness were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Potentiodynamic polarization measurement was adopted to investigate the corrosion resistance of samples and the tests were carried out respectively in 1mol/L H2SO4 and NaOH aquatic solution. The corrosion performance of the amorphous films was compared with that of multilayered and pure Nb films. Experimental results indicated that the corrosion resistance of amorphous films was better than that of the corresponding multilayers and pure Nb films for both Ni-Nb system with negative heat of formation and Cu-Nb system with positive heat of formation.

  13. Effect of Cu, Nb and Ta addition on the structural and magnetic properties of amorphous Fe-Si-B alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. E-mail: agupta@iucindore.ernet.inkane_sn@yahoo.com; Kane, S.N.; Bhagat, N.; Kulik, T

    2003-01-01

    The effect of successive additions of Cu, Nb and Ta in amorphous Fe{sub 77.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9} has been studied using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Addition of Nb/Ta results in an increased near-neighbor distance as well as a decrease in topological order in the system. On the other hand, Cu addition results in a significant increase in the topological order. Addition of Cu does not significantly change the average hyperfine field, whereas, addition of Nb/Ta decreases the hyperfine field. Nb and Ta addition results in appearance of an additional hump in B{sub hf} around 13 T due to Fe atoms with Nb/Ta near neighbors. Thermal annealing of the specimens at 390 deg. C results in changes in the short-range order, which are mainly chemical in nature.

  14. Performance of a 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil with a 300 mm wide cold bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Awaji, Satoshi; Hanai, Satoshi; Ioka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tsubouchi, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    A large-bore 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was developed for a 25 T cryogen-free superconducting magnet. The magnet consisted of a low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet of NbTi and Nb3Sn Rutherford coils, and a high-temperature superconducting magnet. The Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was fabricated by the react-and-wind method for the first time. The LTS magnet reached the designed operation current of 854 A without a training quench at a 1 h ramp rate. The central magnetic field generated by the LTS magnet was measured by a Hall sensor to be 14.0 T at 854 A in a 300 mm cold bore.

  15. Effect of crystallisation on the magnetic properties of FeCuNbBSi amorphous thin films produced by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celegato, Federica; Coisson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco [INRIM, Electromagnetism Division, Torino (Italy); Baricco, Marcello [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Soft magnetic thin films of FeCuNbSiB alloy having different thickness were deposited on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate by rf sputtering. The target was made of amorphous ribbons having nominal composition Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}. The amorphicity of as-deposited films has been checked by X-ray diffraction technique. Selected samples have been submitted to controlled annealing to induce the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation. The influence of thermal treatments on the hysteresis properties has been studied as a function of thickness and microstructure on as prepared and annealed samples. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  17. Nanostructured cobalt sulfide-on-fiber with tunable morphology as electrodes for asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2014-01-01

    Porous cobalt sulfide (Co9S8) nanostructures with tunable morphology, but identical crystal phase and composition, have been directly nucleated over carbon fiber and evaluated as electrodes for asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. As the morphology is changed from two-dimensional (2D) nanoflakes to 3D octahedra, dramatic changes in supercapacitor performance are observed. In three-electrode configuration, the binder-free Co9S82D nanoflake electrodes show a high specific capacitance of 1056 F g-1at 5 mV s-1vs. 88 F g-1for the 3D electrodes. As sulfides are known to have low operating potential, for the first time, asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors are constructed from Co9S8nanostructures and activated carbon (AC), providing an operation potential from 0 to 1.6 V. At a constant current density of 1 A g-1, the 2D Co9S8, nanoflake//AC asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor exhibits a gravimetric cell capacitance of 82.9 F g-1, which is much higher than that of an AC//AC symmetric capacitor (44.8 F g-1). Moreover, the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor shows an excellent energy density of 31.4 W h kg-1at a power density of 200 W Kg-1and an excellent cycling stability with a capacitance retention of ∼90% after 5000 cycles. This journal is

  18. Mechanical alloying and amorphization in Cu-Nb-Ag in situ composite wires studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Ohsaki, S.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    We have studied deformation-driven alloying in a Cu-5 at.% Ag-3 at.% Nb in situ composite by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. In addition to alloying at interfaces, amorphization of nanosized Cu areas was observed after heavy wire drawing (true strain: {eta} = 10.5) at some of the Cu-Nb interfaces. We discuss the alloying in terms of trans-phase dislocation-shuffling and shear banding mechanisms where lattice dislocations penetrate the interfaces between abutting phases. We interpret local amorphization in terms of the thermodynamic destabilization of a Cu-Nb crystalline phase between 35 and 80 at.% Cu due to enforced mixing. Deformation-driven mechanical alloying and amorphization are hence closely associated phenomena.

  19. Temperature dependence of the magnetostriction and the induced anisotropy in nanocrystalline FeCuNbSiB alloys, and their fluxgate properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto V; Petersen, Jan Raagaard

    1994-01-01

    Making use of the stress induced magnetic anisotropy in some iron-rich FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline materials we studied the thermal dependence of their magnetostriction which becomes zero below the Curie temperature. The choice of a suitable composition and annealing temperature results in materials...... with zero magnetostriction at room temperature. Due to the low magnetostriction these materials have very promising fluxgate properties which were studied as well...

  20. Thermal activation analysis of the structural and phase transformations in the Zr-Cu-Nb amorphous alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedotova N.L.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the procedure of the estimation of the thermal activation parameters from the data of dilatometric measurements and the results of its application to the Zr-Cu-Nb amorphous alloy discussed. The determination of the thermal activation parameters of the processes occurring in materials under known temperature-force conditions can be useful for the identification of the structural mechanisms of phase transformations and the evolution of defect structure. We used the data of dilatometric measurements for evaluating the effective activation energy. This method exhibits some advantages over the conventional one due to the design features of dilatometers. First, it ensures the precise measurement of strains; second, the assigned temperature regime is very precisely maintained both at the stage of heating and upon isothermal holding; third, it ensures a high-speed continuous record of the experimental data. The developed method of evaluating the effective activation energy from the results of dilatometric experiments provides statistically reliable results. The data of the photometric analysis of structure images are in accordance with the results of dilatometric experiments

  1. Fabrication, characterization and photocatalytic properties of millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} fiber with nanostructures using cellulose fiber as a template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yun; Sun, Qingfeng [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Tongchao; Yang, Dongjiang [College of Chemistry, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Liu, Yixing [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Li, Jian, E-mail: jianli@nefu.edu.cn [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Millimeter-long nanostructured TiO{sub 2} was fabricated using cellulose as a template. •The as-prepared TiO{sub 2} showed a superior photocatalytic ability to decompose phenol. •A feasible method for fabricating TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was introduced. -- Abstract: We report a millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} fiber with nanostructures fabricated using bamboo cellulose fiber as a template. The method includes the in situ synthesis of titanium oxide nanoparticles in the cellulose fiber template and subsequent removal of the cellulose matrix by calcination. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. XRD pattern confirmed the crystalline phase of the prepared TiO{sub 2} is anatase phase. From the observation of SEM image, the cellulose-templated TiO{sub 2} inherited the initial millimetric length of the bamboo cellulose. TEM image revealed the millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} was comprised of the spherical nanoparticles with the diameter of about 30 nm. Meanwhile, the as-fabricated TiO{sub 2} presented a superior photocatalytic ability to decompose phenol under ultraviolet irradiation. This approach is facile, and would provide ready access to metallic oxide nanostructures of desired morphology and size with the appropriate templates.

  2. Nanostructured silver and platinum modified carbon fiber microelectrodes coated with nafion for H2O2 determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Halouzka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber microelectrodes equipped with nanostructured metals(platinum and silver and covered with a Nafion layer constitutesensitive H2O2 sensors. Metallic layers on carbon fibers wereprepared by surfactant assisted electrodeposition. In the case ofsilver, the procedure leads to coating which is composed of porous,partially aggregated and crystalline deposits containing silvernanoparticles. The electrodeposition of platinum leads to carbonfiber decorated with clusters of platinum nanoparticles. Aftercoating the electrodes with protective and antiinterference barriermade of Nafion, the sensing properties of the preparedmicroelectrodes towards hydrogen peroxide are investigated.

  3. Fabrication of Fiber Bragg Grating Coating with TiO2 Nanostructured Metal Oxide for Refractive Index Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaymaa Riyadh Tahhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the sensitivity of biosensor a new approach using an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG coated with a suitable nanostructured metal oxide (NMO is proposed which is costly effective compared to other biosensors. Bragg grating was written on a D-shaped optical fiber by phase mask method using a 248 nm KrF excimer laser for a 5 min exposure time producing a grating with a period of 528 nm. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanostructured metal oxide was coated over the fiber for the purpose of increasing its sensing area. The etched D-shaped FBG was then coated with 312 nm thick TiO2 nanostructured layer to ensure propagating the radiation modes within the core. The final structure was used to sense deionized water and saline. The etched D-shaped FBG original sensitivity before coating to air-deionized water and to air-saline was 0.314 nm/riu and 0.142 nm/riu, respectively. After coating the sensitivity became 1.257 nm/riu for air-deionized water and 0.857 nm/riu for air-saline.

  4. High sensitivity zero-biased magnetic field sensor based on multiphase laminate heterostructures with FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Chen, Hengjia

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a high sensitivity zero-biased magnetic field sensor based on multiphase laminate heterostructures consisting of FeCuNbSiB/Terfenol-D (Tb1-xDyxFe2)/PZT (Pb(Zr1-x,Tix)O3)/Terfenol-D/PZT/Ternol-D/FeCuNbSiB (FMPMPMF) is presented, whose ME coupling characteristics and sensing performances have been investigated. Compared to traditional Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D (MPM) and Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D (MPMPM) sensors, the zero-biased ME coupling characteristics of FMPMPMF sensor were significantly improved, owing to a build-in magnetic field in FeCuNbSiB/Terfenol-D layers. The optimum zero-biased resonant ME voltage coefficient of 3.02 V/Oe is achieved, which is 1.65 times as great as that of MPMPM and 2.51 times of MPM sensors. The mean value of low-frequency ME field coefficient of FMPMPMF reaches 122.53 mV/cm Oe, which is 2.39 times as great as that of MPMPM and 1.79 times of MPM sensors. Meanwhile, the induced zero-biased ME voltage of FMPMPMF sensor shows an excellent linear relationship to ac magnetic field both at the low frequency (1 kHz) and the resonant frequency (106.6 kHz). Remarkably, it indicates that the proposed zero-biased magnetic field sensor give the prospect of being able to applied to the field of highly sensitive ac magnetic field sensing.

  5. High sensitivity zero-biased magnetic field sensor based on multiphase laminate heterostructures with FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high sensitivity zero-biased magnetic field sensor based on multiphase laminate heterostructures consisting of FeCuNbSiB/Terfenol-D (Tb1−xDyxFe2/PZT (Pb(Zr1-x,TixO3/Terfenol-D/PZT/Ternol-D/FeCuNbSiB (FMPMPMF is presented, whose ME coupling characteristics and sensing performances have been investigated. Compared to traditional Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D (MPM and Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D/PZT/Terfenol-D (MPMPM sensors, the zero-biased ME coupling characteristics of FMPMPMF sensor were significantly improved, owing to a build-in magnetic field in FeCuNbSiB/Terfenol-D layers. The optimum zero-biased resonant ME voltage coefficient of 3.02 V/Oe is achieved, which is 1.65 times as great as that of MPMPM and 2.51 times of MPM sensors. The mean value of low-frequency ME field coefficient of FMPMPMF reaches 122.53 mV/cm Oe, which is 2.39 times as great as that of MPMPM and 1.79 times of MPM sensors. Meanwhile, the induced zero-biased ME voltage of FMPMPMF sensor shows an excellent linear relationship to ac magnetic field both at the low frequency (1 kHz and the resonant frequency (106.6 kHz. Remarkably, it indicates that the proposed zero-biased magnetic field sensor give the prospect of being able to applied to the field of highly sensitive ac magnetic field sensing.

  6. Notched Long-Period Fiber Grating with an Amine-Modified Surface Nanostructure for Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janw-Wei Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and application of a notched long-period fiber grating (NLPFG with an amine-modified surface nanostructure for carbon dioxide (CO2 gas sensing. The NLPFG with the modified surface nanostructure was fabricated by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP etching with an Ag nanoparticle etching barrier. The experimental results show that the spectra were changed with the CO2 gas flow within 12 min. Thereafter, the spectra of the NLPFG remained steady and unchanged. During the absorption process, the transmission loss was decreased by approximately 2.019 dB, and the decreased rate of transmission loss was 0.163 dB/min. The sensitivity was about −0.089 dB/%. These results demonstrate that the NLPFG CO2 gas sensor has the advantages of steady performance, repeatability, and low cost. Therefore, the NLPFG can be utilized as a reliable CO2 gas sensor.

  7. Analyses of normal zone propagation properties of composite Nb{sub 3}Sn wire; Fukugo CuNb/Nb{sub 3}Sn senzai no joudendobu denpa tokusei kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, T.; Murakami, T.; Kaneko, T.; Murase, S.; Shimamoto, S. [Tohoku Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K. [Tohoku Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1999-11-10

    We were 2 cooling systems between refrigerating machine cooling and dipping cooling of liquid helium, and the experiment on quench characteristics of the CuNb reinforcement stabilization Nb{sub 3}Sn wire rod was carried out. As the result, it was proven that the refrigerating machine cooling showed normal conduction division propagation characteristics unlike the dipping cooling. In this study, propagation characteristics in the refrigerating machine cooling are examined. In case of the refrigerating machine cooling, the absolute value of propagation velocity increased from experimental value at analytic value of about 20-30 times. This is because the heat quantity is mainly considered from the practice. Therefore, it is indicated that the heat quantity in the T{sub cs} vicinity is smaller than heat quantity of the full normal region. In the meantime, the qualitative tendency of the load factor dependence agreed almost. (NEDO)

  8. Architecture and engineering of a supramolecular functional material by manipulating the nanostructure of fiber network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Liang; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional fiber networks were created from an organogel system consisting mainly of elongated fibrils by using a nonionic surfactant as an additive. The presence of the surfactant molecules manipulates the network structure by enhancing the mismatch nucleation on the growing fiber tips. Both the fiber network structure and the rheological properties of the material can be finely tuned by changing the surfactant concentration, which provides a robust approach to the engineering of supramolecular soft functional materials.

  9. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  10. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields.

  11. Benefit of Rare-Earth "Smart Doping" and Material Nanostructuring for the Next Generation of Er-Doped Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelii, Inna; Bigot, Laurent; Capoen, Bruno; Gonnet, Cedric; Chanéac, Corinne; Burova, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; El-Hamzaoui, Hicham; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) for harsh environments require to develop specific fabrication methods of Er 3+-doped fibers (EDFs) so as to limit the impact of radiation-induced absorption. In this context, a compromise has to be found between the concentration of Erbium and the glass composition. On the one hand, high concentration of Er 3+ ions helps to reduce the length of the EDF and hence the cumulated attenuation but generally leads to luminescence quenching mechanisms that limit the performances. On the other hand, so as to avoid such quenching effect, glass modifiers like Al 3+ or P 5+ ions are used in the fabrication of commercial EDFs but are not suitable for applications in harsh environment because these glass modifiers are precursors of radiation-induced structural defects and consequently of optical losses. In this work, we investigate the concept of smart doping via material nanostructuring as a way to fabricate more efficient optical devices. This approach aims at optimizing the glass composition of the fiber core in order to use the minimal content of glass modifiers needed to reach the suited level of performances for EDFA. Er 3+-doped alumina nanoparticles (NPs), as precursor of Er 3+ ions in the preform fabrication process, were used to control the environment of rare-earth ions and their optical properties. Structural and optical characterizations of NP-doped preforms and optical fibers drawn from such preforms demonstrate the interest of this approach for small concentrations of aluminum in comparison to similar glass compositions obtained by a conventional technique.

  12. Benefit of Rare-Earth "Smart Doping" and Material Nanostructuring for the Next Generation of Er-Doped Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelii, Inna; Bigot, Laurent; Capoen, Bruno; Gonnet, Cedric; Chanéac, Corinne; Burova, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; El-Hamzaoui, Hicham; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) for harsh environments require to develop specific fabrication methods of Er (3+)-doped fibers (EDFs) so as to limit the impact of radiation-induced absorption. In this context, a compromise has to be found between the concentration of Erbium and the glass composition. On the one hand, high concentration of Er (3+) ions helps to reduce the length of the EDF and hence the cumulated attenuation but generally leads to luminescence quenching mechanisms that limit the performances. On the other hand, so as to avoid such quenching effect, glass modifiers like Al (3+) or P (5+) ions are used in the fabrication of commercial EDFs but are not suitable for applications in harsh environment because these glass modifiers are precursors of radiation-induced structural defects and consequently of optical losses. In this work, we investigate the concept of smart doping via material nanostructuring as a way to fabricate more efficient optical devices. This approach aims at optimizing the glass composition of the fiber core in order to use the minimal content of glass modifiers needed to reach the suited level of performances for EDFA. Er (3+)-doped alumina nanoparticles (NPs), as precursor of Er (3+) ions in the preform fabrication process, were used to control the environment of rare-earth ions and their optical properties. Structural and optical characterizations of NP-doped preforms and optical fibers drawn from such preforms demonstrate the interest of this approach for small concentrations of aluminum in comparison to similar glass compositions obtained by a conventional technique.

  13. Apoferritin fibers: a new template for 1D fluorescent hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Rocío; Castello, Fabio; Bondia, Patricia; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina; Cuesta, Rafael; Domínguez-Vera, José M.; Orte, Angel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2016-05-01

    Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a heating process. Depending on the experimental conditions, fibers with different morphologies and sizes are obtained. The wire-like protein structure is rich in functional groups and allows chemical functionalization with diverse quantum dots (QD), as well as with different Alexa Fluor (AF) dyes, leading to hybrid fluorescent fibers with variable emission wavelengths, from green to near infrared, depending on the QD and AFs coupled. For fibers containing the pair AF488 and AF647, efficient fluorescence energy transfer from the covalently coupled donor (AF488) to acceptor tags (AF647) takes place. Apoferritin fibers are proposed here as a new promising template for obtaining hybrid functional materials.Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a

  14. CVD Synthesis of Hierarchical 3D MWCNT/Carbon-Fiber Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Susi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized by CVD on industrially manufactured highly crystalline vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCFs. Two catalyst metals (Ni and Fe and carbon precursor gases (C2H2 and CO were studied. The catalysts were deposited on the fibers by sputtering and experiments carried out in two different reactors. Samples were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM. Iron was completely inactive as catalyst with both C2H2 and CO for reasons discussed in the paper. The combination of Ni and C2H2 was very active for secondary CNT synthesis, without any pretreatment of the fibers. The optimal temperature for CNT synthesis was 750∘C, with total gas flow of 650 cm3min⁡−1 of C2H2, H2, and Ar in 1.0:6.7:30 ratio.

  15. Nanostructured poly (lactic acid) electrospun fiber with high loadings of TiO2 nanoparticles: Insights into bactericidal activity and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniatto, T V; Rodrigues, B V M; Marsi, T C O; Ricci, R; Marciano, F R; Webster, T J; Lobo, A O

    2017-02-01

    Researchers have been looking for modifying surfaces of polymeric biomaterials approved by FDA to obtain nanofeatures and bactericidal properties. If modified, it would be very interesting because the antibiotic administration could be reduced and, therefore, the bacterial resistance. Here, we report the electrospinning of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) with high loadings of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2, 1-5wt%) and their bactericidal properties. TiO2 nanoparticles have been recognized for a long time for their antibacterial, low cost and self-cleaning properties. However, their ability to reduce bacteria functions when used in polymers has not been well studied to date. In this context, we aimed here to generate nanostructured PLA electrospun fiber-TiO2 nanoparticle composites for further evaluation of their bactericidal activity and cell viability. TEM and SEM micrographs revealed the successful electrospinning of PLA/TiO2 and the generation of polymer-TiO2 nanostructures. When increasing the TiO2 concentration, we observed a proportional increase in the nanoparticle density along the fiber and surface. The nanostructured PLA/TiO2 nanofibers showed no mammalian cell toxicity and, most importantly, possessed bactericidal activity with higher TiO2 loads. Such results suggest that the present PLA electrospun fiber-TiO2 nanoparticle composites should be further studied for a wide range of biomedical applications.

  16. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Andreu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies. The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about

  17. The crystal structure of (Nb0.75Cu0.25)Sn2 in the Cu-Nb-Sn system

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Stefan; Nolze, Gert; Leineweber, Andreas; Leaux, Floriane; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During the processing of superconducting Nb3Sn wire, several intermediate intermetallic phases including a previously encountered Cu-Nb-Sn phase show up. The yet unknown crystal structure of this phase is now identified by a combination of different experimental techniques and database search to be of the hexagonal NiMg2 type with a proposed composition of about (Nb0.75Cu0.25)Sn2. The structure determination started from an evaluation of the lattice parameters from EBSD Kikuchi patterns from quenched material suggesting hexagonal or orthorhombic symmetry. A database search then led to the hexagonal NiMg2 type structure, the presence of which was confirmed by a Rietveld analysis on the basis of high energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Assuming a partial substitution of Nb in orthorhombic NbSn2 by Cu, the change of the valence electron concentration provokes a structural transformation from the CuMg2 type for NbSn2 to the NiMg2 type for (Nb0.75Cu0.25)Sn2. In the previous literature the (Nb0.75Cu0....

  18. Nanostructured copper-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber for gas chromatographic analysis of dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate environmental estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-01-01

    A novel nanostructured copper-based solid-phase microextraction fiber was developed and applied for determining the two most common types of phthalate environmental estrogens (dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate) in aqueous samples, coupled to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The copper film was coated onto a stainless-steel wire via an electroless plating process, which involved a surface activation process to improve the surface properties of the fiber. Several parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as extraction time, extraction temperature, ionic strength, desorption temperature, and desorption time were optimized by a factor-by-factor procedure to obtain the highest extraction efficiency. The as-established method showed wide linear ranges (0.05-250 μg/L). Precision of single fiber repeatability was water. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Synergetic effect between adsorption and photodegradation on nanostructured TiO2/activated carbon fiber felt porous composites for toluene removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lu, Bin; Ke, Qin-Fei; Guo, Ya-Jun; Guo, Ya-Ping

    2017-03-15

    The low quantum efficiency and limited adsorption efficiency of TiO2 makes it only fit for the removal of VOCs with low concentrations. Herein, we for the first time fabricated nanostructured TiO2/activated carbon fiber felt (TiO2/ACFF) porous composites by the in situ deposition of TiO2 microspheres on the carbon fibers in ACFF. Interestingly, the TiO2 microspheres exhibit hierarchical nanostructures constructed by nanocrystals as building blocks. The TiO2/ACFF porous composites possess excellent adsorption and photodegradation properties for toluene because of the synergetic effects between the nanostructured TiO2 and ACFF. The adsorption efficiencies of the TiO2/ACFF porous composites reach approximately 98% at the toluene concentration (TiO2/ACFF porous composites significantly enhances photocatalytic property for toluene by hindering the recombination of electron-hole pairs, reducing the TiO2 band gap energy (Eg) to 2.95eV and accelerating toluene adsorption. At the toluene concentrations of 230ppm and 460ppm, the photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene into CO2 arrives at 100% and 81.5%, respectively. Therefore, the TiO2/ACFF porous composites with synergetic adsorption and photocatalytic activities have great potentials for toluene removal.

  20. Synthesis of ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures by Fiber-template Method%纤维模板合成ZnO分级纳米结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄惜惜; 田永涛; 王杰; 王文闯; 何豪; 王新昌; 李新建

    2013-01-01

    The ZnO hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized by a simple chemical solution method under a low temperature condition using fiber (cotton fiber,nylon fiber,copper filament,silver filament and hair) as template.The ZnO nanorods covered on the fiber surface vertically and densely.The diameter of ZnO nanorod was about several hundred nanometers and the length was about 2 ~ 3 micrometers.The fiber of fabric (cotton fiber,nylon fiber),metal filament (copper,silver) and animal hair (human hair) could be used as template to synthesize ZnO hierarchical nanostructure,which was universalistic.The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure had a larger specific surface area and could be assembled into twodimensional or three-dimensional structures which could have important potential applications in sensors and solar cells.%在低温条件下,以纤维(棉纤维、尼龙纤维、铜丝、银丝、头发)为模板,通过简单的化学溶液生长,合成由ZnO纳米棒组成的分级结构,ZnO纳米棒竖直包覆在纤维表面,生长密集,棒的直径约几百纳米,长度为2~3 μm.该方法可以以织物纤维(棉纤维、尼龙纤维)、金属细丝(铜丝、银丝)和动物毛发(头发)为模板合成由ZnO纳米棒组成的分级结构,具有一定的普适性.该分级结构比表面积较大,同时可以通过组合构成二维或三维结构,在传感器和太阳能电池等方面具有重要的潜在应用价值.

  1. Strengthening effect of Cu-rich phase precipitation in 18Cr9Ni3CuNbN austenitic heat-resisting steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyu CHI; Hongyao YU; Jianxin DONG; Xishan XIE; Zhengqiang CUI; Xiaofang CHEN; Fusheng LIN

    2011-01-01

    The Cu-containing austenitic heat-resistant steel 18Cr9Ni3CuNbN, which is being used as superheater and reheater tube material for modern ultra-super-critical (USC) power plants all over the world, has been investigated at 650 ℃ long time aging till 10 000 h. SEM, TEM and 3DAP (three dimensional atom probe) have been used to follow microstructural changes with mechanical property variations. Experimental results show that Cu-rich phase and MX precipitate in the grains as well as M23C6 precipitates at grain boundaries are the main precipitation strengthening phases in this steel. Among them Cu-rich phase is the most important strengthening phase. Homogeneous distribution of very fine nano-size Cu-rich phase has been formed at very early stage of 650℃ aging (less than 1 h). Cu atoms gradually concentrate to Cu-rich particles and the other elements (such as Fe, Cr, Ni etc) diffuse away from Curich particles to γ-matrix with the increasing of aging time at 650 ℃. The growth rate of Cu-rich phase at 650 ℃ long time aging is very slow and the average diameters of Cu-rich phase have been determined by TEM method. Cu-rich phase keeps in about 30 nm till 650℃ aging for 10 000 h. It shows that nano-size Cu-rich phase precipitation strengthening can be kept for long time aging at 650 ℃ because of its excellent stability at high temperatures. According to structure stability study and mechanical properties determination results the Cu-rich phase precipitation sequence and its strengthening mechanism model have been suggested and discussed.

  2. Crystal chemistry, band engineering, and photocatalytic activity of the LiNb3O8-CuNb3O8 solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prangya Parimita; Maggard, Paul A

    2013-04-15

    A new solid solution has been prepared in the system LiNb3O8-CuNb3O8, and the impacts of chemical composition and crystal structure have been investigated for the resulting band gap sizes and photocatalytic activities for water reduction to hydrogen under visible light. All members of the solid solution were synthesized by solid-state methods within evacuated fused-silica vessels, and their phase purities were confirmed via powder X-ray diffraction techniques (space group P2(1)/a, a = 15.264(5)-15.367(1) Å, b = 5.031(3)-5.070(1) Å, c = 7.456(1)-7.536(8) Å, and β = 107.35(1)-107.14(8)°, for 0 ≤ x ≤ 1). Rietveld refinements were carried out for the x = 0.09, 0.50, and 0.70 members of the solid solution, which reveal the prevailing isostructurality of the continuous solid solution. The structure consists of chains of (Li/Cu)O6 and NbO6 octahedra. The optical band gap size across the solid solution exhibits a significant red-shift from ∼3.89 eV (direct) to ∼1.45 eV and ∼1.27 eV (direct and indirect) with increasing Cu(I) content, consistent with the change in sample color from white to dark brown to black. Electronic structure calculations based on density-functional theory methods reveal the rapid formation of a new Cu 3d(10)-based valence band that emerges higher in energy than the O 2p band. While the pure LiNb3O8 is a highly active UV-photocatalyst for water reduction, the Li(1-x)Cu(x)Nb3O8 solid is shown to be photocatalytically active under visible-light irradiation for water reduction to hydrogen.

  3. Xanthine oxidase functionalized Ta2O5 nanostructures as a novel scaffold for highly sensitive SPR based fiber optic xanthine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2018-01-15

    Fabrication and characterization of a surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic xanthine sensor using entrapment of xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme in several nanostructures of tantalum (v) oxide (Ta2O5) have been reported. Chemical route was adopted for synthesizing Ta2O5 nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes and nanowires while Ta2O5 nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning technique. The synthesized Ta2O5 nanostructures were characterized by photoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectra and X-ray diffraction pattern. The probes were fabricated by coating an unclad core of the fiber with silver layer followed by the deposition of XO entrapped Ta2O5 nanostructures. The crux of sensing mechanism relies on the modification of dielectric function of sensing layer upon exposure to xanthine solution of diverse concentrations, reflected in terms of shift in resonance wavelength. The sensing probe coated with XO entrapped Ta2O5 nanofibers has been turned out to possess maximum sensitivity amongst the synthesized nanostructures. The probe was optimized in terms of pH of the sample and the concentration of XO entrapped in Ta2O5 nanofibers. The optimized sensing probe possesses a remarkably good sensitivity of 26.2nm/µM in addition to linear range from 0 to 3µM with an invincible LOD value of 0.0127µM together with a response time of 1min. Furthermore, probe selectivity with real sample analysis ensure the usage of the sensor for practical scenario. The results reported open a novel perspective towards a sensitive, rapid, reliable and selective detection of xanthine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    with macroscopic reinforcements such as fiber, clay, glass mineral and other fillers. The nano-alloyed polymers are particularly useful for producing...applications, including space-sur- vivable materials and seals, gaskets, cosmetics , and personal care. 25 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets B-3 U.S. Patent Mar...the incorporation of fluorinated nanostructured chemicals onto the surface of a secondary material (such as Ti02 , CaC03 , glass or mineral

  5. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite–tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Weili [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); He, Jianxin, E-mail: hejianxin771117@163.com [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Sang, Feng [Department of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Treatment and Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Ding, Bin [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen, Li, E-mail: chenli@tjpu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A designing scaffold strategy to imitate the mineralized collagen bundles in natural bone was presented. • Aligned nanostructured composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent. • Mechanical properties of aligned TSF nanofiber had been significantly improved by embedding with composite nanoparticles. • Composite scaffolds effectively supported proliferation of MG-63 cells and promoted biomineralization.

  6. Simulated-sunlight-activated photocatalysis of Methylene Blue using cerium-doped SiO2/TiO2 nanostructured fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Liu; Hongbing Yu; Zhenning Lv; Sihui Zhan; Jiangyao Yang; Xinhong Peng; Yixuan Ren; Xiaoyan Wu

    2012-01-01

    Cerium-doped SiO2/TiO2 nanostructured fibers were fabricated by electrospinning technology.The prepared fibers were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).Using the fibers as catalysts,photocatalytic degradation of Methylene Blue (MB) aqueous solution was carried out under simulated sunlight.The 0.2% Ce doping proved to be the optimal concentration for the doping of TiO2/SiO2,compared to other Ce-doped molar concentrations.The 0.2% Ce-doped SiO2/TiO2 fibers exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than industrial Degussa P25 and the samples doped with only Ce or SiO2.The reasons for improving the photocatalytic activity were also discussed.Several operational parameters were studied,which showed that the photocatalytic efficiency of MB was influenced by parameters such as the initial dye concentration,the initial pH,inorganic anions,and so on.In addition,the influences of an electron acceptor and a radical scavenger suggested that OH was the dominant photooxidant during the photocatalytic process.The reuse evaluation of the fibers indicated that their photocatalytic activity had good stability.

  7. 磁控溅射沉积Cu-Nb薄膜的特征及热退火的影响%Characteristics of Cu-Nb Thin Films Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering and Effect of Annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭中正; 孙勇; 段永华; 周铖; 彭明军

    2011-01-01

    用磁控共溅射法制备含铌1.16%~27.04%(原子分数)的Cu-Nb合金薄膜,运用EDX,XRD,SEM,TEM,显微硬度仪和电阻仪对沉积态和热退火态薄膜的成分、结构和性能进行了研究.结果表明,Nb添加显著影响Cu-Nb合金薄膜微结构,使Cu-Nb薄膜晶粒细化,含铌1.82%~15.75%的Cu-Nb膜呈纳米晶结构,存在Nb在Cu中的fec Cu(Nb)非平衡亚稳过饱和同溶体,固溶度随薄膜Nb浓度增加而上升,最大值为8.33%Nb.随Nb含量增加,薄膜中微晶体尺寸减小,Cu-27.04%Nb膜微结构演变至非晶态.与纯Cu膜对比表明,Nb添加显著提高沉积态Cu-Nb薄膜显微硬度和电阻率,总体上二者随膜Nb含量上升而增高.Nb含量高于4.05%时显微硬度增幅趋缓,非晶Cu-Nb膜硬度低于晶态膜,电阻卒则随铌含量上升而持续增加.经200,400及650℃退火1h后,Cu-Nb膜显微硬度降低、电阻率下降,降幅与退火温度呈正相关.XRD和SEM显示,650℃退火后晶态Cu-Nb膜基体相发生晶粒长大,并出现亚微米级富Cu第二相,非晶Cu-27.04%Nb膜则观察到晶化转变和随后的晶粒生长.Nb添加引起晶粒细化效应以及退火中基体相晶粒度增大是Cu-Nb薄膜微观结构和性能形成及演变的主要原因.%The composition, structure, properties of Cu-Nb alloy thin films with Nb content of 1.16% - 27. 04% ( atom fraction) prepared by magnetron co-sputtering were investigated by EDX, XRD, TEM, SEM, microhardness instrument and resistivity meter in the condition of as-deposited and post-annealed states. The results showed that the microstructure of Cu-lVb alloy thin films was influenced by Nb addition significantly and adding Nb led to grain refinement. Cu-Nb thin films with 1. 82% ~ 15. 75% Nb possessed nanocrystalline structure with the presence of fee Cu(Nb) non-equilibrium metastable supersaturated solid solution, and the Nb solubility increased with the incremental Nb concentration and maximum Nb solubility of 8.33%. The size of

  8. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite-tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Ding, Bin; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Nanostructuring an erbium local environment inside sol-gel silica glasses: toward efficient erbium optical fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelii, Inna; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Bigot, Laurent; Bouwmans, Géraud; Fsaifes, Ihsan; Capoen, Bruno; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    To extend the use of erbium- (Er-)/aluminum- (Al-) codoped optical fibers in hostile environments, the reduction of the Al amount has been identified as a serious way to harden them against harsh radiation. In this work, sol-gel monolithic Er3+-doped and Er3+/Al3+-codoped silica glasses were prepared from nanoporous silica xerogels soaked in a solution containing an Er salt together or not with an Al salt. After sintering, these glasses were used as the core material of microstructured optical fibers made by the stack-and-draw method. The influence of Al incorporation on the optical properties of Er3+-doped silica glasses and fibers is investigated. This approach enabled the preparation of silica glasses containing dispersed Er3+ ions with low Al content. The obtained fibers have been tested in an all-fibered cavity laser architecture. The Er3+/Al3+-codoped fiber laser presents a maximum efficiency of 27% at 1530 nm. We show that without Al doping, the laser exhibits lower performances that depend on Er content inside the doped fiber core. The effect of Er pair-induced quenching also has been investigated through nonsaturable absorption experiments, which clearly indicate that the fraction of Er ion pairs is significantly reduced in the Al-codoped fiber.

  10. Screened coulomb hybrid DFT investigation of band gap and optical absorption predictions of CuVO3, CuNbO3 and Cu 5Ta11O30 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moussab

    2014-01-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of the optoelectronic properties of CuVO3, CuNbO3 and Cu 5Ta11O30 materials for potential photocatalytic and solar cell applications. In addition to the experimental results obtained by powder X-ray diffraction and UV-Vis spectroscopy of the materials synthesized under flowing N2 gas at atmospheric pressure via solid-state reactions, the electronic structure and the UV-Vis optical absorption coefficient of these compounds are predicted with high accuracy using advanced first-principles quantum methods based on DFT (including the perturbation theory approach DFPT) within the screened coulomb hybrid HSE06 exchange-correlation formalism. The calculated density of states are found to be in agreement with the UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra, predicting a small indirect band gap of 1.4 eV for CuVO3, a direct band gap of 2.6 eV for CuNbO3, and an indirect (direct) band gap of 2.1 (2.6) eV for Cu5Ta 11O30. It is confirmed that the Cu(i)-based multi-metal oxides possess a strong contribution of filled Cu(i) states in the valence band and of empty d0 metal states in the conduction band. Interestingly, CuVO3 with its predicted small indirect band gap of 1.4 eV shows the highest absorption coefficient in the visible range with a broad absorption edge extending to 886 nm. This novel result offers a great opportunity for this material to be an excellent candidate for solar cell applications. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  11. New nanostructure of polydimethylsiloxane coating as a solid-phase microextraction fiber: Application to analysis of BTEX in aquatic environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, Sara; Jalali, Fahimeh; Es-Haghi, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2016-10-15

    Electrospinning technique was used to convert polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sol-gel solution to a new nanostructure on a stainless steel wire. The surface morphology of the fiber was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It showed a diameter range of 30-60nm for PDMS nanoparticles with a homogeneous and porous surface structure. The applicability of this coating was assessed for the headspace SPME (HS-SPME) of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) from water samples followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The important parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as extraction time and temperature, desorption conditions, agitation rate and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, LODs and LOQs of 0.3-5μgL(-1) and 1-10μgL(-1) were obtained, respectively. The method showed linearity in the broad range of 1-5000μgL(-1) with correlation coefficient of >0.99. Inter-day and intra-day precisions of the developed method ranged from 2.43% to 6.54% and from 5.24% to 13.73%, respectively. The thermal stability of the fiber was investigated on stainless steel wire. It was found to be durable at 260°C for more than 360min. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied for quantification of BTEX in real water samples.

  12. Modal demultiplexing properties of tapered and nanostructured optical fibers for in vivo optogenetic control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Marco; Della Patria, Andrea; Sileo, Leonardo; Sabatini, Bernardo L; De Vittorio, Massimo; Pisanello, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    Optogenetic approaches to manipulate neural activity have revolutionized the ability of neuroscientists to uncover the functional connectivity underlying brain function. At the same time, the increasing complexity of in vivo optogenetic experiments has increased the demand for new techniques to precisely deliver light into the brain, in particular to illuminate selected portions of the neural tissue. Tapered and nanopatterned gold-coated optical fibers were recently proposed as minimally invasive multipoint light delivery devices, allowing for site-selective optogenetic stimulation in the mammalian brain [Pisanello , Neuron82, 1245 (2014)]. Here we demonstrate that the working principle behind these devices is based on the mode-selective photonic properties of the fiber taper. Using analytical and ray tracing models we model the finite conductance of the metal coating, and show that single or multiple optical windows located at specific taper sections can outcouple only specific subsets of guided modes injected into the fiber.

  13. Morphology-Controllable Synthesis of Zn-Co-Mixed Sulfide Nanostructures on Carbon Fiber Paper Toward Efficient Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries and Water Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Han, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoya; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Yida; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Wenbin

    2017-04-12

    It remains an ongoing challenge to develop cheap, highly active, and stable electrocatalysts to promote the sluggish electrocatalytic oxygen evolution, oxygen reduction, and hydrogen evolution reactions for rechargeable metal-air batteries and water-splitting systems. In this work, we report the morphology-controllable synthesis of zinc cobalt mixed sulfide (Zn-Co-S) nanoarchitectures, including nanosheets, nanoplates, and nanoneedles, grown on conductive carbon fiber paper (CFP) and the micronanostructure dependent electrochemical efficacy for catalyzing hydrogen and oxygen in zinc-air batteries and water electrolysis. The formation of different Zn-Co-S morphologies was attributed to the synergistic effect of decomposed urea products and the corrosion of NH4F. Among synthesized Zn-Co-S nanostructures, the nanoneedle arrays supported on CFP exhibit superior trifunctional activity for oxygen reduction, oxygen evolution, and hydrogen evolution reactions than its nanosheet and nanoplate counterparts through half reaction testing. It also exhibited better catalytic durability than Pt/C and RuO2. Furthermore, the Zn-Co-S nanoneedle/CFP electrode enables rechargeable Zn-air batteries with low overpotential (0.85 V), high efficiency (58.1%), and long cycling lifetimes (200 cycles) at 10 mA cm(-2) as well as considerable performance for water splitting. The superior performance is contributed to the integrated nanoneedle/CFP nanostructure, which not only provides enhanced electrochemical active area, but also facilitates ion and gas transfer between the catalyst surface and electrolyte, thus maintaining an effective solid-liquid-gas interface necessary for electrocatalysis. These results indicate that the Zn-Co-S nanoneedle/CFP system is a low cost, highly active, and durable electrode for highly efficient rechargeable zinc-air batteries and water electrolysis in alkaline solution.

  14. Photocatalytic Treatment of Desalination Concentrate Using Optical Fibers Coated With Nanostructured Thin Films: Impact of Water Chemistry and Seasonal Climate Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Huiyao; Luo, Hongmei; Xu, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of desalination concentrate can reduce concentrate volume for disposal, increase water recovery and convert waste to resource. However, concentrate treatment is costly and energy intensive due to high concentrations of salt and recalcitrant organic matter in concentrate. Photocatalytic oxidation provides a novel energy neutral technology for concentrate treatment by degrading organic contaminants. Polymer-assisted hydrothermal deposition method was used to synthesize innovative pure and Fe-doped TiO2 mixed-phase nanocomposite thin films on side-glowing optical fibers (SOFs). The properties of the photocatalysts-coated SOF were characterized by surface morphology, nanostructure, crystallite size and phase and zeta potential. Photodegradation efficiency and durability of the photocatalysts treating different types of desalination concentrate was studied under natural sunlight. Synthetic solutions and reverse osmosis (RO) concentrates from brackish water and municipal wastewater desalination facilities were tested to elucidate the impact of water chemistry, operating conditions and seasonal climate variations (solar irradiation intensity and temperature) on photocatalytic efficiency. High ionic strength and divalent electrolyte ions in RO concentrate accelerated photocatalytic process, whereas the presence of carbonate species and organic matter hindered photodegradation. Outdoor testing of immobilized continuous-flow photoreactors suggested that the catalyst-coated SOFs can utilize a wide spectrum of natural sunlight and achieved durable photocatalytic performance. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Atomic force microscopy of orb-spider-web-silks to measure surface nanostructuring and evaluate silk fibers per strand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D. M.; Naidoo, N.; Staib, G. R.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) study is used to measure the surface topology and roughness of radial and capture spider silks on the micro- and nanoscale. This is done for silks of the orb weaver spider Argiope keyserlingi. Capture silk has a surface roughness that is five times less than that for radial silk. The capture silk has an equivalent flatness of λ /100 (5-6 nm deep surface features) as an optical surface. This is equivalent to a very highly polished optical surface. AFM does show the number of silk fibers that make up a silk thread but geometric distortion occurs during sample preparation. This prevented AFM from accurately measuring the silk topology on the microscale in this study.

  16. Dielectric nanostructures with high laser damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, C. Y.; Hong, L. Y.; Deng, J.; Khoo, E. H.; Liu, Z.; Wu, R. F.; Teng, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric-based metamaterials are proposed to be the ideal candidates for low-loss, high-efficiency devices. However, to employ dielectric nanostructures for high-power applications, the dielectric material must have a high laser-induced damaged threshold (LIDT) value. In this work, we investigated the LIDT values of dielectric nanostructures for high-power fiber laser applications. Consequently, we found that the fabricated SiO2 nanostructured lens can withstand laser fluence exceeding 100 J/cm2.

  17. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  18. Deformation twinning characteristic of mechanically alloyed Cu-Nb alloy powders%机械合金化法制备Cu-Nb合金过程中的形变孪生特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷若姗; 汪明朴; 郭明星; 李周; 魏海根

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure evolution and deformation twinning characteristics of nanocrystalline Cu-10%Nb alloy during mechanical alloying (MA) were investigated by microhardness measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) observation. A local stress concentration model was proposed to explain the deformation twin nucleation mechanism of Cu-Nb alloy. The results show that the Vickers microhardness of the powders increases gradually with the increase of milling time, and reaches 4.8 GPa after 120 h milling. The main structure of the powders is the dislocation cells in the initial milling. After 50 h milling, the average Cu grain size decreases to about 50 nm, and nano-deformation twins begin to form in some regions. With the continued increase of the milling time, the number of twin increases, and the twin boundary strengthening enhances accordingly. Due to the deformation twinning will contribute to further refine the nano-grains, after 120 h milling, the nano-crystalline size decreases to below 20 nm.%采用机械合金化法制备纳米Cu-10%Nb合金,通过显微硬度测量以及高分辨透射电镜观察,对该合金粉末在室温球磨过程中的微观结构演变和形变孪生特性进行研究;利用局部应力集中模型分析形变孪晶的形核机制.结果表明:随着球磨时间的增加,该合金硬度(HV)不断升高,球磨120 h后可达4.8 GPa;该合金在球磨初期以位错胞结构为主;球磨50 h后,Cu平均晶粒尺寸减小至约50 nm,部分区域出现纳米形变孪晶;继续增加球磨时间,孪晶数量增加,孪晶界强化效果显著;由于孪生将促进纳米晶粒的进一步细化,球磨120 h后,纳米晶尺寸减小到20nm以下.

  19. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  20. Hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated carbon fiber: in situ electrochemical synthesis and use as microelectrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a new type of nanohybrid microelectrode based on a hierarchical nanostructured Au/MnO2/graphene-modified carbon fiber (CF) via in situ electrochemical synthesis, which leads to better structural integration of different building blocks into the CF microelectrode. Our finding demonstrates that wrapping CF with graphene nanosheets has dramatically increased the surface area and electrical conductivity of the CF microelectrode. The subsequent template-free electrodeposition of MnO2 on graphene-wrapped CF gives rise to a porous nanonest architecture built up from twisted and intersectant MnO2 nanowires, which serves as an ideal substrate for the direct growth of Au nanoparticles. Owing to the structural merit and synergy effect between different components, the hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated CF demonstrates dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity. When used for nonenzymatic H2O2 sensing, the resultant modified microelectrode exhibits acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, stability, and selectivity, which enable it to be used for real-time tracking H2O2 secretion in human cervical cancer cells. Graphical abstract A schematic illustration of preparation of hierarchical Au/MnO2/ERGO/CF nanohybrid electrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

  1. Raman Study of Uncoated and p-BN/SiC-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 1; Distribution and Nanostructure of Different Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced celsian matrix composites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and imaging, using several laser wavelengths. Composite #1 is reinforced by as-received fibers while coatings of p-BN and SiC protect the fibers in composite #2. The matrix contains traces of the hexagonal phase of celsian, which is concentrated in the neighborhood of fibers in composite #1. Some free silicon was evident in the coating of composite #2 which might involve a {BN + SiC yields BNC + Si} "reaction" at the p-BN/SiC interface. Careful analysis of C-C peaks revealed no abnormal degradation of the fiber core in the composites.

  2. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  3. Spider Silks-Biomimetics Beyond Silk Fibers: Hydrogels, films & Adhesives from Aqueous Recombinant Spider Silk dopes: A Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-Structural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Sujatha; Jones, Justin; Harris, Thomas; Lewis, Randolph

    2015-03-01

    With a combination of high strength and extensibility, spider silk's (SS) mechanical properties surpass those of any man made fiber. The superior properties are due to the primary protein composition and the complex hierarchical structural organization from nanoscale to macroscopic length scales. Considerable progress has been made to synthetically mimic the production of fibers based on SS proteins. We present synchrotron x-ray micro diffraction (SyXRD) results on new fibers and gels (hydrogels, lyogels) from recombinant SS protein water-soluble dopes. Novelty in these materials is two-fold: water based rather than widely used HFIP acid synthesis, makes them safe in medical applications (replacement for tendons & ligaments). Secondly, hydrogels morphology render them as excellent carriers for targeted drug delivery biomedical applications. SyXRD results reveal semi-crystalline structure with ordered beta-sheets and relatively high degree of axial orientation in the fibers, making them the closest yet to natural spider silks. SyXRD on the gels elucidate the structural transformations during the self-recovery process through mechanical removal and addition of water. Studies correlating the observed structural changes to mechanical properties are underway.

  4. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  5. K_4CuNb_8O_(23)掺杂对K_(0.44)Na_(0.52)Li_(0.04)Nb_(0.86)Ta_(0.10)Sb_(0.04)O_3压电陶瓷性能的影响%Effect of K_4CuNb_8O_(23) Doped on the Properties of K_(0.44)Na_(0.52)Li_(0.04)Nb_(0.86)Ta_(0.10)Sb_(0.04)O_3 Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕; 江向平; 涂娜; 冯子义; 陈超; 李月明

    2009-01-01

    采用固相反应法制备了K_(0.44)Na_(0.52)Li_(0.04)Nb_(0.86)Ta_(0.10)Sb_(0.04)O_3+x mol %K_4CuNb_8O_(23)(0≤x≤2)(简称LF4-KCN)无铅压电陶瓷,使用XRD、SEM、 Agilent 4294A精密阻抗分析仪等对该体系的相组成、显微结构、压电及介电等性能进行表征.XRD分析表明,随着KCN含量的增加,室温时样品由四方相向正交相转变,且当x≥1时,出现K_6Li_4Nb_(10)O_(30)杂相.SEM分析表明,掺入KCN后,样品晶粒尺寸减小,晶粒轮廓清晰.随着KCN含量的增加,在100 ℃附近的介电常数温度曲线上出现第二介电常数极大值,即正交→四方铁电相变温度T_(O-T),同时居里温度TC向低温方向移动.KCN掺杂量对LF4的电性能有很大影响,表现为"硬性"掺杂,其压电常数d_(33),平面机电耦合系数k_p,1kHz频率下的介电损耗tanδ和介电常数ε_r均随着 KCN含量的增加而降低,而机械品质因素Q_m整体提高,样品的密度也显著增大.%The K_(0.44)Na_(0.52)Li_(0.04)Nb_(0.86)Ta_(0.10)Sb_(0.04)O_3+x mol%K_4CuNb_8O_(23)(0≤x≤2)(abbreviated as LF4-KCN) lead-free piezoelectric ceramics were fabricated by solid state reaction. The phase, microstructure, electric properties of the samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and Agilent 4294A impedance analyzer. XRD result shows that the phase of the sample transforms from tetragonal into orthorhombic with the increasing of KCN content. When x≥1, the trace amount of second phase K_6Li_4Nb_(10)O_(30) can be detected. SEM shows that the grain size of those materials decreases as the KCN content increasing, and the figure of the grain becomes clearly. There is another dielectric constant maximum value around 100 ℃, which is the phase transition from orthorhombic to tetragonal (T_(O-T)), while the curie temperature (TC) shifts to higher temperature. The KCN-doping has great influence on the electrical properties, the ceramic becomes "hardened", the piezoelectric constant (d_(33)), electromechanical planar

  6. Determination of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural from baby formula using headspace solid phase microextraction based on nanostructured polypyrrole fiber coupled with ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Ghaemi, Elham; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2015-08-15

    Furfural (Fu) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMFu) are extracted using a dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole coating as a fiber for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method in baby formula samples and detected using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Sample pH, salt effect, extraction time and temperature were investigated and optimized as effective parameters in HS-SPME. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 20-300 ng g(-1) (R(2)>0.99). Limits of detection for Fu and HMFu were 6 ng g(-1) and 5 ng g(-1), respectively. The RSD% of Fu and HMFu for five analyses was 4.4 and 4.9, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine of Fu and HMFu in the different baby formula samples with satisfactory result. The results were in agreement with those obtained using HPLC analysis. The HS-SPME-IMS is precise, selective and sensitive analytical method for determination of Fu and HMFu in baby formula samples, without any derivatization process.

  7. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  8. Investigations of the corrosion fatigue behaviour at a super pure martensitic stainless steel X5CrNiCuNb 17 4 PH in comparison to the soft martensitic stainless steel X4CrNiMo 16 5 1 ESR in chloride containing aqueous media. Pt. 2. Corrosion fatigue tests and crack initiation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K.G.; Happle, T.; Wunderlich, R.

    1989-07-01

    The following report concerns the study of the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the soft martensitic steel X4CrNiMo 16 5 1 ESR and the precipitation hardened X5CrNiCuNb 17 4 PH in sodium solution in the temperature range between 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C and the determination of their general corrosion properties and the mechanism of crack propagation. Their corrosion fatigue limits were compared with each other. A comparison was also made between an electro-slag-remelted soft martensitic steel and a charge without an ESR aftertreatment. Microfractographical fracture and crack path investigation were carried out for interpretation of the experimental results. It was observed that in both super pure steels (soft martensitic and precipitation hardened) the oxidic inclusions are not responsible for the crack initiation, as it was found in the non ESR treated steels. In the 17-4 PH steel copper containing inclusions in the crack initiation areas were observed. In concentrated sodium solution pitting corrosion was found at both steels. (orig.).

  9. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  10. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  11. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  12. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  13. GMI in FeCuNbSiB/Cu multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, CCNE, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: mmacorrea@gmail.com; Viegas, A.D.C. [Departamento de Fisica, CCNE, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Silva, R.B. da [Departamento de Fisica, CCNE, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Andrade, A.M.H. de [Departamento de Fisica, CCNE, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Sommer, R.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-10-01

    Very high magnetoimpedance (MI) measured at frequencies up to 1.8 GHz in single and multilayered thin films with composition Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9} and (Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}+Cu) are reported. The magnetic properties of both systems are also compared. MI ratio as high as 300% for the multilayered samples were obtained.

  14. Enhancement of Radiation Tolerance by Interfaces in Nanostructured Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. a...flexible construction of various types (coherent vs. incoherent) of interfaces as well as accurate control of the thickness of individual layers. Cu/Nb...Phillpot, H. Gleiter, Acta Materialia, 50 (2002) 5005-5020. [7] K. Lu, L. Lu, S. Suresh, Science, 324 (2009) 349-352. [8] S. Ogata , J. Li, S. Yip

  15. Nanostructures of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric multiple properties. Using a solid-vapor phase thermal sublimation technique, nanocombs, nanorings, nanohelixes/nanosprings, nanobows, nanobelts, nanowires, and nanocages of ZnO have been synthesized under specific growth conditions. These unique nanostructures unambiguously demonstrate that ZnO is probably the richest family of nanostructures among all materials, both in structures and properties. The nanostructures could have novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, and biomedical science because it is bio-safe.

  16. Fiber diffraction without fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Saldin, D K

    2013-06-28

    Postprocessing of diffraction patterns of completely randomly oriented helical particles, as measured, for example, in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments with an x-ray free electron laser can yield "fiber diffraction" patterns expected of fibrous bundles of the particles. This will allow "single-axis alignment" to be performed computationally, thus obviating the need to do this by experimental means such as forming fibers and laser or flow alignment. The structure of such particles may then be found by either iterative phasing methods or standard methods of fiber diffraction.

  17. Nanostructured CNx (0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongiorno, G; Blomqvist, M; Piseri, P; Milani, P; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Caruso, T; Rudolf, P; Wachtmeister, S; Csillag, S; Coronel, E

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured CNx thin films were prepared by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) and systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporat

  18. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  19. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanujan

    2003-02-01

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials are provided. Advantages of nanocrystalline magnetic materials in the context of both materials and devices are discussed. Several high technology examples of the use of nanostructured magnetic materials are presented. Methods of processing nanostructured materials are described and the examples of sol gel, rapid solidification and powder injection moulding as potential processing methods for making nanostructured materials are outlined. Some opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  20. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  1. Fabrication of superhydrophobic polymethylsilsesquioxane nanostructures on cotton textiles by a solution-immersion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirgholami, Mohammad A; Khalil-Abad, Mohammad Shateri; Khajavi, Ramin; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad E

    2011-07-15

    Superhydrophobic cotton textiles are prepared by a simple, one-step and inexpensive phase separation method under ambient conditions by which a layer of polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) nanostructures is covered onto the cellulose fibers. By changing the silane precursor concentration, PMSQ nanostructures with various shapes, morphologies and sizes were fabricated. Nanostructures were characterized using SEM, EDS, and attenuated total reflectance FTIR. The wettability of the modified cellulose surfaces was characterized with contact-angle goniometry and sliding angle technique, respectively. The water contact angle of modified cotton is measured to be higher than 150°, which is high enough to exhibit the lotus effect as a result of the superhydrophobicity. Tunable water-repellent properties of the fabric are also demonstrated, with sliding contact angles varying from "sticky" to "slippery" depending upon different nanostructures on the surface of the fibers. It is expected that this simple technique will accelerate the large-scale production of superhydrophobic cellulosic materials with new industrial applications.

  2. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  3. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  4. Fiber biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  5. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  6. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  7. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  8. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...... index of the nanostructured surfaces was estimated from atomic force micrographs and the theoretical reflectance was calculated using the transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. The measured reflectance shows good agreement with the theory of graded index antireflective nanostructures...

  9. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  10. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  11. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  12. Nanostructured intense-laser cleaner

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiao Feng; Kong, Qing; Wang, Ping Xiao; Yu, Qin; Gu, Yan Jan; Qu, Jun Fan

    2016-01-01

    A nanostructured target is proposed to enhance an intense-laser contrast: when a laser prepulse is injected on a nanostructured solid target surface, the prepulse is absorbed effectively by the nanostructured surface. The nanostructure size should be less than the laser wavelength. After the prepulse absorption, the front part of the main pulse destroys the microstructure and makes the surface a flat plasma mirror. The body of the main pulse is reflected almost perfectly. Compared with the plasma mirrors, the nanostructured surface is effective for the absorption of the intense laser prepulse, higher than 10^14 W/cm2. By the nanostructured laser cleaner, the laser pulse contrast increases about a hundredfold. The nanostructured laser cleaner works well for near-future intense lasers.

  13. Magnetic Nano-structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永德

    2004-01-01

    Fabrication of magnetic nano-structures with dots array and wires has been paid attention recently due to the application of high-density magnetic recording. In this study, we fabricated the magnetic dots array and wires through several ways that ensure the arrangement of magnetic dots and wires to be the structures we designed. Their magnetic properties are studied experimentally.

  14. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  15. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  16. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  17. Dietary Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  18. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including t...

  19. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  20. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  1. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  2. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    or a few electrons. Such few-electron devices are expected to form the building blocks of future electrical circuits and it is thus necessary to develop a thorough theoretical understanding of the physics of electrons in nanostructures. Re- garding applications there is a particular interest......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method......This thesis concerns theoretical aspects of electrons in man-made nanostruc- tures. Advances in nanofabrication technology during recent decades have made it possible to produce electrical devices on the nano-scale, whose func- tionality is determined by the quantum mechanical nature of a single...

  3. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  4. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  6. Water Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Douvidzon, Mark L; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Fibers constitute the backbone of modern communication and are used in laser surgeries; fibers also genarate coherent X-ray, guided-sound and supercontinuum. In contrast, fibers for capillary oscillations, which are unique to liquids, were rarely considered in optofluidics. Here we fabricate fibers by water bridging an optical tapered-coupler to a microlensed coupler. Our water fibers are held in air and their length can be longer than a millimeter. These hybrid fibers co-confine two important oscillations in nature: capillary- and electromagnetic-. We optically record vibrations in the water fiber, including an audio-rate fundamental and its 3 overtones in a harmonic series, that one can hear in soundtracks attached. Transforming Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems [MEMS] to Micro-Electro-Capillary-Systems [MECS], boosts the device softness by a million to accordingly improve its response to minute forces. Furthermore, MECS are compatible with water, which is a most important liquid in our world.

  7. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  8. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  9. Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0059 Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films RODNEY PRIESTLEY TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 12/23/2014...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/01/2012-08/31/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films 5a. CONTRACT...properties is due to the film morphology, i.e., the films are nanostructured . The aim of this proposal was to understand the mechanism of film formation and

  10. Sonoelectrochemical Approach Towards Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Clemens; Qiu, Xiaofeng

    2006-03-01

    We will report on the sonoelectrochemical synthesis of nanostructured semiconductor materials. The talk will focus on the control of the nanostructure size, shape, and composition using sonolectrochemistry as a versatile synthesis tool. The synthesis of targeted nanostructures requires thorough control of the redox chemistry during the growth process. The composition of the product can be controlled by changing the initial metal-ligand concentration. Futhermore, the properties of the novel materials will be discussed. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products confirmed the compositional change in the nanomaterials. Control of the involved sonoelectrochemistry also allows for the formation of highly monodispersed 1-D Nanorods. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yongbing; Samia, Anna C. S.; Devadoss, Anando; Burgess, James D.; Dayal, Smita; Burda, Clemens. PbTe nanorods by sonoelectrochemistry. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2005), 44(36), 5855-5857. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens; Fu, Ruiling; Pu, Lin; Chen, Hongyuan; Zhu, Junjie. Heterostructured Bi2Se3 Nanowires with Periodic Phase Boundaries. Journal of the American Chemical Society (2004), 126(50), 16276-16277.

  11. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Efimov, Anatoly [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  12. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  13. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  14. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  15. LDRD final report on adaptive-responsive nanostructures for sensing applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01

    Functional organic nanostructures such as well-formed tubes or fibers that can easily be fabricated into electronic and photonic devices are needed in many applications. Especially desirable from a national security standpoint are nanostructures that have enhanced sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and biological (CB) agents and other environmental stimuli. We recently discovered the first class of highly responsive and adaptive porphyrin-based nanostructures that may satisfy these requirements. These novel porphyrin nanostructures, which are formed by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins, may function as conductors, semiconductors, or photoconductors, and they have additional properties that make them suitable for device fabrication (e.g., as ultrasensitive colorimetric CB microsensors). Preliminary studies with porphyrin nanotubes have shown that these nanostructures have novel optical and electronic properties, including strong resonant light scattering, quenched fluorescence, and electrical conductivity. In addition, they are photochemically active and capable of light-harvesting and photosynthesis; they may also have nonlinear optical properties. Remarkably, the nanotubes and potentially other porphyrin nanostructure are mechanically responsive and adaptive (e.g., the rigidity of the micrometers-long nanotubes is altered by light, ultrasound, or chemicals) and they self-heal upon removal the environmental stimulus. Given the tremendous degree of structural variation possible in the porphyrin subunits, additional types of nanostructures and greater control over their morphology can be anticipated. Molecular modification also provides a means of controlling their electronic, photonic, and other functional properties. In this work, we have greatly broadened the range of ionic porphyrin nanostructures that can be made, and determined the optical and responsivity properties of the nanotubes and other porphyrin nanostructures. We have

  16. Catalytic property of fiber media supported palladium containing alloy nanoparticles and electrospun ceramic fibers biodurability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeon Ung

    The nanoscale of the supporting fibers may provide enhancements such as restricting the migration of metal catalyst particles. In this work, palladium nanoparticle doped alumina fibers were electrospun into template submicron fibers. These fibers were calcined at temperatures between 650°C and 1150°C to vary the crystal structures of the calcined fibers with the Pd particle size. Higher calcination temperatures led to higher reaction temperatures from 250 to about 450°C for total conversion, indicating the effective reactivity of the fiber-supported catalysts decreased with increase in calcination temperature. Pd-Au alloy nanoparticle doped titania fibers were also fabricated using an electrospinning method and assembled into a fibrous porous medium structure by a vacuum molding process. In reactor tests, the fiber media with Pd-Au alloy nanoparticle catalyst had greater reactivity in conversion of NO and CO gases than that of fiber media with Pd monometallic catalyst alone, attributed to a lower activation energy of the Pd-Au catalyst particles. In carbon monoxide oxidation reaction tests, the results showed that the performance was optimal for a catalyst of composition Pd2Au1 molar ratio that was active at 125°C, which had higher dispersion of active components and better catalytic performance compared to monometallic particle Au/TiO 2 and Pd/TiO2 fiber media. Moreover, the improved reaction activity of Pd2Au1/TiO2 fiber medium was attributed to a decreased in the activation energy. Further experiments were conducted using the electrospun ceramic fibers biodurability study. The properties of nano-sized fiber structures have attracted the attention of recent research on ceramic nanostructures as nonwoven media for applications in hazardous chemical and high temperature environments. However, health and safety concerns of micro and nano scale ceramic materials have not been fully investigated. Little is known about the physicochemical effects of the properties

  17. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  18. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  19. Photocatalysis application of zinc oxide fibers obtained by electrospinning; Fribras de oxido de zinco obtidas por electrospinning aplicadas a fotocatalise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchman, D.; Alves, A.K.; Berutti, F.A.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    Using the electrospinning technique, composite fibers of polyvinylbutyral and zinc nitrate were obtained. After a heat treatment at 600 deg C, nanostructured zinc oxide fibers were obtained. The fibers were characterized using X ray diffraction. The photocatalytic activity of the nanostructured fibers was determined using the photodegradation of a methyl orange solution. The increase in the heat treatment temperature decreases the photoactivity of the zinc oxide. The heat treatment, the phases and the surface area, affect the physical, chemical and photocatalytic activity of the zinc oxide. (author)

  20. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    FIBER LASERS I. Nd:YAG FIBER LASER FABRICATION .............. 5 A. FIBER GROWTH .......................... 5 B. FIBER PROCESSING 7...1.32 pm FIBER LASERS I. Nd:YAG FIBER LASER FABRICATION A. FIBER GROWTH The single crystal fibers used in this work were grown at Stanford University

  1. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  2. Plasma Spray Forming of Nanostructured Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nanostructure composite coating is obtained via plasma spraying of Al2O3-13 wt pct TiO2 powder. Brittle and hard lamella results from melted nanostructured powder. Ductile nanostructured matrix forms from unmelted nanostructured particles. Through the adjustment of constituent and nanostructure, hardness/strength and toughness/ductility are balanced and overall properties of the structure composite are achieved.

  3. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  4. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  5. Vacuum fiber-fiber coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrici, Axel; Bjelajac, Goran; Jonkers, Jeroen; Jakobs, Stefan; Olschok, Simon; Reisgen, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Research and development carried out by the ISF Welding and Joining Institute of RWTH Aachen University has proven that combining high power laser and low vacuum atmosphere provides a welding performance and quality, which is comparable to electron beam welding. The developed welding machines are still using a beam forming which takes place outside the vacuum and the focusing laser beam has to be introduced to the vacuum via a suitable window. This inflexible design spoils much of the flexibility of modern laser welding. With the target to bring a compact, lightweight flying optics with flexible laser transport fibers into vacuum chambers, a high power fiber-fiber coupler has been adapted by II-VI HIGHYAG that includes a reliable vacuum interface. The vacuum-fiber-fiber coupler (V-FFC) is tested with up to 16 kW sustained laser power and the design is flexible in terms of a wide variety of laser fiber plug systems and vacuum flanges. All that is needed to implement the V-FFC towards an existing or planned vacuum chamber is an aperture of at least 100 mm (4 inch) diameter with any type of vacuum or pressure flange. The V-FFC has a state-of-the-art safety interface which allows for fast fiber breakage detection for both fibers (as supported by fibers) by electric wire breakage and short circuit detection. Moreover, the System also provides connectors for cooling and electric signals for the laser beam optics inside the vacuum. The V-FFC has all necessary adjustment options for coupling the laser radiation to the receiving fiber.

  6. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  7. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay A Singh; Manoj K Harbola; Praveen Pathak

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  8. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  9. Biogenic nanostructured silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is by far the most abundant element in the earth crust and also is an essential element for higher plants, yet its biology and mechanisms in plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses are poorly understood. Based on the molecular mechanisms of the biosilicification in marine organisms such as diatoms and sponges, the cell wall template-mediated self-assembly of nanostructured silica in marine organisms and higher plants as well as the related organic molecules are discussed. Understanding of the templating and structure-directed effects of silicon-processing organic molecules not only offers the clue for synthesizing silicon-based materials, but also helps to recognize the anomaly of silicon in plant biology.

  10. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-15

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  11. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  12. Magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram S. Khattak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A compilation of magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures with Curie temperature (TC between 260 and 340 K has been tabulated. The tabulated data show that nanostructure plays an important role in enhancing the magnetocaloric properties of a material, namely by reducing the peak of magnetic entropy, but broadening of the magnetocaloric effect curve with an average of 10 K sliding window for Curie temperature. A second table lists all bulk metallic and intermetallic materials, in which there is no nanostructural data, with an entropy change of at least 20 J/kg K and a Curie temperature between 260 and 340 K. We propose that further experiments should be made on the nanostructured form of these materials.

  13. Nanostructured materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    This book applies nanostructures and nanomaterials to energy and organic electronics, offering advanced deposition and processing methods and theoretical and experimental aspects for nanoparticles, nanotubes and thin films for organic electronics applications.

  14. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  15. Dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Z; Thorne, R

    1987-01-01

    Studies done on dietary fiber (DF) over the past five years are presented in this Review. The involvement of dietary fiber in the control of plasma glucose and lipid levels is now established. Two dietary fiber sources (soybean and fenugreek) were studied in our laboratory and are discussed herein. These sources were found to be potentially beneficial in the reduction of plasma glucose in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects. They are shown to be acceptable by human subjects and are easy to use either in a mixture of milk products and in cooking. The mechanism by which dietary fiber alters the nutrient absorption is also discussed. The effect of DF on gastric emptying, transit time, adsorption and glucose transport may contribute to reducing plasma glucose and lipid levels. DF was found to be effective in controlling blood glucose and lipid levels of pregnant diabetic women. Dietary fiber may also be potentially beneficial in the reduction of exogenous insulin requirements in these subjects. However, increased consumption of DF may cause adverse side effects; the binding capabilities of fiber may affect nutrient availability, particularly that of minerals and prolonged and high DF dosage supplementation must be regarded cautiously. This is particularly true when recommending such a diet for pregnant or lactating women, children or subjects with nutritional disorders. Physiological effects of DF appear to depend heavily on the source and composition of fiber. Using a combination of DF from a variety of sources may reduce the actual mass of fiber required to obtain the desired metabolic effects and will result in a more palatable diet. Previously observed problems, such as excess flatus, diarrhea and mineral malabsorption would also be minimized.

  16. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  17. Fiber-shaped energy harvesting and storage devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Huisheng

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book covers flexible fiber-shaped devices in the area of energy conversion and storage. The first part of the book introduces recently developed materials, particularly, various nanomaterials and composite materials based on nanostructured carbon such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, metals and polymers for the construction of fiber electrodes. The second part of the book focuses on two typical twisted and coaxial architectures of fiber-shaped devices for energy conversion and storage. The emphasis is placed on dye-sensitized solar cells, polymer solar cells, lithium-ion b

  18. Nanostructured polymeric scaffolds for orthopaedic regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2012-03-01

    Successful regeneration necessitates the development of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-inducing scaffolds that mimic the hierarchical architecture of native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). Cells in nature recognize and interact with the surface topography they are exposed to via ECM proteins. The interaction of cells with nanotopographical features such as pores, ridges, groves, fibers, nodes, and their combinations has proven to be an important signaling modality in controlling cellular processes. Integrating nanotopographical cues is especially important in engineering complex tissues that have multiple cell types and require precisely defined cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions on the nanoscale. Thus, in a regenerative engineering approach, nanoscale materials/scaffolds play a paramount role in controlling cell fate and the consequent regenerative capacity. Advances in nanotechnology have generated a new toolbox for the fabrication of tissue-specific nanostructured scaffolds. For example, biodegradable polymers such as polyesters, polyphosphazenes, polymer blends and composites can be electrospun into ECM-mimicking matrices composed of nanofibers, which provide high surface area for cell attachment, growth, and differentiation. This review provides the fundamental guidelines for the design and development of nanostructured scaffolds for the regeneration of various tissue types in human upper and lower extremities such as skin, ligament, tendon, and bone. Examples focusing on the collective work of our laboratory in those areas are discussed to demonstrate the regenerative efficacy of this approach. Furthermore, preliminary strategies and significant challenges to integrate these individual tissues into one complex organ through regenerative engineering-based integrated graft systems are also discussed.

  19. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  20. MnO2-modified hierarchical graphene fiber electrochemical supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Meng, Yuning; Hu, Chuangang; Zhao, Yang; Shao, Huibo; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2014-02-01

    A novel hybrid fiber that MnO2 modified graphene sheets on graphene fiber has been fabricated by direct deposition of MnO2 onto graphene network surrounding graphene fiber (MnO2/G/GF). In this hierarchical structure, the graphene fiber with a sheath of 3D graphene network is coated with MnO2 nanoflowers. The 3D graphene on graphene fibers (G/GF) serves as highly conductive backbones with high surface area for deposition of nanostructured MnO2, which provide the high accessibility of electrolytic ions for shorten diffusion paths. An all-solid-state flexible supercapacitor based on a MnO2/G/GF hybrid fiber structure has been developed on the basis of the intrinsic mechanical flexibility of GF and the unique hierarchical structure. By combination of electric double layer capacitance of graphene network with the pseudocapacitance of MnO2 nanostructures, the all-solid-state fiber supercapacitor shows the much enhanced electrochemical capacitive behaviors with robust tolerance to mechanical deformation, promising for being woven into a textile for wearable electronics.

  1. Ultrahard magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, P. K.; Liu, Y.; Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Zhang, R.; Franchin, M.; Fangohr, H.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of hard-magnetic nanostructures is investigated by analyzing the size and geometry dependence of thin-film hysteresis loops. Compared to bulk magnets, weight and volume are much less important, but we find that the energy product remains the main figure of merit down to very small features sizes. However, hysteresis loops are much easier to control on small length scales, as epitomized by Fe-Co-Pt thin films with magnetizations of up to 1.78 T and coercivities of up to 2.52 T. Our numerical and analytical calculations show that the feature size and geometry have a big effect on the hysteresis loop. Layered soft regions, especially if they have a free surface, are more harmful to coercivity and energy product than spherical inclusions. In hard-soft nanocomposites, an additional complication is provided by the physical properties of the hard phases. For a given soft phase, the performance of a hard-soft composite is determined by the parameter (Ms - Mh)/Kh.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  3. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  4. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, P.

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiavaioli Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber gratings (OFGs, especially long-period gratings (LPGs and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors, and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  6. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. ...

  7. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  8. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  9. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  10. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices. © 2009 Springer-Verlag....

  11. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  12. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature.

  13. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  14. Micro- and Nano-fibers by Electrospinning Technology: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    Micro- and nano-structures such as micro- and nano-fibers and micro- and nano-particles based on polymers (synthetic and natural) can be processed by electrospinning. Electrospun micro- and nano-structures are an exciting class of novel materials due to several unique characteristics, including......-structures may serve as a highly versatile platform for a broad range of applications in areas such as medicine, pharmacy, sensors, catalysis, filter, composites, ceramics, packaging, electronics, and photonics. Some latest developments in the processing and applications of micro- and nano-structured polymers...

  15. Fiber resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J. Ince

    2004-01-01

    In economics, primary inputs or factors of production define the term ‘resources.’ Resources include land resources (plants, animals, and minerals), labor, capital, and entrepreneurship. Almost all pulp and paper fiber resources are plant materials obtained from trees or agricultural crops. These resources encompass plant materials harvested directly from the land (...

  16. Fabrication, characterization and applications of PZT and ITO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiyou

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PbZr1--xTixO 3, PZT) is one of the most important piezoelectric materials, which has been used traditionally as sensors and actuators. One dimensional (1-D) PZT is expected to have great potentials as building blocks for micro and nano sensors and actuators, nano active fiber composites and integrated nanosystems. The objective of this research is to investigate the size effect on mechanical and piezoelectric properties through the fabrication and characterization of 1-D PZT nanostructures such as PZT nanofibers and nanotubes. The electrospinning process and template-assisted method were used to synthesize PZT nanofibers and nanotubes, respectively. Various novel experimental methods, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanomanipulator, were used to characterize the mechanical and piezoelectric properties of PZT nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the piezoelectric and mechanical properties of PZT are size dependent. A single PZT nanofiber presented a lower young's modulus (42.99 GPa measured from AFM-base method and 46.6 GPa from vibration-based method, respectively) than that of PZT thin films and bulks. The PZT nanofibers with diameters smaller than 150 nm still demonstrated a strong electromechanical coupling effect. The piezoelectric constant (d 33) of PZT nanofibers increased from 574.1 pm/V to 860.5 pm/V when their diameters decreased from 112 nm to 50 nm. PZT nanotubes were found to have a d33 value of up to 595 pm/V. These values are significantly higher than that of PZT thin films and comparable to that of PZT bulks. The PZT nanofibers and nanotubes developed in this research not only provide new types of sensing and actuation mechanisms for various novel nanodevices, but also provide significantly improved performance compared with their thin film counterpart used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). 1-D ITO nanostructures (nanofibers and nanotubes) were synthesized and characterized for potential use

  17. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  18. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  19. Optical transitions in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupasov, Valery I. [ALTAIR Center LLC, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (United States) and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: rupasov@townisp.com

    2007-03-19

    Employing the Maxwell equations and conventional boundary conditions for the radiation field on the nanostructure interfaces, we compute the radiative spontaneous decay rate of optical transitions in spherical semiconductor nanocrystals, core-shell nanocrystals and nanostructures comprising more than one shell. We also show that the coupling between optical transitions localized in the shell of core-shell nanocrystals and radiation field is determined by both conventional electro-multipole momenta and electro-multipole 'inverse' momenta. The latter are proportional to the core radius even for interband transitions that should result in very strong optical transitions.

  20. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...

  1. Nanostructure characterization of beta-sheet crystals in silk under various temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the nanostructure characterizations of β-sheet in silk fiber with different reaction temperatures. A molecular dynamic model is developed and simulated by Gromacs software packages. The results reveal the change rules of the number of hydrogen bonds in β-sheet under different temperatures. The best reaction temperature for the β-sheet crystals is also found. This work provides theoretical basis for the designing of materials based on silk.

  2. Nanostructured Multifilamentary Carbon-Copper Composites: Fabrication, Microstructural Characterization, and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evarice Yama Nzoma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of research on the emerging techniques to produce bulk nanostructured composites materials by severe plastic deformation and their characterization. Based on the Levi work, we present a new method to synthesize a composite wire-containing carbon-nanosized filaments (graphite and C60 fullerenes embedded in a copper matrix. The originality of this process is using powder media as fiber. Microstructures and electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties are presented.

  3. Yb-doped yttria-alumino-silicate nano-particles based optical fibers: Fabrication and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M. C.; Pal, M.; Kir'yanov, A. V.; Das, S.; Bhadra, S. K.; Barmenkov, Yu. O.; Martinez-Gamez, A. A.; Lucio-Martínez, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    An efficient method to fabricate transparent glass ceramic fibers containing in-situ grown Yb 3+ doped oxide nano-particles based on yttria-alumino-silicate glass is presented. These large-mode area Yb 3+ doped fibers having a core diameter around 25.0 μm were drawn by a proper control over the involved process parameters; by this, the size of nano-particles was maintained within 5-10 nm. The main spectroscopic and laser properties of the fabricated fibers along with the nano-structuration results are reported. These results reveal that the developed method offers new scopes for the contemporary Yb 3+ fiber based devices.

  4. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  5. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  6. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  7. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  8. Some properties of electrochemical nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Santos; P Quaino; German Soldano; W Schmickler

    2009-09-01

    The physical and electronic properties of several platinum nanostructures have been investigated by density functional calculations. Particular attention has been paid to the structure of the -band. Our results predict, that nanowires and small platinum clusters supported on Au(111) should be excellent catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction; a monolayer of platinum on Au(111) should also be better than pure platinum.

  9. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  10. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  11. Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexson, Dimitri [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Chen Hongfeng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Cho, Michael [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Dutta, Mitra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Li Yang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Shi, Peng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Raichura, Amit [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Ramadurai, Dinakar [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Parikh, Shaunak [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Stroscio, Michael A [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Vasudev, Milana [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2005-07-06

    Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications are discussed. Results are presented on the use of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots both as biological tags and as structures that interact with and influence biomolecules. Results are presented on the use of semiconducting carbon nanotubes in biological applications. (topical review)

  12. Thermal response of nanostructured tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajita, Shin; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, Thomas; van Eden, Stein; de Kruif, Thijs; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal response of nanostructured tungsten, which was fabricated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II, was investigated using pulsed plasma in the MAGNUM-PSI device and by using high powered laser pulses. The temperature evolution in response to the pulses was measured with an infrared fa

  13. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  14. Ultrasmall peptides self-assemble into diverse nanostructures: morphological evaluation and potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures.

  15. Ultrasmall Peptides Self-Assemble into Diverse Nanostructures: Morphological Evaluation and Potential Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A.E. Hauser

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures.

  16. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  17. Strategy and method for nanoporous cladding formation on silica optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Tian, Fei; Liu, Kai; Kanka, Jiri; Du, Henry

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate the proof of an innovative concept of fabricating nanostructured aluminum oxide cladding on silica optical fiber. Our fabrication strategy entails freeze-coating aluminum on silica fiber and its subsequent anodization, resulting in the formation of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) cladding with highly organized nanopore channels vertically aligned to the fiber axis. We show that the structure (diameter of pore channels and the porosity) of AAO cladding can be controlled by varying anodization conditions such as the type and concentration of electrolyte solutions and applied voltage. The versatility of AAO as a cladding with tunable structural and optical characteristics and/or a host of other functional nanostructures within the pore channels has the potential to enable a new class of specialty optical fiber for new sensor architecture and applications.

  18. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers.

  19. Fabricating polystyrene fiber-dehydrogenase assemble as a functional biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of the enzymes on nano-structured materials is a promising approach to enhance enzyme stabilization, activation and reusability. This study aimed to develop polystyrene fiber-enzyme assembles to catalyze model formaldehyde to methanol dehydrogenation reaction, which is an essential step for bioconversion of CO2 to a renewable bioenergy. We fabricated and modified electrospun polystyrene fibers, which showed high capability to immobilize dehydrogenase for the fiber-enzyme assembles. Results from evaluation of biochemical activities of the fiber-enzyme assemble showed that nitriation with the nitric/sulfuric acid ratio (v/v, 10:1) and silanization treatment delivered desirable enzyme activity and long-term storage stability, showing great promising toward future large-scale applications.

  20. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  1. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  2. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.;

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo......A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  3. Nanostructured materials for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Sabah K; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Kaner, Richard B

    2010-11-28

    Recent studies indicate that nanostructuring can be an effective method for increasing the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in materials. Most of the enhancement in ZT can be attributed to large reductions in the lattice thermal conductivity due to increased phonon scattering at interfaces. Although significant gains have been reported, much higher ZTs in practical, cost-effective and environmentally benign materials are needed in order for thermoelectrics to become effective for large-scale, wide-spread power and thermal management applications. This review discusses the various synthetic techniques that can be used in the production of bulk scale nanostructured materials. The advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are evaluated along with guidelines and goals presented for an ideal thermoelectric material. With proper optimization, some of these techniques hold promise for producing high efficiency devices.

  4. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    spectrum; the new method only evaluates the color of the reflected light using a standard RGB color camera. Color scatterometry provides the combined advantages of spectroscopic scatterometry, which provides fast evaluations, and imaging scatterometry that provides an overview image from which small...... implementation, a range of complementing characterization methods is needed to perform high-speed quality control of the nanostructures. This thesis concerns the development of a new method for fast in-line characterization of periodic nanostructures. The focus is on optical scatterometry, which uses inverse......, with trapezoidal profiles approximately ~200 nm high and with periods between 600 nm and 5000 nm. The heights and filling factors are determined with an accuracy of ~8 %, while the sidewall slopes have larger uncertainties due to a lower influence on the reflected light. The thesis also evaluates the use...

  5. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  6. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O' Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Karnik, R; Wang, E N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T, E-mail: tlaoui@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: karnik@mit.edu, E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemical Engineering and Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity. (topical review)

  7. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  8. Nanostructured materials for water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T; Karnik, R; Wang, E N

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  9. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... counterparts, due to the promising advantages, such as transparency, flexibility, ease of processing etc. But their efficiencies cannot be compared to the inorganic ones. Boosting the efficiency of OSCs by nanopatterning has thus been puzzling many researchers within the past years. Therefore various methods...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...

  10. Chiroplasmonic DNA-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Willner, Itamar

    2017-09-01

    Chiroplasmonic properties of nanoparticles, organized using DNA-based nanostructures, have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest. Theory suggests that the circular dichroism spectra accompanying chiroplasmonic nanoparticle assemblies are controlled by the sizes, shapes, geometries and interparticle distances of the nanoparticles. In this Review, we present different methods to assemble chiroplasmonic nanoparticle or nanorod systems using DNA scaffolds, and we discuss the operations of dynamically reconfigurable chiroplasmonic nanostructures. The chiroplasmonic properties of the different systems are characterized by circular dichroism and further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging and theoretical modelling. We also outline the applications of chiroplasmonic assemblies, including their use as DNA-sensing platforms and as functional systems for information processing and storage. Finally, future perspectives in applying chiroplasmonic nanoparticles as waveguides for selective information transfer and their use as ensembles for chiroselective synthesis are discussed. Specifically, we highlight the upscaling of the systems to device-like configurations.

  11. Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility.......Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility....

  12. Nanostructured Substrates for Optical Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Bailey, Ryan C.; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Sensors that change color have the advantages of versatility, ease of use, high sensitivity, and low cost. The recent development of optically based chemical sensing platforms has increasingly employed substrates manufactured with advanced processing or fabrication techniques to provide precise control over shape and morphology of the sensor micro- and nano-structure. New sensors have resulted with improved capabilities for a number of sensing applications, including the detection of biomolec...

  13. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; M. S. AlSalhi; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  14. Integration of Natural Polymers and Synthetic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    11/2014 Final Report August 15 2011- August 15 2014 INTEGRATION OF NATURAL POLYMERS AND SYNTHETIC NANOSTRUCTURES FA9550-11-1-0233 Vladimir V. Tsukruk...inorganic nanostructures . We employ fabrication techniques including layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition, vacuum-assisted self-assembly, and spin-assisted...writing. U U U UU 1 Final Performance Report August 2011 - August 2014 FA9550-11-1-0233: INTEGRATION OF NATURAL POLYMERS AND SYNTHETIC NANOSTRUCTURES

  15. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  16. Application of smart nanostructures in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Qi, Xiaoxue; Miao, Yuqing; Wu, Hai-Long; He, Nongyue; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Smart nanostructures are sensitive to various environmental or biological parameters. They offer great potential for numerous biomedical applications such as monitoring, diagnoses, repair and treatment of human biological systems. The present work introduces smart nanostructures for biomedical applications. In addition to drug delivery, which has been extensively reported and reviewed, increasing interest has been observed in using smart nanostructures to develop various novel techniques of sensing, imaging, tissue engineering, biofabrication, nanodevices and nanorobots for the improvement of healthcare.

  17. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-07

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  18. Novel Nanostructures of Rutile Fabricated by Templating against Yarns of Polystyrene Nanofibrils and Their Catalytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a facile approach to the synthesis of rutile nanostructures in the form of porous fibers or bundles of nanotubes by maneuvering the surface wettability of yarns made of polystyrene nanofibrils. Specifically, hierarchically porous fibers were obtained by hydrolyzing titanium tetraisopropoxide to form TiO2 nanoparticles in the void spaces among hydrophobic nanofibrils in each yarn. After calcination in air at 800 °C, the resultant fibers were comprised of many interconnected rutile nanoparticles whose diameters were in the range of 20–80 nm. After converting the nanofibrils and yarns into hydrophilic surfaces through plasma treatment, however, the TiO2 formed conformal coatings on the surfaces of nanofibrils in each yarn during hydrolysis instead of just filling the void spaces among the nanofibrils. As a result, bundles of rutile nanotubes were obtained after the sample had been calcined in air at 800 °C. The thermodynamically stable rutile nanostructures were then explored as supports for Pt nanoparticles whose catalytic activity was evaluated using the reduction of p-nitrophenol by NaBH4. The Pt supported on porous rutile fibers exhibited a better performance than the Pt on rutile nanotubes in terms of both induction time (tind) and apparent rate constant (kapp). PMID:23763369

  19. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  20. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  1. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  2. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  3. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  4. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  5. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  6. Hybrid Nanostructured Textile Bioelectrode for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush

    Coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases and strokes are the leading causes of mortality in United States of America. Timely point-of-care health diagnostics and therapeutics for person suffering from these diseases can save thousands of lives. However, lack of accessible minimally intrusive health monitoring systems makes timely diagnosis difficult and sometimes impossible. To remedy this problem, a textile based nano-bio-sensor was developed and evaluated in this research. The sensor was made of novel array of vertically standing nanostructures that are conductive nano-fibers projecting from a conductive fabric. These sensor electrodes were tested for the quality of electrical contact that they made with the skin based on the fundamental skin impedance model and electromagnetic theory. The hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes provided large surface area and better contact with skin that improved electrode sensitivity and reduced the effect of changing skin properties, which are the problems usually faced by conventional dry textile electrodes. The dry electrodes can only register strong physiological signals because of high background noise levels, thus limiting the use of existing dry electrodes to heart rate measurement and respiration. Therefore, dry electrode systems cannot be used for recording complete ECG waveform, EEG or measurement of bioimpedance. Because of their improved sensitivity these hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes can be applied to measurement of ECG and bioimpedance with very low baseline noise. These textile based electrodes can be seamlessly integrated into garments of daily use such as vests and bra. In combination with embedded wireless network device that can communicate with smart phone, laptop or GPRS, they can function as wearable wireless health diagnostic systems.

  7. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  8. Self-powered energy fiber: energy conversion in the sheath and storage in the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Deng, Jue; Sun, Hao; Ren, Jing; Pan, Shaowu; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-11-05

    A high-performance, self-powered, elastic energy fiber is developed that consists of an energy conversion sheath and an energy storage core. The coaxial structure and the aligned nanostructures at the electrode interface enable a high total energy-conversion and energy-storage performance that is maintained under bending and after stretching.

  9. Fiber-coupled NbN superconducting single-photon detectors for quantum correlation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slysz, W.; Wegrzecki, M.; Bar, J.; Grabiec, P.; Gorska, M.; Reiger, E.; Dorenbos, S.; Zwiller, V.; Milostnaya, I.; Minaeva, O.

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated fiber-coupled superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs), designed for quantum-correlationtype experiments. The SSPDs are nanostructured (~100-nm wide and 4-nm thick) NbN superconducting meandering stripes, operated in the 2 to 4.2 K temperature range, and known for ultrafast

  10. Flow-assisted assembly of nanostructured protein microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Ayaka; Mittal, Nitesh; Söderberg, L Daniel; Ingverud, Tobias; Ohm, Wiebke; Roth, Stephan V; Lundell, Fredrik; Lendel, Christofer

    2017-02-07

    Some of the most remarkable materials in nature are made from proteins. The properties of these materials are closely connected to the hierarchical assembly of the protein building blocks. In this perspective, amyloid-like protein nanofibrils (PNFs) have emerged as a promising foundation for the synthesis of novel bio-based materials for a variety of applications. Whereas recent advances have revealed the molecular structure of PNFs, the mechanisms associated with fibril-fibril interactions and their assembly into macroscale structures remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that whey PNFs can be assembled into microfibers using a flow-focusing approach and without the addition of plasticizers or cross-linkers. Microfocus small-angle X-ray scattering allows us to monitor the fibril orientation in the microchannel and compare the assembly processes of PNFs of distinct morphologies. We find that the strongest fiber is obtained with a sufficient balance between ordered nanostructure and fibril entanglement. The results provide insights in the behavior of protein nanostructures under laminar flow conditions and their assembly mechanism into hierarchical macroscopic structures.

  11. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D;

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  12. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    During this ph.d. work, attention has been focused on understanding and analyzing the modal behavior of micro-structured fibers. Micro-structured fibers are fibers with a complex dielectric toplogy, and offer a number of novel possibilities, compared to standard silica based optical fibers. The t...

  13. Photonic Crystal Fiber Attenuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo; Beom; Eom; Hokyung; Kim; Jinchae; Kim; Un-Chul; Paek; Byeong; Ha; Lee

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber attenuator based on photonic crystal fibers. The difference in the modal field diameters of a conventional single mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber was used. A variable optical attenuator was also achieved by applying macro-bending on the PCF part of the proposed attenuator

  14. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random heig...

  15. Recent achievements in nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlyap, Halyna M; Laptev, Viktor I

    2011-06-01

    This mini-review summarizes some key interesting applications and perspectives of nanostructured devices for future nanoelectronics, among them are photonic circuits, carbon nanostructures for chemisensors, unique Ag-Cu-nanocluster contacts for high-effective solar cells. Recent patents in the field are also discussed.

  16. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  17. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Adam, Jost; Barié, Nicole;

    2014-01-01

    We propose multi-periodic nanostructures yielded by superposition of multiple binary gratings for wide control over photon emission in thin-film devices. We present wavelength- and angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements of multi-periodically nanostructured organic light-emitting layers...

  18. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  19. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  20. Nucleation theory and growth of nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires are promising building blocks of future nanoelectronic, nanophotonic and nanosensing devices. Their physical properties are primarily determined by the epitaxy process which is rather different from the conventional thin film growth. This book shows how the advanced nucleation theory can be used in modeling of growth properties, morphology and crystal phase of such nanostructures.

  1. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...

  2. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  3. Enhanced photochromism in nanostructured molybdenum trioxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydaghyan, Gisia; Doiron, Serge; Haché, Alain; Ashrit, P. V.

    2009-08-01

    We present evidence of enhancement of photochromism in nanostructured thin films of molybdenum oxide fabricated by glancing angle deposition. The strong correlation of coloration response with the internal surface area of the films provides evidence of the importance of nanostructuring on the photochromic effect and the vital role played by the availability of water in the photochromic mechanism.

  4. Energy transfer in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughn, Chelsea

    Energy transport and loss are critical to the performance of optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and terahertz imaging devices. Nanostructured materials provide many opportunities to tailor transport and loss parameters for specific device applications. However, it has been very difficult to correlate specific nanoscale structural parameters with changes in these performance metrics. I report the development of new ways of using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to probe charge and energy transport and loss dynamics. These techniques are applied to several types of nanostructured materials, including bulk semiconductors with defects, self-assembled quantum dots and colloidal quantum dots. First, GaAs/InP double heterostructures grown via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were characterized with TRPL. TRPL is typically used to extract minority carrier lifetimes, but we discovered that the measured lifetime depended critically on the intensity of the exciting laser. We developed a Shockley-Read-Hall model to extract trap state densities from intensity-dependent TRPL measurements. Second, we characterized energy and charge transfer between InAs quantum dots and ErAs nanoinclusions within III-V heterostructures. Using intensity- and temperature-dependent TRPL, we confirmed tunneling as the dominant mechanism of charge transport and characterized the electronic structure of the ErAs nanoparticles. Finally, we characterized energy transport in colloidal quantum dot cascade structures. These cascade structures utilize Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and trap state recycling to funnel excitons from donor layers to acceptor layers and suggest a promising method for avoiding losses associated with surface trap states. Collectively, the analysis of these disparate material types advances our understanding of energy dynamics in nanostructured materials and improves our ability to design the next generation of photovoltaic and optoelectronic

  5. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  6. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of silver film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China); He, Min; Bian, Huadong; Yan, Xiaona [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Lu, Bo [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, we report an evolution of surface morphology of silver film irradiated by a 1 kHz femtosecond laser. By SEM observations, it is noted that different nanostructures with respective surface features depend highly on the number of pulses and the laser fluence. Especially when the laser fluence is below the threshold fluence of film breakdown, a textured nanostructure including many nanobumps and nanocavities will appear on the surface of silver film. In order to determine an optimal regime for nanostructuring silver film and to further study the underlying mechanism, we perform a quantitative analysis of laser fluence and pulse number. The results show that this nanostructure formation should be due to a sequential process of laser melting, vapor bubbles bursting, heat stress confinement, and subsequent material redistribution. As a potential application, we find this nanostructured silver film can be used as the active substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. (orig.)

  7. Thermo-plasmonics of Irradiated Metallic Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan

    the size, morphology and composition of metallic nanostructures, the absorption of light can be maximized, resulting in a substantial temperature elevation in a nanoscopic volume. Applications of these nanoscopic sources of heat can be found in various contexts including localized cancer therapy, drug...... of particle temperatures by simple detection of the phase boundary located far away from the particle. Two types of nanostructures were investigated using this assay: colloidal gold nanoparticles (rods and spheres) and e-beam printed metallic composite nanostructures. Chapter 5 presents the quantifications......-beam composite nanostructures, these including discs, triangles, stars and a dimer. The highest surface temperature elevation occurs on the nanostructure with the highest absorption efficiency at the laser irradiation wavelength, regardless of the size or the morphology. We also demonstrate that substantial heat...

  8. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urmimala Maitra; M Pandeeswar; T Govindaraju

    2012-05-01

    Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures of different dimensionalities such as nanodiamond, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene can yield useful homo- and hetero-binary conjugates. Binary conjugation of the nanocarbons has been achieved by introducing symmetrical amide-linkages between acid (-COOH) functionalized nanocarbons and a diamine-linker. The binary conjugates have been characterized by using transmission electron microscopy as well as infrared, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Dispersions of covalently crosslinked binary conjugates of nanocarbons could be obtained in dimethyl formamide (DMF). Composites of the binary conjugates with polymer can be readily prepared by using the DMF suspensions.

  9. Wetting properties of nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Canut, S. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures (UMR CNRS 5586), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: ramos@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-04-15

    Swift heavy ion irradiation is a powerful tool to tailor surfaces under controlled conditions at a nanometric scale. The growing importance of nanostructured surfaces for a wide variety of applications and fundamental investigations is now well established. In this paper I will mainly discuss the interest of such surfaces for investigations concerning solid-liquid interfaces. The role played by topographical defects on wetting properties of solid surfaces, and both the dissipative and the confinement effects on the interface will be demonstrated by simple examples.

  10. Modeling of biological nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, P. D.; Tuduce, Rodica; Arsene, O.; Dinca, Alina; Fulga, F.; Nicolau, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents a methodology using atom or amino acid hydrophobicities to describe the surface properties of proteins in order to predict their interactions with other proteins and with artificial nanostructured surfaces. A standardized pattern is built around each surface atom of the protein for a radius depending on the molecule type and size. The atom neighborhood is characterized in terms of the hydrophobicity surface density. A clustering algorithm is used to classify the resulting patterns and to identify the possible interactions. The methodology has been implemented in a software package based on Java technology deployed in a Linux environment.

  11. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    . Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...... be achieved, which allows us to resolve the second order reflection of graphene and to visualize the atomic structure in HRTEM. With this tool we tackle the challenge of imaging the introduced “defects” and their atomic structure....

  12. Group III-nitrides nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Caro, M.; Ramírez-López, M.; Rojas-Ramírez, J. S.; Martínez-Velis, I.; Casallas-Moreno, Y.; Gallardo-Hernández, S.; Babu, B. J.; Velumani, S.; López-López, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of self-assembled InGaN columnar nanostructures grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) on Si(111) substrates. At a zero concentration of Ga, InN nanocolumns (NCs) were successfully grown. In the case of InGaN, the surface morphology is dependent on composition; however, in general, InGaN samples exhibit columnar features. At concentrations near 50%, the samples show phase separation; this result is explained in terms of solid phase immiscibility.

  13. High power fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Qi-hong; ZHOU Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this review article, the development of the double cladding optical fiber for high power fiber lasers is reviewed. The main technology for high power fiber lasers, including laser diode beam shaping, fiber laser pumping techniques, and amplification systems, are discussed in de-tail. 1050 W CW output and 133 W pulsed output are ob-tained in Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China. Finally, the applications of fiber lasers in industry are also reviewed.

  14. Simultaneous tuning of electric field intensity and structural properties of ZnO: Graphene nanostructures for FOSPR based nicotine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2017-05-15

    We report theoretical and experimental realization of a SPR based fiber optic nicotine sensor having coatings of silver and graphene doped ZnO nanostructure onto the unclad core of the optical fiber. The volume fraction (f) of graphene in ZnO was optimized using simulation of electric field intensity. Four types of graphene doped ZnO nanostructures viz. nanocomposites, nanoflowers, nanotubes and nanofibers were prepared using optimized value of f. The morphology, photoluminescence (PL) spectra and UV-vis spectra of these nanostructures were studied. The peak PL intensity was found to be highest for ZnO: graphene nanofibers. The optimized value of f in ZnO: graphene nanofiber was reconfirmed using UV-vis spectroscopy. The experiments were performed on the fiber optic probe fabricated with Ag/ZnO: graphene layer and optimized parameters for in-situ detection of nicotine. The interaction of nicotine with ZnO: graphene nanostructures alters the dielectric function of ZnO: graphene nanostructure which is manifested in terms of shift in resonance wavelength. From the sensing signal, the performance parameters were measured including sensitivity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), stability, repeatability and selectivity. The real sample prepared using cigarette tobacco leaves and analyzed using the fabricated sensor makes it suitable for practical applications. The achieved values of LOD and LOQ are found to be unrivalled in comparison to the reported ones. The sensor possesses additional advantages such as, immunity to electromagnetic interference, low cost, capability of online monitoring, remote sensing.

  15. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  16. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic nanostructured thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Zhi-Qiang; Yutaka Abe; Jiang Dong-Hua; Lin Hai; Yoshitake Yamazakia; Wu Chen-Xu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using Monte Carlo simulation, we have compared the magnetic properties between nanostructured thin films and two-dimensional crystalline solids. The dependence of nanostructured properties on the interaction between particles that constitute the nanostructured thin films is also studied. The result shows that the parameters in the interaction potential have an important effect on the properties of nanostructured thin films at the transition temperatures.

  18. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  19. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  20. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  2. EDITORIAL: Nanostructures + Light = 'New Optics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2005-02-01

    Suddenly, at the end of the last century, classical optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations of researchers thought were comprehensively covered by the famous Born and Wolf textbook and were essentially dead as research subjects were generating new excitement. In accordance with Richard Feynman’s famous quotation on nano-science, the optical community suddenly discovered that 'there is plenty of room at the bottom'—mixing light with small, meso- and nano-structures could generate new physics and new mind-blowing applications. This renaissance began when the concept of band structure was imported from electronics into the domain of optics and led to the development of what is now a massive research field dedicated to two- and three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures. The field was soon awash with bright new ideas and discoveries that consolidated the birth of the 'new optics'. A revision of some of the basic equations of electrodynamics led to the suspicion that we had overlooked the possibility that the triad of wave vector, electric field and magnetic field, characterizing propagating waves, do not necessarily form a right-handed set. This brought up the astonishing possibilities of sub-wavelength microscopy and telescopy where resolution is not limited by diffraction. The notion of meta-materials, i.e. artificial materials with properties not available in nature, originated in the microwave community but has been widely adopted in the domain of optical research, thanks to rapidly improving nanofabrication capabilities and the development of sub-wavelength scanning imaging techniques. Photonic meta-materials are expected to open a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. The structural units of meta-materials can be tailored in shape and size; their composition and morphology can be artificially tuned, and inclusions can be

  3. An Investigation on the Mechanical Behavior of Roll-Bonded Multilayered Cu-Nb Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-12

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6...elevated temperature, which can be potentially interesting for Army applications. Tensile strength and fracture morphologies are discussed. The views...fracture morphologies are discussed. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that

  4. Tensile behavior and flow stress anisotropy of accumulative roll bonded Cu-Nb nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizolek, Thomas, E-mail: tnizolek@engr.ucsb.edu; Avallone, Jaclyn T.; Pollock, Tresa M. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Beyerlein, Irene J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Mara, Nathan A. [Institute for Materials Science and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The flow stress, ductility, and in-plane anisotropy are evaluated for bulk accumulative roll bonded copper-niobium nanolaminates with layer thicknesses ranging from 1.8 μm to 15 nm. Uniaxial tensile tests conducted parallel to the rolling direction and transverse direction demonstrate that ductility generally decreases with decreasing layer thickness; however, at 30 nm, both high strengths (1200 MPa) and significant ductility (8%) are achieved. The yield strength increases monotonically with decreasing layer thickness, consistent with the Hall-Petch relationship, and significant in-plane flow stress anisotropy is observed. Taylor polycrystal modeling is used to demonstrate that crystallographic texture is responsible for the in-plane anisotropy and that the effects of texture dominate even at nanoscale layer thicknesses.

  5. Pressure stress-impedance effect in FeCuNbSiB amorphours ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The stress-impedance effect in Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (at%) ribbons is measured to investigate the influences of vacuum annealing and pressure stress. The results can be explained by the influence of induced anisotropy in the magnetization processes at the chosen drive current frequency of 90 MHz. The maximum SI% value of the ribbon annealed at 300 ℃ is 2.52%.

  6. Magnetic ageing study of high and medium permeability nanocrystalline FeSiCuNbB alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekdim, Atef; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-04-01

    increasing the energy efficiency is one of the most important issues in modern power electronic systems. In aircraft applications, the energy efficiency must be associated with a maximum reduction of mass and volume, so a high components compactness. A consequence from this compactness is the increase of operating temperature. Thus, the magnetic materials used in these applications, have to work at high temperature. It raises the question of the thermal ageing problem. The reliability of these components operating at this condition becomes a real problem which deserves serious interest. Our work takes part in this context by studying the magnetic material thermal ageing. The nanocrystalline materials are getting more and more used in power electronic applications. Main advantages of nanocrystalline materials compared to ferrite are: high saturation flux density of almost 1.25 T and low dynamic losses for low and medium frequencies. The nanocrystalline Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si15.5B7 alloys have been chosen in our aging study. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics for several continuous thermal ageing (100, 150, 200 and 240 °C). An important experimental work of magnetic characterization is being done following a specific monitoring protocol. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena.

  7. Nanostructured Polylactic Acid/Candeia Essential Oil Mats Obtained by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia L. S. de Oliveira Mori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate the effect of inclusion of different contents of candeia (Eremanthus erythropappus essential oil (whose alpha-bisabolol is the main terpene on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA nanostructured mats and their relationship with fiber morphology and structure. The interaction occurring between the PLA and the candeia essential oil was confirmed by thermal and microscopy analysis. Addition of candeia essential oil increased nanofiber diameter and decreased the glass transition and melting temperatures of the nanofibers, suggesting lower energy input for processing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images provided evidence of a homogeneous structure for the nanostructured mats. X-ray diffraction did not show differences in the crystallization of the nanofibers. This ongoing research confirms the possibility of incorporation of candeia essential oil in the production of nanofibers that will be studied for multipurpose applications.

  8. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  9. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  10. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  11. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  12. Apodized grating coupler using fully-etched nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua; Li, Chong; Li, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Xia

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional apodized grating coupler for interfacing between single-mode fiber and photonic circuit is demonstrated in order to bridge the mode gap between the grating coupler and optical fiber. The grating grooves of the grating couplers are realized by columns of fully etched nanostructures, which are utilized to digitally tailor the effective refractive index of each groove in order to obtain the Gaussian-like output diffractive mode and then enhance the coupling efficiency. Compared with that of the uniform grating coupler, the coupling efficiency of the apodized grating coupler is increased by 4.3% and 5.7%, respectively, for the nanoholes and nanorectangles as refractive index tunes layer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61222501, 61335004, and 61505003), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20111103110019), the Postdoctoral Science Foundation of Beijing Funded Project, China (Grant No. Q6002012201502), and the Science and Technology Research Project of Jiangxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. GJJ150998).

  13. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  14. Gas sensing properties under UV radiation of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures processed by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trocino, S., E-mail: trcsfn83@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Frontera, P., E-mail: patrizia.frontera@unirc.it [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Donato, A., E-mail: andrea.donato@unirc.it [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Busacca, C., E-mail: irconc@hotmail.it [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Scarpino, L.A., E-mail: luciano.scarpino@unirc.it [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Antonucci, P., E-mail: pierluigi.antonucci@unirc.it [Department of Civil Engineering, Energy, Environment and Materials, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Neri, G., E-mail: gneri@unime.it [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada di Dio (S. Agata), 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Manufacturing In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PVP fibers, by sol–gel method coupled with the electrospinning technique, have been obtained In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures. The morphological and microstructural properties of as spun and annealed samples have been examined using Thermo Gravimetric Analysis-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TGA-DSC), X-Ray Diffraction analysis (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Characterization results provided clear indications of the formation of different In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures after annealing by changing the solvent system utilized for the electrospinning process. The sensing characteristics of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures synthesized have been evaluated for the monitoring of nitrogen dioxide at room temperature in the dark, under continuous ultra-violet (UV) illumination and under pulsed UV illumination (provided only during the recovery time). The effect of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructure morphology and UV radiation has been investigated and discussed. The better sensing performances (high response and very short recovery time) were registered when the sensors were irradiated with pulsed UV light. - Highlights: • Preparation and synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures by electrospinning. • Physical and chemical characterization of prepared samples. • Investigation of the sensing properties to monitor NO{sub 2} at RT under pulsed UV light.

  15. Engineering optical properties using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth

    Plasmonic nanostructures can be engineered to take on unusual optical properties not found in natural materials. The optical responses of plasmonic materials are functions of the structural parameters and symmetry of the nanostructures, material parameters of the nanostructure and its surroundings and the incidence angle, frequency and polarization state of light. The scattering and hence the visibility of an object could be reduced by coating it with a plasmonic material. In this thesis, presented is an optical frequency scattering cancelation device composed of a silicon nanorod coated by a plasmonic gold nanostructure. The principle of operation was theoretically analyzed using Mie theory and the device design was verified by extensive numerical simulations. The device was fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam milling. The optical responses of the scattering cancelation device and a control sample of bare silicon rod were directly visualized using near-field microscopy coupled with heterodyne interferometric detection. The experimental results were analyzed and found to match very well with theoretical prediction from numerical simulations thereby validating the design principles and our implementation. Plasmonic nanostructures could be engineered to exhibit unique optical properties such as Fano resonance characterized by narrow asymmetrical lineshape. We present dynamic tuning and symmetry lowering of Fano resonances in plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on flexible substrates. The tuning of Fano resonance was achieved by application of uniaxial mechanical stress. The design of the nanostructures was facilitated by extensive numerical simulations and the symmetry lowering was analyzed using group theoretical methods. The nanostructures were fabricated using electron beam lithography and optically characterized for various mechanical stress. The experimental results were in good

  16. Nanostructured organic and hybrid solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weickert, Jonas; Dunbar, Ricky B.; Hesse, Holger C.; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas [Department of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2011-04-26

    This progress report highlights recent developments in nanostructured organic and hybrid solar cells. The authors discuss novel approaches to control the film morphology in fully organic solar cells and the design of nanostructured hybrid solar cells. The motivation and recent results concerning fabrication and effects on device physics are emphasized. The aim of this review is not to give a summary of all recent results in organic and hybrid solar cells, but rather to focus on the fabrication, device physics, and light trapping properties of nanostructured organic and hybrid devices. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  18. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    with cells is therefore increasingly more relevant from both an engineering and a toxicological viewpoint. My work involves developing and exploring electron microscopy (EM) for imaging nanostructures in cells, for the purpose of understanding nanostructure-cell interactions in terms of their possibilities...... in science and concerns in toxicology. In the present work, EM methods for imaging nanostructure-cell interactions have been explored, and the complex interactions documented and ordered. In particular the usability of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) was explored. Using EM...

  19. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-06

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients.

  20. Nanostructured thin films and coatings functional properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The second volume in ""The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings"" set, this book focuses on functional properties, including optical, electronic, and electrical properties, as well as related devices and applications. It explores the large-scale fabrication of functional thin films with nanoarchitecture via chemical routes, the fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films, and low-dimensional nanocomposite fabrication and applications. The book also presents the properties of sol-gel-derived nanostructured thin films as well as silicon nanocrystals e

  1. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  2. PULP FIBER SIZE CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijie Liu

    2004-01-01

    Pulp fiber length distribution characterization has been examined in this study. Because of the fiber morphology: slender in shape, fiber size distribution characterization is a very difficult task. Traditional technique involves separation of the particles by size,such as Bauer-McNett fiber classifier, and measuring the weight fractions. The particle fractions obtained may or may not reflect the desired size classification.On the other hand, the more recent technique through optical measurement of fiber length is limited by its inability to measure the mass of the particle fractions.Therefore, not only the two techniques fail to generate identical results, either one was accepted to be of better value. Pure hardwood kraft, softwood kraft, and their mixture samples have been measured for their fiber length distributions using an optical fiber quality analyzer: FQA. The data obtained from FQA are extensively studied to investigate more reliable way of representing the fiber length data and thus examining the viable route for measuring the fiber size distributions. It has been found that the fiber length averaged length 11 is a viable indicator of the average pulp fiber length. The fiber size fraction and/or distribution can be represented by the fiber "length" fractions.

  3. Fabrication and properties of poly(vinylidenefluoride)/PbS/Au heterogeneous nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Pill; Gopalan, Anantha Iyengar; Park, Jong Wook; Ragupathy, Dhanusuraman; Manesh, Kalayil Manian

    2009-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVdF) PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au heterogeneous nanostructures by the processes, electrospinning and chemical treatment. Initially electrospinning a solution consisting of PVdF and lead acetate was used to form PVdF nanofibers loaded with Pb ions. Exposure of Pb ions loaded PVdF fibers to H2S resulted in PVdF/PbS nanostructures. The deposition of gold nanoparticles onto PVdF/PbS nanostructures results in PVdF/PbS/Au heterogeneous structure. The existence of PbS particles with an average diameter of 11 nm is evident from field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) image of PVdF/PbS. The results from X-ray diffraction of PVdF/PbS also predict the size of PbS particles as in accordance with FETEM. A blue shift in the optical transition of PbS is noticed in the UV-visible spectrum of PVdF/PbS as a result of quantum confinement effect. The band gap of PbS is influenced by the presence of Au nanoparticles over the PbS particles. An equal atomic weight % of Au and PbS is found in the PVdF/PbS/Au nanostructure as inferred from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au are compared. Emission peaks are noticed at 400 nm and 480 nm for PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au nanostructures respectively for an excitation wavelength of 254 nm. The presence of Au nanoclusters in PVdF/PbS/Au diminishes the intensity of photo emission of PbS.

  4. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays.

  5. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  6. Engineered nanoporous and nanostructured films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel L. Plawsky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous and nanostructured films have become increasingly important to the microelectronics and photonics industries. They provide a route to low dielectric constant materials that will enable future generations of powerful microprocessors. They are the only route to achieving materials with refractive indices less than 1.2, a key feature for the future development of photonic crystal devices, enhanced omni-directional reflectors, enhanced anti-reflection coatings and black-body absorbers. In addition, these films exhibit tremendous potential for separations, catalytic, biomedical and heat transfer applications. This article will review two primary techniques for manufacturing these films, evaporation induced self-assembly and oblique or glancing angle deposition, and will discuss some of the film properties critical to their use in the microelectronics and photonics industries.

  7. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  8. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  9. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Savini, L.; Bonetti, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Bosco, E.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica I.F.M. and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Torino (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  10. Estimates of the Elastic Characteristics of a Composite with Short Anisotropic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubin, V. S.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.; Savelyeva, I. Y.

    2017-09-01

    A composite with chaotically oriented fibers with different elongations and different anisotropy of elastic characteristics is considered. A mathematical model of interaction of such fibers and matrix particles with an isotropic elastic medium whose elastic moduli have to be found as required characteristics of the composite is constructed. The relations derived by the self-consistency method determine the moduli of the composite as functions of the volume concentration, elongations, and elastic properties of each type of fibers, and also of the elastic characteristics of the isotropic matrix. A quantitative analysis of the mathematical model is carried out, and boundaries of the domains of determining parameters within which the effect of fiber elongation is considerable are found. The relations presented allow one to estimate the elastic characteristics of a composite reinforced with various types of short fibers (in particular, high-strength and high-modulus needle-shaped and thread-like crystals, and nanostructural elements).

  11. Preparation and mechanism of calcium phosphate coatings on chemical modified carbon fibers by biomineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Su-ping; ZHOU Ke-chao; LI Zhi-you

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare HA coatings on the carbon fibers, chemical modification and biomineralization processes were applied. The phase components, morphologies, and possible growth mechanism of calcium phosphate were studied by infrared spectroscopy(IR), X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The results show that calcium phosphate coating on carbon fibers can be obtained by biomineralization. But the phase components and morphologies of calcium phosphate coatings are different due to different modification methods. Plate-like CaHPO4-2H2O (DCPD) crystals grow from one site of the active centre by HNO3 treatment. While on the para-aminobenzoic acid treated fibers, the coating is composed of nano-structural HA crystal homogeneously. This is because the -COOH functional groups of para-aminobenzoic acid graft on fibers, with negative charge and arranged structure, accelerating the HA crystal nucleation and crystallization on the carbon fibers.

  12. Porous core-shell carbon fibers derived from lignin and cellulose nanofibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports a method to produce lignin and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) based porous core-shell carbon fibers via co-electrospinning followed by controlled carbonization. Lignin formed the shell of the fiber while CNF network formed the porous core. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was added to the lignin solution to increase its electrospinability. CNFs were surface acetylated and dispersed in silicon oil to obtain a homogenous dispersion for electrospinning the porous core. Hollow lignin fibers were also electrospun using glycerin as the core material. FT-IR measurements confirmed the CNF acetylation. SEM micrographs showed the core-shell and hollow fiber nanostructures before and after carbonization. The novel carbon fibers synthesized in this study exhibited increased surface area and porosity that are promising for many advanced applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead...... of doping, use a microstructure of air and glass to obtain a refractive index difference between the core and the cladding. This air/glass microstructure lends the photonic crystal fibers a range of unique and highly usable properties, which are very different from those found in solid standard fibers....... The freedom to design the dispersion profile of the fibers is much larger and it is possible to create fibers, which support only a single spatial mode, regardless of wavelength. In comparison, the standard dispersion-shifted fibers are limited by a much lower index-contrast between the core and the cladding...

  14. Glass Fibers: Quo Vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Mäder

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1930s, the process of melting glass and subsequently forming fibers, in particular discontinuous fiber glass or continuous glass filaments, evolved into commercial-scale manufacturing.[...

  15. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  16. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  17. Hemocompatibility of polymeric nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S; Popat, Ketul C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin (ALB) adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen (FIB) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG) adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces.

  18. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  19. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  20. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented.

  1. Second harmonic spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Yu, Ping; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures and their application to optoelectronic devices have attracted much attention recently. Lower-dimensional structures, and in particular quantum dots, are highly anisotropic resulting in broken symmetry as compared to their bulk counterparts. This is not only reflected...

  2. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  3. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  4. Plant-derived nanostructures: types and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant-derived nanostructures and nanoparticles (NPs) have functional applications in numerous disciplines such as health care, food and feed, cosmetics, biomedical science, energy science, drug-gene delivery, environmental health, and so on. Consequently, it is imperative for res...

  5. Metallic nanostructures for efficient LED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Verschuuren, M. A.; Rivas, Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are driving a shift toward energy-efficient illumination. Nonetheless, modifying the emission intensities, colors and directionalities of LEDs in specific ways remains a challenge often tackled by incorporating secondary optical components. Metallic nanostructures suppor

  6. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsoo S.; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S.; Weiner, Joseph A.; Cook, Ralph W.; Freshman, Ryan D.; Schallmo, Michael S.; Katchko, Karina M.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Smith, Justin T.; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; McClendon, Mark T.; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.; Stupp , Samuel I. (NWU)

    2017-06-19

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  7. Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC is a multi-institutional research center, one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers established by the...

  8. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  9. Comparative Incorporation of PNA into DNA Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie O. Pedersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA has shown great promise as a building material for self-assembling nanoscale structures. To further develop the potential of this technology, more methods are needed for functionalizing DNA-based nanostructures to increase their chemical diversity. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA holds great promise for realizing this goal, as it conveniently allows for inclusion of both amino acids and peptides in nucleic acid-based structures. In this work, we explored incorporation of a positively charged PNA within DNA nanostructures. We investigated the efficiency of annealing a lysine-containing PNA probe with complementary, single-stranded DNA sequences within nanostructures, as well as the efficiency of duplex invasion and its dependence on salt concentration. Our results show that PNA allows for toehold-free strand displacement and that incorporation yield depends critically on binding site geometry. These results provide guidance for the design of PNA binding sites on nucleic acid nanostructures with an eye towards optimizing fabrication yield.

  10. Plasmonic Nanostructures: Tailoring Light-matter Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    The flow of light can be molded by plasmonic structures within the nanoscale. In this talk, plasmonic nanostructures for suppressing light transmission, improving light absorption and enhancing photoemissions are to be presented....

  11. Acoustic Phonon Thermal Transport through a Nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-Xia; LIU Tian-Yu; LIU Chang-Long

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the scattering matrix method, we investigate the thermal transport in a nanostructure at low temperatures.It is found that phonon transport exhibits some novel and interesting features: resonant transmission, resonant reflection, and small thermal conductance.

  12. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  13. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  14. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  15. Porphyrin-Based Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent significant advances on the design and photocatalytic applications of porphyrin-based nanostructures. The rational strategies, such as texture or crystal modification and interfacial heterostructuring, are described. The applications of the porphyrin-based nanostructures in photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution are presented. Finally, the ongoing challenges and opportunities for the future development of porphyrin nanostructures in high-quality nanodevices are also proposed.

  16. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  17. Overview of the Characteristics of Micro- and Nano-Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungho Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of bio-chemical sensing devices has been greatly improved by the development of surface plasmon resonance (SPR based sensors. Advancements in micro- and nano-fabrication technologies have led to a variety of structures in SPR sensing systems being proposed. In this review, SPR sensors (from typical Kretschmann prism configurations to fiber sensor schemes with micro- or nano-structures for local light field enhancement, extraordinary optical transmission, interference of surface plasmon waves, plasmonic cavities, etc. are discussed. We summarize and compare their performances and present guidelines for the design of SPR sensors.

  18. Oil sorption by lignocellulosic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beom-Goo. Lee; James S. Han; Roger M. Rowell

    1999-01-01

    The oil sorption capacities of cotton fiber, kenaf bast fiber, kenaf core fiber, and moss fiber were compared after refining, extraction, and reduction in particle sizes. The tests were conducted on diesel oil in a pure form. Cotton fiber showed the highest capacity, followed by kenaf core and bast fibers. Wetting, extraction, and reduction in particle size all...

  19. Whole Grains and Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whole grains. Does not contain partially hydrogenated oils. Dietary Fiber Dietary fiber is the term for several materials that make ... water. When eaten regularly as part of a diet low in saturated fat and trans fat soluble fiber has been associated with increased diet quality and ...

  20. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  1. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  2. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  3. Fiber Nonlinearities: A Tutorial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Govind P. Agrawal

    2003-01-01

    Fiber nonlinearities have long been regarded as being mostly harmful for fiber-optic communication systems. Over the last few years, however, the nonlinear effects are increasingly being used for practical telecommunications applications,the Raman amplification being only one of the recent examples. In this tutorial I review the vario us nonlinear effects occurring in optical fibers from both standpoints..

  4. Fiber Nonlinearities: A Tutorial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Govind; P.; Agrawal

    2003-01-01

    Fiber nonlinearities have long been regarded as being mostly harmful for fiber-optic communication systems. Over the last few years, however, the nonlinear effects are increasingly being used for practical telecommunications applications, the Raman amplification being only one of the recent examples. In this tutorial I review the various nonlinear effects occurring in optical fibers from both standpoints..

  5. Metal oxide nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Ghulam Nabi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers on nanoparticles and nanostructures has received a great deal of attention not only in the area of synthesis and characterization but also in their potential application in various high-technological applications. Nanomaterials are widely used not only for environmental and biological applications but also for electronic and sensing applications. Among various classes of nanomaterials, the metal oxide nanostructures possess particular important because of their significa...

  6. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin Z [Santa Cruz, CA; Schwartzberg, Adam [Santa Cruz, CA; Olson, Tammy Y [Santa Cruz, CA

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  7. Syntheses and Assemblies of Noble Metal Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Shape and size control as well as the control of the assembly of nanostructures are current challenges in nano sciences. Focussing on metal nanostructures all of these aspects have been addressed in the frame of the present work. It was possible to develop a new aqueous seeded growth method that produces gold nanoparticles with adjustable diameters over a large range of sizes. The spherical particles obtained show very low polydispersities and a good long term stability. Furthermore it was po...

  8. ZnO nanostructures and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xiaowei, Sun

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the various functional properties and potential applications of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures, from basic principles to our most recent discoveries. It comprises experimental analysis of various properties of ZnO nanostructures, preparation techniques, research methods, and some promising applications. The areas of focus include ZnO-based gas/biochemical sensing devices, field emitters, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, e-papers, and single-nanowire-based transistors.

  9. Zinc Oxide Nanostructured Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. W.Sun; J.X. Wang; A. Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocombs were fabricated by vapor phase transport, and nanorods and hierarchical nanodisk structures by aqueous thermal decomposition. Glucose biosensors were constructed using these ZnO nanostructures as supporting materials for glucose oxidase (GOx) loading. These ZnO glucose biosensors showed a high sensitivity for glucose detection and high affinity of GOx to glucose as well as the low detection limit. The results demonstrate that ZnO nanostructures have potential applications in biosensors.

  10. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Z [Santa Cruz, CA; Schwartzberg, Adam [Santa Cruz, CA; Olson, Tammy Y [Santa Cruz, CA

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  11. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Z.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Olson, Tammy Y.

    2016-03-01

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  12. Vertically aligned cobalt hydroxide nano-flake coated electro-etched carbon fiber cloth electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Han; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2014-11-01

    We describe preparation and characterization of nanostructured electrodes using Co(OH)2 nano-flakes and carbon fiber cloth for supercapacitors. Nanostructured Co(OH)2 flakes are produced by electrodeposition and they are coated onto the electro-etched carbon fiber cloth. A highest specific capacitance of 3404.8 F g-1 and an area-normalized specific capacitance of 3.3 F cm-2 have been obtained from such electrodes. Morphology and structure of the nanostructured electrodes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), constant-current charge and discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and long-time cycling.

  13. Versatility of electrospinning in the fabrication of fibrous mat and mesh nanostructures of bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) and their magnetic and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathkumar, S; Sakar, M; K, Rohith Vinod; Balakumar, S

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates the fabrication of electrospun bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) fiber mat and fibrous mesh nanostructures consisting of aligned and random fibers respectively. The formation of these one dimensional (1D) nanostructures was mediated by the drum and plate collectors in the electrospinning process that yielded aligned and random nanofibers of BFO respectively. The single phase and rhombohedral crystal structure of the fabricated 1D BFO nanostructures are confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies indicated that the fabricated fibers are stoichiometric BFO with native oxidation states +3. The surface texture and morphology are analyzed using the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The average size of fibers in mat and mesh nanostructures is found to be 200 nm and 150 nm respectively. The band gap energy of BFO mat and mesh deduced from their UV diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-DRS) was found to be 2.44 eV and 2.39 eV, respectively, which evidenced the improved visible light receptivity of BFO mesh compared to that of the mat. Magnetization studies using a super conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer revealed the weak ferromagnetic properties of BFO mesh and mat nanostructures that could emerge due to the dimension induced suppression of cycloidal spin structures. The photocatalytic degradation properties of the fibrous mesh are found to be enhanced compared to that of the mat. This could be attributed to the reduced band gap energy and an improved semiconductor band-bending phenomenon in the mesh that favoured the transportation of excited charge carriers to the photocatalyst-dye interfaces and the production of more number of reactive species that lead to the effective degradation of the dye molecules.

  14. Fabrication of complex metallic nanostructures by nanoskiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiaobing; Rioux, Robert M; Whitesides, George M

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the use of nanoskiving to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures by sectioning polymer slabs containing small, embedded metal structures. This method begins with the deposition of thin metallic films on an epoxy substrate by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. After embedding the thin metallic film in an epoxy matrix, sectioning (in a plane perpendicular or parallel to the metal film) with an ultramicrotome generates sections (which can be as thin as 50 nm) of epoxy containing metallic nanostructures. The cross-sectional dimensions of the metal wires embedded in the resulting thin epoxy sections are controlled by the thickness of the evaporated metal film (which can be as small as 20 nm) and the thickness of the sections cut by the ultramicrotome; this work uses a standard 45 degrees diamond knife and routinely generates slabs 50 nm thick. The embedded nanostructures can be transferred to, and positioned on, planar or curved substrates by manipulating the thin polymer film. Removal of the epoxy matrix by etching with an oxygen plasma generates free-standing metallic nanostructures. Nanoskiving can fabricate complex nanostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve by other methods of nanofabrication. These include multilayer structures, structures on curved surfaces, structures that span gaps, structures in less familiar materials, structures with high aspect ratios, and large-area structures comprising two-dimensional periodic arrays. This paper illustrates one class of application of these nanostructures: frequency-selective surfaces at mid-IR wavelengths.

  15. Nanostructured conductive polymers for advanced energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ye; Peng, Lele; Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2015-10-07

    Conductive polymers combine the attractive properties associated with conventional polymers and unique electronic properties of metals or semiconductors. Recently, nanostructured conductive polymers have aroused considerable research interest owing to their unique properties over their bulk counterparts, such as large surface areas and shortened pathways for charge/mass transport, which make them promising candidates for broad applications in energy conversion and storage, sensors, actuators, and biomedical devices. Numerous synthetic strategies have been developed to obtain various conductive polymer nanostructures, and high-performance devices based on these nanostructured conductive polymers have been realized. This Tutorial review describes the synthesis and characteristics of different conductive polymer nanostructures; presents the representative applications of nanostructured conductive polymers as active electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries and new perspectives of functional materials for next-generation high-energy batteries, meanwhile discusses the general design rules, advantages, and limitations of nanostructured conductive polymers in the energy storage field; and provides new insights into future directions.

  16. Piezoelectric interfaces enabled energy harvesting and tailored damping in fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Patterson, Brendan A.; Bowland, Christopher C.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2017-04-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are becoming ubiquitous in modern structures, due to their light weight, high specific strength, and ability to be tailored for a specific application. The increase in the commercial adoption and feasible applications of composite materials has motivated researchers to develop the next generation of composites. These next generation composites aim to integrate more structural and nonstructural properties into the structure with the goal of increasing the efficiency of the system as a whole. There have been many efforts in modifying or replacing structural fiber and matrix phases with active materials. However, this methodology usually affects the structural properties of the composite and limits their practical applications. Here, we present a new approach for the development of multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites. In this method, piezoelectric nanostructures (ZnO nanowires and barium titanate textured films) are integrated at the interface between structural fibers and matrix phase. Since the load transfer between reinforcement phase and polymer matrix happens at the interfacial region, the active phase at the interface results in a composite with unique properties. In this study we examined the vibration damping and energy harvesting of the fabricated composites. The nanostructured interface showed a great potential as a damping mechanism and energy harvesting constituent in these composites. The large amount of stress concentration in this region resulted in increased damping properties and sustainable energy harvesting performance. This research introduces a route for integrating responsive properties into structural composites by utilizing functional nanostructured interfaces.

  17. Commercial Implementation of Model-Based Manufacturing of Nanostructured Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Terry C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Computational modeling is an essential tool for commercial production of nanostructured metals. Strength is limited by imperfections at the high strength levels that are achievable in nanostructured metals. Processing to achieve homogeneity at the micro- and nano-scales is critical. Manufacturing of nanostructured metals is intrinsically a multi-scale problem. Manufacturing of nanostructured metal products requires computer control, monitoring and modeling. Large scale manufacturing of bulk nanostructured metals by Severe Plastic Deformation is a multi-scale problem. Computational modeling at all scales is essential. Multiple scales of modeling must be integrated to predict and control nanostructural, microstructural, macrostructural product characteristics and production processes.

  18. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-06-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterial's and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  19. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  20. Fiber draw synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orf, Nicholas D.; Shapira, Ofer; Sorin, Fabien; Danto, Sylvain; Baldo, Marc A.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of a high-melting temperature semiconductor in a low-temperature fiber drawing process is demonstrated, substantially expanding the set of materials that can be incorporated into fibers. Reagents in the solid state are arranged in proximate domains within a fiber preform. The preform is fluidized at elevated temperatures and drawn into fiber, reducing the lateral dimensions and bringing the domains into intimate contact to enable chemical reaction. A polymer preform containing a thin layer of selenium contacted by tin–zinc wires is drawn to yield electrically contacted crystalline ZnSe domains of sub-100-nm scales. The in situ synthesized compound semiconductor becomes the basis for an electronic heterostructure diode of arbitrary length in the fiber. The ability to synthesize materials within fibers while precisely controlling their geometry and electrical connectivity at submicron scales presents new opportunities for increasing the complexity and functionality of fiber structures.

  1. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    , leading to reduced mode confinement and dispersion flexibility. In this thesis, we treat the nonlinear photonic crystal fiber – a special sub-class of photonic crystal fibers, the core of which has a diameter comparable to the wavelength of the light guided in the fiber. The small core results in a large...... nonlinear coefficient and in various applications, it is therefore possible to reduce the required fiber lengths quite dramatically, leading to increased stability and efficiency. Furthermore, it is possible to design these fibers with zero-dispersion at previously unreachable wavelengths, paving the way...... for completely new applications, especially in and near the visible wavelength region. One such application is supercontinuum generation. Supercontinuum generation is extreme broadening of pulses in a nonlinear medium (in this case a small-core fiber), and depending on the dispersion of the fiber, it is possible...

  2. Nanostructured bioceramics for maxillofacial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamopoulos, Othon; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2007-08-01

    Biomaterials science and technology have been expanding tremendously the recent years. The results of this evolution are obvious in maxillofacial applications especially with the contemporary development of Nanotechnology. Among biomaterials, bioceramics possess a specific field due to various interactions with the biological tissues. The combination of bioceramics and nanotechnology has resulted in enhanced skeletal interactions in maxillofacial applications. Nanotechnology secures better mechanical properties and more effective biological interactions with jaws. The main production methods for the synthesis of nanostructured materials include plasma arcing, chemical vapour deposition, sol-gel and precipitation. The bioceramics in Dentistry comprise inert, bioactive, resorbable and composite systems. The purpose of the present article is to describe the available nanotechnology methods and how these could be addressed to synthesise maxillofacial bioceramics with advanced properties for better biological applications. Additionally, it describes specific clinical applications in maxillofacial surgery of these biomaterials--either by themselves or in combination with others--that can be promising candidates for bone tissue engineering. Such applications include replacement of lost teeth, filling of jaws defects or reconstruction of mandible and temporomandibular joint.

  3. Nonlinear scattering in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena provide novel light manipulation capabilities and innovative applications. Recently, we discovered nonlinear saturation on single-particle scattering of gold nanospheres by continuous-wave laser excitation and innovatively applied to improve microscopic resolution down to λ/8. However, the nonlinearity was limited to the green-orange plasmonic band of gold nanosphere, and the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we demonstrated that nonlinear scattering exists for various material/geometry combinations, thus expanding the applicable wavelength range. For near-infrared, gold nanorod is used, while for blue-violet, silver nanospheres are adopted. In terms of mechanism, the nonlinearity may originate from interband/intraband absorption, hot electron, or hot lattice, which are spectrally mixed in the case of gold nanosphere. For gold nanorod and silver nanosphere, nonlinear scattering occurs at plasmonic resonances, which are spectrally far from interband/intraband absorptions, so they are excluded. We found that the nonlinear index is much larger than possible contributions from hot electrons in literature. Therefore, we conclude that hot lattice is the major mechanism. In addition, we propose that similar to z-scan, which is the standard method to characterize nonlinearity of a thin sample, laser scanning microscopy should be adopted as the standard method to characterize nonlinearity from a nanostructure. Our work not only provides the physical mechanism of the nonlinear scattering, but also paves the way toward multi-color superresolution imaging based on non-bleaching plasmonic scattering.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  5. NANOSTRUCTURES OF FUNCTIONAL BLOCK COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojun Liu

    2000-01-01

    Nanostructure fabrication from block copolymers in my group normally involves polymer design, synthesis, selfassembly, selective domain crosslinking, and sometimes selective domain removal. Preparation of thin films with nanochannels was used to illustrate the strategy we took. In this particular case, a linear triblock copolymer polyisopreneblock-poly(2-cinnamoylethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(t-butyl acrylate), PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA, was used. Films, 25 to50μm thick, were prepared from casting on glass slides a toluene solution of PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA and PtBA homopolymer,hPtBA, where hPtBA is shorter than the PtBA block. At the hPtBA mass fraction of 20% relative to the triblock or the total PtBA (hPtBA and PtBA block) volume fraction of 0.44, hPtBA and PtBA formed a seemingly continuous phase in the matrix of PCEMA and PI. Such a block segregation pattern was locked in by photocrosslinking the PCEMA domain. Nanochannels were formed by extracting out hPtBA with solvent. Alternatively, larger channels were obtained from extracting out hPtBA and hydrolyzing the t-butyl groups of the PtBA block. Such membranes were not liquid permeable but had gas permeability constants ~6 orders of magnitude higher than that of low-density polyethylene films.

  6. Semiconductor nanostructures for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2012-02-01

    Nanowires, with their unique capability to bridge the nanoscopic and macroscopic worlds, have already been demonstrated as important materials for different energy conversion. One emerging and exciting direction is their application for solar to fuel conversion. The generation of fuels by the direct conversion of solar energy in a fully integrated system is an attractive goal, but no such system has been demonstrated that shows the required efficiency, is sufficiently durable, or can be manufactured at reasonable cost. One of the most critical issues in solar water splitting is the development of a suitable photoanode with high efficiency and long-term durability in an aqueous environment. Semiconductor nanowires represent an important class of nanostructure building block for direct solar-to-fuel application because of their high surface area, tunable bandgap and efficient charge transport and collection. Nanowires can be readily designed and synthesized to deterministically incorporate heterojunctions with improved light absorption, charge separation and vectorial transport. Meanwhile, it is also possible to selectively decorate different oxidation or reduction catalysts onto specific segments of the nanowires to mimic the compartmentalized reactions in natural photosynthesis. In this talk, I will highlight several recent examples in this lab using semiconductor nanowires and their heterostructures for the purpose of direct solar water splitting.

  7. Nanostructured surfaces of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-17

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  8. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  9. Nanostructures from Synthetic Genetic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander I; Beuron, Fabienne; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Morris, Edward P; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2016-06-16

    Nanoscale objects of increasing complexity can be constructed from DNA or RNA. However, the scope of potential applications could be enhanced by expanding beyond the moderate chemical diversity of natural nucleic acids. Here, we explore the construction of nano-objects made entirely from alternative building blocks: synthetic genetic polymers not found in nature, also called xeno nucleic acids (XNAs). Specifically, we describe assembly of 70 kDa tetrahedra elaborated in four different XNA chemistries (2'-fluro-2'-deoxy-ribofuranose nucleic acid (2'F-RNA), 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids (FANA), hexitol nucleic acids (HNA), and cyclohexene nucleic acids (CeNA)), as well as mixed designs, and a ∼600 kDa all-FANA octahedron, visualised by electron microscopy. Our results extend the chemical scope for programmable nanostructure assembly, with implications for the design of nano-objects and materials with an expanded range of structural and physicochemical properties, including enhanced biostability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Computational advances in nanostructure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Christopher Lyn

    The atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques fill a hole in conventional crystallographic analysis, which resolves the average long-range structure of a material but inadequately determines deviations from the average. These techniques provide structural information on the sub-nanometer scale and are helping characterize modern materials. Despite their successes, PDF and EXAFS often fall short of adequately describing complex nanostructured materials. Parallel PDF and EXAFS refinement, or corefinement, is one attempt at extending the applicability of these techniques. Corefinement combines the best parts of PDF and EXAFS, the chemical-specific and short-range detail of EXAFS and the short and intermediate-range information from the PDF. New ab initio methods are also being employed to find structures from the PDF. These techniques use the bond length information encoded in the PDF to assemble structures without a model. On another front, new software has been developed to introduce the PDF method to a larger community. Broad awareness of the PDF technique will help drive its future development.

  11. Nanostructures Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos M.; Pereiro, Juan; Basaran, Ali C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    We present two fabrication methods for asymmetric mesoscopic dot arrays over macroscopic areas using anodic aluminum oxide templates. In the first approach, metal is deposited at 45o to the template axis to partially close the pores and produce an elliptical shadow-mask. In the second approach, now underway, nanoimprint lithography on a polymer intermediary layer is followed by reactive ion etching to generate asymmetric pore seeds. Both these techniques are quantified by an analysis of the lateral morphology and lattice of the pores or dots using scanning electron microscopy and a newly developed MATLAB based code (available for free download at http://ischuller.ucsd.edu). The code automatically provides a segmentation of the measured area and the statistics of morphological properties such as area, diameter, and eccentricity, as well as the lattice properties such as number of nearest neighbors, and unbiased angular and radial two point correlation functions. Furthermore, novel user defined statistics can be easily obtained. We will additionally present several applications of these methods to superconducting, ferromagnetic, and organic nanostructures. This work is supported by AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0409

  12. Effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on nanostructural and biomechanical responses in the collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Don; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Chon, Jinmann; Jeong, Yong Seol; Park, Hun-Kuk; Kim, Hee-Sang

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on the nanostructure and adhesion force of collagen fibrils in a rat model of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis (CIAT) using histology and atomic force microscopy. A total of 45 rats were divided into experimental groups of three rats each: a control group, 27 CIAT rats with nine time points, and 15 ESWT rats with five time points. Progressive changes in nanostructure including the fibrillary diameter and D-periodicity, and biomechanical properties including the fibrillary adhesion forces in each healing phase were investigated over a 5-week period after collagenase injection. On postoperative day 3, CIAT rats showed granulomatous tissue associated with subacute inflammation, and a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 12, the ESWT group showed increased vascularity, fibroblastic activity, lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration, dense histocytes, and disorganization of the fibers compared to the CIAT group. The ESWT group showed and improvement in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls, while the CIAT group showed a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 26, the ESWT group showed 30% inflamed tissue and 70% fibrotic tissue, while the CIAT group showed chronic inflammation. By the end of the experiments, in both groups the changes had reversed and the tissues were similar in appearance to those in the control group. Following ESWT the deformed and irregular collagen network returned to a well-aligned normal collagen network nanostructure. These results suggest that ESWT may promote the healing response in Achilles tendinitis.

  13. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  14. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Yoshitake, E-mail: masuda-y@aist.go.jp; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.

  15. Controlled synthesis and energy applications of one-dimensional conducting polymer nanostructures: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhigang; Zheng, Qingdong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian (China)

    2012-02-15

    The past decade has witnessed increasing attention in the synthesis, properties, and applications of one-dimensional (1D) conducting polymer nanostructures. This overview first summarizes the synthetic strategies for various 1D nanostructures of conjugated polypyrrole (PPy), polyaniline (PANI), polythiophene (PTh), poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) and derivatives thereof. By using template-directed or template-free methods, nanoscale rods, wires/fibers, belts/ribbons, tubes, arrays, or composites have been successfully synthesized. With their unique structures and advantageous characteristics (e.g., high conductivity, high carrier mobility, good electrochemical activity, large specific surface area, short and direct path for charge/ion transportation, good mechanical properties), 1D conducting polymer nanostructures are demonstrated to be very useful for energy applications. Next, their applications in solar cells, fuel cells, rechargeable lithium batteries, and electrochemical supercapacitors are highlighted, with a strong emphasis on recent literature examples. Finally, this review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging area of research. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  17. Fabrication of nanostructures and nanostructure based interfaces for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Devesh

    Nanoparticles have applications from electronics, composites, drug-delivery, imaging and sensors etc. Fabricating and controlling shape and size of nanoparticles and also controlling the positioning of these particles in 1, 2 or 3-d structures is of most interest. The underlying theme of this study is to develop simple and efficient techniques to fabricate nanoparticles from polymers, and also achieve control in shape, size and functionalization of nanoparticles, while applying them in biosensor applications. First part of the dissertation studies the fabrication of nanostructures using anodized alumina membrane as template. It discusses the fabrication design for injecting polystyrene nanoparticles inside the pores of anodized alumina membranes and heating the membrane to coalesce the particles into tapered nanoparticles. Various parameters like temperature and amount of injected particles can vary the size and shape of fabricated nanoparticles. Later it focuses on the fabrication of metallic nanostructures using the alumina membranes without the aid of the injection system. It utilizes the difference in the functionality of the pore edges of cleaved alumina membrane with respect to the pore walls to first deposit charged polymers using layer-by-layer deposition followed by deposition of nickel. Second part of this study involves immobilization of enzymes for biosensor applications. It describes a biosensor interface developed by immobilization of tyrosinase using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition process. The interface was modified with functional nanoparticles and their influence on the response of biosensor was studied. Tyrosinase sensor was further extended to develop a novel biosensor which was used to study real time inhibition of NEST, a subunit of the medically relevant membrane protein, neuropathy target esterase. The biosensor was developed to give real time monitoring of dose dependent decrease in activity of NEST. Final part of this study emphasizes on

  18. Semiconductor nanostructures for optoelectronic devices processing, characterization and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2012-01-01

    This book summarizes the current state of semiconductor nanodevice development, examining nanowires, nanorods, hybrid semiconductor nanostructures, wide bandgap nanostructures for visible light emitters and graphene and describing their device applications.

  19. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  20. Nanostructuring of PEG-fibrinogen polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Ilya; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that nanostructuring of scaffolds for tissue engineering has a major impact on their interactions with cells. The current investigation focuses on nanostructuring of a biocompatible, biosynthetic polymeric hydrogel scaffold made from crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen conjugates. Nanostructuring was achieved by the addition of the block copolymer Pluronic F127, which self-assembles into nanometric micelles at certain concentrations and temperatures. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy experiments detected F127 micelles, both embedded within PEGylated fibrinogen hydrogels and in solution. The density of the F127 micelles, as well as their ordering, increased with increasing block copolymer concentration. The mechanical properties of the nanostructured hydrogels were investigated using stress-sweep rheological testing. These tests revealed a correlation between the block copolymer concentration and the storage modulus of the composite hydrogels. In vitro cellular assays confirmed that the increased modulus of the hydrogels did not limit the ability of the cells to form extensions and become spindled within the three-dimensional (3-D) hydrogel culture environment. Thus, altering the nanostructure of the hydrogel may be used as a strategy to control cellular behavior in 3-D through changes in mechanical properties of the environment.

  1. Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry for nanostructure metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyuan; Du, Weichao; Chen, Xiuguo; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-06-29

    In order to achieve effective process control, fast, inexpensive, nondestructive and reliable nanometer scale feature measurements are extremely useful in high-volume nanomanufacturing. Among the possible techniques, optical scatterometry is relatively ideal due to its high throughput, low cost, and minimal sample damage. However, this technique is inherently limited by the illumination spot size of the instrument and the low efficiency in construction of a map of the sample over a wide area. Aiming at these issues, we introduce conventional imaging techniques to optical scatterometry and combine them with Mueller matrix ellipsometry based scatterometry, which is expected to be a powerful tool for the measurement of nanostructures in future high-volume nanomanufacturing, and propose to apply Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry (MMIE) for nanostructure metrology. Two kinds of nanostructures were measured using an in-house developed Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that we can achieve Mueller matrix measurement and analysis for nanostructures with pixel-sized illumination spots by using MMIE. We can also efficiently construct parameter maps of the nanostructures over a wide area with pixel-sized lateral resolution by performing parallel ellipsometric analysis for all the pixels of interest.

  2. Mapping the stochastic response of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Subrahmanyam; Elliott, Ryan S.; Tadmor, Ellad B.

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures are technological devices constructed on a nanometer length scale more than a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Due to the unique properties of matter at this scale, such devices offer great potential for creating novel materials and behaviors that can be leveraged to benefit mankind. This paper addresses a particular challenge involved in the design of nanostructures-their stochastic or apparently random response to external loading. This is because fundamentally the function that relates the energy of a nanostructure to the arrangement of its atoms is extremely nonconvex, with each minimum corresponding to a possible equilibrium state that may be visited as the system responds to loading. Traditional atomistic simulation techniques are not capable of systematically addressing this complexity. Instead, we construct an equilibrium map (EM) for the nanostructure, analogous to a phase diagram for bulk materials, which fully characterizes its response. Using the EM, definitive predictions can be made in limiting cases and the spectrum of responses at any desired loading rate can be obtained. The latter is important because standard atomistic methods are fundamentally limited, by computational feasibility, to simulations of loading rates that are many orders of magnitude faster than reality. In contrast, the EM-based approach makes possible the direct simulation of nanostructure experiments. We demonstrate the method's capabilities and its surprisingly complex results for the case of a nanoslab of nickel under compression.

  3. Electrochemical Fabrication and Electrocatalytic Properties of Nanostructured Mesoporous Platinum Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengyan NIE; Joanne M. Elliott

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition from a lyotropic liquid crystal template medium was used to produce nanostructured platinum microelectrodes with high specific surface area and high mass transport efficiency. Compared to polished and conventional platinized microelectrodes, well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic properties for oxygen and ascorbic acid, whilst well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes offered improved electrocatalytic properties for oxygen reduction compared to disordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes.

  4. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...... W CW fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. Finally, we briefly touch upon the subject of photo darkening and its origin....

  5. Polymer optical fiber fuse

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Although high-transmission-capacity optical fibers are in demand, the problem of the fiber fuse phenomenon needs to be resolved to prevent the destruction of fibers. As polymer optical fibers become more prevalent, clarifying their fuse properties has become important. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a fuse propagation velocity of 21.9 mm/s, which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude slower than that in standard silica fibers. The achieved threshold power density and proportionality constant between the propagation velocity and the power density are respectively 1/186 of and 16.8 times the values for silica fibers. An oscillatory continuous curve instead of periodic voids is formed after the passage of the fuse. An easy fuse termination method is presented herein, along with its potential plasma applications.

  6. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...... W CW fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. Finally, we briefly touch upon the subject of photo darkening and its origin....

  7. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 100 m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to megawatt power levels. Furthermore, we describe the novel airclad-based pump combiners and their use in a completely...... monolithic 350 W cw fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)....

  8. Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  9. Nanotailored Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    precursor fiber and also utilize bi- component spinning along with gel spinning, to obtain small diameter fibers. Various processing parameters during...shape of the fiber. In this regard, we have also conducted single component gel spinning using different gelation bath temperatures (100% methanol). SEM...domestic dishwashing detergent, Palmolive antibacterial , 3 wt% detergent and 97% water) for about a week and retested. *** For 5th trial, tungsten

  10. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  11. Insulated Fiber Brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An insulated-strand fiber brush is provided for a DC motor /generator. The brush is comprised of a plurality of fiber segments which are insulated from one another near the contact surface of a rotor bar. In one embodiment, insulating spacers are fixed to a brush assembly and wear with the fibers, and in another embodiment insulation is provided by a separate shell. (Author)

  12. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  13. Metal films with imprinted nanostructures by template stripping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    We present a novel template stripping procedure for fabricating metal films with imprinted nanostructures. The basic idea is to deposit a gold film onto a nano-structured substrate and subsequently strip the film from the substrate surface thereby revealing imprinted nanostructures in the film...... result is a thin gold film with imprinted nano-cavities....

  14. Transparent nanostructured electrodes: Electrospun NiO nanofibers/NiO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamastra, F.R. [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Nanni, F. [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Enterprise Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Menchini, F. [ENEA, CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Nunziante, P. [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Grilli, M.L., E-mail: marialuisa.grilli@enea.it [ENEA, CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy)

    2016-02-29

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/nickel(II) acetate precursor fibers were deposited by electrospinning directly on radio frequency sputtered thin Ni and NiO films grown on quartz substrate, starting from Ni(II) acetate and PVP solution in ethanol. The samples were calcined in air in the temperature range 400–500 °C to obtain transparent and conductive p-type NiO nanofibers on NiO films. A higher density of nanofibers was obtained on Ni/quartz substrates, as compared to NiO/quartz ones, demonstrating the feasibility of fiber adhesion directly to an insulating substrate previously coated by a thin Ni layer. Samples were characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometric and resistance measurements. - Highlights: • Nanostructured electrodes: electrospun NiO nanofibers/NiO films were fabricated. • NiO fibers were directly grown on insulating substrate coated by thin Ni or NiO films. • Good quality crystalline fibers were obtained at low calcination temperatures. • Transparent and conductive p-type electrodes were fabricated.

  15. Noncovalent interaction of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Panigrahi, Swati; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2014-08-19

    The potential application of carbon nanomaterials in biology and medicine increases the necessity to understand the nature of their interactions with living organisms and the environment. The primary forces of interaction at the nano-bio interface are mostly noncovalent in nature. Quantifying such interactions and identifying various factors that influence such interactions is a question of outstanding fundamental interest in academia and industry. In this Account, we have summarized our recent studies in understanding the noncovalent interactions of carbon nanostructures (CNSs), which were obtained by employing first-principles calculations on various model systems representing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Bestowed with an extended sp(2) carbon network, which is a common feature in all of these nanostructures, they exhibit π-π interactions with aromatic molecules (benzene, naphthalene, nucleobases, amino acids), cation-π type of interactions with metal ions, anion-π interactions with anions, and other XH···π type of interactions with various small molecules (H2O, NH3, CH4, H2, etc.). CNTs are wrapped-up forms of two-dimensional graphene, and hence, it is interesting to compare the binding abilities of these two allotropes that differ in their curvature. The chirality and curvature of CNSs appear to play a major role in determining the structural, energetic, and functional properties. Flat graphene shows stronger noncovalent interactions than the curved nanotubes toward various substrates. Understanding the interactions of CNSs with organic molecules and biomolecules has gained a great deal of research interest because of their potential applications in various fields. Aromatic hydrocarbons show a strong propensity to interact with CNSs via the π-π mode of interaction rather than CH···π interaction. As DNA sequencing appears to be one of the most important potential applications of carbon nanomaterials, the study of CNS

  16. Vibron and phonon hybridization in dielectric nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Thomas C; Signorell, Ruth

    2011-04-05

    Plasmon hybridization theory has been an invaluable tool in advancing our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Through the prism of molecular orbital theory, it allows one to interpret complex structures as "plasmonic molecules" and easily predict and engineer their electromagnetic response. However, this formalism is limited to conducting particles. Here, we present a hybridization scheme for the external and internal vibrations of dielectric nanostructures that provides a straightforward understanding of the infrared signatures of these particles through analogy to existing hybridization models of both molecular orbitals and plasmons extending the range of applications far beyond metallic nanostructures. This method not only provides a qualitative understanding, but also allows for the quantitative prediction of vibrational spectra of complex nanoobjects from well-known spectra of their primitive building blocks. The examples of nanoshells illustrate how spectral features can be understood in terms of symmetry, number of nodal planes, and scale parameters.

  17. Nanostructures for all-polymer microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Bruus, Henrik; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for fabricating nanostructured surfaces with feature sizes down to at least 50 nm and aspect ratios of 1:1 by injection molding. We explored the effects of mold coatings and injection molding conditions on the final nanostructure quality. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon based...... antistiction coating was found to improve the replication fidelity (shape and depth) of nanoscale features substantially. Arrays of holes of 50 nm diameter/35 nm depth and 100 nm/100 nm diameter, respectively, were mass-produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 5013) by injection molding. Polymer microfluidic...... channel chip parts resulted from a separate injection molding process. The microfluidic chip part and the nanostructured chip part were successfully bonded to form a sealed microfluidic system using air plasma assisted thermal bonding....

  18. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.;

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis ...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques.......One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...

  19. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  20. Nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Lu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanostructured materials, compared with conventional materials, may promote greater amounts of specific protein interactions, thereby more efficiently stimulating new bone formation. It has also been indicated that, when features or ingredients of scaffolds are nanoscaled, a variety of interactions can be stimulated at the cellular level. Some of those interactions induce favorable cellular functions while others may leads to toxicity. This review presents the mechanism of interactions between nanoscaled materials and cells and focuses on the current research status of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which nanoscaled materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D.; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young’s modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures. PMID:27386542

  2. Application opportunities for nanostructured materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1995-12-01

    Nanostructured materials have the potential to change materials science as we know it today significantly, as well as to provide a new generation of materials with a quantum improvement in properties. While many interesting properties have been generated in the laboratory, there is still much work to be done before there are production applications for nanostructured materials and coatings in gas turbine engines and similar demanding strength- and temperature-limited applications. This paper (1) describes the need for improved materials in gas turbine engines, (2) summarizes the improved physical and mechanical properties that have been reported for nanostructured materials, (3) discusses a research and development methodology that has the potential for accelerating technology implementation, and (4) describes high pay-off applications. (orig.)

  3. Polymer Masks for nanostructuring of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvets, Violetta

    This PhD project is a part of Center for Nanostructured Graphene (CNG) activities. The aim of the project is to develop a new lithography method for creation of highly ordered nanostructures with as small as possible feature and period sizes. The method should be applicable for graphene...... polymer masks is developed. Mask fabrication is realized by microtoming of 30-60 nm thin sections from pre-aligned polymer monoliths with different morphologies. The resulting polymer masks are then transferred to both silicon and graphene substrates. Hexagonally packed hole patterns with 10 nm hole...... diameter and 20 nm periodicity are successfully transferred to both substrates. The method allowed to realize the first ever transfer of moiré patterns to silicon. Furthermore, in collaboration with CNG, device with nanostructured graphene are fabricated and electrical measurements made on these devices...

  4. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young's modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures.

  6. Oriented nanostructures for energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; Dubois, Dan; Zhou, Xiaodong; Graff, Gordon L; Pederson, Larry R; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures demonstrate promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion, and storage. In this Review, we highlight the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors, and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, a common fundamental challenge is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity and discuss the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels, and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the transport of electrons and ions. Finally, we discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information is provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoscale effects of mostly inorganic-based materials and devices.

  7. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  8. Spin currents in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeschka, Franz Dominik

    2011-09-05

    A pure spin current, i.e., a flow of angular momentum without accompanying net charge current, is a key ingredient in the field of spintronics. In this thesis, we experimentally investigated two different concepts for pure spin current sources suggested by theory. The first is based on a time-dependent magnetization precession which ''pumps'' a pure spin current into an adjacent non-magnetic conductor. Our experiments quantitatively corroborated important predictions expected theoretically for this approach, including the dependence of the spin current on the sample geometry and the microwave power. Even more important, we could show for the first time that the spin pumping concept is viable in a large variety of ferromagnetic materials and that it only depends on the magnetization damping. Therefore, our experiments established spin pumping as generic phenomenon and demonstrated that it is a powerful way to generate pure spin currents. The second theoretical concept is based on the conversion of charge currents into spin currents in non-magnetic nanostructures via the spin Hall effect. We experimentally investigated this approach in H-shaped, metallic nanodevices, and found that the predictions are linked to requirements not realizable with the present experimental techniques, neither in sample fabrication nor in measurement technique. Indeed, our experimental data could be consistently understood by a spin-independent transport model describing the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport. In addition, the implementation of advanced fabrication and measurement techniques allowed to discover a new non-local phenomenon, the non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance. Finally, we also studied spin-polarized supercurrents carried by spin-triplet Cooper pairs. We found that low resistance interfaces are a key requirement for further experiments in this direction. (orig.)

  9. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  10. Oriented Fiber Filter Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bharadwaj

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Coalescing filters are widely used throughout industry and improved performance will reduce droplet emissions and operating costs. Experimental observations show orientation of micro fibers in filter media effect the permeability and the separation efficiency of the filter media. In this work two methods are used to align the fibers to alter the filter structure. The results show that axially aligned fiber media improve quality factor on the order of 20% and cutting media on an angle from a thick layered media can improve performance by about 40%. The results also show the improved performance is not monotonically correlated to the average fiber angle of the medium.

  11. PULP FIBER SIZE CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShijieLiu

    2004-01-01

    Pulp fiber length distribution characterization hasbeen examined in this study. Because of the fibermorphology: slender in shape, fiber size distributioncharacterization is a very difficult task. Traditionaltechnique involves separation of the particles by size,such as Bauer-McNett fiber classifier, and measuringthe weight fractions. Themay or may not reflect theparticle fractions obtaineddesired size classification.On the other hand, the more recent technique throughoptical measurement of fiber length is limited by itsinability to measure the mass of the particle fractions.Therefore, not only the two techniques fail togenerate identical results, either one was accepted tobe of better value. Pure hardwood kraft, softwoodkraft, and their mixture samples have been measuredfor their fiber length distributions using an opticalfiber quality analyzer: FQA. The data obtained fromFQA are extensively studied to investigate morereliable way of representing the fiber length data andthus examining the viable route for measuring thefiber size distributions. It has been found that thefiber length averaged length 1~ is a viable indicator ofthe average pulp fiber length. The fiber size fractionand/or distribution can be represented by the fiber"length" fractions.

  12. ZBLAN, Silica Fiber Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This graph depicts the increased signal quality possible with optical fibers made from ZBLAN, a family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium) as compared to silica fibers. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. In the graph, a line closer to the black theoretical maximum line is better. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  13. Synthesis of carbon fibers with branched nanographene sheets for electrochemical double layer capacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Masahiro; Kalita, Golap; Kato, Kimitoshi; Noda, Mikio; Uchida, Hideo; Wakita, Koichi; Umeno, Masayoshi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a one step technique to synthesis the carbon fibers (CNFs) with branched nanographene sheets by the pulsed discharge (PD) plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Highly crystalline branched nanographene sheets were directly grown from the surface of the carbon fibers to obtain a three dimensional (3D) nanostructure. The growth process can be explained from the catalyst support growth of the CNFs, and subsequently nucleation and growth of the nanographene sheets from the crystalline surface of the CNF. The deposited nanostructured films with different pulse discharge were used as an electrode for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLC). It is observed that the capacitance is dependent on the morphology of the electrode materials and an optimum capacitance is obtained with the branched nanographene on CNFs.

  14. Controllable synthesis of conducting polypyrrole nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jin; Song, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan

    2006-01-26

    Wire-, ribbon-, and sphere-like nanostructures of polypyrrole have been synthesized by solution chemistry methods in the presence of various surfactants (anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant) with various oxidizing agents [ammonium persulfate (APS) or ferric chloride (FeCl3), respectively]. The surfactants and oxidizing agents used in this study have played a key role in tailoring the nanostructures of polypyrrole during the polymerization. It is inferred that the lamellar structures of a mesophase are formed by self-assembly between the cations of a long chain cationic surfactant [cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or dodeyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)] and anions of oxidizing agent APS. These layered mesostructures are presumed to act as templates for the formation of wire- and ribbon-like polypyrrole nanostructures. In contrast, if a short chain cationic surfactant octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) or nonionic surfactant poly(ethylene glycol) mono-p-nonylphenyl ether (Opi-10) is used, sphere-like polypyrrole nanostructures are obtained, whichever of the oxidizing agents mentioned above is used. In this case, micelles resulting from self-assembly among surfactant molecules are envisaged to serve as the templates while the polymerization happens. It is also noted that, if anionic surfactant sodium dodeyl surfate (SDS) is used, no characteristic nanostructures of polypyrrole were observed. This may be attributed to the doping effect of anionic surfactants into the resulting polypyrrole chains, and as a result, micelles self-assembled among surfactant molecules are broken down during the polymerization. The effects of monomer concentration, surfactant concentration, and surfactant chain length on the morphologies of the resulting polypyrrole have been investigated in detail. The molecular structures, composition, and electrical properties of the nanostructured polypyrrole have also been investigated in this study.

  15. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  16. Applications of monolithic fiber interferometers and actively controlled fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Rugeland, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to develop applications of monolithic fiber devices and actively controlled fibers. A special twin-core fiber known as a ‘Gemini’ fiber was used to construct equal arm-length fiber interferometers, impervious to temperature and mechanical perturbations. A broadband add/drop multiplexer was constructed by inscribing fiber Bragg gratings in the arms of a Gemini Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A broadband interferometric nanosecond switch was constructed from a micr...

  17. Simple Approach to Superamphiphobic Overhanging Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Superhydrophobic silicon nanostructures were fabricated by anisotropic etching of silicon coated with a thin hydrophobic layer. At certain etch parameters, overhanging nanostructures form at the apexes of the rod-shaped tips, This leads to superoleophobic behavior for several oily liquids...... with contact angles up to 152 degrees and roll-off angle down to 8 degrees. Such nonlithographic nanoscale overhanging Structures can also be added to silicon nanograss by deposition of a thin SiO2 layer, which equips the silicon rods with 100-300 nm sized overhanging Structures. This is a simple, fast...

  18. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  19. Functional nanostructures on injection molded plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte; Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    Nanotechnology can be used to make inexpensive plastic parts with functional surfaces. The plastic parts can be molded using a standard injection molding process. The nanostructures are directly transferred from the surface of the molding tool to the surface of the molded plastic part during...... the molding process. The main advantage with this method is that surface treatments and chemical additives are avoided, which minimizes health risks and simplifies recycling. Another advantage is that the unique technology enables nanostructuring of free form molded parts. The functional surfaces can have...

  20. Glutathione-triggered drug release from nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of drugs can be improved with the use of different carriers, such as those based on nanoparticles. The nanostructures loaded with the therapeutic molecules should be able to reach the target cells and, what is more, release the drugs efficiently. Ideally, the drugs should be delivered only in the target cells, and not along their way to the cells. For these reasons several approaches have been developed to control the release of the drugs at the desired sites. In this review article we have summarized the reports that describe the use of glutathione to trigger the release of the therapeutic molecules from different nanostructures.

  1. MBE growth of Quantum nanostructures for optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a powerful tech-nique for the fabrication of several self-assembled III-V nanostructures such as quantum rings, quantum dots, (Garcia 2013) and quantum wires that can cover a wide range of the spectrum from 0.98 ¿m to 1.6 ¿m. The possibility of performing in-situ, real-time, measurements of accumulated stress (¿¿) dur-ing growth of these nanostructures enables to achieve a deep understanding of the growth processes. For example, whereas quantum rings (QR) f...

  2. Geometry induced entanglement transitions in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P; D'Amico, I

    2010-01-01

    We model quantum dot nanostructures using a one-dimensional system of two interacting electrons. We show that strong and rapid variations may be induced in the spatial entanglement by varying the nanostructure geometry. We investigate the position-space information entropy as an indicator of the entanglement in this system. We also consider the expectation value of the Coulomb interaction and the ratio of this expectation to the expectation of the confining potential and their link to the entanglement. We look at the first derivative of the entanglement and the position-space information entropy to infer information about a possible quantum phase transition.

  3. Controlling optical response of metallic nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorenko, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In this talk I am going to discuss the direct and inverse problems in nanoplasmonics in classical, and in particular quantum regimes of excitations. The inverse problem in nanoplasmonics is aimed to control the eigenspectrum, excitations,and other physical properties of nanosized quantum systems via controlling their size, shape, and structural composition. Using a combination of modern modeling techniques and optimization procedures, one can succeed to solve the inverse problem, namely, to find a nanostructure which has the desired functionality, or to find optimal control field in the presence of known nanostructured metallic surface.

  4. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2011-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses th

  5. Screening effect on nanostructure of charged gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Hino, M

    2004-01-01

    Charge screening effects on nanostructures of N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) and -acrylic acid (NIPA-AAc) gels are investigated with small-angle neutron scattering. The NIPA-SA and NIPA-AAc gels with low water content exhibit microphase separations with different dimensions....... The dehydrated NIPA-SA gel also makes the microphase separation but the dehydrated NIPA-AAc gel does not. These results indicate that ionic circumstance around charged bases strongly affects the nanostructures both of the dehydrated gel and the gel with low water content. (C) 2004 Elsevier B. V. All rights...

  6. Nanocoatings size effect in nanostructured films

    CERN Document Server

    Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Size effect in structures has been taken into consideration over the last years. In comparison with coatings with micrometer-ranged thickness, nanostructured coatings usually enjoy better and appropriate properties, such as strength and resistance. These coatings enjoy unique magnetic properties and are used with the aim of producing surfaces resistant against erosion, lubricant system, cutting tools, manufacturing hardened sporadic alloys, being resistant against oxidation and corrosion. This book reviews researches on fabrication and classification of nanostructured coatings with focus on size effect in nanometric scale. Size effect on electrochemical, mechanical and physical properties of nanocoatings are presented.

  7. Synthesis of nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 on activated carbon cloth by hydrothermal and microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosayebi, Elham; Azizian, Saeid; Hajian, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 loaded on activated carbon cloth were synthesized by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition and hydrothermal methods. By hydrothermal method the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with dandelion-like nanostructures. By microwave-assisted chemical bath method the structure and composition of deposited sample depends on solution pH. At pH = 9.8 the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with flower-like microstructure; but at pH = 10.8 the sample is a mixture of ZnO and Zn(OH)2 with flower-like and rhombic microstructures, respectively. The mechanism of crystal grow by microwave-assisted chemical bath method was investigated by SEM method at both pH.

  8. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  9. A Novel Polarization Maintaining Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It introduces a novel elliptical jacket polarization maintaining fiber, whose SAP is like numeral "1". One preform can be drawn over 8km. Fiber's performances show that it is fit for fiber gyroscope and other sensors.

  10. A Novel Polarization Maintaining Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Xue

    2003-01-01

    It introduces a novel elliptical jacket polarization maintaining fiber, whose SAP is like numeral "1" One preform can be drawn over 8km. Fiber's performances show that it is fit for fiber gyroscope and other sensors.

  11. Vaccination of biological cellulose fibers with glucose: a gateway to novel nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Tamer Y A; Mobarak, Fardous

    2008-01-01

    This work introduces, for the first time worldwide, the means to preserve and protect the natural nanoporous structure of the never-dried plant cell wall, against the irreversible collapse, which occurs due to drying. Simultaneously, these means, used for the above-mentioned aim, provide a gateway to novel nanocomposite materials, which retain the super reactive and super absorbent properties of the never-dried biological cellulose fibers. The present work showed, for the first time worldwide, that glucose can be vaccinated into the cell wall micropores or nanostructure of the never-dried biological cellulose fibers, by simple new techniques, to create a reactive novel nanocomposite material possessing surprising super absorbent properties. Inoculation of the never dried biological cellulose fibers, with glucose, prevented the collapse of the cell wall nanostructure, which normally occurs due to drying. The nanocomposite, produced after drying of the glucose inoculated biological cellulose, retained the super absorbent properties of the never dried biological cellulose fibers. It was found that glucose under certain circumstances grafts to the never dried biological cellulose fibers to form a novel natural nanocomposite material. About 3-8% (w/w) glucose remained grafted in the novel nanocomposite.

  12. Progress in nanostructured photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyang; Fang, Jian; Liu, Yong; Lin, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Solar cells represent a principal energy technology to convert light into electricity. Commercial solar cells are at present predominately produced by single- or multi-crystalline silicon wafers. The main drawback to silicon-based solar cells, however, is high material and manufacturing costs. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted much attention during recent years because of the low production cost and other advantages. The photoanode (working electrode) plays a key role in determining the performance of DSSCs. In particular, nanostructured photoanodes with a large surface area, high electron transfer efficiency, and low electron recombination facilitate to prepare DSSCs with high energy conversion efficiency. In this review article, we summarize recent progress in the development of novel photoanodes for DSSCs. Effect of semiconductor material (e.g. TiO2, ZnO, SnO2, N2O5, and nano carbon), preparation, morphology and structure (e.g. nanoparticles, nanorods, nanofibers, nanotubes, fiber/particle composites, and hierarchical structure) on photovoltaic performance of DSSCs is described. The possibility of replacing silicon-based solar cells with DSSCs is discussed.

  13. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzetto L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Zorzetto,1 Paola Brambilla,1 Elena Marcello,1 Nora Bloise,2 Manuela De Gregori,3 Lorenzo Cobianchi,4,5 Andrea Peloso,4,5 Massimo Allegri,6 Livia Visai,2,7 Paola Petrini1 1Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering ‘G. Natta’, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Health Technologies (CHT, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, 3Pain Therapy Service, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo Pavia, Pavia, 4General Surgery Department, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 5Departments of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 6Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, 7Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Lab of Nanotechnology, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured

  14. Characteristics of Angora rabbit fiber using optical fiber diameter analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat, S A; de Rochambeau, H; Brims, M; Thébault, R G; Deretz, S; Bonnet, M; Allain, D

    2007-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to describe the characteristics of Angora rabbit fiber using optical fiber diameter analyzer (OFDA). A total of 349 fleece samples were collected from 60 French Angora rabbits. Recorded measurements of OFDA were as follows: mean fiber diameter, CV of fiber diameter, comfort factor, spinning fineness, mean fiber curvature, SD of fiber curvature, mean opacity of fibers, percentage of medullated fibers, mean fiber diameter along the length, and SD of fiber diameter along the length. Comfort factor is the percentage of fibers less than or equal to 30 microns. The main effects included in the mixed model were fixed effects of group, harvest season, and age and a random effect of animal. Correlations among total fleece weight, compression, and OFDA measurements were calculated. Mean fiber diameter was lower than the fiber diameter along the length. Mean percentage of medullated fibers was very low and ranged from 0.1 to 7.3%. The mean comfort factor was 97.5% and ranged from 93.3 to 99.8%. The mean fiber curvature was 40.1 degrees/mm. The major changes in Angora fleece characteristics from 8 to 105 wk of age were an increase in fiber diameter, CV of fiber diameter, mean fiber diameter along the length and curvature, and a decrease in compression and comfort factor. The effect of harvest season was significant on some fiber characteristics. Mean fiber diameter and the mean fiber diameter along the length had a positive correlation with total fleece weight. The OFDA methodology is a method to evaluate fiber diameter, CV of fiber diameter, and bristle content through measuring of the comfort factor. However, OFDA is not adapted for measuring opacity or size of the medulla, or both, in Angora wool and needs a new definition or a special calibration. The spinning fineness should be redefined and adapted for Angora rabbits.

  15. Emerging plasmonic nanostructures for controlling and enhancing photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Jiyeon; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2017-07-01

    Localised surface plasmon resonance endows plasmonic nanostructures with unique, powerful properties such as photoluminescence enhancement, which is a phenomenon based on the interaction between light and a metal nanostructure. In particular, photoluminescence modulation and enhancement are of importance to many research fields such as photonics, plasmonics and biosensing. In this minireview, we introduce basic principles of plasmonic-nanostructure photoluminescence and recently reported plasmonic nanostructures exhibiting surface-enhanced fluorescence and direct photoluminescence, with one-photon photoluminescence being of particular interest. Gaining insights into these systems not only helps understand the fundamental concepts of plasmonic nanostructures but also advances and extends their applications.

  16. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  17. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures - revew article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit interesting electronic and optical properties due to their low dimensionality leading to quantum confinement effects. ZnO has received lot of attention as a nanostructured material because of unique properties rendering it suitable for various applications. Amongst the different methods of synthesis of ZnO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is attractive for its simplicity and environment friendly conditions. This review summarizes the conditions leading to the growth of different ZnO nanostructures using hydrothermal technique. Doping of ZnO nanostructures through hydrothermal method are also highlighted.

  18. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by manufactured DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Youngkwon; Shin, Jihoon; Seo, Soonbeom; Park, Sung Ha; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-03-01

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  19. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  20. Segmented metallic nanostructures, homogeneous metallic nanostructures and methods for producing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes a method of producing a segmented 1D nanostructure. The method includes providing a vessel containing a template wherein on one side of the template is a first metal reagent solution and on the other side of the template is a reducing agent solution, wherein the template comprises at least one pore; allowing a first segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow within a pore of the template until a desired length is reached; replacing the first metal reagent solution with a second metal reagent solution; allowing a second segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow from the first segment until a desired length is reached, wherein a segmented 1D nanostructure is produced.

  1. Catalyst-nanostructure interaction in the growth of 1-D ZnO nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C; Müller, S; Stichtenoth, D; Schwen, D; Ronning, C

    2006-02-02

    Vapor-liquid-solid is a well-established process in catalyst guided growth of 1-D nanostructures, i.e., nanobelts and nanowires. The catalyst particle is generally believed to be in the liquid state during growth, and is the site for impinging molecules. The crystalline structure of the catalyst may not have any influence on the structure of the grown nanostructures. In this work, using Au guided growth of ZnO, we show that the interfaces between the catalyst droplet and the nanostructure grow in well-defined mutual crystallographic relationships. The nanostructure defines the crystallographic orientation of the solidifying Au droplet. Possible alloy, intermetallic, or eutectic phase formation during catalysis are elucidated with the help of a proposed ternary Au-Zn-O phase diagram.

  2. RF Fiber Optic Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    CONTENTS (Continued) 0 o p- Paragraph Title Page 4.6.3 Laser Diode and Single Mode Fiber Interface ....... 68 0 4.6.4 Laser Noise Discussion...A111-4. 2. 0. Marcuse and C. L. Lin, "Low Dispersion Single-Mode Fiber Transmission - The Question of Practical Versus Theoretical Maxlimum...001/0161A 68 ,.-. .- ,-... -. ..- , .. -............. . ............... • :q

  3. Precursor Derived Nanostructured Si-C-X Materials for Nuclear Applications. Final Report, October 2010 - September 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordia, Rajendra [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Henager, Chuck [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Polymer derived ceramic route is an attractive approach to make structural materials with unique nanostructures that have very desirable high temperature properties. Processing techniques to make a variety of needed shapes and forms (e.g. coatings, matrices for fiber reinforced composites, porous ceramics) have been developed. With appropriate high temperature processing, the precursors can be converted to nano-crystalline materials. In this collaborative project, we investigated the processing, stability and properties of nanostructured Si-C materials, derived from polymeric precursors, and their performance under conditions appropriate for nuclear energy applications. All the milestones of the project were accomplished. Some of the results are being currently analyzed and additional papers being prepared in which support from NEUP will be acknowledged. So far, eight peer-reviewed papers have been published and one invention disclosure made. In this report, we summarize the major findings of this project.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  5. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  6. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.

  7. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  8. Python fiber optic seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  9. Controlling light with resonant plasmonic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waele, R. de

    2009-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in a metal. At optical frequencies plasmons enable nanoscale confinement of light in metal nanostructures. This ability has given rise to many applications in e.g. photothermal cancer treatment, light trapping in photovoltaic cells, and sensing.

  10. Osteoblastic cell behavior on nanostructured metal implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehennec, L Le; Martin, F.; Lopez-Heredia, M.A.; Louarn, G.; Amouriq, Y.; Cousty, J.; Layrolle, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Surface modifications at the nanometric scale may promote protein adsorption, cell adhesion and thus favor the osseointegration of metal implants. The behavior of osteoblastic cells was studied on mirror-polished (Smooth-SS) and nanostructured (Nano-SS) stainless steel surfaces. MATERIALS & ME

  11. Nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha

    2017-01-01

    The testing and further development of a prototype nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, with a focus on surface modification and detailed characterization of the biosensor chip and in-field and at-line applicability in the food industry is described. Furthermore, a simp

  12. Fullerenes and nanostructured plastic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, Joop; Hummelen, Jan C.; Kuzmany, H; Fink, J; Mehring, M; Roth, S

    1998-01-01

    We report on the present on the present status of the plastic solar cell and on the design of fullerene derivatives and pi-conjugated donor molecules that can function as acceptor-donor pairs and (supra-) molecular building blocks in organized, nanostructured interpenetrating networks, forming a bul

  13. Photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad; Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2009-01-01

    This monograph investigates photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures. It contains open-ended research problems which form an integral part of the text and are useful for graduate courses as well as aspiring Ph.D.'s and researchers..

  14. Structures and Strength of Gradient Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    A recent study [1] has shown that a microstructure can be refined to a record low of 5 nm and that dislocation glide is still a controlling mechanism at this length scale. The nanostructure was produced in Cu by applying a very high strain in friction. The stress and strain decrease with increasing...

  15. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  16. Nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha

    2017-01-01

    The testing and further development of a prototype nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, with a focus on surface modification and detailed characterization of the biosensor chip and in-field and at-line applicability in the food industry is described. Furthermore, a

  17. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dunwei Wang; Stafford Sheehan; Sa Zhou; Yongjing Lin; Xiaohua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews...

  18. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  19. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  20. Numerical simulations of nanostructured gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Frydendahl, Christian; Novikov, Sergey M.

    2017-01-01

    We present an approach to analyse near-field effects on nanostructured gold films by finite element simulations. The studied samples are formed by fabricating gold films near the percolation threshold and then applying laser damage. Resulting samples have complicated structures, which...

  1. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  2. Injection Molding of High Aspect Ratio Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Larsen, Niels Bent

    We present a process for injection molding of 40 nm wide and >100 nm high pillars (pitch: 200 nm). We explored the effects of mold coatings and injection molding conditions on the replication quality of nanostructures in cyclic olefin copolymer. We found that optimization of molding parameters...

  3. Optical properties of organic and semiconductor nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeukens, C.R.L.P.N.

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructures have at least one of their dimensions in the range 1-100 nm. Fabricating new, well-defined nanoscale objects and studying their physical properties is of importance, because it can lead to the development of potentially useful materials, novel device applications, and the discovery of

  4. Tunable nanostructures as photothermal theranostic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joseph K; Figueroa, Elizabeth R; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2012-02-01

    The theranostic potential of several nanostructures has been discussed in the context of photothermal therapies and imaging. In the last several decades, the burden of cancer has grown rapidly, making the need for new theranostic approaches vital. Lasers have emerged as promising tools in cancer treatment, especially with the advent of photothermal therapies wherein light absorbing dyes or plasmonic gold nanoparticles are used to generate heat and achieve tumor damage. Recently, photoabsorbing nanostructures have materialized that can be employed in conjunction with lasers in the near-infrared region in order to enhance both imaging and photothermal effects. The incorporation of tunable nanostructures has resulted in improved specificity in cancer treatment. Silica-cored gold nanoshells and gold nanorods currently serve as the chief plasmonic structures for photothermal therapy. Although gold nanorods and silica-cored gold nanoshells have shown promise as therapeutic agents, over the past few years new nanostructures have emerged that offer comparable and even superior theranostic properties. In the present review, several theranostic agents and their impact on the development of more effective photothermal therapies for the treatment of cancer are discussed. These agents include hollow gold nanoshells, gold gold-sulfide nanoparticles, gold nanocages, carbon and titanium nanotubes, photothermal-based nanobubbles, polymeric nanoparticles and copper-based nanocrystals.

  5. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  6. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  7. Nanostructured polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I O; Liu, X H; Smith, L A; Ma, P X

    2009-01-01

    The structural features of tissue engineering scaffolds affect cell response and must be engineered to support cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. The scaffold acts as an interim synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) that cells interact with prior to forming a new tissue. In this review, bone tissue engineering is used as the primary example for the sake of brevity. We focus on nanofibrous scaffolds and the incorporation of other components including other nanofeatures into the scaffold structure. Since the ECM is comprised in large part of collagen fibers, between 50 and 500 nm in diameter, well-designed nanofibrous scaffolds mimic this structure. Our group has developed a novel thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process in which a solution of biodegradable polymer is cast into a porous scaffold, resulting in a nanofibrous pore-wall structure. These nanoscale fibers have a diameter (50-500 nm) comparable to those collagen fibers found in the ECM. This process can then be combined with a porogen leaching technique, also developed by our group, to engineer an interconnected pore structure that promotes cell migration and tissue ingrowth in three dimensions. To improve upon efforts to incorporate a ceramic component into polymer scaffolds by mixing, our group has also developed a technique where apatite crystals are grown onto biodegradable polymer scaffolds by soaking them in simulated body fluid (SBF). By changing the polymer used, the concentration of ions in the SBF and by varying the treatment time, the size and distribution of these crystals are varied. Work is currently being done to improve the distribution of these crystals throughout three-dimensional scaffolds and to create nanoscale apatite deposits that better mimic those found in the ECM. In both nanofibrous and composite scaffolds, cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation improved when compared to control scaffolds. Additionally, composite scaffolds showed a decrease in

  8. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  9. Conformal Coating of Three-Dimensional Nanostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition for Development of Advanced Energy Storage Devices and Plasmonic Transparent Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Gary A.

    Due to the prodigious amount of electrical energy consumed throughout the world, there exists a great demand for new and improved methods of generating electrical energy in a clean and renewable manner as well as finding more effective ways to store it. This enormous task is of great interest to scientists and engineers, and much headway is being made by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured materials. This work explores the application of two types of 3D nanostructured materials toward fabrication of advanced electrical energy storage and conversion devices. The first nanostructured material consists of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. This three-dimensional structure is opaque, electrically conducting, and contains active sites along the outside of each fiber that are conducive to chemical reactions. Therefore, they make the perfect 3D conducting nanostructured substrate for advanced energy storage devices. In this work, the details for transforming vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays into core-shell structures via atomic layer deposition as well as into a mesoporous manganese oxide coated supercapacitor electrode are given. Another unique type of three-dimensional nanostructured substrate is nanotextured glass, which is transparent but non-conducting. Therefore, it can be converted to a 3D transparent conductor for possible application in photovoltaics if it can be conformally coated with a conducting material. This work details that transformation as well as the addition of plasmonic gold nanoparticles to complete the transition to a 3D plasmonic transparent conductor.

  10. Functional DNA nanostructures for theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dan; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-02-18

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing nanostructures by exploiting the unparalleled ability of DNA molecules in self-assembly. We have seen the appearance of many fantastic, "art-like" DNA nanostructures in one, two, or three dimensions during the last two decades. More recently, much attention has been directed to the use of these elegant nanoobjects for applications in a wide range of areas. Among them, diagnosis and therapy (i.e., theranostics) are of particular interest given the biological nature of DNA. One of the major barricades for the biosensor design lies in the restricted target accessibility at the solid-water interface. DNA nanotechnology provides a convenient approach to well control the biomolecule-confined surface to increase the ability of molecular recognition at the biosensing interface. For example, tetrahedral DNA nanostructures with thiol modifications can be self-assembled at the gold surface with high reproducibility. Since DNA tetrahedra are highly rigid and well-defined structures with atomic precision and versatile functionality, they provide scaffolds for anchoring of a variety of biomolecular probes (DNA, aptamers, peptides, and proteins) for biosensing. Significantly, this DNA nanostructure-based biosensing platform greatly increases target accessibility and improves the sensitivity for various types of molecular targets (DNA, RNA, proteins, and small molecules) by several orders of magnitude. In an alternative approach, DNA nanostructures provide a framework for the development of dynamic nanosensors that can function inside the cell. DNA tetrahedra are found to be facilely cell permeable and can sense and image specific molecules in cells. More importantly, these DNA nanostructures can be efficient drug delivery nanocarriers. Since they are DNA molecules by themselves, they have shown excellent cellular biocompatibility with minimal cytotoxicity. As an example, DNA tetrahedra tailored with CpG oligonucleotide drugs have

  11. Nanostructured Thermoelectrics and the New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2012-02-01

    A comprehensive and stable energy strategy would require proportionate attention to all three legs of the ``energy stool''; supply (sources), demand (efficiency) and storage/transport (delivery). Thermoelectric materials, that convert waste thermal energy into useful electrical energy, have an important role to play in any and all these three legs. The efficacy and efficiency of thermoelectrics is reflected in the figure of merit ZT, which is directly proportional to the power factor (comprising electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient) and inversely proportional to thermal conductivity (comprising carrier and lattice contributions). The recent emergence of nanostructured thermoelectrics has ushered in a new era for bulk thermoelectrics, which show considerable promise to enhance the ``contra-indicating'' parameters of high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. This is achieved by introducing nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric host materials to significantly reduce lattice thermal conductivity via effective scattering of heat carrying phonon through hierarchical architecture of nanostructured thermoelectrics. The presentation will cover recent developments, current research in our EFRC and future prospects for high performance bulk materials. Systems based on lead chalcogenides (e.g., PbTe, PbSe, PbS) present key science challenges with promising properties and are given particular emphasis. We have achieved excellent control of synthesis and crystal growth of such materials resulting in record enhancements in the figure of merit. These enhancements derive from very large reductions in lattice thermal conductivity possible with nanostructuring. We have experimentally realized concurrent synergistic effect of phonon blocking and charge transmission via the endotaxial placement of nanocrystals in thermoelectric material host. In particular, we have shown that the enhanced performance is due to nanostructuring of thermoelectric host matrix

  12. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  13. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  14. Fiber optic spanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-10-01

    Rotation is a fundamental function in nano/biotechnology and is being useful in a host of applications such as pumping of fluid flow in microfluidic channels for transport of micro/nano samples. Further, controlled rotation of single cell or microscopic object is useful for tomographic imaging. Though conventional microscope objective based laser spanners (based on transfer of spin or orbital angular momentum) have been used in the past, they are limited by the short working distance of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate development of a fiber optic spanner for rotation of microscopic objects using single-mode fiber optics. Fiber-optic trapping and simultaneous rotation of pin-wheel structure around axis perpendicular to fiber-optic axis was achieved using the fiber optic spanner. By adjusting the laser beam power, rotation speed of the trapped object and thus the microfluidic flow could be controlled. Since this method does not require special optical or structural properties of the sample to be rotated, three-dimensional rotation of a spherical cell could also be controlled. Further, using the fiber optic spanner, array of red blood cells could be assembled and actuated to generate vortex motion. Fiber optical trapping and spinning will enable physical and spectroscopic analysis of microscopic objects in solution and also find potential applications in lab- on-a-chip devices.

  15. Fiber Optic Microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  16. Photochromic glass optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Bilal A.; Israr, Amber; Asif, Muhammad; Aamir, Muhammad; Rehan, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and analysis of novel twin cored fiber which contains a transparent and silver halide doped photochromic core in same cladding. The Photochromic core fibers were fabricated in twin cored structure by rode and tube method. The diameter of photochromic core and transparent core is around 15 m. The distance between two cores is 1.5m. The transparent core was used to guide the probe beam and photochromic core was excited by UV source. The interaction of the probe beam with the excited photochromic core showed the photochromic behavior of the fiber.

  17. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2001-01-01

    The Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering have awarded Govind Agrawal with an honorable mention for the Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award for his work on Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd edition.Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd Edition, provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers. It retains most of the material that appeared in the first edition, with the exception of Chapter 6, which is now devoted to the polarization effects relevant for light propagation in optical

  18. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  19. ZBLAN Fiber Apparatus Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Dernis Tucker of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center examines a miniature furnace to be used in studying the crystallization of ZBLAN optical fibers under low-gravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 low-g aircraft. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. ZBLAN is a heavy-metal fluoride glass that shows exceptional promise for high-throughput communications with infrared lasers. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  20. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  1. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  2. Random Fiber Laser

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Christiano J S; Brito-Silva, Antônio M; Gámez, M A Martinez; Gomes, Anderson S L; de Araújo, Cid B

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of two dimensional confinement on the lasing properties of a classical random laser system operating in the incoherent feedback (diffusive) regime. A suspension of 250nm rutile (TiO2) particles in a Rhodamine 6G solution was inserted into the hollow core of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) generating the first random fiber laser and a novel quasi-one-dimensional RL geometry. Comparison with similar systems in bulk format shows that the random fiber laser presents an efficiency that is at least two orders of magnitude higher.

  3. Jilin Chemical Fiber Group Launches Its Largest Carbon Fiber Preject

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flora

    2011-01-01

    China's carbon fiber precursor production line with 5,000 tons of annual output was put into operation in Jilin Chemical Fiber Group on November 18th this year, creating the maximum production capacity currently in China, for which Jilin Chemical Fiber Group become China's largest carbon fiber precursor production base, The smooth operation of the project has laid a solid foundation for promoting China's carbon fiber industry steady, rapid, and healthy development,

  4. Multifunctional carbon nanotube composite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, E. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Dalton, A.B. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Collins, S.; Kozlov, M.; Razal, J.; Ebron, V.H.; Selvidge, M.; Ferraris, J.P.; Baughman, R.H. [The NanoTech Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, P.O. Box 830688, BE26, Richardson, TX 75083-0688 (United States); Coleman, J.N. [Department of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kim, B.G. [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea)

    2004-10-01

    Continuous carbon nanotube composite fibers having record energy-to-break (toughness) are reported. These fibers have been employed in the fabrication of lightweight fiber supercapacitors, which can be woven or sewn into fabrics and, therefore, be potentially considered as components for electronic textiles. Moreover, these fibers provided remarkable electromechanical actuator capabilities. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.;

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  6. Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Johathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.; Terani, Mehran [UNM MECH.ENG.; Al - Haik, Marwan [UNM MECH.ENG.; Garcia, Daniel [UNM MECH.ENG.; Taha, Mahmoud R [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber reinforced structural composites such as fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) have proven to be key materials for blast mitigation due to their enhanced mechanical performance. However, there is a need to further increase total energy absorption of the composites in order to retain structural integrity in high energy environments, for example, blast events. Research has shown that composite failure in high energy environments can be traced to their relatively low shear strength attributed to the limited bond strength between the matrix and the fibers. One area of focus for improving the strength of composite materials has been to create 'multi-scale' composites. The most common approach to date is to introduce carbon nanotubes into a more traditional composite consisting of epoxy with embedded micron scale fibers. The inclusion of carbon nanotubes (CNT) clearly toughens different matrices. Depositing CNT in brittle matrix increases stiffness by orders of magnitude. Currently, this approach to create multiscale composites is limited due to the difficulty of dispersing significant amounts of nanotubes. It has repeatedly been reported that phase separation occurs above relatively low weight percent loading (ca. 3%) due to the strong van der Waals forces between CNTs compared with that between CNT and polymer. Hence, the nanotubes tend to segregate and form inclusions. One means to prevent nanotube or nanofilament agglomeration is to anchor one end of the nanostructure, thereby creating a stable multi-phase structure. This is most easily done by literally growing the CNTs directly on micron scale fibers. Recently, CNT were grown on carbon fibers, both polyacrylonitrile- (PAN-) and pitch-based, by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using H2 and CH4 as precursors. Nickel clusters were electrodeposited on the fiber surfaces to catalyze the growth and uniform CNT coatings were obtained on both the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers. Multiwalled CNTs

  7. Machining of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komanduri, Ranga; Zhang, Bi; Vissa, Chandra M.

    Factors involved in machining of fiber-reinforced composites are reviewed. Consideration is given to properties of composites reinforced with boron filaments, glass fibers, aramid fibers, carbon fibers, and silicon carbide fibers and to polymer (organic) matrix composites, metal matrix composites, and ceramic matrix composites, as well as to the processes used in conventional machining of boron-titanium composites and of composites reinforced by each of these fibers. Particular attention is given to the methods of nonconventional machining, such as laser machining, water jet cutting, electrical discharge machining, and ultrasonic assisted machining. Also discussed are safety precautions which must be taken during machining of fiber-containing composites.

  8. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Drews, M. J.; Ellison, M. S.; Gantt, B. W.

    1989-01-01

    A process is being developed which evenly coats individual carbon fibers with thermoplastic polymers. In this novel, continuous coating process, the fiber tow bundle is first spread cover a series of convex rollers and then evenly coated with a fine powder of thermoplastic matrix polymer. Next, the fiber is heated internally by passing direct current through the powder coated fiber. The direct current is controlled to allow the carbon fiber temperature to slightly exceed the flow temperature of the matrix polymer. Analysis of the thermoplastic coated carbon fiber tows produced using this continuous process indicates that 30 to 70 vol pct fiber prepregs can be obtained.

  9. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Drews, M. J.; Ellison, M. S.; Gantt, B. W.

    1989-01-01

    A process is being developed which evenly coats individual carbon fibers with thermoplastic polymers. In this novel, continuous coating process, the fiber tow bundle is first spread cover a series of convex rollers and then evenly coated with a fine powder of thermoplastic matrix polymer. Next, the fiber is heated internally by passing direct current through the powder coated fiber. The direct current is controlled to allow the carbon fiber temperature to slightly exceed the flow temperature of the matrix polymer. Analysis of the thermoplastic coated carbon fiber tows produced using this continuous process indicates that 30 to 70 vol pct fiber prepregs can be obtained.

  10. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  11. Direct transfer of metallic photonic structures onto end facets of optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Feifei; Lin, Yuanhai

    2016-07-01

    We present a flexible approach to transfer metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) onto end facets of optical fibers. The MPCs were initially fabricated on a glass substrate with a spacer layer of indium tin oxide (ITO), which was used as a buffer layer in the transferring process. The fiber ends were firstly welded on the top surface of the MPCs by a drop of polymer solution after the solvent evaporated. The ITO layer was then etched by hydrochloric acid (HCl), so that the MPCs got off the substrate and were transferred to the fiber ends. Alternatively, the MPCs may be also etched off the substrate first by immersing the sample in HCl. The ultra-thin MPC sheet consisting of gold nanolines interlaced with photoresist gratings was then transferred to cap the fiber ends. In the later approach, we can choose which side of the MPCs to be used as the contact with the fiber facet. Such methods enabled convenient nanostructuring on optical fiber tips and achieving miniaturized MPC devices with compact integration, extending significantly applications of MPCs. In particular, the fabrications presented in this manuscript enrich the lab-on-fiber engineering techniques and the resultant devices have potential applications in remote sensing and detection systems.

  12. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  13. Low-fiber diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slow your bowel movements. This helps decrease diarrhea, gas, and bloating. Your doctor may recommend that you follow a low-fiber diet when you have a flare-up of: Irritable bowel syndrome Diverticulitis Crohn disease ...

  14. Fiber optics engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Azadeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Covering fiber optics from an engineering perspective, this text emphasizes data conversion between electrical and optical domains. Techniques to improve the fidelity of this conversion (from electrical to optical domain, and vice versa) are also covered.

  15. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  16. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  17. Preparation of mullite fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Wang, B.; Liu, S.; Yan, Y. [Xiamen Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    Transparent mullite fibers have been prepared using aluminum carboxylates (ACs) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as starting materials. The ACs are derived from the catalyzed dissolution of elemental aluminum in a mixture of formic acid and acetic acid. The solubility of aluminum in the acids is influenced by the concentrations of the acids, water, and additives and the preparation temperature. A 1:4:3:24 molar ratio of aluminum, formic acid, acetic acid, and water dissolves the aluminum completely to give a colorless, clear solution suitable for fiber synthesis. The mixture of the ACs and TEOS, in the presence of ethyl alcohol as a mutual solvent at 50--60 C, is concentrated to give a spinnable dope, from which mullite precursor fibers can be drawn. Heat treatment of the precursor at 1,250 C yields crystallized and transparent mullite fibers.

  18. ZBLAN Fiber Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Sections of ZBLAN fibers pulled in a conventional 1-g process (left) and in experiments aboard NASA's KC-135 low-gravity aircraft. The rough surface of the 1-g fiber indicates surface defects that would scatter an optical signal and greatly degrade its quality. ZBLAN is part of the family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium). NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. ZBLAN is a heavy-metal fluoride glass that shows exceptional promise for high-throughput communications with infrared lasers. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  19. Roof Polishing of Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    Bevealed tip gives optimum coupling efficiency. Abrasive tape used to grind tip of optical fiber. Grinding force depends on stiffness of optical fiber. "Roof" shape on end of optical glass fiber increases efficiency which couples laser light. End surface angle of 65 degrees with perpendicular required for optimum coupling. Since fiber and tape are light in weight and compliant, ridge defect-free, and chipping on fiber edge totally eliminated.

  20. Ground Wood Fiber Length Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Lauri Ilmari Salminen; Sari Liukkonen; Alava, Mikko J.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers ground wood fiber length distributions arising from pilot grindings. The empirical fiber length distributions appear to be independent of wood fiber length as well as feeding velocity. In terms of mathematics the fiber fragment distributions of ground wood pulp combine an exponential distribution for high-length fragments and a power-law distribution for smaller lengths. This implies that the fiber length distribution is influenced by the stone surface. A fragmentation-ba...

  1. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with quartz clad and aluminum buffer.

  2. Neuroanatomic Fiber Orientation Maps (FOMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, Hubertus; Jantzen, Jan; Grässel, David;

    2002-01-01

    A new neuroanatomic method is described which allows to map the orientation of central nervous fibers in gross histological sections. Polarised light is used to calculate the angle of inclination and direction of the fibers in each pixel. Serial fiber orientation maps (FOMs) can be aligned and 3D...... reconstructed. This volume allows to identify and segment the major fiber tracts. The feasible goal is a human central nervous fiber atlas....

  3. Raman Scattering of Inorganic Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    We have examined evolution of Raman spectra of carbon fibers and SiC fibers through structural transformations caused by heat treatment. Raman spectra of the SiC fibers indicate that the fibers consist of amorphous or microcrystalline SiC and graphitic microcrystals. We discuss the correlation between the tensile strength of the fibers and their microscopic structure deduced from the Raman data.

  4. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  5. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    numerical aperture is assumed to be small, the fiber modes are taken to be of the LP-type, described for example by Marcuse (Reference 11). In an (x...Fort Washington, PA. 11. D. Marcuse in Theory of Dielectric Optical Waveguides, Quantum Electronics, Principles and Applications, (Academic...10, 2252-2258, October 1971. 17. D. Marcuse , "Gaussian approximation of the fundamental modes of graded- index fibers," J. Opt. Soc. Am., Vol

  6. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  7. Production of mullite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor); Sparks, J. Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed here is a process for making mullite fibers wherein a hydrolizable silicon compound and an aluminum compound in the form of a difunctional aluminum chelate are hydrolized to form sols using water and an alcohol with a catalytic amount of hydrochloric acid. The sols are mixed in a molar ratio of aluminum to silicon of 3 to 1 and, under polycondensation conditions, a fibrous gel is formed. From this gel the mullite fibers can be produced.

  8. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    range of fluorescence could be tuned from yellow-green to blue , making these fibers ideal for micro- and nano-optoelectronic devices [144]. Figure 7...forces. Rapid phase separation of the distorted droplet and energy minimization may lead to the formation of the spider -web-like structure of the fiber...engineering cellularized blood vessels. Biomaterials 2010, 31, 4313–4321. 59. Thorvaldsson, A.; Stenhamre, H.; Gatenholm, P.; Walkenstrom, P

  9. Transport quantique dans des nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, C.

    2002-09-01

    Quantum transport in nanostructures This work is devoted to the design, fabrication and magnetotransport investigations of mesoscopic devices. The sample are obtain by e-beam lithography and the measurements are performed at low temperature in a dilution refrigerator in the presence of a magnetic field. We have used MBE grown AlGaAs/GaAs heterojonctions as starting material to fabricate a bipartite tiling of rhombus called mathcal{T}3 lattice. We observe for the first time large amplitude h/e oscillations in this network as compared to the one measured in square lattices of similar size. These oscillations are the signature of a recently predited localization phenomenon induced by Aharonov-Bohm interferences on this peculiar topology. For particular values of the magnetic field the propagation of the electron wave function is bounded in a small number of cells, called Aharonov-Bohm cages. More strikingly, at high magnetic field, h/2e oscillations appear whose amplitude can be much higher than the fundamental period. Their temperature dependence is similar to that of the h/e signal. These observations withdraw a simple interpretation in terms of harmonics generation. The origin of this phenomenon is still unclear and needs more investigations. The influence electrical width of the wire defining the network and so the rule of the number of channels can be studied using a gate deposited over the lattice. In particular we have measured the amplitude dependence of the h/e and h/2e signal versus the gate voltage. Ce travail est consacré à la réalisation d'échantillons mésoscopiques à partir de la lithographie électronique ainsi qu'à leur caractérisation à très basse température en magnétotransport. Nous avons pour cela exploité le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons situé à l'interface d'une hétérojonction AlGaAs/GaAs pour réaliser un réseau de boucle d'une géométrie particulière baptisée la géométrie mathcal{T}3. Nous avons observé sur cette

  10. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  11. Preparation and Dielectric Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Whiskers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Ling; YUAN Jie; ZHOU Wei; RONG Ji-Li; CAO Mao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    By a novel controlled combustion synthesis method, a large number of nanostructured ZnO whiskers with different morphologies, such as tetra-needles, long-leg tetra-needles and multi-needles, are prepared without any additive in open air at high temperature. The morphologies and crystalline structures of the as-prepared ZnO nanostructured whiskers are investigated by SEM and XRD. The possible growth mechanism on the nanostructured ZnO whiskers is proposed. The experimental results indicate that the dielectric constants and losses of the nanostructured ZnO whiskers are very low, demonstrating that the nanostructured ZnO whiskers are low-loss materials for microwave absorption in X-band. However, obvious microwave absorption in nanostructured ZnO whiskers is observed. The quasi-microantenna model may be attributed to the microwave absorption of the ZnO whiskers.

  12. Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation from Coupled Asymmetric Plasmonic Metal Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Yildiz, Bilge Can; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Coskun, Sahin; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Bek, Alpan

    2014-01-01

    We show that second harmonic generation can be enhanced by Fano resonant coupling of asymmetric plasmonic metal nanostructures. We develop a theoretical model examining the effects of electromagnetic interaction between two metal nanostructures on the second harmonic generation. We compare the second harmonic generation efficiency of a single plasmonic metal nanostructure with that of two coupled ones. We show that second harmonic generation from a single metal nanostructure can be enhanced about 30 times by attaching a second metal nanostructure with a 10 times higher quality factor than that of the first one. The origin of this enhancement is Fano resonant coupling of the two metal nanostructures. We support our findings on Fano enhancement of second harmonic generation by an experimental study of a coupled plasmonic system composed of a silver nanoparticle and a silver nanowire on glass surface in which the ratio of the quality factors are also estimated to be around 10 times.

  13. Development of a gold-nanostructured surface for amperometric genosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanardi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.zanardi@unimore.it [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Baldoli, Clara, E-mail: clara.baldoli@istm.cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari del CNR (Italy); Licandro, Emanuela [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale (Italy); Terzi, Fabio; Seeber, Renato [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A gold-nanostructured surface has been obtained by stable deposition of chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (2.1-5.5 nm size range) on a gold substrate through a dithiol linker. The method proposed for the obtainment of the nanostructure is suitable for the further stable anchoring of a peptide nucleic acid oligomer through four amine groups of lysine terminal residues, leading to fairly reproducible systems. The geometric area of the nanostructured surface is compared with those of a smooth and of an electrochemically generated nanostructured surface by depositing a probe bearing an electrochemically active ferrocene residue. Despite the area of the two nanostructures being quite similar, the response toward a 2 nM target oligonucleotide sequence is particularly high when using the surface built up by nanoparticle deposition. This aspect indicates that morphologic details of the nanostructure play a key role in conditioning the performances of the genosensors.

  14. Nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia coatings deposited by air plasma spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong; LI Fei; HE Bo; WANG Jun; SUN Bao-de

    2007-01-01

    Nanostructured yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying with reconstituted nanosized powder. The microstructures and phase compositions of the powder and the as-sprayed nanostructured coatings were characterized by transmission electron microscopy(TEM), scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD). The results demonstrate that the microstructure of as-sprayed nanostructured zirconia coating exhibits a unique tri-modal distribution including the initial nanostructure of the powder, equiaxed grains and columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed nanostructured zirconia coatings consist of only the nontransformable tetragonal phase, though the reconstituted nanostructured powder shows the presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal and the cubic phases. The mean grain size of the coating is about 42 nm.

  15. Light management of tandem solar cells on nanostructured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alan H.; Keshavarz, Majid; Wang, Guo; Yu, Rosaline; Niu, Xinwei; Yang, Liyou

    2017-04-01

    We report the use of nanostructured substrates as a simple approach to improve the performance of tandem micromorph silicon solar cells. In the proposed approach, nanostructured substrates are produced using a low-cost, self-assembled growth process. The use of a nanostructured substrate coated with a thick transparent conductive oxide electrode layer enables the conformal deposition of the tandem solar cell absorber layers while allowing the solar cell to exhibit a modified surface morphology caused by the underlying nanostructured morphology. Using this nanostructured substrate approach, we demonstrated a 78% relative enhancement in the conversion efficiency of a tandem micromorph silicon cell on a nanostructured substrate compared to a standard tandem micromorph cell deposited onto a flat substrate.

  16. Free-form nanostructured tools for plastic injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kafka, Jan; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Lam, Yee Cheong;

    -nated typically by lithography. The nanostructures are imprinted by means of flexible stamps. After imprinting, nanostructures in the sol-gel are cured by baking, by which the material is converted to a quartz-like substance. Line patterns with depths up to about 500 nm and aspect ratio of up to 1 have been...... realized and successfully transferred to plastic parts during injection moulding.As an example, we present theory and results regarding the imprint of pillar nanostructures on a semi-spherical mold surface, followed by injection molding of the same. The deformation of the flexible stamp is characterized......We present results on a recently developed process to provide nanostructured surfaces on curved free-form injection moulding tools. The nanostructures are prepared using a sol-gel type coating, which can be applied by various means. Nanostructures are transferred from master structures origi...

  17. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors.

  18. Nanostructure studies of strongly correlated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiang; Natelson, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Strongly correlated materials exhibit an amazing variety of phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity, as strong electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings lead to competing correlated ground states. Recently, researchers have begun to apply nanostructure-based techniques to this class of materials, examining electronic transport properties on previously inaccessible length scales, and applying perturbations to drive systems out of equilibrium. We review progress in this area, particularly emphasizing work in transition metal oxides (Fe(3)O(4), VO(2)), manganites, and high temperature cuprate superconductors. We conclude that such nanostructure-based studies have strong potential to reveal new information about the rich physics at work in these materials.

  19. Controlling diffusion of lithium in silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tzu-Liang; Chelikowsky, James R

    2010-03-10

    The ability to control the diffusion of dopants or impurities is a controlling factor in the functionalization of materials used in devices both at the macro- and nanoscales. At the nanoscale, manipulating diffusion of dopants is complicated by a number of factors such as the role of quantum confinement and the large surface to volume ratio. Here we examine Li in Si nanostructures, as atoms with low atomic mass such as Li can be used as a carrier for energy storage with high specific energy capacity. Specifically, Li-ion batteries with specific energy capacity as high as 4200 mA h g(-1) using Si nanowires as anodes have been achieved. Using ab initio calculations, we determine how the factors of size and dimensionality can be used to achieve an optimal diffusion of Li atoms in Si nanostructures.

  20. Quantum theory of plasmons in nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kirsten Trøstrup

    . For a theoretical description of plasmon in such materials, where the electrons are heavily confined in one or more directions, a quantum mechanical description of the electrons in the material is necessary. In this thesis, the ab initio methods Density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time-dependent DFT......In this thesis, ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations are used to study the properties of plasmons in nanostructures that involve atomic length-scales. The plasmon is an electronic excitation that corresponds to oscillations in the electron charge density in metals, often visualized as water...... are applied to calculate the properties of plasmons in nanostructures in different dimensions. In order to identify and visualize localized plasmon modes, a method for calculating plasmon eigenmodes within the ab initio framework has been developed. In the studied materials, quantum mechanical effects...