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Sample records for ct urography definition

  1. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  2. CT and MR urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Learning objectives:1) To describe the techniques of CT Urography and of MR urography; 2) To illustrate the benefit of the methods in clinical practice; 3)To present typical cases from the daily practice CT has become the mainstay of uroradiology in adults. CT urography is an excellent technique for the evaluation of urinary tract calculi, trauma, infections, complicated cysts, renal masses, having high sensitivity and specificity for both conditions facilitated by the possibilities for multiplanar imaging of the urinary system. It resembles excretory urography and consists of unenhanced, nephrographic, and pyelographic phases and can be used even as routine investigation. MR urography is a new, modern modality for evaluation of various urological abnormalities providing both morphological and functional information by means of different sequences with or without injection of gadolinium. The method is clinically useful in the evaluation of the collecting system, various variants and congenital abnormalities of the kidney, different cases of obstruction of the excretory system, tumors and inflammatory processes, hematuria. Compared to CT urography, MR urography is particularly beneficial in pediatric group or pregnant patients. It can also be performed in patients with renal insufficiency, iodine allergy and other cases of contraindications to the use of ionizing radiation. CT and MR urography are promising diagnostic methods of the wide spectrum of pathological conditions affecting the urinary tract. They are highly informative and overcome a lot of limitations of the other imaging modalities with the potential to become leading modalities to diagnose kidney diseases and other urogenital disorders.

  3. CT-Urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio; Morra, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography [it

  4. CT urography and hematuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretlau, Thomas; Hansen, Rasmus H; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography (CT) urography is now used in the work-up of patients with hematuria. The dose of contrast medium and radiation varies considerably between the different CT protocols. PURPOSE: To study the disease prevalence in a consecutive group of patients with hematuria...

  5. CT-Urography; Urografia CT

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    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio [Trieste Univ., Trieste (Italy). Dipartimento di scienze cliniche, morfologiche e tecnologiche, UCO di radiologia; Morra, Aldo [CRO, Aviano (Italy). Reparto di radiologia

    2005-09-15

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography. [Italian] Gli Autori presentano una panoramica sulla Urografia TC (Uro TC). L'avvento della TC multistrato e l'evoluzione delle tecniche di elaborazione consentono di ottenere dei quadri urografici ottimali comparativi con quelli convenzionali. Vengono ricordate le varie tecniche di acquisizione e i protocolli usati dai vari Autori. La dose effettiva di radiazioni ha rappresentato uno dei fattori condizionanti per cui oggi prevale l'orientamento di ridurre il numero di scansioni, considerando dopo la scansione senza mezzo di contrasto un'unica scansione contrasto grafica comprendente sia la fase nefrografica che quella urografica. Con l'uso della TC multistrato la qualita dell'urogramma migliora con l'aumento del numero degli strati. Vengono descritte le varie tecniche di elaborazione, la

  6. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications; MR-Urographie und CT-Urographie: Prinzipien, Untersuchungstechniken, Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten

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    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2003-02-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T{sub 2}-weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T{sub 1}-weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T{sub 1}-weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T{sub 2}*-effects) in the urine. T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T{sub 1}-weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in

  7. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G.; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J.

    2003-01-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T 2 -weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T 1 -weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T 1 -weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T 2 *-effects) in the urine. T 1 -weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T 1 -weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in modern uroradiology. (orig

  8. Prolonged CT urography in duplex kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Honghan; Gao, Lei; Dai, Xi-Jian; Zhou, Fuqing; Zhang, Ning; Zeng, Xianjun; Jiang, Jian; He, Laichang

    2016-05-13

    Duplex kidney is a common anomaly that is frequently associated with multiple complications. Typical computed tomography urography (CTU) includes four phases (unenhanced, arterial, parenchymal and excretory) and has been suggested to considerably aid in the duplex kidney diagnosi. Unfortunately, regarding duplex kidney with prolonged dilatation, the affected parenchyma and tortuous ureters demonstrate a lack of or delayed excretory opacification. We used prolonged-delay CTU, which consists of another prolonged-delay phase (1- to 72-h delay; mean delay: 24 h) to opacify the duplicated ureters and affected parenchyma. Seventeen patients (9 males and 8 females; age range: 2.5-56 y; mean age: 40.4 y) with duplex kidney were included in this study. Unenhanced scans did not find typical characteristics of duplex kidney, except for irregular perirenal morphology. Duplex kidney could not be confirmed on typical four-phase CTU, whereas it could be easily diagnosed in axial and CT-3D reconstruction using prolonged CTU (prolonged-delay phase). Between January 2005 and October 2010, in this review board-approved study (with waived informed consent), 17 patients (9 males and 8 females; age range: 2.5 ~ 56 y; mean age: 40.4 y) with suspicious duplex kidney underwent prolonged CTU to opacify the duplicated ureters and confirm the diagnosis. Our results suggest the validity of prolonged CTU to aid in the evaluation of the function of the affected parenchyma and in the demonstration of urinary tract malformations.

  9. Comparison of CT urography and intravenous urography in patients with hematuria

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    Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Byung Chul; Hwang, Ji Young [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    We wanted to compare CT urography (CTU) with using multi-detector row CT (MDCT) and intravenous urography (IVU) for diagnosing the causes of hematuria. From January 2003 to March 2004, IVU and CTU were obtained in 48 patients. We evaluated the causes of hematuria in 34 of 48 patients. The IVU images were obtained by the conventional method. The CTU images were routinely obtained before intravenous contrast injection, and at 2 and 5 minutes after intravenous contrast injection. In case of delayed excretion of contrast by the kidneys, the delayed CT scans were obtained at 120 minutes after contrast injection. All the CT images, including the axial and 3D coronal reformatted CTUs with using software as well as conventional IVU images, were reviewed by two radiologists working in consensus. We decided if urinary stone existed or not and we looked for the indirect signs such as hydronephrosis or delayed excretion, etc. We also observed if it was possible to determine the mass, ureteral stricture and enhancement of the ureteral wall, etc. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for each modality to diagnose urinary stone. We compared the detection rate according to the phases of CTU. We confirmed the presence of urinary tract stones in 27 of 34 patients who had undergone both IVU and CTU. We diagnosed ureteritis in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 5 and acute pyelonephritis in 1 of the remaining 7 patients. The urinary stones were detected in fifteen patients on both IVU and CTU (15/27, 55.6%). We detected the urinary stones on CTU, but not IVU, in twelve patients (12/27, 44.5%). The sensitivity to detect the urinary stones was 100% (27/27) on CTU and 55.6% (12/27) on IVU respectively. The specificity was 100% (7/7) on IVU and CTU, respectively. The positive predictive value was 100% (15/15) on IVU and 100% (27/27) on CTU, respectively. The negative predictive value was 36.8% (7/19) on IVU and 100% (7/7) on CTU

  10. Urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and to identify abnormalities in patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. In addition to imaging the urinary tract, CT ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  11. Multi-slice CT urography after diuretic injection: initial results

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    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Wildberger, J.E.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Borchers, H. [Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Urology

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of CT urography (CTU) using a multi-slice (MS) scanner and to find out whether a low-dose diuretic injection is advantageous for the opacification of the urinary tract. Methods: MS-CTU was performed in 21 patients with urologic diseases. In 5/21 patients, 250 ml of physiologic saline solution were injected. In 16/21 patients, 10 mg of furosemide were injected 3-5 min before contrast material administration. A 4x2.5 mm collimation with a pitch of 1.25 and a tube curent of 100-150 mA were used. Scan time was 12-16 sec. 3 mm thin axial images with an overlap of 67% were reconstructed. Multiplanar maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were postprocessed to obtain urographic views. Bone structures were eliminated using the volume-of-interest method. Results: Furosemide-enhanced MS-CTU achieved either near complete or complete opacification in 30/32 (94%) ureters and in 32/32 (100%) pelvicaliceal systems up to a serum creatinine of 150 {mu}mol/l. In our series, only one CTU scan per patient was needed to obtain a diagnostic urogram after 10 min of contrast material injection. Ureteral compression was not necessary. When physiologic saline solution was used instead of furosemide, the radiopacity inside the enhanced pelvicalices was 4-5 times higher and more inhomogeneous. Diuretic-enhanced MS-CTU was more accurate in the depiction of pelvicaliceal details. In combination with furosemide, calculi were well identified inside the opacified urine and were safely differentiated from phleboliths. Postprocessing times of up to 20 minutes were problematic as were contrast-enhanced superimposing bowel loops on MIP images. Conclusion: Preliminary results demonstrate a good feasibility of furosemide-enhanced MS-CTU for obtaining detailed visualization of the entire upper urinary tract. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Untersuchung zur Durchfuehrbarkeit der CT Urographie (CTU) mit einem Multidetektor(MD)-Computertomographen und ob eine

  12. CT urography in the diagnosis of renal masses in patients with hematuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warshauer, D.M.; Street, L.; McCarthy, S.M.; Glickman, M.G.; Ritcher, J.; Rosenfield, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal method for the diagnosis of renal masses in patients with hematuria has been in question since the introduction of axial imaging techniques. A prospective study comparing excretory urography and nephrotomography (EU) with limited renal CT was undertaken. Results showed EU able to detect approximately 75% of CT-confirmed masses greater than 2 cm, but less than 10% of CT masses smaller than 2 cm. These results suggest that a combination study of CT/EU utilizing a single contrast injection with EU for imaging the collecting system and CT for renal parenchymal evaluation would be the best screening study in patients with hematuria

  13. Comparison of post contrast CT urography phases in bladder cancer detection

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    Helenius, Malin; Dahlman, Par; Lonnemark, Maria; Magnusson, Anders [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Brekkan, Einar [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Urology, Uppsala (Sweden); Wernroth, Lisa [Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate which post-contrast phase(s) in a four-phase CT urography protocol is (are) most suitable for bladder cancer detection. The medical records of 106 patients with visible haematuria who underwent a CT urography examination, including unenhanced, enhancement-triggered corticomedullary (CMP), nephrographic (NP) and excretory (EP) phases, were reviewed. The post-contrast phases (n = 318 different phases) were randomized into an evaluation order and blindly reviewed by two uroradiologists. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Sensitivity for bladder cancer detection was 0.95 in CMP, 0.83 in NP and 0.81 in EP. Negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.99 in CMP, 0.96 in NP and 0.95 in EP. The sensitivity was higher in CMP than in both NP (p-value 0.016) and EP (p-value 0.0003). NPV was higher in CMP than in NP (p-value 0.024) and EP (p-value 0.002). In the CT urography protocol with enhancement-triggered scan, sensitivity and NPV were highest in the corticomedullary phase, and this phase should be used for bladder assessment. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of post contrast CT urography phases in bladder cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helenius, Malin; Dahlman, Par; Lonnemark, Maria; Magnusson, Anders; Brekkan, Einar; Wernroth, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which post-contrast phase(s) in a four-phase CT urography protocol is (are) most suitable for bladder cancer detection. The medical records of 106 patients with visible haematuria who underwent a CT urography examination, including unenhanced, enhancement-triggered corticomedullary (CMP), nephrographic (NP) and excretory (EP) phases, were reviewed. The post-contrast phases (n = 318 different phases) were randomized into an evaluation order and blindly reviewed by two uroradiologists. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Sensitivity for bladder cancer detection was 0.95 in CMP, 0.83 in NP and 0.81 in EP. Negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.99 in CMP, 0.96 in NP and 0.95 in EP. The sensitivity was higher in CMP than in both NP (p-value 0.016) and EP (p-value 0.0003). NPV was higher in CMP than in NP (p-value 0.024) and EP (p-value 0.002). In the CT urography protocol with enhancement-triggered scan, sensitivity and NPV were highest in the corticomedullary phase, and this phase should be used for bladder assessment. (orig.)

  15. CT urography of urinary diversions with enhanced CT digital radiography: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakoff, Gary S; Guralnick, Michael; Langenstroer, Peter; Foley, W Dennis; Cihlar, Krista L; Shakespear, Jonathan S; See, William A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if 3D-rendered CT urography (CTU) depicts both normal and abnormal findings in patients with urinary diversions and if the addition of contrast-enhanced CT digital radiography (CTDR) improves opacification of the urinary collecting system. Thirty CTU and contrast-enhanced CTDR examinations were performed in 24 patients who underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer. Indications for evaluation included hematuria, tumor surveillance, or suspected diversion malfunction. All examinations were evaluated without knowledge of the stage or grade of a patient's tumor and were compared with the clinical records. Opacification of the urinary collecting system was evaluated with 3D CTU alone, contrast-enhanced CTDR alone, and combined CTU and CTDR. Nine abnormalities were identified including distal ureteral strictures (n = 4), vascular compression of the mid left ureter (n = 1), scarring of the mid right pole infundibulum (n = 1), bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter (n = 1), urinary reservoir calculus (n = 1), and tumor recurrence invading the afferent limb of the neobladder (n = 1). Eight of the nine detected abnormalities were surgically or pathologically confirmed. All abnormalities were identified on all three imaging techniques but were best seen on 3D CTU and enhanced CTDR images. Incomplete opacification of the urinary collecting system occurred in 17 patients with CTU alone, 12 patients with contrast-enhanced CTDR alone, and nine patients with combined CTU and contrast-enhanced CTDR. Compared with CTU alone, the combined technique of 3D CTU and contrast-enhanced CTDR improved opacification by a statistically significant difference (p = 0.037). CTU with 3D rendering can accurately depict both normal and abnormal postoperative findings in patients with urinary diversions. Adding enhanced CTDR can improve visualization of the urinary collecting system.

  16. CT urography in women with primary or recurrent pelvic tumors. Background and initial experiences; CT-Urographie bei Frauen mit primaeren oder rezidivierenden Beckentumoren. Hintergrund und erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, S.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Degenhart, C.; Mourched, F.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Campus Innenstadt, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Jundt, K. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Campus Innenstadt, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Gynaekologie und Geburtshilfe, Muenchen (Germany); Stief, C.G.; Mueller-Lisse, U.L. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Campus Innenstadt, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Urologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Malignant tumors of the female pelvis account for 12-13% of newly diagnosed solid neoplasms among women in the USA and Germany. German guidelines advocate diagnostic imaging for local recurrence and metastasis while there are no recommendations for primary tumors. As excretory urography has been replaced by the excretory phase of computed tomography urography (CTU) in many institutions, two independent observers retrospectively evaluated CTUs of primary or recurrent female pelvic tumors to rule out associations between CTU findings and subsequent urologic measures. Among 31 CTUs of 27 women (age 29-84 years, mean 57 years) with 15 primary and 13 recurrent tumors, 83-100% of unremarkable proximal, middle and distal ureter segments were completely delineated in the excretory phase (delay 6-29 min, mean 16 min). The most common pathological findings included distal ureter obstruction (n=19, 61%), bladder compression (n=13, 42%) and bladder invasion (n=8, 26%). Out of 20 pathologically altered urinary tracts 8 were subsequently subjected to urologic measures (2-tailed Fisher exact test, p=0.0215) but none of the 10 unremarkable urinary tracts were treated. It appears that CTU is a sensible pre-therapeutic test for the urinary tract for primary and recurrent female pelvic tumors. (orig.) [German] Maligne Beckentumoren stellen 12-13% aller neu diagnostizierten soliden Neoplasien bei Frauen in den USA und in Deutschland dar. Deutsche Leitlinien befuerworten bildgebende Untersuchungen bei Lokalrezidiven und Metastasen; fuer Primaertumoren gibt es keine einschlaegigen Empfehlungen. Da das Ausscheidungsurogramm durch die Ausscheidungsaufnahme der CT-Urographie (CTU) weitgehend abgeloest ist, wurde bei weiblichen Beckentumoren oder deren Rezidive der Zusammenhang zwischen CTU-Befunden und nachfolgenden operativen urologischen Massnahmen retrospektiv von 2 unabhaengigen Auswertern geprueft. Bei 31 CTUs von 27 Frauen (Alter 29-84, Median 57 Jahre) mit 15 Primaertumoren und 13

  17. Modern diagnostic assessment of the upper urinary tract using multislice CT urography; Moderne Diagnostik des oberen Harntraktes mittels Mehrschicht-CT-Urographie

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    Kemper, J.; Adam, G.; Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    The advent of Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT) has made evaluation of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution sections during a single breath-hold a reality. Acquisition of multiple thin overlapping slices provides excellent two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reformations of the urinary tract. The concept of 'Multislice CT Urography (MSCTU)' has emerged from this technical improvement. As a result, a wide range of pathologies inside and outside the urinary tract can be identified. During the last several years, MSCTU has challenged intravenous urography (IVU) in the evaluation of urinary tract abnormalities. Compared with IVU, MSCT(U) is more sensitive and specific in the detection and characterization of a variety of urinary tract disorders, including renal masses and urolithiasis. The main advantage of IVU has been its ability to offer excellent delineation of kidney basin cup system and ureteral anatomy and to depict subtle uroepithelial abnormalities. MSCTU has already shown promising results for overcoming this challenge. Optimal opacification and distension appear to be an essential requirement for a thorough evaluation of the collecting system. Dedicated preparation strategies have been developed to meet these technical difficulties. The biggest disadvantage of MSCTU is the significant radiation exposure. For broad routine clinical application, there is still a need for dose reduction protocols despite the ongoing technical developments in MSCTU. In this article, we outline the different concepts of technical processing for MSCTU and summarize the current role of MSCTU in the evaluation of the upper urinary tract. (orig.)

  18. Single-phase dual-energy CT urography in the evaluation of haematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenti, G; Mileto, A; Gaeta, M; Blandino, A; Mazziotti, S; Scribano, E

    2013-02-01

    To assess the value of a single-phase dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) urography protocol with synchronous nephrographic-excretory phase enhancement and to calculate the potential dose reduction by omitting the unenhanced scan. Eighty-four patients referred for haematuria underwent CT urography using a protocol that included single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy contrast-enhanced with synchronous nephrographic-excretory phase scans. DECT-based images [virtual unenhanced (VUE), weighted average, and colour-coded iodine overlay] were reconstructed. Opacification degree by contrast media of the upper urinary tract, and image quality of virtual unenhanced images were independently evaluated using a four-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy in detecting urothelial tumours on DECT-based images was determined. The dose of a theoretical dual-phase single-energy protocol was obtained by multiplying the effective dose of the unenhanced single-energy acquisition by two. Radiation dose saving by omitting the unenhanced scan was calculated. The degree of opacification was scored as optimal or good in 86.9% of cases (k = 0.72); VUE image quality was excellent or good in 83.3% of cases (k = 0.82). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for urothelial tumours detection were 85.7, 98.6, 92.3, and 97.1%. Omission of the unenhanced scan led to a mean dose reduction of 42.7 ± 5%. Single-phase DECT urography with synchronous nephrographic-excretory phase enhancement represents an accurate "all-in-one'' approach with a radiation dose saving up to 45% compared with a standard dual-phase protocol. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-phase dual-energy CT urography in the evaluation of haematuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascenti, G.; Mileto, A.; Gaeta, M.; Blandino, A.; Mazziotti, S.; Scribano, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the value of a single-phase dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) urography protocol with synchronous nephrographic–excretory phase enhancement and to calculate the potential dose reduction by omitting the unenhanced scan. Materials and methods: Eighty-four patients referred for haematuria underwent CT urography using a protocol that included single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy contrast-enhanced with synchronous nephrographic–excretory phase scans. DECT-based images [virtual unenhanced (VUE), weighted average, and colour-coded iodine overlay] were reconstructed. Opacification degree by contrast media of the upper urinary tract, and image quality of virtual unenhanced images were independently evaluated using a four-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy in detecting urothelial tumours on DECT-based images was determined. The dose of a theoretical dual-phase single-energy protocol was obtained by multiplying the effective dose of the unenhanced single-energy acquisition by two. Radiation dose saving by omitting the unenhanced scan was calculated. Results: The degree of opacification was scored as optimal or good in 86.9% of cases (k = 0.72); VUE image quality was excellent or good in 83.3% of cases (k = 0.82). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for urothelial tumours detection were 85.7, 98.6, 92.3, and 97.1%. Omission of the unenhanced scan led to a mean dose reduction of 42.7 ± 5%. Conclusion: Single-phase DECT urography with synchronous nephrographic–excretory phase enhancement represents an accurate “all-in-one’’ approach with a radiation dose saving up to 45% compared with a standard dual-phase protocol.

  20. CT urography: a comparison of strategies for upper urinary tract opacification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Rupan; Deshmukh, Amol; Singh Sheorain, Virender; Taori, Kishor [Government Medical College, Department of Radiology, Nagpur (India)

    2007-05-15

    A consensus is yet to be reached regarding the best strategy for ensuring maximum ureteric delineation during CT urography (CTU). In this study we have compared various CTU protocols to try to establish the best method for ureteric delineation. Saline infusion in the supine position, saline infusion in the prone position, furosemide administration (10 mg, iv) and buscopan administration (20 mg iv) with saline infusion in the prone position were tried in four groups, each having 15 patients who were undergoing CTU. The pelvicalyceal system and ureter were divided into six segments, to each of which an opacification score was assigned (0, unopacified segment; 1, less than 50% opacified segment; 2, 50-99% of the segment opacified; or 3, completely opacified segment) and the results compared. Furosemide administration resulted in complete opacification of 93% of the ureters (28 of 30). In the distal (below the sciatic notch) ureter, the mean score with furosemide was 2.9, while that with saline, supine and prone positioning was 1.87 and 1.83, respectively, and this difference was highly significant (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.0001). It was also significantly higher than the buscopan group (score 2.3, P = 0.002). Also in the lower (the iliac crest to the sciatic notch) and upper (above the iliac crest) ureter, furosemide had significantly higher scores than saline infusion in either position. Saline infusion in the supine and prone positions had very similar scores in all segments that were less than the buscopan group, but this difference was not statistically significant. During CT urography, furosemide administration in low doses is the most effective and convenient technique for ureteric opacification. (orig.)

  1. CT urography: a comparison of strategies for upper urinary tract opacification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Rupan; Deshmukh, Amol; Singh Sheorain, Virender; Taori, Kishor

    2007-01-01

    A consensus is yet to be reached regarding the best strategy for ensuring maximum ureteric delineation during CT urography (CTU). In this study we have compared various CTU protocols to try to establish the best method for ureteric delineation. Saline infusion in the supine position, saline infusion in the prone position, furosemide administration (10 mg, iv) and buscopan administration (20 mg iv) with saline infusion in the prone position were tried in four groups, each having 15 patients who were undergoing CTU. The pelvicalyceal system and ureter were divided into six segments, to each of which an opacification score was assigned (0, unopacified segment; 1, less than 50% opacified segment; 2, 50-99% of the segment opacified; or 3, completely opacified segment) and the results compared. Furosemide administration resulted in complete opacification of 93% of the ureters (28 of 30). In the distal (below the sciatic notch) ureter, the mean score with furosemide was 2.9, while that with saline, supine and prone positioning was 1.87 and 1.83, respectively, and this difference was highly significant (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.0001). It was also significantly higher than the buscopan group (score 2.3, P = 0.002). Also in the lower (the iliac crest to the sciatic notch) and upper (above the iliac crest) ureter, furosemide had significantly higher scores than saline infusion in either position. Saline infusion in the supine and prone positions had very similar scores in all segments that were less than the buscopan group, but this difference was not statistically significant. During CT urography, furosemide administration in low doses is the most effective and convenient technique for ureteric opacification. (orig.)

  2. The effect of CT urography in the diagnosis of non-calculous urinary obstruction diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhuiyang; Shen Yuanliang; Li Xin; Cao Rongmei; Xu Xiqi; Dong Jian; Hua Dongying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic effect of CT urography (CTU) in patients with non-calculous obstructive diseases of urinary tract. Methods: Forty cases with non-calculous urinary obstruction underwent helical CT during nephrographic and excretory phases. Three dimensional CTU was obtained with the reconstruction of excretory phase axial images through the workstation. Results: 24 of 40 cases with benign obstruction had a slight or severe urinary dilation. Among them,18 congenital urinary malformations showed specific findings. Four ureteric inflammations revealed a gradual taper of the lumen just like a beak, and another two prostatic hypertrophy appeared oval impression upon the middle of the posterior bladder. Six intrinsic and 10 extrinsic tumors were seen irregular filling defects of the urinary tracts as well as soft tissue mass surrounding the obstructive site, accompanied by the middle urinary dilation in 12 cases and severe in four. Meanwhile, bilateral ureterohydronephroses were also found in four extrinsic tumors. In six patients with unilateral nonfunctioning urinary tracts, CTU could be imaged with minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and then be merged with contralateral maximum intensity projection (MaxIP). Conclusion: CTU is an effective modality in the evaluation of non-calculous urinary obstruction diseases. (authors)

  3. Split-bolus CT-urography using dual-energy CT: Feasibility, image quality and dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuru, E-mail: m2rbimn@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Kawai, Tatsuya; Ito, Masato; Ogawa, Masaki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Ohashi, Kazuya [Nagoya City University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) split-bolus CT-urography (CTU) and the quality of virtual non-enhanced images (VNEI) and DE combined nephrographic-excretory phase images (CNEPI), and to estimate radiation dose reduction if true non-enhanced images (TNEI) could be omitted. Patients and methods: Between August and September 2011, 30 consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected urothelial cancer or with hematuria underwent DE CT. Single-energy TNEI and DE CNEPI were obtained. VNEI was reconstructed from CNEPI. Image quality of CNEPI and VNEI was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The attenuation of urine in the bladder on TNEI and VNEI was measured. The CT dose index volume (CTDI (vol)) of the two scans was recorded. Results: The mean image quality score of CNEPI and VNEI was 4.7 and 3.3, respectively. The mean differences in urine attenuation between VNEI and TNEI were 14 {+-} 15 [SD] and -16 {+-} 29 in the anterior and posterior parts of the bladder, respectively. The mean CTDI (vol) for TNEI and CNEPI was 11.8 and 10.9 mGy, respectively. Omission of TNEI could reduce the total radiation dose by 52%. Conclusion: DE split-bolus CTU is technically feasible and can reduce radiation exposure; however, an additional TNEI scan is necessary when the VNEI quality is poor or quantitative evaluation of urine attenuation is required.

  4. [Clinical application of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with stellar photon detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Xue, Hua-dan; Jin, Zheng-yu; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Yu; He, Yong-lan; Zhang, Da-ming; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Yun; Qi, Bing; Xu, Kai; Wang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the clinical feasibility of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector. Totally 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with Stellar photon detector [80 kV, ref.92 mAs, CARE Dose 4D and CARE kV, pitch of 3.0, filter back projection reconstruction algorithm (FBP)] (group A). Another 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with common detector(100 kV, ref.140 mAs, CARE Dose 4D, pitch of 3.0, FBP) (group B). Quantitative measurement of CT value of urinary segments (Hounsfield units), image noise (Hounsfield units), and effective radiation dose (millisievert) were compared using independent-samples t test between two groups. Urinary system subjective opacification scores were compared using Mann-Whitney U test between two groups. There was no significant difference in subjective opacification score of intrarenal collecting system and ureters between two groups (all P>0.05). The group A images yielded significantly higher CT values of all urinary segments (all P0.05). The effective radiation dose of group A (1.1 mSv) was significantly lower than that of group B (3.79 mSv) (Ppitch low-tube-voltage during excretory phase dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector is feasible, with acceptable image noise and lower radiation dose.

  5. Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with CT urography versus renal dynamic imaging Gates method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Shan [Hebei North University, Department of Graduate, Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province (China); Ma, XianWu; Zhang, ChangZhu; Li, Qiang [Qiqihar Chinese Medicine Hospital, Department of Radiology, Qigihar City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Shi, WenWei; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, XiaoDong [The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2018-03-15

    To present a single-kidney CT-GFR measurement and compare it with the renal dynamic imaging Gates-GFR. Thirty-six patients with hydronephrosis referred for CT urography and 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging were prospectively included. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The CT urography protocol included non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phase imaging. The total CT-GFR was calculated by dividing the CT number increments of the total urinary system between the nephrographic and excretory phase by the products of iodine concentration in the aorta and the elapsed time, then multiplied by (1- Haematocrit). The total CT-GFR was then split into single-kidney CT-GFR by a left and right kidney proportionality factor. The results were compared with single-kidney Gates-GFR by using paired t-test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Paired difference between single-kidney CT-GFR (45.02 ± 13.91) and single-kidney Gates-GFR (51.21 ± 14.76) was 6.19 ± 5.63 ml/min, p<0.001, demonstrating 12.1% systematic underestimation with ±11.03 ml/min (±21.5%) measurement deviation. A good correlation was revealed between both measurements (r=0.87, p<0.001). The proposed single-kidney CT-GFR correlates and agrees well with the reference standard despite a systematic underestimation, therefore it could be a one-stop-shop for evaluating urinary tract morphology and split renal function. (orig.)

  6. Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with CT urography versus renal dynamic imaging Gates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Shan; Ma, XianWu; Zhang, ChangZhu; Li, Qiang; Shi, WenWei; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, XiaoDong

    2018-01-01

    To present a single-kidney CT-GFR measurement and compare it with the renal dynamic imaging Gates-GFR. Thirty-six patients with hydronephrosis referred for CT urography and 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging were prospectively included. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The CT urography protocol included non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phase imaging. The total CT-GFR was calculated by dividing the CT number increments of the total urinary system between the nephrographic and excretory phase by the products of iodine concentration in the aorta and the elapsed time, then multiplied by (1- Haematocrit). The total CT-GFR was then split into single-kidney CT-GFR by a left and right kidney proportionality factor. The results were compared with single-kidney Gates-GFR by using paired t-test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Paired difference between single-kidney CT-GFR (45.02 ± 13.91) and single-kidney Gates-GFR (51.21 ± 14.76) was 6.19 ± 5.63 ml/min, p<0.001, demonstrating 12.1% systematic underestimation with ±11.03 ml/min (±21.5%) measurement deviation. A good correlation was revealed between both measurements (r=0.87, p<0.001). The proposed single-kidney CT-GFR correlates and agrees well with the reference standard despite a systematic underestimation, therefore it could be a one-stop-shop for evaluating urinary tract morphology and split renal function. (orig.)

  7. Computer-aided detection of bladder wall thickening in CT urography (CTU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny H.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon Z.; Gordon, Marshall N.; Samala, Ravi K.

    2018-02-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection system for bladder cancer in CT urography (CTU). Bladder wall thickening is a manifestation of bladder cancer and its detection is more challenging than the detection of bladder masses. We first segmented the inner and outer bladder walls using our method that combined deep-learning convolutional neural network with level sets. The non-contrast-enhanced region was separated from the contrast-enhanced region with a maximum-intensity-projection-based method. The non-contrast region was smoothed and gray level threshold was applied to the contrast and non-contrast regions separately to extract the bladder wall and potential lesions. The bladder wall was transformed into a straightened thickness profile, which was analyzed to identify regions of wall thickening candidates. Volume-based features of the wall thickening candidates were analyzed with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to differentiate bladder wall thickenings from false positives. A data set of 112 patients, 87 with wall thickening and 25 with normal bladders, was collected retrospectively with IRB approval, and split into independent training and test sets. Of the 57 training cases, 44 had bladder wall thickening and 13 were normal. Of the 55 test cases, 43 had wall thickening and 12 were normal. The LDA classifier was trained with the training set and evaluated with the test set. FROC analysis showed that the system achieved sensitivities of 93.2% and 88.4% for the training and test sets, respectively, at 0.5 FPs/case.

  8. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography (CTU) using CLASS with enhanced contour conjoint procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for computerized bladder segmentation in CTU is that the bladder often contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast. Previously, we proposed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder is partially filled with contrast, CLASS segments the non-contrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours with a Contour Conjoint Procedure (CCP). The CCP is not trivial. Inaccuracies in the NC and C contours may cause CCP to exclude portions of the bladder. To alleviate this problem, we implemented model-guided refinement to propagate the C contour if the level set propagation in the region stops prematurely due to substantial non-uniformity of the contrast. An enhanced CCP with regularized energies further propagates the conjoint contours to the correct bladder boundary. Segmentation performance was evaluated using 70 cases. For all cases, 3D hand segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of average volume intersection %, average % volume error, and average minimum distance. With enhanced CCP, those values were 84.4±10.6%, 8.3±16.1%, 3.4±1.8 mm, respectively. With CLASS, those values were 74.6±13.1%, 19.6±18.6%, 4.4±2.2 mm, respectively. The enhanced CCP improved bladder segmentation significantly (p<0.001) for all three performance measures.

  9. The value of computed tomography-urography in predicting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The natural course of pelviureteric junction (PUJ) obstruction is variable. Of those who require surgical intervention, there is no definite reliable preoperative predictor of the likely postoperative outcome. We evaluated the value of preoperative computed tomography (CT)-urography in predicting the ...

  10. Comparison of CLASS and ITK-SNAP in segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. We have developed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast, CLASS segments the noncontrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours. In this study, we compared the performance of CLASS to ITK-SNAP 2.4, which is a publicly available software application for segmentation of structures in 3D medical images. ITK-SNAP performs segmentation by using the edge-based level set on preprocessed images. The level set were initialized by manually placing a sphere at the boundary between the C and NC parts of the bladders with C and NC regions, and in the middle of the bladders that had only C or NC region. Level set parameters and the number of iterations were chosen after experimentation with bladder cases. Segmentation performances were compared using 30 randomly selected bladders. 3D hand-segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of the average volume intersection %, average % volume error, average absolute % volume error, average minimum distance, and average Jaccard index. For CLASS, the values for these performance metrics were 79.0±8.2%, 16.1±16.3%, 19.9±11.1%, 3.5±1.3 mm, 75.7±8.4%, respectively. For ITK-SNAP, the corresponding values were 78.8±8.2%, 8.3±33.1%, 24.2±23.7%, 5.2±2.6 mm, 71.0±15.4%, respectively. CLASS on average performed better and exhibited less variations than ITK-SNAP for bladder segmentation.

  11. Urinary stone detection and characterisation with dual-energy CT urography after furosemide intravenous injection: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botsikas, Diomidis; Hansen, Catrina; Stefanelli, Salvatore; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospital, Radiology Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To investigate the added advantage of IV furosemide injection and the subsequent urine dilution in the detection of urinary calculi in the excretory phase of dual-source dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) urography, and to investigate the feasibility of characterising the calculi through diluted urine. Twenty-three urinary calculi were detected in 116 patients who underwent DECT urography for macroscopic haematuria with a split bolus two- or three-acquisition protocol, including a true unenhanced series and at least a mixed nephrographic excretory phase. Virtual unenhanced images were reconstructed from contrast-enhanced DE data. Calculi were recorded on all series and characterised based on their X-ray absorption characteristics at 100 kVp and 140 kVp in both true unenhanced and nephrographic excretory phase series. All calculi with a diameter more than 2 mm were detected in the virtual unenhanced phase and in the nephrographic excretory phase. Thirteen of these calculi could be characterised in the true unenhanced phase and in the mixed nephrographic excretory phase. The results were strictly identical for both phases, six of them being recognised as non-uric acid calculi and seven as uric acid calculi. Mixed nephrographic excretory phase DECT after furosemide administration allows both detection and characterisation of clinically significant calculi, through the diluted urine. (orig.)

  12. CT urography: segmentation of urinary bladder using CLASS with local contour refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M; Cohan, Richard H; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a computerized system for bladder segmentation on CT urography (CTU), as a critical component for computer-aided detection of bladder cancer. The presence of regions filled with intravenous contrast and without contrast presents a challenge for bladder segmentation. Previously, we proposed a conjoint level set analysis and segmentation system (CLASS). In case the bladder is partially filled with contrast, CLASS segments the non-contrast (NC) region and the contrast-filled (C) region separately and automatically conjoins the NC and C region contours; however, inaccuracies in the NC and C region contours may cause the conjoint contour to exclude portions of the bladder. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a local contour refinement (LCR) method that exploits model-guided refinement (MGR) and energy-driven wavefront propagation (EDWP). MGR propagates the C region contours if the level set propagation in the C region stops prematurely due to substantial non-uniformity of the contrast. EDWP with regularized energies further propagates the conjoint contours to the correct bladder boundary. EDWP uses changes in energies, smoothness criteria of the contour, and previous slice contour to determine when to stop the propagation, following decision rules derived from training. A data set of 173 cases was collected for this study: 81 cases in the training set (42 lesions, 21 wall thickenings, 18 normal bladders) and 92 cases in the test set (43 lesions, 36 wall thickenings, 13 normal bladders). For all cases, 3D hand segmented contours were obtained as reference standard and used for the evaluation of the computerized segmentation accuracy. For CLASS with LCR, the average volume intersection ratio, average volume error, absolute average volume error, average minimum distance and Jaccard index were 84.2 ± 11.4%, 8.2 ± 17.4%, 13.0 ± 14.1%, 3.5 ± 1.9 mm, 78.8 ± 11.6%, respectively, for the training set and 78.0 ± 14.7%, 16.4 ± 16.9%, 18.2 ± 15

  13. Comprehensive MR Urography Protocol: Equally Good Diagnostic Performance and Enhanced Visibility of the Upper Urinary Tract Compared to Triple-Phase CT Urography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Sudah

    Full Text Available To prospectively compare the diagnostic performance and the visualization of the upper urinary tract (UUT using a comprehensive 3.0T- magnetic resonance urography (MRU protocol versus triple-phase computed tomography urography (CTU.During the study period (January-2014 through December-2015, all consecutive patients in our tertiary university hospital scheduled by a urologist for CTU to exclude UUT malignancy were invited to participate. Diagnostic performance and visualization scores of 3.0T-MRU were compared to CTU using Wilcoxon matched-pairs test.Twenty patients (39 UUT excreting units were evaluated. 3.0T-MRU and CTU achieved equal diagnostic performances. The benign etiology of seven UUT obstructions was clarified equally with both methods. Another two urinary tract malignant tumors and one benign extraurinary tumor were detected and confirmed. Diagnostic visualization was slightly better in the intrarenal cavity areas with CTU but worsened towards distal ureter. MRU showed consistently slightly better visualization of the ureter. In the comparison, full 100% visualizations were detected in all areas in 93.6% (with 3.0T-MRU and 87.2% (with CTU and >75% visualization in 100% (3.0T-MRU and 93.6% (CTU. Mean CTU effective radiation dose was 9.2 mSv.Comprehensive 3.0T-MRU is an accurate imaging modality achieving comparable performance with CTU; since it does not entail exposure to radiation, it has the potential to become the primary investigation technique in selected patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02606513.

  14. Bladder cancer treatment response assessment in CT urography using two-channel deep-learning network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny H.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Samala, Ravi K.; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Weizer, Alon Z.; Alva, Ajjai

    2018-02-01

    We are developing a CAD system for bladder cancer treatment response assessment in CT. We trained a 2- Channel Deep-learning Convolution Neural Network (2Ch-DCNN) to identify responders (T0 disease) and nonresponders to chemotherapy. The 87 lesions from 82 cases generated 18,600 training paired ROIs that were extracted from segmented bladder lesions in the pre- and post-treatment CT scans and partitioned for 2-fold cross validation. The paired ROIs were input to two parallel channels of the 2Ch-DCNN. We compared the 2Ch-DCNN with our hybrid prepost- treatment ROI DCNN method and the assessments by 2 experienced abdominal radiologists. The radiologist estimated the likelihood of stage T0 after viewing each pre-post-treatment CT pair. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed and the area under the curve (AUC) and the partial AUC at sensitivity AUC0.9) were compared. The test AUCs were 0.76+/-0.07 and 0.75+/-0.07 for the 2 partitions, respectively, for the 2Ch-DCNN, and were 0.75+/-0.08 and 0.75+/-0.07 for the hybrid ROI method. The AUCs for Radiologist 1 were 0.67+/-0.09 and 0.75+/-0.07 for the 2 partitions, respectively, and were 0.79+/-0.07 and 0.70+/-0.09 for Radiologist 2. For the 2Ch-DCNN, the AUC0.9s were 0.43 and 0.39 for the 2 partitions, respectively, and were 0.19 and 0.28 for the hybrid ROI method. For Radiologist 1, the AUC0.9s were 0.14 and 0.34 for partition 1 and 2, respectively, and were 0.33 and 0.23 for Radiologist 2. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of using a 2Ch-DCNN for the estimation of bladder cancer treatment response in CT.

  15. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  16. Bladder cancer staging in CT urography: effect of stage labels on statistical modeling of a decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, Dhanuj; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2018-02-01

    In bladder cancer, stage T2 is an important threshold in the decision of administering neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our long-term goal is to develop a quantitative computerized decision support system (CDSS-S) to aid clinicians in accurate staging. In this study, we examined the effect of stage labels of the training samples on modeling such a system. We used a data set of 84 bladder cancers imaged with CT Urography (CTU). At clinical staging prior to treatment, 43 lesions were staged as below stage T2 and 41 were stage T2 or above. After cystectomy and pathological staging that is considered the gold standard, 10 of the lesions were upstaged to stage T2 or above. After correcting the stage labels, 33 lesions were below stage T2, and 51 were stage T2 or above. For the CDSS-S, the lesions were segmented using our AI-CALS method and radiomic features were extracted. We trained a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with leave-one-case-out cross validation to distinguish between bladder lesions of stage T2 or above and those below stage T2. The CDSS-S was trained and tested with the corrected post-cystectomy labels, and as a comparison, CDSS-S was also trained with understaged pre-treatment labels and tested on lesions with corrected labels. The test AUC for the CDSS-S trained with corrected labels was 0.89 +/- 0.04. For the CDSS-S trained with understaged pre-treatment labels and tested on the lesions with corrected labels, the test AUC was 0.86 +/- 0.04. The likelihood of stage T2 or above for 9 out of the 10 understaged lesions was correctly increased for the CDSS-S trained with corrected labels. The CDSS-S is sensitive to the accuracy of stage labeling. The CDSS-S trained with correct labels shows promise in prediction of the bladder cancer stage.

  17. Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal diverticulum discovered by magnetic resonance urography[

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akatsuka, Jun; Suzuki, Yasutomo; Hamasaki, Tsutomu; Kimura, Go; Kondo, Yukihiro, E-mail: s00-001@nms.ac.jp [Departments of Urology, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Neither computed tomography (CT) nor intravenous pyelography (IVP) alone can diagnose tumors of renal pelvic diverticula, but magnetic resonance urography (MRU) can obtain accurate preoperative information. (author)

  18. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification - a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szolar, Dieter H.; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p ≤ 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p ≤ 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p ≤ 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement. (orig.)

  19. Ultrasonography versus intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaksen, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the clinical value of urography and ultrasonography in a non-selected group of patients referred for urography to a university hospital. The conslusions and clinical implications of the study are as follows: Intravenous urography remains the cornerstone imaging examination in the evaluation of ureteral calculi. Ultrasonography is a valuable adjunct in cases of non- visualization of the kidneys, in distal obstruction and known contrast media allergy. When women with recurrent urinary tract infection are referred for imaging of the urinary tract, ultrasonography should be used. Ultrasonography should replace urography for screening of non-acute hydronephrosis like in female genital cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia. There is good correlation between urography and ultrasonography in assessing the degree of hydronephrosis. However, more researh on the relationship between hydronephrosis and obstruction is necessary. Ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging method of the upper urinary tract in patients with microscopic hematuria. In patients less than 50 years with macroscopic hematuria, ultrasonography should be used as the only imaging of the upper urinary tract, and an examination of the urinary bladder should be included. In patients over 50 years, urography supplied with ultrasonography should be used, but more research is necessary on the subject of imaging method and age. 158 refs

  20. CT urography in the urinary bladder: To compare excretory phase images using a low noise index and a high noise index with adaptive noise reduction filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takaki; Ohgiya, Yoshimitsu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although CT urography (CTU) is widely used for the evaluation of the entire urinary tract, the most important drawback is the radiation exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a noise reduction filter (NRF) using a phantom and to quantitatively and qualitatively compare excretory phase (EP) images using a low noise index (NI) with those using a high NI and postprocessing NRF (pNRF). Material and Methods: Each NI value was defined for a slice thickness of 5 mm, and reconstructed images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm were assessed. Sixty patients who were at high risk of developing bladder tumors (BT) were divided into two groups according to whether their EP images were obtained using an NI of 9.88 (29 patients; group A) or an NI of 20 and pNRF (31 patients; group B). The CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the bladder with respect to the anterior pelvic fat were compared in both groups. Qualitative assessment of the urinary bladder for image noise, sharpness, streak artifacts, homogeneity, and the conspicuity of polypoid or sessile-shaped BTs with a short-axis diameter greater than 10 mm was performed using a 3-point scale. Results: The phantom study showed noise reduction of approximately 40% and 76% dose reduction between group A and group B. CTDI vol demonstrated a 73% reduction in group B (4.6 ± 1.1 mGy) compared with group A (16.9 ± 3.4 mGy). The CNR value was not significantly different (P = 0.60) between group A (16.1 ± 5.1) and group B (16.6 ± 7.6). Although group A was superior (P < 0.01) to group B with regard to image noise, other qualitative analyses did not show significant differences. Conclusion: EP images using a high NI and pNRF were quantitatively and qualitatively comparable to those using a low NI, except with regard to image noise

  1. MR urography: the future gold standard in paediatric urogenital imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthne, A.; Nordshus, T.; Reiseter, T. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Geitung, J.T. [Department of General Radiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Gjesdal, K.I. [Department of Medical Physics and Techniques, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Babovic, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Bjerre, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Loe, B. [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    1999-09-01

    Background. Examination of the paediatric urogenital tract is traditionally performed using methods that utilise ionising radiation, such as intravenous urography (IVU), computerised tomography (CT), voiding cystourethrography (VCU), and scintigraphy, in addition to ultrasound (US). Objective. To determine the potential and effectiveness of MR urography (MRU) in infants and children. Materials and methods. 44 MRU examinations were prospectively performed in 39 patients (21 infants, mean age 3.5 months, and 18 children, mean age 6 years 2 months) with known or suspected pathology of the urinary tract. Non-enhanced, fast spin-echo sequences (TSE) were performed in all patients. In 70 % of the patients a contrast-enhanced, fast gradient-echo sequence (TFE) was included. The dynamic sequence was prolonged and supplemented with furosemide provocation in some patients with suspected urinary-tract obstruction. Results. Nine percent of examinations were non-diagnostic or interrupted due to movement. MRU contributed additional information in 66 %. Nine patients with suspected urinary-tract obstruction were examined with both contrast-enhanced MRU and scintigraphy. Three MRU examinations were less informative and one equal to scintigraphy when obstruction was the diagnosis. When using a technique with a prolonged dynamic sequence, including frusemide provocation, four MRU examinations were equal and one was superior to scintigraphy. Conclusions. MRU has the potential to replace traditional diagnostic methods which use ionising radiation in paediatric patients. Further studies are needed before definite conclusions can be drawn. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 34 refs.

  2. Multislice CT urography (MSCTU): evaluation of a modified scan protocol for optimized opacification of the collecting system; Mehrschicht-CT-Urographie (MSCTU): Beurteilung eines modifizierten Untersuchungsprotokolls zur Optimierung der Kontrastierung des Harnwegsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Regier, M.; Stork, A.; Adam, G.; Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively quantify opacification of the urinary tract using a MSCTU protocol based on furosemide and individual adaptation of urographic acquisition delay. Materials and methods: MSCTU examinations obtained from 4-row and 16-row CT scanners in 53 patients (35 men, 18 women, average age 59) were independently reviewed by two radiologists. MSCTUs were performed using a low-dose injection of furosemide. No fixed scan delay for urographic image acquisition was applied. The urographic timing was individually adapted by performing low-dose test images of the distal ureters to display their current opacification. Image analysis included grading of the opacification of the segmented collecting system. The average urographic delay was calculated. Stratified comparisons of mean scores were assessed using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests. The inter-observer kappa value was calculated. Results: The calculated median scan delay for patients with normal serum-creatinine levels (n=51) was 418 sec (mean 447 sec; SD, 118 sec). The median number of acquired test images was 2 (range 1-6 images). The opacification analysis demonstrated that 98% of the ICS, 90% of the proximal, 86% of the middle, and 83% of the distal ureteral segments showed opacification greater than 90%. 9.5% of the distal ureteral segments could not be visualized. Statistics did not show significant opacification differences between proximal, middle, and distal ureteral segments (p>0.05). The two observers were largely in agreement (kappa coefficient r=0.81). Conclusion: The analyzed MSCTU technique based on furosemide and scan delay timing by means of test images reliably lead to a homogeneous opacification of the entire upper urinary tract. It features the individual adaptation of MSCTU to the excretory rate of the kidneys. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of four different preparation protocols to achieve bladder distension in patients with gross haematuria undergoing a CT urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helenius, Malin; Segelsjo, Monica; Dahlman, Par; Magnusson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: CT examination has been shown to be effective in detecting bladder cancer. Proper evaluation of the bladder requires it to be well distended. The purpose of the present study was to establish a preparation protocol to achieve satisfactory bladder distension without causing unacceptable patient discomfort. Material and method: We used four different preparation protocols (1: 0.5 L of fluid intake during a 1-h period, 2: Same as 1 with the addition of IV diuretics when the patient was examined, 3: 1 L of fluid intake during a 2-h period, 4: Same as 3 with the additional instruction to empty the bladder after 1 h. In protocols 1–3, the patients were asked not to empty their bladder during the preparation time). Bladder volume was calculated and bladder distension was judged as satisfactory or not by the radiologist. The patients answered questions about their ability to follow the preparation protocol and were requested to rate their need to empty the bladder pre-, during and post-examination. Results: Protocol 1 had the lowest bladder volume. Protocols 2, 3 and 4 were similar in bladder volume. However, Protocol 2 caused unacceptable patient discomfort, and the compliance was lowest in Protocol 4. Conclusion: Protocol 3, drinking 1 L of fluid during a 2-h period, gave satisfactory bladder distension, did not cause unacceptable discomfort in patients and did not have the lowest compliance.

  4. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging for simultaneous detection, characterization, and volume measurement of urinary stones with excretory-phase CT urography alone. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Niikawa, Hidekazu; Shikata, Atsushi; Murakami, Emi; Tsunoda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshihide; Tsujihata, Masao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if two-pass dual-energy CT imaging - id est (i.e.), simultaneous three-material and two-material decomposition analysis - can depict and characterize urinary stones in various concentrations of iodine solution in vitro. Twelve urinary stones were scanned with a dual-source CT scanner. First, each stone (in a saline-filled tube) underwent single- and dual-energy mode CT scans in order to measure the volume of the stone. Each stone was then placed in various concentrations of contrast medium and scanned in dual-energy mode to calculate its volume via three-material decomposition analysis. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging analysis software for the Matlab environment, which was developed specifically to process simultaneous three-material and two-material decomposition, was applied to characterize and calculate the volume of each stone. Although the virtual non-contrast images from three-material decomposition analysis clearly visualized all of the stones in contrast medium with up to 80 mgI/mL, the volumes of the uric acid stones were overestimated. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging was able to depict and characterize non-uric-acid stones in diluted contrast medium with up to 80 mgI/mL, whereas uric acid stones were correctly evaluated in diluted contrast medium with 40 mgI/mL or less. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging is able to depict and characterize urinary stones in contrast medium. (author)

  5. Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal diverticulum discovered by magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Akatsuka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neither computed tomography (CT nor intravenous pyelography (IVP alone can diagnose tumors of renal pelvic diverticula, but magnetic resonance urography (MRU can obtain accurate preoperative information.

  6. Comparison of excretory phase, helical computed tomography with intravenous urography in patients with painless haematuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, M.E.; Hahn, P.F.; Yoder, I.C.; Gazelle, G.S.; McGovern, F.J.; Mueller, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare excretory phase, helical computed tomography (CT) with intravenous (IV) urography for evaluation of the urinary tract in patients with painless haematuria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-one out-patients had IV urography followed by helical CT limited to the urinary tract. Both IV urograms and CT images were evaluated for abnormalities of the urinary tract in a blinded, prospective manner. The clinical significance of abnormalities was scored subjectively and receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was performed. RESULTS: In 69 of 91 patients (76%), no cause of haematuria was identified. In 22 of 91 patients (24%), the cause of haematuria was identified as follows: transitional cell cancer of the bladder (n=15), urinary tract stones (n=3), cystitis (n=2), haemorrhagic pyelitis (n=1) and benign ureteral stricture (n=1). With IV urography, there were 15 true-positive, seven false-negative and three false-positive interpretations. With CT, there were 18 true-positive, four false-negative and two false-positive interpretations. There was no significant difference between IV and CT urography for the significance of the positive interpretations (n=0.47). CONCLUSION: Excretory phase CT urography was comparable with IV urography for evaluation of the urinary tract in patients with painless haematuria. However, the study population did not include any upper tract cancers. O'Malley M. E. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology 58, 294-300

  7. Low tube voltage computed tomography urography using low-concentration contrast media: Comparison of image quality in conventional computed tomography urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Inpyeong; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Oh, Seung-June; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Lee, Joongyup; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and image quality of excretory CT urography performed using low iodine-concentration contrast media and low tube voltage. This prospective study enrolled 63 patients who undergoing CT urography. The subjects were randomized into two groups of an excretory phase CT urography protocol and received either 240 mg I/mL of contrast media and 80 kVp of tube voltage (low-concentration protocol, n=32) or 350 mg I/mL and 120 kVp (conventional protocol, n=31). Two readers qualitatively evaluated images for sharpness of the urinary tract, image noise, streak artifact and overall diagnostic acceptability. The mean attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and figure of merit were measured in the urinary tract. The non-inferiority test assessed the diagnostic acceptability between the two protocol groups. The low-concentration protocol showed a significantly lower effective radiation dose (3.44 vs. 5.70 mSv, Pcontrast-to-noise ratio and figure of merit were significantly higher in the low-concentration protocol along the entire urinary tract (Pcontrast media, 80 kVp tube voltage and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is beneficial to reduce radiation dose and iodine load, and its objective image quality and subjective diagnostic acceptability is not inferior to that of conventional CT urography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative retrospective studies on the findings of CT, sonography, urography, and angiography in retroperitoneal organ structures - random study on a mixed group of subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation was, in a retrospective study, to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the CT with that of sonography and, as far as possible, of other X-ray methods for kidneys, the pancreas, suprarenal glands and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The data of all patients was looked at who were examined in the afore mentioned regions using a computerised tomograph, at the Deutsche Klinik fuer Diagnostik in Wiesbaden between May 1978 and January 1980. In all, 288 cases were studied. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Changing indications for excretory urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Most individuals suspected of having renovascular hypertension, men with benign prostatic enlargement, women with recurrent infections of the urinary tract or urinary stress incontinence, women undergoing hysterectomy, uremic and diabetic patients, and patients with renal transplant or adult polycystic kidney disease should not, as a rule, undergo routine excretory urography (EU). Possible morbidity and mortality and unwarranted cost do not justify the study, since the majority of individuals in any of these situations do not benefit from the information obtained from the study. Excretory urography must be performed selectively, rather than routinely, in such persons. As the authors emphasize, modified EU, often using only two to three films, may be performed under many clinical situations to reduce radiation exposure, toxic effects, and cost to the patient

  10. Computed tomography as a supplement to urography in the evaluation of suspected neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M. J.; Sagel, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven children in whom a retropertioneal neuroblastoma was suspected on the basis of plain radiographic or urographic findings underwent computed tomography (CT). CT identified and localized a neurogenic tumor in eight patients. Calcifications were demonstrated by CT in six lesions, but by urography in only four. One neuroblastoma detected by CT was not seen on the urogram; in five patients greater extent of the tumor was defined by CT than by conventional radiologic procedures. In three patients CT excluded a neuroblastoma, but diagnosed other disorders (hepatic tumor, pancreatitis, and retrocaval ureter). Our results confirm that CT is a simple and accurate method for diagnosis, delineation of extent, or exclusion of neuroblastoma

  11. MR urography: examination techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2001-03-01

    Modern MR urography is performed on the basis of two different imaging strategies, which can be used complementarily to cover almost all aspects in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract diseases. The first technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T2-weighted pulse sequences to obtain static-fluid images of the urinary tract. T2-weighted MR urograms have proved to be excellent in the visualization of the markedly dilated urinary tract, even if the renal excretory function is quiescent. Static-fluid MR urography is less suitable for imaging of disorders that occur in the nondilated collecting system. The second MR urography technique is analogous to the methodology of conventional intravenous pyelography and is, therefore, designated as excretory MR urography. For this purpose, a non-nephrotoxic gadolinium chelate is intravenously administered and after its renal excretion, the gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized using fast T1-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of the contrast material inside the entire urinary tract and, secondly, to avoid high endoluminal gadolinium concentrations, which cause signal loss of the urine due to T2{sup *} effects. Gadolinium excretory MR urography allows to obtain high-quality images of both nondilated and obstructed urinary tracts in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. This article reviews the principles of T2- and T1-weighted MR urography in detail and informs how to use these techniques safely in potential clinical applications such as chronic urolithiasis, intrinsic and extrinsic tumor diseases, and congenital anomalies. Magnetic resonance urography performed in combination with standard MR imaging offers a potential to reduce the need for invasive retrograde pyelography. Although the economic aspect is still problematic, it is obvious that MR urography will continue to increase its role in

  12. Computed tomography-urography for upper urinary tract imaging: is it required for all patients who present with hematuria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cauberg, Evelyne C. C.; Nio, C. Y.; de la Rosette, Jean M. C. H.; Laguna, M. Pilar; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2011-01-01

    To define in which patients who present with microscopic or macroscopic hematuria CT urography (CTU) is indicated as an imaging mode for the upper urinary tract (UUT). We conducted a prospective study on consecutive patients who attended a modern protocol-driven hematuria clinic from January 2006 to

  13. Clinical study of retrocaval ureter diagnosed by CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Isao; Hata, Ryosuke; Amemiya, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    Although retrocaval ureter is relatively uncommon congenital anomaly, surgical intervention is often necessary to alleviate the clinical signs and symptoms of the patients. Vena cavography has been indispensable imaging modality for the definitive diagnosis of this anomaly. Recently, however, CT scan in addition to excretory urography (IVP) and retrograde pyelography(RP) has been utilized in many reported cases in the diagnosis of retrocaval ureter. We have experienced 3 cases of retrocaval ureter consecutively. In this paper we report these 3 cases of retrocaval ureter, in which CT scan enabled us to confirm the definitive diagnosis. We also report another case of pelviureteric stenosis that was taken for retrocaval ureter by CT scan. Causes of the misdiagnosis is discussed. In conclusion CT scan is useful diagnostic modality in the diagnosis of retrocaval ureter and this lesser invasive technique might lessen the need for vena cavography. (author)

  14. Feasibility of MR urography in patients with urinary diversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battal, Bilal; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ilica, Turan; Akgun, Veysel; Aydur, Emin; Dayanc, Murat

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the diagnostic value of MR urography and to compare the T2- and T1-weighted MR urography techniques in patients with urinary diversion. We retrospectively reviewed 19 MR urograms in 14 patients (13 male and one female, 8–77 years old, mean age: 54.2) with urinary diversion. Magnetic resonance urography examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR scanners. In addition to T2- and T1-weighted MR urography techniques, conventional T1- and T2-weighted axial and coronal sequences were also obtained. Collecting systems were evaluated in five segments (right proximal and distal collecting system, left proximal and distal collecting system and conduit or reservoir). Imaging features of the urinary collecting systems were evaluated with T2- and T1-weighted MR urography images. The clinical, laboratory data and follow-up imaging findings were regarded as standard. A cross table was formed to determine sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR urography techniques. T2-weighted MR urography, T1-weighted MR urography and combination of these two techniques could demonstrate 89.01, 87.65 and 93.83% of all collecting system segments, respectively. For the detection of the pathologic urinary segments, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100, 95.29 and 95.6% in T2-weighted MR urography and 100, 93.42 and 93.82% in T1-weighted MR urography, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100% in combined T2- and T1-weighted MR urography technique. Magnetic resonance urography is an effective imaging method for the evaluation of the urinary system in patients with urinary diversion. T2-weighted MR urography alone has high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, does not require intravenous contrast medium and can be obtained in 3–5 min. However, T1-weighted MR urography may provide additional information in some cases.

  15. Intraosseous Urography Compared with Intravenous Urography: An Experimental Study in the Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    SAĞLAM, Mutlu; UĞUREL, Şahin

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of bone injection gun assisted intraosseous administration of contrast media as an alternative to the intravenous route for urography. Intravenous urographies were obtained in 6 rabbits. Urographic examinations by the intraosseous route were performed in the same animals 48 h later. After adequate anesthesia, the retroauricular vein was punctured for intravenous injection and a bone injection gun was used for intraosseous injections to the ...

  16. MR urography: Anatomical and quantitative information on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is considered to be the next step in uroradiology. This technique combines superb anatomical images and functional information in a single test. In this article, we aim to present the topic of MRU in children and how it has been implemented in Northern Greece so ...

  17. MR urography evaluation of obstructive uropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D.; Jones, Richard A.; Little, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Hydronephrosis and the evaluation of obstructive uropathy are the most common indications for MR urography in our practice. Typically our patients fall into one of two groups: infants with antenatal hydronephrosis and older children who present with abdominal pain, hematuria or urinary tract infection. Obstruction in children is usually chronic and partial. Intermittent episodes of increased pressure occur when the urine production exceeds the capacity for drainage. MR urography uses a fluid and diuretic challenge to assess the hydronephrotic kidney. High-quality anatomic images provide a morphologic assessment of the hydronephrotic system. Although it is relatively straightforward to determine if a system is not obstructed on the basis of the renal transit time (RTT), no single parameter is adequate to fully characterize obstruction. By evaluating the changes in signal intensity in the renal parenchyma following contrast administration, the hydronephrotic systems are classified as compensated or decompensated. Delayed RTT and the presence of urine-contrast levels indicate stasis. Calyceal transit time and the difference between the volumetric and the Patlak differential renal function (vDRF-pDRF) are measures of the physiologic changes within the kidney. Additionally, MR urography provides prognostic information by assessing the quality of the renal parenchyma and identifying uropathy preoperatively. MR urography combines both anatomic and functional information in a single test and is capable of providing a comprehensive evaluation of obstructive uropathy that could ultimately help select those patients most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. (orig.)

  18. MR urography evaluation of obstructive uropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D.; Jones, Richard A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA (United States); Little, Stephen B. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Hydronephrosis and the evaluation of obstructive uropathy are the most common indications for MR urography in our practice. Typically our patients fall into one of two groups: infants with antenatal hydronephrosis and older children who present with abdominal pain, hematuria or urinary tract infection. Obstruction in children is usually chronic and partial. Intermittent episodes of increased pressure occur when the urine production exceeds the capacity for drainage. MR urography uses a fluid and diuretic challenge to assess the hydronephrotic kidney. High-quality anatomic images provide a morphologic assessment of the hydronephrotic system. Although it is relatively straightforward to determine if a system is not obstructed on the basis of the renal transit time (RTT), no single parameter is adequate to fully characterize obstruction. By evaluating the changes in signal intensity in the renal parenchyma following contrast administration, the hydronephrotic systems are classified as compensated or decompensated. Delayed RTT and the presence of urine-contrast levels indicate stasis. Calyceal transit time and the difference between the volumetric and the Patlak differential renal function (vDRF-pDRF) are measures of the physiologic changes within the kidney. Additionally, MR urography provides prognostic information by assessing the quality of the renal parenchyma and identifying uropathy preoperatively. MR urography combines both anatomic and functional information in a single test and is capable of providing a comprehensive evaluation of obstructive uropathy that could ultimately help select those patients most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. (orig.)

  19. Iohexol compared with metrizoate in urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levorstad, K.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Loeyning, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    Urography was performed in 20 patients using the new non-ionic contrast medium iohexol (Omnipaque) and in 22 patients using the conventional ionic medium metrizoate (Isopaque) in a randomized, double blind comparison. Iohexol caused significantly less subjective reactions and less tachycardia than metrizoate. No significant difference between the contrast media was observed regarding the influence on blood pressure, hematologic parameters, or clinical chemical parameters in blood and urine. Urographic films of similar and high quality were obtained with both contrast media. (Auth.)

  20. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Cheong, Gyung Ho; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Young Gon

    2000-01-01

    To compare the feasibility of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography (GEMRU) and conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney. Fifteen patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney, as demonstrated by ultrasonography or intravenous urography, were enrolled in this study. Nine were men and six were women, and their age ranged from 18 to 77 (mean, 60.6) years. For all MR examinations, a 1.5T MR unit was employed. For breath-hold MR urography, the HASTE technique (MRU) was used, and reconstruction involved the use of a maximum intensity-projection (MIP) algorithm. For gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography, the fast low angle shot (FLASH) 3-D method was used and images were obtained at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes, and reconstruction again involved the use of MIP algorithm. In some cases, additional GEMRU was obtained 24 hour after contrast material injection, and an MIP algorithm was used for reconstruction. MRU and GEMRU were independently interpreted by two radiologists who for quantitative analysis compared SNR with CNR, and at each anatomic level qualitatively analyzed morphologic accuracy and diagnostic value of the lesions. In quantitative analysis, SNR and CNR differences between the two sequences at the renal pelvis and the level of the ureter were not significant (p greater than 0.05). In qualitative analysis, GEMRU was superior to MRU for the assessment of evaluated ureter at each level (p less than 0.05), anatomic anomaly and intrinsic tumor. Ureteral stones, however, were more easily diagnosed with MRU. For assessment of the ureter GEMRU is superior to MRU and has the advantage of evaluating renal function. We believe that for evaluation of the urinary tract, especially the distal ureter, GEMRU may be a valuable adjunct to routine MR urography. (author)

  1. Virtual cystoscopy, computed tomography urography and optical cystoscopy for the detection and follow-up for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez Muñoz, D; Quintana Martínez, I; Fernández Militino, A; Sánchez Zalabardo, D; Sarria Octavio de Toledo, L; Cozcolluela Cabrejas, R

    To evaluate the utility of virtual cystoscopy (VC) performed with CT urography in patients being studied under gross hematuria or patients being followed-up after a previous bladder cancer and compare the results with those obtained with gold standard technique (optical cystoscopy). Retrospective study of 117 patients who were referred for VC by the Urology Department between May 2014 and May 2015. Those patients presented with gross hematuria or they were previously treated patients from bladder cancer being followed up. These patients were evaluated with MDCT and virtual cystoscopy after distending the bladder with air. The results were compared with those obtained with optical cystoscopy which was performed no more than a week after. The global sensitivity and specificity of VC were 81,8 and 92,1%. Aditional findings detected in CT urography were an aortic dissection, urinary lithiasis and colonic metastasis. VC seems an useful technique in the diagnosis and follow-up for bladder cancer with a good correlation with OC. The main limitations are the impossibility of biopsy during the procedure and the detection of erythematous lesions. Collateral findings can be detected performed with CT urography although the high radiation exposure does not recommend their combined use. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  3. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  4. Excretory MR urography using breathhold three-dimensional FISP: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Won Kue; Lee, Jeong Min; Jin, Kong Young; Hwang, Ho keung; Han, Young Min [Chonbuk Narional University Hospital, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Ym, Seong Hee [Namwon Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To compare the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using breath-hold three-dimensional fast imaging with steady state precession (3-D FISP) with conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. Twenty-three patients in whom ultrasonography (US) and/or intravenous urography (IVU) revealed signs of urinary obstruction were enrolled in this study. Fifteen were men and eight were women, and their mean age was 54 (range, 21-80) years. All MR images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit. MR urography using the HASTE technique (MRU) and gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using the 3D-FISP technique were performed, and in all cases, reconstructions involved maximum intensity projection. For contrast-enhanced MR urography(CEMRU), images were obtained 3, 5, 20, and 30 minutes after the administration of intravenous contrast media, and for selected cases, additional images were obtained until 24 hours after contrast media injection. For qualitative analysis, two experienced radiologists compared CEMRU and MRU in terms of their diagnostic value as regards the level and cause of urinary obstruction, and morphologic accuracy. In addition, signal to noise ration(SNR) and contrast to noise ration (CNR) of the urinary tract at each anatomic level were quantitatively analysed. Quantitative analysis showed that in terms of SNR and CNR of the urinary tract at the level of the mid and distal ureter, CEMRU using 3-D FISP was better than MRU using HASTE (p less than 0.05). Qualitative analysis indicated that for the depiction of the whole length of normal ureter, and detection of the level of obstruction, anatomic anomalies and intrinsic tumors, 3-D FISP was superior to HASTE. There was, however, no difference between these two modalities in the diagnosis of ureteral stone and the degree of hydronephrosis. In addition, 3-D FISP was better than HASTE for the

  5. Excretory MR urography using breathhold three-dimensional FISP: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Won Kue; Lee, Jeong Min; Jin, Kong Young; Hwang, Ho keung; Han, Young Min; Ym, Seong Hee

    2000-01-01

    To compare the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using breath-hold three-dimensional fast imaging with steady state precession (3-D FISP) with conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. Twenty-three patients in whom ultrasonography (US) and/or intravenous urography (IVU) revealed signs of urinary obstruction were enrolled in this study. Fifteen were men and eight were women, and their mean age was 54 (range, 21-80) years. All MR images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit. MR urography using the HASTE technique (MRU) and gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using the 3D-FISP technique were performed, and in all cases, reconstructions involved maximum intensity projection. For contrast-enhanced MR urography(CEMRU), images were obtained 3, 5, 20, and 30 minutes after the administration of intravenous contrast media, and for selected cases, additional images were obtained until 24 hours after contrast media injection. For qualitative analysis, two experienced radiologists compared CEMRU and MRU in terms of their diagnostic value as regards the level and cause of urinary obstruction, and morphologic accuracy. In addition, signal to noise ration(SNR) and contrast to noise ration (CNR) of the urinary tract at each anatomic level were quantitatively analysed. Quantitative analysis showed that in terms of SNR and CNR of the urinary tract at the level of the mid and distal ureter, CEMRU using 3-D FISP was better than MRU using HASTE (p less than 0.05). Qualitative analysis indicated that for the depiction of the whole length of normal ureter, and detection of the level of obstruction, anatomic anomalies and intrinsic tumors, 3-D FISP was superior to HASTE. There was, however, no difference between these two modalities in the diagnosis of ureteral stone and the degree of hydronephrosis. In addition, 3-D FISP was better than HASTE for the

  6. Reproducibility of CT bone dosimetry: Operator versus automated ROI definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, O.; Luypaert, R.; Osteaux, M.; Kalender, W.

    1988-01-01

    Intrasubject reproducibility with repeated determination of vertebral mineral density from a given set of CT images was investigated. The region of interest (ROI) in 10 patient scans was selected by four independent operators either manually or with an automated procedure separating cortical and spongeous bone, the operators being requested to interact in ROI selection. The mean intrasubject variation was found to be much lower with the automated process (0.3 to 0.6%) than with the conventional method (2.5 to 5.2%). In a second study, 10 patients were examined twice to determine the reproducibility of CT slice selection by the operator. The errors were of the same order of magnitude as in ROI selection. (orig.)

  7. Honeycombing on CT; its definition, pathologic correlation, and future direction of its diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johkoh, Takeshi, E-mail: johkoht@aol.com [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, 3-1 Kurumazuka, Itami, Hyogo, 664-8533 (Japan); Sakai, Fumikazu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Saitama International Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Hidaka (Japan); Noma, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri (Japan); Akira, Masanori [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, Sakai (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori [Department of Radiology and Center for Diagnostic Imaging, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Watadani, Takeyuki [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sugiyama, Yukihiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Honeycombing on CT is the clue for the diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and its hallmark. According to the ATS-ERS-JRS-ALAT 2010 guideline, the patients with honeycombing on CT can be diagnosed as UIP without surgical biopsy. On CT scans, it is defined as clustered cystic airspaces, typically of comparable diameters of the order of 3–10 mm, which are usually subpleural and have well-defined walls. Pathologically, honeycombing consists of both collapsing of multiple fibrotic alveoli and dilation of alveolar duct and lumen Although the definition of honeycombing seems to be strict, recognition of honeycombing on CT is various among each observer Because typical honeycombing is frequently observed in the patients with UIP, we should judge clustered cysts as honeycombing when a diagnosis of UIP is suspected.

  8. Cortical region of interest definition on SPECT brain images using X-ray CT registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzourio, N.; Sutton, D. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot); Joliot, M. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot INSERM, Orsay (France)); Mazoyer, B.M. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot Antenne d' Information Medicale, C.H.U. Bichat, Paris (France)); Charlot, V. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France). Service de Psychiatrie); Salamon, G. (CHU La Timone, Marseille (France). Service de Neuroradiologie)

    1992-11-01

    We present a method for brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis based on individual registration of anatomical (CT) and functional ([sup 133]Xe regional cerebral blood flow) images and on the definition of three-dimensional functional regions of interest. Registration of CT and SPECT is performed through adjustment of CT-defined cortex limits to the SPECT image. Regions are defined by sectioning a cortical ribbon on the CT images, copied over the SPECT images and pooled through slices to give 3D cortical regions of interest. The proposed method shows good intra- and interobserver reproducibility (regional intraclass correlation coefficient [approx equal]0.98), and good accuracy in terms of repositioning ([approx equal]3.5 mm) as compared to the SPECT image resolution (14 mm). The method should be particularly useful for analysing SPECT studies when variations in brain anatomy (normal or abnormal) must be accounted for. (orig.).

  9. Role of magnetic resonance urography in pediatric renal fusion anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Sherwin S.; Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Khrichenko, Dmitry; Back, Susan J.; Darge, Kassa; Tasian, Gregory E.; Dillman, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Renal fusion is on a spectrum of congenital abnormalities that occur due to disruption of the migration process of the embryonic kidneys from the pelvis to the retroperitoneal renal fossae. Clinically, renal fusion anomalies are often found incidentally and associated with increased risk for complications, such as urinary tract obstruction, infection and urolithiasis. These anomalies are most commonly imaged using ultrasound for anatomical definition and less frequently using renal scintigraphy to quantify differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. Functional magnetic resonance urography (fMRU) is an advanced imaging technique that combines the excellent soft-tissue contrast of conventional magnetic resonance (MR) images with the quantitative assessment based on contrast medium uptake and excretion kinetics to provide information on renal function and drainage. fMRU has been shown to be clinically useful in evaluating a number of urological conditions. A highly sensitive and radiation-free imaging modality, fMRU can provide detailed morphological and functional information that can facilitate conservative and/or surgical management of children with renal fusion anomalies. This paper reviews the embryological basis of the different types of renal fusion anomalies, their imaging appearances at fMRU, complications associated with fusion anomalies, and the important role of fMRU in diagnosing and managing children with these anomalies. (orig.)

  10. Role of magnetic resonance urography in pediatric renal fusion anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sherwin S. [Children' s Mercy Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Khrichenko, Dmitry [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Body Imaging, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Back, Susan J.; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Body Imaging, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tasian, Gregory E. [University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Thoracoabdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Renal fusion is on a spectrum of congenital abnormalities that occur due to disruption of the migration process of the embryonic kidneys from the pelvis to the retroperitoneal renal fossae. Clinically, renal fusion anomalies are often found incidentally and associated with increased risk for complications, such as urinary tract obstruction, infection and urolithiasis. These anomalies are most commonly imaged using ultrasound for anatomical definition and less frequently using renal scintigraphy to quantify differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. Functional magnetic resonance urography (fMRU) is an advanced imaging technique that combines the excellent soft-tissue contrast of conventional magnetic resonance (MR) images with the quantitative assessment based on contrast medium uptake and excretion kinetics to provide information on renal function and drainage. fMRU has been shown to be clinically useful in evaluating a number of urological conditions. A highly sensitive and radiation-free imaging modality, fMRU can provide detailed morphological and functional information that can facilitate conservative and/or surgical management of children with renal fusion anomalies. This paper reviews the embryological basis of the different types of renal fusion anomalies, their imaging appearances at fMRU, complications associated with fusion anomalies, and the important role of fMRU in diagnosing and managing children with these anomalies. (orig.)

  11. Functional analysis in MR urography - made simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrichenko, Dmitry; Darge, Kassa [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-02-15

    MR urography (MRU) has proved to be a most advantageous imaging modality of the urinary tract in children, providing one-stop comprehensive morphological and functional information, without the utilization of ionizing radiation. The functional analysis of the MRU scan still requires external post-processing using relatively complex software. This has proved to be a limiting factor in widespread routine implementation of MRU functional analysis and use of MRU functional parameters similar to nuclear medicine. We present software, developed in a pediatric radiology department, that not only enables comprehensive automated functional analysis, but is also very user-friendly, fast, easily operated by the average radiologist or MR technician and freely downloadable Virtual Machine is required for the installation, which is obtained at no charge. The analysis software, known as ''CHOP-fMRU,'' has the potential to help overcome the obstacles to widespread use of functional MRU in children. (orig.)

  12. Experiences in excretion urography using iohexol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russmann, D

    1986-07-14

    The non-ionic contrast medium Iohexol (Omnipaque 300) was used on 125 patients during intravenous excretory urography within the framework of a multicentric study. One third of the patients had already, according to careful anamnesis, experienced allergic reactions; 8% of these had experienced incompatibility after application of a contrast medium. After a short 50 ml or 100 ml infusion, an insignificant general reaction in only one patient could be observed, which abated after a short period. The other 124 patients remained completely free of symptoms. The contrast density achieved was good throughout, during which a mean contrast quantity of approx. 75 ml proved to be the optimum dosage, taking into consideration certain questions and constitution parameters of the patients.

  13. Intravenous urography in children and youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Oestensen, H.; Pape, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    This report derives from Tromsoe in northern Norway. In a retrospective study of the indications for intravenous urography (IU) and the findings at IU in 740 patients (451 girls and 289 boys) aged 0-19 years, we found that urinary tract infections accounted for 69.4% of the IU in females and 30.1% of the IU in males, most often seen in the youngest patients. The pathological findings most frequently seen were anomalies (17 females and 10 males) and urinary tract obstruction (3 females and 15 males). The present study indicates the following: first, that the yield of IU in the primary investigation of children and youth suffering from enuresis and non-specific abdominal disturbancies is small; and second, that the use of IU in children and youth with urinary tract infection and haematuria should be questioned and reconsidered. (orig.)

  14. 1-3-7 minute intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; Yoon, Sei Chul; Lee, Myung Hee

    1980-01-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) as it is used widely today was probably started in early 1950's after the introduction of triiodobenzoic acid compounds as contrast media. This long cherished traditional method consists of taking radiograms at 5, 15 and 25 minutes after the injection of contrast medium. There are a few modifications of this standard urographic examination such as five minute IVU (Woodruff, 1959), minute-sequence pyelogram (Maxwell et al., 1964), drip infusion pyelography (Schencker, 1964) and nephrotomography (Evans et al., 1955). The present study has been undertaken to test if the conventional standard IVU can be more rapidly performed without losing essential informational contents of urograms. In this new clinical trial, urograms were taken at the end of 1, 3 and 7 minutes instead of 5, 15 and 25 minutes after the intravenous injection of contrast medium. We injected 40 ml of meglumine diatrizoate solution within 30 seconds using an 18G iv needle. (The amount of injected contrast medium has been reduced recently to ordinary single dose of 20 ml for subjects weighing less than 8 kg). Upon viewing the 7 minute film in front of an automatic processor, the examination was terminated after obtaining an upright view unless any further radiogram was indicated. As shown in Tables and Figures, our new 1-3-7 minute method has been proven to provide us with as much essential and useful information as conventional 5-15-25 minute urography. Thus, we were able to finish one examination within 10 minutes without losing any necessary diagnostic information. In some of patients with obstructive uropathy such as stone the examination was extended as long as it was desired. Side reactions were occasional nausea, flushing and rare mild vomiting which never prevented the examination

  15. Diagnostic value of F18-FDG PET/CT in patients with the revised definition of fever of unknown origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prakash, Vineet; Ketharanathan, Nagulabaskaran; Lorenz, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is an increasingly accepted indication for PET/CT where it has a relatively high diagnostic yield. This study assesses its diagnostic value for the revised definition of FUO. Methods: The revised definition of FUO is fever of greater than 38.3C for more...... than 3 weeks duration and an uncertain diagnosis after comprehensive evaluation as an inpatient or outpatient for a minimum of 3 days or 3 outpatient visits, having excluded immunocompromised states. 59 patients (pts) (F=35, age 18-92) with this definition underwent PET with full diagnostic contrast......), neoplasm (6 pts) and drug fever (1 pt). Before ordering a PET/CT, conventional CT or MRI was performed in 43 pts. We considered that a PET/CT was essential to establish the final diagnosis in 15/43 pts (35%) with inconclusive CT or MRI. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET/CT contributed to establishing a final...

  16. Multiple organ definition in CT using a Bayesian approach for 3D model fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Jennifer L.; Weymouth, Terry E.; Meyer, Charles R.

    1995-08-01

    Organ definition in computed tomography (CT) is of interest for treatment planning and response monitoring. We present a method for organ definition using a priori information about shape encoded in a set of biometric organ models--specifically for the liver and kidney-- that accurately represents patient population shape information. Each model is generated by averaging surfaces from a learning set of organ shapes previously registered into a standard space defined by a small set of landmarks. The model is placed in a specific patient's data set by identifying these landmarks and using them as the basis for model deformation; this preliminary representation is then iteratively fit to the patient's data based on a Bayesian formulation of the model's priors and CT edge information, yielding a complete organ surface. We demonstrate this technique using a set of fifteen abdominal CT data sets for liver surface definition both before and after the addition of a kidney model to the fitting; we demonstrate the effectiveness of this tool for organ surface definition in this low-contrast domain.

  17. MR urography in children. Pt. 2. How to use ImageJ MR urography processing software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); University of Rouen, LITIS Laboratory EA 4108, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Dolores, Michael [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); Taylor, Melissa [Department of Paediatrics, Ambroise Pare Hospital, Boulogne Billancourt (France)

    2010-05-15

    MR urography (MRU) is an emerging technique particularly useful in paediatric uroradiology. The most common indication is the investigation of hydronephrosis. Combined static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRU (DCE-MRU) provides both morphological and functional information in a single examination. However, specific post-processing must be performed and to our knowledge, dedicated software is not available in conventional workstations. Investigators involved in MRU classically use homemade software that is not freely accessible. For these reasons, we have developed a software program that is freely downloadable on the National Institute of Health (NIH) website. We report and describe in this study the features of this software program. (orig.)

  18. A three-dimensional CT-based target definition for elective irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Wijers, Oda B.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: Elective treatment of the clinically node-negative neck by radiation results in excellent control rates. However, radiation therapy with its organ-preserving properties is not without morbidity. Side effects of elective neck irradiation are mainly due to damage of the major and minor salivary glands, resulting in the dry mouth syndrome. Given that RT is the preferred treatment modality in case of elective treatment of the neck in many institutions, it is of utmost importance to try and reduce the associated sequelae of RT. Material and Methods: With the introduction of CT-planning systems and the development of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) techniques, it has become feasible to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the target (neck) and at the same time saving (parts of) the salivary glands from doses beyond tolerance. A prerequisite for these techniques is that they require a precise knowledge of the target (i.e., of the elective neck) on CT. To be able to correlate borders of the surgical levels in the neck (I-VI) with structures seen on CT, an anatomical study, using two fixed (phenol, formaldehyde) human cadavers, was performed. Subsequently, the 6 potential lymph node regions in the neck on CT were defined. Results and Discussion: The reference for the current 3D CT-based definition of the lymph node regions in the neck is the official report of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, describing, based on surgical anatomy, the lymph node groups in the neck by Levels I-VI. The present investigation depicts reproducible landmarks on transversal CT images, corresponding to anatomical reference structures known from surgical levels (I-VI) and, this way, CT-based lymph node regions (1-6) were constructed

  19. The clinical application of the digital imaging in urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yuelong; Xie Sumin; Zhang Li; Li Huayu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of the digital imaging in the urography. Methods: In total 112 patients underwent digital urography, including intravenous pyelography (IVP) in 38 cases and retrograde pyelography in 74 cases. Results: the entire urinary tract was better shown on digital imaging, which was accurate in locating the obstruction of urinary tract and helped the qualitative diagnosis. Digital urography was especially valuable in detecting urinary calculus. In 38 cases of IVP, the results were normal in 5 patients, renal stone in 12, ureteral stone in 13, ureteral stenosis in 6 and nephroblastom in 2. In the 74 cases of retrograde pyelography, benign ureteral stenosis was found in 31 patients, ureteral stone in 27, ureteral polyp in 2, urethral stone in 8 and benign urethral stenosis in 6. Conclusion: Digital imaging technique is of big value in the diagnosis of urinary tract lesions

  20. Artificial hydroureteronephrosis to facilitate MR urography during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Insertion of a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheter decompresses the upper urinary tract, thereby removing the hydroureteronephrosis upon which magnetic resonance (MR) urography is dependent for diagnosing the precise level and cause of ureteric obstruction. METHOD: We present the case of a young woman who required PCN insertion during pregnancy. RESULT: Only when unenhanced T2-weighted MR urography was repeated after the creation of an artificial hydronephrosis by an injection of sterile saline via the PCN catheter was the diagnosis of stone in the mid-ureter later made possible. CONCLUSION: This case highlights an easy solution to a limitation with the use of MR urography during pregnancy, when a physiological hydroureteronephrosis has been relieved by the insertion of a PCN catheter.

  1. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  2. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT Urography (CTU) using CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Law, Yuen; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cho, Hyun-Chong; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2012-03-01

    We are developing a computerized system for bladder segmentation on CTU, as a critical component for computer aided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for bladder segmentation is the presence of regions without contrast (NC) and filled with IV contrast (C). We are developing a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) specifically for this application. CLASS performs a series of image processing tasks: preprocessing, initial segmentation, and 3D and 2D level set segmentation and post-processing, designed according to the characteristics of the bladder in CTU. The NC and the C regions of the bladder were segmented separately in CLASS. The final contour is obtained in the post-processing stage by the union of the NC and C contours. Seventy bladders (31 containing lesions, 24 containing wall thickening, and 15 normal) were segmented. The performance of CLASS was assessed by rating the quality of the contours on a 5-point scale (1= "very poor", 3= "fair", 5 = "excellent"). For the 53 partially contrast-filled bladders, the average quality ratings for the 53 NC and 53 C regions were 4.0+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.0, respectively. 46 NC and 41 C regions were given quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 2 NC and 5 C regions had ratings under 3. The average quality ratings for the remaining 12 completely no contrast (NC) and 5 completely contrast-filled (C) bladder contours were 3.3+/-1.0 and 3.4+/-0.5, respectively. After combining the NC and C contours for each of the 70 bladders, 46 had quality ratings of 4 or above. Only 4 had ratings under 3. The average quality rating was 3.8+/-0.7. The results demonstrate the potential of CLASS for automated segmentation of the bladder.

  3. Drug-induced MR urography: the effects of furosemide and intravenous saline injection on MR urography of obstructed and non-obstructed urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Ha; Lee, Myung Jun; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To determine the usefulness of MR urography technique for the evaluation of urinary systems in patients with obstructed urinary tract and normal volunteers with non-obstructed urinary tract after intravenous normal saline and diuretic injection. Three normal volunteers and 12 patients with urinary tract obstruction [ureteral calculi (n=8), extraurinary mass (n=1), ureteral tumor invasion (n=3)] underwent MR urography using a 1.0T scanner and a 2D non-breath-hold heavily T2-weighted fast spin-cho sequence. These acquisition were post-processed with a maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm. Two acquisitions were performed, the first prior to saline solution infusion following standard MR urography procedures, and the second, within 2-3 minutes of the infusion of 250 ml saline solution followed by 20 mg of Lasix administered intravenously. For this latter, drug-induced MR urography procedures were followed. In healthy volunteer (n=3) and those experiencing partial obstruction (n=4) by a urinary stone, drug-induced MR urography provided better images of the urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those in whom a urinary stone or tumor had caused complete obstruction (n=8), standard MR urography provided good images, as did drug-induced MR urography. In patients with a partially or non-obstructed urinary tract, drug-induced MR urography provided better anatomic and functional details of the kidney and urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those experiencing complete obstruction of the urinary tract, however, standard or drug-induced MR urography permitted very adequate evaluation of the tract, and drug-induced MR urography was unnecessary.

  4. A simplified CT-based definition of the lymph node levels in the node negative neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijers, O.B.; Levendag, P.C.; Tan, T.; Dieren, E.B. van; Sornsen de Koste, J. van; Est, H. van der; Senan, S.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Using three dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) techniques for elective neck irradiation (ENI) may allow for local disease control to be maintained while diminishing xerostomia by eliminating major salivary glands (or parts thereof) from the treatment portals. The standardization of CT based target volumes for the clinically negative (elective) neck is a prerequisite for 3DCRT. The aim of the present study was to substantially modify an existing ('original') CT-based protocol for the delineation of the neck tar-et volume, into a more practical ('simplified') protocol. This will allow for rapid contouring and the implementation of conformal ENI in routine clinical procedures. An earlier ('original') version of the CT-based definition for elective neck node re-ions 2-5 was re-evaluated, using 15 planning CT scans of previously treated patients. The contouring guidelines were simplified by (1) using a smaller number of easily identifiable soft tissue- and bony anatomical landmarks, which in turn had to be identified in only a limited number of CT slices, and (2) by subsequently interpolating the contoured lymph node regions. The adequacy of target coverage and the sparing using both 'original' and 'simplified' delineation protocols was evaluated by DVH analysis after contouring the primary tumor, the neck and the major salivary glands in a patient with supraglottic laryngeal (SGL) carcinoma who was treated using a 3DCRT technique. The BEV projections of the 'original' and the 'simplified' versions of the 3D elective neck target showed good agreement and were found to be reproducible. The DVH's of the target and parotid glands were not significantly different using both contouring protocols. The 'simplified' protocol for the delineation of the 3D elective neck target produced both comparable target coverage and sparing of the major salivary glands. When used together with an interpolation program, this 'simplified' protocol substantial reduced the contouring

  5. Impact of magnetic resonance urography and ultrasonography on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: (1) To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in comparison with ultrasonography (US) to determine the extent of upper urinary tract dilation and (2) to evaluate the impact of MRU on therapy management. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2010, ...

  6. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently investigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable results. Aim of the work: To ...

  7. Evaluation of urogenital fistulas by magnetic resonance urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamere, Augusto Elias; Coelho, Rafael Darahem Souza; Cecin, Alexandre Oliveira; Feltrin, Leonir Terezinha; Lucchesi, Fabiano Rubiao; Seabra, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistulas are unusual complications secondary to pelvic surgery or pelvic diseases. The therapeutic success in these cases depends on an appropriate preoperative evaluation for diagnosis and visualization of the fistulous tract. The present study is aimed at demonstrating the potential of magnetic resonance urography for the diagnosis of vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistulas as well as for defining the fistulous tracts. Materials And Methods: Seven female patients clinically diagnosed with vesicovaginal or ureterovaginal fistulas had their medical records, radiological and magnetic resonance images retrospectively reviewed. Magnetic resonance urography included 3D-HASTE sequences with fat saturation. Results: Six patients presented vesicovaginal fistulas and, in one patient, a right-sided ureterovaginal fistula was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance urography allowed the demonstration of the fistulous tract in six (85.7%) of the seven patients evaluated in the present study, without the need of bladder catheterization or contrast injection. Conclusion: This study demonstrates both the potential and applicability of magnetic resonance urography in the evaluation of these types of fistulas. (author)

  8. MR urography of obstructive uropathy: diagnostic value of the method in selected clinical groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielonko, J.; Studniarek, M. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Gdansk, Debinki 7, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Markuszewski, M. [Department of Radiology, Clinical Hospital No. 3, Kieturakisa 1, 80-742 Gdansk (Poland)

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of MR urography (MRU) in the diagnosis of obstructive uropathy in selected groups of patients. The groups involved following pathologies: calculi; strictures of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ); benign and malignancy-induced ureterostenosis. Sixty patients with clinical diagnosis of obstructive uropathy were subjected to static fluid MRU (sMRU) with the use of 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence in a 0.5-T magnet. The examination was completed with conventional MR sequences and in 12 cases additionally with sequences after the administration of Gd-DTPA and excretory MRU. The results were compared with intravenous urography (IVU), CT, US, clinical and histopathological data. The degree of the urinary tract dilatation as well as the level and type of obstruction were estimated. In patients with urolithiasis sMRU correctly depicted the degree of ureterohydronephrosis in 85%, in cases of UPJ stenosis and malignancy-induced ureterostenosis in 100% and in the group of benign ureterostenosis in 91% of patients. Determination of obstruction level in patients with stones was adequate in 92% and in cases of non-calculous ureteral strictures in 100% of patients. The sMRU sequence alone could not specify the nature of obstruction except 1 case of bladder carcinoma. Filling defects in ureters visible on MR urograms were verified with IVU or CT to exclude intrinsic tumours. Completed with conventional MR sequences sMRU enabled the depiction of solid mass or infiltration in 83% cases of malignancy-induced ureterostenosis, and in the remaining groups of patients neoplastic process was excluded in 91%. In conjunction with excretory MRU and conventional MR images sMRU appears to be a highly useful technique in assessment of obstructive uropathy, especially that of non-calculous origin. Among different clinical applications MRU is superior in the evaluation of dilated urinary tract in altered anatomical conditions (e.g. in patients with ileal

  9. Contrasting lexical similarity and formal definitions in SNOMED CT: consistency and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankur; Elhanan, Gai

    2014-02-01

    To quantify the presence of and evaluate an approach for detection of inconsistencies in the formal definitions of SNOMED CT (SCT) concepts utilizing a lexical method. Utilizing SCT's Procedure hierarchy, we algorithmically formulated similarity sets: groups of concepts with similar lexical structure of their fully specified name. We formulated five random samples, each with 50 similarity sets, based on the same parameter: number of parents, attributes, groups, all the former as well as a randomly selected control sample. All samples' sets were reviewed for types of formal definition inconsistencies: hierarchical, attribute assignment, attribute target values, groups, and definitional. For the Procedure hierarchy, 2111 similarity sets were formulated, covering 18.1% of eligible concepts. The evaluation revealed that 38 (Control) to 70% (Different relationships) of similarity sets within the samples exhibited significant inconsistencies. The rate of inconsistencies for the sample with different relationships was highly significant compared to Control, as well as the number of attribute assignment and hierarchical inconsistencies within their respective samples. While, at this time of the HITECH initiative, the formal definitions of SCT are only a minor consideration, in the grand scheme of sophisticated, meaningful use of captured clinical data, they are essential. However, significant portion of the concepts in the most semantically complex hierarchy of SCT, the Procedure hierarchy, are modeled inconsistently in a manner that affects their computability. Lexical methods can efficiently identify such inconsistencies and possibly allow for their algorithmic resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of high-definition CT coronary angiography in high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, S.S.; Morgan-Hughes, G.; Ukoumunne, O.; Clayton, B.; Davies, E.J.; Nikolaou, V.; Hyde, C.J.; Shore, A.C.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) using a combination of high-definition CT (HD-CTCA) and high level of reader experience, with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the reference standard, in high-risk patients for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods: Three hundred high-risk patients underwent HD-CTCA and ICA. Independent experts evaluated the images for the presence of significant CAD, defined primarily as the presence of moderate (≥50%) stenosis and secondarily as the presence of severe (≥70%) stenosis in at least one coronary segment, in a blinded fashion. HD-CTCA was compared to ICA as the reference standard. Results: No patients were excluded. Two hundred and six patients (69%) had moderate and 178 (59%) had severe stenosis in at least one vessel at ICA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 97.1%, 97.9%, 99% and 93.9% for moderate stenosis, and 98.9%, 93.4%, 95.7% and 98.3%, for severe stenosis, on a per-patient basis. Conclusion: The combination of HD-CTCA and experienced readers applied to a high-risk population, results in high diagnostic accuracy comparable to ICA. Modern generation CT systems in experienced hands might be considered for an expanded role. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of High-Definition CT Angiography (HD-CTCA) has been assessed. • Invasive Coronary angiography (ICA) is the reference standard. • Diagnostic accuracy of HD-CTCA is comparable to ICA. • Diagnostic accuracy is not affected by coronary calcium or stents. • HD-CTCA provides a non-invasive alternative in high-risk patients.

  11. Diagnostic value of diuretic-enhanced excretory MR urography in patients with obstructive uropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabacakoglu, Aydin E-mail: radaydin@hotmail.com; Karakose, Serdar; Ince, Ozlem; Cobankara, Osman Ege; Karalezli, Giray

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Ultrasonography and conventional intravenous urography are most common methods in diagnosis of obstructive uropathies. The disadvantage of ultrasonography is inability of visualizing middle and lower one thirds of ureter, while intravenous urography is using radiation, also functionally extra loading effect on kidneys. In this study, the diagnostic value of MR urography on obstructive uropathy were investigated. Materials and methods: Forty five patients who were suffered from obstructive uropathy examined by ultrasonography, intravenous urography and diuretic-enhanced excretory MR urography by using MR-contrast-agent. Results: MR urography established accuracy rate of 92.8% for stone diseases which formed the largest group in this study, however, in other causes of obstructive uropathy, MR urography provide 100% correct diagnosis. Conclusion: MR urography provide high quality images for diagnosing and determining causes of urinary obstruction defining position and severity of dilatations as well as showing localization of the pathology. We think that MR urography should be a primary investigation in patients with obstructive uropathy who have contrast agent and X-ray contrindication.

  12. Diagnostic value of diuretic-enhanced excretory MR urography in patients with obstructive uropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabacakoglu, Aydin; Karakose, Serdar; Ince, Ozlem; Cobankara, Osman Ege; Karalezli, Giray

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasonography and conventional intravenous urography are most common methods in diagnosis of obstructive uropathies. The disadvantage of ultrasonography is inability of visualizing middle and lower one thirds of ureter, while intravenous urography is using radiation, also functionally extra loading effect on kidneys. In this study, the diagnostic value of MR urography on obstructive uropathy were investigated. Materials and methods: Forty five patients who were suffered from obstructive uropathy examined by ultrasonography, intravenous urography and diuretic-enhanced excretory MR urography by using MR-contrast-agent. Results: MR urography established accuracy rate of 92.8% for stone diseases which formed the largest group in this study, however, in other causes of obstructive uropathy, MR urography provide 100% correct diagnosis. Conclusion: MR urography provide high quality images for diagnosing and determining causes of urinary obstruction defining position and severity of dilatations as well as showing localization of the pathology. We think that MR urography should be a primary investigation in patients with obstructive uropathy who have contrast agent and X-ray contrindication

  13. The value of HASTE MR urography in the diagnosis of the chronic nephrogenic flank pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werel, D.; Tarasow, E.; Dzienis, W.; Ustymowicz, A.; Orzechowska-Bobkiewicz, A.; Walecki, J.; Darewicz, B.

    2004-01-01

    To asses the usefulness of the projectional HASTE sequence in the diagnosis of chronic flank pain caused by obstructive uropathy in comparison with conventional urography. 28 patients with chronic flank pain and hydronephrosis on ultrasound underwent conventional urography and HASTE sequence of static MR urography. The methods were evaluated for image quality, presence, agree, level and cause of urinary tract dilatation. The image quality of the urinary tract on HASTE was good in 57.1% and satisfactory in 42.9%; in conventional urography - good in 28.6%, satisfactory in 42.8% and poor in 28.6%. HASTE demonstrated hydronephrosis and degree of hydronephrosis in all the cases and conventional urography in 25 (83.3%). HASTE identified correctly the site of obstruction in 29 cases (96.7%), and conventional urography in 21 cases (70%). The sensitivity of HASTE in diagnosis of the intrinsic and extrinsic causes of obstruction was 73.7% and 80%, accuracy 73.3% and that of conventional urography 68.4%, 40% and 56.7%, respectively. HASTE is a valuable method in the diagnostics of chronic obstructive uropathy. It allows to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis, the level and in many cases the cause of obstruction. When the urinary tract is not visualized in conventional urography, static MR urography is especially useful. (author)

  14. Usefulness of CT in diagnosing and staging of kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batycka-Ugorska, I.

    1993-01-01

    Article presents 170 patients with suspected kidney cancer and applicability of CT in the diagnosis. According to author CT imaging is better than others (ultrasonography, urography) in assessment of the tumor development and detection of metastases to lymphatic nodes of abdomen and other organs. The method is compared with angiography in diagnosis of metastases of kidney cancer to veins

  15. Functional MR urography in patients with renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopp, M.V.; Doersam, J.; Oesingmann, N.; Piesche, S.; Hawighorst, H.; Wiesel, M.; Schad, L.R.; Kaick, G. van

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of functional magnetic resonance urography for the noninvasive postoperative evaluation of renal transplants. Methods: A saturation inversion projection sequence allows the selective imaging of strongly T1 weighted signal from the MR contrast agent. A coronal slab leads to images comparable to conventional urography which can be acquired as a sequence with four images per minute. Results: 15 patients with urologic questionable findings after renal transplantation were studied. FMRU revealed in 6 patients normal findings, in 6 moderate dilatation of the renal pelvis without any urodynamic relevant obstruction. 3 pathologic findings, ureteral leak, ureteropelvic-junction obstruction and ureteral stenosis were diagnosed and consequently surgically treated. The imaging quality in all studies was diagnostic and urologically relevant. Conclusion: FMRU can be used as a noninvasive technique for the assessment of renal transplant in cases with suspicion of complication in the excretory system. (orig.) [de

  16. Magnetic resonance urography in duplex kidney with ectopic ureteral insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conjeevaram Rajendrarao Thambidorai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on the use of magnetic resonance urography (MRU in a 6-year-old girl who presented with urinary incontinence. She had a left duplex kidney with poorly functioning upper moiety and ectopic insertion of the dilated upper pole ureter. MRU has been shown to be superior to conventional imaging techniques in delineating poorly functioning moieties of duplex kidneys and ectopic ureters.

  17. MR urography for the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, Jeannette; Kort, Gerard A.P. de; Lo, Rob; Gils, A.P.G. van; Beek, Frederik J.A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Hene, Ronald J. [Department of Nephrology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Lock, Tycho M.T.W. [Department of and Urology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Burger, Huib [Julius Center for Patient Oriented Research, University of Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the image quality and diagnostic value of MR urography in detecting abnormalities of the urinary collecting system relevant for the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors. Study subjects were selected from the existing intravenous urography (IVU) reports: 18 consecutive patients with a duplication or another abnormality of the collecting system and 20 consecutive patients with normal anatomy. They underwent a respiratory-triggered 3D T2-weighted fast spin-echo acquisition after oral administration of furosemide, without and with abdominal compression. The MR images were evaluated by two independent blinded observers. The IVU was used as the standard of reference. Image quality of the MR urograms with compression was overall better than those without compression, and the former were regarded as adequate for the evaluation of small filling defects and deformities of the pelvis and calyces in 76-81% of the kidneys and 74-79% of the patients. Both observers correctly diagnosed all 13 kidneys with a partial or complete duplication. The image quality of MR urography was inadequate to evaluate the calyces and pelvis for small filling defects or deformities in approximately 25% of the patients; however, the technique was accurate in the detection of abnormalities of the urinary collecting system relevant for the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic CT of the renal parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Yukio; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Ishikawa, Tohru; Fujii, Masamichi; Uji, Teruyuki

    1985-01-01

    Normal renal dynamic CT findings of 57 cases were analysed in termes of sequential change of renal parenchymal CT image. Cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla were delineated and their sequential CT image was well correlated with the anatomicophysiological character of the kidney. Dynamic CT of 32 abnormal cases showed abnormal sequential CT findings explaining the mechanism of the abnormalities. Especially, delayed enhancement of renal cortex was noted in 17 of 19 kidneys with arterial obstruction and delayed enhancement of renal medulla in 22 of 25 cases with renal dysfunction. Compaired with excretory urography in 11 cases with renal dysfunction, advantage of dynamic CT were noted. (author)

  19. Appearances of the circumcaval ureter on excretory urography and MR urography: A single-center case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Muthusami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe Magnetic Resonance Urography (MRU appearances of the circumcaval ureter, a rare congenital cause of hydronephrosis. Materials and Methods: Seven cases of circumcaval ureter, suspected on intravenous urography (IVU, underwent subsequent static MRU using heavily T2-weighted sequences. Results: The various appearances of circumcaval ureter on IVU and MRU were studied and compared. The circumcaval portion of the ureter was especially well seen on axial MRU sections, though this portion was routinely not visualized on IVU. In one case with a ureteric calculus, MRU also depicted a circumcaval course of the ureter, thus providing a complete diagnosis. In yet another case, where a circumcaval ureter was suspected on IVU, MRU proved the actual cause of ureteric obstruction to be a crossing vessel. Conclusion: Static MRU using heavily T2-weighted coronal and axial sequences can make or exclude the diagnosis of circumcaval ureter unequivocally.

  20. Posttreatment assessment of response using FDG-PET/CT for patients treated with definitive radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Heron, Dwight E.; Degirmenci, Berna; Filho, Pedro A.A.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Seethala, Raja R.; Ferris, Robert L.; Avril, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate coregistered [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the detection of persistent disease after definitive radiation therapy in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Posttreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed in 28 patients on average 8 weeks (range, 4 to 15.7 weeks) after completing definitive radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT was visually analyzed for the entire patient group and at two time points (4-8 and >8 weeks) after treatment. The contrast-enhanced CT portion of PET/CT was separately analyzed blinded to the results of coregistered FDG-PET/CT and classified as negative or positive for residual locoregional disease. Pathologic findings and clinical follow-up served as the reference standard. Results: Follow-up data were available for all 28 patients (median, 17.6 months). Regarding the detection of residual disease, the overall sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT was 76.9% and 93.3%, respectively, compared with 92.3% and 46.7% for contrast-enhanced CT. The accuracy of FDG-PET/CT was 85.7%, compared with 67.9% for CT alone. All false-negative (n = 3) and false-positive (n = 1) FDG-PET/CT results occurred between 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. At 8 weeks or later after treatment, the specificity of CT was 28%, compared with 100% for FDG-PET/CT. Conclusions: The metabolic-anatomic information from coregistered FDG-PET/CT provided the most accurate assessment for treatment response when performed later than 8 weeks after the conclusion of radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT excelled by a higher specificity and overall diagnostic performance than CT imaging alone. These results support a potential clinical role of FDG-PET/CT in the early assessment of therapy response after definitive radiation therapy

  1. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography using a balanced turbo field echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifci, Egemen; Coban, Goekcen [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya (Turkey); Cicek, Tufan; Goenuelalan, Umut [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, Konya (Turkey)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of the study was to compare the inter-observer variability and the accuracy of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) using a thin sectional balanced-turbo field echo (B-TFE) sequence for detecting ureteral calculi and to determine the effect of additional factors (size, density and location of the calculus) on the sensitivity and specificity of the MRU. MRU and CT images were evaluated independently by two radiologists according to presence, density and localization of calculi. The degrees of inter-rater agreement for categorical items were evaluated by the Kappa coefficient. According to the 1st and 2nd observers, the sensitivity of MRU was 65.9 %, 71.8 % and the specificity of MRU was 95.9 %, 100 %, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was 84.6 % for stone detection. The larger size had a better effect on detectability (p < 0.05). Also, the higher density had a better impact on detectability (p < 0.05). Our study has shown that B-TFE MRU was useful to detect ureteral calculi. However, B-TFE MRU has low sensitivity and high specificity in comparison with CT images. MRU is a reasonable alternative imaging technique for follow-up periods of selective groups like patients with large urinary stones, children or pregnant patients when ionizing radiation is undesirable. (orig.)

  2. Potential impact of 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT on prostate cancer definitive radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Jérémie; Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Herrmann, Ken; Ceci, Francesco; Reiter, Robert E; Matthew, Rettig B; Hegde, John V; Shaverdian, Narek; King, Christopher R; Steinberg, Michael L; Czernin, Johannes; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-13

    Background: Standard-of-care imaging for initial staging of prostate cancer (PCa) underestimates disease burden. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) detects PCa metastasis with superior accuracy with potential impact definitive radiation therapy (RT) planning for non-metastatic PCa. Objectives: i) To determine how often definitive PCa RT planning based on standard target volumes cover 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT defined disease, and ii) To assess the potential impact of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT on definitive PCa RT planning. Patients and Methods: This is a post-hoc analysis of an intention to treat population of 73 patients with localized PCa without prior local therapy who underwent 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT for initial staging as part of an Investigational New Drug trial. 11/73 were intermediate-risk (15%), 33/73 were high-risk (45%), 22/73 were very high risk (30%), and 7/73 were N1 (9.5%). Clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines were contoured on the CT portion of the PET/CT by a radiation oncologist blinded to the PET findings. 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT images were analyzed by a nuclear medicine physician. PSMA-positive lesions not covered by planning volumes based on the CTVs were considered to have a major potential impact on treatment planning. Results: All patients had PSMA-positive primary prostate lesion(s). 25/73 (34%) and 7/73 (9.5%) had PSMA-positive pelvic nodal and distant metastases, respectively. The sites of nodal metastases in decreasing order of frequency were external iliac (20.5%), common iliac (13.5%), internal iliac (12.5%) obturator (12.5%), perirectal (4%), abdominal (4%), upper-diaphragm (4%), and presacral (1.5%). The median size of the nodal lesions was 6 mm (range 4-24 mm). RT planning based on the CTVs covered 69/73 (94.5%) of primary disease and 20/25 (80%) of

  3. Role of static fluid MR urography in detecting post urinary diversion complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Farouk Ibrahim Moustafa

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of work: The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic performance of static MR urography in detection of post cystectomy complications & the ability of static fluid MR urography in visualization of urinary tract segments. Material & methods: We prospectively reviewed 21 MR urograms with urinary diversion. The most common surgical procedures included Ileal conduit & Ileocecal neobladder diversion.Magnetic resonance urography examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR scanners. T2 weighted (static fluid MR urography techniques were done, in addition to conventional T1- and T2-weighted axial and coronal sequences. Urinary tract was divided in different parts: pelvicalyceal systems, upper, mid and lower ureteric segments & the reservoir or conduit Imaging features of the urinary collecting systems were evaluated for their visualization and complications detection. Results: T2-weighted MR urography could demonstrate 95% of urinary tract segments & together with conventional MR sequences all urinary tract segments can be visualized. Urinary diversion related complications were encountered included in 15 patients (71.4% & no urological complications were seen in 6 patients (28.6%. Conclusion: Comprehensive T2-weighted MR urography is an effective imaging method for the visualization of the urinary system and detection of early and late postoperative complications in patients with urinary diversion. Keywords: MR urography, Urinary diversion, Cancer bladder

  4. The relation of CT-determined tumor parameters and local and regional outcome of tonsillar cancer after definitive radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, Robert; Op de beeck, Katya; Bogaert, Walter van den; Rijnders, Alexis; Staelens, Lorenzo; Feron, Michel; Bellon, Erwin

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of CT-derived tumor parameters as predictor of local and regional outcome of tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The pretreatment CT studies of 112 patients with tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. After redigitizing the films, primary and nodal tumor volume was calculated with the summation-of-areas technique. The nodal CT aspect was graded using a 3-point scale (homogenous, inhomogeneous, and necrotic). Mean follow-up time was 33 months. Actuarial statistical analysis of local and regional outcome was done for each of the covariates; multivariate analysis was performed using Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: In the actuarial analysis, CT-determined primary tumor volume was significantly correlated with local recurrence rate (p<0.05) when all patients were considered, but primary tumor volume did not predict local control within the T2, T3, and T4 category. CT-determined nodal volume was significantly related to regional outcome (p<0.01), but nodal density was not. Total tumor volume was not significantly related to locoregional outcome (p=0.1). In the multivariate analysis, the T and N categories were the independent predictors of local and regional outcomes, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to other head-and-neck sites, primary and nodal tumor volume have only marginal predictive value regarding local and regional outcome after radiation therapy in tonsillar cancer

  5. The evaluation of kidney scan: On comparison with excretory urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    The kidney scan and the excretory urography of 21 cases in kidney disease proved clinically or pathologically at Yonsei University, Severance Hospital were reviewed and analysed briefly. Following were the results: 1. In all except 2 cases of pyelonephritis, changes on the kidney scan were noted with generalized motted density and cold area in the kidney, and with diffuse poor or non uptake density and various size or shape of the kidney. 2. On the excretory urogram, the demonstrable findings in the kidney parenchyma were discribed on the only 7 of 21 cases, hypernephroma, tuberculosis kidney, necrotizing papillits, medullary sponge kidney, and stenosis of renal artery. 3. Three of all cases, renal carbuncle, retroperitoneal hematoma with aberrant vessel and angiolipomyoma were no appreciable finding on the pyelography, but on the view of kidney scanning, there were apparently demonstrated abnormal cold area and some enlargement of kidney size. We concluded that the close correlation of the two techniques, kidney scanning and excretory urography on the kidney disease leads to more improved diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Digital radiography versus conventional radiography during excretory urography: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervi, P.M.; Bighi, S.; Merlo, L.; Lupi, L.; Vita, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe a computed radiographic system employed to generate and archive digital images in intravenous urography. For each exposure the system produces two digital images: the first (left image) simulates a conventional screen-film radiograph, the second (right image); enhances some spatial frequencies and emphasizes the margins of the structures. These images can be modified in their chief parameters and then printed by a laser-printer and archived on optical disks. Four experienced radiologists evaluated digital images with regard to some chief diagnostic parameters and, in 50 patients, they compared digital images with conventional screen-film radiographs and submitted the results to statistical analysis. For some of the chosen parameters, particularly for the evaluation of renal margins before and after contrast medium injection, digital images gave statistically better results than conventional films, while, no statistically significant different was observed for the other parameters. From the results of this preliminary study digital radiography was found to be useful in intravenous urography by reducing the patient's exposition dose, by always obtaining images of good quality, and by enhancing some particular features of the standard image; on the other hand there were many unsolved problems regarding the communicating and archiving system (PACS), because of the slowness of the image transfer procedure, difficulties in data transmission and complexity of referential procedures

  7. The evaluation of kidney scan: On comparison with excretory urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook

    1970-01-01

    The kidney scan and the excretory urography of 21 cases in kidney disease proved clinically or pathologically at Yonsei University, Severance Hospital were reviewed and analysed briefly. Following were the results: 1. In all except 2 cases of pyelonephritis, changes on the kidney scan were noted with generalized motted density and cold area in the kidney, and with diffuse poor or non uptake density and various size or shape of the kidney. 2. On the excretory urogram, the demonstrable findings in the kidney parenchyma were discribed on the only 7 of 21 cases, hypernephroma, tuberculosis kidney, necrotizing papillits, medullary sponge kidney, and stenosis of renal artery. 3. Three of all cases, renal carbuncle, retroperitoneal hematoma with aberrant vessel and angiolipomyoma were no appreciable finding on the pyelography, but on the view of kidney scanning, there were apparently demonstrated abnormal cold area and some enlargement of kidney size. We concluded that the close correlation of the two techniques, kidney scanning and excretory urography on the kidney disease leads to more improved diagnostic accuracy

  8. Definition of internal target volume and domestric study for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Cai Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional (4D) CT, and to compare the differences in target volume definition and dose distribution among 3D, 4D and respiratory-gated plans. Methods: 4DCT scanning was obtained for 12 patients with hepatocellular. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and normal tissues were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT images. The 3D, 4D and gated treatment plans were prepared for each patient using three different planning target volumes (PTVs): 1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; 2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs); 3) PT Gating was derived from ITV Gating , which encompassed 3 CTVs within gating-window at end-expiration plus SMs. The PTV volume and dose distribution were compared among different plans. Results: The PTV3D was the largest in all 12 patients, but still missed partial target volume in 5 patients when comparing with PTV4D. Both the 4D plans and the gated plans spared more normal tissues than the 3D plans, especially the liver. Without increasing normal tissue dose, the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from (50.8 ± 2.0) Gy (3D plans) to (54.7 ± 3.3) Gy, and the gated plans could further increase the dose to (58.0 ± 3.9) Gy. Conclusions: The 4DCT-based plans can ensure optimal target coverage with less irradiation of normal tissues and allow dose escalation when compared with 3D plans. Respiratory gated radiotherapy can further reduce the target volumes to spare more surrounding tissues, especially for patients with large extent of respiratory mobility. (authors)

  9. Definition of postlumpectomy tumor bed for radiotherapy boost field planning: CT versus surgical clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Hadassah; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the location and extent of the tumor bed as defined by surgical clips and computed tomography (CT) scans, after lumpectomy, for electron boost planning as part of breast radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 31 operated breasts in 30 patients who underwent lumpectomy were reviewed. One or more clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity. Serial CT images were used to measure the depth and transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The area and geometric center of the tumor bed were defined by the clips and CT. Results: The CT and clip measurements were identical for the maximal tumor depth in 27 of 30 patients. The CT bed extended beyond the clips by 0-7 mm medially in the transverse/longitudinal extent (multiclip patients). The median distance between the geometric centers in the coronal plane for the tumor bed center was larger for patients with single clips than for those with multiple clips (p 2 . The CT bed was more readily visible in patients with a shorter interval between surgery and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The maximal depth of the tumor bed was similar using the two methods. The extent and centers of the clip-and CT-determined beds differed significantly. This may indicate an underestimation of the tumor bed as defined by clips only and justifies integration of CT information in boost field planning

  10. Definition of the prostate in CT and MRI: a multi-observer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasch, C.; Barillot, I.; Remeijer, P.; Touw, A.; van Herk, M.; Lebesque, J. V.

    1999-01-01

    To determine, in three-dimensions, the difference between prostate delineation in magnetic resonance (MR) and computer tomography (CT) images for radiotherapy treatment planning. Three radiation oncologists, considered experts in the field, outlined the prostate without seminal vesicles both on CT,

  11. Diuretic urography in the assessment of obstruction of the pelvi-ureteric junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, A.E.; Aurell, M.; Bratt, C.G.; Nilsson, S.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty adult patients with urographic evidence of unilateral, moderately wide renal pelves were examined by routine and diuretic urography. Planimetry of the corresponding calyx system of the two examinations was performed. An increase in size by more than 20 per cent following osmotic diuresis indicated an obstruction of the pelvi-ureteric junction in kidneys with moderately wide renal pelves. Diuretic urography may be useful to diagnose obstruction as a cause of moderately wide renal pelves and to assess operative results. (Auth.)

  12. Integrated imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, intravenous urography) in diagnosing renal tumors and tumor-like formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drudi, F.M.; Capanna, G.; Poggi, R.; Occhiato, R.; Iannicelli, E.; Nardo, R.; di Passariello, R.

    1994-01-01

    This is an assessment of semiologic imaging criteria based on computerised tomography, ultrasound diagnosis and intravenous urography in renal tumors. The purpose is to obtain differential diagnostic data capable to modify the treatment approach. Over the last three years, a total of 570 cases of kidney tumors are observed. In 490 of them (86%) the imaging patterns obtained by either of the three techniques leads to correct diagnosis. In 62 of the remaining 80 patients, the integration of two techniques allows to unveil the neoplastic nature of the disease (27 cases), or the presence of a benign process (35 cases). In 15 of the remaining 18 cases only integration of the three techniques results in diagnosing renal tumors or tumor-like conditions (3 adeno-carcinomas, 5 abscesses, 3 cases of tuberculosis, 2 - pyeloxanthogranulomatosis, 2 dysmorphisms). In the last three cases definite diagnosis is made on the basis of needle biopsy. The radiological diagnosis is confirmed intraoperatively or during clinical follow-up study. The obtained data underscore the clinical relevance of imaging integration in evaluating renal lesions. This is particularly valid whenever the clinical data are nonspecific or misleading. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of DMSA scintigraphy and urography in assessing both acute and permanent renal damage in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokland, E.; Jacobsson, B. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden).; Hellstroem, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Jodal, U. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Sixt, R. [Dept. of Pediatric Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)

    1998-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy and urography in the detection of renal involvement in children with urinary tract infection (UTI) in order to identify patients with a high risk of developing renal damage. Material and Methods: A total of 157 children (median age 0.4 years, range 5 days to 5.8 years) with first-time symptomatic UTI were examined scintigraphy (with an assessment of renal area involvement) and urography at the time of UTI and 1 year later. All evaluations were made blindly. Results: Of the total 314 kidneys, 80 (25%) were abnormal at initial scintigraphy. Of these 80 kidneys, 44 (55%) had normalized at follow-up. Of the 234 initially normal kidneys, 29 (12%) were abnormal at follow-up. One year after UTI, abnormalities were seen in 59 children at scintigraphy and in 18 children at urography. Renal area involvement was larger and split function abnormalities more common in kidneys that were abnormal at both scintigraphy and urography than in kidneys with only scintigraphic abnormalities. Conclusion: Quantitation of renal area involvement and split renal function at early scintigraphy would seem to be useful in identifying patients at risk of developing renal damage. Urography at 1 year after infection identified mainly those with the most severe scintigraphic abnormalities. The clinical importance of scintigraphic abnormalities that are not confirmed by urography is not known. (orig.)

  14. Gd-BOPTA-enhanced excretory MR urography without administration of diuretics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allkemper, T.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical utility of Gd-BOPTA enhanced excretory magnetic resonance urography without additional administration of diuretics in correlation with conventional urography. Method: 15 preoperative patients with pelvic tumors were examined at 1.5 T using a breath-hold high-resolution 3D-FLASH sequence during first-pass as well as 5, 10, 15 minutes after iv. injection of 0.05 mmol/kg BW Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance trademark ) without administration of diuretics. Post-processed coronal and multiplanar MIP reconstructions were compared to conventional excretory urography with regard to morphologic accuracy, anatomic variability, filling defects, cause and level of obstruction or compression, tumor visibility, and time-effectiveness by two independent radiologists. Results: Visualization of the urinary tract by MRU was comparable to conventional excretory urography in 14 of 15 cases. Caliceal fornices were better delineated on conventional urographies, whereas MRU was considered superior in the assessment of the inferior ureter sections, the urinary bladder and obstructive tumors, whose extents could be clearly marked out. Examination times of both techniques were comparable. Conclusion: These first results show that non-diuretic Gd-BOPTA enhanced MRU is comparable to conventional excretory urography for the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic tumors. Further improvements of this technique seem possible by optimization of examination intervals and injection doses. (orig.) [de

  15. Evaluation of DMSA scintigraphy and urography in assessing both acute and permanent renal damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokland, E.; Jacobsson, B.; Jodal, U.; Sixt, R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy and urography in the detection of renal involvement in children with urinary tract infection (UTI) in order to identify patients with a high risk of developing renal damage. Material and Methods: A total of 157 children (median age 0.4 years, range 5 days to 5.8 years) with first-time symptomatic UTI were examined scintigraphy (with an assessment of renal area involvement) and urography at the time of UTI and 1 year later. All evaluations were made blindly. Results: Of the total 314 kidneys, 80 (25%) were abnormal at initial scintigraphy. Of these 80 kidneys, 44 (55%) had normalized at follow-up. Of the 234 initially normal kidneys, 29 (12%) were abnormal at follow-up. One year after UTI, abnormalities were seen in 59 children at scintigraphy and in 18 children at urography. Renal area involvement was larger and split function abnormalities more common in kidneys that were abnormal at both scintigraphy and urography than in kidneys with only scintigraphic abnormalities. Conclusion: Quantitation of renal area involvement and split renal function at early scintigraphy would seem to be useful in identifying patients at risk of developing renal damage. Urography at 1 year after infection identified mainly those with the most severe scintigraphic abnormalities. The clinical importance of scintigraphic abnormalities that are not confirmed by urography is not known. (orig.)

  16. Quality of urography with Iopamidol and diuretic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.; Bazzocchi, M.; Zanella, F.; Abbona, M.; Ukovich, W.

    1987-01-01

    The results obtained in four successive trials based on the analysis of urography performed on patients with normal kidney function are reported. The scores obtained with a non-ionic contrast (Iopamidol) were compared with those produced after injecting the same contrast medium with the addition of various diuretics (furosemide, various quantitives of 5% glucose solution, 20% mannitol). The results obtained by injecting the diuretic together with the Iopamidol were usually unsatisfactory. Injection of diuretic 15 ms after the Iopamidol gave better results in the lower urinary tract, particularly the bladder. The best results were obtained by injecting 250 ml, 20% mannitol, after 15 ms. However this technique is not applicable to patients requiring a voiding cystourethrogram due to the inadequate opacification of the urethra it provides

  17. Radiation Doses in Intravenous Urography And Potentials For Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halato, M.A.; Badawi, A.; Gassom, G.A.; Barsham, M.A.; Ibrahim, A.F.; Suliman, I.I.; Sulieman, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study radiation doses in IVU clinical examinations were measured in three public hospitals and a sample of 44 patients. In each room the machine output was measured for different peak tube voltages. Patient's data such as (age and weight) and exposure parameters (kVp) and mAs) were recorded. Entrance Surface Air Kerma (ESAK) for patients was determined by using the tube output and the patient exposure parameters. The ESAK ranged from 0.76 to 6.75 mGy. The cumulative ESAK ranged from 3.5 to 34.6 mGy. In conclusion, the obtained results are in agreement with the standard reference ESAK levels. The study showed that the cumulative ESAK can approach a level known to increase the probability of stochastic effect. Keywords: Patient dose, intravenous Urography, radiation protection

  18. Measurement of patient radiation doses in certain urography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Zailae, A.; Abuderman, A.; Theodorou, K.

    2015-01-01

    Patients are exposed to significant radiation doses during diagnostic and interventional urological procedures. This study aimed to measure patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and to estimate the effective dose during intravenous urography (IVU), extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and ascending urethrogram (ASU) procedures. ESAK was measured in patients using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 179 procedures were investigated. 27.9 % of the patients underwent IVU procedures, 27.9 % underwent ESWL procedures and 44.2 % underwent ASU procedures. The mean ESAK was 2.1, 4.18 and 4.9 mGy for IVU, ESWL, and ASU procedures, respectively. Differences in patient ESAK for the same procedure were observed. The mean ESAK values were comparable with those in previous studies. (authors)

  19. Feasibility of [18F]FDG-PET and coregistered CT on clinical target volume definition of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; IBFM-CNR, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Ceresoli, G.L.; Gregorc, V.; Rizzo, G.; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Artioli, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Castellone, P.; Picchio, M.; Landoni, C.; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Fazio, F.; IBFM-CNR, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Aim. To prospectively evaluate the impact of co registered positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in patients with non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods. Twenty-one patients (median age: 57 years; range: 42-80 years) referred to 3D-CRT for NSCLC were recruited. Positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG-PET) and conventional CT images were coregistered (PET/CT images) using a commerciaI software package based on surface matching technique. Neoplastic areas were contoured on [ 18 F]FDGPET images with the aid of the correspondent CT image by a nuclear medicine physician. CT images and their relative PET contours were then transferred to treatment planning system. A radiation oncologist firstly contoured clinical target volumes (CTV) on CT scan alone (CTV-CT), and then on co registered PET/CT images (CTV-PET/CT). CTV-CT and CTV-PET/CT were compared for each patient; a difference higher than 25% was considered of clinical relevance. Results. Three patients were shifted to palliative radiotherapy for metastatic disease or very large tumor size, showed by [ 18 F]FDG-PET. Of the remaining 18 patients a CTV change, after inclusion of PET/CT data, was observed in 10/18 cases (55%): larger in 7/18 (range 33-279%) and smaller in 3/18 patients (range 26-34%), mainly due to inclusion or exclusion of Iymph-nodal disease and to better definition of tumor extent. CTV changes smaller than 25% occurred in the remaining 8/18 patients. Conclusion. [ 18 F]FDG-PET and CT images co-registration in radiotherapy treatment planning Ied to a change in CTV definition in the majority of our patients, which may signillcantly modify management and radiation treatment modality in these patients

  20. Contrast-induced nephropathy following intravenous urography with Iopromid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krysteva, R.; Andreev, E.; Kirojcheva, M.; Kundurdzhiev, A.; Kiperova, B.

    1997-01-01

    In retrospective studies the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy is less than 1 per cent, while in prospective ones it may reach up to 10 per cent. Thirty-nine patients (9 men and 30 women at mean age 46.6 ± 16.5 years, range 15 - 75) undergo prospective study by iv urography with Iopramid (Ultravist 370) administered at mean dose 0.9 ± 0.1 ml/kg b.w. The patients are distributed in 3 groups: group I - with normal renal function free of diabetes mellitus (33 cases), group II - with normal renal function and diabetes mellitus, group III - with renal failure free of diabetes mellitus (plasma creatinine concentration (Pcr) > 140 μmol/l). Pcr is evaluated prior to (baseline) and 48 hours after urography. Dehydration is precluded and none of the patients is given nephrotoxic drugs. In group I Pcr shows a more than 25 per cent increase in 4 patients, but remains below 140 μmol/l. In 2 patients of the same group Pcr levels exceed the reference values: from 51 to 205, and from 105 to 196 μmol/l in two women aged 70 and 74 years, respectively. Renal function impairment is reversible, with Pcr returning to normal within a week. In groups II and III no changes in Pcr level are noted. A slight elevation of serum creatinine pointing to contrast-induced nephrotoxicity is documented in 4 patients with previously normal renal function. A reversible renal failure is observed in two instances. The obtained results demonstrate an incidence rate of contrast-induced nephropathy amounting to 15.4 per cent, or in 6/39 patients (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance urography in children – when and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegar-Zubovic, Sandra; Kristic, Spomenka; Lincender, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the potential of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in evaluation of paediatric urinary tract pathologies. Twenty-one paediatric urological patients were evaluated with T1, T2 prior and after and 3D gradient echo sequences after the contrast administration. Results were compared with findings obtained with ultrasound which was performed to all of patients, intravenous urography performed to 14 patients with the diagnosis of hydronephrosis and voiding cystouretrography performed to 6 patients where hydronephrosis was suspected to be caused by vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). MRU not only established the cause of hydronephrosis in all 14 cases (5 ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) stenosis, 1 functional stenosis, 3 residual hydronephrosis, 1 combination of UPJ and vesico-ureteric junction (VUJ) stenosis with hydromegaureter, 2 fetal ureters and 3 insufficient broad ureteral orifices), but gave additional information about existing pathological conditions in all of patients compared to other previously performed examination (1 caliceal lithiasis, 4 UPJ stenosis, 1 VUJ stenosis, 1 neurogenic bladder, 1 hypotonic ureter, 1 urinary infection, 1 duplication of pelvis and ureter, 1 urinary retention and 1 fetal ureter). Other MRU findings were: 3 polycystic kidney disease, 1 caliceal cyst, 2 simple renal cysts, 1 long hypotonic twisted ureters and 1 hypertrophied column of Bertini. Because of the ability to acquire high contrast and spatial resolution images of the whole urinary tract in any orthogonal plane, MRU enables a precise detection and differentiation of pathological urological conditions. We believe that in the future, because of its advantages, MRU will replace traditional methods in the evaluation of urinary tract pathologies

  2. Magnetic resonance urography: application in urinary tract obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Malet, A.; Rue, M.; Villajos, M.; Martin, C.; Garcia, D.; Prats, J.

    1999-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) in the assessment of the upper urinary tract in patients with obstructive uropathy. Twenty-three patients suspected of having urinary tract obstruction were examined by IVU and MRU, MRU imaging was performed with a 1.0 Tesla multicoil unit. The images were obtained with two MR sequences: a) half-Fourier single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE), and b) highly T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) based on fast acquisition with the relaxation and enhancement (RARE) method. The images were examined independently by four radiologists. Two radiologists reviewed the IVU images by consensus and two reviewed the MRU images by consensus. The incidencences of dilatation and of stricture were calculated and the McNemar test was used to compare the two techniques. The mean duration of MRU was 11 minutes (range: 7 to 25 minutes), while the mean duration of IVU was 363 minutes (range: 45 to 2,160 minutes). IVU took more than 150 minutes to complete in over 50% of the patients. Twenty.one patients presented dilatation of the pyelocaliceal system. MRU disclosed the urinary tract dilatation in all 21 cases, while IVU detected it in 15 (65%: p=0.03). The causes of obstruction were neoplasm (n=9), calculi (n=6) and extrinsic stricture (n=6). MRU is much more reliable and rapid in the detection of dilatation and the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive uropathy, and could be used as an alternative to IVU in certain cases. (Author) 13 refs

  3. Thoracic cavity definition for 3D PET/CT analysis and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W; Higgins, William E

    2015-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical details on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage=99.2% and leakage=0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of MR urography in neonates and infants with anomalies of the upper urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Ruppert-Kohlmayr, A.; Fotter, R.; Simbrunner, J.; Ebner, F.; Ring, E.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic potential of dynamic MR urography (MRU) in neonates and infants with sonographically detected abnormalities of the upper urinary tract. Thirty infants (age range 5 days to 3 years, mean age 7.9 months; male:female: 22:8) underwent MRU using T2 and contrast-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted sequences. The results were compared with the findings of ultrasound (n=30), intravenous urography (IVU, n=19) and/or scintigraphy (n=25) based on the criteria suggestive of obstructive uropathy. Oral sedation was sufficient to perform MRU with diagnostic quality in 20 of 21 patients younger than 1 year; 9 older patients needed intravenous sedation. Diagnosis of the 66 renal units (58 kidneys, 29 successful examinations) included normal systems (contralateral units), duplex systems, vesico-ureteral reflux, obstructive megaureter, ureteropelvic junction obstruction and accompanying renal parenchymal disease, with complex pathology in 10 patients. Magnetic resonance urography demonstrated anatomy better than IVU, particularly the renal parenchyma, (ectopic) ureters, and poorly functioning dilated systems. Magnetic resonance urography was superior to US in showing ureteral pathology. Tiny cysts in dysplastic kidneys were better seen by US. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRU allowed accurate assessment of obstruction applying IVU criteria. Here MRU matched IVU results, and most of the scintigraphic findings. Magnetic resonance urography can be performed in young infants with diagnostic quality using oral sedation. Magnetic resonance urography correctly depicts anatomy and allows assessment of the urinary tract better than US and IVU, with additional functional information. Magnetic resonance urography thus has the potential to replace IVU for many indications. (orig.)

  5. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  6. Prediction of vesico-ureteral reflux in children from intravenous urography films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, P.; Seppaenen, U.; Huttunen, N.P.; Uhari, M.

    1979-01-01

    Intravenous urography and voiding urethrocystography were performed on 255 children with urinary tract infection. Eighty-six (34%) of these children has some kind of abnormality of the urinary tract. Vesico-ureteral reflux was observed to 96 ureters (19%) in 69 children (27%). The prediction of vesic-ureteral reflux by two radiologists from urography films only gave 46 (48%) and 51 (53%) false negative results respectively. In cases of clinically important reflux (III to V 0 ), however, the rate of false negative prediction was 0/18 and 1/18 (6%) respectively. The rate for false positive predictions were 45/413 (11%) for both radiologist. In view of the number of pathological findings in this series i.v. urography is recommended as a routine in children undergoing urological work-up after their first urinary tract infection. As the clinically important vesico-ureteral reflux seems to be predictable from urography films alone, voiding urethrocystography seems not to be justified in children with negative i.v. urography, and can be postponed and carried out later if the urinary tract infection recurs. (author)

  7. Excretory urography by subcutaneous injection of iodixanol in Persian squirrel (Sciurus anomalous)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veshkini, A.; Tavana, M.; Haghdost, I.S.; Masouleh, M.N.; Savojbolaghi, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    There are many indications for excretory urography in humans and animals. Intravenous urography (IVU) is the most practical method about other urography techniques are used because of difficulties for finding veins in IVU, due to small size of the patients. This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of subcutaneous injection of iodixanol in providing a safe and diagnostic urogram in Persian squirrel. Twelve clinically healthy adult Persian squirrels were prepared and kept for two weeks prior to study. Blood tests were performed 7 days prior to the study. After eighteen hour fasting, animals were sedated by using xylazine/diazepam cocktail (xylazine 5mg/kg, diazepam 30mg/kg). Lateral and ventrodorsal control radiographs were taken. Thirteen hundred and 1800 mg iodine per kilogram body weight of iodixanol was injected subcutaneously over shoulder area in Persian squirrels (each dose for six Persian squirrels). Lateral and ventrodorsal radiographs were taken every 5 m

  8. Evaluation of multidetector computed tomography urography and ultrasonography for diagnosing bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, M.K. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cowan, N.C. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nigel.cowan@nds.ox.ac.uk; Rivers-Bowerman, M.D.; Turney, B.W. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography urography (CTU) and ultrasonography (US) for diagnosing bladder cancer. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 143 patients over 40-years of age, presenting with macroscopic haematuria and without urinary tract infection underwent same-day CTU, US, and flexible cystoscopy. CTU and US were independently rated on a five-point scale for the presence of bladder cancer without knowledge of the reference standard of flexible or rigid cystoscopy and/or biopsy results. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and likelihood ratios. Results: For CTU, a rating of 5 (definitely tumour) was highly specific for bladder cancer (96.5%, 95%CI: 91.3-99%), effectively confirming diagnosis (positive likelihood ratio 25.6, 95%CI: 9.7-67.4). For US, specificity was also high (94.7%, 95%CI: 88.9-98%) with a positive likelihood ratio of 13.1 (95%CI: 5.8-29.6). Sensitivity at this rating was substantially higher for CTU (89.7%, 95%CI: 72.7-97.8%) than US (69%, 95%CI: 49.2-84.7%). Standardized partial area (A{sub z}) under the ROC curve between 95-100% specificity, representing the average sensitivity in this range, was significantly greater (0.88 versus 0.61, p < 0.05) for CTU than US. Conclusion: The specificities of CTU and US for the diagnosis of bladder cancer were similar, but CTU was more sensitive. Although the sensitivity of CTU was not high enough to replace flexible cystoscopy in the diagnostic pathway, the high specificity enables direct referral to rigid cystoscopy, bypassing flexible cystoscopy and expediting diagnosis and treatment in those patients testing positive.

  9. Evaluation of multidetector computed tomography urography and ultrasonography for diagnosing bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, M.K.; Cowan, N.C.; Rivers-Bowerman, M.D.; Turney, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography urography (CTU) and ultrasonography (US) for diagnosing bladder cancer. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 143 patients over 40-years of age, presenting with macroscopic haematuria and without urinary tract infection underwent same-day CTU, US, and flexible cystoscopy. CTU and US were independently rated on a five-point scale for the presence of bladder cancer without knowledge of the reference standard of flexible or rigid cystoscopy and/or biopsy results. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and likelihood ratios. Results: For CTU, a rating of 5 (definitely tumour) was highly specific for bladder cancer (96.5%, 95%CI: 91.3-99%), effectively confirming diagnosis (positive likelihood ratio 25.6, 95%CI: 9.7-67.4). For US, specificity was also high (94.7%, 95%CI: 88.9-98%) with a positive likelihood ratio of 13.1 (95%CI: 5.8-29.6). Sensitivity at this rating was substantially higher for CTU (89.7%, 95%CI: 72.7-97.8%) than US (69%, 95%CI: 49.2-84.7%). Standardized partial area (A z ) under the ROC curve between 95-100% specificity, representing the average sensitivity in this range, was significantly greater (0.88 versus 0.61, p < 0.05) for CTU than US. Conclusion: The specificities of CTU and US for the diagnosis of bladder cancer were similar, but CTU was more sensitive. Although the sensitivity of CTU was not high enough to replace flexible cystoscopy in the diagnostic pathway, the high specificity enables direct referral to rigid cystoscopy, bypassing flexible cystoscopy and expediting diagnosis and treatment in those patients testing positive

  10. Bilateral congenital midureteric strictures associated with multicystic dysplastic kidney and hydronephrosis: evaluation with MR urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D.; Little, Stephen [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kirsch, Andrew J. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Urology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    We report a case of bilateral congenital midureteric strictures diagnosed using MR urography. The severity of obstruction differed in the two ureters, resulting in a multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) with an atretic ureter on one side and hydronephrosis that worsened over time due to progressive stenosis on the other. Although midureteric strictures are usually misdiagnosed as ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) or ureterovesical junction (UVJ) obstruction on conventional imaging, MR urography was able to clearly demonstrate both the anatomical and functional abnormalities. Additionally, because of the excellent anatomical resolution, similarities in the underlying pathological lesions could be contrasted with the severity of the pathophysiological impact upon each kidney. (orig.)

  11. The significance of a uniform definition of pathological lymph nodes in Hodgkin lymphoma: Impact of different thresholds for positive lymph nodes in CT imaging on staging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Obenauer, Silvia; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The most commonly used approach for the assessment for differentiating malignant versus reactive lymph nodes is the measurement of the cross-section diameter of the lymph nodes in the transversal CT-planes. The intention of this article is to assess the impact of varying definitions of pathological lymph node size in CT-imaging in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and to evaluate its effect on staging, chemotherapy regimes and radiation field size. Materials and methods: Pretherapeutic CT-scans of 10 consecutive patients with Hodgkin lymphoma have been evaluated based on two different definitions for malignant lymph node size; the classification of the German study group for Hodgkin lymphoma (1.0 cm) and the classification according to the results of the Cotswold consensus meeting 1989 (1.5 cm). Results: Applying the definitions of the DHSG and the Cotswold meeting we found more affected lymph node regions compared to the evaluation of the referring institutions in 9/10 and 6/10 patients, higher stages in 2/10 and 1/10 patients, more intense chemotherapy regimes in 3/10 and 1/10 and larger radiation fields in 10/10 and 6/10 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Varying definitions of pathologic lymph node size and inconsequent application of definitions reduce the comparability between different studies and within each study

  12. Gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MR urography versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children; Kontrastangehobene T{sub 1}-gewichtete MR-Urographie versus T{sub 2}-gewichtete (HASTE) MR-Urographie im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staatz, G.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Haage, P.; Tacke, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Rohrmann, D. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Stollbrink, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MR urography (EMRU) versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children with upper urinary tract abnormalities. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study 63 children, aged from 3 weeks to 15 years, underwent MR urography in a 1.5-T scanner. Before and after an intravenous injection of 0.05 mg/kg body weight of furosemide, respiratory-triggered HASTE images were obtained for T{sub 2}-weighted MR urography. EMRU was performed subsequent to i.v. gadolinium injection with respiratory-gated, coronal 3D-gradient-echo sequences. Results: Compared to T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography, gadolinium-enhanced MR urography revealed a superior diagnostic accuracy in non-dilated collecting systems (horseshoe kidneys, ectopic kidneys, duplex systems, single ectopic ureters, ureteroceles). EMRU and T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU turned out to be equivalent in the assessment of obstructed but normal functioning upper urinary tracts (UPJ obstructions, megaureters). Non-functioning dilated collecting systems and multicystic dysplastic kidneys were best visualized with use of T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MRU allows accurate evaluation of most upper urinary tract abnormalities. T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU complements GMRU in the evaluation of non-functioning renal units and cystic disease of the kidneys. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Vergleich der kontrastangehobenen T{sub 1}-gewichteten MR-Urographie mit der T{sub 2}-gewichteten (HASTE) MR-Urographie bei Kindern mit Anomalien des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: In einer prospektiven Studie wurde bei 63 Kindern (3 Wo. - 15J.) eine MR-Urographie (MRU) in einem 1,5-Tesla-Magneten durchgefuehrt. Die T{sub 2}-gewichtete MRU erfolgte vor und nach intravenoeser Injektion von 0,05 mg/kg KG Furosemid mit atemgetriggerten HASTE-Sequenzen. Fuer die T{sub 1}-gewichtete MRU wurden nach

  13. Static-dynamic MR urography. Comparison with excretory urography and scintigraphy in experimentally induced urinary tract obstruction (UTO); Statisch-dynamische MR-Urographie. Vergleich mit Ausscheidungsurographie und Szintigraphie bei experimentell induzierter Harntransportstoerung (HTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Wunsch, R.; Troeger, J. [Paediatrische Radiologie, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Hoffend, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, K. [Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Darge, K.; Clorius, J.H. [Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Medizin-Systeme, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of combined static-dynamic MR urography (MRU) for the functional-morphological evaluation of experimentally induced urinary tract obstruction. Methods: Static-dynamic MRU - combination study with a respiratory-triggered 3D-IR-TSE sequence and a dynamic 2D-FFE sequence after Gd-DTPA and furosemide - was obtained in comparison with {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), excretory urography (EU) and ultrasound (US) in 29 healthy piglets and in 20 piglets with surgically induced ureteric stenosis (total of 50 postoperative examination blocks). Results: MRU allowed complete depiction of the urinary tract in all controls, in operated piglets the stenosis was always correctly identified. Quality of MRU was superior to EU in 36 to 43 comparative studies. Calculation of single kidney function from parenchymal renograms, and assessment of urinary excretion from whole-kidney renograms resulted in a highly significant agreement of MRU with DRS. Conclusion: Static-dynamic MR urography allows excellent depiction of experimentally induced urinary tract obstruction, and reliable assessment of individual renal function and urinary excretion. Two advantages of the method stand out, it does not require radiation and it permits a functional-morphological correlation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Einschaetzung der Wertigkeit der kombinierten statisch-dynamischen MR-Urographie (MRU) zur umfassenden funktionell-morphologischen Diagnostik tierexperimentell induzierter Harntransportstoerungen. Methodik: Die statisch-dynamische MRU-Kombination aus einer atemgetriggerten 3D-IR-TSE-Sequenz und einer dynamischen 2D-FFE-Sequenz nach Gd-DTPA und Furosemid - wurde im Vergleich zu {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-Diurese-Nierenszintigraphie (DNS), Ultraschall (US) und Ausscheidungsurographie (AUG) bei 29 gesunden Ferkeln sowie bei 20 Ferkeln mit operativ indizierter Harnwegsstenose (insgesamt 50 postoperative Untersuchungsbloecke) durchgefuehrt. Ergebnisse: Die MRU

  14. The changing scene of radiology: Value of urography as initial examination in infectious and hypertensive disease, hematuria and malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethlin, J.H.; Gadeholt, G.; Hoeiem, L.; Aslaksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Four to 20% positive findings were found in a review of 1913 excretory urographics. Possibly relevant findings were 20% in patients referred for infectious disease, 10% in hypertensive disease, 6% in hematuria and 4% in neoplasms. Urography influenced treatment mainly in the 2 groups with few positive findings. The costs for positive findings may be acceptable in patients with hematuria or suspicion of neoplasms, but are too high in the other groups. Until ultrasonography can replace intravenous urography as the first screening method in upper urinary tract disease, the patient selection for urography in infectious and hypertensive disease should be improved. (orig.)

  15. Contribution of abdoscan using MR cholangio-pancreatography and MR urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecesne, R.; Drouillard, J.; Cisse, R.; Schiratti, M.

    1998-01-01

    MR cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and MR Urography (MRU) are promising recent imaging modalities. Oral magnetic particles (Abdoscan, Nycomed SA, Oslo, Norway) is an negative contrast agent eliminating signal intensity of the gastro-intestinal tract thus improvising image quality at MRCP and MRU. (author)

  16. Diagnostic value of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with hydroneph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Emad-Eldin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, accuracy and diagnostic potential of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with sonographically detected hydronephrosis. We prospectively evaluated 28 children (11 girls and 17 boys, mean age 8.3 years (range 2 months–16 years. Static-excretory MR Urography was performed in all cases. The results of MR Urography were compared with the results of other imaging modalities, cystoscopy and surgery. In 28 children, 61 renal units were evaluated by MR Urography (the renal unit is the kidney and its draining ureter. The final diagnoses included: normal renal units (n = 23; uretropelvic junction obstruction (n = 14; megaureter (n = 8; midureteric stricture (n = 1, complicated duplicated systems (n = 5, post ESWL non-obstructive dilation (n = 2, extrarenal pelvis (n = 4, dysplastic kidney (n = 4. Complex pathology and more than one disease entity in were found in 7 children. The MRI diagnosis correlated with the final diagnosis in 57 units, with diagnostic accuracy 93.4%. In conclusions static and excretory MRU give both morphological and functional information in a single examination without exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast agent. It is a valuable imaging technique for children with upper urinary tract dilatation; especially in cases of complex congenital pathologies and severely hydronephrotic kidney.

  17. Low osmolar (non-ionic) contrast media versus high osmolar (ionic) contrast media in intravenous urography and enhanced computerized tomography: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsuphachart, S

    1991-12-01

    The cost-effectiveness of three alternative policies for the use of intravenous contrast media for urography and enhanced computerized tomography (CT) are analyzed. Alternative #1 is to use high osmolar contrast media (HOCM) in all patients, the historical policy. Alternative #2 is to replace it with low osmolar contrast media (LOCM) in all patients. Alternative #3 is to use LOCM only in the high risk patients. Data on the 6,242 patients who underwent intravenous urography and enhanced CT at the Department of Radiology, Chulalongkorn Hospital in 1989 were used. Both societal and hospital viewpoints were analyzed. The incremental cost-effectiveness (ICE) between #2 and #1 was 26,739 Baht (US$1,070) per healthy day saved (HDS), while the ICE between #3 and #1 was 12,057 Baht (US$482) per HDS. For fatal cases only, ICE between #2 and #1 was 35,111 Baht (US$1,404) per HDS, while the ICE between #3 and #1 was 18,266 Baht (US$731) per HDS. The incremental cost (IC) per patient was 2,341 Baht (US$94) and 681 Baht (US$27) respectively. For the hospital viewpoint the ICE between #2 and #1 was 13,744 (US$550) and between #3 and #1 was 6,127 Baht (US$245) per HDS. The IC per patient was 1,203 Baht (US$48) and 346 Baht (US$14), respectively. From the sensitivity analysis, #3 should be used if the LOCM price is reduced more than 75% (equal to 626 Baht or less) and more than 80% of the patients are able to pay for the contrast media.

  18. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Patients with Rising Prostatic-Specific Antigen After Definitive Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Detection Efficacy and Diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Maged Abdel Galil; Basha, Mohammad Abd Alkhalik; Ahmed, Hussien; Obaya, Ahmed Ali; Afifi, Amira Hamed Mohamed; Abdelbary, Eman H

    2018-06-20

    68 Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen-11 ( 68 Ga-PSMA-11) is a recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer that can detect prostate cancer (PC) relapses and metastases with high contrast resolution. The aim of this study was to assess the detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT image in patients with rising prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) after treatment of PC. The present prospective study included 188 patients who exhibited rising of PSA level on a routine follow-up examination after definitive treatment of PC. All patients underwent a 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination. For each patient, we determined the disease stage, the Gleason score, and the maximum standardized uptake value of the local recurrence and extraprostatic metastases. The detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT were established by histopathology and clinical and imaging follow-up as the reference standards. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT detected tumour relapse in 165 patients (35 patients had local recurrence, 106 patients had extraprostatic metastases, and 24 patients had combined lesions). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination in the detection of PC recurrence were 98.8%, 100%, and 98.8%, respectively. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT revealed an overall detection rate of 87.8% (165/188) in patients with rising PSA (median of 2.2 ng/mL, and range of 0.01-70 ng/mL). 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a valuable tool for the detection of PC local recurrence or extraprostatic metastases following rising PSA levels after primary definitive therapy and should be incorporated during routine work-up. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A comparison between two modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Tiina; Visapää, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Beule, Annette; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion.

  20. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. A comparison between two modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Visapaeae, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland); Beule, Annette [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Studie war es, die Umstellung der Strahlentherapieplanung des Prostatakarzinoms von CT-gestuetzter in ausschliesslich MR-gestuetzte Zieldefinition zu untersuchen. Bei 30 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden eine CT und eine MRT unter Planungsbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Zwei Untersucher konturierten die Prostata in CT- und T2-gewichteten MR-Bildern. Mit Hilfe der Position von Goldstiften und der anatomischen Grenzen der Prostata wurden die CT- und MR-Bilder koregistriert. Es wurden die Genauigkeit der Koregistrierung sowie die Unterschiede der Zielvolumina und der

  1. Optimization of 64-MDCT urography: effect of dual-phase imaging with furosemide on collecting system opacification and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Orith; Guranda, Larisa; Apter, Sara; Eiss, David; Amitai, Marianne Michal; Konen, Eli

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare opacification of the urinary collecting system and radiation dose associated with three-phase 64-MDCT urographic protocols and those associated with a split-bolus dual-phase protocol including furosemide. Images from 150 CT urographic examinations performed with three scanning protocols were retrospectively evaluated. Group A consisted of 50 sequentially registered patients who underwent a three-phase protocol with saline infusion. Group B consisted of 50 sequentially registered patients who underwent a reduced-radiation three-phase protocol with saline. Group C consisted of 50 sequentially registered patients who underwent a dual-phase split-bolus protocol that included a low-dose furosemide injection. Opacification of the urinary collecting system was evaluated with segmental binary scoring. Contrast artifacts were evaluated, and radiation doses were recorded. Results were compared by analysis of variance. A significant reduction in mean effective radiation dose was found between groups A and B (p < 0.001) and between groups B and C (p < 0.001), resulting in 65% reduction between groups A and C (p < 0.001). This reduction did not significantly affect opacification score in any of the 12 urinary segments (p = 0.079). In addition, dense contrast artifacts overlying the renal parenchyma observed with the three-phase protocols (groups A and B) were avoided with the dual-phase protocol (group C) (p < 0.001). A dual-phase protocol with furosemide injection is the preferable technique for CT urography. In comparison with commonly used three-phase protocols, the dual-phase protocol significantly reduces radiation exposure dose without reduction in image quality.

  2. MR urography in children. Pt. 1. How we do the F0 technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); University of Rouen, LITIS Laboratory EA 4108, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Dolores, Michael [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); Taylor, Melissa [Ambroise Pare Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Boulogne Billancourt (France); Elbaz, Frederic; Liard, Agnes [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Rouen (France)

    2010-05-15

    MR urography (MRU) has been widely accepted as a substitute to intravenous urography for investigating children with a dilated urinary tract after preliminary assessment by US and voiding cystourethrography. Hydronephrosis is by far the main indication for MRU because upper tract dilatation is a frequent condition in infants and children. Recent advances in technology have allowed MR to go beyond morphology and to assess renal function parameters such as split renal function and drainage. In this article we report our routine practice of the F0 MRU technique. The main advantages of our protocol are no requirement for general anaesthesia, no bladder catheterization, use of low-dose gadolinium-based contrast agent (0.05-0.1 mmol/kg) and total acquisition time of 30 min or less. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic imaging in children with urinary tract infection: the role of intravenous urography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A; Wagner, A A; Lavard, L D

    1995-01-01

    Ninety children referred to hospital with urinary tract infection (UTI) were investigated by iv urography (IVU), ultrasonography (US) and 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (DMSA). Fifty-eight children also underwent micturating cystourethrography (MCUG). In 36 (40%) of the children, at least one...... important for treatment or prognosis. IVU is an important supplement to US and DMSA in investigation programs for children with UTI. IVU should be performed in cases of renal scars, dilatations or in children with recurrent infections....

  4. Magnetic resonance urography in the assessment of hydronephrosis and hydroureter in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, V.

    2011-01-01

    MR urography is a new, modern modality for evaluation of various urological abnormalities in children. The goal of this article is to describe the role of MR urography in the assessment of hydronephrosis and hydroureters. MRU is most commonly applied to the evaluation of hydronephrosis and provides valuable insight into a wide range of obstructive uropathies. In our study we investigate 96 children with suspected abnormalities of the upper urinary tract. Using static and excretory MRU we obtain both morphological and functional information by means of different sequences with or without injection of gadolinium. MR urography is promising diagnostic method of wide spectrum of pathological conditions affecting the urinary tract with potential to revolutionize uroradiology imaging in children. It integrates exquisite anatomical information with a variety of functional data and avoids ionizing radiation. MRU is increasingly employed as a problem solver when conventional imaging studies remain inconclusive and overcomes a lot of their limitations with the potential to become in the future leading modality to diagnose diseases of the kidney especially in newborns and children. (authors)

  5. Accuracy of intermediate dose of furosemide injection to improve multidetector row CT urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Catherine; Jeantroux, Jeremy; Irani, Farah G.; Sauer, Benoit; Lang, Herve; Saussine, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the usefulness of intermediate dose furosemide to improve visualization of the intrarenal collecting system and ureter using MDCTU. Materials and methods: Two groups of 100 patients without urinary tract disease or major abdominal pathology underwent MDCTU. Group I (various abdominal indications) was performed without any additional preparation and Group II (suspicion of urinary tract disease) 10 min after injection of furosemide (20 mg). MIP images of the excretory phase were post-processed. Maximal short-axis diameter of the pelvis and ureter were measured on axial images for all phases. Visualization of the collecting system wall and the identification of the whole ureter were assessed. Results: Mean pelvic diameter before contrast was (7.4 mm, S.D. ± 2.7; 13.4 mm, S.D. ± 4.1), on cortico-medullary phase (8.4 mm, S.D. ± 4.2; 14.3 mm, S.D. ± 4), on nephrographic phase (8.1 mm, S.D. ± 2.5; 14.8 mm, S.D. ± 4) and on excretory phase (9.7 mm, S.D. ± 3.4; 14.9 mm, S.D. ± 4.5), respectively, for Groups I and II. Intrarenal collecting system wall was clearly identified on both corticomedullary and nephrographic phases in 91% of Group II against 20% of Group I. Opacification of the entire ureter was excellent on excretory phase in 96% of Group II against 13% of Group I. The difference between the mean values for the two groups was statistically significant for all phases (p -9 ). Conclusion: Intermediate-dose furosemide (20 mg) before MDCTU is a very simple add-on for accurate depiction of pelvicalyceal details and collecting system wall without artefacts. The procedure is associated with a constant and complete visualisation of the entire urete

  6. Accuracy of intermediate dose of furosemide injection to improve multidetector row CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Catherine [Department of Radiology B, Universitary Hospital of Strasbourg-Civil Hospital, 1, Place de l' hopital BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: catherine.roy@chru-strasbourg.fr; Jeantroux, Jeremy; Irani, Farah G.; Sauer, Benoit [Department of Radiology B, Universitary Hospital of Strasbourg-Civil Hospital, 1, Place de l' hopital BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Lang, Herve; Saussine, Christian [Department of Urology, Universitary Hospital of Strasbourg-Civil Hospital, 1, Place de l' hopital BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2008-05-15

    Objective: Evaluate the usefulness of intermediate dose furosemide to improve visualization of the intrarenal collecting system and ureter using MDCTU. Materials and methods: Two groups of 100 patients without urinary tract disease or major abdominal pathology underwent MDCTU. Group I (various abdominal indications) was performed without any additional preparation and Group II (suspicion of urinary tract disease) 10 min after injection of furosemide (20 mg). MIP images of the excretory phase were post-processed. Maximal short-axis diameter of the pelvis and ureter were measured on axial images for all phases. Visualization of the collecting system wall and the identification of the whole ureter were assessed. Results: Mean pelvic diameter before contrast was (7.4 mm, S.D. {+-} 2.7; 13.4 mm, S.D. {+-} 4.1), on cortico-medullary phase (8.4 mm, S.D. {+-} 4.2; 14.3 mm, S.D. {+-} 4), on nephrographic phase (8.1 mm, S.D. {+-} 2.5; 14.8 mm, S.D. {+-} 4) and on excretory phase (9.7 mm, S.D. {+-} 3.4; 14.9 mm, S.D. {+-} 4.5), respectively, for Groups I and II. Intrarenal collecting system wall was clearly identified on both corticomedullary and nephrographic phases in 91% of Group II against 20% of Group I. Opacification of the entire ureter was excellent on excretory phase in 96% of Group II against 13% of Group I. The difference between the mean values for the two groups was statistically significant for all phases (p < 10{sup -9}). Conclusion: Intermediate-dose furosemide (20 mg) before MDCTU is a very simple add-on for accurate depiction of pelvicalyceal details and collecting system wall without artefacts. The procedure is associated with a constant and complete visualisation of the entire urete.

  7. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  8. Predictive value of excretory urography, ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and liver and bone scan in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanash, K.A.; Bissada, N.K.; Abla, A.; Esmail, D.; Dowling, A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and radioisotopic scanning in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer has not been reported previously. Forty patients with invasive bladder cancer seen at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre between January 1978 and June 1981 underwent complete preoperative workup for staging of their tumors prior to radical cystectomy. The preoperative radiologic investigations included excretory urography (IVP), ultrasonography (US), CT of the pelvis, and liver and bone scans. The results of these investigations were compared with the operative and pathologic staging. Ninety-three percent of the patients with bilharzial cancer had evidence of ureteric obstruction on IVP compared with 22% of the nonbilharzial cancer patients. The presence of ureteric obstruction in these patients did not correlate with the stage of the disease with 83% of the patients with superficial tumors (T1 and T2) having hydroureteronephrosis. Ultrasonography and CT had an 83% accuracy in the staging of superficial tumors. Stage T3 tumors were understaged in 14% of the cases. Ultrasonography did not differentiate Stages T3 and T4 tumors while CT scan differentiated these two stages in 57% of the cases. Bone scan failed to reveal evidence of metastatic disease in any of the bilharzial cancer patients. Liver scan was suspicious for liver metastases in two patients with bilharzial cancers in whom open liver biopsy revealed only hepatic bilharziasis. Of all the radiographic studies, US or preferably CT scan seem to be of some value in the staging of bilharzial tumors localized to the bladder. Bone and liver scans are probably of no cost effective benefit

  9. Distribution of lymph node metastases on FDG-PET/CT in inoperable or unresectable oesophageal cancer patients and the impact on target volume definition in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, Melanie; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Van Os, Rob M.; Hulshof, Maarten CCM; Wouterse, Sanne J.; Bennink, Roel J.; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke WM.

    2016-01-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) is standard care for localised inoperable/unresectable oesophageal tumours. Many surgical series have reported on distribution of lymph node metastases (LNM) in resected patients. However, no data is available on the distribution of at-risk LN regions in this more unfavourable patient group. This study aimed to determine the spread of LNM using FDG-PET/CT, to compare it with the distribution in surgical series and to define its impact on the definition of elective LN irradiation (ENI). FDG-PET/CT images of patients with oesophageal cancer treated with dCRT (from 2003 to 2013) were reviewed to identify the anatomic distribution of FDG-avid LNs. Tumours were divided according to proximal, mid-thoracic or distal localisation. About 105 consecutive patients entered analysis. The highest numbers of FDG-avid LNs in proximal tumours were at LN station 101R (45%) and 106recL (35%). For mid-thoracic tumours at 104R (30%) and 105 (30%). For tumours located in the distal oesophagus, the most common sites were along the lesser curvature of the stomach (21%) and the left gastric artery (21%). Except for the supraclavicular and pretracheal nodes, there were no positive locoregional LNM found outside the standard surgical resection area. Our results show a good correlation between the distribution of nodal volumes at risk in surgical series and on FDG-PET/CT. The results can be used to determine target definition in dCRT for oesophageal cancer. For mid-thoracic tumours, the current target delineation guidelines may be extended based on the risk of node involvement, but more clinical studies are needed to determine if the potential harm of expanding the CTV outweighs the potential benefit.

  10. Distribution of lymph node metastases on FDG-PET/CT in inoperable or unresectable oesophageal cancer patients and the impact on target volume definition in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Melanie; Wouterse, Sanne J; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; van Os, Rob M; Bennink, Roel J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke Wm; Hulshof, Maarten Ccm

    2016-08-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) is standard care for localised inoperable/unresectable oesophageal tumours. Many surgical series have reported on distribution of lymph node metastases (LNM) in resected patients. However, no data is available on the distribution of at-risk LN regions in this more unfavourable patient group. This study aimed to determine the spread of LNM using FDG-PET/CT, to compare it with the distribution in surgical series and to define its impact on the definition of elective LN irradiation (ENI). FDG-PET/CT images of patients with oesophageal cancer treated with dCRT (from 2003 to 2013) were reviewed to identify the anatomic distribution of FDG-avid LNs. Tumours were divided according to proximal, mid-thoracic or distal localisation. About 105 consecutive patients entered analysis. The highest numbers of FDG-avid LNs in proximal tumours were at LN station 101R (45%) and 106recL (35%). For mid-thoracic tumours at 104R (30%) and 105 (30%). For tumours located in the distal oesophagus, the most common sites were along the lesser curvature of the stomach (21%) and the left gastric artery (21%). Except for the supraclavicular and pretracheal nodes, there were no positive locoregional LNM found outside the standard surgical resection area. Our results show a good correlation between the distribution of nodal volumes at risk in surgical series and on FDG-PET/CT. The results can be used to determine target definition in dCRT for oesophageal cancer. For mid-thoracic tumours, the current target delineation guidelines may be extended based on the risk of node involvement, but more clinical studies are needed to determine if the potential harm of expanding the CTV outweighs the potential benefit. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. PET/CT Improves the Definition of Complete Response and Allows to Detect Otherwise Unidentifiable Skeletal Progression in Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamagni, Elena; Nanni, Cristina; Mancuso, Katia; Tacchetti, Paola; Pezzi, Annalisa; Pantani, Lucia; Zannetti, Beatrice; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Brioli, Annamaria; Rocchi, Serena; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Marzocchi, Giulia; Borsi, Enrica; Rizzello, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano; Cavo, Michele

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in 282 symptomatic multiple myeloma patients treated up-front between 2002 and 2012. All patients were studied by PET/CT at baseline, during posttreatment follow-up, and at the time of relapse. Their median duration of follow-up was 67 months. Forty-two percent of the patients at diagnosis had >3 focal lesions, and in 50% SUVmax was >4.2; extramedullary disease was present in 5%. On multivariate analysis, ISS stage 3, SUVmax >4.2, and failure to achieve best complete response (CR) were the leading factors independently associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). These 3 variables were used to construct a prognostic scoring system based on the number of risk factors. After treatment, PET/CT negativity (PET-neg) was observed in 70% of patients, whereas conventionally defined CR was achieved in 53%. Attainment of PET-neg favorably influenced PFS and OS. PET-neg was an independent predictor of prolonged PFS and OS for patients with conventionally defined CR. Sixty-three percent of patients experienced relapse or progression; in 12%, skeletal progression was exclusively detected by systematic PET/CT performed during follow-up. A multivariate analysis revealed that persistence of SUVmax >4.2 following first-line treatment was independently associated with exclusive PET/CT progression. PET/CT combined with ISS stage and achievement or not of CR on first-line therapy sorted patients into different prognostic groups. PET/CT led to a more careful evaluation of CR. Finally, in patients with persistent high glucose metabolism after first-line treatment, PET/CT can be recommended during follow-up, to screen for otherwise unidentifiable progression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Role of magnetic resonance urography in diagnosis of duplex renal system: Our initial experience at a tertiary care institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind P Joshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography in cases of duplex renal system. Method: Twenty cases between five month to nine years with suspected or known duplex renal system were evaluated by ultrasound (USG, micturating cystourethrography (MCU, intravenous urography (IVU and magnetic resonance urography (MRU. The findings of these diagnostic imaging studies were then compared with each other and against the results of final diagnosis established at surgery. Results: Duplex renal system could be identified in two of these cases on USG, was diagnosed in four in IVU and could be diagnosed in all cases with MRU. Conclusion: MRU is superior and far accurate than IVU, MCU and USG in diagnosing duplex renal system.

  13. The usefulness of T2-weighted MR urography and contrast enhanced MR urography in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy: comparisonal study with antegrade pyelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Hoon; Lee, Jeong Min; Jin, Kong Yong; Chung, Gyung Ho; Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Young Kon; Oh, Gyung Jae

    2002-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of contrast-enhanced and T2-weighted magnetic resonance urography (MRU) for the depiction of obstruction and evaluation of the causes of obstructive uropathy with that of antegrade pyelography. Twenty-five patients with obstructive uropathy who underwent percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and antegrade pyelography( AGP) were included in the study. We performed MR urography, comprising half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) T2- weighted imaging and 3-D fast imaging with steady state precession (3-D FISP) T1-weighted imaging after gadolinium enhancement and compared the quality of the images of both the HASTE and 3-D FISP MRU technique in terms of their depiction of the dilated pelvocalyceal system, and the level, type, and causes of obstruction. In terms of anatomical depiction of the pelvocalyceal system (p=0.002) and the causes of obstruction (p=0.003). T1-weighted MRU using 3D-FISP was significantly better than T2-weighted MRU using the HASTE sequence. Regarding level of obstruction, T2-weighted MRU using the HASTE sequence and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRU using 3D-FISP showed an accuracy of 76% (19/25) and 84% (21/25), respectively. In terms of type of obstruction, the accuracy of T2-weighted MRU and T1-weighted CEMRU was 72% (18/25) and 88% (22/25), respectively. T2-weighted MRU and Ta-weighted CEMRU provided both anatomical information and that relating to impaired renal function. The two modelities played a complementary role and their use could decrease the unnecessary use of invasive diagnostic examination for the evaluation of obstructive uropathy

  14. Evaluation of UPJ obstruction before and after pyeloplasty using MR urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Stephen B.; Jones, Richard A.; Grattan-Smith, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    This article builds on the previous article in this symposium and shows how MR urography contributes to the postoperative evaluation of children with UPJ obstruction. By analyzing the postoperative results, we derived new insights into their preoperative evaluation. With MR urography we combine simultaneous physiological and anatomic evaluation that enables us to identify changes in renal pathophysiology that occur in association with impaired drainage and obstruction. We studied 35 children before and after pyeloplasty. The pyeloplasty was considered successful in 30 and unsuccessful in 5. Both anatomic and functional criteria were used. The anatomic parameters included the degree of hydronephrosis, the appearance of the renal parenchyma, the quality of the nephrogram and the presence of crossing vessels. The functional criteria included the renal transit time, the calyceal transit time, the volumetric differential function, the Patlak differential function, the difference between the volumetric and Patlak differential function and the Patlak number per milliliter of renal tissue. No single parameter was sufficient to fully characterize UPJ obstruction, but by synthesizing all the information we were able to subdivide UPJ obstruction into compensated, decompensated and uropathic kidneys. Decompensated systems had the most significant improvement following successful pyeloplasty. Compensated systems showed little improvement in renal function, and uropathic kidneys were associated with a poor prognosis. It is clear that not all UPJ obstructions are the same, and it seems logical that treatment should be individually tailored rather than using a standard approach for all cases. Because MR urography can identify pathophysiological differences in children with UPJ obstruction that are occult to renal scintigraphy, it has an important potential role in identifying those who will benefit most from pyeloplasty and those who are probably best observed. (orig.)

  15. Computed tomography urography in non malignant kidney diseases – how to overcome one of the disadvantages?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed tomography urography is among the fastest growing imaging directions, indications of which continue to change. Radiation dose is one of its main disadvantages. There are a number of literary publications regarding how to reduce radiation dose: by voltage, by mA or by reducing the number of phases. What you will learn: We present the initial experience in the diagnosis of non-malignant kidney disease with three low-dose study protocol: a standard low dose, low dose and low dose introduced by us. Our research is based on three groups of patients. The first of 36 men and 22 women viewed with repetitive low-dose protocol: 120 kV / 219 effective milliampere. The second and third group of 16 men and 9 women, respectively: 100/ 163 and 80/115 . Discussion: There have been a number of studies to reduce the radiation dose that is considered one of the main disadvantages of computed tomography urography. Reducing mA (≤ 30 mAs), leads to the radiation dose similar to that of an overview abdominal radiography. Reducing of 140 kV to 120, reducing the dosage of the skin by about 33 % and decreasing it to 80 kilovolts, the result is about 70 %. Another technology to reduce radiation exposure is by reducing the number of phases of the study, but studies have shown that the removal of the native phase is not desirable. Conclusion: We believe that computed tomography urography is a detailed study that should be applied in certain clinical indications. Its major disadvantage is the radiation dose. Images obtained with low-dose protocols are newly comparable image quality to the standard, but with much lower radiation exposure

  16. Evaluation of UPJ obstruction before and after pyeloplasty using MR urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Stephen B. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Grattan-Smith, J.D. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    This article builds on the previous article in this symposium and shows how MR urography contributes to the postoperative evaluation of children with UPJ obstruction. By analyzing the postoperative results, we derived new insights into their preoperative evaluation. With MR urography we combine simultaneous physiological and anatomic evaluation that enables us to identify changes in renal pathophysiology that occur in association with impaired drainage and obstruction. We studied 35 children before and after pyeloplasty. The pyeloplasty was considered successful in 30 and unsuccessful in 5. Both anatomic and functional criteria were used. The anatomic parameters included the degree of hydronephrosis, the appearance of the renal parenchyma, the quality of the nephrogram and the presence of crossing vessels. The functional criteria included the renal transit time, the calyceal transit time, the volumetric differential function, the Patlak differential function, the difference between the volumetric and Patlak differential function and the Patlak number per milliliter of renal tissue. No single parameter was sufficient to fully characterize UPJ obstruction, but by synthesizing all the information we were able to subdivide UPJ obstruction into compensated, decompensated and uropathic kidneys. Decompensated systems had the most significant improvement following successful pyeloplasty. Compensated systems showed little improvement in renal function, and uropathic kidneys were associated with a poor prognosis. It is clear that not all UPJ obstructions are the same, and it seems logical that treatment should be individually tailored rather than using a standard approach for all cases. Because MR urography can identify pathophysiological differences in children with UPJ obstruction that are occult to renal scintigraphy, it has an important potential role in identifying those who will benefit most from pyeloplasty and those who are probably best observed. (orig.)

  17. Experiences of using a single post-contrast CT scan of the urinary tract after triphasic contrast injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Carl Pretorius

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available I was alerted to an article in Radiology Vol. 255 No. 2 (May 20101 by a colleague. The article, entitled ‘Kidney and urinary tract imaging: Triple-bolus multidetector CT urography as a one-stop shop – Protocol design, opacification, and image quality analysis’, clearly describes the technique, while the quotation below, from the article, summarises the findings: ‘We have shown that triple-bolus multidetector CT urography allowed visualization of renal parenchymal, excretory, and vascular contrast-enhancement phases in a single dose-efficient acquisition and provided sufficient opacification of the UUT, with simultaneous and adequate image quality of renal parenchyma and vascular anatomy.’ The main emphasis on this technique is to reduce the number of unnecessary CT scans when assessing the urinary tract. Our previous protocol for scanning the urinary tract for pathology included four phases: a pre-contrast, corticomedullary, nephrographic and delay excretory phase.

  18. Intravenous urography and voiding cystoureterography in northern Norway: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.K.; Pape, J.F.; Gudmundsen, T.E.; Ostensen, H.; Tromsoe Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Intravenous urography (IU) was performed in 489 patients aged 0-9 years during 1980-1983. A total of 35 (7.2%), 19 (13.1%) boys and 16 (4.7%) girls had pathological changes at IU. Of these, 11 boys and 5 girls had findings with therapeutic consequences. We have analysed the results of IU and voiding cystoureterography (VC) in 62 patients and show that a normal IU does not exclude vesicoureteral reflux into the renal pelvis. By performing only VC hydronephrosis, pyelonephritic scarring and anomalies may be missed. (orig.)

  19. The diagnostic effectiveness of contrast media in the excretory urography in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velesova, M.; Ledecky, V.

    2005-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted to investigate the use of four different positive contrast media, Omnipaque (Nycomed Imaging As.), Optiray (Maliincrodt Medical GmbH), Ultravist (Schering AG), and Urografin (Schering AG) in normograde excretory urography. Investigations were carried out on thirteen dogs. Each group of dogs was administered a different contrast medium. Radiographs were obtained immediately after the administration of contrast media and after a lapse of 5, 10 and 15 minutes. The effectiveness of the application was evaluated by assessing the radiographs of abdominal cavities in ventro-dorsal and latero-lateral positions. None of the dogs showed pronounced side effect after the application of contrast media. Ectopic ureter was diagnosed in three and a prostate cyst in one of the patients. Our results showed that Omnipaque and Ultravist were the contrast agents most suitable for the examination of the urinary apparatus by intravenous contrast excretory urography. Their advantage is that visualisation of the kidneys and ureters achieved by these media are sufficiently long and contrastive

  20. Excretory urography and ultrasonography in the diagnosis of bilateral ectopic ureters in a foal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blikslager, A.T.; Green, E.M.; MacFadden, K.E.; Fagin, B.; Johnson, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    A 7-week-old Appaloosa filly was admitted for persistent urinary incontinence since birth. Vaginal speculum examination revealed urine flowing from an opening in the right vaginal wall. Cytoscopy demonstrated that the ureters did not terminate at the bladder. The endoscope passed easily from the vagina directly into a dilated right ureter. An excretory urogram confirmed the vaginal termination of at least one ureter, based upon extensive filling of the vagina with contrast media in the absence of bladder filling. Bilateral hydroureter and dilated renal pelves were demonstrated both by excretory urography and by urtrasonography. Euthanasia was required by the owner in lieu of attempted surgical correction. At necroscopy, it was confirmed that the right ureter entered the vagina and the left ureter terminated at the urethra. The diagnosis of bilateral ectopic ureter in this foal was suggested by this history and clinical signs, supported by endoscopy and ultrasonography, and confirmed by excretory urography and necropsy. This case establishes the value of diagnostic imaging techniques in the antemortem diagnosis of ectopic ureter

  1. Congenital pyeloureteral junction stenosis -postoperative follow-up with MDCT urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: 30-year-old male patient with asymptomatic congenital hydronephrosis of the left kidney detected on routine ultrasound investigation in relation to haematemesis 7 years ago. It is established a pyeloureteral junction stenosis and has made a resection of the stenotic part of the segment with a further plastic by Anderson - Haynes - Kuester. The histological analysis of resected area found expressed muscle layer and chronic inflammatory infiltrates as same as the in miofibroepithel disembriogenesis. After that, there was a recidive of the hydronephrosis and a further replastic and endopyeloplastic surgery performed in Germany in 2008. Two years after that with multislice computed tomography and computed tomography urography showing recurrence of the disease. Hydronephrosis is nonobstructive, asymptomatic, with no gallstones visualized along the left ureter. There is a delayed drainage function of the left kidney, which does not separate contrast medium in the 60th minute of computed tomography urography. The diagnosis of the condition is a nonobstructive hydronephrosis recidive of the left kidney. There are no aberrant renal arteries or renal arteries stenosis on postprocessing imaging

  2. Accuracy of repeated kidney size estimation by ultrasonography and urography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hederstroem, E.; Forsberg, L.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of repeated sonographic and urographic kidney length measurements in kidney size evaluation was investigated in 80 children 0 to 14 years of age, mean age 4.5 years. At sonography 250 kidney lengths were compared. A difference of 0 to 1.0 cm in repeated length measurement was considered to be good accuracy and 94 per cent of right and 96 per cent of left kidney length were found within this interval-a better result than for urography with 76 per cent of repeated right kidney and 79 per cent of kidney lengths within the same interval (94 lengths). Both methods display a variation of kidney lengths which may lead to under- and overestimation of kidney size and growth. The investigation thus indicates good accuracy for repeated sonographic kidney size assessment which should be repeated often enough to estabilish a growth chart displaying the trend rather than rely too much on single measurements. Sonography can be highly recommended as a convenient and harmless alternative to urography. (orig.)

  3. Absorbed Doses to Embryo from Intravenous Urography at Selected Radiological Departments in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkus, R.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2003-01-01

    Actual legislation used in radiological protection requires quality assurance program for decreasing radiation load of patients from radiological examinations. The information about irradiation of pregnant women is very important, because the embryo is more radiosensitive as adult organism. On the basis of absence of unified calculations or measurements of absorbed doses to embryo from various radiological examinations in Slovakia we present in this study the values of absorbed doses to embryo from intravenous urography at selected radiological departments in Slovakia. Absorbed doses to embryo were obtained by measurement and calculation using the simulation of irradiation of pregnant woman by intravenous urography. The results of our study indicate, that absorbed doses to embryo were at various radiological departments considerably different, depending on type of X-ray machine and different settings of technical parameters of X-ray machine. In accordance with worldwide trend it is necessary to decrease radiation load of patients as low as possible level. Differences in radiation load between radiological departments indicate, that it is necessary to continue in solving of this problem and perform measurements and calculations of absorbed doses to embryo at different types of X-ray machines and at different examinations, where the embryo is in direct beam of X-ray. (author)

  4. Fully automatic segmentation of femurs with medullary canal definition in high and in low resolution CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Diogo F; Ruben, Rui B; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Verhegghe, Benedict; De Beule, Matthieu

    2016-12-01

    Femur segmentation can be an important tool in orthopedic surgical planning. However, in order to overcome the need of an experienced user with extensive knowledge on the techniques, segmentation should be fully automatic. In this paper a new fully automatic femur segmentation method for CT images is presented. This method is also able to define automatically the medullary canal and performs well even in low resolution CT scans. Fully automatic femoral segmentation was performed adapting a template mesh of the femoral volume to medical images. In order to achieve this, an adaptation of the active shape model (ASM) technique based on the statistical shape model (SSM) and local appearance model (LAM) of the femur with a novel initialization method was used, to drive the template mesh deformation in order to fit the in-image femoral shape in a time effective approach. With the proposed method a 98% convergence rate was achieved. For high resolution CT images group the average error is less than 1mm. For the low resolution image group the results are also accurate and the average error is less than 1.5mm. The proposed segmentation pipeline is accurate, robust and completely user free. The method is robust to patient orientation, image artifacts and poorly defined edges. The results excelled even in CT images with a significant slice thickness, i.e., above 5mm. Medullary canal segmentation increases the geometric information that can be used in orthopedic surgical planning or in finite element analysis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the role of 18FDG-PET/CT in radiotherapy target definition in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, Katie L; Partridge, Mike; Cook, Gary; Sharma, Bhupinder; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Background and purpose. As techniques for radiotherapy delivery have developed, increasingly accurate localisation of disease is demanded. Functional imaging, particularly PET and its fusion with anatomical modalities, such as PET/CT, promises to improve detection and characterisation of disease. This study evaluated the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on radiotherapy target volume definition in head and neck cancer (HNC). Materials and methods. The PET/CT scans of patients with HNC were used in a radiotherapy planning (RTP) study. The gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined conventionally and compared to those defined using the PET/CT. Data were reported as the median value with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Eighteen patients were consented, 9 had known primary tumour site, 9 presented as unknown primary. In nine cases where the primary site was known, the combined primary and nodal GTV (GTVp+n) increased by a median of 6.1cm3 (2.6, 12.2) or 78% (18, 313), p=0.008 with CTV increasing by a median of 10.1cm3 (1.3, 30.6) or 4% (0, 13) p=0.012. In 9 cases of unknown primary the GTVp+n increased by a median 6.3cm3 (0.2, 15.7) or 61% (4, 210), p=0.012, with CTV increasing by a median 155.4cm3 (2.7, 281.7) or 95% (1, 137), p=0.008. Conclusion. 18FDG-PET revealed disease lying outside the conventional target volume, either extending a known area or highlighting a previously unknown area of disease, including the primary tumour in 5 cases. We recommend PET/CT in the RTP of all cases of unknown primary. In patients with a known primary, although the change in volume was statistically significant the clinical impact is less clear. 18FDG-PET can also show areas within the conventional target volume that are hypermetabolic which may be possible biological target volumes for dose escalation studies in the future

  6. Definition of the supraclavicular and infraclavicular nodes: implications for three-dimensional CT-based conformal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, C N; Quint, D J; Normolle, D P; Marsh, R B; Wang, E Y; Pierce, L J

    2001-11-01

    To delineate with computed tomography (CT) the anatomic regions containing the supraclavicular (SCV) and infraclavicular (IFV) nodal groups, to define the course of the brachial plexus, to estimate the actual radiation dose received by these regions in a series of patients treated in the traditional manner, and to compare these doses to those received with an optimized dosimetric technique. Twenty patients underwent contrast material-enhanced CT for the purpose of radiation therapy planning. CT scans were used to study the location of the SCV and IFV nodal regions by using outlining of readily identifiable anatomic structures that define the nodal groups. The brachial plexus was also outlined by using similar methods. Radiation therapy doses to the SCV and IFV were then estimated by using traditional dose calculations and optimized planning. A repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to compare the SCV and IFV depths and to compare the doses achieved with the traditional and optimized methods. Coverage by the 90% isodose surface was significantly decreased with traditional planning versus conformal planning as the depth to the SCV nodes increased (P correlation was found between brachial plexus depth and SCV depth up to 7 cm. Conformal optimized planning provided improved dosimetric coverage compared with standard techniques.

  7. A three-dimensional definition of nodal spaces on the basis of CT images showing enlarged nodes for pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portaluri, Maurizio; Bambace, Santa; Perez, Celeste; Angone, Grazia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that margins of each pelvic chain may be derived by verifying the bony and soft tissue structures around abnormal nodes on computed tomography (CT) slices. Methods and Materials: Twenty consecutive patients (16 males, 4 females; mean age, 66 years; range, 43-80 years) with radiologic diagnosis of nodal involvement by histologically proved cervix carcinoma (two), rectum carcinoma (three), prostate carcinoma (four), lymphoma (five), penis carcinoma (one), corpus uteri carcinoma (one), bladder carcinoma (two), cutis tumor (one), and soft-tissue sarcoma (one) were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred CT scans showing 85 enlarged pelvic nodes were reviewed by two radiation oncologists (M.P., S.B.), and two radiologists (C.P., G.A.). Results: The more proximal structures to each enlarged node or group of nodes were thus recorded in a clockwise direction. Conclusion: According to their frequency and visibility, craniocaudal, anterior, lateral, posterior and medial margins of common iliac, external and internal iliac nodal chains, obturator and pudendal nodes, and deep and superficial inguinal nodes were derived from CT observations

  8. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guang-yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-ming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jin [Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao-xi [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jian-rong, E-mail: renjixujr@163.com [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Results: Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p = 0.031/p = 0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: p < 0.001/p < 0.001 and accuracy: 83/81%, p = 0.001/p < 0.001) and static-fluid MRU with DWI (sensitivity: p = 0.023/p = 0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p = 0.042/p = 0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p = 0.031/p = 0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Conclusion: Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses.

  9. An evaluation of the variability of tumor-shape definition derived by experienced observers from CT images of supraglottic carcinomas (ACRIN protocol 6658)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Jay S.; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Toledano, Alicia Y.; Beldon, Clifford; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Amdur, Robert; Sailer, Scott; Loevner, Laurie A.; Kousouboris, Phil; Ang, K. Kian; Cormack, Jean; Sicks, JoRean M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is considered essential for sophisticated, image-guided radiation therapy; however, relatively little information has been reported that measures our ability to identify the precise shape of targets accurately. We decided to assess the manner in which eight 'experts' interpreted the size and shape of tumors based on 'real-life' contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Four neuroradiologists and four radiation oncologists (the authors) with considerable experience and presumed expertise in treating head-and-neck tumors independently contoured, slice-by-slice, his/her interpretation of the precise gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of 20 sets of CT scans taken from 20 patients who previously were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 91-11. Results: The average proportion of overlap (i.e., the degree of agreement) was 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.457 to 0.606). There was a slight tendency for the proportion of overlap to increase with increasing average GTV. Conclusions: Our work suggests that estimation of tumor shape currently is imprecise, even for experienced physicians. In consequence, there appears to be a practical limit to the current trend of smaller fields and tighter margins

  10. Patient preparation for intravenous urography: are we practising evidence-based medicine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Reddicliffe, N.; Parker, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To identify the current practice of patient preparation prior to intravenous urography (IVU) in England and Wales. Methods: Seventy-two hospitals were contacted to request details regarding the duration of fluid restriction, adherence to a low-residue diet, or use of laxatives for patient preparation before IVU examinations. Results: Results showed that out of 45 hospitals that still use IVU, only six (13.3%) did not follow a patient-preparation regime. The vast majority of the hospitals contacted (87.6%), implemented either fluid and/or food restriction, or prescribed laxatives. The duration of fluid and food restriction varied from 2-12 h duration, and some departments advocated 48 h of laxatives. Conclusion: A large proportion of hospitals are not practising evidence-based medicine in relation to IVU, and we suggest that the practice of patient preparation should be abandoned

  11. Extended radionuclide urography (ERU). A new diagnostic technique in urinary tract infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Brand, J.; Fliegel, C.; Leititis, J.

    1982-01-01

    Radionuclide renal studies with 99m-Tc-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate (99m-Tc-DTPA) are commonly used to assess renal perfusion, glomerular filtration and excretion. One of the two remaining problems in pediatric urology is the difficulty in determining the significance of upper urinary tract dilatation. The second is the need for a safe, non-invasive and reliable method to detect and quantify vesicoureteral reflux. Using Extended Radionuclide Urography (ERU) it is possible to distinguish between obstructive and dilated non obstructive hydronephrosis analysing activity time curves before and after furosemide injection. Furthermore, the miction part of the study can detect a vesicoureteral reflux without catheterisation. The method is non-invasive, saving radiation and costs and suitable for follow-up after surgical correction

  12. Rapid contrast infusion of bolus injection for i.v. urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenborn, H.; Klose, P.; Klose, K.; Schmiedel, E.

    1993-01-01

    The rate of contrast injection during i.v. urography may vary considerably (bolus injection or drip infusion). The effect of 5 rates of injection (6, 12, 18, 36 and 72 ml/min) on the contrast density in the renal collecting system was examined over a period of 30 minutes. Measurements showed an inter-individual difference of more than 200% in each group. The intra-individual variations for different rates of injection were very slight; individual concentration in the kidney for a given dose depends only slightly on the rate of injection. There is no statistically significant improvement in contrast values as a result of a bolus injection. The reduced incidence of side effects justifies the use of bolus injections but pressure injections are unnecessary from a diagnostic point view. (orig.) [de

  13. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    A 131 iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure

  14. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Kushal R.; Kraft, Kate H.; Ivancic, Vesna; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hammer, Matthew R. [University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-11-15

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatrics: utilization of ultrafast single-shot spin echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Martin, J.; Duran, C.; Rigol, S.; Rojo, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the value of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) using ultrafast single-shot (SS) rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and half-Fourier (HF) SS-RARE (SS-HF-RARE or HASTE) in the evaluation of congenital urinary tract anomalies in pediatric patients, and their possible application as alternatives to intravenous urography (IVU). Eighteen children (11 boys and 7 girls) aged 2 months to 15 years (mean: 5 years) with a total of 19 congenital urinary tract anomalies were studies by MU using SS-RARE and HASTE sequences in a 1 Tesla scanner. All the patients had previously been studies by ultrasound (US) and IVU. Twelve patients required anesthesia. The images were acquired by means of a HASTE sequence with multisection technique (TR, infinite; TE e f, 87 msec; echo train, 128; interval between echoes, 10.9 msec; total acquisition time, 13 sections/12 seconds), and SS-RARE (TR, infinite; TE e f, 1.100 msec; echo train, 240, and acquisition time, 7 seconds). Four radiologists evaluated the images independently; two who reviewed the IV images in consensus and two who reviewed the MRU images in consensus. The images were evaluated to assess the dilatation of the urinary tract and their utility in detecting the level and cause of the obstruction. MRU images revealed the urinary tract dilation, the level of the obstruction and the type of anomaly in 18 patients (100%), while IVU provided this information in only 10 [ sensitivity, 53%, 95% confidence interval (29%, 76%)]. The mean time required for MRU was 20 minutes (range: 7 to 30 minutes), while that of IVU was 1,242 minutes (range: 45 to 1,440 minutes). MRU using ultrafast single-short spin echo sequences is a rapid and effective technique that permits and excellent evaluation of congenital urinary tract anomalies in pediatric patients and does not require the administration of contrast media or ionizing radiation. (Author) 10 refs

  16. Multidetector computed tomography urography for diagnosing upper urinary tract urothelial tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nigel C; Turney, Ben W; Taylor, Nia J; McCarthy, Catherine L; Crew, Jeremy P

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate multidetector computed tomography urography (MDCTU) for diagnosing upper urinary tract (UUT) urothelial tumour by comparison with retrograde ureteropyelography (RUP). MDCTU and RUP were used in a selected series of adult patients presenting with haematuria. Entry criteria were based on findings on intravenous urography and were chosen to ensure a high prevalence of UUT urothelial tumour to allow a valid retrospective comparison of the diagnostic techniques. MDCTU and RUP studies were scored for the presence and absence of UUT urothelial tumour by two radiologists, retrospectively and independently, and while unaware of the demographic and clinical information. The reference standards were the histopathology and clinical follow-up. MDCTU and RUP were used in 106 patients over a 24-month period. RUP was attempted in 151 of 212 UUTs; the corresponding MDCTU for each UUT was reviewed. MDCTU was a true-positive (TP) for urothelial tumour in 31, true-negative (TN) in 111, false-positive (FP) in eight and false-negative (FN) in one UUT, giving a sensitivity of 0.97, a specificity of 0.93, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.79 and a negative PV (NPV) of 0.99. RUP was technically successful and diagnostic in 96% of the UUTs (143/151). For diagnosing urothelial tumour, RUP was TP in 26, TN in 112, FP in four and FN in one UUT, giving a sensitivity of 0.97, specificity of 0.93, a PPV of 0.79 and NPV of 0.99. This study validates quantitatively the use of MDCTU for diagnosing UUT urothelial tumour.

  17. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non–small-cell lung cancer (≥60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7–22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  18. Delineation of upper urinary tract segments at MDCT urography in patients with extra-urinary mass lesions: retrospective comparison of standard and low-dose protocols for the excretory phase of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L. [University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); University of Munich Medical School, Department of Urology, Muenchen (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva M.; Meindl, Thomas; Degenhart, Christoph; Scherr, Michael K.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G. [University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Stief, Christian G. [University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Excretory-phase CT urography (CTU) may replace excretory urography in patients without urinary tumors. However, radiation exposure is a concern. We retrospectively compared upper urinary tract (UUT) delineation in low-dose and standard CTU. CTU (1-2 phases, 120 KV, 4 x 2.5 mm, pitch 0.875, i.v. non-ionic contrast media, iodine 36 g) was obtained with standard (14 patients, n = 27 UUTs, average 175.6 mAs/slice, average delay 16.8 min) or low-dose (26 patients, n = 86 UUTs, 29 mAs/slice, average delay 19.6 min) protocols. UUT was segmented into intrarenal collecting system (IRCS), upper, middle, and lower ureter (UU,MU,LU). Two independent readers (R1,R2) graded UUT segments as 1-not delineated, 2-partially delineated, 3-completely delineated (noisy margins), 4-completely delineated (clear margins). Chi-square statistics were calculated for partial versus complete delineation and complete delineation (clear margins), respectively. Complete delineation of UUT was similar in standard and low-dose CTU (R1, p > 0.15; R2, p > 0.2). IRCS, UU, and MU clearly delineated similarly often in standard and low-dose CTU (R1, p > 0.25; R2, p > 0.1). LU clearly delineated more often in standard protocols (R1, 18/6 standard, 38/31 low-dose, p > 0.1; R2 18/6 standard, 21/48 low-dose, p < 0.05). Low-dose CTU sufficiently delineated course of UUT and may locate obstruction/dilation, but appears unlikely to find intraluminal LU lesions. (orig.)

  19. Prostate bed target interfractional motion using RTOG consensus definitions and daily CT on rails. Does target motion differ between superior and inferior portions of the clinical target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Zhou, Sumin; Enke, Charles A.; Wahl, Andrew O.; Chen, Shifeng

    2017-01-01

    Using high-quality CT-on-rails imaging, the daily motion of the prostate bed clinical target volume (PB-CTV) based on consensus Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) definitions (instead of surgical clips/fiducials) was studied. It was assessed whether PB motion in the superior portion of PB-CTV (SUP-CTV) differed from the inferior PB-CTV (INF-CTV). Eight pT2-3bN0-1M0 patients underwent postprostatectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy, totaling 300 fractions. INF-CTV and SUP-CTV were defined as PB-CTV located inferior and superior to the superior border of the pubic symphysis, respectively. Daily pretreatment CT-on-rails images were compared to the planning CT in the left-right (LR), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Two parameters were defined: ''total PB-CTV motion'' represented total shifts from skin tattoos to RTOG-defined anatomic areas; ''PB-CTV target motion'' (performed for both SUP-CTV and INF-CTV) represented shifts from bone to RTOG-defined anatomic areas (i. e., subtracting shifts from skin tattoos to bone). Mean (± standard deviation, SD) total PB-CTV motion was -1.5 (± 6.0), 1.3 (± 4.5), and 3.7 (± 5.7) mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. Mean (± SD) PB-CTV target motion was 0.2 (±1.4), 0.3 (±2.4), and 0 (±3.1) mm in the LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. Mean (± SD) INF-CTV target motion was 0.1 (± 2.8), 0.5 (± 2.2), and 0.2 (± 2.5) mm, and SUP-CTV target motion was 0.3 (± 1.8), 0.5 (± 2.3), and 0 (± 5.0) mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. No statistically significant differences between INF-CTV and SUP-CTV motion were present in any direction. There are no statistically apparent motion differences between SUP-CTV and INF-CTV. Current uniform planning target volume (PTV) margins are adequate to cover both portions of the CTV. (orig.) [de

  20. The value and significance of genito-urography in the diagnosis of intersex and other malformations of the urogenital tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabenwoeger, F.; Grabenwoeger, M.; Dock, W.; Gherardini, R.; Karnel, F.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of genito-urography in the diagnosis of intersex and for the demonstration of the internal genitalia has been studied in 16 patients. If was found tat the radiological appearances agreed in all cases with the surgical findings. Individual malformations of the genitals have been considered with reference to the classification of Shopfner and Prader and the advantages and disadvantages of various examination techniques are discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excretory urography to detect renal scars was 84% and the specificity was 83%. The 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan showed 5 cases of focal renal scarring not detected by excretory urography. The sensitivity of the renal scan to detect renal scars was 77% and the specificity was 75%. We conclude that neither study alone could effectively replace the other for the detection of renal scars, and recommend that both be included in the initial evaluation and followup of patients with renal scars

  2. Evaluation of an improved technique for lumen path definition and lumen segmentation of atherosclerotic vessels in CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velsen, Evert F S; Niessen, Wiro J; de Weert, Thomas T; de Monyé, Cécile; van der Lugt, Aad; Meijering, Erik; Stokking, Rik

    2007-07-01

    Vessel image analysis is crucial when considering therapeutical options for (cardio-) vascular diseases. Our method, VAMPIRE (Vascular Analysis using Multiscale Paths Inferred from Ridges and Edges), involves two parts: a user defines a start- and endpoint upon which a lumen path is automatically defined, and which is used for initialization; the automatic segmentation of the vessel lumen on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images. Both parts are based on the detection of vessel-like structures by analyzing intensity, edge, and ridge information. A multi-observer evaluation study was performed to compare VAMPIRE with a conventional method on the CTA data of 15 patients with carotid artery stenosis. In addition to the start- and endpoint, the two radiologists required on average 2.5 (SD: 1.9) additional points to define a lumen path when using the conventional method, and 0.1 (SD: 0.3) when using VAMPIRE. The segmentation results were quantitatively evaluated using Similarity Indices, which were slightly lower between VAMPIRE and the two radiologists (respectively 0.90 and 0.88) compared with the Similarity Index between the radiologists (0.92). The evaluation shows that the improved definition of a lumen path requires minimal user interaction, and that using this path as initialization leads to good automatic lumen segmentation results.

  3. Evaluation of an improved technique for lumen path definition and lumen segmentation of atherosclerotic vessels in CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velsen, Evert F.S. van; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik; Stokking, Rik; Weert, Thomas T. de; Monye, Cecile de; Lugt, Aad van der

    2007-01-01

    Vessel image analysis is crucial when considering therapeutical options for (cardio-) vascular diseases. Our method, VAMPIRE (Vascular Analysis using Multiscale Paths Inferred from Ridges and Edges), involves two parts: a user defines a start- and endpoint upon which a lumen path is automatically defined, and which is used for initialization; the automatic segmentation of the vessel lumen on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images. Both parts are based on the detection of vessel-like structures by analyzing intensity, edge, and ridge information. A multi-observer evaluation study was performed to compare VAMPIRE with a conventional method on the CTA data of 15 patients with carotid artery stenosis. In addition to the start- and endpoint, the two radiologists required on average 2.5 (SD: 1.9) additional points to define a lumen path when using the conventional method, and 0.1 (SD: 0.3) when using VAMPIRE. The segmentation results were quantitatively evaluated using Similarity Indices, which were slightly lower between VAMPIRE and the two radiologists (respectively 0.90 and 0.88) compared with the Similarity Index between the radiologists (0.92). The evaluation shows that the improved definition of a lumen path requires minimal user interaction, and that using this path as initialization leads to good automatic lumen segmentation results. (orig.)

  4. PET CT Thresholds for Radiotherapy Target Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: How Close are we to the Pathologic Findings?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kailiang; Ung, Yee C.; Hornby, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal target delineation threshold values for positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) radiotherapy planning is controversial. In this present study, different PET CT threshold values were used for target delineation and then compared pathologically. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent PET CT before surgery. The maximal diameter (MD) of the pathologic primary tumor was obtained. The CT-based gross tumor volumes (GTV CT ) were delineated for CT window-level thresholds at 1,600 and -300 Hounsfield units (HU) (GTV CT1 ); 1,600 and -400 (GTV CT2 ); 1,600 and -450 HU (GTV CT3 ); 1,600 and -600 HU (GTV CT4 ); 1,200 and -700 HU (GTV CT5 ); 900 and -450 HU (GTV CT6 ); and 700 and -450 HU (GTV CT7 ). The PET-based GTVs (GTV PET ) were autocontoured at 20% (GTV 20 ), 30% (GTV 30 ), 40% (GTV 40 ), 45% (GTV 45 ), 50% (GTV 50 ), and 55% (GTV 55 ) of the maximal intensity level. The MD of each image-based GTV in three-dimensional orientation was determined. The MD of the GTV PET and GTV CT were compared with the pathologically determined MD. Results: The median MD of the GTV CT changed from 2.89 (GTV CT2 ) to 4.46 (GTV CT7 ) as the CT thresholds were varied. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT compared with the pathologically determined MD ranged from 0.76 to 0.87. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT1 was the best (r = 0.87). The median MD of GTV PET changed from 5.72cm to 2.67cm as the PET thresholds increased. The correlation coefficient of the GTV PET compared with the pathologic finding ranged from 0.51 to 0.77. The correlation coefficient of GTV 50 was the best (r = 0.77). Conclusion: Compared with the MD of GTV PET , the MD of GTV CT had better correlation with the pathologic MD. The GTV CT1 and GTV 50 had the best correlation with the pathologic results.

  5. Dose reduction in multidetector CT of the urinary tract. Studies in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppenrath, E.; Meindl, T.; Herzog, P.; Khalil, R.; Mueller-Lisse, U.; Krenn, L.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.

    2006-01-01

    A novel ureter phantom was developed for investigations of image quality and dose in CT urography. The ureter phantom consisted of a water box (14 cm x 32 cm x 42 cm) with five parallel plastic tubes (diameter 2.7 mm) filled with different concentrations of contrast media (1.88-30 mg iodine/ml). CT density of the tubes and noise of the surrounding water were determined using two multidetector scanners (Philips MX8000 with four rows, Siemens Sensation 16 with 16 rows) with varying tube current-time product (15-100 mAs per slice), voltage (90 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV), pitch (0.875-1.75), and slice thickness (1 mm, 2 mm, 3.2 mm). Contrast-to-noise ratio as a parameter of image quality was correlated with dose (CTDI) and was compared with image evaluation by two radiologists. The CT densities of different concentrations of contrast media and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher when low voltages (90 kV versus 120 kV, 100 kV versus 120 kV) were applied. Smaller slice thickness (1 mm versus 2 mm) did not change CT density but decreased contrast-to-noise ratio due to increased noise. Contrast phantom studies showed favourable effects of low tube voltage on image quality in the low dose range. This may facilitate substantial dose reduction in CT urography. (orig.)

  6. Renal ultrasound and excretory urography in infants and young children with urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenda, R.; Kenig, T.; Silc, M.; Zupancic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to see whether excretory urography (EU) can be safely replaced by ultrasound (US) in children with urinary tract infection (UTI) younger than 6 years. 101 hospitalised children were admitted to the prospective study. They were all diagnosed as having UTI and were treated accordingly. All children had voiding cystography (VCU), EU and US done. US and EU correlated well in 94% of the cases. In all 6 cases with discrepancy between EU and US, the VCU was abnormal. Our results confirm the data from other authors, that VCU and US should be sufficient as an initial work-up on children with UTI, while EU should be done only in the cases with abnormal findings on either one or both of the former investigations. However, it should be kept in mind that some cases of parenchymal involvement or mild subpelvic stenosis can be missed using this protocol. If EU is obtained only in the cases with abnormal US and/or VCU, only 55 children (54%) in our group would have had an EU done. (orig.)

  7. MDCT urography: retrospective determination of optimal delay time after intravenous contrast administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meindl, Thomas; Coppenrath, Eva; Kahlil, Rami; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L.

    2006-01-01

    The optimal delay time after intravenous (i.v.) administration of contrast medium (CM) for opacifcation of the upper urinary tract (UUT) for multidetector computed tomography urography (MDCTU) was investigated. UUT opacification was retrospectively evaluated in 36 four-row MDCTU examinations. Single- (n=10) or dual-phase (n=26) MDCTU was performed with at least 5-min delay after i.v. CM. UUT was divided into four sections: intrarenal collecting system (IRCS), proximal, middle and distal ureter. Two independent readers rated UUT opacification: 1, none; 2, partial; 3, complete. Numbers and percentages of scores, and the 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% percentiles of delay time were calculated for each UUT section. After removing diseased segments, 344 segments were analysed. IRCS, proximal and middle ureter were completely opacified in 94% (81/86), 93% (80/86) and 77% (66/86) of cases, respectively. Median delay time was 15 min for complete opacification. The distal ureter was completely opacified in 37% (32/86) of cases and not opacified in 26% (22/86). Median delay time for complete opacification was 11 min with 25% and 75% percentiles of 10 and 16 min, respectively. At MDCTU, opacification of the IRCS, proximal and middle ureter was hardly sensitive to delay time. Delay times between 10 and 16 min were favourable in the distal ureter. (orig.)

  8. MDCT urography: experience with a bi-phasic excretory phase examination protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meindl, Thomas; Coppenrath, Eva; Degenhart, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G.; Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L.

    2007-01-01

    The benefit of multidetector computed tomographic urography (MDCTU) for visualising early and late excretory phase (EP) upper urinary tract (UUT) opacification has been studied. UUT opacification was retrospectively evaluated in 45 bi-phasic four-row MDCTU examinations. The UUT was divided into intrarenal collecting system (IRCS), proximal, middle and distal ureter. Two independent readers rated opacification: 1, none; 2, partial; 3, complete. Numbers of segments and percentages of UUTs at each score were calculated for each EP and two EPs combined. Results of a single EP and of combined EPs were compared by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks. IRCS and proximal ureter were at least partially opacified in each EP in >95%. The middle ureter was at least partially opacified in the early and late EP in 85% and 93%, respectively. The distal ureter was opacified in 65% (49/75) in the early EP and in 78% (59/75) in the late EP. Combining two EPs, non-opacified distal segments decreased to 9% (7/75). Significant improvement between a single EP and combining two EPs were found for the middle and distal ureter (P < 0.03). Bi-phasic MDCTU substantially improved opacification of the middle and distal ureter. IRCS and proximal ureter are reliably opacified with one EP. (orig.)

  9. Distal ureteral calculi: the usefulness of transrectal ultrasound and comparison with intravenous urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Moon Hae; Yoon, Dae Young; Shim, Joo Eun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yi, Jeong Geun; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ha Young

    1996-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and to compare TRUS with intravenous urography (IVU) in the evaluation of distal ureteral calculi. TRUS and IVU were performed in 24 patients with distal ureteral calculi. Using TRUS, we evaluated the presence and size of calculus, type of ureteral jet at the affected site and diameter of ureter proximal to calculus, and using IVU evaluated the presence and size of calculus, degree of ureteral obstruction, and degree of hydroureter. TRUS and IVU findings, were compared. In each patient, TRUS detected calculus of the distal ureter;in only 18 cases (75%), were the calculi demonstrated with IVU. In 18 cases where calculi were detected by both modalities, average calculus size was 4.5x3.0mm (longest and shortest dimensions) by IVU, and 6.1x3.7mm by TRUS. Between TRUS and IVU(p 0.05). TRUS appears to be a useful adjunctive method for the evaluation of distal ureteral calculus

  10. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  11. MR urography versus retrograde pyelography/ureteroscopy for the exclusion of upper urinary tract malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S., E-mail: kslee@bidmc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Zeikus, E. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); DeWolf, W.C. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Rofsky, N.M.; Pedrosa, I. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) versus retrograde pyelography and/or ureteroscopy (RPU) in the detection of upper urinary tract neoplasms. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 35 patients with suspected upper urinary tract malignancy who underwent MRU and RPU within 6-months in our institution during the study period (February 2002 to January 2007). MRU and RPU reports were reviewed and results recorded. For each patient, the urinary tract was sub-divided into four regions for analysis: left kidney/renal pelvis, left ureter, right kidney/renal pelvis, and right ureter. MRU and RPU results for each patient were compared to a reference standard and the diagnostic performance of both techniques was compared. Results: A total of 113 regions were analysed on MRU and 90 regions on RPU. Nineteen neoplasms were identified. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the detection of urinary tract neoplasms were 63, 91, 60, and 92% for MRU, respectively, and 53, 97, 83, and 88% for RPU, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The high negative predictive value of MRU in the present series supports its use as a non-invasive screening examination for excluding the presence of upper urinary tract malignancy.

  12. Reduction method of the radiation dose for the urography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Kazuo; Chiba, Nobuyuki; Terashima, Kazumitsu

    1976-01-01

    An Al-Filter corresponding to the half value layer of exposure voltage was used at the lower abdomen to protect the sexual gland, when the urography was done. In I.V.P., the picture was taken by covering the site lower than the illiac region with an Al-Filter, Supposing that an ovary is located at the one-half of the thickness of the abdomen, exposure dose to the sexual gland was determined using the Mix D P phantom. The dose exposed at 56 kv, 2mAs was 5.2 mRad in the skin. On the other hand, it was decreased to one-half dose (2.6 mRad) in the skin by exposured with filter. The exposure dose to the sexual gland was decreased to about 20% of non-filter exposure. It was decreased to 45% at 72 kv, 8 mA. Therefore, the Al-Filter can reasonably reduce exposure dose to the sexual gland. (serizawa, K.)

  13. Multi-slice computed tomography urography after diuretic injection in children with urinary tract dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosucu, P.; Ahmetoglu, A.; Imamoglu, M.; Cay, A.; Ozdemir, O.; Dinc, H.; Kosucu, M.; Sari, A.; Saruhan, H.; Gumele, H.R. [Farabi Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the potential use of multi-slice computed tomography urography (MSCTU) after diuretic injection in children with urinary tract dilatation. MSCTU was performed in 19 patients (11 boys, 8 girls, mean age 5.4 years) with suspicion of urinary tract obstruction and dilatation. Furosemide, 1 mg/kg, was injected 3 min before contrast material administration and followed by a bolus of 30 ml of physiologic saline solution immediately after application of contrast material. Excretory-phase images were obtained through the abdomen and pelvis beginning 10 min after initiation of the injection of contrast material. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) images were post-processed to obtain urographic views. MSCTU revealed pathology in 16 of 19 patients, while 3 patients had normal findings. Ureteropelvic obstruction was found in 4 patients, obstructive megaureter in 8. Both ureteropelvic obstruction and obstructive megaureter were disclosed in 1 patient, partial ureteral duplication in 1 patient, and both complete ureteral duplication and ureterocele in 2 patients. In all patients, MIP and VR images could satisfactorily show the pathologies of the urinary tract. The estimated effective average doses of MSCTU were higher than IVU. Preliminary results of furosemide-enhanced MSCTU demonstrated consistently dilated urinary tracts, obstruction levels, and underlying pathologies better than US and IVU.

  14. A prospective survey of delayed adverse reactions to iohexol in urography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munechika, Hirotsugu; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Kudo, Sho; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hamada, Chikuma; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Katayama, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    We investigated 7505 inpatients who underwent intravenous urography or contrast-enhanced computed tomography to assess risk factors for delayed adverse drug reactions to iohexol, a non-ionic iodinated contrast medium. Focusing on delayed adverse reactions, all adverse events were prospectively investigated for 7 days after injection of iohexol. To explore the relevant risk factors, the relationship between occurrence of adverse reactions to iohexol and 17 different variables was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. To assess the influence of seasonal factors, adverse reactions were separately evaluated during two periods: February to April (the pollinosis period in Japan) and July to September (the non-pollinosis period). The prevalence of delayed adverse events and delayed adverse reactions was 3.5 and 2.8%, respectively, whereas the prevalence of adverse events and adverse reactions was 5.7 and 5.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that six parameters had a significant influence on delayed adverse reactions to iohexol, including (a) a history of allergy, (b) season, (c) radiographic procedure, (d) age, (e) concomitant surgery or other invasive procedures, and (f) concomitant medication. The prevalence of delayed reactions was lower than in previous large-scale studies. Significant risk factors included a history of allergy and performance of radiography during the pollinosis period, suggesting that allergy was involved in delayed adverse reactions. The type of radiographic procedure also had an influence. (orig.)

  15. Differences in the definition of internal target volumes using slow CT alone or in combination with thin-slice CT under breath-holding conditions during the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Satoshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsuya; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Deloar, Hossain M.; Kawase, Takatsugu; Fukada, Junichi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Uematsu, Minoru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the delineations of the internal target volume (ITV) made from 'slow' CT alter with reference to 'thin-slice' CT. Materials and methods: Thin-slice CT images taken under breath-holding conditions and slow CT images taken under shallow-breathing conditions (8 s/image) of 11 lung cancers were used for this study. Five radiation oncologists delineated ITV of the 11 lesions using slow CT images (ITV1), and then redefined them with reference to thin-slice CT images (ITV2). SD-images (standard deviation image) were created for all patients from ITV images in order to visualize the regional variation of the ITVs. Results: The mean value of ITV2 was smaller than that initially defined by ITV1. There was no significant change in ITV1 and ITV2 between operators with regard to standard deviation in volume. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the ratio of ITV1 to ITV2 obtained on thin-slice CTs between cases with and without ground glass opacity. In cases without ground glass opacity there was a tendency for ITV2 to have a smaller volume than ITV1. Conclusions: Combined use of slow CT and thin-slice CT in delineation of ITV contours appeared to be useful in making adjustments for obscured tumor images caused by respiratory movement

  16. Comparison between the efficacy of dimeric and monomeric non-ionic contrast media (iodixanol vs iopromide) in urography in patients with macroscopic haematuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.; Cova, M.; Pravato, M.; Floriani, I.

    2003-01-01

    Non-ionic dimers induce less diuresis than non-ionic monomers, resulting in increased opacification of the urinary tract in intravenous urography. This trial compared the diagnostic efficacy of iodixanol and iopromide in patients with macroscopic haematuria. One hundred consecutive patients with normal renal function and macroscopic haematuria entered a double blind, comparative, randomised, parallel trial. Contrast media were given with bolus injection in doses of 300 mgI/kg b.w. Radiographs were blindly evaluated by three radiologists who analysed different parameters (calyceal density and filling, papillary blush detection, delineation of collecting ducts, renal pelvis opacification, visualisation of ureters, bladder density, bladder distention) and estimated the diagnostic confidence (whether abnormal findings were definitely absent, probably absent, doubtful, probably present or certainly present). Radiological diagnoses were compared with final diagnoses. Results were summarised as the ratio of the odds of having a worse performance of iopromide vs iodixanol. Iodixanol showed a significantly better calyceal density and filling [odds ratio (OR): 1.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.60-2.41], a significantly better pelvis opacification (OR 2.91; CI 2.02-4.18) and a significantly more frequent papillary blush detection (OR 1.95; CI 1.29-2.95). Iopromide showed a significantly better ureteral visualisation (OR 0.67; CI 0.48-0.92) and a significantly higher bladder distention (OR 0.59; CI 0.36-0.99). Iodixanol allowed a significantly higher diagnostic confidence as to calyceal evaluation (OR 1.35; CI 1.01-1.79). No significant differences were found with regard to other parameters. The results confirmed theoretical expectations. The higher opacification provided by iodixanol allowed better results and a higher diagnostic confidence in the upper excretory pathway. (orig.)

  17. Prostate bed target interfractional motion using RTOG consensus definitions and daily CT on rails. Does target motion differ between superior and inferior portions of the clinical target volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek; Zhou, Sumin; Enke, Charles A.; Wahl, Andrew O. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Omaha (United States); Chen, Shifeng [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Using high-quality CT-on-rails imaging, the daily motion of the prostate bed clinical target volume (PB-CTV) based on consensus Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) definitions (instead of surgical clips/fiducials) was studied. It was assessed whether PB motion in the superior portion of PB-CTV (SUP-CTV) differed from the inferior PB-CTV (INF-CTV). Eight pT2-3bN0-1M0 patients underwent postprostatectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy, totaling 300 fractions. INF-CTV and SUP-CTV were defined as PB-CTV located inferior and superior to the superior border of the pubic symphysis, respectively. Daily pretreatment CT-on-rails images were compared to the planning CT in the left-right (LR), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Two parameters were defined: ''total PB-CTV motion'' represented total shifts from skin tattoos to RTOG-defined anatomic areas; ''PB-CTV target motion'' (performed for both SUP-CTV and INF-CTV) represented shifts from bone to RTOG-defined anatomic areas (i. e., subtracting shifts from skin tattoos to bone). Mean (± standard deviation, SD) total PB-CTV motion was -1.5 (± 6.0), 1.3 (± 4.5), and 3.7 (± 5.7) mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. Mean (± SD) PB-CTV target motion was 0.2 (±1.4), 0.3 (±2.4), and 0 (±3.1) mm in the LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. Mean (± SD) INF-CTV target motion was 0.1 (± 2.8), 0.5 (± 2.2), and 0.2 (± 2.5) mm, and SUP-CTV target motion was 0.3 (± 1.8), 0.5 (± 2.3), and 0 (± 5.0) mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively. No statistically significant differences between INF-CTV and SUP-CTV motion were present in any direction. There are no statistically apparent motion differences between SUP-CTV and INF-CTV. Current uniform planning target volume (PTV) margins are adequate to cover both portions of the CTV. (orig.) [German] Zur Evaluation der interfraktionellen Variabilitaet des klinischen Zielvolumens der Prostataloge

  18. Gd-BOPTA-enhanced excretory MR urography without administration of diuretics; Gd-BOPTA-gestuetzte MR-Ausscheidungsurographie ohne Diuretikagabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkemper, T.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical utility of Gd-BOPTA enhanced excretory magnetic resonance urography without additional administration of diuretics in correlation with conventional urography. Method: 15 preoperative patients with pelvic tumors were examined at 1.5 T using a breath-hold high-resolution 3D-FLASH sequence during first-pass as well as 5, 10, 15 minutes after iv. injection of 0.05 mmol/kg BW Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance {sup trademark}) without administration of diuretics. Post-processed coronal and multiplanar MIP reconstructions were compared to conventional excretory urography with regard to morphologic accuracy, anatomic variability, filling defects, cause and level of obstruction or compression, tumor visibility, and time-effectiveness by two independent radiologists. Results: Visualization of the urinary tract by MRU was comparable to conventional excretory urography in 14 of 15 cases. Caliceal fornices were better delineated on conventional urographies, whereas MRU was considered superior in the assessment of the inferior ureter sections, the urinary bladder and obstructive tumors, whose extents could be clearly marked out. Examination times of both techniques were comparable. Conclusion: These first results show that non-diuretic Gd-BOPTA enhanced MRU is comparable to conventional excretory urography for the preoperative diagnosis of pelvic tumors. Further improvements of this technique seem possible by optimization of examination intervals and injection doses. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Abschaetzung der Durchfuehrbarkeit und des klinischen Nutzens der Gd-BOPTA-gestuetzten MR-Ausscheidungsurographie (MRU) ohne zusaetzliche Diuretikagabe im Vergleich zur konventionellen Ausscheidungsurographie. Methoden: 15 Patienten mit Beckentumoren wurden praeoperativ an einem 1.5 T-Ganzkoerpersystem mit Hilfe einer atemgehaltenen, hochaufloesenden 3D-FLASH-Sequenz unmittelbar nach intra-venoeser Applikation von 0,05 mmol/kg KG Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance {sup

  19. Is there need for both intravenous urography and voiding cystography in the evaluation of children with recurrent urinary tract infections?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Qvist, N; Jensen, K M

    1986-01-01

    In a prospective study 33 children (aged 6-14 years) consecutively referred for recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI), underwent intravenous urography (IVU) as well as voiding cystography (VC). Seven children had unilateral and two children had bilateral renal scarring, while ten children had...... and the current theories on the significance of patient age and grade of VUR, we conclude that in case of a normal IVU in children with RUTI and age of at least 6 years, there is no reason to supplement the pre-treatment evaluation with VC....

  20. Optimizing functional MR urography: prime time for a 30-minutes-or-less fMRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A.; Adeb, Melkamu; Carson, Robert H.; Khrichenko, Dmitry [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Canning, Douglas A. [University of Pennsylvania, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Current protocols for functional MR urography (fMRU) require long scan times, limiting its widespread use. Our goal was to use pre-defined criteria to reduce the number of sequences and thus the examination time without compromising the morphological and functional results. The standard fMRU protocol in our department consists of eight sequences, including a 17-min dynamic post-contrast scan. Ninety-nine children and young adults (43 male, 56 female, mean age 7 years) were evaluated with this protocol. Each sequence was retrospectively analyzed for its utility and factors that affect its duration. Mean scan time to perform the eight sequences, without including the variable time between sequences, was 40.5 min. Five sequences were categorized as essential: (1) sagittal T2 for planning the oblique coronal plane, (2) axial T2 with fat saturation for the assessment of corticomedullary differentiation and parenchymal thickness, (3) coronal 3-D T2 with fat saturation for multiplanar and 3-D reconstructions, (4) pre-contrast coronal T1 with fat saturation to ensure an appropriate scan prior to injecting the contrast material and (5) the coronal post-contrast dynamic series. Functional information was obtained after 8 min of dynamic imaging in the majority of children. The coronal fat-saturated T2, coronal T1, and post-contrast sagittal fat-saturated T1 sequences did not provide additional information. Because of the effects of pelvicalyceal dilation and ureteropelvic angle on the renal transit time, prone position is recommended, at least in children with high-grade pelvicalyceal dilation. Comprehensive fMRU requires approximately 19 min for sequence acquisition. Allowing for time between sequences and motion correction, the total study time can be reduced to about 30 min. Four pre-contrast sequences and a shortened post-contrast dynamic scan, optimally with the child in prone position, are sufficient. (orig.)

  1. Virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract based on contrast material-enhanced MR urography data sets; Virtuelle Endoskopie des oberen Harntraktes auf der Basis kontrastangehobener MR-Urographie Datensaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Krombach, G.; Staatz, G.; Kilbinger, M.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a virtual endoscopy from MR imaging data sets of the upper urinary tract. Method: The data obtained from 28 contrast-enhanced MR urographic examinations (5 normal; 23 pathologic) were post-processed to reconstruct a virtual ureterorenoscopy (VURS) using a threshold image segmentation. The visualization of the upper urinary tract was based on the acquisition of T{sub 1}-weighted 3D gradient-echo sequences after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA and a prior injection of low-dose furosemide. Results: The employed MR urography technique created in all 28 cases a complete and strong contrast enhancement of the urinary tract. These 3D sequence data allowed the reconstruction of a VURS, even when the collecting system was not dilated. The best accuracy was provided by the MR urography sequences with the smallest voxel size. Moreover, the data acquisition based on a breath-hold technique has proved superior to that using a respiratory gating. Inside the renal pelvis, all calices could be assessed by turning the virtual endoscope in the appropriate direction. The visualization of the ureteral orifices in the bladder was also possible. All filling defects that were diagnosed by MR urography could be evaluated from the endoluminal view using the VURS. The exact characterization of the lesions based only on the assessment of the surface structure was difficult. Conclusion: A virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract can be successfully reconstructed using the data sets of high-resolution 3D MR urography sequences. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Untersuchungen zur Anwendung der virtuellen Endoskopie auf MR-tomographische Datensaetze des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: Die Daten von 28 kontrastangehobenen MR-Urographien (5 normal; 23 pathologisch) wurden zur Erstellung einer virtuellen Ureterorenoskopie (VURS) mittels Schwellenwert-Bildsegmentierung nachverarbeitet. Als Grundlage fuer die Darstellung des Harntraktes

  2. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Meregalli, Sofia; Niespolo, Rita [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); Zorz, Alessandra; De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina; Crespi, Andrea [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Brenna, Sarah [University of Milan-Bicocca, School of Radiation Oncology, Monza (Italy); Gardani, Gianstefano [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No

  3. Diuretic-enhanced gadolinium excretory MR urography: comparison of conventional gradient-echo sequences and echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Tacke, J.; Adam, G.B.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Jung, P.; Jakse, G. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Urology

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of different gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted gradient-echo techniques in excretory MR urography. In 74 urologic patients, excretory MR urography was performed using various T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) sequences after injection of gadolinium-DTPA and low-dose furosemide. The examinations included conventional GRE sequences and echo-planar imaging (GRE EPI), both obtained with 3D data sets and 2D projection images. Breath-hold acquisition was used primarily. In 20 of 74 examinations, we compared breath-hold imaging with respiratory gating. Breath-hold imaging was significantly superior to respiratory gating for the visualization of pelvicaliceal systems, but not for the ureters. Complete MR urograms were obtained within 14-20 s using 3D GRE EPI sequences and in 20-30 s with conventional 3D GRE sequences. Ghost artefacts caused by ureteral peristalsis often occurred with conventional 3D GRE imaging and were almost completely suppressed in EPI sequences (p < 0.0001). Susceptibility effects were more pronounced on GRE EPI MR urograms and calculi measured 0.8-21.7% greater in diameter compared with conventional GRE sequences. Increased spatial resolution degraded the image quality only in GRE-EPI urograms. (orig.)

  4. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B; Grossbach, A; Gruber-Rouh, T; Zangos, S; Vogl, Th J; Eichler, K

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26-292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic errors and additional need for CT. Instead, a single abdominal low

  5. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, B.; Grossbach, A.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, Th. J.; Eichler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Results: Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26–292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). Conclusion: X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic

  6. SU-F-J-223: Patterns of Failure for Laryngeal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive IMRT: Comparing Two Different Methods for Determining the Origin of Recurrence From Follow-Up PET/CT Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, P; Guha, C; Tome, W [Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, R; Kalnicki, S; Garg, M [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Vogelius, I [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine patterns of failure in laryngeal cancer treated with definitive IMRT by comparing two different methods for identifying the recurrence epicenter on follow-up PET/CT. Methods: We identified 20 patients treated for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with definitive IMRT who had loco-regional recurrence diagnosed on PET/CT. Recurrence PET/CT scans were co-registered with the original treatment planning CT using deformable image registration with the VoxAlign deformation engine in MIM Software. Recurrence volumes were delineated on co-registered follow-up scans using a semi-automatic PETedge tool and two separate methods were used to identify the recurrence point of origin: a) Finding the point within the recurrence volume for which the maximum distance to the surface of the surrounding recurrence volume is smaller than for any other point. b) Finding the point within the recurrence volume with the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), without geometric restrictions.For each method the failure pattern was determined as whether the recurrence origin fell within the original high-dose target volumes GTV70, CTV70, PTV70 (receiving 70Gy), intermediate-risk PTV59 (receiving 59.4Gy) or low-risk PTV54 (receiving 54.1Gy), in the original treatment planning CT. Results: 23 primary/nodal recurrences from the 20 patients were analyzed. The three-dimensional distance between the two different origins was on average 10.5mm (std.dev. 10mm). Most recurrences originated in the high-dose target volumes for both methods with 13 (57%) and 11 (48%) in the GTV70 and 20 (87%) and 20 (87%) in the PTV70 for method a) and b), respectively. There was good agreement between the two methods in classifying the origin target volumes with 69% concordance for GTV70, 89% for CTV70 and 100% for PTV70. Conclusion: With strong agreement in patterns of failure between two separate methods for determining recurrence origin, we conclude that most recurrences occurred within the

  7. CT findings at the primary site of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma within 6-8 weeks after definitive radiotherapy as predictors of primary site control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojiri, Hiroya; Mendenhall, William M.; Mancuso, Anthony A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether findings on CT studies, done 6 weeks after radiotherapy (RT), can predict the likelihood of ultimate control at the primary site in oropharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma underwent RT with curative intent. A minimal 2-year clinical follow-up after RT was required. The primary site CT findings were graded for risk of recurrence on a modified 3-point scale as follows: Grade 0, no detectable focal abnormalities; Grade 1, anatomic asymmetry or focal mass 10 mm (2a) or 10 mm at the primary site, the likelihood of local control is high (93%). The study results indicate that CT findings, based on this relatively small series, may not add incremental information beyond that of clinical examination for predicting local control but may be useful as a baseline if imaging surveillance is contemplated

  8. CT in diseases of the kidney and suprarenal glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baert, A.L.; Marchal, G.; Coenen, Y.; Wilms, G.; Jeanmart, L.; Osteaux, M.; Struyven, I.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis on a series of 312 CT examinations of the renal and suprarenal area performed with a second generation scanner, criteria for the differentiation between the different renal space-occupying masses are suggested. It appears that cystic lesions can be accurately demonstrated due to their low attenuation values compared with the normal renal parenchyma. In conclusion, the authors define the precise role of CT examination as follows: In suspicion of renal or suprarenal space-occupying lesions, echography remains the first examination indicated after conventional urography. If a typical cystic image is found on ultrasound and then CT as well, more invasive examination can usually be obviated. Investigative methods, such as angiography or retrograde pyelography are indicated only when a disordance between ultrasound, CT, and clinical data appears regarding the cystic nature or when a solid space-occupying lesion is suspected. As for perirenal pathalogy, CT proves to be more valuable than ultrasound since it provides an obviously better visualization of the topography and extension of these lesions. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  9. UNDESIRED REACTIONS AT THE UROGRAPHY IN THE CORRELATION OF THE IODIC AND THE NON-TODIC CONTRAST MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babić

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the undesired reactions at 6053 urographies (IVU in thecorrelation of the iodic and the non-iodic contrast media (ICM.Depending on the allergological status the ICM (iodic or non-iodic is chosenfor the sake of carrying out an urographic examination as well as the necessarypremedication measures.The undesired reactions to the TCM are registered in 4,87% (1:20 TVU,namely in 5,6% (1:17 TVU to the iodic and in 2,39% (1:41 IVU to the non-iodicICM.At the intravenous application of the iodic ICM at the IVU the undesiredreactions are registered for2,4 times more often than at the application of the non-iodicICM.

  10. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  11. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author)

  12. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, Satoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author).

  13. CT findings of inoperable lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.B.; Black, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    CT is useful in the evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed or highly suspected lung cancer. The principal role of CT is to screen those patients with metastatic disease beyond the hili from an attempt at curative thoracotomy. While CT is regarded as very sensitive, it is not considered highly specific, and thus a surgical procedure is usually recommended for definitive diagnosis of most ''positive'' CT findings. However, the authors demonstrate a few characteristic CT findings that are highly predictive of unresectable metastatic disease. These CT findings include massive mediastinal lymphadenopathy, diffuse mediastinal infiltration, pericardial involvement, vascular encasement, and advanced chest wall invasion

  14. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-10-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD.

  15. CT findings of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tadashi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Takeda, Norio; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Ito, Jusuke.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of ten patients with medulloblastomas was evaluated. Six of them showed solid, nearly homogeneous lesions and a definite enhancement after the infusion of the contrast medium. However, 4 cases showed heterogenous mass lesions composed of areas of a low density and an iso- or slightly high density which was attenuated by contrast enhancement. Histological examinations revealed differentiated medulloblastomas in two of them, but the other two cases were typical medulloblastomas. It should be remembered that medulloblastomas can reveal heterogenous cerebellar midline mass lesions in CT scans. (author)

  16. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-01-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: 'conservative' IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; 'radical' IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. 'Conservative' IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. 'Radical' plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning

  17. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    It has been said that chronic subdural hematoma cannot be diagnosed by CT. In our cases, CT was used, and the results were described. According to the density of the picture, CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma could be classified into 3 types, those of higher density than that of the cerebral paranchyma, those of isodensity, and those of lower density than that of the cerebral parenchyma. The difference among them appeared to be due to variation in the fluid in hematoma, especially that in hemoglobin concentration. Chronic subdural hematoma was found in 27 of 388 cases of head trauma in which CT was undertaken in our department of surgery for last 2 years. It is difficult to differenciate this disease from subdural edema or subarachnoideal retention of the cerebrospinal fluid. In many cases, use of contrast medium added no change to the CT picture. Cerebral angiography is necessary for definite diagnosis of the disease. Chronic subdural hematoma gives more varieties of findings than other intracranial hematomas. However, if the film is very carefully read, CT is still useful for diagnosing this disease in spite of initially remarked difficulties. (Ueda, J.)

  18. Combined static-dynamic MR urography for the simultaneous evaluation of morphology and function in urinary tract obstruction. I. Evaluation of the normal status in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Hoffend, J.; Becker, K.; Clorius, J.H.; Darge, K.; Kooijman, H.; Troeger, J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. A new approach, combined static-dynamic MR urography is evaluated to determine its potential utility for the functional-morphological diagnosis of paediatric urinary tract obstruction. In this initial investigation we sought to evaluate the procedure by imaging the urinary tract of piglets. Materials and methods. Twenty-nine healthy piglets were studied with MR urography (MRU), 99 m Tc-MAG3 diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), ultrasound (US) and excretory urography (EU). The functional and morphological findings were compared. For MRU we combined a respiration-triggered 3D-IR-TSE sequence and a dynamic 2D-FFE sequence after Gd-DTPA injection. Results. MRU depicted the complete urinary tract with superior image quality compared to EU. Calculation of time-intensity curves from the dynamic sequence permitted determination of single kidney function from parenchymal ROIs and urinary excretion using the whole kidney ROI. MRU and DRS showed significant agreement in the assessment of both single kidney function and urinary excretion. Disturbances of urinary drainage were generally caused by an overfilled bladder. Conclusions. Combined static-dynamic MRU is well suited for the depiction of the complete urinary tract and for the determination of individual kidney function and urinary excretion in the piglet. (orig.)

  19. Combined static-dynamic MR urography for the simultaneous evaluation of morphology and function in urinary tract obstruction. II. Findings in experimentally induced ureteric stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Becker, K.; Hoffend, J.; Clorius, J.H.; Darge, K.; Kooijman, H.; Troeger, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the diagnostic value of combined static-dynamic MR urography (MRU) for the functional-morphological evaluation of experimentally induced urinary tract obstruction in the piglet. Materials and methods. In 20 piglets unilateral ureteric stenosis was created operatively. Post-surgery repeated comparative examinations were obtained with MRU, diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), excretory urography (EU) and ultrasound (US). MRU was performed as a combination study with a static 3D-IR-TSE sequence and a dynamic 2D-FFE sequence after Gd-DTPA with frusemide administration. Results. MRU allowed complete depiction of the prestenotic urinary tract and of the stenosis in all cases. In 43 comparative studies MRU was superior to EU in 36, EU to MRU in 2. When single kidney function was calculated with both MRU and DRS, results were highly correlated (r = 0.92). When urinary excretion was compared, significant agreement was achieved with concordant findings in 86 % and slightly discordant results in 12 %. Conclusions. Static-dynamic MR urography permits excellent depiction of experimentally induced urinary tract obstruction in piglets and reliable assessment of individual renal function and urinary excretion. Two advantages of the method stand out - it does not require radiation and it permits functional-morphological correlation. (orig.)

  20. Impact of respiratory-correlated CT sorting algorithms on the choice of margin definition for free-breathing lung radiotherapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thengumpallil, Sheeba; Germond, Jean-François; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the impact of Toshiba phase- and amplitude-sorting algorithms on the margin strategies for free-breathing lung radiotherapy treatments in the presence of breathing variations. 4D CT of a sphere inside a dynamic thorax phantom was acquired. The 4D CT was reconstructed according to the phase- and amplitude-sorting algorithms. The phantom was moved by reproducing amplitude, frequency, and a mix of amplitude and frequency variations. Artefact analysis was performed for Mid-Ventilation and ITV-based strategies on the images reconstructed by phase- and amplitude-sorting algorithms. The target volume deviation was assessed by comparing the target volume acquired during irregular motion to the volume acquired during regular motion. The amplitude-sorting algorithm shows reduced artefacts for only amplitude variations while the phase-sorting algorithm for only frequency variations. For amplitude and frequency variations, both algorithms perform similarly. Most of the artefacts are blurring and incomplete structures. We found larger artefacts and volume differences for the Mid-Ventilation with respect to the ITV strategy, resulting in a higher relative difference of the surface distortion value which ranges between maximum 14.6% and minimum 4.1%. The amplitude- is superior to the phase-sorting algorithm in the reduction of motion artefacts for amplitude variations while phase-sorting for frequency variations. A proper choice of 4D CT sorting algorithm is important in order to reduce motion artefacts, especially if Mid-Ventilation strategy is used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of computed tomography (CT scan in staging of cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Staging of cervical carcinoma is done clinically using International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO guidelines. It is based on physical examination findings and also includes results of biopsy, endoscopy and conventional radiological tests like chest radiograph, intravenous urography and barium enema. These conventional radiological investigations have largely been replaced by computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at present. FIGO staging system does not consider CT and MRI mandatory; however, use of these modalities are encouraged. This prospective study was conducted to determine the role of CT in staging work up in women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty three women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma were evaluated with contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. CT scan images were especially evaluated to determine tumour size, invasion of parmetrium, pelvic walls, rectum, urinary bladder and ureters, pelvic or retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and distant metastases. CT findings were associated with clinical findings and staging, including findings from cystoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. Results: There was a poor agreement between clinical and CT staging of cervical carcinoma. Primary tumour was demonstrated on CT in 36 (70% of 53 patients. CT underestimated the parametrial, vaginal and pelvic wall invasion when compared with physical examination. CT overestimated the urinary bladder and rectal invasion when compared with cysto-sigmoidoscopy, however, CT had 100 per cent negative predictive value (NPV to exclude bladder and rectal involvement. CT detection of lymph node enlargement and lung metastases influenced the management. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that CT scan does not reliably correlate with clinical FIGO staging of cervical cancer. However, it can detect urinary obstruction as well as nodal or distant metastases and thus improves the

  2. The impact of time between staging PET/CT and definitive chemo-radiation on target volumes and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, Sarah; Plumridge, Nikki; Herschtal, Alan; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the impact of treatment delays on radiation therapy (RT) target volumes and overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent two baseline FDG PET/CT scans. Material and methods: Patients underwent a staging (PET1) and RT planning (PET2) FDG PET/CT scan. At PET1 all patients were eligible for radical chemo-RT. OS and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared for patients remaining eligible for radical RT and those treated palliatively because PET2 showed progression. RT target volumes were contoured using PET1 and PET2. Normal tissue doses were compared for patients remaining eligible for radical RT. Results: Eighty-two patients underwent PET2 scans between October 2004 and February 2007. Of these, 21 had a prior PET1 scan, median 23 days apart (range 8–176 days). Six patients (29%) were unsuitable for radical RT after PET2; five received palliative treatment and one received no treatment. Patients treated palliatively had significantly worse OS and PFS than patients treated radically p < 0.001. Mean RT tumour volume increased from 105cc to 198cc (p < 0.005) between scans. Conclusions: Disease progression while awaiting initiation of curative RT in NSCLC is associated with larger treatment volumes and worse survival

  3. Intraindividual comparison of image quality in MR urography at 1.5 and 3 Tesla in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regier, M.; Adam, G.; Kemper, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: experimental evaluation of image quality of the upper urinary tract in MR urography (MRU) at 1.5 and 3 Tesla in a porcine model. Materials and methods: in this study four healthy domestic pigs, weighing between 71 and 80 kg (mean 73.6 kg), were examined with a standard T 1w 3D-GRE and a high-resolution (HR) T 1w 3D-GRE sequence at 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Additionally, at 3 Tesla both sequences were performed with parallel imaging (SENSE factor 2). The MR urographic scans were performed after intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg body weight (bw)) and low-dose furosemide (0.1 mg/kg bw). Image evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists blinded to sequence parameters and field strength. Image analysis included grading of image quality of the segmented collecting system based on a five-point grading scale regarding anatomical depiction and artifacts observed (1: the majority of the segment (> 50%) was not depicted or was obscured by major artifacts; 5: the segment was visualized without artifacts and had sharply defined borders). Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were determined. Statistical analysis included {kappa}-statistics, Wilcoxon and paired student t-test. Results: the mean scores for MR urographies at 1.5 Tesla were 2.83 for the 3D-GRE and 3.48 for the HR 3D-GRE sequence. Significantly higher values were determined using the corresponding sequences at 3 Tesla, averaging 3.19 for the 3D-GRE (p = 0.047) and 3.92 for the HR 3D-GRE (p = 0.023) sequence. Delineation of the pelvicaliceal system was rated significantly higher at 3 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla (3D-GRE: p = 0.015; HR 3D-GRE: p = 0.006). At 3 Tesla the mean SNR and CNR were significantly higher (p < 0.05). A {kappa} of 0.67 indicated good interobserver agreement. (orig.)

  4. Intraindividual comparison of image quality in MR urography at 1.5 and 3 Tesla in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regier, M.; Adam, G.; Kemper, J.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: experimental evaluation of image quality of the upper urinary tract in MR urography (MRU) at 1.5 and 3 Tesla in a porcine model. Materials and methods: in this study four healthy domestic pigs, weighing between 71 and 80 kg (mean 73.6 kg), were examined with a standard T 1w 3D-GRE and a high-resolution (HR) T 1w 3D-GRE sequence at 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Additionally, at 3 Tesla both sequences were performed with parallel imaging (SENSE factor 2). The MR urographic scans were performed after intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg body weight (bw)) and low-dose furosemide (0.1 mg/kg bw). Image evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists blinded to sequence parameters and field strength. Image analysis included grading of image quality of the segmented collecting system based on a five-point grading scale regarding anatomical depiction and artifacts observed (1: the majority of the segment (> 50%) was not depicted or was obscured by major artifacts; 5: the segment was visualized without artifacts and had sharply defined borders). Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were determined. Statistical analysis included κ-statistics, Wilcoxon and paired student t-test. Results: the mean scores for MR urographies at 1.5 Tesla were 2.83 for the 3D-GRE and 3.48 for the HR 3D-GRE sequence. Significantly higher values were determined using the corresponding sequences at 3 Tesla, averaging 3.19 for the 3D-GRE (p 0.047) and 3.92 for the HR 3D-GRE (p = 0.023) sequence. Delineation of the pelvicaliceal system was rated significantly higher at 3 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla (3D-GRE: p = 0.015; HR 3D-GRE: p = 0.006). At 3 Tesla the mean SNR and CNR were significantly higher (p < 0.05). A κ of 0.67 indicated good interobserver agreement. (orig.)

  5. Impact of magnetic resonance urography and ultrasonography on diagnosis and management of hydronephrosis and megaureter in paediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Wildbrett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: (1 To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography (MRU in comparison with ultrasonography (US to determine the extent of upper urinary tract dilation and (2 to evaluate the impact of MRU on therapy management. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2010, paediatric patients with hydronephrosis or megaureter who underwent MRU in addition to standard work-up imaging were included. Data were retrospectively collected and analysed in comparison with the data obtained from results by US. Results: Forty-five patients with upper urinary tract dilatation were included into the study. Twenty-six patients (58% had a hydronephrosis and 19 patients (42% presented with a megaureter. Diagnosis was established in all patients by multimodulary imaging work-up including micturating cysto-urethrography, MAG3 renography, US and MRU and could be confirmed in all patients who underwent surgery (n = 28. Hydronephrosis was detected in 26 of 26 patients by US (100% sensitivity and in 25 of 26 patients (96% by MRU (Not significant (n.s.. Megaureter was detected in 17 of 19 patients (sensitivity 89% by US and in 18 of 19 patients (sensitivity 95% by MRU (n.s.. In all 45 patients, MRU had no impact on surgical or conservative management of hydronephrosis or megaureter. Conclusion: In our experience, MRU was not superior to US in detecting hydronephrosis or megaureter and had no impact on the surgical or conservative management of upper urinary tract dilation.

  6. The value of urography after angiocardiography. A survey of 300 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyle, R.; Goebel, N.; Krayenbuehl, H.P.; Zurich Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Routine films were taken of the kidneys after contrast studies of the heart and great vessels in 300 consecutive patients using the Sircam 100-mm camera. A significant amount of information was obtained at low cost and with minimal radiation of the patient. A standard was established for normal sizes of kidneys using this format. There were 56 abnormalities, including 26 pairs of kidneys that differed significantly in size (19% and 9%). There were 2 tumors, 2 cysts, 19 congenital abnormalities, 1 renal artery stenosis, 4 renal and 1 biliary stone. One of the tumors, undetected at a previous angiographic examination, was inoperable, and earlier detection would have undoubtedly benefited and may have offered a possible cure to this patient. The authors feel that the addition of this examination, trifling in the expenditure of time and money, is of definite benefit to the patient. (orig.) [de

  7. CT pelvimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Charles, G.; Le Berre, J.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Pelvimetry aims at providing the obstetrician with information on the size and morphology of the female pelvis, thus enabling him to assess the obstetrical prognosis as accurately as possible. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages, in particular the lower mother and fetus radiation dose. After a brief description of obstetrical anatomy, the usual CT exploration method is presented and its results are considered in terms of measurements, indices and morphological findings. If performed with a very strict exploration procedure, CT pelvimetry is a very reliable, fact and comfortable method of examination. All these advantages, combined with the minimized patient dose, should lead to an increasingly widespread use of this technique [fr

  8. Role of renal scintigraphy in the functional evaluation of ectopic kidneys as compared to intravenous urography and ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, G.; Das, B.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Kaushik, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Ectopic kidneys are mainly diagnosed by Ultrasonography (US) and/or Intravenous urography (IVU) but a functional study using a radionuclide can provide much useful additional information. The objective of this retrospective study was to analyze and compare the information obtained from anatomical investigations like IVU and US with that obtained from a functional study. Materials and Methods: 44 patients (26 males and 18 females) in the age ranging from 2-53 yr. and involving 53 ectopic kidney units were included in the study. All patients underwent renal dynamic scintigraphy with either Tc-99m EC or Tc-99m DTPA after adequate hydration. US report was available in 35 and IVU in 31 kidney units. All investigations were evaluated independent of each other. Results: Out of 53 units 31 were left ectopic (26 simple and 5 crossed) while 21 were right ectopic (18 simple and 3 crossed). One grossly hydronephrotic was seen on ultrasound but not on scintigraphy.26/53 units showed adequate or normal function and drainage. 19/53 units showed obstructive uropathy. 7 units had negligible function. 28/35 units that underwent both ultrasonography and scintigraphy showed concordant findings as far as localization of the kidney was concerned while 7/35 units showed discordant findings. 20/31 units showed discordant findings in scintigraphy as compared to IVU. Of these 9 units were non-visualized on I.V.U but showed adequate function and clearance in renal scintigraphy. In 11/31 units Nuclear Medicine findings corroborated with those of IVU. Conclusion: Nuclear Medicine studies provide reliable anatomic information comparable to IVU and USS and more reliable pathophysiological information. Thus in conjunction with USS and IVU, renal dynamic scintigraphy can play a very important role in the evaluation of ectopic kidneys

  9. Kontrastmittelverstärkte Magnet-Resonanz-Urographie unter forcierter Diurese - Stellenwert in der Differentialdiagnostik bei Obstruktionen des oberen Harntraktes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Magnet-Resonanz-Urographie (MRU ist ein relativ neues Verfahren in der Diagnostik des oberen Harntraktes. Das Ziel dieser Studie war der Vergleich der Aussagefähigkeit der MRU unter Gabe von Gadolinium und Furosemid und dem konventionellen Urogramm (IVU in der Diagnostik der Ursache von Obstruktionen im Bereich des Harnleiters. 82 Patienten mit im IVU nachgewiesener Obstruktion des oberen Harntraktes oder urographisch stummer Niere bei sonographisch nachgewiesener Dilatation wurden der MRU zugeführt. Die Bilder beider Untersuchungsmethoden wurden von voneinander unabhängigen Untersuchern befundet. Zwei Urologen befundeten die IVU-Bilder, zwei Radiologen die MRU-Bilder, die Radiologen kannten die IVU-Diagnose nicht. Bei unklarer Diagnose wurden weitere Untersuchungen wie Computertomographie, retrograde Pyelographie oder Ureteroskopie durchgeführt. Die Diagnosen waren: Harnleitersteine bei 72 Patienten, Harnleitertumore bei 8 Patienten und extraureterale Tumore bei 2 Patienten. Eine richtige Diagnose bei den Steinpatienten wurde durch IVU bei 49 von 72 Patienten und durch MRU bei 64 von 72 Patienten gestellt. In dieser Patientengruppe wurden durch die MRU zwei falsche Diagnosen gestellt. Fehlende Kontrastmittelausscheidung war der Hauptgrund für Versagen der IVU. 3 der 8 Patienten mit Harnleitertumoren wurden durch die IVU richtig dignostiziert, bei dreien wurde eine falsche Diagnose gestellt. Durch die MRU konnten in dieser Gruppe 7 von 8 Patienten korrekt diagnostiziert werden, es wurde keine falsche Diagnose erhoben. IVU wird zunächst die Standarduntersuchungstechnik zur Darstellung des oberen Harntraktes bleiben, aber durch diese Studie konnte die Möglichkeit gezeigt werden, die in der MRU in Kombination mit Gadolinium und Furosemid liegt. Die größte Bedeutung dieser Untersuchung liegt in der urographisch stummen Niere, bei Untersuchungen in der Schwangerschaft, bei Kindern und bei Patienten mit Kontrastmittelunverträglichkeit.

  10. Renal transplant failure due to urologic complications: Comparison of static fluid with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Koester, A.; Andersen, K.; Kurz, K.D.; Moedder, U.; Cohnen, M. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: Postrenal reasons of renal transplant failure can be assessed by magnetic resonance urography. This study was designed to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of static fluid (T2-)MRU compared to contrast enhanced (CE-)MRU in patients with renal transplant failure. Material and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (14 female, 21 men; mean age 48.6 years) with renal transplant failure and sonographically detected hydronephrosis were examined both with T2-MRU as well as CE-MRU resulting in 39 MRU examinations. MRU was performed both using T2-weighted HASTE-sequence (T2-MRU) as well as Gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLASH-sequence (CE-MRU) on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Medical Solutions). Subjective image quality of resulting maximum intensity projection was assessed in consensus by two readers blinded to the final diagnosis, using a five point scale. MRU findings were correlated to sonography, operative results or clinical follow up. Results: CE-MRU yielded a sensitivity of 85.7% (T2-MRU 76.2%), and a specificity of 83.3% (T2-MRU: 73.7%), however statistical significance was not reached. The subjective image quality was significantly better in CE-MRU. Conclusions: Only concerning subjective image quality CE-MRU proved superior to T2-MRU. Yet, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between T2- and CE-MRU. Thinking of incipient nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, T2-MRU can be used as reliable alternative in patients with decreased renal transplant function due to urological complications.

  11. Renal transplant failure due to urologic complications: Comparison of static fluid with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondin, D.; Koester, A.; Andersen, K.; Kurz, K.D.; Moedder, U.; Cohnen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Postrenal reasons of renal transplant failure can be assessed by magnetic resonance urography. This study was designed to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of static fluid (T2-)MRU compared to contrast enhanced (CE-)MRU in patients with renal transplant failure. Material and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (14 female, 21 men; mean age 48.6 years) with renal transplant failure and sonographically detected hydronephrosis were examined both with T2-MRU as well as CE-MRU resulting in 39 MRU examinations. MRU was performed both using T2-weighted HASTE-sequence (T2-MRU) as well as Gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLASH-sequence (CE-MRU) on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Medical Solutions). Subjective image quality of resulting maximum intensity projection was assessed in consensus by two readers blinded to the final diagnosis, using a five point scale. MRU findings were correlated to sonography, operative results or clinical follow up. Results: CE-MRU yielded a sensitivity of 85.7% (T2-MRU 76.2%), and a specificity of 83.3% (T2-MRU: 73.7%), however statistical significance was not reached. The subjective image quality was significantly better in CE-MRU. Conclusions: Only concerning subjective image quality CE-MRU proved superior to T2-MRU. Yet, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between T2- and CE-MRU. Thinking of incipient nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, T2-MRU can be used as reliable alternative in patients with decreased renal transplant function due to urological complications

  12. A Flexible Method for Multi-Material Decomposition of Dual-Energy CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Paulo R S; Lamb, Peter; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dual-energy computed-tomographic (CT) systems to determine the concentration of constituent materials in a mixture, known as material decomposition, is the basis for many of dual-energy CT's clinical applications. However, the complex composition of tissues and organs in the human body poses a challenge for many material decomposition methods, which assume the presence of only two, or at most three, materials in the mixture. We developed a flexible, model-based method that extends dual-energy CT's core material decomposition capability to handle more complex situations, in which it is necessary to disambiguate among and quantify the concentration of a larger number of materials. The proposed method, named multi-material decomposition (MMD), was used to develop two image analysis algorithms. The first was virtual unenhancement (VUE), which digitally removes the effect of contrast agents from contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT exams. VUE has the ability to reduce patient dose and improve clinical workflow, and can be used in a number of clinical applications such as CT urography and CT angiography. The second algorithm developed was liver-fat quantification (LFQ), which accurately quantifies the fat concentration in the liver from dual-energy CT exams. LFQ can form the basis of a clinical application targeting the diagnosis and treatment of fatty liver disease. Using image data collected from a cohort consisting of 50 patients and from phantoms, the application of MMD to VUE and LFQ yielded quantitatively accurate results when compared against gold standards. Furthermore, consistent results were obtained across all phases of imaging (contrast-free and contrast-enhanced). This is of particular importance since most clinical protocols for abdominal imaging with CT call for multi-phase imaging. We conclude that MMD can successfully form the basis of a number of dual-energy CT image analysis algorithms, and has the potential to improve the clinical utility

  13. CT and MRT in mediastinal and hilar masses. CT und MRT bei mediastinalen und hilaeren Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L.; Kramer, J.; Stiglbauer, R.; Wimberger, D.; Imhof, H. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologisch-Physikalische Tumordiagnostik, Vienna (Austria)); Metz, V. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Chirurgische Klinik)

    1990-11-01

    Thirty-eight patients with mediastinal and/or hilar masses were imaged by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results were analyzed retrospectively regarding the ability to demonstrate the masses, their number, size, definition, location and tissue characteristics. CT and MRI showed equivalent results in 32 cases; additional information was obtained in two patients by CT, in four patients by MRI. In view of the specific advantages and limitations of both CT and MRI we believed that in patients with mediastinal and/or hilar masses, contrast enhanced CT remains the procedure of choice after performing plain chest radiographs; in certain cases MRI will prove useful for further evaluation. (orig.).

  14. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  15. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  16. CT Enterography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These ... other medical conditions, and if you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ...

  17. Early report: Comparison of breath-hold MR excretory urography, Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography in evaluation of symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.A.; Tomlinson, A.J.; Weston, M.J.; Lloyd, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To compare assessment by MR excretory urography (MREU), Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography of women with symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy and to define its cause. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven women at 19-34 weeks of gestation were studied prospectively with gadolinium-enhanced breath-hold gradient echo MREU and transabdominal Doppler ultrasound compared with a 'gold standard' of isotope renography employing frusemide challenge. All studies were performed within 24 h, were reported independently in a blinded fashion and employed clearly defined criteria. Obstetric and infant outcomes were obtained. RESULTS: There were no adverse reactions to gadolinium administration in pregnancy and no adverse obstetric or infant outcomes. Three of the 11 women were unable to tolerate the complete MREU protocol. Ultrasound indices could not be used to predict ureteric obstruction as shown by isotope renography. MREU agreed with renographic findings in five of the six cases with obstruction and in two without obstruction. MREU directly demonstrated hydronephrosis to result from extrinsic compression of the ureter between the gravid uterus and iliopsoas muscle. CONCLUSION: MR excretory urography is a promising technique which affords equivalent functional and additional anatomical information to isotope renography. It is more accurate than Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of ureteric obstruction in pregnancy. Spencer, J. A. (2000)

  18. Functional MR urography in infants and children. Indications, techniques and requirements; Funktionelle MR-Urografie (fMRU) bei Kindern und Jugendlichen. Indikationen, Techniken und Anforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, Martin; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Universitaetsklinikum Jena (Germany). Sektion Paediatrische Radiologie; Darge, Kassa [Children' s Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Section ' ' Body Imaging' ' ; John, Ulrike [Universitaetsklinikum Jena (Germany). Sektion Paediatrische Nephrologie

    2013-03-15

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) need to be diagnosed correctly in early life in order to avoid the need for dialysis and renal transplantation. Traditionally, X-ray, fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasonography are the imaging methods to assess kidneys and the urinary tract. In infants and children, however, ultrasonography is the imaging method of first choice. In order to analyse the renal, to be more precise, the split renal function, MR urography has the potential for giving that information. More easily, information on morphology and dynamics of urinary flow in the upper renal tract can be obtained, too. Up to now, there is no commercial solution for obtaining split renal function with MR machines, however, two freeware solutions exist (''CHOP-fMRU'' and ''MR Urography''), that fill the gap. This article gives detailed information on patient selection, patient preparation, dedicated MR sequence technique, moreover discusses installation, use, and interpretation of the functional part using the ''CHOP-fMRU'' software. (orig.)

  19. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Usefulness of multi-plane dynamic subtraction CT (MPDS-CT) for intracranial high density lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Ryo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    We present a new CT technique using the high speed CT scanner in detection and evaluation of temporal and spatial contrast enhancement of intracranial high density lesions. A multi-plane dynamic subtraction CT (MPDS-CT) was performed in 21 patients with intracranial high density lesions. These lesions consisted of 10 brain tumors, 7 intracerebral hemorrhages and 4 vascular malformations (2 untreated, 2 post-embolization). Baseline study was first performed, and 5 sequential planes of covering total high density lesions were selected. After obtaining the 5 sequential CT images as mask images, three series of multi-plane dynamic CT were performed for the same 5 planes with an intravenous bolus injection of contrast medium. MPDS-CT images were reconstructed by subtracting dynamic CT images from the mask ones. MPDS-CT were compared with conventional contrast-enhanced CT. MPDS-CT images showed the definite contrast enhancement of high density brain tumors and vascular malformations which were not clearly identified on conventional contrast-enhanced CT images because of calcified or hemorrhagic lesions and embolic materials, enabling us to eliminate enhanced abnormalities with non-enhanced areas such as unusual intracerebral hemorrhages. MPDS-CT will provide us further accurate and objective information and will be greatly helpful for interpreting pathophysiologic condition. (author).

  1. Detailed evaluation of the upper urinary tract in patients with prune belly syndrome using magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Roig, M L; Grattan-Smith, J D; Arlen, A M; Smith, E A; Kirsch, A J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has proven to be useful in the setting of complex urologic anatomy. Prune belly syndrome (PBS) patients are known to have malformed and highly variable urinary tract anatomy due to significant dilation and renal dysplasia. To further characterize the renal and ureteral anatomy and renal function in patients with PBS via MRU. Children with PBS undergoing MRU (2006-2011) were identified. Studies were performed to evaluate severe hydronephrosis in all patients. Demographics, previous imaging, and MRU findings were collected. A single radiologist reviewed all studies. MRU was performed on 13 boys, with a median age of 29.3 months (IQR 6-97). Two patients underwent >1 study for ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJ obstruction) and calyceal diverticulum with a solitary kidney, respectively. Hydroureteronephrosis (HUN) was identified in 12 boys (92%), while one (8%) did not have ureteral dilation. All patients demonstrated morphologic abnormalities beyond HUN as follows: five (38%) renal dysplasia; five (38%) scarring; four (31%) calyceal diverticula; and three (23%) thickened bladder. The median renal transit time (RTT) was 6 min (IQR 3.5-10.5), and >8 min (range 8.5-35) in six patients; one patient was ultimately diagnosed with obstruction. The mean serum creatinine was 0.5 ± 0.3 mg/dl. This summary figure is a coronal excretory phase T1 MRU image demonstrating absence of well-defined calyces and a 5-cm calyceal diverticulum (white arrow). This study reports significant anatomic and functional findings on MRU that were not readily apparent when using standard imaging for children with PBS. The high-resolution images and functional data obtained with MRU allowed for visualization of calyceal diverticula and abnormal renal pelvic anatomy not previously described in PBS. In addition, renal dysplasia could be identified with MRU, which is badly characterized in the PBS population outside of renal biopsy studies. Potential limitations

  2. The diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance urography in children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarabi V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Urinary tract infection 0 in children causes renal scarring and permanent damage to the organ. In this study, we compared the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urogram for urinary tract anomalies with other conventional imaging methods in children with UTI. "n"nMethods : In this case-control study, 190 children (mean age 3.23±3.59 yrs with UTI were recruited from the Pediatric Ward of Rasul-e-Akram Hospital during 2007-2009. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied imaging technique: MRU (cases and conventional imaging groups (controls."n"nResults : Abnormal imaging detection rates for Ultrasonography were 32%, X-ray of kidneys, ureters and bladder (KUB 9%, Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP 26%, Voiding Cystoure therogram (VCUG 54%, Dimercaptosuccinic Acid scan (DMSA indicating non-obstructive (reflux uropathy in 76% (mean age 3.5 yrs and MRU 43% (mean age 1.6 yrs, respectively. A meaningful correlation was observed between MRU and DMSA scan with IVP results (Kappa=0.75. KUB and Ultrasonography had similar results in cases with abnormal MRU and DMSA scan (P=0.121. MRU had strong agreement with VCUG and IVP for the detection of obstructive uropathy and scar due to congenital malformation

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  4. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error <7%) and reproducible (interobserver concordance 0.99). For eight treatments, in cases of complex hepatic vascularization, the hepatic volumes based on angiography and CT led to a relative overestimation or underestimation of the vascularized hepatic volume by 43.2 ± 32.7% (5-87%) compared with SPECT/CT analyses. The vascularized liver volume taken into account calculated from SPECT/CT data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  5. Clinical applications of SPECT-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [University Hospital Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-06-01

    Covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. Includes chapters on the use of SPECT/CT for dosimetry and for therapy planning. Completely up to date. Many helpful illustrations. SPECT/CT cameras have considerably improved diagnostic accuracy in recent years. Such cameras allow direct correlation of anatomic and functional information, resulting in better localization and definition of scintigraphic findings. In addition to this anatomic referencing, CT coregistration provides superior quantification of radiotracer uptake based on the attenuation correction capabilities of CT. Useful applications of SPECT/CT have been identified not only in oncology but also in other specialties such as orthopedics and cardiology. This book covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis and therapy planning of benign and malignant diseases. Opening chapters discuss the technology and physics of SPECT/CT and its use for dosimetry. The role of SPECT/CT in the imaging of a range of pathologic conditions is then addressed in detail. Applications covered include, among others, imaging of the thyroid, bone, and lungs, imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, cardiac scintigraphy, and sentinel node scintigraphy. Individual chapters are also devoted to therapy planning in selective internal radiation therapy of liver tumors and bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT. Readers will find this book to be an essential and up-to-date source of information on this invaluable hybrid imaging technique.

  6. CT cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Cancer of the urinary bladder is one of the commonest urothelial neoplasms. Conventional cystoscopy remains the mainstay in the diagnosis of urinary bladder carcinomas. But it is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure, associated with complications. Computed tomographic (CT) virtual cystoscopy has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality with potential advantages in the detection of urinary bladder neoplasms and good patient acceptance. It is a minimally invasive technique, allowing imaging of the urinary bladder in multiple planes and a 360 0 view. CT cystoscopy provides information about the location, size and morphologic features of urinary bladder lesions, indicating appropriate areas for biopsy. It can be performed in cases in which conventional cystoscopy is not feasible, such as in the presence of urethral strictures, marked prostatic hypertrophy or active bleeding, and in cases in which cystoscopic findings are inconclusive. The technique can be used to evaluate areas of the urinary bladder difficult to evaluate with cystoscopy, such as the anterior bladder neck and narrowmouthed diverticula. Finally, virtual cystoscopy provides both intraluminal and extraluminal pathologic changes, so intravesical disease and exrtavesical extension can be evaluated in the same study. One of the limitations of this technique is the difficulty to demonstrate small-sized lesions. The introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanners was a major technological advancement because among other things it substantially improves z-axis resolution by reducing section collimation and allowing the detection of very small lesions. The near isotropic or isotropic pixels achieved with a multidetector CT scanner, enable the creation of multiplanar reformatted images with a resolution very close to that of the axial images and three-dimensional (3D) renderings of outstanding quality. Transverse, multiplanar reformations and virtual endoscopic images are complementary

  7. Bowel preparation for CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, Emanuele; Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan; Bemi, Pietro; Mantarro, Annalisa; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Bowel preparation represents an essential part of CT colonography, as the accuracy of the exam is strongly related to the adequacy of colonic cleansing, and a poor bowel preparation may compromise the diagnostic quality even despite optimization of all other acquisition parameters. Residual stool and fluid in the large bowel may affect the interpretation of the exam and may increase the number of false positives and false negatives. In this regard, the majority of patients having undergone CT colonography state that bowel preparation is the most unpleasant part. Unfortunately, to date no definite consensus has been reached about the ideal bowel preparation technique, and there is great variability in preparation strategies across diagnostic centers. The purpose of this review article is to describe the development and evolution of bowel preparation techniques in order to choose the best approach for optimizing the diagnostic quality of CT colonography in each patient

  8. Bowel preparation for CT colonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.neri@med.unipi.it [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy); Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan [Department of Radiology, Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Roeselare (Belgium); Bemi, Pietro; Mantarro, Annalisa; Bartolozzi, Carlo [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Bowel preparation represents an essential part of CT colonography, as the accuracy of the exam is strongly related to the adequacy of colonic cleansing, and a poor bowel preparation may compromise the diagnostic quality even despite optimization of all other acquisition parameters. Residual stool and fluid in the large bowel may affect the interpretation of the exam and may increase the number of false positives and false negatives. In this regard, the majority of patients having undergone CT colonography state that bowel preparation is the most unpleasant part. Unfortunately, to date no definite consensus has been reached about the ideal bowel preparation technique, and there is great variability in preparation strategies across diagnostic centers. The purpose of this review article is to describe the development and evolution of bowel preparation techniques in order to choose the best approach for optimizing the diagnostic quality of CT colonography in each patient.

  9. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  10. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  11. CT scan of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, T; Noguchi, S; Nishitani, H [National Sanatorium of Utano, Kyoto (Japan); Kitano, H; Ikegami, Y

    1981-04-01

    In forty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease, we examined the ventricular size and the degree of cortical atrophy which were measured by the photos of CT scan and compared them with their clinical symptoms and side effects of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The ventricular size was expressed as the ventricular ratio which is the percentage of superimposed lateral ventricular area to the white and gray matter area at the slice number 2B of CT scan photos. The degree of the cortical atrophy was expressed as the sulcal numbers which were clearly visualized at the slice number 3B or 4A of CT scan photos. We used the CT scan photos of age-matched other patients which did not show definit central nervous system abnormalities. Our findings were as follows: (1) The ventricular enlargement was observed in the parkinsonian patients who showed dementia and/or Yahr's classification grades IV or V. (2) There was no correlation between the duration of this disease and the L--dopa treatments with the ventricular size and sulcal numbers. (3) The side effects of drugs such as visual hallucination were tended to be observed in the patients who showed the ventricular enlargement. (4) There was no definite correlation between the degree of cortical atrophy with clinical symptoms and side effects of various drugs. These findings suggested that the ventricular enlargement in Parkinson's disease was an important sign of dementia and the tendency of appearance of side effects of various drugs.

  12. CT scan of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tetsuro; Noguchi, Sadako; Nishitani, Hiroshi; Kitano, Haruo; Ikegami, Yoshinori.

    1981-01-01

    In forty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease, we examined the ventricular size and the degree of cortical atrophy which were measured by the photos of CT scan and compared them with their clinical symptoms and side effects of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The ventricular size was expressed as the ventricular ratio which is the percentage of superimposed lateral ventricular area to the white and gray matter area at the slice number 2B of CT scan photos. The degree of the cortical atrophy was expressed as the sulcal numbers which were clearly visualized at the slice number 3B or 4A of CT scan photos. We used the CT scan photos of age-matched other patients which did not show definit central nervous system abnormalities. Our findings were as follows: (1) The ventricular enlargement was observed in the parkinsonian patients who showed dementia and/or Yahr's classification grades IV or V. (2) There was no correlation between the duration of this disease and the L--dopa treatments with the ventricular size and sulcal numbers. (3) The side effects of drugs such as visual hallucination were tended to be observed in the patients who showed the ventricular enlargement. (4) There was no definite correlation between the degree of cortical atrophy with clinical symptoms and side effects of various drugs. These findings suggested that the ventricular enlargement in Parkinson's disease was an important sign of dementia and the tendency of appearance of side effects of various drugs. (author)

  13. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  14. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  15. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Molvin, Lior Z. [Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA (United States); Wang, Jia [Stanford University, Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  16. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik; Molvin, Lior Z.; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  17. FDG-PET/CT in oncology. German guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Delbeke, D.; Kotzerke, J.; Minkov, V.; Reiser, M.; Willich, N.

    2007-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT examinations combine metabolic and morphologic imaging within an integrated procedure. Over the past decade PET/CT imaging has gained wide clinical acceptance in the field of oncology. This FDG-PET/CT guideline focuses on indications, data acquisition and processing as well as documentation of FDG-PET/CT examinations in oncologic patients within a clinical and social context specific to Germany. Background information and definitions are followed by examples of clinical and research applications of FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, protocols for CT scanning (low dose and contrast-enhanced CT) and PET emission imaging are discussed. Documentation and reporting of examinations are specified. Image interpretation criteria and sources of errors are discussed. Quality control for FDG and PET/CT-systems, qualification requirements of personnel as well as legal aspects are presented. (orig.)

  18. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS CT-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    under appropriate medical therapy and the lesion was successfully excised. ... origin.[4] Typically, these sympathetic tumours secrete catecholamines. It should be noted that phaeochromocytomas, arising from the adrenal medulla, are, by definition, ... Radiologically, CT, MRI, metaidbenzylguanidine scan and PET imaging.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  5. Radiation exposure in CT-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: Roman.Kloeckner@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kara, Levent [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, Freiburgstraße 18, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions, to establish reference levels for exposure, and to discuss strategies for dose reduction. Materials and methods: We analyzed 1576 consecutive CT-guided procedures in 1284 patients performed over 4.5 years, including drainage placements; biopsies of different organs; radiofrequency and microwave ablations (RFA/MWA) of liver, bone, and lung tumors; pain blockages, and vertebroplasties. Data were analyzed with respect to scanner settings, overall radiation doses, and individual doses of planning CT series, CT intervention, and control CT series. Results: Eighy-five percent of the total radiation dose was applied during the pre- and post-interventional CT series, leaving only 15% applied by the CT-guided intervention itself. Single slice acquisition was associated with lower doses than continuous CT-fluoroscopy (37 mGy cm vs. 153 mGy cm, p < 0.001). The third quartile of radiation doses varied considerably for different interventions. The highest doses were observed in complex interventions like RFA/MWA of the liver, followed by vertebroplasty and RFA/MWA of the lung. Conclusions: This paper suggests preliminary reference levels for various intervention types and discusses strategies for dose reduction. A multicenter registry of radiation exposure including a broader spectrum of scanners and intervention types is needed to develop definitive reference levels.

  6. (18)F-FDG PET-CT simulation for non-small-cell lung cancer: effect in patients already staged by PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Gerard G; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J; Stewart, David P; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H; Young, V A Linda; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV(CT) to GTV(FUSED) was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  7. 18F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV CT to GTV FUSED was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  8. The use of fused PET/CT images for patient selection and radical radiotherapy target volume definition in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Results of a prospective study with mature survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Everitt, Sarah; Bayne, Mike; Ball, David; Plumridge, Nikki; Binns, David; Herschtal, Alan; Cruickshank, Deborah; Bressel, Mathias; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study investigated the impact of radiotherapy (RT)-planning FDG-PET/CT on management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Patients still eligible for radical RT after conventional staging underwent RT-planning PET/CT and, if disease was still treatable to 60 Gy, they entered our planning study, where visually-contoured tumour volumes derived with and without PET information were compared. If PET/CT detected advanced disease, palliative therapy was given. Overall survival (OS) for palliative and curative patients was compared. Results: Of 76 eligible patients, only 50 (66%) received radical chemoRT after PET/CT while 26 (34%) received palliative therapies because PET/CT detected advanced disease. Without PET, FDG-avid tumour would reside outside the planning target volume (PTV) in 36% of radical cases and in 25% 95% prescribed dose. OS for all patients was 56.8% and 24.9% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. OS for patients given chemoRT was 77.5% and 35.6% at 1 and 4 years, respectively and was 32% for stage IIIA patients at 4 years. OS for patients treated palliatively was inferior (P < 0.001); 16.3% and 4.1% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. Conclusions: Planning PET/CT frequently changed management and was associated with excellent survival. Survival data from this study were presented in part at the 2011 World Lung Cancer Conference, Amsterdam and planning data at the 2010 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Chicago

  9. Indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy in lung cancer patients: SPECT, CT or SPECT-CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the role of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT) and SPECT-CT of selected volume in lung cancer patients with indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy (BS). The data of 50 lung cancer patients (53 ± 10.3 years; range 30-75; male/female 38/12) with 65 indeterminate lesions on planar BS (January 2010 to November 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. All of them underwent SPECT-CT of a selected volume. SPECT, CT and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by two experienced readers (experience in musculoskeletal imaging, including CT: 5 and 7 years) in separate sessions. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely metastatic, 2 is probably metastatic, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably benign and 5 is definitely benign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for each modality, taking a score ≤2 as metastatic. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Clinical and imaging follow-up and/or histopathology were taken as reference standard. For both readers SPECT was inferior to CT (P = 0.004, P = 0.022) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.003, P = 0.037). However, no significant difference was found between CT and SPECT-CT for reader 1 (P = 0.847) and reader 2 (P = 0.592). The findings were similar for lytic as well as sclerotic lesions. Moderate inter-observer agreement was seen for SPECT images (κ = 0.426), while almost perfect agreement was seen for CT (κ = 0.834) and SPECT-CT (κ = 0.971). CT alone and SPECT-CT are better than SPECT for accurate characterisation of indeterminate lesions on planar BS in lung cancer patients. CT alone is not inferior to SPECT-CT for this purpose and might be preferred because of shorter acquisition time and wider availability. (orig.)

  10. Renal dysplasia with single system ectopic ureter: Diagnosis using magnetic resonance urography and management with laparoscopic nephroureterectomy in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Joshi

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion : Single system ectopic ureter associated with congenital renal dysplasia is exceedingly rare. MRU is definitely the better investigation for the diagnosis of this condition as compared to the conventional radiological investigations. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is a very good procedure for the management of these cases.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, a biodegradable nanosized magnetic resonance contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzuo Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongzuo Xu1, Todd Lyle Kaneshiro1, Eun-Kee Jeong2, Dennis L Parker2, Zheng-Rong Lu31Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has been recently shown to be effective for diagnostic urography. High-resolution urographic images can be acquired with T1 contrast agents for the kidney and urinary tract with minimal noise in the abdomen. Currently, clinical contrast agents are low molecular weight agents and can rapidly extravasate from blood circulation, leading to slow contrast agent elimination through kidney and consequently providing limited contrast enhancement in urinary tract. In this study, a new biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent, nanoglobule-G4-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, was prepared by conjugating Gd-DO3A chelates on the surface of a generation 4 nanoglobule, poly-l-lysine octa(3-aminopropylsilsesquioxane dendrimer, via a disulfide spacer, where the carrier had a precisely defined nanosize that is far smaller than the renal filtration threshold. The in vivo contrast enhancement and dynamic imaging of the urinary tract of the agent was evaluated in nude mice using a low molecular weight agent Gd(DTPA-BMA as a control. The agent eliminated rapidly from blood circulation and accumulated more abundantly in urinary tract than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The fast elimination kinetics is ideal for functional evaluation of the kidneys. The morphology of the kidneys and urinary tract was better visualized by the biodegradable nanoglobular contrast agent than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The agent also resulted in low liver contrast enhancement, indicating low nonspecific tissue deposition. These features render the G4 nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A conjugate a promising contrast agent for magnetic

  12. Interest of 99mTc-DMSA in the exploration of non-functional kidneys in the intravenous urography; report of 20 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghfir, I.; Ouboukdir, R.; Ben Rais, N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DMSA constitutes a non-invasive and functional method that is of appreciable interest in the qualitative study of renal parenchyma and the evaluation of the separate renal function. Material and methods We report, through this work, the observation of 20 patients presenting a unilateral renal muteness to the intravenous urography (I.V.U.). A 99m Tc-DMSA scintigraphy was carried out among all our patients by means of a gamma-camera with large field equipped with a parallel collimator of weak energy and high-resolution. The evaluation of images obtained consisted of a qualitative study of parenchyma as well as an estimate of the functional value separated from the two kidneys obtained by the calculation of geometric mean. Results On the 20 studied cases, the sex-ratio was equal to 1.16; the average age was 29.72 years with extremes spanning from 18 months to 70 years. The renal muteness reported on intravenous urography was due among 12 patients (60% of cases) to a lithiasis origin, in six patients (30% of cases), to an ureteral-pelvic junction, in one patient (5% of cases), to a chronic pyelonephritis and in another patient (5% of cases) to a mega urethra. The separated renal function of the non functional kidneys to the I.V.U., obtained from the renal 99m Tc-DMSA scintigraphy varied from 11% to 31% with an average of 20.6%. Discussion Through our series, 99m Tc-DMSA scintigraphy allowed to alleviate the limits of I.V.U. in the evaluation of the precise functional value of pathologic kidneys. Indeed, in the 20 studied cases where the I.V.U. had reported a renal muteness, the 99m Tc-DMSA scintigraphy allowed a better appreciation of the renal function which varied from 11% to 31% thus calling into question the accuracy of I.V.U. in the exploration of renal function at an advanced stage of uropathy. (N.C.)

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Clinical values of CT and dynamic CT in brain infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Il; Jang, Do; Seo, Eun Joo; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul

    1985-01-01

    With the advent of faster scan time and new computer program, a scanning technique called 'dynamic computed tomography' has become possible. Dynamic computed tomography consisted of performing multiple rapid sequence scans after injection of contrast material. The authors have evaluated the clinical usefulness of computed tomography and dynamic computed tomography of 93 patients with brain infarction and/or ischemia during the period of 17 months from April 1983 to August 1984 in Department of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Hospital. The results were as follows; 1. The age distribution ranged from 18 years to 78 years. Among them the most common age group was between 50 years and 59 years (40.9%). 2. The sites of brain infarction were cerebral lobes (63 cases,68), basal ganglia (15 cases, 16.1%) and multiple sites (6 cases, 6.4%). The common affected site was middle cerebral artery territories. 3. The contrast enhancement of acute infarction was noted in 14 cases (17.5%) which occurred commonly between 3 days and 2 weeks from ictus. 4. The patterns of time-density curve in brain infarction and/or ischemia were as follow: a. Depression of slow wash-in phase was 20 cases (59%). b. Lower peak concentration was 17 cases (50%). c. Lower and delayed peak concentration was 7 cases (21%). d. No definite peak concentration was 6 cases (18%). First three patterns of time-density curve were thought as relatively characteristic curve of brain infarction and/or ischemia. 5. Two cases that showed negative findings on precontrast CT scan appeared to be positive findings as hypodensity on postcontrast CT scan and were confirmed as brain infarction by dynamic CT. 6. The diagnostic entity of dynamic CT scan were as follows; a. large artery thrombotic infarction were 23 cases (58%). b. lacnar infarction were 6 cases (15%). c. ischemia were 5 cases (13%). d. normal were 5 cases (13%). In six cases of lacunar infarction which was double hypodensity on pre-and postcontrast CT

  15. Clinical values of CT and dynamic CT in brain infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Il; Jang, Do; Seo, Eun Joo; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-04-15

    With the advent of faster scan time and new computer program, a scanning technique called 'dynamic computed tomography' has become possible. Dynamic computed tomography consisted of performing multiple rapid sequence scans after injection of contrast material. The authors have evaluated the clinical usefulness of computed tomography and dynamic computed tomography of 93 patients with brain infarction and/or ischemia during the period of 17 months from April 1983 to August 1984 in Department of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Hospital. The results were as follows; 1. The age distribution ranged from 18 years to 78 years. Among them the most common age group was between 50 years and 59 years (40.9%). 2. The sites of brain infarction were cerebral lobes (63 cases,68), basal ganglia (15 cases, 16.1%) and multiple sites (6 cases, 6.4%). The common affected site was middle cerebral artery territories. 3. The contrast enhancement of acute infarction was noted in 14 cases (17.5%) which occurred commonly between 3 days and 2 weeks from ictus. 4. The patterns of time-density curve in brain infarction and/or ischemia were as follow: a. Depression of slow wash-in phase was 20 cases (59%). b. Lower peak concentration was 17 cases (50%). c. Lower and delayed peak concentration was 7 cases (21%). d. No definite peak concentration was 6 cases (18%). First three patterns of time-density curve were thought as relatively characteristic curve of brain infarction and/or ischemia. 5. Two cases that showed negative findings on precontrast CT scan appeared to be positive findings as hypodensity on postcontrast CT scan and were confirmed as brain infarction by dynamic CT. 6. The diagnostic entity of dynamic CT scan were as follows; a. large artery thrombotic infarction were 23 cases (58%). b. lacnar infarction were 6 cases (15%). c. ischemia were 5 cases (13%). d. normal were 5 cases (13%). In six cases of lacunar infarction which was double hypodensity on pre

  16. Initial experience with FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Cohade, Christian; Mourtzikos, Karen A.; Wahl, Richard L.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2006-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed FDG-PET/CT images in patients with breast cancer to determine whether PET/CT improved the level of diagnostic confidence as compared with PET and to compare PET/CT and CT findings at the location of suspected malignancies. The study included 75 patients with known breast cancer. The initial PET/CT study for each patient was retrospectively reviewed to determine whether improved diagnostic confidence (IDC) regarding lesion localization and characterization was observed with PET/CT as compared with PET alone. PET/CT and CT findings were compared regarding lesion characterization and staging in 69 of the 75 patients, and in the case of discordant findings, comparison with histological or informative follow-up results was also performed. Fifty of the 75 patients exhibited increased FDG uptake in a total of 95 regions. In the comparison of PET/CT and PET, PET/CT resulted in IDC in 30 (60%) of these 50 patients and in 52 (55%) of the 95 regions. In the comparison between PET/CT and CT in 69 patients, PET/CT demonstrated a significantly better accuracy than CT (P<0.05). PET/CT showed definitely positive findings in 60 regions with malignancies, among which CT exhibited positive findings in 43 (72%). PET/CT and CT accurately staged 59 (86%) and 53 (77%) of the 69 patients, respectively. (orig.)

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a ... is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  19. CT of sella after pituitary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, W.; Imhof, H.; Schratter, M.; Knosp, E.

    1986-01-01

    A CT control scan of 32 patients after transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary tumour revealed sellar contents of different density and varying extent. Additional criteria were used to differentiate the intrasellar structures (size, extent, shape, structure, contrast enhancement, bone changes). CT made the definite diagnosis in 6 patients with pituitary tumour recurrence. Hormonal measurements were superior to CT in identifying recurrent tumours in another 3 patients. It is concluded that hormonal methods should be used in evaluating patients after surgery of a hormone-producing tumour. However, CT is the most useful method in detecting tumour recurrence in patients with non-functioning adenomas, and, if an adequate technique is used (coronal scanning, iv-contrast), even clinical asymptomatic tumours can be identified. (orig.) [de

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kattoh, Keiichi; Kawakami, Genichiroh; Igami, Isao; Mariya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Saitoh, Yohko; Tamura, Koreroku; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1986-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has the ability to provide sensitive visualization of organs and lesions. Owing to the nature of CT to be transaxial images, a structure which is greater than a certain size appears as several serial CT images. Consequently each observer must reconstruct those images into a three-dimensional (3-D) form mentally. It has been supposed to be of great use if such a 3-D form can be described as a definite figure. A new computer program has been developed which can produce 3-D figures from the profiles of organs and lesions on CT images using spline curves. The figures obtained through this method are regarded to have practical applications.

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy in head and neck Cancer: a correlation study between suitable uptake value threshold and tumor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yu, Chun-Yen; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Yang, Shih-Neng; Wang, Yao-Ching; Liang, Ji-An; Chien, Chun-Ru; Chen, Shang-Wen

    2010-01-01

    To define a suitable threshold setting for gross tumor volume (GTV) when using 18 Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomogram (PET/CT) for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer (HNC). Fifteen HNC patients prospectively received PET/CT simulation for their radiation treatment planning. Biological target volume (BTV) was derived from PET/CT-based GTV of the primary tumor. The BTVs were defined as the isodensity volumes when adjusting different percentage of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), excluding any artifact from surrounding normal tissues. CT-based primary GTV (C-pGTV) that had been previously defined by radiation oncologists was compared with the BTV. Suitable threshold level (sTL) could be determined when BTV value and its morphology using a certain threshold level was observed to be the best fitness of the C-pGTV. Suitable standardized uptake value (sSUV) was calculated as the sTL multiplied by the SUVmax. Our result demonstrated no single sTL or sSUV method could achieve an optimized volumetric match with the C-pGTV. The sTL was 13% to 27% (mean, 19%), whereas the sSUV was 1.64 to 3.98 (mean, 2.46). The sTL was inversely correlated with the SUVmax [sTL = -0.1004 Ln (SUVmax) + 0.4464; R 2 = 0.81]. The sSUV showed a linear correlation with the SUVmax (sSUV = 0.0842 SUVmax + 1.248; R 2 = 0.89). The sTL was not associated with the value of C-pGTVs. In PET/CT-based BTV for HNC, a suitable threshold or SUV level can be established by correlating with SUVmax rather than using a fixed threshold

  2. Radiotherapy and the importance of CT for the nasopharyngeal squammous cell carcinoma, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Dokiya, Takushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (NPC) were examined with computed tomography (CT) before definitive radiotherapy. CT clearly delincated the extent of the primary tumors. CT frequently showed subtle destruction of the paranasal sinuses and pterygoid plate, which was not usually detected by conventional X-ray examinations. T-staging was made according to the UICC TNM classification system (1978), depending on the clinical findings and the conventional X-ray examinations (non-CT T-stage). Then the non-CT T-stage of each patient was compared with T-stage diagnosed with CT findings alone (CT T-stage). CT upstaged non-CT T-stage in 14 of the 35 patients. Only one patient was downstaged by CT ; this patient had cranial nerve palsy but no detectable bone destruction as shown by CT. Since CT can reveal both bones and abnormal soft tissues well, it is a very useful diagnostic tool for the staging of the tumor assessment of treatment planning. Before radiotherapy, we should use CT to confirm that whether the tumor was located within the radiation field. CT is also useful to see the tumor regression after definitive radiotherapy. We conclude that CT is the single, most reliable imaging method for primary tumors of the NPC patients. (author)

  3. Preoperative examination of potential renal transplant donors: value of gadolinium-enhanced 3D-MR-angiography in comparison with DSA and urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterer, J.T.; Paul, G.; Einert, A.; Altehoefer, C.; Uhrmeister, P.; Laubenberger, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess a contrast-enhanced standardized MRA protocol for the presurgical evaluation of potential renal transplant donors. Methods: Twenty-three potential donors for renal transplantations were examined with gadolinium-enhanced, two-phase MR angiograms (1.5 T) and DSA/urography for the number of renal arteries, the presence of aberrant arterial and venous branches, renal artery stenoses and anatomy of the renal collecting system and ureters. The diagnostic value was assessed by evaluating different image processing modalities and interobserver variability. Results: Using maximum intensity projections (MIP) together with multiplanar reformatting (MPR), accessory arteries were detected with a sensitivity/specificity of 100%/98%. Depending on diagnostic experience, exclusive evaluation of MIP yielded a sensitivitiy/specificity of 67-100%/95-100%. Using MIP/MPR, venous depiction was good in 80%, with MIP solely in 30-40%. At least the proximal third of the ureter was visible in 67%. Conclusion: MPR/MIP evaluation of two-phase, contrast-enhanced MRA provides an excellent depiction of renal vessel anatomy for presurgical evaluation of renal transplant donors. Exclusive MIP assessment is less reliable and depends strongly on the examiner's experience. For sufficient visualization of the ureters, either additional measurements or low-dose diuretic injection have to be performed. (orig.) [de

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) of Intravenous Urography (IVU) and Unenhanced Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) for Initial Investigation of Suspected Acute Ureterolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikefjord, E.; Askildsen, J.E.; Roervik, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is important to compare the cost and effectiveness of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and intravenous urography (IVU) to determine the most cost-effective alternative for the initial investigation of acute ureterolithiasis. Purpose: To analyze the task-specific variable costs combined with the diagnostic effect of MDCT and IVU for patients with acute flank pain, and to determine which is most cost effective. Material and Methods: 119 patients with acute flank pain suggestive of stone disease (ureterolithiasis) were examined by both MDCT and IVU. Variable costs related to medical equipment, consumption material, equipment control, and personnel were calculated. The diagnostic effect was assessed. Results: The variable costs of MDCT versus IVU were EUR 32 and EUR 117, respectively. This significant difference was mainly due to savings in examination time, higher annual examination frequency, lower material costs, and no use of contrast media. As for diagnostic effect, MDCT proved considerably more accurate in the diagnosis of stone disease than IVU and markedly more accurate concerning differential diagnoses. Conclusion: MDCT had lower differential costs and a higher capacity to determine correctly stone disease and differential diagnoses, as compared to IVU, in patients with acute flank pain. Consequently, MDCT is a dominant alternative to IVU when evaluated exclusively from a cost-effective perspective

  5. Urinary Tract Effects After Multifocal Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation of the Kidney: Acute and Chronic Monitoring by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Intravenous Urography and Urinary Cytology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, Johann Jakob, E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Pech, Maciej [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Porsch, Markus; Janitzky, Andreas [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Fischbach, Frank [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Buhtz, Peter; Vogler, Klaus [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Huehne, Sarah [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Borucki, Katrin [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Clinical Chemistry (Germany); Strang, Christof [University of Magdeburg, Department of Anaesthesiology (Germany); Mahnkopf, Dirk [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany); Ricke, Jens [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Liehr, Uwe-Bernd [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a novel potential ablation modality for renal masses. The aim of this study was the first evaluation of NTIRE's effects on the renal urine-collecting system using intravenous urography (IVU) and urinary cytology in addition to histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Eight percutaneous NTIRE ablations of the renal parenchyma, including the calyxes or pelvis, were performed in three male swine. MRI, IVU, histology, and urinary cytology follow-ups were performed within the first 28 days after treatment. Results: MRI and histological analysis demonstrated a localized necrosis 7 days and a localized scarification of the renal parenchyma with complete destruction 28 days after NTIRE. The urine-collecting system was preserved and showed urothelial regeneration. IVU and MRI showed an unaltered normal morphology of the renal calyxes, pelvis, and ureter. A new urinary cytology phenomenon featured a temporary degeneration by individual vacuolization of detached transitional epithelium cells within the first 3 days after NTIRE. Conclusions: This first urographical, urine-cytological, and MRI evaluation after porcine kidney NTIRE shows multifocal parenchyma destruction while protecting the involved urine-collecting system with regenerated urothelial tissue. NTIRE could be used as a targeted ablation method of centrally located renal masses.

  6. Augmented Quadruple-Phase Contrast Media Administration and Triphasic Scan Protocol Increases Image Quality at Reduced Radiation Dose During Computed Tomography Urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Charbel; Mohamad, May; Kerek, Racha; Hamieh, Nadine; Alsheikh Deeb, Ibrahim; El-Achkar, Bassam; Tamim, Hani; Abdul Razzak, Farah; Haddad, Maurice; Abi-Ghanem, Alain S; El-Merhi, Fadi

    The aim of this article was to investigate the opacification of the renal vasculature and the urogenital system during computed tomography urography by using a quadruple-phase contrast media in a triphasic scan protocol. A total of 200 patients with possible urinary tract abnormalities were equally divided between 2 protocols. Protocol A used the conventional single bolus and quadruple-phase scan protocol (pre, arterial, venous, and delayed), retrospectively. Protocol B included a quadruple-phase contrast media injection with a triphasic scan protocol (pre, arterial and combined venous, and delayed), prospectively. Each protocol used 100 mL contrast and saline at a flow rate of 4.5 mL. Attenuation profiles and contrast-to-noise ratio of the renal arteries, veins, and urogenital tract were measured. Effective radiation dose calculation, data analysis by independent sample t test, receiver operating characteristic, and visual grading characteristic analyses were performed. In arterial circulation, only the inferior interlobular arteries in both protocols showed a statistical significance (P contrast-to-noise ratio than protocol A (protocol B: 22.68 ± 13.72; protocol A: 14.75 ± 5.76; P contrast media and triphasic scan protocol usage increases the image quality at a reduced radiation dose.

  7. Comparative study between intravenous urography and renal scintigraphy with DMSA for the diagnosis of renal scars in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa B. Araújo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the value of intravenous urography (IVU in detecting and grading the renal scar, comparing its results with those of scintigraphy with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 43 children investigated by DMSA and IVU, who had vesicoureteral reflux diagnosed and classified through voiding cystourethrography. RESULTS: Among the kidneys with reflux, there was agreement between the results of DMSA and IVU concerning the presence and the absence of scars in 82.4% of the cases. Based on the results obtained, IVU would have a sensitivity of 66.6%, specificity of 94.4%; accuracy of 82.5%; positive predictive value (PPV of 90% and negative predictive value (NPV of 79%, when compared with DMSA results. Our data also confirm the close relation between the reflux grade and the presence of renal scar, since 75% of the kidneys with grade IV and V reflux presented scars. In relation to the grading of nephropathy, in 78% of patients the classification of the scar by both methods was identical. The highest disagreement was verified in the group with segmental scar on DMSA, where 41.6% of the kidneys were classified as normal on IVU. CONCLUSION: The data obtained confirm that the scintigraphy with DMSA is essential in the investigation of patients with renal scar, and cannot be replaced by IVU, due to its low sensitivity and lower ability of satisfactory grading.

  8. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  9. Value of CT in the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, E.K.; Merine, D.S.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Jones, B.

    1989-01-01

    With the increasing use of Ct as a primary imaging modality in the patient with abdominal distress, it is not surprising the CT may be the initial study to suggest the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis. The authors reviewed the CT scans in 16 patients with proved pseudomembranous colitis. In 12 of these cases, the diagnosis was not considered prior to CT. The CT findings included wall thickening (average, 18 mm), definite ulcerations (11 cases), ascites (two cases), and pseudoperforation (three cases). The pseudoperforation is caused by the trapping of contrast material within the large ulcerated mucosal folds and can simulate contrast extravasation. The various CT appearances of pseudomembranous colitis are addressed, as well as the potential difficulty in distinguishing it from other types of colitis

  10. Analysis of 64-row multidetector CT images for preoperative angiographic evaluation of potential living kidney donors; Analyse der mehrphasigen 64-Zeilen-Multidetektor-Computertomographie zur praeoperativen angiographischen Evaluation potenzieller Lebendnierenspender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D.; Andersen, K.; Kroepil, P.; Cohnen, M.; Moedder, U.; Jung, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sandmann, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Gefaesschirurgie und Nierentransplantation, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ivens, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Nephrologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Anatomical imaging and the ascertainment of any anomalies in the renal vessels and the ureters are essential in the planning of a kidney donation. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of 64-row multidetector CT in noninvasive examination of the renal vessels and ureters of potential living kidney donors. The evaluation embraced 63 living renal donors (LNS) who underwent preoperative CT examination from December 2004 to January 2007. The examinations were all carried out using a Somatom Sensation -Cardiac 64 (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). As well as CT angiography (CTA), a venous phase of the abdomen and a late phase after 15 min using low-dose technique were performed for CT urography (CTU). The radiological findings were compared with the surgical results, or with the angiograms in 2 cases. Sensitivity, specificity and both negative and positive predictive value were calculated. In the 63 (31 female, 32 male) donors CTA had a sensitivity of 100% in examination of the main and accessory renal arteries and of 98.3% when the venous and ureteric anatomy were assessed. The sensitivity of low-dose CTU was also 100%. The findings recorded in this study indicate that noninvasive preoperative planning with 64-row multidetector CTA and CTU is a reliable 'one-stop shopping' method of examination for potential living kidney donors. (orig.) [German] Die anatomische Darstellung und Erfassung moeglicher Anomalien der Nierengefaesse und Ureteren ist fuer die Planung einer Lebendnierenspende von essenzieller Bedeutung. Die vorliegende Untersuchung soll die Wertigkeit der nichtinvasiven Evaluation mit der 64-Zeilen-Multidetektor-CT untersuchen. In die Auswertung wurden 63 Lebendnierenspender (LNS) eingeschlossen, die im Zeitraum 12.2004 bis 01.2007 mit der CT praeoperativ untersucht wurden. Die Untersuchungen erfolgten mit einem Somatom-Sensation-Cardiac-64 (Siemens Medical Solutions, Deutschland). Neben einer CT-Angiographie (CTA) wurden eine

  11. CT diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Dehong; Shi Mulan; Luo Douqiang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the CT appearances of thyroid carcinoma and its cervical metastatic lymphadenopathy, as well as to evaluate the diagnostic criteria of tumor invasion of adjacent structures. Methods: CT findings of surgery and pathology proved thyroid carcinoma in 52 patients were analyzed. Results: All of the primary tumor were heterogeneous in density, 32 tumors (82.5%) were ill-defined. Fine granular calcifications were revealed in 11 primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes in 5 cases. Cystic formation with intracystic high density papillary-like nodules were found in 4 primary tumors and metastatic lymphadenopathy in 5 cases. Trachea, esophagus and carotic artery invasion were proved by surgery in 22, 21 and 10 cases respectively. Serrated inner wall and tumor nodule protrusion into tracheal lumen were the definite signs of trachea invasion. Use tumor encasement over 1/2 of the circumference of esophagus and 1/3 of the circumference of carotid artery as the diagnostic criterion of invasion, sensitivity was 71.4%, 100.0% specificity was 96.3%, 95.2% respectively. Conclusion: Fine granular calcification and cystic formation with high attenuation intracystic papillary-like nodules were characteristic manifestations of primary thyroid carcinoma (especially papillary carcinoma) and its metastatic lymphadenopathy as well. Contrast enhanced CT scan is helpful in the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma and the delineation of tumor extent, which is very important in surgical planning

  12. Definition of IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Two definitions of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) are cited: 'Frequent imaging in the treatment room during a course of radiotherapy to guide the treatment process' and 'Any use of planar imaging, volumetric imaging or volumetric cine imaging, marker localization, marker tracking, patient surface imaging or patient surface tracking to improve the precision of radiation-therapy delivery'. Also cited are the sentences 'IGRT refers broadly to treatment delivery using modern imaging methods, such as CT, MRI, PET and Ultrasound, in target and non-target structures and in RT definition, design and delivery...' and 'IGRT includes, but is not limited to, 3DCRT, IMRT: stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic RT, and brachytherapy...'. Purposes include: Precise patient positioning; Automatic localization of bony structures or implanted fiducial markers; Imaging and positioning of soft tissue tumors and critical structures; Margin reduction and healthy organ sparing; and Delivering the desired dose distribution. On the negative side are the following factors: Physics staffing at treatment delivery Longer treatment times: 1 min. arm deployment, setup for scan, 1 min. gantry rotation - volume image acquisition, 30 sec. reconstruction (depends on resolution), 30 sec. load CT and CB into registration; Registration: from few sec. to few min.; Feasible if the number of treatments is low. The history of IGRT is mentioned, instrumentation is described using ample photographs, and many applications are shown. (P.A.)

  13. CT appearance of splenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  14. CT appearance of splenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . diseases or malformations of the skull. CT scanning is also performed ... biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. CT ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT scan, an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ... clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually visible to you, revolve around ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page ... for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist can ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ... particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ... medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... sometimes compared to looking into a loaf of bread by cutting the loaf into thin slices. When ... actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, ... and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images that also show a patient's paranasal ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  2. Computed tomography versus intravenous urography in diagnosis of acute flank pain from urolithiasis: a randomized study comparing imaging costs and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.M.Z.; Maling, T.M.J.; Glocer, J.; Mark, S.; Abbott, C.

    2001-01-01

    The equivalent sensitivity of non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) and intravenous urography (IVU) in the diagnosis of suspected ureteric colic has been established. Approximately 50% of patients with suspected ureteric colic do not have a nephro-urological cause for pain. Because many such patients require further imaging studies, NCCT may obviate the need for these studies and, in so doing, be more cost effective and involve less overall radiation exposure. The present study compares the total imaging cost and radiation dose of NCCT versus IVU in the diagnosis of acute flank pain. Two hundred and twenty-four patients (157 men; mean age 45 years; age range 19-79 years) with suspected renal colic were randomized either to NCCT or IVU. The number of additional diagnostic imaging studies, cost (IVU A$ 136; CTU A$ 173), radiation exposure and imaging times were compared. Of 119(53%) patients with renal obstruction, 105 had no nephro-urological causes of pain. For 21 (20%) of these patients an alternative diagnosis was made at the initial imaging, 10 of which were significant. Of 118 IVU patients, 28 (24%) required 32 additional imaging tests to reach a diagnosis, whereas seven of 106 (6%) NCCT patients required seven additional imaging studies. The average total diagnostic imaging cost for the NCCT group was A$181.94 and A$175.46 for the IVU group (P< 0.43). Mean radiation dose to diagnosis was 5.00 mSv (NCCT) versus 3.50 mSv (IVU) (P < 0.001). Mean imaging time was 30 min (NCCT) versus 75 min (IVU) (P < 0.001). Diagnostic imaging costs were remarkably similar. Although NCCT involves a higher radiation dose than IVU, its advantages of faster diagnosis, the avoidance of additional diagnostic imaging tests and its ability to diagnose other causes makes it the study of choice for acute flank pain at Christchurch Hospital. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Multidetector computed tomography has replaced conventional intravenous excretory urography in imaging of the kidneys: A scoping review of multidetector computed tomography findings in renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntombizakhona B.A. Mthalane

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB is a worldwide infectious disease burden, especially in non-developed countries, with increased morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Extrapulmonary TB is rare and renal TB is one of the commonest manifestations. The end result of renal TB is end-stage renal disease; however, this can be avoided if the diagnosis is made early. The diagnosis of renal TB is challenging because of the non-specific presentation and low sensitivity of clinical tests. Although the sequel of TB infection in the kidney causes varying manifestations depending on the stage of the disease, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT is capable of demonstrating early findings. We performed a 20-year scoping review of MDCT findings in renal TB to promote awareness. Aim: To identify specific MDCT imaging characteristics of renal TB, promote early diagnosis and increase awareness of the typical imaging features. Methods and material: We searched published and unpublished literature from 1997 to 2017 using a combination of search terms on electronic databases. We followed the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 150 articles were identified, of which 145 were found through electronic search engines and 5 were obtained from grey literature. Seventy-nine articles that fulfilled our inclusion criteria were reviewed. These included original research, case reports, literature review, organisational reports and grey literature. Conclusion: Multidetector computed tomography can reproduce images comparable with intravenous excretory urography; together with advantages of being able to better assess the renal parenchyma and surrounding spaces, it is important in suggesting the diagnosis of renal TB and clinicians should consider including MDCT when investigating patients with recurrent urinary tract infection not responding to usual antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Preliminary study on the differentiation between parapelvic cyst and hydronephrosis with non-calculous using only pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Ma, Guangming; Wei, Lequn; Ren, Chenglong; Zhou, Jieli; Shen, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of using the quantitative parameters from only the pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT imaging for distinguishing between parapelvic cyst and hydronephrosis with non-calculous (HNC). Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. 28 patients with parapelvic cyst and 24 patients with HNC who underwent standard pre-contrast and multiphase contrast-enhanced dual-energy spectral CT imaging were retrospectively identified. The parapelvic cyst and HNC were identified using the contrast-enhanced scans, and their CT number in the 70-keV monochromatic images, effective atomic number (Zeff), iodine concentration (IC) and water concentration in the pre-contrast images were measured. The slope of the spectral curve (λ) was calculated. The difference in the measurements between parapelvic cyst and HNC was statistically analyzed using SPSS® v. 19.0 (IBM Corp., New York, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) statistical software. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: The CT numbers in the 70-keV images, Zeff and IC values were statistically different between parapelvic cyst and HNC (all p  0.05). Conclusion: The quantitative parameters obtained in the pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT imaging may be used to differentiate between parapelvic cyst and HNC. Advances in knowledge: The pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT scans may be used to screen parapelvic cysts for patients who are asymptomatic, thereby avoiding contrast-enhanced CT or CT urography examination for these patients to reduce ionizing radiation dose and contrast dose. PMID:28281789

  5. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  6. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine; Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  8. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  18. Functional-anatomic evaluation of dilated uropathies in children using combined MR-nephrography and MR-urography compared to renal scintigraphy; Funktionell-anatomische Diagnostik dilatierter Uropathien bei Kindern mit kombinierter MR-Nephrographie und MR-Urographie im Vergleich zur renalen Isotopennephrographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M. [Abt. fuer bildgebende Diagnostik am Kinderkrankenhaus Park Schoenfeld, Kassel (Germany); Tuerkay, S. [GE Medical Systems Deutschland GmbH, Solingen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Purpose: to evaluate MR-tomographic assessment of split renal function and degree of obstruction compared to diuretic renal scintigraphy, and pathoanatomic imaging of the urinary tract as all in one exam. Patients and methods: in a prospective study 62 children, aged 1 month to 9.5 years, mean 2.8 years, underwent diuretic renal scintigraphy and dynamic MR-nephrography at the same day except for 7 patients with a time interval of 1 day. In all patients we did T2w (water-technique) MR-urography additionally. Results: comparing spilt renal function we found a very close correlation in 54 out of 62 patients (correlation coefficient = 0.95). Due to technical failures 8 cases couldn't be calculated. Comparing degrees of obstruction there was an agreement in 57 out of 62 patients, 3 studies were gradually over-, 2 underestimated. All but one morphologic diagnoses in advance obtained by ultrasound and completed by other imaging modalities later on were confirmed MR-urographically. Though correctly imaged the functionless upper moiety in a renal duplication with ureterocele was misinterpreted at a first glance. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es sollte geprueft werden, ob die Berechnung der seitengetrennten Nierenfunktion, die Bestimmung des Obstruktionsgrades und die pathoanatomische Darstellung des Harntraktes im Vergleich zur Diurese-Szintigraphie in einem Untersuchungsgang MR-tomographisch zuverlaessig moeglich ist. Patienten und Methode: In einer prospektiven Studie wurden bei 62 Kindern im Alter von 1 Monat bis 9,5 Jahren, Mittelwert 2,8 Jahre, ein Diurese-Szintigramm und eine dynamische MR-Nephrographie am gleichen Tag durchgefuehrt; lediglich bei 7 Patienten lag 1 Tag zwischen beiden Untersuchungen. Alle Patienten erhielten zusaetzlich eine T2w-MR-Urographie in ''Wasserbild''-Technik. Ergebnisse: Beim Vergleich der seitengetrennten Nierenfunktion fand sich eine sehr enge Korrelation bei 54 von insgesamt 62 Patienten (Korrelationskoeffizient = 0

  19. Evaluation of CT findings for diagnosis of pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas-Jimenez, J.; Alonso-Charterina, S.; Fernandez-Latorre, F.; Gil-Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Paya, J.; Lloret-Llorens, M.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography studies are usually used to assess patients with pleural effusions, and radiologists should be aware of the significance of different CT findings for the diagnosis of the effusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CT findings for etiological diagnosis of pleural effusions. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest of 211 patients with pleural effusion of definite diagnosis were evaluated. The CT images were evaluated for the presence and extent of pleural effusion, thickening or nodules, extrapleural fat and other changes in the mediastinum or lung. The CT scans were read by two independent observers and correlation between them was evaluated. Comparison of CT findings between benign and malignant effusions, between exudates and transudates, and between empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions were carried out. Kappa values for most CT findings were >0.85. Loculation, pleural thickening, pleural nodules, and extrapleural fat of increased density were only present in exudative effusions. Multiple pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were the only pleural findings limited to malignant pleural effusions. The signs were also more frequently seen in empyemas than in other parapneumonic effusions. Computed tomography findings can help to distinguish between transudates and exudates. Although there is some overlap between benign and malignant pleural effusions, pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were present almost exclusively in the latter. Although differences between CT findings of empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions exist, there is no finding which can definitely differentiate between them. (orig.)

  20. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  1. LD Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning Disability Quarterly, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The position paper (1981) of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities presents a revised definition of learning disabilities and identifies issues and concerns (such as the limitation to children and the exclusion clause) associated with the definition included in P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. (DB)

  2. Dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.M.; Einsiedel, P.; Langenberg, F.; Lui, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in CT technology have produced brighter X-ray sources. gantries capable of increased rotation speeds, faster scintil lation materials arranged into multiple rows of detectors, and associated advances in 3D reconstruction methods. These innovations have allowed multi-detector CT to be turned to the diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities and compliment traditional imaging techniques such as coronary angiography. This study examines the cardiac imaging solution offered by the Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source 64 slice CT scanner. Our dose reduction strategies involve optimising the data acquisition protocols according to diagnostic task, patient size and heart rate. The relationship between scan parameters, image quality and patient dose is examined and verified against measurements with phantoms representing the standard size patient. The dose reduction strategies are reviewed with reference to survey results of patient dose. Some cases allow the insertion of shielding to protect radiosensitive organs, and results are presented to quantify the dose saving.

  3. The sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) scans in detecting trauma: are CT scans reliable enough for courtroom testimony?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, D Kimberley; Nichols, Joanna J; Dimaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Rapid and accurate recognition of traumatic injuries is extremely important in emergency room and surgical settings. Emergency departments depend on computed tomography (CT) scans to provide rapid, accurate injury assessment. We conducted an analysis of all traumatic deaths autopsied at the Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office in which perimortem medical imaging (CT scan) was performed to assess the reliability of the CT scan in detecting trauma with sufficient accuracy for courtroom testimony. Cases were included in the study if an autopsy was conducted, a CT scan was performed within 24 hours before death, and there was no surgical intervention. Analysis was performed to assess the correlation between the autopsy and CT scan results. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were defined for the CT scan based on the autopsy results. The sensitivity of the CT scan ranged from 0% for cerebral lacerations, cervical vertebral body fractures, cardiac injury, and hollow viscus injury to 75% for liver injury. This study reveals that CT scans are an inadequate detection tool for forensic pathologists, where a definitive diagnosis is required, because they have a low level of accuracy in detecting traumatic injuries. CT scans may be adequate for clinicians in the emergency room setting, but are inadequate for courtroom testimony. If the evidence of trauma is based solely on CT scan reports, there is a high possibility of erroneous accusations, indictments, and convictions.

  4. Radiation exposure during CT-guided biopsies: recent CT machines provide markedly lower doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Nika; Forsting, Michael; Ringelstein, Adrian; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel

    2018-03-28

    To examine radiation dose levels of CT-guided interventional procedures of chest, abdomen, spine and extremities on different CT-scanner generations at a large multicentre institute. 1,219 CT-guided interventional biopsies of different organ regions ((A) abdomen (n=516), (B) chest (n=528), (C) spine (n=134) and (D) extremities (n=41)) on different CT-scanners ((I) SOMATOM-Definition-AS+, (II) Volume-Zoom, (III) Emotion6) were included from 2013-2016. Important CT-parameters and standard dose-descriptors were retrospectively examined. Additionally, effective dose and organ doses were calculated using Monte-Carlo simulation, following ICRP103. Overall, radiation doses for CT interventions are highly dependent on CT-scanner generation: the newer the CT scanner, the lower the radiation dose imparted to patients. Mean effective doses for each of four procedures on available scanners are: (A) (I) 9.3mSv versus (II) 13.9mSv (B) (I) 7.3mSv versus (III) 11.4mSv (C) (I) 6.3mSv versus (II) 7.4mSv (D) (I) 4.3mSv versus (II) 10.8mSv. Standard dose descriptors [standard deviation (SD); CT dose index vol (CTDI vol ); dose-length product (DLP body ); size-specific dose estimate (SSDE)] were also compared. Effective dose, organ doses and SSDE for various CT-guided interventional biopsies on different CT-scanner generations following recommendations of the ICRP103 are provided. New CT-scanner generations involve markedly lower radiation doses versus older devices. • Effective dose, organ dose and SSDE are provided for CT-guided interventional examinations. • These data allow identifying organs at risk of higher radiation dose. • Detailed knowledge of radiation dose may contribute to a better individual risk-stratification. • New CT-scanner generations involve markedly lower radiation doses compared to older devices.

  5. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwanseop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kwanseop@hallym.or.kr; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kwangseon [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  6. Goal Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2018-01-01

    The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons...... for carrying out the study, (4) Target audience , (5) Comparative studies to be disclosed to the public and (6) Commissioner of the study and other influential actors. The instructions address both the conduct and reporting of a goal definition and are largely based on the ILCD guidance document (EC...

  7. Unenhanced helical computed tomography vs intravenous urography in patients with acute flank pain: accuracy and economic impact in a randomized prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, S.A.; Deckart, A.; Laschke, S.; Gasser, T.C.; Dellas, S.; Otto, U.; Buitrago, C.; Wiesner, W.; Bongartz, G.; Roth, J.

    2003-01-01

    Unenhanced helical computed tomography (UHCT) has evolved into a well-accepted alternative to intravenous urography (IVU) in patients with acute flank pain and suspected ureterolithiasis. The purpose of our randomized prospective study was to analyse the diagnostic accuracy of UHCT vs IVU in the normal clinical setting with special interest on economic impact, applied radiation dose and time savings in patient management. A total of 122 consecutive patients with acute flank pain suggestive of urolithiasis were randomized for UHCT (n=59) or IVU (n=63). Patient management (time, contrast media), costs and radiation dose were analysed. The films were independently interpreted by four radiologists, unaware of previous findings, clinical history and clinical outcome. Alternative diagnoses if present were assessed. Direct costs of UHCT and IVU are nearly identical (310/309 Euro). Indirect costs are much lower for UHCT because it saves examination time and when performed immediately initial abdominal plain film (KUB) and sonography are not necessary. Time delay between access to the emergency room and start of the imaging procedure was 32 h 7 min for UHCT and 36 h 55 min for IVU. The UHCT took an average in-room time of 23 min vs 1 h 21 min for IVU. Mild to moderate adverse reactions for contrast material were seen in 3 (5%) patients. The UHCT was safe, as no contrast material was needed. The mean applied radiation dose was 3.3 mSv for IVU and 6.5 mSv for UHCT. Alternative diagnoses were identified in 4 (7%) UHCT patients and 3 (5%) IVU patients. Sensitivity and specificity of UHCT and IVU was 94.1 and 94.2%, and 85.2 and 90.4%, respectively. In patients with suspected renal colic KUB and US may be the least expensive and most easily accessable modalities; however, if needed and available, UHCT can be considered a better alternative than IVU because it has a higher diagnostic accuracy and a better economic impact since it is more effective, faster, less expensive and less

  8. Automated quantification of emphysema in CT studies of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, D.C.; deKemp, R.A.; Coblentz, C.L.; Nahmias, C.

    1991-01-01

    Emphysema by definition is a pathologic diagnosis. Recently, in vivo quantification of emphysema from CT with point counting and with a GE 9800 CT scanner program called Density Mask has been described. These methods are laborious and time-consuming, making them unsuitable for screening. The propose of this paper is to create a screening test for emphysema. The authors developed a computer program that quantifies the amount of emphysema from standard CT-scans. The computer was programmed to recognize the lung edges on each section by identifying abrupt changes in CT numbers; grow regions within each lung to identify and separate the lungs from other structures; count regions of lung containing CT numbers measuring <-900 HU corresponding to areas of emphysema; and calculation the percentage of emphysema present from the volume of normal emphysematous lung. The programs were written in C and urn on a Sun 4/100 workstation

  9. Scope Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Laurent, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    The scope definition is the second phase of an LCA. It determines what product systems are to be assessed and how this assessment should take place. This chapter teaches how to perform a scope definition. First, important terminology and key concepts of LCA are introduced. Then, the nine items...... making up a scope definition are elaborately explained: (1) Deliverables. (2) Object of assessment, (3) LCI modelling framework and handling of multifunctional processes, (4) System boundaries and completeness requirements, (5) Representativeness of LCI data, (6) Preparing the basis for the impact...... assessment, (7) Special requirements for system comparisons, (8) Critical review needs and (9) Planning reporting of results. The instructions relate both to the performance and reporting of a scope definition and are largely based on ILCD....

  10. The evaluation of the quality of virtual non-enhanced CT of the kidney%肾脏能谱CT虚拟平扫的图像质量评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭波; 刘姝芩; 侯键; 张玉东; 谢明国

    2017-01-01

    目的:分析比较肾脏常规CT平扫与能谱CT虚拟平扫(VNC)的图像质量,以探讨肾脏能谱CT VNC替代常规CT平扫的可行性.方法:前瞻性搜集行CTU患者26例,所有患者均在常规平扫后开启能谱模式行肾脏动脉期、实质期及排泄期增强扫描,增强扫描图像经后处理分别获得6组VNC图像,即动脉期抑碘图、动脉期水基图、实质期抑碘图、实质期水基图、排泄期抑碘图、排泄期水基图,分别比较常规平扫与6组VNC的噪声、对比噪声比(CNR)、图像质量主观评分及有效辐射剂量.结果:常规平扫分别与6组VNC噪声比较,差异均无统计学意义(均P>0.05);常规平扫分别与6组VNC皮质CNR比较,均大于各期抑碘图(均P0.05);在图像质量主观评分上,6组VNC图像组间差异有统计学意义(P0.05). The difference of cortical CNR between VNC and plain scan was statistically significant (Piodine-suppressed image. The image quality of VNC was slightly worse than plain scan subjectively (P<0.05),with arterial phase iodine-suppressed image being scored the highest. The effective radiation dose was reduced about 27.89% compared to routine contrast enhanced urography CT. Conclusion:The image quality between the CNE and VNC are very high,so that the spectral CT virtual non-enhanced in the CT urinary tract contrast examination can basically replace the conventional CT scan,which can reduce the times of scanning,reduce the patient radiation dose and provide the possibility to further investigate the spectral CT's low dose radiation CT urography imaging scheme.

  11. CT simulation in nodal positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, E.; Schuck, A.; Moustakis, C.; Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Kronholz, H.L.; Willich, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background: A variety of solutions are used to match tangential fields and opposed lymph node fields in irradiation of nodal positive breast cancer. The choice is depending on the technical equipment which is available and the clinical situation. The CT simulation of a non-monoisocentric technique was evaluated in terms of accuracy and reproducibility. Patients, Material and Methods: The field match parameters were adjusted virtually at CT simulation and were compared with parameters derived mathematically. The coordinate transfer from the CT simulator to the conventional simulator was analyzed in 25 consecutive patients. Results: The angles adjusted virtually for a geometrically exact coplanar field match corresponded with the angles calculated for each set-up. The mean isocenter displacement was 5.7 mm and the total uncertainty of the coordinate transfer was 6.7 mm (1 SD). Limitations in the patient set-up became obvious because of the steep arm abduction necessary to fit the 70 cm CT gantry aperture. Required modifications of the arm position and coordinate transfer errors led to a significant shift of the marked matchline of >1.0 cm in eight of 25 patients (32%). Conclusion: The virtual CT simulation allows a precise and graphic definition of the field match parameters. However, modifications of the virtual set-up basically due to technical limitations were required in a total of 32% of cases, so that a hybrid technique was adapted at present that combines virtual adjustment of the ideal field alignment parameters with conventional simulation. (orig.) [de

  12. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Vocal cord paralysis due to extralaryngeal causes : evaluation with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Mo, Jong Hyun; Moon, Sung Hee; Na, Dong Gyu; Byun, Hong Sik; Cho, Jae Min; Han, Boo Kyung; Son, Young Ik; Baek, Chung Whan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the use of CT in patients with vocal cord paralysis due to extralaryngeal causes, and to use CT for the assessment of extralaryngeal diseases causing vocal cord paralysis. We prospectively studied the results of CT in 41 patients with vocal cord paralysis in whom laryngoscopy revealed no laryngeal cause and physical examination demonstrated no definite extralaryngeal cause. The extralaryngeal cause of vocal cord palsy was determined after comprehensive clinical diagnosis. Enhanced CT scans were acquired from the skull base and continued to the level of the aorticopulmonary window. We used CT to assess the detection rate for extralaryngeal causes and to extimate the extent of extralaryngeal disease and the distribution of lesions. CT revealed that in 20 of 41 patients(49%) the extralarygeal causes of vocal paralysis were as follows : thyroid cancer(n=10), nodal disease(n=6), esophageal cancer(n=2), neurogenic tumor(n=1), aortic aneurysm(n=1). Lesions were located on the left side in 13 patients(65%), and in the tracheoesophageal groove in 15(75%). In patients with vocal cord paralysis in whom no definite lesion is seen on physical examination , CT could be a useful primary imaging method for the assessment of extralaryngeal causes

  14. CT of Mirizzi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Fukushima, Keisuke; Ishihara, Kenji; Hirano, Yutaka; Sano, Kaizo

    1983-01-01

    PTC or ERCP findings of four cases of Mirizzi syndrome were demonstrated. They consisted of a smooth stricture of the common hepatic duct, curved impressions of the duct and dilatation of proximal biliary radicles. CT could visualize the impacted stone in the neck of the gallbladder, dilatation of proximal common hepatic and intrahepatic duct. Absence of the dilatation of distal common bile duct could also be confirmed by CT, thus the diagnosis of Mirizzi syndrome might be possible by CT. (author)

  15. CT imaging of necrosive fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, M.; Overkamp, D.; Joanoviciu, S.; Horger, M.

    2008-01-01

    NF is a rare but dramatic and often fatal infection of the fascii and adjoining soft tissues. Contrary to the Fournier's definition, it is most common in elderly people. Patients with immune problems have a higher risk (e.g. Diabetes mellitus, alcohol or drug abuse, AIDS, leukaemia, chemotherapy and immunosuppressive medication). Predisposition factors are diverticulitis, insect bites, or surgical interventions (Uppot RN, Levy HM, PLatel PH, Radiology 2003; 226; 115; Wysoki MG, Santora TA, Shah RM et al. Necrotizing fasciitis: CT characteristics, Radiology 1997; 203;859). Men are affected more frequently than women. In principle, NF may occur everywhere in the body but incidence in the region of the scrotum, perineum and lower extremities are the most common. (orig.)

  16. Coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Coronary CT angiography has attained increasing scientific attention at academic institutions and has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality. Extending this knowledge into a practice setting is the purpose of 'Coronary CT Angiography'. This book will assist you in integrating cardiac CT into your daily practice, while also giving an overview of the current technical status and applications. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors are also presented providing an objective overview of noninvasive coronary angiography using CT. (orig.)

  17. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  19. Retractile mesenteritis in a 12-year-old girl: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, D.; Chiba, S.

    1997-01-01

    We report a pathologically proven case of retractile mesenteritis in a 12-year-old girl. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a large mass of fat density completely circumscribing the colon. Although the definitive diagnosis of retractile mesenteritis depends on histopathological findings, recognition of CT features is helpful in the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  20. Evaluation of the efficiency of FDG PET/CT in detection and characterization of skeletal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Wafaie

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Fused PET/CT was highly efficient in evaluation of skeletal metastases with superior performance in: detection of early bone marrow infiltration not apparent on CT, resolution of metabolic activity before definite signs of complete healing on CT, detection of missed sclerotic metastases on PET due to their relatively low metabolic activity, detection of intra and extra osseous recurrence and differentiation of benign from malignant bone lesions.

  1. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  9. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.).

  10. Tuberculous peritonitis: CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, R.D.; Hunter, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Rare, sporadic cases of tuberculous peritonitis do occur in the United States and other advanced countries. Because there are few descriptions of the CT appearance of the peritoneal forms of tuberculous (TB), this report illustrates a case of tuberculous peritonitis with prominent CT findings and discusses the differentiation of this entity from other, more common diseases

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of the sinuses is now widely available and is performed in a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should ... for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of the sinuses is now widely available ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or nurse at the time of the CT examination. If your child has a known contrast material ... be given to your child for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ...

  16. CT of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, B.G.; Federle, M.P.; Minagi, H.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive cases of surgically proved splenic injuries were evaluated by CT. CT correctly identified 54 splenic injuries, with one false-negative and three false-positive studies. In the single false-negative study and in two of the three false-positive studies, CT correctly indicated the presence of a large hemoperitoneum and other abdominal visceral lacerations and so correctly indicated the need for surgery. Of the 55 proved cases of splenic injury, CT revealed hemoperitoneum in 54 (99%), perisplenic clot in 47 (85%), splenic laceration in 39 (71%), and subcapsular hematoma in 13 (24%). Perisplenic clot can be distinguished from lysed blood in the peritoneal cavity and is a sensitive and specific sign of splenic trauma, even in the absence of visible splenic laceration. The authors conclude that CT is highly reliable means of evaluating splenic trauma

  17. CT of abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The imaging search for a suspected abdominal abscess is common in hospitalized patients, especially after recent abdominal surgery. This paper examines the role of CT in the detection, localization, and treatment of abdominal abscess. The accuracy, limitations, and technical aspects of CT in this clinical setting are discussed. The diagnosis of an abscess is based on the demonstration of a circumscribed abnormal fluid collection. Although percutaneous aspiration with gram stain and culture is usually indicated to differentiate abscess from other fluid collections, the CT-based detection of extraluminal gas bubbles makes the diagnosis of an abscess highly likely. CT is compared with conventional radiographic studies, US, and radio-nuclide imaging. Specific CT and clinical features of abscesses in the following sites are emphasized: subphrenic space, liver, pancreas, kidneys, psoas muscle, appendix, and colonic diverticula. Most abdominal abscesses can be successfully treated with percutaneous drainage techniques. The techniques, results, and limitations of percutaneous abscess drainage are reviewed

  18. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  19. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  20. CT of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has made a significant contribution to the radiologic assessment of the injured larynx. CT is an accurate, noninvasive modality that can rapidly diagnose both soft tissue and cartilaginous injuries. CT of the larynx involves a minimal degree of patient manipulation and discomfort and can be performed in conjunction with CT evaluation of intracranial or facial injuries. Conventional radiologic studies (anteroposterior and lateral soft tissue films of the neck, tomograms, or xerograms) are capable of demonstrating some cartilaginous fractures but are of limited value in defining the extent of soft tissue injury. In the acute trauma setting, laryngography is often technically difficult to perform because of patient discomfort and inability to cooperate. Although the overall experience is somewhat limited, CT appears to overcome many of the limitations of these conventional radiologic methods. The following is a discussion of the role of CT scanning in evaluating injuries to the larynx and cervical soft tissues

  1. The ratio of ICRP103 to ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT: Monte Carlo calculations with the ADELAIDE voxel paediatric model and comparisons with published values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ADELAIDE voxel model of paediatric anatomy was used with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to compare effective dose from computed tomography (CT) calculated with both the ICRP103 and ICRP60 definitions which are different in their tissue weighting factors and in the included tissues. The new tissue weighting factors resulted in a lower effective dose for pelvis CT (than if calculated using ICRP60 tissue weighting factors), by 6.5 % but higher effective doses for all other examinations. ICRP103 calculated effective dose for CT abdomen + pelvis was higher by 4.6 %, for CT abdomen (by 9.5 %), for CT chest + abdomen + pelvis (by 6 %), for CT chest + abdomen (by 9.6 %), for CT chest (by 10.1 %) and for cardiac CT (by 11.5 %). These values, along with published values of effective dose from CT that were calculated for both sets of tissue weighting factors were used to determine single values for the ratio ICRP103:ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT, for seven CT examinations. The following values for ICRP103:ICRP60 are suggested for use to convert ICRP60 calculated effective dose to ICRP103 calculated effective dose for the following CT examinations: Pelvis CT, 0.75; for abdomen CT, abdomen + pelvis CT, chest + abdomen + pelvis CT, 1.00; for chest + abdomen CT, and for chest CT. 1.15; for cardiac CT 1.25.

  2. Dual tracer functional imaging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and 18F-FDG PET-CT: competitive or complimentary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Karunanithi, Sellam; Reddy, Rama Mohan; Patnecha, Manish; Lata, Sneh; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT with F-FDG PET/CT in the patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Data of 51 patients with definite histological diagnosis of GEP-NET who underwent both Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT within a span of 15 days were selected for this retrospective analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT, and results were compared both on patientwise and regionwise analysis. Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT on patientwise analysis (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT only for lymph node metastases (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT detected more liver and skeletal lesions compared with F-FDG PET-CT, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, the results of combined imaging helped in selecting candidates who would undergo the appropriate mode of treatment, whether octreotide therapy or conventional chemotherapy Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT seems to be superior to F-FDG PET-CT for imaging GEP-NETs. However, their role seems to be complementary because combination of Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT in such patients helps demonstrate the total disease burden and segregate them to proper therapeutic groups.

  3. Gd-DTPA-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MR urography after low-dose diuretic injection; T{sub 1}-gewichtete MR-Ausscheidungsurographie mittels Gd-DTPA und vorheriger niedrigdosierter Gabe eines Diuretikums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Buecker, A.; Adam, G.; Neuerburg, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-09-01

    Purpose: Assessment of the morphology of the urinary tract by gadolinium(Gd)-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MR-urography (MRU) and precontrast diuretic injection. Methods: MRU was performed in 5 patients using Gd-DTPA-enhanced coronal T{sub 1}-weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences with different spatial resolution. Prior to contrast injection, 10 mg of furosemide were administered intravenously. Results: Secondary to the precontrast furosemide injection, the increase of the renal excretion rate allows complete visualisation of the entire collecting system within 10 minutes following Gd injection. Maximum intensity projections provide a three-dimensional overview of the ureters separate from the bladder. To achieve detailed anatomic imaging of the calices, both optimal distension and high resolution sequences are prerequisites which cannot be realized by means of survey urograms only. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der Morphologie der ableitenden Harnwege mittels T{sub 1}-gewichteter MR-Urographie (MRU) nach Gabe eines nierengaengigen Gadolinium(Gd)-Chelates und vorheriger Diuretikumapplikation. Methoden: Der Harntrakt von 5 Patienten wurde nach Injektion von Gd-DTPA mit koronaren T{sub 1}-gewichteten 3D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen unterschiedlicher Ortsaufloesung untersucht. Vor der Kontrastmittelgabe wurden jeweils 10 mg Furosemid intravenoes verabreicht. Ergebnisse: Nach initialer Steigerung des Harnflusses durch Furosemidgabe wurden Uebersichtsurogramme mit vollstaendig durchzeichnenden Ureteren bereits 10 min nach Gd-Injektion erzielt. Maximumintensitaetsprojektionen ermoeglichten die Beurteilung des dreidimensionalen Verlaufes der Ureteren ohne Blasenueberlagerung. Eine genauere anatomische Darstellung der Nierenkelche erforderte neben einem guten Fuellungszustand eine moeglichst hohe Sequenzaufloesung, die mit Uebersichtsurogrammen allein nicht zu erreichen war. (orig./AJ)

  4. CT of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances based upon the detector elements instead of X-ray film have greatly increased the power of X-ray imaging. Computed tomography (CT) creates cross sectional rather than projected images. Recently, high speed CT devices have been developed for cardiovascular studies. The Cine-CT scanner employs a scanning electron beam deflected on an extended tungsten target ring. Fast scans of 50 millisecond exposures at multiple levels can provide information concerning blood flow in vessels and tissues, myocardial wall motion, valve integrity, coronary bypass graft patency and proximal coronary artery anatomy. Cine-CT dynamic scanning can also provide volume imaging with small quantities (0.05 - 1.5 ml/kg) of contrast medium administered via peripheral vein injections. Cine-CT provides simultaneous measurements of cardiac dimensions and function and is rapidly becoming a new tool for quantitating myocardial blood flow, cardiac chamber volumes and wall mechanics. The future outlook is very promising for this three-dimensional cine-CT technique with high spatial resolution. High speed CT should provide unique diagnostic information and as the technology continues to improve at a rapid speed, this new imaging modality could be a challenge for angiography. (Auth.)

  5. Development of a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma and selection of the reference CT films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huashi; Tamura, Taro; Kusaka, Yukinori; Suganuma, Narufumi; Subhannachart, Ponglada; Vijitsanguan, Chomphunut; Noisiri, Weeraya; Hering, Kurt G.; Akira, Masanori; Itoh, Harumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: International experts developed a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma for radiologists and physicians. It is intended that it act as a supplement to the current International Classification of HRCT for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases. Methods: The research literatures on mesothelioma CT features were systematically reviewed. Ten mesothelioma CT features were adopted into the guideline prepared according to experts’ opinion. The terminology of mesothelioma CT features and mesothelioma probability were agreed by consensus of experts. The CT reference films for each mesothelioma feature were selected based on agreement by experts from 22 definite mesothelioma cases confirmed pathologically and immunohistochemically. To support the validity of the mesothelioma probability, 4 experts’ readings of CT films from 57 cases with or without mesothelioma were analyzed by kappa statistics between the experts; sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were also assessed. Results: The mesothelioma CT Guideline was developed, providing the terminology of CT features and the mesothelioma probability, the judgement of severity, the distribution of mesothelioma, and the revised CT reading sheet including mesothelioma items. The CT reference films with ten mesothelioma typical features were selected. The average linearly and quadratically weighted kappa of the agreement on the 4-point scale mesothelioma probability were 0.58 and 0.71, respectively. The average sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were 93.2% and 65.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The evidence-based mesothelioma CT Guideline developed may serve as a good educational tool to facilitate physicians in recognising mesothelioma and improve their proficiency in diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  6. Development of a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma and selection of the reference CT films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huashi, E-mail: zhouhua@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Tamura, Taro, E-mail: tarou@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Kusaka, Yukinori, E-mail: kusakayk@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi, E-mail: nsuganuma@kochi-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi University School of Medicine (Japan); Subhannachart, Ponglada, E-mail: pongladas@gmail.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Vijitsanguan, Chomphunut, E-mail: Chompoo_vj@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Noisiri, Weeraya, E-mail: weeraya_tat@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Hering, Kurt G., E-mail: k.g.hering@t-online.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Radiological Clinic, Miner' s Hospital, Radiologische Klinik, Lansppaschaftskranhaus Dortmund, Wieckesweg 27 44309, Dortmund (Germany); Akira, Masanori, E-mail: akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Itoh, Harumi, E-mail: hitoh@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki Matsuoka, Eiheizi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: International experts developed a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma for radiologists and physicians. It is intended that it act as a supplement to the current International Classification of HRCT for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases. Methods: The research literatures on mesothelioma CT features were systematically reviewed. Ten mesothelioma CT features were adopted into the guideline prepared according to experts’ opinion. The terminology of mesothelioma CT features and mesothelioma probability were agreed by consensus of experts. The CT reference films for each mesothelioma feature were selected based on agreement by experts from 22 definite mesothelioma cases confirmed pathologically and immunohistochemically. To support the validity of the mesothelioma probability, 4 experts’ readings of CT films from 57 cases with or without mesothelioma were analyzed by kappa statistics between the experts; sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were also assessed. Results: The mesothelioma CT Guideline was developed, providing the terminology of CT features and the mesothelioma probability, the judgement of severity, the distribution of mesothelioma, and the revised CT reading sheet including mesothelioma items. The CT reference films with ten mesothelioma typical features were selected. The average linearly and quadratically weighted kappa of the agreement on the 4-point scale mesothelioma probability were 0.58 and 0.71, respectively. The average sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were 93.2% and 65.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The evidence-based mesothelioma CT Guideline developed may serve as a good educational tool to facilitate physicians in recognising mesothelioma and improve their proficiency in diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  7. CT pelvimetry. La scanopelvimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicens, J.L.; Charles, G.; Le Berre, J.; Flageat, J. (Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (FR))

    1989-01-01

    Pelvimetry aims at providing the obstetrician with information on the size and morphology of the female pelvis, thus enabling him to assess the obstetrical prognosis as accurately as possible. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages, in particular the lower mother and fetus radiation dose. After a brief description of obstetrical anatomy, the usual CT exploration method is presented and its results are considered in terms of measurements, indices and morphological findings. If performed with a very strict exploration procedure, CT pelvimetry is a very reliable, fact and comfortable method of examination. All these advantages, combined with the minimized patient dose, should lead to an increasingly widespread use of this technique.

  8. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  9. NMR-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Sato, Kozo; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Masataka.

    1983-01-01

    A brief explanation is made on the imaging methods for a practical diagnostic NMR-CT scanner : A whole-body NMR-CT scanner utilizing a resistive magnet has been developed by Toshiba in cooperation with the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. Typical NMR-CT images of volunteers and patients obtained in the clinical experiments using this device are presented. Detailed specifications are also shown about the practical NMR-CTs which are to be put on the market after obtaining the government approval. (author)

  10. Dual energy cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Granillo, Gastón

    2017-06-01

    Conventional single energy CT suffers from technical limitations related to the polychromatic nature of X-rays. Dual energy cardiac CT (DECT) shows promise to attenuate and even overcome some of these limitations, and might broaden the scope of patients eligible for cardiac CT towards the inclusion of higher risk patients. This might be achieved as a result of both safety (contrast reduction) and physiopathological (myocardial perfusion and characterization) issues. In this article, we will review the main clinical cardiac applications of DECT, that can be summarized in two core aspects: coronary artery evaluation, and myocardial evaluation.

  11. Optimal gross tumor volume definition in lung-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy for pleural mesothelioma: an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticella, Angela; Defraene, Gilles; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Deroose, Christophe M; Coolen, Johan; Nafteux, Philippe; Peeters, Stephanie; Ricardi, Umberto; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    The gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is ill-defined. We therefore investigated which imaging modality is optimal: computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IVC), positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen consecutive patients with untreated stage I-IV MPM were included. Patients with prior pleurodesis were excluded. CT with IVC, 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI (T2 and contrast-enhanced T1) were obtained. CT was rigidly co-registered with PET/CT and with MRI. Three sets of pleural GTVs were defined: GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI . Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the contoured GTVs were performed. Compared to CT-based GTV definition, PET/CT identified additional tumor sites (defined as either separate nodules or greater extent of a known tumor) in 12/16 patients. Compared to either CT or PET/CT, MRI identified additional tumor sites in 15/16 patients (p = .7). The mean GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI [±standard deviation (SD)] were 630.1 cm 3 (±302.81), 640.23 cm 3 (±302.83) and 660.8 cm 3 (±290.8), respectively. Differences in mean volumes were not significant. The mean Jaccard Index was significantly lower in MRI-based contours versus all the others. As MRI identified additional pleural disease sites in the majority of patients, it may play a role in optimal target volume definition.

  12. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ... information is needed to determine the extent of soft tissue of the tumor, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic, or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... wear during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... wear during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... wear during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... that lasts for at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... that lasts for at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... hard time staying still, are claustrophobic, or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... hard time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... still, are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT ... iodine is extremely rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Because children are ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT ... iodine is extremely rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Because children are ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT of the sinuses is primarily used to: help diagnose sinusitis . evaluate sinuses that are filled with ... elevated. Straps and pillows may be used to help the patient maintain the correct position and to ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. Tell your ... emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has ...

  9. CT diagnosis of hepatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Yuji [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-04-01

    In hepatocellular carcinoma, present status of CT diagnosis was discussed. Hepatocellular carcinoma is sometimes imaged in same concentration as that of surrounding tissues, and the detection rate ranged from 79 to 94%. The rate of differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic carcinoma was only 83% (includes 22% of false diagnosis) using contrast enhancement. The rates of detection of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic one were also only 87% and 75%, respectively, even by the combined use of arterial infusion CT and dynamic CT. However, the CT images is reproducible, and is supplemented by the information of US. Thus, the combination of these methods is useful in diagnosing the presence, extension, and nature of liver carcinoma.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should ... can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of the sinuses is now widely available ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... treatments. plan for and assess the results of surgery, such as organ transplants. stage, plan and properly ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... as: infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease ... caused by a burst appendix or an infected fluid collection and the subsequent spread of infection. CT ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  17. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... is painless, noninvasive and accurate. It’s also the most reliable imaging technique for determining if the sinuses ... CT scan of the sinuses, the patient is most commonly positioned lying flat on the back. The ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page This page was reviewed ... GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal Cancer Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen ...

  2. Heart CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make to decrease the risk of heart disease. Risks Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the examination table will move during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral ... and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal Cancer Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... should always inform their physician and the CT technologist if there is any possibility that they may ... located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. It’s ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. If ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

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    Full Text Available ... in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

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