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Sample records for ct number accuracy

  1. SU-F-J-205: Effect of Cone Beam Factor On Cone Beam CT Number Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, W; Hua, C; Farr, J; Brady, S; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the suitability of a Catphan™ 700 phantom for image quality QA of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system deployed for proton therapy. Methods: Catphan phantoms, particularly Catphan™ 504, are commonly used in image quality QA for CBCT. As a newer product, Catphan™ 700 offers more tissue equivalent inserts which may be useful for generating the electron density – CT number curve for CBCT based treatment planning. The sensitometry-and-geometry module used in Catphan™ 700 is located at the end of the phantom and after the resolution line pair module. In Catphan™ 504 the line pair module is located at the end of the phantom and after the sensitometry-and-geometry module. To investigate the effect of difference in location on CT number accuracy due to the cone beam factor, we scanned the Catphan™ 700 with the central plane of CBCT at the center of the phantom, line pair and sensitometry-andgeometry modules of the phantom, respectively. The protocol head and thorax scan modes were used. For each position, scans were repeated 4 times. Results: For the head scan mode, the standard deviation (SD) of the CT numbers of each insert under 4 repeated scans was up to 20 HU, 11 HU, and 11 HU, respectively, for the central plane of CBCT located at the center of the phantom, line pair, and sensitometry-and-geometry modules of the phantom. The mean of the SD was 9.9 HU, 5.7 HU, and 5.9 HU, respectively. For the thorax mode, the mean of the SD was 4.5 HU, 4.4 HU, and 4.4 HU, respectively. The assessment of image quality based on resolution and spatial linearity was not affected by imaging location changes. Conclusion: When the Catphan™ 700 was aligned to the center of imaging region, the CT number accuracy test may not meet expectations. We recommend reconfiguration of the modules.

  2. Tin-filter enhanced dual-energy-CT: image quality and accuracy of CT numbers in virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Sauter, Alexander; Spira, Daniel; Gatidis, Sergios; Ketelsen, Dominik; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D; Thomas, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    To measure and compare the objective image quality of true noncontrast (TNC) images with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images acquired by tin-filter-enhanced, dual-source, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of upper abdomen. Sixty-three patients received unenhanced abdominal CT and enhanced abdominal DECT (100/140 kV with tin filter) in portal-venous phase. VNC images were calculated from the DECT datasets using commercially available software. The mean attenuation of relevant tissues and image quality were compared between the TNC and VNC images. Image quality was rated objectively by measuring image noise and the sharpness of object edges using custom-designed software. Measurements were compared using Student two-tailed t-test. Correlation coefficients for tissue attenuation measurements between TNC and VNC were calculated and the relative deviations were illustrated using Bland-Altman plots. Mean attenuation differences between TNC and VNC (HUTNC - HUVNC) image sets were as follows: right liver lobe -4.94 Hounsfield units (HU), left liver lobe -3.29 HU, vena cava -2.19 HU, spleen -7.46 HU, pancreas 1.29 HU, fat -11.14 HU, aorta 1.29 HU, bone marrow 36.83 HU (all P VNC and TNC series were observed for liver, vena portae, kidneys, pancreas, muscle and bone marrow (Pearson's correlation coefficient ≥0.75). Mean image noise was significantly higher in TNC images (P VNC and TNC images (P = .19). The Hounsfield units in VNC images closely resemble TNC images in the majority of the organs of the upper abdomen (kidneys, liver, pancreas). In spleen and fat, Hounsfield numbers in VNC images are tend to be higher than in TNC images. VNC images show a low image noise and satisfactory edge sharpness. Other criteria of image quality and the depiction of certain lesions need to be evaluated additionally. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accuracy of Dual-Energy Virtual Monochromatic CT Numbers: Comparison between the Single-Source Projection-Based and Dual-Source Image-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueguchi, Takashi; Ogihara, Ryota; Yamada, Sachiko

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the accuracy of dual-energy virtual monochromatic computed tomography (CT) numbers obtained by two typical hardware and software implementations: the single-source projection-based method and the dual-source image-based method. A phantom with different tissue equivalent inserts was scanned with both single-source and dual-source scanners. A fast kVp-switching feature was used on the single-source scanner, whereas a tin filter was used on the dual-source scanner. Virtual monochromatic CT images of the phantom at energy levels of 60, 100, and 140 keV were obtained by both projection-based (on the single-source scanner) and image-based (on the dual-source scanner) methods. The accuracy of virtual monochromatic CT numbers for all inserts was assessed by comparing measured values to their corresponding true values. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the dependency of measured CT numbers on tissue attenuation, method, and their interaction. Root mean square values of systematic error over all inserts at 60, 100, and 140 keV were approximately 53, 21, and 29 Hounsfield unit (HU) with the single-source projection-based method, and 46, 7, and 6 HU with the dual-source image-based method, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed that the interaction between the attenuation and the method had a statistically significant effect on the measured CT numbers at 100 and 140 keV. There were attenuation-, method-, and energy level-dependent systematic errors in the measured virtual monochromatic CT numbers. CT number reproducibility was comparable between the two scanners, and CT numbers had better accuracy with the dual-source image-based method at 100 and 140 keV. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CT number of the fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kawai, Takeshi; Kanasaki, Yoshiki; Akagi, Hiroaki

    1981-01-01

    This report is studied on CT number and CT images of the eight cases with fatty liver. Five of these cases showed the reversal of densities of the liver and vessels. In these cases, the diagnoses of the fatty liver were easible. In other cases, the diagnoses were possible only by comparison of the CT number of the liver and spleen because the CT number of normal liver were higher than those of the spleen. In the results which we examined the correlation of the CT number and specific gravities of the blood, normal saline, distilled water, mayonnaise, eatable iol, ethyl alcohol and lard, we observed the linear relationship between CT number and specific gravities. And so, we think that the diagnosis of the fatty liver and the degree of fatty infiltration can be guessed by the CT number of the liver and spleen. (author)

  5. The effect of the cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers

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    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Koide, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Shimote, Koichi; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro (Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The effects of the cranial size and the computed tomography (CT) numbers of the cranial bone on that of the brain were studied in 70 subjects, aged from 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and showed no abnormalities in the central nervous system upon physical examinations and a CT scan. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39 cm{sup 2}) at the bilateral thalamus and at twelve areas of the deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size, and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. The effect of the cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers was statistically significant. The brain CT numbers increased with the increase in the cranial bone CT numbers. There was, however, no significant correlation between brain CT numbers and cranial size. In measuring the brain CT numbers, it is desirable that consideration be given to the cranial bone CT numbers. (author).

  6. Transthoracic CT-guided biopsy with multiplanar reconstruction image improves diagnostic accuracy of solitary pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Takenaka, Daisuke; Imai, Masatake; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) image for CT-guided biopsy and determine factors of influencing diagnostic accuracy and the pneumothorax rate. Materials and methods: 390 patients with 396 pulmonary nodules underwent transthoracic CT-guided aspiration biopsy (TNAB) and transthoracic CT-guided cutting needle core biopsy (TCNB) as follows: 250 solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) underwent conventional CT-guided biopsy (conventional method), 81 underwent CT-fluoroscopic biopsy (CT-fluoroscopic method) and 65 underwent conventional CT-guided biopsy in combination with MPR image (MPR method). Success rate, overall diagnostic accuracy, pneumothorax rate and total procedure time were compared in each method. Factors affecting diagnostic accuracy and pneumothorax rate of CT-guided biopsy were statistically evaluated. Results: Success rates (TNAB: 100.0%, TCNB: 100.0%) and overall diagnostic accuracies (TNAB: 96.9%, TCNB: 97.0%) of MPR were significantly higher than those using the conventional method (TNAB: 87.6 and 82.4%, TCNB: 86.3 and 81.3%) (P<0.05). Diagnostic accuracy were influenced by biopsy method, lesion size, and needle path length (P<0.05). Pneumothorax rate was influenced by pathological diagnostic method, lesion size, number of punctures and FEV1.0% (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of MPR for CT-guided lung biopsy is useful for improving diagnostic accuracy with no significant increase in pneumothorax rate or total procedure time

  7. The accuracy of after-hour registrar computed tomography (CT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-16

    May 16, 2014 ... tomography (CT) reporting in a South African tertiary teaching hospital. Authors: ... The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of after-hour registrar CT reporting, to identify possible factors that may .... The authors declare that they have no financial or personal relationship(s) that may have ...

  8. Comparison of CT numbers between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    To compare the CT numbers on 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) images with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT) image using CT phantom and to develop linear regressive equations using CT numbers to material density for all the CT scanner each. Mini CT phantom comprised of five 1 inch thick cylindrical models with 1.125 inches diameter of materials with different densities (polyethylene, polystyrene, plastic water, nylon and acrylic) was used. It was scanned in 3 CBCTs (i-CAT, Alphard VEGA, Implagraphy SC) and 1 MDCT (Somatom Emotion). The images were saved as DICOM format and CT numbers were measured using OnDemand 3D. CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images were compared and linear regression analysis was performed for the density, ρ(g/cm 3 ), as the dependent variable in terms of the CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were smaller than those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image (p<0.05). Linear relationship on a range of materials used for this study were ρ=0.001 H+1.07 with R2 value of 0.999 for Somatom Emotion, ρ=0.002 H+1.09 with R2 value of 0.991 for Alphard VEGA, ρ=0.001 H+1.43 with R2 value of 0.980 for i-CAT and ρ=0.001 H+1.30 with R2 value of 0.975 for Implagraphy. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were not same as those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image. The linear regressive equations to determine the density from the CT numbers with very high correlation coefficient were obtained on three CBCT and MDCT scan.

  9. Comparison of CT numbers between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    To compare the CT numbers on 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) images with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT) image using CT phantom and to develop linear regressive equations using CT numbers to material density for all the CT scanner each. Mini CT phantom comprised of five 1 inch thick cylindrical models with 1.125 inches diameter of materials with different densities (polyethylene, polystyrene, plastic water, nylon and acrylic) was used. It was scanned in 3 CBCTs (i-CAT, Alphard VEGA, Implagraphy SC) and 1 MDCT (Somatom Emotion). The images were saved as DICOM format and CT numbers were measured using OnDemand 3D. CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images were compared and linear regression analysis was performed for the density, {rho}(g/cm{sup 3}), as the dependent variable in terms of the CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were smaller than those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image (p<0.05). Linear relationship on a range of materials used for this study were {rho}=0.001 H+1.07 with R2 value of 0.999 for Somatom Emotion, {rho}=0.002 H+1.09 with R2 value of 0.991 for Alphard VEGA, {rho}=0.001 H+1.43 with R2 value of 0.980 for i-CAT and {rho}=0.001 H+1.30 with R2 value of 0.975 for Implagraphy. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were not same as those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image. The linear regressive equations to determine the density from the CT numbers with very high correlation coefficient were obtained on three CBCT and MDCT scan.

  10. CT numbers of liver and spleen in normal children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kim

    2002-01-01

    To determine the mean liver CT numbers, and differences between liver and spleen, and liver and back muscle CT numbers in normal children, and to correlate the findings with sex and age. One hundred and five normal children aged 2-14 years underwent pre-contrast CT scanning. Mean CT numbers of the liver, spleen, and back muscles were calculated, as well as the differences in CT numbers between the liver and spleen (liver-spleen CT numbers), and between the liver-back muscle CT numbers were 70.22±6.51 HU, 53.28±3.57 HU, 17.13±6.57 HU, and 11.88±5.94 HU, respectively. Mean liver CT numbers and the difference between liver and back muscle CT numbers were not different by age. By sex, all the CT numbers did not vary according to age. The sex of a subject did not affect the CT number. The children's mean liver CT number was 70.22±6.51 HU and the difference between liver and spleen CT numbers was 17.13±6.57 HU. Younger children had higher liver CT and liver-spleen CT numbers than older children. No CT numbers varied according to sex

  11. Accuracy of radiographer reporting of paediatric brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Andrew; Louw, Brand; Dekker, Gerrit; Andronikou, Savvas; Wieselthaler, Nicki; Kilborn, Tracy; Bertelsman, Jessica; Dreyer, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Radiographer reporting has been studied for plain films and for ultrasonography, but not in paediatric brain CT in the emergency setting. To study the accuracy of radiographer reporting in paediatric brain CT. We prospectively collected 100 paediatric brain CT examinations. Films were read from hard copies using a prescribed tick sheet. Radiographers with 12 years' and 3 years' experience, respectively, were blinded to the history and were not trained in diagnostic film interpretation. The radiographers' results were compared with those of a consultant radiologist. Three categories were defined: abnormal scans, significant abnormalities and insignificant abnormalities. Both radiographers had an accuracy of 89.5% in reading a scan correctly as abnormal, and radiographer 1 had a sensitivity of 87.8% and radiographer 2 a sensitivity of 96%. Radiographer 1 had an accuracy in detecting a significant abnormality of 75% and radiographer 2 an accuracy of 48.6%, and the sensitivities for this category were 61.6% and 52.9%, respectively. Results for detecting the insignificant abnormalities were poorer. Selected radiographers could play an effective screening role, but lacking the sensitivity required for detecting significant abnormality, they could not be the final diagnostician. We recommend that the study be repeated after both radiographers have received formal training in interpretation of paediatric brain CT. (orig.)

  12. Influence of chamber misalignment on cased telescoped (CT ammunition accuracy

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    D. Corriveau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of a research program, it was desired to better understand the impact of the rotating chamber alignment with the barrel throat on the precision and accuracy of a novel cased telescoped (CT ammunition firing rifle. In order to perform the study, a baseline CT ammunition chamber which was concentric with a Mann barrel bore was manufactured. Additionally, six chambers were manufactured with an offset relative to the barrel bore. These chambers were used to simulate a misaligned chamber relative to the bore axis. Precision and accuracy tests were then performed at 200 m in an indoor range under controlled conditions. For this project, 5.56 mm CT ammunition was used. As the chamber axis offset relative to the gun bore was increased, the mean point of impact was displaced away from the target center. The shift in the impact location is explained by the presence of in-bore yaw which results in lateral throw-off and aerodynamic jump components. The linear theory of ballistics is used to establish a relationship between the chamber misalignment and the resulting projectile mean point of impact for a rifle developed to fire CT ammunition. This relationship allows for the prediction of the mean point of impact given a chamber misalignment.

  13. Anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery: diagnostic accuracy of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauv, Paul; Benadjaoud, Samir; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Zins, Marc [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Curis, Emmanuel [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire de biomathematiques, Faculte de pharmacie, Paris (France); Loriau, Jerome [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Digestive Surgery, Paris (France)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in postoperative colorectal anastomotic leakage (AL). Two independent blinded radiologists reviewed 153 CTs performed for suspected AL within 60 days after surgery in 131 consecutive patients, with (n = 58) or without (n = 95) retrograde contrast enema (RCE). Results were compared to original interpretations. The reference standard was reoperation or consensus (a radiologist and a surgeon) regarding clinical, laboratory, radiological, and follow-up data after medical treatment. AL was confirmed in 34/131 patients. For the two reviewers and original interpretation, sensitivity of CT was 82 %, 87 %, and 71 %, respectively; specificity was 84 %, 84 %, and 92 %. RCE significantly increased the positive predictive value (from 40 % to 88 %, P = 0.0009; 41 % to 92 %, P = 0.0016; and 40 % to 100 %, P = 0.0006). Contrast extravasation was the most sensitive (reviewers, 83 % and 83 %) and specific (97 % and 97 %) sign and was significantly associated with AL by univariate analysis (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis with recursive partitioning, CT with RCE was accurate to confirm or rule out AL with contrast extravasation. CT with RCE is accurate for diagnosing postoperative colorectal AL. Contrast extravasation is the most reliable sign. RCE should be performed during CT for suspected AL. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, A. E.; Ridley, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study was to carry out a systematic review determining the accuracy of CT angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. A search of published work in Medline and manual searching of reference lists of articles was conducted. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eight published studies evaluating 129 patients were included. Data were used to form 2 x2 tables. Computed tomography angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval 78-92%) and specificity of 95% (95% confidence interval 76-100%), without showing significant heterogeneity (x 2 = 3.5, P=0.6) and (x 2 - 5.4, P = 0.6), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.93. Computed tomography angiography is accurate in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can show the precise location and aetiology of bleeding, thereby directing further management. Strong recommendations for use of CT cannot be made from this review because of the methodological limitations and further large prospective studies are needed to define the role of CT in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  15. CT Angiography for Living Kidney Donors: Accuracy, Cause of Misinterpretation and Prevalence of Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jee Won; Lee, Whal; Yin, Yong Hu; Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Hoe [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    To determine the accuracy of the use of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) to predict vascular anatomy in living kidney donors and to reveal the prevalence of vascular variations in a Korean population. A total of 153 living kidney donors that had undergone preoperative CT and nephrectomy, either with open or laparoscopic surgery, were selected retrospectively. The initial CT results were compared with the surgical findings and repeated review sessions of CT scans were performed to determine the causes of mismatches in discordant cases. The accuracy of CT angiography was 95% to predict the number of renal vessels. Four arteries and two veins were missed during the initial CT interpretation due to perception errors (for two arteries and two veins) and technical limitations (two arteries). The prevalence of multiple renal arteries and veins, early branching of a renal artery and late confluence of a renal vein were 31%, 5%, 12%, 17%, respectively. The circumaortic renal vein and the bilateral inferior vena cava were found in two cases each (1.3%). One case (0.7%) each of a retroaortic renal vein and a supradiaphragmatic originated renal artery were found. MDCT provides a reliable method to evaluate the vascular anatomy and variations of living kidney donors.

  16. CT Angiography for Living Kidney Donors: Accuracy, Cause of Misinterpretation and Prevalence of Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jee Won; Lee, Whal; Yin, Yong Hu; Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2008-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of the use of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) to predict vascular anatomy in living kidney donors and to reveal the prevalence of vascular variations in a Korean population. A total of 153 living kidney donors that had undergone preoperative CT and nephrectomy, either with open or laparoscopic surgery, were selected retrospectively. The initial CT results were compared with the surgical findings and repeated review sessions of CT scans were performed to determine the causes of mismatches in discordant cases. The accuracy of CT angiography was 95% to predict the number of renal vessels. Four arteries and two veins were missed during the initial CT interpretation due to perception errors (for two arteries and two veins) and technical limitations (two arteries). The prevalence of multiple renal arteries and veins, early branching of a renal artery and late confluence of a renal vein were 31%, 5%, 12%, 17%, respectively. The circumaortic renal vein and the bilateral inferior vena cava were found in two cases each (1.3%). One case (0.7%) each of a retroaortic renal vein and a supradiaphragmatic originated renal artery were found. MDCT provides a reliable method to evaluate the vascular anatomy and variations of living kidney donors

  17. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in...... development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling...

  18. Correlation between CT numbers and tissue parameters needed for Monte Carlo simulations of clinical dose distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Wilfried; Bortfeld, Thomas; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2000-02-01

    We describe a new method to convert CT numbers into mass density and elemental weights of tissues required as input for dose calculations with Monte Carlo codes such as EGS4. As a first step, we calculate the CT numbers for 71 human tissues. To reduce the effort for the necessary fits of the CT numbers to mass density and elemental weights, we establish four sections on the CT number scale, each confined by selected tissues. Within each section, the mass density and elemental weights of the selected tissues are interpolated. For this purpose, functional relationships between the CT number and each of the tissue parameters, valid for media which are composed of only two components in varying proportions, are derived. Compared with conventional data fits, no loss of accuracy is accepted when using the interpolation functions. Assuming plausible values for the deviations of calculated and measured CT numbers, the mass density can be determined with an accuracy better than 0.04 g cm-3 . The weights of phosphorus and calcium can be determined with maximum uncertainties of 1 or 2.3 percentage points (pp) respectively. Similar values can be achieved for hydrogen (0.8 pp) and nitrogen (3 pp). For carbon and oxygen weights, errors up to 14 pp can occur. The influence of the elemental weights on the results of Monte Carlo dose calculations is investigated and discussed.

  19. SU-F-T-441: Dose Calculation Accuracy in CT Images Reconstructed with Artifact Reduction Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C; Chan, S; Lee, F; Ngan, R [Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Hong Kong); Lee, V [University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, HK (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation in patients with surgical implants is complicated by two factors. First is the accuracy of CT number, second is the dose calculation accuracy. We compared measured dose with dose calculated on CT images reconstructed with FBP and an artifact reduction algorithm (OMAR, Philips) for a phantom with high density inserts. Dose calculation were done with Varian AAA and AcurosXB. Methods: A phantom was constructed with solid water in which 2 titanium or stainless steel rods could be inserted. The phantom was scanned with the Philips Brillance Big Bore CT. Image reconstruction was done with FBP and OMAR. Two 6 MV single field photon plans were constructed for each phantom. Radiochromic films were placed at different locations to measure the dose deposited. One plan has normal incidence on the titanium/steel rods. In the second plan, the beam is at almost glancing incidence on the metal rods. Measurements were then compared with dose calculated with AAA and AcurosXB. Results: The use of OMAR images slightly improved the dose calculation accuracy. The agreement between measured and calculated dose was best with AXB and image reconstructed with OMAR. Dose calculated on titanium phantom has better agreement with measurement. Large discrepancies were seen at points directly above and below the high density inserts. Both AAA and AXB underestimated the dose directly above the metal surface, while overestimated the dose below the metal surface. Doses measured downstream of metal were all within 3% of calculated values. Conclusion: When doing treatment planning for patients with metal implants, care must be taken to acquire correct CT images to improve dose calculation accuracy. Moreover, great discrepancies in measured and calculated dose were observed at metal/tissue interface. Care must be taken in estimating the dose in critical structures that come into contact with metals.

  20. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Mahmoudi

    Full Text Available For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses.In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN. Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs.The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV at three kVp's was less than 1.2%.The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

  1. Reconstructing the CT number array from gray-level images and its application in PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Zhuang, Tian-ge; Wu, Wei

    2001-08-01

    Although DICOM compliant computed tomography has been prevailing in medical fields nowadays, there are some incompliant ones, from which we could hardly get the raw data and make an apropos interpretation due to the proprietary image format. Under such condition, one usually uses frame grabbers to capture CT images, the results of which could not be freely adjusted by radiologists as the original CT number array could. To alleviate the inflexibility, a new method is presented in this paper to reconstruct the array of CT number from several gray-level images acquired under different window settings. Its feasibility is investigated and a few tips are put forward to correct the errors caused respectively by 'Border Effect' and some hardware problems. The accuracy analysis proves it a good substitution for original CT number array acquisition. And this method has already been successfully used in our newly developing PACS and accepted by the radiologists in clinical use.

  2. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David C; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank; Landry, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling of detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors of 0.2% and 0.5% (for each phantom) compared to 0.5% and 0.9%. Single energy CT root mean square errors were 2.7% and 1.6%. Maximal errors for proton, dual energy and single energy CT were 0.51%, 1.7% and 7.4%, respectively. Better stopping power estimates could significantly reduce the range errors in proton therapy, but requires a large improvement in current methods which may be achievable with proton CT.

  3. Reassessment of CT images to improve diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and an equivocal preoperative CT interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Jin [Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To identify CT features that discriminate individuals with and without acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings, and to assess whether knowledge of these findings improves diagnostic accuracy. 53 patients that underwent appendectomy with an indeterminate preoperative CT interpretation were selected and allocated to an acute appendicitis group or a non-appendicitis group. The 53 CT examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to identify CT findings that could aid in the discrimination of those with and without appendicitis. In addition, two additional radiologists were then requested to evaluate independently the 53 CT examinations using a 4-point scale, both before and after being informed of the potentially discriminating criteria. CT findings found to be significantly different in the two groups were; the presence of appendiceal wall enhancement, intraluminal air in appendix, a coexistent inflammatory lesion, and appendiceal wall thickening (P < 0.05). Areas under the curves of reviewers 1 and 2 significantly increased from 0.516 and 0.706 to 0.677 and 0.841, respectively, when reviewers were told which CT variables were significant (P = 0.0193 and P = 0.0397, respectively). Knowledge of the identified CT findings was found to improve diagnostic accuracy for acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings. circle Numerous patients with clinically equivocal appendicitis do not have acute appendicitis circle Computed tomography (CT) helps to reduce the negative appendectomy rate circle CT is not always infallible and may also demonstrate indeterminate findings circle However knowledge of significant CT variables can further reduce negative appendectomy rate circle An equivocal CT interpretation of appendicitis should be reassessed with this knowledge. (orig.)

  4. Reassessment of CT images to improve diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and an equivocal preoperative CT interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won; Park, Seong Jin

    2012-01-01

    To identify CT features that discriminate individuals with and without acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings, and to assess whether knowledge of these findings improves diagnostic accuracy. 53 patients that underwent appendectomy with an indeterminate preoperative CT interpretation were selected and allocated to an acute appendicitis group or a non-appendicitis group. The 53 CT examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to identify CT findings that could aid in the discrimination of those with and without appendicitis. In addition, two additional radiologists were then requested to evaluate independently the 53 CT examinations using a 4-point scale, both before and after being informed of the potentially discriminating criteria. CT findings found to be significantly different in the two groups were; the presence of appendiceal wall enhancement, intraluminal air in appendix, a coexistent inflammatory lesion, and appendiceal wall thickening (P < 0.05). Areas under the curves of reviewers 1 and 2 significantly increased from 0.516 and 0.706 to 0.677 and 0.841, respectively, when reviewers were told which CT variables were significant (P = 0.0193 and P = 0.0397, respectively). Knowledge of the identified CT findings was found to improve diagnostic accuracy for acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings. circle Numerous patients with clinically equivocal appendicitis do not have acute appendicitis circle Computed tomography (CT) helps to reduce the negative appendectomy rate circle CT is not always infallible and may also demonstrate indeterminate findings circle However knowledge of significant CT variables can further reduce negative appendectomy rate circle An equivocal CT interpretation of appendicitis should be reassessed with this knowledge. (orig.)

  5. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ranallo, F. N. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Judy, P. F. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gierada, D. S. [Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Fain, S. B., E-mail: sfain@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering,University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%–9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel.

  6. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ranallo, F. N.; Judy, P. F.; Gierada, D. S.; Fain, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%–9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel

  7. Construction of a voxel model from CT images with density derived from CT numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Mengyun; Zeng Qin; Cao Ruifen; Li Gui; Zheng Huaqing; Huang Shanqing; Song Gang; Wu Yican

    2010-01-01

    The voxel models representing human anatomy have been developed to calculate dose distribution in human body, while the density is the most important physical property of voxel model. Traditionally, when creating the Monte Carlo input files, the average tissue parameters recommended in ICRP report were used to assign each voxel in the existing voxel models. However, as each tissue consists of many voxels in which voxels are different in their densities, the method of assigning average tissue parameters doesn't take account of the voxel's discrepancy, and can't represent human anatomy faithfully. To represent human anatomy more faithfully, a method was implemented to assign each voxel, the density of which was derived from CT number. In order to compare with the traditional method, we have constructed two models from a same cadaver specimen date set. A CT-based pelvic voxel model called Pelvis-CT model, was constructed, the densities of which were derived from the CT numbers. A color photograph-based pelvic voxel model called Pelvis-Photo model, was also constructed, the densities of which were taken from ICRP Publication. The CT images and color photographs were obtained from the same female cadaver specimen. The Pelvis-CT and Pelvis-Photo models were ported into Monte Carlo code MCNP to calculate the conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose for external monoenergetic photon beams with energies of 0.1, 1 and 10 MeV under anterior-posterior (AP) geometries. The results were compared with those of given in ICRP74. Differences of up to 50% were observed between conversion coefficients of Pelvis-CT and Pelvis-Photo models, moreover the discrepancies decreased for the photon beams with higher energies. The overall trend of conversion coefficients of the Pelvis-CT model were agreed well with that of ICRP74 data. (author)

  8. Construction of a voxel model from CT images with density derived from CT numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Mengyun; Zeng Qin; Cao Ruifen; Li Gui; Zheng Huaqing; Huang Shanqing; Song Gang; Wu Yican

    2011-01-01

    The voxel models representing human anatomy have been developed to calculate dose distribution in human body, while the density and elemental composition are the most important physical properties of voxel model. Usually, when creating the Monte Carlo input files, the average tissue densities recommended in ICRP Publication were used to assign each voxel in the existing voxel models. As each tissue consists of many voxels with different densities, the conventional method of average tissue densities failed to take account of the voxel's discrepancy, and therefore could not represent human anatomy faithfully. To represent human anatomy more faithfully, a method was implemented to assign each voxel, the densities of which were derived from CT number. In order to compare with the traditional method, we constructed two models from the cadaver specimen dataset. A CT-based pelvic voxel model called Pelvis-CT model was constructed, the densities of which were derived from the CT numbers. A color photograph-based pelvic voxel model called Pelvis-Photo model was also constructed, the densities of which were taken from ICRP Publication. The CT images and the color photographs were obtained from the same female cadaver specimen. The Pelvis-CT and Pelvis-Photo models were both ported into Monte Carlo code MCNP to calculate the conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose for external monoenergetic photon beams with energies of 0.1, 1 and 10 MeV under anterior-posterior (AP) geometry. The results were compared with those of given in ICRP Publication 74. Differences of up to 50% were observed between conversion coefficients of Pelvis-CT and Pelvis- Photo models, moreover the discrepancies decreased for the photon beams with higher energies. The overall trend of conversion coefficients of the Pelvis-CT model agreed well with that of ICRP Publication 74 data. (author)

  9. Accuracy improvement of CT reconstruction using tree-structured filter bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Morikawa, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Junichi

    2009-01-01

    Accuracy improvement of 'CT reconstruction algorithm using TSFB (Tree-Structured Filter Bank)' that is high-speed CT reconstruction algorithm, was proposed. TSFB method could largely reduce the amount of computation in comparison with the CB (Convolution Backprojection) method, but it was the problem that an artifact occurred in a reconstruction image since reconstruction was performed with disregard to a signal out of the reconstruction domain in stage processing. Also the whole band filter being the component of a two-dimensional synthesis filter was IIR filter and then an artifact occurred at the end of the reconstruction image. In order to suppress these artifacts the proposed method enlarged the processing range by the TSFB method in the domain outside by the width control of the specimen line and line addition to the reconstruction domain outside. And, furthermore, to avoid increase of the amount of computation, the algorithm was proposed such as to decide the needed processing range depending on the number of steps processing with the TSFB and the degree of incline of filter, and then update the position and width of the specimen line to process the needed range. According to the simulation to realize a high-speed and highly accurate CT reconstruction in this way, the quality of the reconstruction image of the proposed method was improved in comparison with the TSFB method and got the same result with the CB method. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Accuracy of low dose CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in childhood and comparison with USG and standard dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dae Yong; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Kim, Jee Taek; Lee, Na Mi; Kim, Hyery; Yun, Sin Weon; Chae, Soo Ahn; Lim, In Seok

    Computed tomography should be performed after careful consideration due to radiation hazard, which is why interest in low dose CT has increased recently in acute appendicitis. Previous studies have been performed in adult and adolescents populations, but no studies have reported on the efficacy of using low-dose CT in children younger than 10 years. Patients (n=475) younger than 10 years who were examined for acute appendicitis were recruited. Subjects were divided into three groups according to the examinations performed: low-dose CT, ultrasonography, and standard-dose CT. Subjects were categorized according to age and body mass index (BMI). Low-dose CT was a contributive tool in diagnosing appendicitis, and it was an adequate method, when compared with ultrasonography and standard-dose CT in terms of sensitivity (95.5% vs. 95.0% and 94.5%, p=0.794), specificity (94.9% vs. 80.0% and 98.8%, p=0.024), positive-predictive value (96.4% vs. 92.7% and 97.2%, p=0.019), and negative-predictive value (93.7% vs. 85.7% and 91.3%, p=0.890). Low-dose CT accurately diagnosed patients with a perforated appendix. Acute appendicitis was effectively diagnosed using low-dose CT in both early and middle childhood. BMI did not influence the accuracy of detecting acute appendicitis on low-dose CT. Low-dose CT is effective and accurate for diagnosing acute appendicitis in childhood, as well as in adolescents and young adults. Additionally, low-dose CT was relatively accurate, irrespective of age or BMI, for detecting acute appendicitis. Therefore, low-dose CT is recommended for assessing children with suspected acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  11. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P.; Sun, H.H.; Jiang, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  12. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P. (Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China)), email: zqpddn1@gmail.com; Sun, H.H. (Dept. of Orthopaedic, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical Univ., Xian Shaanxi (China)); Jiang, Y.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  13. Accuracy Enhancement of CT Measurements using Data Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro; Kallasse, Maarja-Helena; Carli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the impact of data filtering on CT capability to inspect assemblies. The investigation was carried out using an industrial multi-material assembly provided by Novo Nordisk A/S. The assembly comprises two parts made of polyoxymethylene (POM) and of an alloy comprising polycarb...

  14. CT fluoroscopy-guided vs. multislice CT biopsy mode-guided lung biopsies: Accuracy, complications and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, Helmut; Stadler, Alfred; Schilling, Matthias; Bürklin, Sandra; Eisenhuber, Edith; Schober, Ewald; Mostbeck, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy, the frequency of complications, the duration of the interventions and the radiation doses of CT fluoroscopy (CTF) guided biopsies of lung lesions with those of multislice CT (MS-CT) biopsy mode-guided biopsies. Methods: Data and images from 124 consecutive patients undergoing CTF-guided lung biopsy (group A) and 132 MS-CT-biopsy mode-guided lung biopsy (group B) were reviewed. CTF-guided biopsies were performed on a Siemens Emotion 6 CT scanner with intermittent or continuous CT-fluoroscopy, MS-CT biopsy mode-guided biopsies were performed on a Siemens Emotion 16 CT scanner. All biopsies were performed with a coaxial needle technique. Results: The two groups (A vs. B) did not differ significantly regarding sensitivity (95.5% vs. 95.9%), specificity (96.7% vs. 95.5%), negative predictive value (87.9% vs. 84%) or positive predictive value (98.8% vs. 98.9%). Pneumothorax was observed in 30.0% and 32.5% of the patients, respectively. Chest tube placement was necessary in 4% (group A) and 13% (group B) of the patients. The duration of the intervention was significantly longer in group A (median 37 min vs. 32 min, p = 0.04). The mean CT dose index (CTDI) was 422 in group A and 36.3 in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Compared to CTF-guided biopsies, chest biopsies using the MS-CT biopsy mode show dramatically lower CTDI levels. Although the diagnostic yield of the procedures do not differ significantly, biopsies using the MS-CT-biopsy mode have a three-fold higher rate of chest tube placement.

  15. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Willemink, Martin J; Schmidt, Bernhard T; Flohr, Thomas; Schilham, Arnold; Milles, Julien; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. METHODS: Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive 64-slice CT coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, Francesca; Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Mollet, Nico R.A.; deFeyter, Pim J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Runza, Giuseppe [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera di Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Mieghem, Carlos van; Meijboom, Willem B.; Baks, Timo [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Malagutti, Patrizia [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University of Ferrara, Department of Cardiology, Ferrara (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Azienda Ospedaliera di Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Multislice computed tomography (CT) is an emerging technique for the non-invasive detection of coronary stenoses. While the diagnostic accuracy of 4-slice scanners was limited, 16-slice CT imagers showed promising results due to increased temporal and spatial resolution. These technical advances prompted us to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in the detection of significant stenoses (defined as {>=} 50% luminal diameter reduction) versus invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Thirty-five patients with stable angina pectoris underwent CT coronary angiography performed with a 64-slice scanner (gantry rotation time 330 ms, individual detector width 0.6 mm) prior to conventional coronary angiography. Patients with heart rates >70 beats/min received 100 mg metoprolol orally. One hundred millilitres of contrast agent with an iodine concentration of 400 mgl/ml were injected at a rate of 5 ml/s into the antecubital vein. The CT scan was triggered with the bolus tracking technique. The sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of 64-slice CT were 99%, 96%, 78% and 99%, respectively, on a per-segment basis. The values obtained on a per-patient basis were 100%, 90%, 96% and 100%, respectively. When referral to catheterisation is questionable, CT coronary angiography may identify subjects with normal angiograms and consistently decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive 64-slice CT coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, Francesca; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Mollet, Nico R.A.; DeFeyter, Pim J.; Runza, Giuseppe; Mieghem, Carlos van; Meijboom, Willem B.; Baks, Timo; Malagutti, Patrizia; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2006-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (CT) is an emerging technique for the non-invasive detection of coronary stenoses. While the diagnostic accuracy of 4-slice scanners was limited, 16-slice CT imagers showed promising results due to increased temporal and spatial resolution. These technical advances prompted us to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in the detection of significant stenoses (defined as ≥ 50% luminal diameter reduction) versus invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Thirty-five patients with stable angina pectoris underwent CT coronary angiography performed with a 64-slice scanner (gantry rotation time 330 ms, individual detector width 0.6 mm) prior to conventional coronary angiography. Patients with heart rates >70 beats/min received 100 mg metoprolol orally. One hundred millilitres of contrast agent with an iodine concentration of 400 mgl/ml were injected at a rate of 5 ml/s into the antecubital vein. The CT scan was triggered with the bolus tracking technique. The sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of 64-slice CT were 99%, 96%, 78% and 99%, respectively, on a per-segment basis. The values obtained on a per-patient basis were 100%, 90%, 96% and 100%, respectively. When referral to catheterisation is questionable, CT coronary angiography may identify subjects with normal angiograms and consistently decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures. (orig.)

  18. Estimation of regional intrapulmonary moisture volumes by pulmonary CT numbers in CT views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, Takaaki; Kato, Shiro; Yoshimura, Masaharu

    1987-01-01

    In order to study the regional intrapulmonary moisture volume in normal lungs, lungs with congestion, and lungs with increased blood flow, a series of 42 subjects underwent transverse computed tomography (CT) scanning performed at a total of 17 points corresponding to the upper (7), middle (3), and lower (7) lung fields. The subjects were divided into group I (n = 24, with left-sided heart failure), group II (n = 8, with left-to-right shunt heart disease), and group III (n = 10, normals). In group I, the pulmonary peripheral minus CT numbers were inversely correlated with the pulmonary wedge mean pressure and pulmonary arterial mean pressure; and were linearly correlated with pulmonary blood flow (PBF). In group II, they were inversely correlated with PBF and left-to-right shunt volume. The pulmonary pheripheral CT numbers were significantly higher in both groups I and II than group III. In group III, these CT numbers were higher in the posterior field than the anterior field in supine position. (Hou, H.L.)

  19. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung Eun [Sangkye Paek Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  20. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Seung Eun

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  1. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chan, Kai-Chieh

    2013-06-01

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18 F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x10 5 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  2. Perforated appendicitis: accuracy of CT diagnosis and correlation of CT findings with the length of hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, H.A.; Afzal, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT findings in the differentiation of perforated from nonperforated appendicitis and correlate CT diagnosis with the length of hospital stay. The study included 70 patients who presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and underwent preoperative CT scan followed by appendectomy. Patients were divided into two groups of having perforated and nonperforated appendicitis on the basis of CT scan findings. The surgical and pathological reports combined were considered the reference standard for the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis. Various CT scan findings and average duration of hospital stay in days was compared by t-test. Twenty-six (37%) of 70 patients had perforated appendicitis. It was correctly identified on pre-operative CT scan in 18 patients. There were 18 true positive diagnoses, 43 true negative diagnoses, 1 false positive diagnosis and 8 false negative diagnoses which yielded a sensitivity of 69%, specificity of 97%, positive predictive value of 94% and negative predictive value of 84%. Mean length of hospital stay in perforated group was 6.3 days and 2.9 days in nonperforated group. Severe periappendiceal inflammation, periappendiceal and or abdominopelvic fluid and abscess were significantly associated with perforated appendicitis and with a significant longer hospital stay (p <.001). CT scan is 69% sensitive and 97% specific for the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis and constellation of CT findings can be used to select patients with perforated appendicitis for initial non-operative management. Presence of CT signs of significant appendiceal inflammation is independent predictor of longer hospital stay. (author)

  3. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Vajtai, Petra L.; Hopkins, Katharine L.

    2015-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI vol . Reduced CTDI vol was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs eff ) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI vol , size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI vol was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI vol and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  4. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Vajtai, Petra L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Hopkins, Katharine L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2014-07-05

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI{sub vol}. Reduced CTDI{sub vol} was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs{sub eff}) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI{sub vol}, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  5. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-01-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens...... which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner...

  6. Combined FDG PET/CT imaging for restaging of colorectal cancer patients: impact of image fusion on staging accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, H.; Jaeger, U.; Flacke, S.; Hortling, N.; Bucerius, J.; Joe, A.; Reinhardt, M.; Palmedo, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic impact of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-labeled deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) combined with non-contrast computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT modality in restaging colorectal cancer patients. Material and methods: In this retrospective study, 29 consecutive patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer (17 female, 12 male, aged 51-76 years) underwent whole body scans in one session on a dual modality PET-CT system (Siemens Biograph) 90 min. after i.v. administration of 370 MBq 18 F-FDG. The CT imaging was performed with 40 mAs, 130 kV, slice-thickness 5 mm and without i.v. contrast administration. PET and CT images were reconstructed with a slice-thickness of 5 mm in coronal, sagittal and transverse planes. During a first step of analysis, PET and CT images were scored blinded and independently by a group of two nuclear medicine physicians and a group of two radiologists, respectively. For this purpose, a five-point-scale was used. The second step of data-analysis consisted of a consensus reading by both groups. During the consensus reading, first a virtual (meaning mental) fusion of PET and CT images and afterwards the 'real' fusion (meaning coregistered) PET-CT images were also scored with the same scale. The imaging results were compared with histopathology findings and the course of disease during further follow-up. Results: The total number of malignant lesions detected with the combined PET/CT were 86. For FDG-PET alone it was n=68, and for CT alone n=65. Comparing PET-CT and PET, concordance was found in 81 of 104 lesions. Discrepancies predominantly occurred in the lung, where PET alone often showed true positive results in lymph nodes and soft tissue masses, where CT often was false negative. Comparing mental fusion and 'real' co-registered images, concordance was found in 94 of 104 lesions. In 13 lesions or, respectively, in 7 of 29 patients, a relevant information was gathered using fused images

  7. Accuracy verification of PET-CT image fusion and its utilization in target delineation of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuetao; Yu Jinming; Yang Guoren; Gong Heyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the accuracy of co-registration of PET and CT (PET-CT) images on line with phantom, and utilize it on patients to provide clinical evidence for target delineation in radiotherapy. Methods: A phantom with markers and different volume cylinders was infused with various concentrations of 18 FDG, and scanned at 4 mm by PET and CT respectively. After having been transmitted into GE eNTEGRA and treatment planning system (TPS) workstations, the images were fused and reconstructed. The distance between the markers and the errors were monitored in PET and CT images respectively. The volume of cylinder in PET and CT images were measured and compared by certain pixel value proportion deduction method. The same procedure was performed on the pulmonary tumor image in ten patients. Results: eNTEGRA and TPS workstations had a good length linearity, but the fusion error of the latter was markedly greater than the former. Tumors in different volume filled by varying concentrations of 18 FDG required different pixel deduction proportion. The cylinder volume of PET and CT images were almost the same, so were the images of pulmonary tumor of ten patients. Conclusions: The accuracy of image co-registration of PET-CT on line may fulfill the clinical demand. Pixel value proportion deduction method can be used for target delineation on PET image. (authors)

  8. Analysis of diagnositc accuracy with CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy for pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiyan; Zhuang Yiping; Zhang Jin; Feng Yong; Zhang Xiao; Xu Lin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors which may affect the diagnostic accmracy of CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy for pulmonary lesions. Methods: CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy was performed in 264 patients, all of which were proved by surgical pathology or clinical follow-up. A logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the location and the size of the lesions and insertion depth of biopsy needles and the diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous transthomcic lung biopsy. The complication rate including pneumatothorax and bleeding rate were record. Results: The diagnostic accuracy was 87.5%. Both the pneumothorax and the bleeding of lesion were 1.9%. The size of lesion was suggested by Logistic regression analysis had a significant influence on the diagnostic accuracy (Wald=12.891, P=0.00034, OR=0.96). Conclusion: CT-guided pereumneous transthoracic lung biopsy has a high diagnostic accuracy for pulmonary lesions. The size of the lesions had significant effect on the diagnostic accuracy. (authors)

  9. Accuracy of CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography imaging to detect lesions preoperatively in patients undergoing surgery for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seastedt, Kenneth P; Trencheva, Koiana; Michelassi, Fabrizio; Alsaleh, Doaa; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Sonoda, Toyooki; Lee, Sang W; Nandakumar, Govind

    2014-12-01

    CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography have emerged as first-line imaging technologies for the evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in Crohn's disease. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of these imaging modalities to identify Crohn's disease lesions preoperatively. This was a retrospective chart review. The study was conducted at a single institution. Seventy-six patients with Crohn's disease with preoperative CT enterography and/or magnetic resonance enterography were included in the study. The number of stenoses, fistulas, and abscesses on CT enterography and/or magnetic resonance enterography before surgery were compared with operative findings. Forty patients (53%) were women, 46 (60%) underwent surgery for recurrent Crohn's disease, and 46 (57%) had previous abdominal surgery. Thirty-six (47%) had a preoperative CT enterography and 43 (57%) had a preoperative magnetic resonance enterography. CT enterography sensitivity was 75% for stenosis and 50% for fistula. MRE sensitivity was 68% for stenosis and 60% for fistula. The negative predictive values of CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography for stenosis were very low (54% and 65%) and were 85% and 81% for fistula. CT enterography had 76% accuracy for stenosis and 79% for fistula; magnetic resonance enterography had 78% accuracy for stenosis and 85% for fistula. Both were accurate for abscess. False-negative rates for CT enterography were 50% for fistula and 25% for stenosis. False-negative rates for magnetic resonance enterography were 40% for fistula and 32% for stenosis. Unexpected intraoperative findings led to modification of the planned surgical procedure in 20 patients (26%). This study was limited by its small sample size, its retrospective nature, and that some studies were performed at outside institutions. CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in patients with Crohn's disease were accurate for the identification of abscesses but not for

  10. Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules by integrated PET/CT: improved accuracy by FDG uptake pattern and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joon Young Choi; Kyung Soo Lee; O Jung Kwon; Young Mog Shim; Kyung-Han Lee; Yong Choi; Yearn Seong Choe; Byung-Tae Kim

    2004-01-01

    Objective: FDG PET is useful to differentiate malignancy from benign lesions in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). However, FDG PET showed false positive results in benign inflammatory lesions such as tuberculosis and organizing pneumonia. Furthermore, malignant tumors such as adenocarcinoma (AC) with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) type had lower FDG uptake than other cell types of non-small cell lung cancer. We investigated whether FDG uptake pattern and image findings of CT for attenuation correction could improve accuracy for evaluating SPNs over SUV in integrated PET/CT imaging using FDG. Methods: Forty patients (M:F = 23:17, mean age 58.2±9.4 yrs) with non-calcified SPNs (diameter on CT 30 mm, no significant mediastinal node enlargement, no atelectasis) were included. All subjects underwent integrated PET/CT imaging using FDG. One nuclear medicine physician and 1 chest radiologist interpreted the PET and non-contrast CT images for attenuation correction, respectively. On PET images, maximum SUV of SPN was acquired, and FDG uptake pattern was categorized as diffusely increased or heterogeneously increased with upper threshold of window setting adjusted to maximum SUV of each nodule. A radiologist interpreted SPNs as benign or malignant based on CT images with lung and mediastinai window settings blinded to PET findings. Results: On pathological exam, 30 SPNs were confirmed to be malignant (11 AC with non-BAC type, 8 AC with BAC type, 8 squamous cell carcinoma, 1 adenosquamous cell carcinoma, 1 neuroendocrine carcinoma, 1 large cell carcinoma), and 10 were benign (4 tuberculosis, 3 organizing pneumonia, 2 sclerosing pneumocytoma, 1 non-specific inflammation). All 5 nodules with max SUV 7.0 except one with tuberculoma had malignancy. When only nodules with diffusely increased uptake were considered malignant in indeterminate group with max SUV of 4.0 to 7.0, PET could diagnose 5 of 9 malignant nodules with one false positive nodule. In 6 of

  11. A Simplified Whole-Organ CT Perfusion Technique with Biphasic Acquisition: Preliminary Investigation of Accuracy and Protocol Feasibility in Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, XiaoDong; Zhang, Jing; Quan, ChangBin; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hong; Ao, GuoKun

    2016-04-01

    To determine the feasibility and accuracy of a protocol for calculating whole-organ renal perfusion (renal blood flow [RBF]) and regional perfusion on the basis of biphasic computed tomography (CT), with concurrent dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) CT perfusion serving as the reference standard. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Biphasic CT of the kidneys, including precontrast and arterial phase imaging, was integrated with a first-pass dynamic volume CT protocol and performed and analyzed in 23 patients suspected of having renal artery stenosis. The perfusion value derived from biphasic CT was calculated as CT number enhancement divided by the area under the arterial input function and compared with the DCE CT perfusion data by using the paired t test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Correlation analysis was made between the RBF and the extent of renal artery stenosis. All postprocessing was independently performed by two observers and then averaged as the final result. Mean ± standard deviation biphasic and DCE CT perfusion data for RBF were 425.62 mL/min ± 124.74 and 419.81 mL/min ± 121.13, respectively (P = .53), and for regional perfusion they were 271.15 mL/min per 100 mL ± 82.21 and 266.33 mL/min per 100 mL ± 74.40, respectively (P = .31). Good correlation and agreement were shown between biphasic and DCE CT perfusion for RBF (r = 0.93; ±10% variation from mean perfusion data [P < .001]) and for regional perfusion (r = 0.90; ±13% variation from mean perfusion data [P < .001]). The extent of renal artery stenosis was negatively correlated with RBF with biphasic CT perfusion (r = -0.81, P = .012). Biphasic CT perfusion is clinically feasible and provides perfusion data comparable to DCE CT perfusion data at both global and regional levels in the kidney. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Characterization of the relation between CT technical parameters and accuracy of quantification of lung attenuation on quantitative chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Brian M; Stolin, Alexander V; Williams, Mark B; Gay, Spencer B; Brody, Alan S; Altes, Talissa A

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the compromise between CT technical parameters and the accuracy of CT quantification of lung attenuation. Materials that simulate water (0 H), healthy lung (-650 H), borderline emphysematous lung (-820 H), and severely emphysematous lung (-1,000 H) were placed at both the base and the apex of the lung of an anthropomorphic phantom and outside the phantom. Transaxial CT images through the samples were obtained while the effective tube current was varied from 440 to 10 mAs, kilovoltage from 140 to 80 kVp, and slice thickness from 0.625 to 10 mm. Mean +/- SD attenuation within the samples and the standard quantitative chest CT measurements, the percentage of pixels with attenuation less than -910 H and 15th percentile of attenuation, were computed. Outside the phantom, variations in CT parameters produced less than 2.0% error in all measurements. Within the anthropomorphic phantom at 30 mAs, error in measurements was much larger, ranging from zero to 200%. Below approximately 80 mAs, mean attenuation became increasingly biased. The effects were most pronounced at the apex of the lungs. Mean attenuation of the borderline emphysematous sample of apex decreased 55 H as the tube current was decreased from 300 to 30 mAs. Both the 15th percentile of attenuation and percentage of pixels with less than -910 H attenuation were more sensitive to variations in effective tube current than was mean attenuation. For example, the -820 H sample should have 0% of pixels less than -910 H, which was true at 400 mA. At 30 mA in the lung apex, however, the measurement was highly inaccurate, 51% of pixels being below this value. Decreased kilovoltage and slice thickness had analogous, but lesser, effects. The accuracy of quantitative chest CT is determined by the CT acquisition parameters. There can be significant decreases in accuracy at less than 80 mAs for thin slices in an anthropomorphic phantom, the most pronounced effects occurring in the lung

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of static CT perfusion for the detection of myocardial ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias Holm; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Linde, Jesper James

    2016-01-01

    : Systematic literature review and meta-analysis of studies examining the diagnostic accuracy of static CTP imaging alone or combined with coronary CT angiography (CTA) in comparison to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP), and/or invasive coronary angiography...

  14. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  15. Influence of CT on the number of radiologic procedures and hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkhuysen, F.H.B.; Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The research concerns the influence of body CT on medical efficiency in radiology and hospitalization in The Netherlands. General hospitals with body CT are compared with hospitals without CT. In radiology the substitution effect is investigated with use of the number of radiological performances per clinical patient as a parameter. From 1977 to 1984 this parameter proves to decrease in hospitals with body CT (9%) in contrast to the rise in hospitals without CT (10%). Concerning the average hospital in patient stay, it appears that this parameter shows a faster decrease in hospitals with body CT compared with hospitals without CT (5%-8%)

  16. CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic aspiration biopsy of lung lesions: factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenguo; Zhang Xuezhe; Wang Wu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy in CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic aspiration biopsy of lung lesions. Methods: CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic biopsy was performed in 435 patients with surgical pathologic confirmation or clinical follow-up. Univariant statistical analysis and multivariant stepwise Logistic regression analysis were used to study the influence of lesion-related factors (benignancy or malignancy, size, location, depth, presence of cavity), procedure factors (laser-guidance, position of patient) and patient-related factors (sex, age, presence of emphysema); with the accuracy of the diagnosis. Results: 1)289 lesions were diagnosed as malignant ones and 146 as benign ones. The accuracy of CT-guided biopsy was 83.4%(363/435). Univariant analysis showed that the diagnostic accuracies for malignant and benign lesions were 88.9%(257/289) and 72.6%(106/146), respectively (χ 2 =18.71, P=0.00002). Laser-group was superior to non-laser group (88.4% versus 80.9%, respectively, χ 2 =4.00, P=0.0456). Mean diameters of lesions in correct diagnostic group and non-correct diagnostic group were 3.78±1.64 cm and 3.02±1.26 cm, respectively (F=13.79, P=0.0002). 2)Multivariant stepwise Logistic regression analysis showed that among the various factors influencing the final benign or malignant diagnoses (Wald χ 2 =14.01, P=0.0002) and using laser-guidance(Wald χ 2 =3.92, P=0.0477) were significantly associated with the diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions: Final correct diagnoses (benign, malignant) are closely related to the application of laser-guidance for determining the diagnostic accuracy in CT-guided transcutaneous thoracic needle aspiration biopsy. (authors)

  17. Comparison of CT number calibration techniques for CBCT-based dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, Alex; McQuaid, Dualta; Nill, Simeon; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Oelfke, Uwe; Murray, Julia; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin; Poludniowski, Gavin; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare and validate various computed tomography (CT) number calibration techniques with respect to cone beam CT (CBCT) dose calculation accuracy. CBCT dose calculation accuracy was assessed for pelvic, lung, and head and neck (H and N) treatment sites for two approaches: (1) physics-based scatter correction methods (CBCT r ); (2) density override approaches including assigning water density to the entire CBCT (W), assignment of either water or bone density (WB), and assignment of either water or lung density (WL). Methods for CBCT density assignment within a commercially available treatment planning system (RS auto ), where CBCT voxels are binned into six density levels, were assessed and validated. Dose-difference maps and dose-volume statistics were used to compare the CBCT dose distributions with the ground truth of a planning CT acquired the same day as the CBCT. For pelvic cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume deviations below 1.5 %. RS auto provided larger than average errors for pelvic treatments for patients with large amounts of adipose tissue. For H and N cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume differences below 1.0 % with CBCT r (0.5 %) and RS auto (0.6 %) performing best. For lung cases, WL and RS auto methods generated dose distributions most similar to the ground truth. The RS auto density override approach is an attractive option for CTN adjustments for a variety of anatomical sites. RS auto methods were validated, resulting in dose calculations that were consistent with those calculated on diagnostic-quality CT images, for CBCT images acquired of the lung, for patients receiving pelvic RT in cases without excess adipose tissue, and for H and N cases. (orig.) [de

  18. Accuracy of computed tomography-intravenous cholangiography (CT-IVC) in detection of choledocholithiasis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.; Speer, A.G.; Collier, N.A.; Vincent, J.M.; Jardine, C.; Noack, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of computed tomography-intravenous cholangiography (CT-IVC) in the detection of choledocholithiasis, compared with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). 65 patients undergoing ERC had CT-IVC within 24 hours prior to ERC. Helical CT-IVC was performed following intravenous infusion of 100ml Biliscopin (Schering, Berlin). 2mm beam collimation was used with axial reformats at 1.5mm intervals used for image interpretation. Patients with serum bilirubin levels>3 times normal were excluded. CT-IVC and ERC studies were interpreted independently, and studies were graded as positive, negative or indeterminate for the presence of ductal calculi. 65 patients had a median age of 56 years. Median serum bilirubin at the time of CT-IVC was 13 mmol/L (range 5-47). ERC was indeterminate in 3 patients (4.7%) and CT-IVC in 4 (6.3%). 23 patients had ductal calculi on ERC and CT-IVC was positive in 22 (sensitivity 96%). False positive rate for CT-IVC was 8.3% with positive and negative predictive values of 92% and 97% respectively. Stones' size range was 4-16mm. Of the 14 solitary stones, 10 were pound 5mm and 8 pound 4mm.The bilirubin level in the positive cases was within the normal range in 20, with a range of 7-37 mmol/L. CT-IVC is highly accurate for detection of ductal calculi, including single small calculi, in patients with a serum bilirubin of <3 times normal. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Accuracy and efficiency of radiologists reporting CT studies from a multiscreen electronic workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, W.D.; Lawson, T.L.; Erickson, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a limited picture archiving communication system linking, a via fiber optic cable, two computed tomographic (CT) scanners, and a double-screen (1,000-line monitors) display station with a 600-megabyte image memory evaluated for accuracy and efficiency in the generation of a radiology report. Twenty preselected CT studies (an average of 30 images per study, ten with prior examination for comparison) in cases with pathologically or clinically proved diagnoses were read by five radiologists, in random order, from both the electronic display console and conventional multiformat images. All cases were reread after 1-month interval in a different random order viewing sequence and the opposite viewing modality

  20. Neuronavigation accuracy dependence on CT and MR imaging parameters: a phantom-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poggi, S; Pallotta, S; Russo, S; Gallina, P; Torresin, A; Bucciolini, M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical benefits from neuronavigation are well established. However, the complexity of its technical environment requires a careful evaluation of different types of errors. In this work, a detailed phantom study which investigates the accuracy in a neuronavigation procedure is presented. The dependence on many different imaging parameters, such as field of view, slice thickness and different kind of sequences (sequential and spiral for CT, T1-weighted and T2-weighted for MRI), is quantified. Moreover, data based on CT images are compared to those based on MR images, taking into account MRI distortion. Finally, the contributions to global accuracy coming from image acquisition, registration and navigation itself are discussed. Results demonstrate the importance of imaging accuracy. Procedures based on CT proved to be more accurate than procedures based on MRI. In the former, values from 2 to 2.5 mm are obtained for 95% fractiles of cumulative distribution of Euclidean distances between the intended target and the reached one while, in the latter, the measured values range from 3 to 4 mm. The absence of imaging distortion proved to be crucial for registration accuracy in MR-based procedures

  1. Diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in cavitary pulmonary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping, E-mail: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Hai-Yan, E-mail: mycherishgirl@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jin, E-mail: yari_zj@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Yong, E-mail: fengyong119@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: motozl163@163.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: CT-guided transthoracic biopsy is a well-established method in the cytologic or histologic diagnosis of pulmonary lesions. The knowledge of its diagnostic performance and complications for cavitary pulmonary lesions is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in cavitary pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: 102 consecutive patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions received CT-guided FNAB with use of an 18-gauge (n = 35) or 20-gauge (n = 67) Chiba for histology diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of FNAB were calculated as compared with the final diagnosis. Complications associated with FNAB were observed. The diagnostic accuracy and complications were compared between patients with different lesion sizes and different cavity wall thickness. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNAB were 96.3%, 98.0%, and 96.1%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnosis accuracy in different lesion size (<2 cm vs ≥2 cm), or different cavity wall thickness (<5 mm vs ≥5 mm) were not different (P > 0.05; 0.235). More nondiagnostic sample was found in wall thickness <5 mm lesions (P = 0.017). Associated complications included pneumothorax in 9 (8.8%) patients and alveolar hemorrhage in 14 patients (13.7%) and hemoptysis in 1 patient (1%). No different rate of complications was found with regard to lesion size, wall thickness, length of the needle path and needle size (P > 0.05). Conclusion: CT-guided FNAB can be effectively ad safely used for patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions.

  2. Accuracy of computed tomographic intravenous cholangiography (CT-IVC) with iotroxate in the detection of choledocholithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Robert N.; Vincent, Janette M.; Speer, Tony; Noack, Keith; Collier, Neil A.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of computed tomographic intravenous cholangiography (CT-IVC) for detection of choledocholithiasis. Sixty-five patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) underwent CT-IVC prior to ERC, using a single detector helical CT following intravenous infusion of 100 ml iotroxate. Patients with bilirubin levels >3 times normal were excluded. ERC was indeterminate in three patients (4.7%) and CT-IVC in four (6.3%). Twenty-three patients had ductal calculi at ERC, and CT-IVC was positive in 22, with two false positives and one false negative: sensitivity 95.6%, specificity 94.3%. Stones were multiple in nine and solitary in 14. Of the 14 solitary stones, ten were ≤5 mm and eight were ≤4 mm. The bilirubin level in positive cases was within normal in 20. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats showed stones in only 27% of cases and surface rendered (SR) reformats in none. CT-IVC is highly accurate for detection of ductal calculi, including single small calculi, with a normal or near normal serum bilirubin. Axial images should be used for interpretation rather than MIP or SR reformats. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of anatomical structure of jaw bone trabecula with micro-CT and its accuracy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Guangchun; Zhang Xiaoyan; Jiang Ling; Li Xianglin; Zhang Di; Li Weixing; Jin Xizhen; Jin Dongchun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To measure the anatomic structures of the jaw and to discuss the accuracy of the method. Methods: The mandibular specimens were divided into ankle condylar group (3 specimens, regular trabecular architecture and mandibular body group (5 specimens, irregular trabecular trabecular architecture). Fifteen volumes of interests (VOI) were created in each group and the total of thirty were measured. The mean value and standard deviation of each parameter at each reconstruction voxel size were calculated. Repeated ANOVA test was used to determine whether the significant differences in the values existed between each parameter. Results: The structure model index (SMI) value in mandibular body group had significant difference (P<0.05) at all reconstruction voxel sizes compared with 18 μm group; but in condyle group, the reconstruction voxel size of 36 μm was not significant (P>0.05). The differences of trabecular thickness (Tb. Th), trabecular number (Tb. N) and trabecular separation (Tb. Sp) values between condyle and mandibular body groups were significant at all reconstruction voxel sizes (P<0.05). In condyle group, except for Tb. Th, Tb. N and Tb. Sp, the most parameter values were not significant at reconstruction pixel size of 36μm. In the mandible body group, the differences of all parameter values between different pixel sizes were significant. Conclusion: Micro-CT can reflect the anatomical changes of bone trabecula structure. (authors)

  4. Effect of CT image size and resolution on the accuracy of rock property estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaikin, Y.; Gurevich, B.; Iglauer, S.; Khachkova, T.; Kolyukhin, D.; Lebedev, M.; Lisitsa, V.; Reshetova, G.

    2017-05-01

    In order to study the effect of the micro-CT scan resolution and size on the accuracy of upscaled digital rock property estimation of core samples Bentheimer sandstone images with the resolution varying from 0.9 μm to 24 μm are used. We statistically show that the correlation length of the pore-to-matrix distribution can be reliably determined for the images with the resolution finer than 9 voxels per correlation length and the representative volume for this property is about 153 correlation length. Similar resolution values for the statistically representative volume are also valid for the estimation of the total porosity, specific surface area, mean curvature, and topology of the pore space. Only the total porosity and the number of isolated pores are stably recovered, whereas geometry and the topological measures of the pore space are strongly affected by the resolution change. We also simulate fluid flow in the pore space and estimate permeability and tortuosity of the sample. The results demonstrate that the representative volume for the transport property calculation should be greater than 50 correlation lengths of pore-to-matrix distribution. On the other hand, permeability estimation based on the statistical analysis of equivalent realizations shows some weak influence of the resolution on the transport properties. The reason for this might be that the characteristic scale of the particular physical processes may affect the result stronger than the model (image) scale.

  5. Prospective Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of MR Imaging versus CT for Acute Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repplinger, Michael D; Pickhardt, Perry J; Robbins, Jessica B; Kitchin, Douglas R; Ziemlewicz, Tim J; Hetzel, Scott J; Golden, Sean K; Harringa, John B; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-04-24

    Purpose To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with that of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in emergency department (ED) patients. Materials and Methods This was an institutional review board-approved, prospective, observational study of ED patients at an academic medical center (February 2012 to August 2014). Eligible patients were nonpregnant and 12- year-old or older patients in whom a CT study had been ordered for evaluation for appendicitis. After informed consent was obtained, CT and MR imaging (with non-contrast material-enhanced, diffusion-weighted, and intravenous contrast-enhanced sequences) were performed in tandem, and the images were subsequently retrospectively interpreted in random order by three abdominal radiologists who were blinded to the patients' clinical outcomes. Likelihood of appendicitis was rated on a five-point scale for both CT and MR imaging. A composite reference standard of surgical and histopathologic results and clinical follow-up was used, arbitrated by an expert panel of three investigators. Test characteristics were calculated and reported as point estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Analysis included images of 198 patients (114 women [58%]; mean age, 31.6 years ± 14.2 [range, 12-81 years]; prevalence of appendicitis, 32.3%). The sensitivity and specificity were 96.9% (95% CI: 88.2%, 99.5%) and 81.3% (95% CI: 73.5%, 87.3%) for MR imaging and 98.4% (95% CI: 90.5%, 99.9%) and 89.6% (95% CI: 82.8%, 94.0%) for CT, respectively, when a cutoff point of 3 or higher was used. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.2 (95% CI: 3.7, 7.7) and 0.04 (95% CI: 0, 0.11) for MR imaging and 9.4 (95% CI: 5.9, 16.4) and 0.02 (95% CI: 0.00, 0.06) for CT, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff point to maximize accuracy was 4 or higher, at which point there was no difference between MR imaging and CT

  6. The registration accuracy analysis of different CT-MRI imaging fusion method in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Shao Qian; Zhang Zicheng; Chen Jinhu; Chen Zhaoqiu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To find an effective CT-MRI image fusion protocol in brain tumor by analyzing the registration accuracy of different methods. Methods: The simulation CT scan and MRI T 1 WI imaging of 10 brain tumor patients obtained with same position were registered by Tris-Axes landmark ,Tris-Axes landmark + manual adjustment, mutual information and mutual information + manual adjustment method. The clinical tumor volume (CTV) were contoured on both CT and MRI images respectively. The accuracy of image fusion was assessed by the mean distance of five bone markers (d 1-5 ), central position of CTV (d CTV ) the percentage of CTV overlap (P CT-MRI ) between CT and MRI images. The difference between different methods was analyzed by Freedman M non-parameter test. Results: The difference of the means d1-5 between the Tris-Axes landmark,Tris-Axes landmark plus manual adjustment,mutual information and mutual information plus manual adjustment methods were 0.28 cm ±0.12 cm, 0.15 cm ±0.02 cm, 0.25 cm± 0.19 cm, 0.10 cm ± 0.06 cm, (M = 14.41, P = 0.002). the means d CTV were 0.59 cm ± 0.28 cm, 0.60 cm± 0.32 cm, 0.58 cm ± 0.39 cm, 0.42 cm± 0.30 cm (M = 9.72, P = 0.021), the means P CT-MRI were 0.69% ±0.18%, 0.68% ±0.16%, 0.66% ±0.17%, 0.74% ±0.14% (M =14.82, P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: Mutual information plus manual adjustment registration method was the preferable fusion method for brain tumor patients. (authors)

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT in Paediatric Intracranial Neoplastic Lesions - Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of paediatric tumours in developing countries could be attributed to the increased percentage (39% of total population of children) in the overall population. Therefore, extensive researches should be under taken in the field of Paediatric Oncology in the third world. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT by comparing the pre-operative radiological findings of paediatric brain tumours with post-operative histopathological findings on the basis of characteristic radiological features of various tumours. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital based prospective, cross-sectional and descriptive study carried out in Radiology Dept, KEMU / Mayo Hospital, Lahore. Study was conducted over a period of 3 years from June 2005 till June 2008 and comprised of 100 cases of paediatric brain tumours up to 12 years of age. Cases were also collected from Mayo and Children Hospital, Lahore. Results: Topographically, supratentorial tumours were found more than infratentorial 55 : 45. Low grade were more common than high grade 73 : 27. The most common tumour was astrocytoma with 52 cases. Medulloblastoma ranked the second with 16 cases followed by craniopharyngioma with 12 cases. Conclusion: The diagnostic accuracy of CT scan was found to be 83% when correlated with histopathology. CT proved fairly accurate in detection of paediatric intracranial neoplastic lesions. As CT is relatively commonly available inexpensive modality than MRI so it can be used as non invasive imaging modality. (author)

  8. Acute appendicitis: sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of thin-section contrast-enhanced CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Yon; Choi, Dong Il; Park, Hae Won; Lee, Young Rae; Kook, Shin Ho; Kwang, Hyon Joo; Kim, Seung Kwon; Chung, Eun Chul

    2002-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of individual contrast-enhanced helical CT findings of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively reviewed the appendiceal helical CT scans, obtained after intravenous contrast administration (abdomen; 7-mm collimation, abdominopelvic junction; 5-mm collimation), of 50 patients with surgically proven acute appendicitis and 112 with alternative diagnoses. The following parameters were analysed by three radiologists: enlarged appendix (>6 mm in diameter), appendiceal wall thickening, appendiceal wall enhancement, no identification of the appendix, appendicolith(s), (appendiceal) intraluminal air, abscess, lymphadenopathy, terminal ileal wall thickening, focal cecal apical thickening, focal colonic wall thickening, and segmental colonic wall thickening. The CT findings of acute appendicitis that statistically distinguished it from alternative diagnoses were an enlarged appendix (sensitivity; 92%, specificity; 93%, diagnostic accuracy; 93%), appendiceal wall thickening (for these three parameters: 68%, 96% and 88%, respectively), periappendiceal fat stranding (90%, 79%, 82%), appendiceal wall enhancement (72%, 86%, 82%), appendicolith (16%, 100%, 74%), and focal cecal apical thickening (14%, 100%, 74%) (for each, p<0305). On thin-section contrast-enhanced helical CT, an enlarged appendix and periappendiceal fat stranding were found in 90% or more patients with acute appendicitis. Appendiceal wall thickening and enhancement were alearly demonstrated and significant findings for diagnosis. Less common but specific findings include appendicolith, focal cecal apical thickening and intramural air, can also help us establish a diagnosis of acute appendicitis

  9. A systematic review on diagnostic accuracy of CT-based detection of significant coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janne d'Othee, Bertrand; Siebert, Uwe; Cury, Ricardo; Jadvar, Hossein; Dunn, Edward J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic review of diagnostic accuracy of contrast enhanced coronary computed tomography (CE-CCT). Background: Noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) by CE-CCT as an alternative to catheter-based coronary angiography (CCA) may improve patient management. Methods: Forty-one articles published between 1997 and 2006 were included that evaluated native coronary arteries for significant stenosis and used CE-CCT as diagnostic test and CCA as reference standard. Study group characteristics, study methodology and diagnostic outcomes were extracted. Pooled summary sensitivity and specificity of CE-CCT were calculated using a random effects model (1) for all coronary segments, (2) assessable segments, and (3) per patient. Results: The 41 studies totaled 2515 patients (75% males; mean age: 59 years, CAS prevalence: 59%). Analysis of all coronary segments yielded a sensitivity of 95% (80%, 89%, 86%, 98% for electron beam CT, 4/8-slice, 16-slice and 64-slice MDCT, respectively) for a specificity of 85% (77%, 84%, 95%, 91%). Analysis limited to segments deemed assessable by CT showed sensitivity of 96% (86%, 85%, 98%, 97%) for a specificity of 95% (90%, 96%, 96%, 96%). Per patient, sensitivity was 99% (90%, 97%, 99%, 98%) and specificity was 76% (59%, 81%, 83%, 92%). Heterogeneity was quantitatively important but not explainable by patient group characteristics or study methodology. Conclusions: Current diagnostic accuracy of CE-CCT is high. Advances in CT technology have resulted in increases in diagnostic accuracy and proportion of assessable coronary segments. However, per patient, accuracy may be lower and CT may have more limited clinical utility in populations at high risk for CAD

  10. Spatial Component Position in Total Hip Arthroplasty. Accuracy and repeatability with a new CT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivecrona, H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: 3D detection of centerpoints of prosthetic cup and head after total hip arthroplasty (THA) using CT. Material and Methods: Two CT examinations, 10 min apart, were obtained from each of 10 patients after THA. Two independent examiners placed landmarks in images of the prosthetic cup and head. All landmarking was repeated after 1 week. Centerpoints were calculated and compared. Results: Within volumes, all measurements of centerpoints of cup and head fell, with a 95% confidence, within one CT-voxel of any other measurement of the same object. Across two volumes, the mean error of distance between center of cup and prosthetic head was 1.4 mm (SD 0.73). Intra- and interobserver 95% accuracy limit was below 2 mm within and below 3 mm across volumes. No difference between intra- and interobserver measurements occurred. A formula for converting finite sets of point landmarks in the radiolucent tread of the cup to a centerpoint was stable. The percent difference of the landmark distances from a calculated spherical surface was within one CT-voxel. This data was normally distributed and not dependent on observer or trial. Conclusion: The true 3D position of the centers of cup and prosthetic head can be detected using CT. Spatial relationship between the components can be analyzed visually and numerically

  11. Spatial Component Position in Total Hip Arthroplasty. Accuracy and repeatability with a new CT method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivecrona, H. [Soedersjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Hand Surgery; Weidenhielm, L. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedics; Olivecrona, L. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Noz, M.E. [New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Maguire, G.Q. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Kista (Sweden). Inst. for Microelectronics and Information Technology; Zeleznik, M. P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Svensson, L. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematics; Jonson, T. [Eskadern Foeretagsutveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: 3D detection of centerpoints of prosthetic cup and head after total hip arthroplasty (THA) using CT. Material and Methods: Two CT examinations, 10 min apart, were obtained from each of 10 patients after THA. Two independent examiners placed landmarks in images of the prosthetic cup and head. All landmarking was repeated after 1 week. Centerpoints were calculated and compared. Results: Within volumes, all measurements of centerpoints of cup and head fell, with a 95% confidence, within one CT-voxel of any other measurement of the same object. Across two volumes, the mean error of distance between center of cup and prosthetic head was 1.4 mm (SD 0.73). Intra- and interobserver 95% accuracy limit was below 2 mm within and below 3 mm across volumes. No difference between intra- and interobserver measurements occurred. A formula for converting finite sets of point landmarks in the radiolucent tread of the cup to a centerpoint was stable. The percent difference of the landmark distances from a calculated spherical surface was within one CT-voxel. This data was normally distributed and not dependent on observer or trial. Conclusion: The true 3D position of the centers of cup and prosthetic head can be detected using CT. Spatial relationship between the components can be analyzed visually and numerically.

  12. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Willemink, Martin J; Schmidt, Bernhard T; Flohr, Thomas; Schilham, Arnold; Milles, Julien; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2017-09-01

    To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Adding two phantom rings simulated increased patient size. For third-generation dual source CT (DSCT), tube voltage combinations of 150Sn and 70, 80, 90, 100 kVp were analysed. For dual layer CT (DLCT), 120 and 140 kVp were used. Scans were repeated three times. Median normalized values and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated for all kVp settings and phantom sizes. Correlation between measured and known iodine concentrations was excellent for both systems (R = 0.999-1.000, p < 0.0001). For DSCT, median measurement errors ranged from -0.5% (IQR -2.0, 2.0%) at 150Sn/70 kVp and -2.3% (IQR -4.0, -0.1%) at 150Sn/80 kVp to -4.0% (IQR -6.0, -2.8%) at 150Sn/90 kVp. For DLCT, median measurement errors ranged from -3.3% (IQR -4.9, -1.5%) at 140 kVp to -4.6% (IQR -6.0, -3.6%) at 120 kVp. Larger phantom sizes increased variability of iodine measurements (p < 0.05). Iodine concentration can be accurately quantified with state-of-the-art DECT systems from two vendors. The lowest absolute errors were found for DSCT using the 150Sn/70 kVp or 150Sn/80 kVp combinations, which was slightly more accurate than 140 kVp in DLCT. • High-end CT scanners allow accurate iodine quantification using different DECT techniques. • Lowest measurement error was found in scans with largest photon energy separation. • Dual-source CT quantified iodine slightly more accurately than dual layer CT.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of high-definition CT coronary angiography in high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, S.S.; Morgan-Hughes, G.; Ukoumunne, O.; Clayton, B.; Davies, E.J.; Nikolaou, V.; Hyde, C.J.; Shore, A.C.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) using a combination of high-definition CT (HD-CTCA) and high level of reader experience, with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the reference standard, in high-risk patients for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods: Three hundred high-risk patients underwent HD-CTCA and ICA. Independent experts evaluated the images for the presence of significant CAD, defined primarily as the presence of moderate (≥50%) stenosis and secondarily as the presence of severe (≥70%) stenosis in at least one coronary segment, in a blinded fashion. HD-CTCA was compared to ICA as the reference standard. Results: No patients were excluded. Two hundred and six patients (69%) had moderate and 178 (59%) had severe stenosis in at least one vessel at ICA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 97.1%, 97.9%, 99% and 93.9% for moderate stenosis, and 98.9%, 93.4%, 95.7% and 98.3%, for severe stenosis, on a per-patient basis. Conclusion: The combination of HD-CTCA and experienced readers applied to a high-risk population, results in high diagnostic accuracy comparable to ICA. Modern generation CT systems in experienced hands might be considered for an expanded role. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of High-Definition CT Angiography (HD-CTCA) has been assessed. • Invasive Coronary angiography (ICA) is the reference standard. • Diagnostic accuracy of HD-CTCA is comparable to ICA. • Diagnostic accuracy is not affected by coronary calcium or stents. • HD-CTCA provides a non-invasive alternative in high-risk patients.

  14. Stopping power accuracy and achievable spatial resolution of helium ion imaging using a prototype particle CT detector system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volz Lennart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A precise relative stopping power map of the patient is crucial for accurate particle therapy. Charged particle imaging determines the stopping power either tomographically – particle computed tomography (pCT – or by combining prior knowledge from particle radiography (pRad and x-ray CT. Generally, multiple Coulomb scattering limits the spatial resolution. Compared to protons, heavier particles scatter less due to their lower charge/mass ratio. A theoretical framework to predict the most likely trajectory of particles in matter was developed for light ions up to carbon and was found to be the most accurate for helium comparing for fixed initial velocity. To further investigate the potential of helium in particle imaging, helium computed tomography (HeCT and radiography (HeRad were studied at the Heidel-berg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre (HIT using a prototype pCT detector system registering individual particles, originally developed by the U.S. pCT collaboration. Several phantoms were investigated: modules of the Catphan QA phantom for analysis of spatial resolution and achievable stopping power accuracy, a paediatric head phantom (CIRS and a custom-made phantom comprised of animal meat enclosed in a 2 % agarose mixture representing human tissue. The pCT images were reconstructed applying the CARP iterative reconstruction algorithm. The MTF10% was investigated using a sharp edge gradient technique. HeRad provides a spatial resolution above that of protons (MTF1010%=6.07 lp/cm for HeRad versus MTF10%=3.35 lp/cm for proton radiography. For HeCT, the spatial resolution was limited by the number of projections acquired (90 projections for a full scan. The RSP accuracy for all inserts of the Catphan CTP404 module was found to be 2.5% or better and is subject to further optimisation. In conclusion, helium imaging appears to offer higher spatial resolution compared to proton imaging. In future studies, the advantage of helium imaging compared to other

  15. Experimental estimation of regional lung water volume by histogram of pulmonary CT numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shiro; Momoki, Shigeru; Asai, Toshihiko; Shimada, Takeshi; Tamano, Masahiro; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Yoshimura, Masaharu

    1989-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were made to assess the ability of pulmonary CT numbers to quantitatively determine regional water volume in cases of pulmonary congestion or edema associated with left heart failure. In vitro experiment revealed a good linear correlation between the volume of injected water and the determined CT number of polyethylene tube packed with sponge. In the subsequent in vivo experiment with 10 adult mongrel dogs, lung water volumes obtained by pulmonary CT numbers were found to be consistent with the actual volumes. Pulmonary CT numbers for water volume proved to become parameters to quantitatively evaluate pulmonary congestion or edema. (Namekawa, K)

  16. Accuracy of hepatocellular carcinoma detection on multidetector CT in a transplant liver population with explant liver correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addley, H.C.; Griffin, N.; Shaw, A.S.; Mannelli, L.; Parker, R.A.; Aitken, S.; Wood, H.; Davies, S.; Alexander, G.J.; Lomas, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation. Secondary aims were to examine the effect of radiologist experience and lesion size on diagnostic accuracy. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine patients (72% male with a mean age of 56.5 years) underwent liver transplantation following preoperative triple-phase MDCT examination of the liver. MDCT examinations were retrospectively independently reviewed by three radiologists for the presence and location of suspected HCCs, with the diagnostic confidence recorded using a five-point confidence scale. MDCT examinations were compared with explant specimens for histopathological correlation. Results: Histopathological results demonstrated 46 HCCs in 29 of the 39 patients. Analysis demonstrated a sensitivity of 65-75% and specificity of 47-88% for detection of HCC lesions. The sensitivity dropped to 48-57% for lesions of size ≤20 mm. As the diagnostic confidence increased, there was a further decrease in the sensitivity (4-26%). The radiologist with the greatest number of years experience was found to have a significantly higher accuracy of detection of HCC lesions compared with the least experienced radiologist. Conclusion: Larger lesion size of HCC and greater number of years experience of the radiologist resulted in significantly higher accuracy of HCC lesion detection. The overall sensitivity and specificity results for MDCT detection of HCC are comparable to previous helical CT imaging.

  17. Reduction of Cone-Beam CT scan time without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westberg, Jonas; Jensen, Henrik R.; Bertelsen, Anders; Brink, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Background. In modern radiotherapy accelerators are equipped with 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) which is used to verify patient position before treatment. The verification is based on an image registration between the CBCT acquired just before treatment and the CT scan made for the treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to minimise the scan time of the CBCT without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT. Material and methods. Fast scans were simulated by reducing the number of acquired projection images, i.e. new reconstructions based on a subset of the original projections were made. The deviation between the registrations of these new reconstructions and the original registration was measured as function of the amount of reduction. Results and Discussion. Twenty nine head and neck (HandN) and 11 stereotactic lung patients were included in the study. The mean of the registration deviation did not differ significantly from zero independently of the number of projections included in the reconstruction. Except for the smallest subset of reconstructions (10% and 25% of the original projection for the lung and HandN patients, respectively) the standard deviation of the registration differences was constant. The standard deviations were approximately 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm for the HandN and lung group, respectively. Based on these results an in-house developed solution, able to reduce the Cone-Beam CT scan time, has been implemented clinically

  18. Detection of relevant colonic neoplasms with PET/CT: promising accuracy with minimal CT dose and a standardised PET cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, Wolfgang [Multiorgan Screening Foundation, Frankfurt (Germany); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Volker, Teresa; Zoephel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Joerg [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Wiedemann, Baerbel [University Hospital Dresden, Institute of Medical Informatics and Biometrics, Dresden (Germany); Wehrmann, Ursula [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Koch, Arne; Abolmaali, Nasreddin [University Hospital Dresden, Oncoray, Dresden (Germany); Toussaint, Todd; Luboldt, Hans-Joachim [Multiorgan Screening Foundation, Frankfurt (Germany); Middendorp, Markus; Gruenwald, Frank [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Frankfurt (Germany); Aust, Daniela [University Hospital Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    To determine the performance of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of relevant colorectal neoplasms (adenomas {>=}10 mm, with high-grade dysplasia, cancer) in relation to CT dose and contrast administration and to find a PET cut-off. 84 patients, who underwent PET/CT and colonoscopy (n=79)/sigmoidoscopy (n=5) for (79 x 6+5 x 2)=484 colonic segments, were included in a retrospective study. The accuracy of low-dose PET/CT in detecting mass-positive segments was evaluated by ROC analysis by two blinded independent reviewers relative to contrast-enhanced PET/CT. On a per-lesion basis characteristic PET values were tested as cut-offs. Low-dose PET/CT and contrast-enhanced PET/CT provide similar accuracies (area under the curve for the average ROC ratings 0.925 vs. 0.929, respectively). PET demonstrated all carcinomas (n=23) and 83% (30/36) of relevant adenomas. In all carcinomas and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (n=10) the SUV{sub max} was {>=}5. This cut-off resulted in a better per-segment sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) than the average PET/CT reviews (sensitivity: 89% vs. 82%; NPV: 99% vs. 98%). All other tested cut-offs were inferior to the SUV{sub max}. FDG-PET/CT provides promising accuracy for colorectal mass detection. Low dose and lack of iodine contrast in the CT component do not impact the accuracy. The PET cut-off SUV{sub max}{>=} 5 improves the accuracy. (orig.)

  19. Detection of relevant colonic neoplasms with PET/CT: promising accuracy with minimal CT dose and a standardised PET cut-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luboldt, Wolfgang; Volker, Teresa; Zoephel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Wehrmann, Ursula; Koch, Arne; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Toussaint, Todd; Luboldt, Hans-Joachim; Middendorp, Markus; Gruenwald, Frank; Aust, Daniela; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the performance of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of relevant colorectal neoplasms (adenomas ≥10 mm, with high-grade dysplasia, cancer) in relation to CT dose and contrast administration and to find a PET cut-off. 84 patients, who underwent PET/CT and colonoscopy (n=79)/sigmoidoscopy (n=5) for (79 x 6+5 x 2)=484 colonic segments, were included in a retrospective study. The accuracy of low-dose PET/CT in detecting mass-positive segments was evaluated by ROC analysis by two blinded independent reviewers relative to contrast-enhanced PET/CT. On a per-lesion basis characteristic PET values were tested as cut-offs. Low-dose PET/CT and contrast-enhanced PET/CT provide similar accuracies (area under the curve for the average ROC ratings 0.925 vs. 0.929, respectively). PET demonstrated all carcinomas (n=23) and 83% (30/36) of relevant adenomas. In all carcinomas and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (n=10) the SUV max was ≥5. This cut-off resulted in a better per-segment sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) than the average PET/CT reviews (sensitivity: 89% vs. 82%; NPV: 99% vs. 98%). All other tested cut-offs were inferior to the SUV max . FDG-PET/CT provides promising accuracy for colorectal mass detection. Low dose and lack of iodine contrast in the CT component do not impact the accuracy. The PET cut-off SUV max ≥ 5 improves the accuracy. (orig.)

  20. Automatic radiation dose monitoring for CT of trauma patients with different protocols: feasibility and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashigaito, K.; Becker, A.S.; Sprengel, K.; Simmen, H.-P.; Wanner, G.; Alkadhi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of automatic radiation dose monitoring software for computed tomography (CT) of trauma patients in a clinical setting over time, and to evaluate the potential of radiation dose reduction using iterative reconstruction (IR). Materials and methods: In a time period of 18 months, data from 378 consecutive thoraco-abdominal CT examinations of trauma patients were extracted using automatic radiation dose monitoring software, and patients were split into three cohorts: cohort 1, 64-section CT with filtered back projection, 200 mAs tube current–time product; cohort 2, 128-section CT with IR and identical imaging protocol; cohort 3, 128-section CT with IR, 150 mAs tube current–time product. Radiation dose parameters from the software were compared with the individual patient protocols. Image noise was measured and image quality was semi-quantitatively determined. Results: Automatic extraction of radiation dose metrics was feasible and accurate in all (100%) patients. All CT examinations were of diagnostic quality. There were no differences between cohorts 1 and 2 regarding volume CT dose index (CTDI_v_o_l; p=0.62), dose–length product (DLP), and effective dose (ED, both p=0.95), while noise was significantly lower (chest and abdomen, both −38%, p<0.017). Compared to cohort 1, CTDI_v_o_l, DLP, and ED in cohort 3 were significantly lower (all −25%, p<0.017), similar to the noise in the chest (–32%) and abdomen (–27%, both p<0.017). Compared to cohort 2, CTDI_v_o_l (–28%), DLP, and ED (both –26%) in cohort 3 was significantly lower (all, p<0.017), while noise in the chest (+9%) and abdomen (+18%) was significantly higher (all, p<0.017). Conclusion: Automatic radiation dose monitoring software is feasible and accurate, and can be implemented in a clinical setting for evaluating the effects of lowering radiation doses of CT protocols over time. - Highlights: • Automatic dose monitoring software can be

  1. Improving the accuracy of CT dimensional metrology by a novel beam hardening correction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Li, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Xi, Xiaoqi; Deng, Lin; Yan, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Its powerful nondestructive characteristics are attracting more and more research into the study of computed tomography (CT) for dimensional metrology, which offers a practical alternative to the common measurement methods. However, the inaccuracy and uncertainty severely limit the further utilization of CT for dimensional metrology due to many factors, among which the beam hardening (BH) effect plays a vital role. This paper mainly focuses on eliminating the influence of the BH effect in the accuracy of CT dimensional metrology. To correct the BH effect, a novel exponential correction model is proposed. The parameters of the model are determined by minimizing the gray entropy of the reconstructed volume. In order to maintain the consistency and contrast of the corrected volume, a punishment term is added to the cost function, enabling more accurate measurement results to be obtained by the simple global threshold method. The proposed method is efficient, and especially suited to the case where there is a large difference in gray value between material and background. Different spheres with known diameters are used to verify the accuracy of dimensional measurement. Both simulation and real experimental results demonstrate the improvement in measurement precision. Moreover, a more complex workpiece is also tested to show that the proposed method is of general feasibility. (paper)

  2. Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual energy CT in latest generation dual source and dual layer CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, P.O. Box EB44, Groningen (Netherlands); Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Willemink, Martin J.; Schilham, Arnold; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schmidt, Bernhard T.; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, P.O. Box EB44, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the accuracy of iodine quantification with dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in two high-end CT systems with different spectral imaging techniques. Five tubes with different iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were analysed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Adding two phantom rings simulated increased patient size. For third-generation dual source CT (DSCT), tube voltage combinations of 150Sn and 70, 80, 90, 100 kVp were analysed. For dual layer CT (DLCT), 120 and 140 kVp were used. Scans were repeated three times. Median normalized values and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated for all kVp settings and phantom sizes. Correlation between measured and known iodine concentrations was excellent for both systems (R = 0.999-1.000, p < 0.0001). For DSCT, median measurement errors ranged from -0.5% (IQR -2.0, 2.0%) at 150Sn/70 kVp and -2.3% (IQR -4.0, -0.1%) at 150Sn/80 kVp to -4.0% (IQR -6.0, -2.8%) at 150Sn/90 kVp. For DLCT, median measurement errors ranged from -3.3% (IQR -4.9, -1.5%) at 140 kVp to -4.6% (IQR -6.0, -3.6%) at 120 kVp. Larger phantom sizes increased variability of iodine measurements (p < 0.05). Iodine concentration can be accurately quantified with state-of-the-art DECT systems from two vendors. The lowest absolute errors were found for DSCT using the 150Sn/70 kVp or 150Sn/80 kVp combinations, which was slightly more accurate than 140 kVp in DLCT. (orig.)

  3. Accuracy of FDG-PET-CT in the Diagnostic Work-up of Vascular Prosthetic Graft Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, J. L. M.; Glaudemans, A. W. J. M.; Saleem, B. R.; Meerwaldt, R.; Alkefaji, H.; Prins, T. R.; Start, R. H. J. A.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) compared with computed tomography (CT) scanning and added value of fused FDG-PET CT in diagnosing vascular prosthetic graft infection. Design: Prospective cohort study with

  4. Clinical studies on thyroid CT number in Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamijo, Keiichi

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate CT Hounsfield unit (H.U.) of the thyroid in hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis. The mean thyroid CT number in 95 controls was 122±18 H.U.(±SD) and did not change significatly with advancing age. The mean thyroid CT number (±SD) of 85±22 H.U. in 60 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease was significantly lower than either in normal controls or 116±22 H.U. in 11 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease. Comparison of thyroid hormones and TSH receptor Ab values of untreated patients with a normal and an abnormally low thyroid CT number showed that serum total and free T 3 were significantly higher in the latter group than the former group. With respect to the effect of methimazol (MMI) on the thyroid CT number, in the untreated 10 patients with a low thyroid CT number, the initial mean CT number was 65±11 H.U. and increased significantly to 76±14 H.U. after treatment with MMI. In contrast, in 6 patients with a normal thyroid CT number prior to therapy, the initial mean thyroid CT number was 102±11 H.U. and fell significantly to 84±16 H.U. after treatment with MMI. The thyroid CT number in destructive thyrotoxicosis is markedly decreased to less than 70 H.U. and the mean values of 57±7 H.U. in 6 patients with silent thyroiditis and of 61±5 H.U. in 7 with subacute thyroiditis differ significantly from Graves' disease. In conclusion, the thyroid CT number is significantly reduced in hyperthyroid Graves' disease, normal in euthyroid Graves' disease and markedly decreased in destructive thyrotoxicosis. The high T-3 value seemed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a decline in the thyroid CT number in Graves' disease. An antithyroid drug therapy caused two different changes in the thyroid CT number, depending on whether the thyroid CT number prior to therapy was normal or low. (author)

  5. Clinical studies on thyroid CT number in Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamijo, Keiichi (Kamijo Thyroid and Pituitary Clinic, Sapporo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate CT Hounsfield unit (H.U.) of the thyroid in hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis. The mean thyroid CT number in 95 controls was 122[+-]18 H.U.([+-]SD) and did not change significatly with advancing age. The mean thyroid CT number ([+-]SD) of 85[+-]22 H.U. in 60 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease was significantly lower than either in normal controls or 116[+-]22 H.U. in 11 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease. Comparison of thyroid hormones and TSH receptor Ab values of untreated patients with a normal and an abnormally low thyroid CT number showed that serum total and free T[sub 3] were significantly higher in the latter group than the former group. With respect to the effect of methimazol (MMI) on the thyroid CT number, in the untreated 10 patients with a low thyroid CT number, the initial mean CT number was 65[+-]11 H.U. and increased significantly to 76[+-]14 H.U. after treatment with MMI. In contrast, in 6 patients with a normal thyroid CT number prior to therapy, the initial mean thyroid CT number was 102[+-]11 H.U. and fell significantly to 84[+-]16 H.U. after treatment with MMI. The thyroid CT number in destructive thyrotoxicosis is markedly decreased to less than 70 H.U. and the mean values of 57[+-]7 H.U. in 6 patients with silent thyroiditis and of 61[+-]5 H.U. in 7 with subacute thyroiditis differ significantly from Graves' disease. In conclusion, the thyroid CT number is significantly reduced in hyperthyroid Graves' disease, normal in euthyroid Graves' disease and markedly decreased in destructive thyrotoxicosis. The high T-3 value seemed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a decline in the thyroid CT number in Graves' disease. An antithyroid drug therapy caused two different changes in the thyroid CT number, depending on whether the thyroid CT number prior to therapy was normal or low. (author).

  6. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia; Halaweish, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE

  7. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia, E-mail: mccollough.cynthia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Halaweish, Ahmed [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  9. Accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for assessment of pediatric musculoskeletal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L.; Strouse, Peter J.; Biermann, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy has been shown in adults to be an effective diagnostic tool for a large number of musculoskeletal malignancies. To characterize our experience with CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of pediatric bone lesions and determine its utility in diagnosing pediatric osseous lesions, in a population where such lesions are commonly benign. From 2000 to 2009, 61 children underwent 63 CT-guided percutaneous biopsies. Radiological, pathological and clinical records were reviewed. Fourteen biopsies (22%) were performed on malignant lesions, while 49 biopsies (78%) were performed on benign lesions. Forty-nine of the 63 biopsies (78%) were adequate; these children underwent no further tissue sampling. Fourteen of the 63 biopsies (22%) were inadequate or non-conclusive. Of these patients, 12 underwent open biopsy. Retrospective analysis of percutaneous biopsies in these patients demonstrates that 9/12 provided clinically relevant information, and 4/12 patients received final diagnoses that confirmed initial core biopsy findings. No malignancies were diagnosed as benign on percutaneous biopsy. Overall, percutaneous core needle biopsy provided accurate diagnostic information in 84% (53/63) of biopsies. Our results demonstrate that CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is safe and beneficial in children. This study supports the use of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for primary diagnosis of pediatric bone lesions. (orig.)

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of CT, US and angiography in histologically verified hepatocellular carcinoma. Report on 125 foci in 84 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Hiroo; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Shima, Yasuo; Muramatsu, Yukio; Takayasu, Kenichi; Ushio, Kyosuke; Matsue, Hiroto; Sasagawa, Michizo; Yamada, Tatsuya

    1985-02-01

    Detectability of a total of 125 foci in 84 cases with HCC was evaluated. All foci were surgically resected and confirmed histologically. Tumor size >=2.1 cm in diameter:each modality has the accuracy more than 90%, 2.0>=Tumor size>=1.1 cm:CT has the accuracy of 81%, US 56% and Angio 56% respectively. 1.0 cm>=Tumor size:CT shows the accuracy of 35%, US 5% and Angio 30%. Combined with CT, US and Angio in the lesions more than 1.1 cm in diameter, over all accuracy was 100%. Whereas, in the foci less than 1.0 cm, over all accuracy was only 45%, comparing with that of intraoperative US. 57%. Therefore, it was clarified to be very difficult to detect these small lesions, and a careful survey is needed. (author).

  11. Accuracy of the detection of infratentorial stroke lesions using perfusion CT: an experimenter-blinded study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Hyouk; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Myeong Sub; You, Joshua H.; Lee, Ji Yong; Whang, Kum

    2010-01-01

    Although perfusion CT (PCT) for the detection of supratentorial stroke is well established, there is a dearth of evidence of its effectiveness in the detection of infratentorial stroke. Hence, this study compared sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PCT maps between infratentorial and supratentorial stroke lesions. One hundred patients with acute stroke who had successfully undergone near whole-brain PCT with the toggling table technique and follow-up MRI were included. Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test was performed at P 0.01 in all PCT maps) between supratentorial and infratentorial stroke. Also, there was no remarkable difference in both sensitivity and specificity of PCT maps. This was the first study to investigate the accuracy of PCT with the toggling table technique in detection of infratentorial stroke lesions. Clinically, PCT is highly reliable and accurate in detecting infratentorial stroke lesions. (orig.)

  12. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  13. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  14. Accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for lymph node staging in non-small-cell lung cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bao-jun; DONG Jing-cheng; XU Chang-qing; ZUO Chuan-tao; LE Jing-jing; GUAN Yi-hui; ZHAO Jun; WU Jin-feng; DUAN Xiao-hong; CAO Yu-xue

    2009-01-01

    Background This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of 2-(F18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography(18F-FDG-PET)/COmputed tomography(PET/CT)in the preoperative diagnosis of metastatic mediastinal and hilar lymph node in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods A total of 39 patients received preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT and the postoperative biopsy.We compared preoperative PET/CT scan results with corresponding intraoperative histopathalogic findings in 39 NSCLC patients.The sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive and negative predictive value of 18F-FDG PET/CT were assessed.Results Histopathologic examination confirmed metastasis in 57 out of the 208 excised lymph nodes;23 of the 57 nodes were mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes.The sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT in the preoperative diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in NSCLC patients were 65%,96.8%,92%,78.5%and 90%,respectively.Conclusions PET/CT scan showed good accuracy in the preoperative diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar lymph node metastasis in the patients with NSCLC.We recommend that PET/CT scanning be used as a first-line evaluation tool for tumor diagnosis,therapy evaluation and follow-up.

  15. Monte Carlo calculated CT numbers for improved heavy ion treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamhiyeh Sima

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Better knowledge of CT number values and their uncertainties can be applied to improve heavy ion treatment planning. We developed a novel method to calculate CT numbers for a computed tomography (CT scanner using the Monte Carlo (MC code, BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. To generate the initial beam shape and spectra we conducted full simulations of an X-ray tube, filters and beam shapers for a Siemens Emotion CT. The simulation output files were analyzed to calculate projections of a phantom with inserts. A simple reconstruction algorithm (FBP using a Ram-Lak filter was applied to calculate the pixel values, which represent an attenuation coefficient, normalized in such a way to give zero for water (Hounsfield unit (HU. Measured and Monte Carlo calculated CT numbers were compared. The average deviation between measured and simulated CT numbers was 4 ± 4 HU and the standard deviation σ was 49 ± 4 HU. The simulation also correctly predicted the behaviour of H-materials compared to a Gammex tissue substitutes. We believe the developed approach represents a useful new tool for evaluating the effect of CT scanner and phantom parameters on CT number values.

  16. Improving Intensity-Based Lung CT Registration Accuracy Utilizing Vascular Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate pulmonary image registration is a challenging problem when the lungs have a deformation with large distance. In this work, we present a nonrigid volumetric registration algorithm to track lung motion between a pair of intrasubject CT images acquired at different inflation levels and introduce a new vesselness similarity cost that improves intensity-only registration. Volumetric CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. The performance of four intensity-only registration algorithms was compared with and without adding the vesselness similarity cost function. Matching accuracy was evaluated using landmarks, vessel tree, and fissure planes. The Jacobian determinant of the transformation was used to reveal the deformation pattern of local parenchymal tissue. The average matching error for intensity-only registration methods was on the order of 1 mm at landmarks and 1.5 mm on fissure planes. After adding the vesselness preserving cost function, the landmark and fissure positioning errors decreased approximately by 25% and 30%, respectively. The vesselness cost function effectively helped improve the registration accuracy in regions near thoracic cage and near the diaphragm for all the intensity-only registration algorithms tested and also helped produce more consistent and more reliable patterns of regional tissue deformation.

  17. Comparison of CT number calibration techniques for CBCT-based dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, Alex [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom); McQuaid, Dualta; Nill, Simeon; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Oelfke, Uwe [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Murray, Julia; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin [The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Poludniowski, Gavin [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Nutting, Christopher [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Newbold, Kate [The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work was to compare and validate various computed tomography (CT) number calibration techniques with respect to cone beam CT (CBCT) dose calculation accuracy. CBCT dose calculation accuracy was assessed for pelvic, lung, and head and neck (H and N) treatment sites for two approaches: (1) physics-based scatter correction methods (CBCT{sub r}); (2) density override approaches including assigning water density to the entire CBCT (W), assignment of either water or bone density (WB), and assignment of either water or lung density (WL). Methods for CBCT density assignment within a commercially available treatment planning system (RS{sub auto}), where CBCT voxels are binned into six density levels, were assessed and validated. Dose-difference maps and dose-volume statistics were used to compare the CBCT dose distributions with the ground truth of a planning CT acquired the same day as the CBCT. For pelvic cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume deviations below 1.5 %. RS{sub auto} provided larger than average errors for pelvic treatments for patients with large amounts of adipose tissue. For H and N cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume differences below 1.0 % with CBCT{sub r} (0.5 %) and RS{sub auto} (0.6 %) performing best. For lung cases, WL and RS{sub auto} methods generated dose distributions most similar to the ground truth. The RS{sub auto} density override approach is an attractive option for CTN adjustments for a variety of anatomical sites. RS{sub auto} methods were validated, resulting in dose calculations that were consistent with those calculated on diagnostic-quality CT images, for CBCT images acquired of the lung, for patients receiving pelvic RT in cases without excess adipose tissue, and for H and N cases. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich und die Validierung mehrerer CT-Kalibrierungsmethoden zur Dosisberechnung auf der Grundlage von Kegelstrahlcomputertomographie

  18. A comprehensive study on decreasing the kilovoltage cone-beam CT dose by reducing the projection number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo; Lu, Haibin; Palta, Jatinder

    2010-05-12

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on registration accuracy and image qualities with a reduced number of planar projections used in volumetric imaging reconstruction. The ultimate goal is to evaluate the possibility of reducing the patient dose while maintaining registration accuracy under different projection-number schemes for various clinical sites. An Elekta Synergy Linear accelerator with an onboard CBCT system was used in this study. The quality of the Elekta XVI cone-beam three-dimensional volumetric images reconstructed with a decreasing number of projections was quantitatively evaluated by a Catphan phantom. Subsequently, we tested the registration accuracy of imaging data sets on three rigid anthropomorphic phantoms and three real patient sites under the reduced projection-number (as low as 1/6th) reconstruction of CBCT data with different rectilinear shifts and rota-tions. CBCT scan results of the Catphan phantom indicated the CBCT images got noisier when the number of projections was reduced, but their spatial resolution and uniformity were hardly affected. The maximum registration errors under the small amount transformation of the reference CT images were found to be within 0.7 mm translation and 0.3 masculine rotation. However, when the projection number was lower than one-fourth of the full set with a large amount of transformation of reference CT images, the registration could easily be trapped into local minima solutions for a nonrigid anatomy. We concluded, by using projection-number reduction strategy under conscientious care, imaging-guided localization procedure could achieve a lower patient dose without losing the registration accuracy for various clinical sites and situations. A faster scanning time is the main advantage compared to the mA decrease-based, dose-reduction method.

  19. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasound, Contrast-enhanced CT, and Conventional MRI for Differentiating Leiomyoma From Leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; McLean, Karen; Sciallis, Andrew P; Alves, Timothy; Maturen, Katherine E; Mervak, Benjamin M; Moore, Andreea G; Wasnik, Ashish P; Erba, Jake; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether uterine leiomyoma can be distinguished from uterine leiomyosarcoma on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without diffusion-weighted imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained and informed consent was waived for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective case-control diagnostic accuracy study. All subjects with resected uterine leiomyosarcoma diagnosed over a 17-year period (1998-2014) at a single institution for whom pre-resection US (n = 10), CT (n = 11), or MRI (n = 7) was available were matched by tumor size and imaging modality with 28 subjects with resected uterine leiomyoma. Six blinded radiologists (three attendings, three residents) assigned 5-point Likert scores for the following features: (1) margins, (2) necrosis, (3) hemorrhage, (4) vascularity, (5) calcifications, (6) heterogeneity, and (7) likelihood of malignancy (primary end point). Mean suspicion scores were calculated and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. The ability of individual morphologic features to predict malignancy was assessed with logistic regression. Mean suspicion scores were 2.5 ± 1.2 (attendings) and 2.4 ± 1.3 (residents) for leiomyoma, and 2.7 ± 1.3 (attendings) and 2.7 ± 1.4 (residents) for leiomyosarcoma. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (range: 0.330-0.685) were not significantly different from chance, either overall (P = .36-.88) or by any modality (P = .28-.96), for any reader. Reader experience had no effect on diagnostic accuracy. No morphologic parameter was significantly predictive of malignancy (P = .10-.97). Uterine leiomyoma cannot be differentiated accurately from leiomyosarcoma on US, CT, or MRI without diffusion-weighted imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Learning linear spatial-numeric associations improves accuracy of memory for numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Ann Thompson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory for numbers improves with age and experience. One potential source of improvement is a logarithmic-to-linear shift in children’s representations of magnitude. To test this, Kindergartners and second graders estimated the location of numbers on number lines and recalled numbers presented in vignettes (Study 1. Accuracy at number-line estimation predicted memory accuracy on a numerical recall task after controlling for the effect of age and ability to approximately order magnitudes (mapper status. To test more directly whether linear numeric magnitude representations caused improvements in memory, half of children were given feedback on their number-line estimates (Study 2. As expected, learning linear representations was again linked to memory for numerical information even after controlling for age and mapper status. These results suggest that linear representations of numerical magnitude may be a causal factor in development of numeric recall accuracy.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh; Pal, Sujoy; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma, suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. This was a retrospective study. Data from 180 patients (age 56.3 ± 10.4 years; 126 men, 54 women) with histopathologically proven oesophageal carcinoma (squamous cell 115, adenocarcinoma 59, neuroendocrine carcinoma 4, small cell 1, poorly differentiated 1) who had undergone 227 18 F-FDG PET/CT studies for suspected recurrence were analysed. Recurrence was suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. PET/CT images were revaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus. Findings were grouped into local, nodal and distant recurrence. Results were compared to those from contrast-enhanced (CE) CT when available (109 patients). Clinical/imaging follow-up (minimum 6 months) with histopathology (when available) was taken as the reference standard. Of the 227 18 F-FDG PET/CT studies,166 were positive and 61 were negative for recurrent disease. PET/CT showed local recurrence in 134, nodal recurrence in 115 and distant recurrence in 47, with more than one site of recurrence in 34. The PET/CT findings were true-positive in 153 studies, true-negative in 54, false-positive in 13 and false-negative in 7. The sensitivity of 18 F-FDG PET/CT was 96 %, the specificity was 81 %, the positive and negative predictive values were 92 % and 89 %, respectively, and the accuracy was 91 %. PET/CT showed similar accuracy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and in those with adenocarcinoma (P = 0.181). 18 F-FDG PET/CT was more specific than CECT (67 % vs. 21 %; P 18 F-FDG PET/CT shows high accuracy in the detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma. It is more specific than and is superior to CECT in the detection of nodal recurrence. (orig.)

  3. Derivation of linear attenuation coefficients from CT numbers for low-energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Y.

    1999-01-01

    One can estimate photon attenuation properties from the CT number. In a standard method one assumes that the linear attenuation coefficient is proportional to electron density and ignores its nonlinear dependence on atomic number. When the photon energy is lower than about 50 keV, such as for brachytherapy applications, however, photoelectric absorption and Rayleigh scattering become important. Hence the atomic number must be explicitly considered in estimating the linear attenuation coefficient. In this study we propose a method to more accurately estimate the linear attenuation coefficient of low-energy photons from CT numbers. We formulate an equation that relates the CT number to the electron density and the effective atomic number. We use a CT calibration phantom to determine unknown coefficients in the equation. The equation with a given CT number is then solved for the effective atomic number, which in turn is used to calculate the linear attenuation coefficient for low-energy photons. We use the CT phantom to test the new method. The method significantly improves the standard method in estimating the attenuation coefficient at low photon energies (20keV≤E≤40keV) for materials with high atomic numbers. (author)

  4. Accuracy limits for the determination of cortical width and density: the influence of object size and CT imaging parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevrhal, S.; Engelke, K.; Kalender, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we analysed the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) measurements in assessing cortical bone. We determined the dependency of thickness and density measurements on the true width and density of the cortex and on the spatial resolution in the CT images using two optimized segmentation methods. As a secondary goal, we assessed the ability of CT to reflect small changes in cortical thickness. Two different bone-mimicking phantoms with varying cortical thickness were scanned with single-slice CT on a Somatom Plus 4 scanner. Images were reconstructed with both a standard and a high-resolution convolution kernel. Two special operator-independent segmentation methods were used to automatically detect the edges of the cortical shell. We measured cortical thickness and density and compared the phantom measurements with theoretical computations by simulating a cross-sectional shape of the cortical shell. Based on the simulations, we calculated CT's power to detect small changes in cortical thickness. Simulations and phantom measurements were in very good agreement. Cortical thickness could be measured with an error of less than 10% if the true thickness was larger than 0.9 (0.7) mm for the standard (high-resolution) kernel which is close to the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread functions for these kernels and our scanner. Density measurements yielded errors of less than 10% for true cortical thickness values above two to three times the FWHM corresponding to 2.5 (2) mm in our case. The simulations showed that a 10% change in cortical width would not be detected with satisfying probability in bones with a cortical shell thinner than 1.2 mm. An accurate determination of the cortical thickness is limited to bones with a thickness higher than the FWHM of the scanner's point spread function. Therefore, the use of a high-resolution reconstruction kernel is crucial. Cortical bone mineral density can only be measured accurately in bones two to three

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of (18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullier E

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of (18 F-FDG positron emission tomography/ computerized tomography (PET/CT for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC of colorectal cancer (CRC. Methods: one hundred and forty six eligible patients referred for a PET/CT to evaluate CRC at a single institution were included consecutively and retrospectively. After joint training on 20 similar patient files, two nuclear physicians reviewed the PET/CT scans blindly and independently using a method specifically designed for PC detection. The gold standard was either histological results from surgical exploration for resected patients (n=65 or clinical follow up defined as the 3-month CT follow up supplemented by one year of clinical information and CT monitoring for non-resected patients (n=81. As secondary objectives we evaluated the interobserver reliability between the two PET/CT readings and the diagnostic accuracy of a contemporary ceCT (n=69 or CT component of the PET/CT (n=77 reviewed by an independent radiologist . The extent of PC according to a simplified Sugarbaker index (PCI was examined for the operated subgroup, when PCI was available from the surgeon and PET/CT (n=12. Results: according to the gold standard, 35/146 patients had PC (including 19 of 65 patients with histological gold standard and 16 of 81 patients with clinical follow up gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were 88% and 96% respectively and positive and negative predictive values and accuracy, 88%, 96% and 94% respectively. For CT alone, the corresponding values were: 68%, 92%, 72%, 90% and 86%. The interobserver agreement for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis in PET/CT showed high agreement at 0.91 (Kappa. Median PCI was 3 [range: 1–13] when assessed by surgeons and 4 [range: 1–10] on PET/CT. Focal uptake was the most frequently observed sign on PET. Conclusions: PET/CT appears to be an accurate and reproducible test for PC diagnosis in

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of dual energy CT angiography in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabel, C.; Bongers, M.N.; Syha, R.; Ketelsen, D.; Homann, G.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Nikolaou, K.; Bamberg, F.; Thomas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) represents a major and highly prevalent complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. The diagnostic, non-invasive work-up by computed tomography angiography (CTA) is limited in the presence of extensive calcification. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of dual energy CTA (DE-CTA) for the detection and characterization of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study 30 diabetic patients with suspected or known PAD were retrospectively included in the analysis. All subjects underwent DE-CTA (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) prior to invasive angiography, which served as the reference standard. Blinded analysis included assessment of the presence and degree of peripheral stenosis on curved multiplanar reformatting (MPR) and maximum intensity projections (MIP). Conventional measures of diagnostic accuracy were derived. Among the 30 subjects included in the analysis (83 % male, mean age 70.0 ± 10.5 years, 83 % diabetes type 2), the prevalence of critical stenosis in 331 evaluated vessel segments was high (30 %). Dual energy CT identified critical stenoses with a high sensitivity and good specificity using curved MPR (100 % and 93.1 %, respectively) and MIP images (99 % and 91.8 %, respectively). In stratified analysis, the diagnostic accuracy was higher for stenosis pertaining to the pelvic and thigh vessels as compared with the lower extremities (curved MPR accuracy 97.1 % vs. 99.2 vs. 90.9 %; respectively, p < 0.001). The use of DE-CTA allows reliable detection and characterization of peripheral arterial stenosis in patients with diabetes mellitus with higher accuracy in vessels in the pelvic and thigh regions compared with the vessels in the lower legs. (orig.) [de

  7. Interleaving cerebral CT perfusion with neck CT angiography. Pt. I. Proof of concept and accuracy of cerebral perfusion values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Marcel T.H.; Meijer, Frederick J.A.; Woude, Willem-Jan van der; Smit, Ewoud J.; Ginneken, Bram van; Prokop, Mathias; Manniesing, Rashindra [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    We present a novel One-Step-Stroke protocol for wide-detector CT scanners that interleaves cerebral CTP with volumetric neck CTA (vCTA). We evaluate whether the resulting time gap in CTP affects the accuracy of CTP values. Cerebral CTP maps were retrospectively obtained from 20 patients with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke and served as the reference standard. To simulate a 4 s gap for interleaving CTP with vCTA, we eliminated one acquisition at various time points of CTP starting from the bolus-arrival-time(BAT). Optimal timing of the vCTA was evaluated. At the time point with least errors, we evaluated elimination of a second time point (6 s gap). Mean absolute percentage errors of all perfusion values remained below 10 % in all patients when eliminating any one time point in the CTP sequence starting from the BAT. Acquiring the vCTA 2 s after reaching a threshold of 70HU resulted in the lowest errors (mean <3.0 %). Eliminating a second time point still resulted in mean errors <3.5 %. CBF/CBV showed no significant differences in perfusion values except MTT. However, the percentage errors were always below 10 % compared to the original protocol. Interleaving cerebral CTP with neck CTA is feasible with minor effects on the perfusion values. (orig.)

  8. Accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, K W; Kang, E-Y; Yong, H S; Woo, O H; Lee, K Y; Oh, Y-W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with application of iterative reconstruction (IR) according to nodule size, nodule density and CT tube currents, using artificial lung nodules within an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Eight artificial nodules (four diameters: 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; two CT densities: -630 HU that represents ground-glass nodule and +100 HU that represents solid nodule) were randomly placed inside a thoracic phantom. Scans were performed with tube current-time product to 10, 20, 30 and 50 mAs. Images were reconstructed with IR and filtered back projection (FBP). We compared volume estimates to a reference standard and calculated the absolute percentage error (APE). The APE of all nodules was significantly lower when IR was used than with FBP (7.5 ± 4.7% compared with 9.0 ±6.9%; p volumetry in low-dose CT by application of IR showed reliable accuracy in a phantom study. Lung nodule volumetry can be reliably applicable to all lung nodules including small, ground-glass nodules even in ultra-low-dose CT with application of IR. IR significantly improved the accuracy of lung nodule volumetry compared with FBP particularly for ground-glass (-630 HU) nodules. Volumetry in low-dose CT can be utilized in patient with lung nodule work-up, and IR has benefit for small, ground-glass lung nodules in low-dose CT.

  9. Accuracy of the detection of infratentorial stroke lesions using perfusion CT: an experimenter-blinded study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Hyouk; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Myeong Sub [Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); You, Joshua H. [Center for Health, Wellness, Fitness, Prevention, and Healing Across the Life Span, Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School of Rehabilitation Science, Yonsei University, Center for Movement Impairment Solutions, Wonju City (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Yong [Yonsei University, Department of Neurology, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Whang, Kum [Yonsei University, Department of Neurosurgery, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Although perfusion CT (PCT) for the detection of supratentorial stroke is well established, there is a dearth of evidence of its effectiveness in the detection of infratentorial stroke. Hence, this study compared sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PCT maps between infratentorial and supratentorial stroke lesions. One hundred patients with acute stroke who had successfully undergone near whole-brain PCT with the toggling table technique and follow-up MRI were included. Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test was performed at P < 0.01. There was no significant statistical difference in the accuracy (91.79% vs. 93.23% in regional cerebral blood volume; 92.26% vs. 95.31% in regional cerebral blood flow; 89.17% vs. 92.71% in mean transit time; 89.76% vs. 92.19% in time to peak; P > 0.01 in all PCT maps) between supratentorial and infratentorial stroke. Also, there was no remarkable difference in both sensitivity and specificity of PCT maps. This was the first study to investigate the accuracy of PCT with the toggling table technique in detection of infratentorial stroke lesions. Clinically, PCT is highly reliable and accurate in detecting infratentorial stroke lesions. (orig.)

  10. Low density lesion in solid mass on CT: Pathologic change and housfield number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae Il; Lim, Joo Won; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ko, Young Tae; Song, Mi Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Ju Hie

    1994-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic changes and housfield unit of the low density lesion in solid mass on CT. Pathologically proved solid mass was evaluated in regard to the shape and margin of the low density in the mass on the CT scans of 23 patient. The CT number of the low density lesion was correlated with the pathologic changes. Pathologic changes of the low density lesions were; necrosis (n=17), hemorrhage (n=13), cyst (n=4), myxoid degeneration (n=2), hyaline degeneration (n=1), fibrosis (n=1), and mixed cellularity (n=1). In 14 cases, more than 2 pathologic changes were seen. In 11 cases, necrosis was associated with hemorrhage. The CT number ranged from 11.5 to 44.9 Housfield unit(HU) (mean, 25.2 HU). The average CT number was 26.9 HU in hemorrhage and necrosis, 17.2 HU in cystic change, 20.9 HU in myxoid degeneration, 35.7 HU in hyaline de generation, 22.3 HU in fibrosis, and 21.4 HU in mixed cellularity. The hemorrhage and necrosis in 17 cases showed irregular margin, amorphous shape, and showed centrifugal distribution. The cystic change in 4 cases showed well defined margin, round shape, and peripheral location in solid mass. The low density lesions in solid mass on CT represented variable pathologic changes; necrosis, hemorrhage, cyst, myxoid degeneration, hyaline degeneration, fibrosis, and mixed cellularity. Pathologic changes would not be differentiated on the basis of CT number

  11. CT coronary angiography: Influence of different cardiac reconstruction intervals on image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: marc.dewey@charite.de; Teige, Florian [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany); Rutsch, Wolfgang [Department of Cardiology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: wolfgang.rutsch@charite.de; Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: peter.martus@charite.de; Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze image quality and diagnostic accuracy of different reconstruction intervals of coronary angiography using multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Materials and methods: For each of 47 patients, 10 ECG-gated MSCT reconstructions were generated throughout the RR interval from 0 to 90%, resulting in altogether 470 datasets. These datasets were randomly analyzed for image quality and accuracy and compared with conventional angiography. Statistical comparison of intervals was performed using nonparametric analysis for repeated measurements to account for clustering of arteries within patients. Results: Image reconstruction intervals centered at 80, 70, and 40% of the RR interval resulted (in that order) in the best overall image quality for all four main coronary vessels. Eighty percent reconstructions also yielded the highest diagnostic accuracy of all intervals. The combination of the three best intervals (80, 70, and 40%) significantly reduced the nondiagnostic rate as compared with 80% alone (p = 0.005). However, the optimal reconstruction interval combination achieved significantly improved specificities and nondiagnostic rates (p < 0.05). The optimal combination consisted of 1.7 {+-} 0.9 reconstruction intervals on average. In approximately half of the patients (49%, 23/47) a single reconstruction was optimal. In 18 (38%), 3 (6%), and 3 (6%) patients one, two, and three additional reconstruction intervals were required, respectively, to achieve optimal quality. In 28% of the patients the optimal combination consisted of reconstructions other than the three best intervals (80, 70, and 40%). Conclusion: Multiple image reconstruction intervals are essential to ensure high image quality and accuracy of CT coronary angiography.

  12. Assessment of the accuracy and reliability of the Topcon CT80 non-contact tonometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuehi, Kelechi C

    2006-09-01

    The reliability of non-contact tonometers has been reported extensively in the literature. This study was designed to assess reliability of the new Topcon CT80 non-contact tonometer in normotensive subjects, using the Goldmann tonometer as the standard. The accuracy of the Topcon CT 80 non-contact tonometer was assessed by comparing its IOP assessments with those of the Goldmann applanation tonometer, on 60 right eyes of young healthy subjects with normal intraocular pressures. Each subject's intraocular pressure was assessed with each technique on two separate occasions, one week apart. The reliability of each technique was determined by the assessment of its inter-session repeatability using the Bland-Altman method. The 95 per cent limits of agreement for the two methods were also determined. No statistically significant difference was found between the average intraocular pressures measured with the two techniques (p > 0.05). The inter-session repeatability indices for the two techniques did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). The mean difference in intraocular measurements between the two techniques was 0.2 +/- 1.5 mmHg (mean +/- SD) and the 95 per cent limits of agreement were -3.14 and +2.74 mmHg, with the non-contact tonometer returning higher readings than the Goldmann tonometer. In this sample of normotensive subjects, the Topcon CT80 non-contact tonometer proved to be accurate and as reliable as the Goldmann tonometer in the assessment of intraocular pressure. Thus, it can be used as an objective clinical method for the assessment of normal intraocular pressure.

  13. Coronary CT angiography using prospective ECG triggering. High diagnostic accuracy with low radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldi, E.; Ramos-Duran, L.; Abro, J.A.; Costello, P.; Zwerner, P.L.; Schoepf, U.J.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) using prospective ECG triggering (PT) for the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis compared to invasive coronary angiography (ICA). A total of 20 patients underwent coronary CTA with PT using a 128-slice CT scanner (Definition trademark AS+, Siemens) and ICA. All coronary CTA studies were evaluated for significant coronary artery stenoses (≥50% luminal narrowing) by 2 observers in consensus using the AHA-15-segment model. Findings in CTA were compared to those in ICA. Coronary CTA using PT had 88% sensitivity in comparison to 100% with ICA, 95% to 88% specificity, 80% to 92% positive predictive value and 97% to 100% negative predictive value for diagnosing significant coronary artery stenosis on per segment per patient analysis, respectively. Mean effective radiation dose-equivalent of CTA was 2.6±1 mSv. Coronary CTA using PT enables non-invasive diagnosis of significant coronary artery stenosis with high diagnostic accuracy in comparison to ICA and is associated with comparably low radiation exposure. (orig.) [de

  14. Tree-structured vector quantization of CT chest scans: Image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosman, P.C.; Tseng, C.; Gray, R.M.; Olshen, R.A.; Moses, L.E.; Davidson, H.C.; Bergin, C.J.; Riskin, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of lossy compressed images is often characterized by signal-to-noise ratios, informal tests of subjective quality, or receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves that include subjective appraisals of the value of an image for a particular application. The authors believe that for medical applications, lossy compressed images should be judged by a more natural and fundamental aspect of relative image quality: their use in making accurate diagnoses. They apply a lossy compression algorithm to medical images, and quantify the quality of the images by the diagnostic performance of radiologists, as well as by traditional signal-to-noise ratios and subjective ratings. The study is unlike previous studies of the effects of lossy compression in that they consider non-binary detection tasks, simulate actual diagnostic practice instead of using paired tests or confidence rankings, use statistical methods that are more appropriate for non-binary clinical data than are the popular ROC curves, and use low-complexity predictive tree-structured vector quantization for compression rather than DCT-based transform codes combined with entropy coding. Their diagnostic tasks are the identification of nodules (tumors) in the lungs and lymphadenopathy in the mediastinum from computerized tomography (CT) chest scans. For the image modality, compression algorithm, and diagnostic tasks they consider, the original 12 bit per pixel (bpp) CT image can be compressed to between 1 bpp and 2 bpp with no significant changes in diagnostic accuracy

  15. Reduction of Cone-Beam CT scan time without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Jonas; Jensen, Henrik R; Bertelsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy accelerators are equipped with 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) which is used to verify patient position before treatment. The verification is based on an image registration between the CBCT acquired just before treatment and the CT scan made for the treatment planning. The purpose...... of this study is to minimise the scan time of the CBCT without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT....

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI Versus CT for the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Pickhardt, Perry J; Riedesel, Erica L; Gill, Kara G; Robbins, Jessica B; Kitchin, Douglas R; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Harringa, John B; Reeder, Scott B; Repplinger, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    Appendicitis is frequently diagnosed in the emergency department, most commonly using CT. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI with that of contrast-enhanced CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis in adolescents when interpreted by abdominal radiologists and pediatric radiologists. Our study included a prospectively enrolled cohort of 48 patients (12-20 years old) with nontraumatic abdominal pain who underwent CT and MRI. Fellowship-trained abdominal and pediatric radiologists reviewed all CT and MRI studies in randomized order, blinded to patient outcome. Likelihood for appendicitis was rated on a 5-point scale (1, definitely not appendicitis; 5, definitely appendicitis) for CT, the unenhanced portion of the MRI, and the entire contrast-enhanced MRI study. ROC curves were generated and AUC compared for each scan type for all six readers and then stratified by radiologist type. Image test characteristics, interrater reliability, and reading times were compared. Sensitivity and specificity were 85.9% (95% CI, 76.2-92.7%) and 93.8% (95% CI, 89.7-96.7%) for unenhanced MRI, 93.6% (95% CI, 85.6-97.9%) and 94.3% (95% CI, 90.2-97%) for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 93.6% (95% CI, 85.6-97.9%) and 94.3% (95% CI, 90.2-97%) for CT. No difference was found in the diagnostic accuracy or interpretation time when comparing abdominal radiologists to pediatric radiologists (CT, 3.0 min vs 2.8 min; contrast-enhanced MRI, 2.4 min vs 1.8 min; unenhanced MRI, 1.5 min vs 2.3 min). Substantial agreement between abdominal and pediatric radiologists was seen for all methods (κ = 0.72-0.83). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI to diagnose appendicitis was very similar to CT. No statistically significant difference in accuracy was observed between imaging modality or radiologist subspecialty.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Volume Rendering Images of Multi-Detector CT for the Detection of Lumbar Transverse Process Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hak; Chun, Tong Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To compare the accuracy of three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) volume rendering techniques with axial images of multi-detector row computed tomography to identify lumbar transverse process (LTP) fractures in trauma patients. We retrospectively evaluated 42 patients with back pain as a result of blunt trauma between January and June of 2010. Two radiologists examined the 3D CT volume rendering images independently. The confirmation of a LTP fracture was based on the consensus of the axial images by the two radiologists. The results of 3D CT volume rendering images were compared with the axial images and the diagnostic powers (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy) were calculated. Seven of the 42 patients had twenty five lumbar transverse process fractures. The diagnostic power of the 3D CT volume rendering technique is as accurate as axial images. Reader 1, sensitivity 96%, specificity 100%, accuracy 99.9%; and Reader 2 sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.8%, accuracy 99.8%. The accordance of the two radiologists was 99.8%. 3D CT volume rendering images can alternate axial images to detect lumbar transverse process fractures with good image quality.

  18. Evaluation of the accuracy of ventricular volume measurement by ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei; Dai Ruping; Guo Yuyin

    1997-01-01

    The authors evaluated the accuracy of ventricular volume measured by ultrafast CT (UFCT); and (2) compared the value of ventricular volume derived from long- and short-axis view. Fourteen human left ventricular casts and 15 right ventricular casts were scanned by Imatron C-150 scanner along both the long- and short-axis. The scan protocol was similar to that used in vivo. Eight 7 mm-thick slices were obtained from each cast for both long- and short-axis views. Ventricular volume was determined by the modified Simpson's rule provided by Inamtron Inc. The actual volumes of the ventricular casts were determined by the amount of water displacement by the cast. The actual volumes for left and right ventricles were 55.57 +- 28.91 ml and 64.23 +- 24.51 ml, respectively, the left and right ventricular volumes determined by UFCT were 66.50 +- 33.04 ml and 76.47 +-28.70 ml from long-axis view, and 60.36 +- 29.90 ml and 75.36 +- 28.73 ml from short-axis view, respectively. The measurements by UFCT were significantly greater than the actual volumes of the casts, both for the left and right ventricles (P 0.990). Both left and right ventricular volumes can be determined by UFCT with identical accuracy for both long- and short-axis views in calculating ventricular volume; however, overestimation of ventricular volume by UFCT should be noted

  19. Para-aortic lymphadenectomy in advanced stage cervical cancer, a protocol for comparing safety, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of surgical staging versus PET-CT; PALDISC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Casper; Abbink, Karin; Rovers, Maroeska M; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Zusterzeel, Petra L M

    2018-01-01

    Currently, a PET-CT is used to assess the need for extended field radiotherapy of para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) in International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2-IVA (locally advanced stage) cervical cancer. A small study established a sensitivity and specificity estimate for PALN metastases of 50% (95% CI; 7-93%) and 83% (95% CI; 52-98%), respectively. Surgical staging of PALN may lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy. However, surgical staging of para-aortic lymph nodes in locally advanced stage cervical cancer is not common practice. Therefore, a phase 2 randomised controlled trial is needed to assess its safety and feasibility. In addition to standard imaging (MRI or CT scan) with PET-CT, 30 adult women with FIGO stage IB2, IIA2-IVA cervical cancer will be randomised to receive either surgical staging or usual PET-CT staging. Administering extended field radiotherapy will be based on lymphadenectomy results for the intervention group and on the PET-CT results for the control group. Follow-up visits at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will assess health-related quality of life and progression-free survival.Primary safety and feasibility outcomes of surgical staging will be assessed by calculating means with 95% confidence intervals for duration of surgery, number of complications, blood loss, nodal yield after para-aortic lymphadenectomy and treatment delay due to surgical staging. Secondary patient-centred outcomes on quality of life and first year survival will be documented and compared between the two groups. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values of MRI, PET-CT and surgical staging will be presented with 95% CI.. All analysis will be performed according to the intention to treat principle. This study will assess safety and feasibility, expressed as the number and severity of complications, effect on quality of life and the treatment delay due to surgically staging para-aortic lymph nodes in

  20. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Halaweish, A [Siemens Healthcare, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  1. Improvement of analysis precision upon the atomic number and electron density measurement by the dual x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Yukino; Morii, Hisashi; Koike, Akifumi; Okunoyama, Takaharu; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru

    2010-08-01

    To identify the factor impairing the material identification parameters, which is provided by the dual-energy X-ray computed tomography method using a conventional X-ray tube and a CdTe detector, linear attenuation coefficient was measured by the radioactivity of radio isotopes and compared with theoretical figure. In our study, the atomic number and the electron density is calculated from the linear attenuation coefficient obtained in CT measurement by 64-channel CdTe line detector. To estimate accuracy of CdTe line sensor, it is needed to obtain the linear attenuation coefficient accurately. Using a single detector, the linear attenuation coefficient is verified for accuracy. The energy resolution of CdTe detectors and the method of reconstruction are discussed.

  2. The accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in primary lymph node staging in high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oebek, Can; Doganca, Tuenkut [Acibadem Taksim Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kural, Ali Riza [Acibadem University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yildirim, Asif [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yuecetas, Ugur [Istanbul Training and Research Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirdag, Cetin [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdogan, Sarper M. [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Istanbul (Turkey); Kabasakal, Levent [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Collaboration: Members of Urooncology Association, Turkey

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET in predicting lymph node (LN) metastases in primary N staging in high-risk and very high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer in comparison with morphological imaging. This was a multicentre trial of the Society of Urologic Oncology in Turkey in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department of Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University. Patients were accrued from eight centres. Patients with high-risk and very high-risk disease scheduled to undergo surgical treatment with extended LN dissection between July 2014 and October 2015 were included. Either MRI or CT was used for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT was performed and evaluated at a single centre. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated for the detection of lymphatic metastases by PSMA PET/CT and morphological imaging. Kappa values were calculated to evaluate the correlation between the numbers of LN metastases detected by PSMA PET/CT and by histopathology. Data on 51 eligible patients are presented. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PSMA PET in detecting LN metastases in the primary setting were 53%, 86% and 76%, and increased to 67%, 88% and 81% in the subgroup with of patients with ≥15 LN removed. Kappa values for the correlation between imaging and pathology were 0.41 for PSMA PET and 0.18 for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT is superior to morphological imaging for the detection of metastatic LNs in patients with primary prostate cancer. Surgical dissection remains the gold standard for precise lymphatic staging. (orig.)

  3. Adrenal adenomas: relationship between histologic lipid-rich cells and CT attenuation number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Saito, Haruo; Matsuhashi, Toshio; Majima, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Masashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Moriya, Takuya

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between lipid-rich cells of the adrenal adenoma and precontrast computed tomographic (CT) attenuation numbers in three clinical groups. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five surgically resected adrenal adenomas were used. The clinical diagnoses of the patients included 13 cases of primary aldosteronism, 15 cases of Cushing's syndrome, and 7 non-functioning tumors. The number of lipid-rich clear cells was counted using a microscopic eyepiece grid that contained 100 squares. The results were expressed as the percentages of lipid-rich areas. Results: There was a strong inverse linear relationship between the percentage of lipid-rich cells and the precontrast CT attenuation number (R 2 =0.724, P<0.0001). There were significantly more lipid-rich cells in the primary aldosteronism and non-functioning tumor cases compared to cases of Cushing's syndrome (P=0.007 and 0.015, respectively). The CT attenuation numbers of the primary aldosteronism cases were significantly lower than those of Cushing's syndrome (P=0.0052). Furthermore, the CT attenuation numbers of the non-functioning tumor cases were lower than those of Cushing's syndrome cases. Conclusion: We showed that adrenal adenomas in primary aldosteronism and non-functioning tumors contain significantly more lipid-rich cells than those in Cushing's syndrome. They also showed significantly lower attenuation than that in Cushing's syndrome on CT scans. Our results suggest that precontrast CT attenuation numbers may be helpful in the differentiation of adenomas from non-adenomatous lesions, which include malignancies

  4. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice multidetector CT for detection of in-stent restenosis in an unselected, consecutive patient population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis, E-mail: sigurdisha@gmail.com [Boston Medical Center, 72 East Concord Street (Evans 124), Boston, MA, 02118 (United States); Gudnason, Thorarinn, E-mail: thorgudn@landspitali.is [Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Sigurdsson, Axel F., E-mail: axelfsig@landspitali.is [Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Gudjonsdottir, Jonina, E-mail: jonina@rd.is [Rontgen Domus Medica, Egilsgata 3, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Lehman, Sam J., E-mail: slehman@partners.org [Massachusetts General Hospital, 165 Cambridge Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Eyjolfsson, Kristjan, E-mail: kristey@landspitali.is [Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Scheving, Sigurpall S., E-mail: sigurpal@landspitali.is [Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Gibson, C. Michael, E-mail: mgibson@perfuse.org [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Hoffmann, Udo, E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org [Massachusetts General Hospital, 165 Cambridge Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Jonsdottir, Birna, E-mail: birna@rd.is [Rontgen Domus Medica, Egilsgata 3, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Andersen, Karl, E-mail: andersen@landspitali.is [Landspitali University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2010-11-15

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-CT) for detection of in-stent restenosis (ISR) in an unselected, consecutive patient population. Background: Detection of in-stent restenosis by cardiac CT would be a major advance for the evaluation of patients suspected of having ISR. However, the diagnostic accuracy of current generation 64-CT in this context is not fully established. Methods: We conducted a prospective study on patients with stable angina or acute coronary syndrome with no prior history of coronary artery disease. Six months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement they underwent a 64-CT scan (Toshiba Multi-Slice Aquilion 64) and consequently a repeat coronary angiography for comparison. Cardiac CT data sets were analyzed for the presence of in-stent restenosis by two independent expert readers blinded to the coronary angiographic data. Results: Ninety-three patients with a total of 140 stents were evaluated. Males comprised 82% of the study group and the mean age was 63 {+-} 10 years. The mean time from PCI to the repeat coronary angiography was 208 {+-} 37 days and the mean time from 64-CT to repeat coronary angiography was 3.7 {+-} 4.9 days. The restenosis rate according to coronary angiography was 26%. Stent diameter, strut thickness, heart rate and body mass index (BMI) significantly affected image quality. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 64-CT for detection of in-stent restenosis were 27%, 95%, 67% and 78%, respectively. Conclusions: Current generation, 64-slice CT, remains limited in its ability to accurately detect in-stent restenosis.

  6. Identification of Nasal Bone Fractures on Conventional Radiography and Facial CT: Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy in Different Imaging Modalities and Analysis of Interobserver Reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Lee, Yoo Jin

    2013-01-01

    There has been no study to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an experienced radiologist with a trainee in nasal bone fracture. To compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) for the identification of nasal bone fractures and to evaluate the interobserver reliability between a staff radiologist and a trainee. A total of 108 patients who underwent conventional radiography and CT after acute nasal trauma were included in this retrospective study. Two readers, a staff radiologist and a second-year resident, independently assessed the results of the imaging studies. Of the 108 patients, the presence of a nasal bone fracture was confirmed in 88 (81.5%) patients. The number of non-depressed fractures was higher than the number of depressed fractures. In nine (10.2%) patients, nasal bone fractures were only identified on conventional radiography, including three depressed and six non-depressed fractures. CT was more accurate as compared to conventional radiography for the identification of nasal bone fractures as determined by both readers (P <0.05), all diagnostic indices of an experienced radiologist were similar to or higher than those of a trainee, and κ statistics showed moderate agreement between the two diagnostic tools for both readers. There was no statistical difference in the assessment of interobserver reliability for both imaging modalities in the identification of nasal bone fractures. For the identification of nasal bone fractures, CT was significantly superior to conventional radiography. Although a staff radiologist showed better values in the identification of nasal bone fracture and differentiation between depressed and non-depressed fractures than a trainee, there was no statistically significant difference in the interpretation of conventional radiography and CT between a radiologist and a trainee

  7. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvoy, Sinead; Lavelle, Lisa; Kilcoyne, Aoife; McCarthy, Colin; Dodd, Jonathan D.; DeJong, Pim A.; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.; McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R 2 = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  8. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Sinead; Lavelle, Lisa; Kilcoyne, Aoife; McCarthy, Colin; Dodd, Jonathan D. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); DeJong, Pim A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine and National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R{sup 2} = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  9. Accuracy of automated volumetry of pulmonary nodules across different multislice CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Katoh, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gietema, H.A.; Prokop, Mathias; Czech, Andre; Diederich, Stefan; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of an automated volumetry software for phantom pulmonary nodules across various 16-slice multislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners from different vendors. A lung phantom containing five different nodule categories (intraparenchymal, around a vessel, vessel attached, pleural, and attached to the pleura), with each category comprised of 7-9 nodules (total, n = 40) of varying sizes (diameter 3-10 mm; volume 6.62 mm 3 -525 mm 3 ), was scanned with four different 16-slice MSCT scanners (Siemens, GE, Philips, Toshiba). Routine and low-dose chest protocols with thin and thick collimations were applied. The data from all scanners were used for further analysis using a dedicated prototype volumetry software. Absolute percentage volume errors (APE) were calculated and compared. The mean APE for all nodules was 8.4% (±7.7%) for data acquired with the 16-slice Siemens scanner, 14.3% (±11.1%) for the GE scanner, 9.7% (±9.6%) for the Philips scanner and 7.5% (±7.2%) for the Toshiba scanner, respectively. The lowest APEs were found within the diameter size range of 5-10 mm and volumes >66 mm 3 . Nodule volumetry is accurate with a reasonable volume error in data from different scanner vendors. This may have an important impact for intraindividual follow-up studies. (orig.)

  10. Early clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma (cT1): Utility of CT in regional nodal metastasis detection and can the clinical accuracy be improved?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L., E-mail: slbetancourt@mdanderson.org; Sabloff, Bradley, E-mail: bsabloff@mdanderson.org; Carter, Brett W., E-mail: bcarter2@mdanderson.org; Benveniste, Marcelo F., E-mail: mfbenveniste@mdanderson.org; Correa, Arlene M., E-mail: amcorrea@mdanderson.org; Maru, Dipen M., E-mail: dmaru@mdanderson.org; Ajani, Jaffer A., E-mail: jajani@mdanderson.org; Erasmus, Jeremy J., E-mail: jerasmus@mdanderson.org; Hofstetter, Wayne L., E-mail: whofstetter@mdanderson.org

    2017-03-15

    Introduction: Treatment of early esophageal cancer depends on the extent of the primary tumor and presence of regional lymph node metastasis.(RNM). Short axis diameter >10 mm is typically used to detect RNM. However, clinical determination of RNM is inaccurate and can result in inappropriate treatment. Purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a single linear measurement (short axis > 10 mm) of regional nodes on CT in predicting nodal metastasis, in patients with early esophageal cancer and whether using a mean diameter value (short axis + long axis/2) as well as nodal shape improves cN designation. Methods: CTs of 49 patients with cT1 adenocarcinoma treated with surgical resection alone were reviewed retrospectively. Regional nodes were considered positive for malignancy when round or ovoid and mean size >5 mm adjacent to the primary tumor and >7 mm when not adjacent. Results were compared with pN status after esophagectomy. Results: 18/49 patients had pN+ at resection. Using a single short axis diameter >10 mm on CT, nodal metastasis (cN) was positive in 7/49. Only 1 of these patients was pN+ at resection (sensitivity 5%, specificity 80%, accuracy 53%). Using mean size and morphologic criteria, cN was positive in 28/49. 11 of these patients were pN+ at resection (sensitivity 61%, specificity 45%, accuracy 51%). EUS with limited FNA of regional nodes resulted in 16/49 patients with pN+ being inappropriately designated as cN0. Conclusions: Evaluation of size, shape and location of regional lymph nodes on CT improves the sensitivity of cN determination compared with a short axis measurement alone in patients with cT1 esophageal cancer, although clinical utility is limited.

  11. Determination of the integrated CT number of the whole liver in patients with severe hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumahara, Tadashi; Muto, Yasutoshi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yoshida, Takashi; Tomita, Eiichi

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the functional reserve of the liver of patients with severe hepatitis by computed tomography (CT), in particular employing the integrated CT number of the whole liver (ICTN). ICTN was calculated by integrating the product of 'area' times 'mean CT number' of the liver in each CT slice for the entire height of the liver. The following results were obtained: 1) In patients with fulminant hepatitis (FH) as well as those with subacute hepatitis (SAH), ICTN was found to be significantly lower as compared to that of patients with acute hepatitis (AH) or non-hepatic diseases. In addition, in FH and SAH patients, ICTN showed a larger degree of decrease when compared with such conventional parameters as either estimated liver volume or mean hepatic CT number. Thus, ICTN seems to more sensitively reflect the changes in functional reserve of the liver. 2) ICTN showed significant positive correlations with prothrombin time and plasma BCAA/AAA ratio, and a significant negative correlation with plasma methionine level. 3) Time course of changes in ICTN correlated well with the clinical features of severe hepatitis. In particular, patients with initial ICTN values above 20 l·HU/m 2 of body surface area showed significantly higher survival rate than those with initial ICTN below 20. In conclusion, ICTN well indicates the functional reserve of the liver, and is further suggested to be valuable as a parameter to predict the prognosis of patients with severe hepatitis. (author)

  12. Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT: comparison of deformable registration and image correction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be inaccurate due to unreliable Hounsfield units (HU) in the CBCT. Deformable image registration of planning CT images to CBCT, and direct correction of CBCT image values are two methods proposed to allow heterogeneity corrected dose calculations based on CBCT. In this paper we compare the accuracy and robustness of these two approaches. CBCT images for 44 patients were used including pelvis, lung and head & neck sites. CBCT HU were corrected using a ‘shading correction’ algorithm and via deformable registration of planning CT to CBCT using either Elastix or Niftyreg. Radiotherapy dose distributions were re-calculated with heterogeneity correction based on the corrected CBCT and several relevant dose metrics for target and OAR volumes were calculated. Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an ‘override ratio’ method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the same image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to the patient’s planning CT as a gold standard. Similar performance is achieved by shading corrected CBCT and both deformable registration algorithms, with mean and standard deviation of dose metric error less than 1% for all sites studied. For lung images, use of deformed CT leads to slightly larger standard deviation of dose metric error than shading corrected CBCT with more dose metric errors greater than 2% observed (7% versus 1%).

  13. Semi-automated scoring of pulmonary emphysema from X-ray CT: Trainee reproducibility and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owrangi, Amir M., E-mail: aowrangi@robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Entwistle, Brandon, E-mail: Brandon.Entwistle@londonhospitals.ca; Lu, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Lu@londonhospitals.ca; Chiu, Jack, E-mail: Jack.Chiu@londonhospitals.ca; Hussain, Nabil, E-mail: Nabil.Hussain@londonhospitals.ca; Etemad-Rezai, Roya, E-mail: Roya.EtemadRezai@lhsc.on.ca; Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medical Imaging, Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: We developed a semi-automated tool to quantify emphysema from thoracic X-ray multi-detector (64-slice) computed tomography (CT) for training purposes and multi-reader studies. Materials and Methods: Thoracic X-ray CT was acquired in 93 ex-smokers, who were evaluated by six trainees with little or no expertise (trainees) and a single experienced thoracic radiologist (expert). A graphic user interface (GUI) was developed for emphysema quantification based on the percentile of lung where a score of 0 = no abnormalities, 1 = 1–25%, 2 = 26–50%, 3 = 51–75% and 4 = 76–100% for each lung side/slice. Trainees blinded to subject characteristics scored randomized images twice; accuracy was determined by comparison to expert scores, density histogram 15th percentile (HU{sub 15}), relative area at −950 HU (RA{sub 950}), low attenuation clusters at −950 HU (LAC{sub 950}), −856 HU (LAC{sub 856}) and the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO%pred}). Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was evaluated using coefficients-of-variation (COV), intra-class (ICC) and Pearson correlations. Results: Trainee–expert correlations were significant (r = 0.85–0.97, p < 0.0001) and a significant trainee bias (0.15 ± 0.22) was observed. Emphysema score was correlated with RA{sub 950} (r = 0.88, p < 0.0001), HU{sub 15} (r = −0.77, p < 0.0001), LAC{sub 950} (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001), LAC{sub 856} (r = 0.74, p = 0.0001) and DL{sub CO%pred} (r = −0.71, p < 0.0001). Intra-observer reproducibility (COV = 4–27%; ICC = 0.75–0.94) was moderate to high for trainees; intra- and inter-observer COV were negatively and non-linearly correlated with emphysema score. Conclusion: We developed a GUI for rapid and interactive emphysema scoring that allows for comparison of multiple readers with clinical and radiological standards.

  14. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detection of advanced colorectal adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollub, M.J.; Grewal, R.K.; Panu, N.; Thipphavong, S.; Sohn, M.; Zheng, J.; Moskowitz, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) in the detection of advanced colorectal adenomas. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, patient consent was waived by the institutional review board. Combined FDG whole-body PET and computed tomography (CT) images (2000–2009) were re-read and compared with reports of complete colonoscopy performed up to 1 year after the PET examination. One or more areas of focal colonic uptake greater than the background indicated a positive PET result, irrespective of standardized uptake value (SUV). Lesion and patient-level measures of PET accuracy with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: One hundred and eighty patients undergoing colonoscopy with or without biopsy underwent PET within 1 year prior to colonoscopy. There were 92 women and 88 men (mean age 63.3 years). Indications for PET were extent of disease and treatment response in all cases. Patients had non-colorectal cancer (n = 160) or colon cancer (n = 20). One hundred and fourteen FDG-avid lesions were present. In 33, there was no colonoscopic correlate. Two hundred and fifty-eight biopsies revealed tubular adenomas (n = 91, one with intra-mucosal cancer), tubulovillous adenomas (n = 28), adenocarcinoma (n = 37), inflammation (n = 22), hyperplastic polyps (n = 54), serrated adenoma (n = 5), metastatic disease (n = 5), normal/benign mucosa or submucosal benign tumors (n = 13) or miscellaneous (n = 3). Per-lesion performance of PET showed a sensitivity of 38% (95% CI: 31–46; 64/167) for all adenomas and carcinomas and 58% (95% CI: 49–67; 57/98) for lesions ≥10 mm. At the patient level, for all adenomas and carcinomas the sensitivity was 54% (95% CI: 44–63; 61/113), specificity 100% (pre-defined), positive predictive value (PPV) 100% (pre-defined), and negative predictive value (NPV) 56% (95% CI: 47–65; 67/119). For patients with advanced

  16. Diagnosis of bronchiectasis with multislice spiral CT: accuracy of 3-mm-thick structured sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy-Jardin, Martine; Amara, Assia; Campistron, Philippe; Mastora, Ioana; Remy, Jacques [Department of Radiology, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclerc, 59037, Lille Cedex (France); Delannoy, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain [Department of Medical Statistics, University of Lille, Place de Verdun, 59037, Lille Cedex (France)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3-mm-thick reconstructed sections in the diagnosis of bronchiectasis with multislice CT (MSCT). Forty consecutive patients suspected of bronchiectasis (23 females, 17 males; mean age 51 years) underwent MSCT of the entire thorax with a 4 x 1-mm collimation (120 kV, 0.5 s/rotation, 80 mAs/slice) and a pitch of 1.75. From each data set (mean z-axis coverage: 257 mm; mean duration: 21 s), two series of images were systematically generated: 1-mm (group 1) and 3-mm (group 2)-thick reconstructed scans. Both series of images were obtained at 10-mm intervals and reconstructed with a high-spatial-frequency algorithm. Two observers independently analyzed the presence of bronchiectasis and associated abnormalities in group-1 and group-2 lung images. No significant difference between group 1 and group 2 was found in: (a) the detection of bronchiectasis, identified in 24 patients (60%) in group 1 and in 23 patients (57.5%) in group 2 (p=0.08); (b) the evaluation of the extent of bronchiectasis, identifying focal bronchiectasis in 10 patients (25%) in group 1 and 7 patients (17.5%) in group 2 (p=0.39) and multifocal bronchiectasis in 16 patients (40%) in both groups; (c) the characterisation of bronchiectasis (cylindral bronchiectasis: group 1, n=24, 60%; group 2, n=21, 53%, p=0.08); varicose bronchiectasis: group 1, n=5, 12.5%; group 2, n=6, 15%, p=0.56; and cystic bronchiectasis: group 1, n=2, 5%; group 2, n=2, 5%. Apart from the identification of abnormal bronchial wall thickening (group 2, n=35, 87.5%, vs group 1, n=31, 77.5%, p<0.05), recognition of associated bronchopulmonary anomalies did not differ between the two groups. This study demonstrates a comparable accuracy of the 3- and 1-mm-thick reconstructed scans in the detection and characterization of bronchiectasis. These results suggest the potential usefulness of 3-mm-thick scans generated from 4 x 2.5-mm acquisitions in the screening of bronchiectasis, which would

  17. Accuracy of bone SPECT/CT for identifying hardware loosening in patients who underwent lumbar fusion with pedicle screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudyana, Hendrah; Maes, Alex [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Thierry; Fidlers, Luc [AZ Groeninge, Department of Neurosurgery, Kortrijk (Belgium); Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nicolai, Daniel [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of bone SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) in diagnosing loosening of fixation material in patients with recurrent or persistent back pain that underwent lumbar arthrodesis with pedicle screws using surgery and clinical follow-up as gold standard A total of 48 patients (median age 49 years, range 21-81 years; 17 men) who had undergone lumbar spinal arthrodesis were included in this retrospective analysis. SPECT/CT results were compared to the gold standard of surgical evaluation or clinical follow-up. Positive SPECT/CT results were considered true positives if findings were confirmed by surgery or if clinical and other examinations were completely consistent with the positive SPECT/CT finding. They were considered false positives if surgical evaluation did not find any loose pedicle screws or if symptoms subsided with non-surgical therapy. Negative SPECT/CT scans were considered true negatives if symptoms either improved without surgical intervention or remained stable over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Negative SPECT/CT scans were determined to be false negatives if surgery was still required and loosening of material was found. The median length of time from primary surgery to bone SPECT/CT referral was 29.5 months (range 12-192 months). Median follow-up was 18 months (range 6-57) for subjects who did not undergo surgery. Thirteen of the 48 patients were found to be positive for loosening on bone SPECT/CT. Surgical evaluation (8 patients) and clinical follow-up (5 patients) showed that bone SPECT/CT correctly predicted loosening in 9 of 13 patients, while it falsely diagnosed loosening in 4 patients. Of 35 negative bone SPECT/CT scans, 12 were surgically confirmed. In 18 patients, bone SPECT/CT revealed lesions that could provide an alternative explanation for the symptoms of pain (active facet degeneration in 14 patients, and disc and sacroiliac

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: Meta analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gang, E-mail: cjr.sungang@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Li, Min [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jiang, Zhi-wei [Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 169, Changle West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Xu, Lin [Department of Medical Cardiology, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Peng, Zhao-hui; Ding, Juan; Li, Li [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jin, Zhi-tao [Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of the Second Artillery, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Rationale and objective: To synthesize the available data to underscore the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and methods: We searched in the electronic databases of PubMed for all published studies that examined patients with AF using DSCT. We used an exact binomial rendition of the bivariate mixed-effects regression model to synthesize the diagnostic data. Results: The positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) at the patient level were 6.0 (CI, 3.6–10.1) and 0.03(CI, 0.004–0.2), respectively. The negative predictive values higher than 90% were available for a CAD prevalence <78%. The pooled vessel- and segment-level estimates showed higher positive and negative LRs than the patient-level estimates (15.3 [CI, 9.8–23.9] and 0.1 [CI, 0.07–0.3]; 25.1 [CI, 10.8–58.5] and 0.2 [CI, 0.2–0.3], respectively). No statistically significant heterogeneity between studies and publication bias were found at the patient level estimate. A sensitivity analysis showed that no study influenced the pooled results larger than 0.02. Conclusions: Cardiac angiography with DSCT can be applied as an imaging test for ruling out CAD in patient with AF. However, DSCT angiography may be not an effective tool for risk stratification for the high negative LR at the artery and segment levels.

  19. Accuracy of liver lesion assessment using automated measurement and segmentation software in biphasic multislice CT (MSCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puesken, M.; Juergens, K.U.; Edenfeld, A.; Buerke, B.; Seifarth, H.; Beyer, F.; Heindel, W.; Wessling, J.; Suehling, M.; Osada, N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of liver lesion measurement using automated measurement and segmentation software depending on the vascularization level. Materials and Methods: Arterial and portal venous phase multislice CT (MSCT) was performed for 58 patients. 94 liver lesions were evaluated and classified according to vascularity (hypervascular: 13 hepatocellular carcinomas, 20 hemangiomas; hypovascular: 31 metastases, 3 lymphomas, 4 abscesses; liquid: 23 cysts). The RECIST diameter and volume were obtained using automated measurement and segmentation software and compared to corresponding measurements derived visually by two experienced radiologists as a reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test and concordance correlation coefficients. Results: Automated measurements revealed no significant difference between the arterial and portal venous phase in hypovascular (mean RECIST diameter: 31.4 vs. 30.2 mm; p = 0.65; κ = 0.875) and liquid lesions (20.4 vs. 20.1 mm; p = 0.1; κ = 0.996). The RECIST diameter and volume of hypervascular lesions were significantly underestimated in the portal venous phase as compared to the arterial phase (30.3 vs. 26.9 mm, p = 0.007, κ 0.834; 10.7 vs. 7.9 ml, p = 0.0045, κ = 0.752). Automated measurements for hypovascular and liquid lesions in the arterial and portal venous phase were concordant to the reference standard. Hypervascular lesion measurements were in line with the reference standard for the arterial phase (30.3 vs. 32.2 mm, p 0.66, κ = 0.754), but revealed a significant difference for the portal venous phase (26.9 vs. 32.1 mm; p = 0.041; κ = 0.606). (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of bone mineral density quantification using dual-layer spectral detector CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Harder, Annemarie M. den; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Willemink, Martin J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Engelke, Klaus [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keizer, Bart de [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, Harald J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-10-15

    To investigate the accuracy of bone mineral density (BMD) quantification using dual-layer spectral detector CT (SDCT) at various scan protocols. Two validated anthropomorphic phantoms containing inserts of 50-200 mg/cm{sup 3} calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) were scanned using a 64-slice SDCT scanner at various acquisition protocols (120 and 140 kVp, and 50, 100 and 200 mAs). Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in each insert and mean attenuation profiles at monochromatic energy levels (90-200 keV) were constructed. These profiles were fitted to attenuation profiles of pure HA and water to calculate HA concentrations. For comparison, one phantom was scanned using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). At both 120 and 140 kVp, excellent correlations (R = 0.97, P < 0.001) were found between true and measured HA concentrations. Mean error for all measurements at 120 kVp was -5.6 ± 5.7 mg/cm{sup 3} (-3.6 ± 3.2%) and at 140 kVp -2.4 ± 3.7 mg/cm{sup 3} (-0.8 ± 2.8%). Mean measurement errors were smaller than 6% for all acquisition protocols. Strong linear correlations (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.970, P < 0.001) with DXA were found. SDCT allows for accurate BMD quantification and potentially opens up the possibility for osteoporosis evaluation and opportunistic screening in patients undergoing SDCT for other clinical indications. However, patient studies are needed to extend and translate our findings. (orig.)

  1. In-vitro study on the accuracy of a simple-design CT-guided stent for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Young June; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul

    2012-01-01

    An individual surgical stent fabricated from computed tomography (CT) data, called a CT-guided stent, would be useful for accurate installation of implants. The purpose of the present study was to introduce a newly developed CT-guided stent with a simple design and evaluate the accuracy of the stent placement. A resin template was fabricated from a hog mandible and a specially designed plastic plate, with 4 metal balls inserted in it for radiographic recognition, was attached to the occlusal surface of the template. With the surgical stent applied, CT images were taken, and virtual implants were placed using software. The spatial positions of the virtually positioned implants were acquired and implant guiding holes were drilled into the surgical stent using a specially designed 5-axis drilling machine. The surgical stent was placed on the mandible and CT images were taken again. The discrepancy between the central axis of the drilled holes on the second CT images and the virtually installed implants on the first CT images was evaluated. The deviation of the entry point and angulation of the central axis in the reference plane were 0.47±0.27 mm, 0.57±0.23 mm, and 0.64±0.16 degree, 0.57±0.15 degree, respectively. However, for the two different angulations in each group, the 20 degree angulation showed a greater error in the deviation of the entry point than did the 10 degree angulation. The CT-guided template proposed in this study was highly accurate. It could replace existing implant guide systems to reduce costs and effort.

  2. The accuracy of CT and tumor markers in the detection of a recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Yukari; Ishida, Jiro; Kotake, Fumio; Hirose, Masahiro; Kawana, Koji; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburo; Negishi, Yoshiyuki; Akiya, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-three patients previously diagnosed as having ovarian cancer were examined with both serum tumor markers (CA 125, CA 19-9, TPA, IAP, AFP) and a pelvic CT scan. The tumor markers predict the clinical outcome more accurately than the CT scan. Further, the tumor markers showed a clear correlation with the clinical course. But in one case, however, the tumor markers were seen to reduce below the normal level from chemotherapy, while the CT scan showed a tumor mass. Thus, both, a CT scan and tumor marker assays are felt to be indispensable for detecting the recurrence of an ovarian cancer. (author)

  3. Dose reduction for CT in children with cystic fibrosis: is it feasible to reduce the number of images per scan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Pim A. de; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.; Nakano, Yasutaka; Lequin, Maarten H.

    2006-01-01

    Reducing the dose for each CT scan is important for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To determine whether the number of CT images and therefore the dose per CT scan could be reduced without any significant loss of information in children with CF. A cohort of children with CF was followed with biennial surveillance CT scans, obtained in inspiration after a voluntary breath-hold as 1-mm thick images at 10-mm intervals from lung apex to base. A random set of 20 baseline CT scans and 10 follow-up CT scans were blinded. Sets of every image (10-mm intervals), every second image (20-mm intervals), every third image (30-mm intervals) and a selection of three and five images were scored randomly using a published CT scoring system by one experienced observer. The 20 subjects were 10 years of age with a range of 3.7-17.6 years at baseline. Fewer CT images resulted in a significantly lower (less abnormal) CT score and the number of patients positive for abnormalities decreased subsequently. At intervals greater than 20 mm no significant change in CT score over 2 years could be detected, while the CT scores at 10-mm (P=0.02) and 20-mm (P=0.02) intervals worsened significantly. A reduction in the number of inspiratory CT images by increasing the interval between images to greater than 10 mm is not a valid option for radiation dose reduction in children with CF. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of US score and CT number for diagnosis of fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Tetsuo; Tanda, Shigeru; Lim, Insu; Oota, Keisuke; Taima, Tadashi

    1987-01-01

    The author evaluates US and CT for diagnosis of fatty liver in 70 cases with fatty change of the liver. We tried to score the US findings of the fatty change, i.e., ''bright liver pattern'', ''liver-kidney contrast'', ''vascular blurring'', ''deep attenuation'', and the usefulness of the scoring was examined. Comparing with CT number, US score was more sensitive, but had no significant correlation with the amount of the fat in the liver and with the abnormality of the liver function tests. The results indicate that US should be used as a primary screening examination, and for the further evaluation of the fatty change of the liver, CT should be carried out. (author)

  5. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  6. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  7. Application of CT-PSF-based computer-simulated lung nodules for evaluating the accuracy of computer-aided volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaki, Ayumu; Ohkubo, Masaki; Wada, Shinichi; Murao, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toru; Niizuma, Shinji

    2012-07-01

    With the wide dissemination of computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer, measuring the nodule volume accurately with computer-aided volumetry software is increasingly important. Many studies for determining the accuracy of volumetry software have been performed using a phantom with artificial nodules. These phantom studies are limited, however, in their ability to reproduce the nodules both accurately and in the variety of sizes and densities required. Therefore, we propose a new approach of using computer-simulated nodules based on the point spread function measured in a CT system. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by the excellent agreement obtained between computer-simulated nodules and phantom nodules regarding the volume measurements. A practical clinical evaluation of the accuracy of volumetry software was achieved by adding simulated nodules onto clinical lung images, including noise and artifacts. The tested volumetry software was revealed to be accurate within an error of 20 % for nodules >5 mm and with the difference between nodule density and background (lung) (CT value) being 400-600 HU. Such a detailed analysis can provide clinically useful information on the use of volumetry software in CT screening for lung cancer. We concluded that the proposed method is effective for evaluating the performance of computer-aided volumetry software.

  8. Accuracy and role of contrast-enhanced CT in diagnosis and surgical planning in 88 soft tissue tumours of extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verga, Lucia; Robiati, Sara; De Marchi, Armanda; Martorano, Domenico; Faletti, Carlo; Brach del Prever, Elena Maria; Linari, Alessandra; Boffano, Michele; Piana, Raimondo

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue tumours (STT) require accurate diagnosis in order to identify potential malignancies. Preoperative planning is fundamental to avoid inadequate treatments. The role of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for local staging remains incompletely assessed. Aims of the study were to evaluate CT accuracy in discriminating active from aggressive tumours compared to histology and evaluate the role of CT angiography (CTA) in surgical planning. This retrospective cohort series of 88 cases from 1200 patients (7 %) was locally studied by contrast-enhanced CT and CTA in a referral centre: 74 malignant tumours, 14 benign lesions. Contrast-enhancement patterns and relationship of the mass with major vessels and bone were compared with histology on surgically excised samples. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were evaluated in discriminating active from aggressive tumours. Sensitivity in differentiating aggressive tumours from active lesions was 89 %, specificity 84 %, PPV 90 %, NPV 82 %. The relationship between mass and major vessels/bone was fundamental for surgical strategy respectively in 40 % and in 58 % of malignant tumours. Contrast-enhanced CT and CTA are effective in differentiating aggressive masses from active lesions in soft tissue and in depicting the relationship between tumour and adjacent bones and major vessels. (orig.)

  9. Assessing the Dosimetric Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance-Generated Synthetic CT Images for Focal Brain VMAT Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradis, Eric, E-mail: eparadis@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Vineberg, Karen; Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the dosimetric accuracy of synthetic CT (MRCT) volumes generated from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for focal brain radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A study was conducted in 12 patients with gliomas who underwent both MR and CT imaging as part of their simulation for external beam treatment planning. MRCT volumes were generated from MR images. Patients' clinical treatment planning directives were used to create 12 individual volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans, which were then optimized 10 times on each of their respective CT and MRCT-derived electron density maps. Dose metrics derived from optimization criteria, as well as monitor units and gamma analyses, were evaluated to quantify differences between the imaging modalities. Results: Mean differences between planning target volume (PTV) doses on MRCT and CT plans across all patients were 0.0% (range: −0.1 to 0.2%) for D{sub 95%}; 0.0% (−0.7 to 0.6%) for D{sub 5%}; and −0.2% (−1.0 to 0.2%) for D{sub max}. MRCT plans showed no significant changes in monitor units (−0.4%) compared to CT plans. Organs at risk (OARs) had average D{sub max} differences of 0.0 Gy (−2.2 to 1.9 Gy) over 85 structures across all 12 patients, with no significant differences when calculated doses approached planning constraints. Conclusions: Focal brain VMAT plans optimized on MRCT images show excellent dosimetric agreement with standard CT-optimized plans. PTVs show equivalent coverage, and OARs do not show any overdose. These results indicate that MRI-derived synthetic CT volumes can be used to support treatment planning of most patients treated for intracranial lesions.

  10. Improved accuracy of quantitative parameter estimates in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT study with low temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mo, E-mail: Sunmo.Kim@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Yeung, Ivan W. T. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 2P9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A previously proposed method to reduce radiation dose to patient in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT is enhanced by principal component analysis (PCA) filtering which improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time-concentration curves in the DCE-CT study. The efficacy of the combined method to maintain the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimates at low temporal resolution is investigated with pixel-by-pixel kinetic analysis of DCE-CT data. Methods: The method is based on DCE-CT scanning performed with low temporal resolution to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. The arterial input function (AIF) with high temporal resolution can be generated with a coarsely sampled AIF through a previously published method of AIF estimation. To increase the SNR of time-concentration curves (tissue curves), first, a region-of-interest is segmented into squares composed of 3 × 3 pixels in size. Subsequently, the PCA filtering combined with a fraction of residual information criterion is applied to all the segmented squares for further improvement of their SNRs. The proposed method was applied to each DCE-CT data set of a cohort of 14 patients at varying levels of down-sampling. The kinetic analyses using the modified Tofts’ model and singular value decomposition method, then, were carried out for each of the down-sampling schemes between the intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the measured data in high temporal resolution (i.e., original scanning frequency) as the reference. Results: The patients’ AIFs were estimated to high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases of arterial impulse responses established in the previous paper. In addition, noise in the images was effectively reduced by using five principal components of the tissue curves for filtering. Kinetic analyses using the proposed method showed superior results compared to those with down-sampling alone; they were able to maintain the accuracy in the

  11. Reappraisal of Pediatric Diastatic Skull Fractures in the 3-Dimensional CT Era: Clinical Characteristics and Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Simple Skull X-Ray, 2-Dimensional CT, and 3-Dimensional CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sook Young; Kim, Hyun Gi; Yoon, Soo Han; Choi, Jong Wook; Cho, Sung Min; Choi, Mi Sun

    2017-12-01

    Diastatic skull fractures (DSFs) in children are difficult to detect in skull radiographs before they develop into growing skull fractures; therefore, little information is available on this topic. However, recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging technology have enabled more accurate diagnoses of almost all forms of skull fracture. The present study was undertaken to document the clinical characteristics of DSFs in children and to determine whether 3D CT enhances diagnostic accuracy. Two hundred and ninety-two children younger than 12 years with skull fractures underwent simple skull radiography, 2-dimensional (2D) CT, and 3DCT. Results were compared with respect to fracture type, location, associated lesions, and accuracy of diagnosis. DSFs were diagnosed in 44 (15.7%) of children with skull fractures. Twenty-two patients had DSFs only, and the other 22 had DSFs combined with compound or mixed skull fractures. The most common fracture locations were the occipitomastoid (25%) and lambdoid (15.9%). Accompanying lesions consisted of subgaleal hemorrhages (42/44), epidural hemorrhages (32/44), pneumocephalus (17/44), and subdural hemorrhages (3/44). A total of 17 surgical procedures were performed on 15 of the 44 patients. Fourteen and 19 patients were confirmed to have DSFs by skull radiography and 2D CT, respectively, but 3D CT detected DSFs in 43 of the 44 children (P skull radiography or 2D CT for detecting DSFs. This finding indicates that 3D CT should be used routinely rather than 2D CT for the assessment of pediatric head trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multidetector CT of the coronary imaging: assessment of image quality and accuracy in detecting stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Meiping; Liu Qishun; Liu Hui; Liang Changhong; Zhang Shaobin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the image quality of 64-multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) and the clinical accuracy in detecting coronary artery lesions. Methods: One hundred and five patients were studied by MDCT. The results were compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Patients were excluded for atrial fibrillation, but not for high heart rate, coronary calcification, or obesity. MDCT was analyzed with regard to image quality and presence of coronary artery lesions. Results: The data evaluation of the image quality was based on a total of 1365 segments (13 coronary segments for each patient), of which 1144 segments were considered to have diagnostic image quality, but 221 segments (16.2%) could not be sufficiently evaluated because of severe calcifications (153 segments) and motion artifacts (68 segments). The median calcium score [Agatston score equivalent (ASE)] was 154 (range 0--1983). 87 of the 105 patients had an ASE of less than 1,000 [median 105 (range 0-994)], and 18 patients had an ASE greater than 1000 [median 1477 (range 1115-1983)]. For detecting lesions with 50% or greater narrowing (without any exclusion criteria), the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 85.7%, 97.9%, 93.0%, and 95.5%, respectively. When limiting the number of patients to those with a calcium score of less than 1000 ASE, the threshold- corrected sensitivity for lesions with 50% or greater narrowing was 96.0%; specificity, 98.9%; positive predictive value, 95.3%; and negative predictive value, 99.0%. Conclusion: Our results indicate high quantitative and qualitative diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MSCT in comparison to QCA in a broad spectrum of patients. (authors)

  13. Accuracy of preoperative diagnosis for primary hyperparathyroidism by CT, US and scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Masanobu; Nonaka, Satoshi; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kunibe, Isamu; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2003-01-01

    We determined the usefulness of computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US) and Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy for preoperative diagnosis in 12 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, all of which were solitary adenoma. Seven (63.6%) of 11 tumors were detected by CT, 7 (58.3%) of 12 tumors were detected by US, and 7 (63.6%) of 11 tumors were detected by Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy. Of 7 tumors with size>10 mm, 6 (85.7%) were detected by CT, 5 (71.4%) were detected by US, and 6 (85.7%) were detected by Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy, whereas only 1 (25%) with a diameter of 10 mm was detected by each of CT or Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy and 2 (40%) with diameters 10 mm were detected by US. Of 6 tumors situated behind the thyroid gland or intra thyroid gland, 5 (83.3%) were detected by CT and all 6 (100%) were detected by US, Tl-Tc subtraction scintigraphy, which was employed for 5 tumors, detected all 5 (100%). However, in the tumors situated beneath the thyroid gland only 2 (40%) of 5, 1 (16.7%) of 6 and 2 (33.3%) of 6 were detected by CT, US and Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy respectively. In 5 tumors without thyroid disease, 4 (80%) of 5 were detected by both CT and US, 3 (75%) of 4 were detected by Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy. However, in 7 tumors with thyroid diseases (papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, follicular adenoma, chronic thyroiditis, and adenomatous goiter), 3 (50%) of 6 were detected by CT, 3 (42.9%) of 7 were detected by US and 4 (57.1%) of 7 were detected by Tc-Tl subtraction scintigraphy. Location of tumor was the factor most likely to make appropriate diagnosis difficult for primary hyperparathyroidism by any assessment method. (author)

  14. Requirements on the Redshift Accuracy for future Supernova and Number Count Surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kim, Alex; Broderick, Tamara

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the required redshift accuracy of type Ia supernova and cluster number-count surveys in order for the redshift uncertainties not to contribute appreciably to the dark energy parameter error budget. For the SNAP supernova experiment, we find that, without the assistance of ground-based measurements, individual supernova redshifts would need to be determined to about 0.002 or better, which is a challenging but feasible requirement for a low-resolution spectrograph. However, we find that accurate redshifts for z < 0.1 supernovae, obtained with ground-based experiments, are sufficient to immunize the results against even relatively large redshift errors at high z. For the future cluster number-count surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, Planck or DUET, we find that the purely statistical error in photometric redshift is less important, and that the irreducible, systematic bias in redshift drives the requirements. The redshift bias will have to be kept below 0.001-0.005 per redshift bin (which is determined by the filter set), depending on the sky coverage and details of the definition of the minimal mass of the survey. Furthermore, we find that X-ray surveys have a more stringent required redshift accuracy than Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect surveys since they use a shorter lever arm in redshift; conversely, SZ surveys benefit from their high redshift reach only so long as some redshift information is available for distant (zgtrsim1) clusters

  15. Is diagnostic accuracy for detecting pulmonary nodules in chest CT reduced after a long day of reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert; Schartz, Kevin M.

    2012-02-01

    Radiologists are reading more cases with more images, especially in CT and MRI and thus working longer hours than ever before. There have been concerns raised regarding fatigue and whether it impacts diagnostic accuracy. This study measured the impact of reader visual fatigue by assessing symptoms, visual strain via dark focus of accommodation, and diagnostic accuracy. Twenty radiologists and 20 radiology residents were given two diagnostic performance tests searching CT chest sequences for a solitary pulmonary nodule before (rested) and after (tired) a day of clinical reading. 10 cases used free search and navigation, and the other 100 cases used preset scrolling speed and duration. Subjects filled out the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) and the oculomotor strain subscale of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) before each session. Accuracy was measured using ROC techniques. Using Swensson's technique yields an ROC area = 0.86 rested vs. 0.83 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's LROC technique yields an area = 0.73 rested vs. 0.66 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's Loc Accuracy technique yields an area = 0.77 rested vs. 0.72 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.13). Subjective measures of fatigue increased significantly from early to late reading. To date, the results support our findings with static images and detection of bone fractures. Radiologists at the end of a long work day experience greater levels of measurable visual fatigue or strain, contributing to a decrease in diagnostic accuracy. The decrease in accuracy was not as great however as with static images.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of 64 multislice CT angiography in the assessment of coronary in-stent restenosis: A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhonghua; Almutairi, Abdulrahman Marzouq D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice CT angiography for the detection of coronary in-stent restenosis in patients treated with coronary stents when compared to conventional coronary angiography. Materials and methods: A search of PUBMED/MEDLINE, ProQuest and Cochrane library databases for English literature was performed. Only studies comparing 64-slice CT angiography with conventional coronary angiography for the detection of coronary in-stent restenosis (more than 50% stenosis) were included for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity estimates pooled across studies were tested using a fixed effects model. Results: Fourteen studies met selection criteria for inclusion in the analysis. The mean value of assessable stents was 89%. Prevalence of in-stent restenosis following coronary stenting was 20% among these studies. Pooled estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of overall 64-slice CT angiography for the detection of coronary in-stent restenosis was 90% (95% CI: 86%, 94%) and 91% (95% CI: 90%, 93%), respectively, based on the evaluation of assessable stents. Diagnostic value of 64-slice CT angiography was found to decrease significantly when the analysis was performed with inclusion of nonassessable segments in five studies, with pooled sensitivity and specificity being 79% (95% CI: 68%, 88%) and 81% (95% CI: 77%, 84%). Stent diameter is the main factor affecting the diagnostic value of 64-slice CT angiography. Conclusion: Our results showed that 64-slice CT angiography has high diagnostic value (both sensitivity and specificity) for detection of coronary in-stent restenosis based on assessable segments when compared to conventional coronary angiography.

  17. Added value of cost-utility analysis in simple diagnostic studies of accuracy: (18)F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT in prostate cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Oke; Poulsen, Mads H; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic studies of accuracy targeting sensitivity and specificity are commonly done in a paired design in which all modalities are applied in each patient, whereas cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses are usually assessed either directly alongside to or indirectly by means of stochastic modeling based on larger randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However the conduct of RCTs is hampered in an environment such as ours, in which technology is rapidly evolving. As such, there is a relatively limited number of RCTs. Therefore, we investigated as to which extent paired diagnostic studies of accuracy can be also used to shed light on economic implications when considering a new diagnostic test. We propose a simple decision tree model-based cost-utility analysis of a diagnostic test when compared to the current standard procedure and exemplify this approach with published data from lymph node staging of prostate cancer. Average procedure costs were taken from the Danish Diagnosis Related Groups Tariff in 2013 and life expectancy was estimated for an ideal 60 year old patient based on prostate cancer stage and prostatectomy or radiation and chemotherapy. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were deduced from the literature, and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used to compare lymph node dissection with respective histopathological examination (reference standard) and (18)F-fluoromethylcholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT). Lower bounds of sensitivity and specificity of FCH-PET/CT were established at which the replacement of the reference standard by FCH-PET/CT comes with a trade-off between worse effectiveness and lower costs. Compared to the reference standard in a diagnostic accuracy study, any imperfections in accuracy of a diagnostic test imply that replacing the reference standard generates a loss in effectiveness and utility. We conclude that diagnostic studies of accuracy can be put to a more extensive use

  18. The iPad as a mobile device for CT display and interpretation: diagnostic accuracy for identification of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pamela T; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Heath, David; Eng, John; Horton, Karen M; Scott, William W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2012-08-01

    Recent software developments enable interactive, real-time axial, 2D and 3D CT display on an iPad by cloud computing from a server for remote rendering. The purpose of this study was to compare radiologists' interpretative performance on the iPad to interpretation on the conventional picture archive and communication system (PACS). Fifty de-identified contrast-enhanced CT exams performed for suspected pulmonary embolism were compiled as an educational tool to prepare our residents for night call. Two junior radiology attendings blindly interpreted the cases twice, one reader used the PACS first, and the other interpreted on the iPad first. After an interval of at least 2 weeks, the cases were reinterpreted in different order using the other display technique. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identification of pulmonary embolism were compared for each interpretation method. Pulmonary embolism was present in 25 patients, ranging from main pulmonary artery to subsegmental thrombi. Both readers interpreted 98 % of cases correctly regardless of display platform. There was no significant difference in sensitivity (98 vs 100 %, p = 1.0), specificity (98 vs 96 %, p = 1.0), or accuracy (98 vs 98 %, p = 1.0) for interpretation with the iPad vs the PACS, respectively. CT interpretation on an iPad enabled accurate identification of pulmonary embolism, equivalent to display on the PACS. This mobile device has the potential to expand radiologists' availability for consultation and expedite emergency patient management.

  19. Calibration of megavoltage cone-beam CT for radiotherapy dose calculations: Correction of cupping artifacts and conversion of CT numbers to electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Steven F.; Elmpt, Wouter J. C. van; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre L. A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) is used for three-dimensional imaging of the patient anatomy on the treatment table prior to or just after radiotherapy treatment. To use MV CBCT images for radiotherapy dose calculation purposes, reliable electron density (ED) distributions are needed. Patient scatter, beam hardening and softening effects result in cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distort the CT number to ED conversion. A method based on transmission images is presented to correct for these effects without using prior knowledge of the object's geometry. The scatter distribution originating from the patient is calculated with pencil beam scatter kernels that are fitted based on transmission measurements. The radiological thickness is extracted from the scatter subtracted transmission images and is then converted to the primary transmission used in the cone-beam reconstruction. These corrections are performed in an iterative manner, without using prior knowledge regarding the geometry and composition of the object. The method was tested using various homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms with varying shapes and compositions, including a phantom with different electron density inserts, phantoms with large density variations, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. For all phantoms, the cupping artifact was substantially removed from the images and a linear relation between the CT number and electron density was found. After correction the deviations in reconstructed ED from the true values were reduced from up to 0.30 ED units to 0.03 for the majority of the phantoms; the residual difference is equal to the amount of noise in the images. The ED distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose calculation accuracy for homogeneous cylinders of different size; errors decreased from 7% to below 1% in the center of the objects for the uncorrected and corrected images, respectively, and maximum differences were reduced from 17% to 2%, respectively. The

  20. Means to verify the accuracy of CT systems for metrology applications (In the Absence of Established International Standards)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettenbauer, H.; Georgi, B.; Weib, D.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) reconstructs an unknown object from X-ray projections and has long been used for qualitative investigation of internal structures in industrial applications. Recently there has been increased interest in applying X-ray cone beam CT to the task of high-precision dimensional measurements of machined parts, since it is a relatively fast method of measuring both inner and outer geometries of arbitrary complexity. The important information for the user in dimensional metrology is if measured elements of a machined part are within the defined tolerances or not. In order to qualify cone beam CT as an established measurement technology, it must be qualified in the same manner as established measurement technologies such as coordinate measurement machines (CMMs) with tactile or optical sensors. In international standards artefacts are defined that are calibrated by certified institutions. These artefacts are defined by certain geometrical elements. CT measurements are performed on the reconstructed object volume, either directly or using an intermediate surface-extraction step. The results of these measurements have to be compared to the values of the calibrated elements; the level of agreement of the results defines the accuracy of the measurements. By using established methods to define measurement uncertainty a very high level of acceptance in dimensional metrology can be reached for the user. Only if results are comparable to standards of the established technologies the barriers of entry into metrology will be removed and all benefits of this technology will be available for the user. (authors)

  1. CTC-ask: a new algorithm for conversion of CT numbers to tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculations applying DICOM RS knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, Rickard O; Behrens, Claus F

    2011-01-01

    One of the building blocks in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning is to convert patient CT data to MC compatible phantoms, consisting of density and media matrices. The resulting dose distribution is highly influenced by the accuracy of the conversion. Two major contributing factors are precise conversion of CT number to density and proper differentiation between air and lung. Existing tools do not address this issue specifically. Moreover, their density conversion may depend on the number of media used. Differentiation between air and lung is an important task in MC treatment planning and misassignment may lead to local dose errors on the order of 10%. A novel algorithm, CTC-ask, is presented in this study. It enables locally confined constraints for the media assignment and is independent of the number of media used for the conversion of CT number to density. MC compatible phantoms were generated for two clinical cases using a CT-conversion scheme implemented in both CTC-ask and the DICOM-RT toolbox. Full MC dose calculation was subsequently conducted and the resulting dose distributions were compared. The DICOM-RT toolbox inaccurately assigned lung in 9.9% and 12.2% of the voxels located outside of the lungs for the two cases studied, respectively. This was completely avoided by CTC-ask. CTC-ask is able to reduce anatomically irrational media assignment. The CTC-ask source code can be made available upon request to the authors. (note)

  2. STACK NUMBER INFLUENCE ON THE ACCURACY OF ASTER GDEM (V2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. J. Mirzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the influence of stack number (STKN on the accuracy of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER Global DEM (GDEM has been investigated. For this purpose, two data sets of ASTER and Reference DEMs from two study areas with various topography (Bomehen and Tazehabad were used. The Results show that in both study areas, STKN of 19 results in minimum error so that this minimum error has small difference with other STKN. The analysis of slope, STKN, and error values shows that there is no strong correlation between these parameters in both study areas. For example, the value of mean absolute error increase by changing the topography and the increase of slope values and height on cells but, the changes in STKN has no important effect on error values. Furthermore, according to high values of STKN, effect of slope on elevation accuracy has practically decreased. Also, there is no great correlation between the residual and STKN in ASTER GDEM.

  3. Accuracy of software-assisted contour propagation from planning CT to cone beam CT in head and neck radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Christian A.; Elstrøm, Ulrik V.; Jensen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    ) algorithm for organs at risk (OAR) in the neck region, when applied to CBCT. Material and methods: For 30 head and neck cancer (HNC) patients 14 OARs including parotid glands, swallowing structures and spinal cord were delineated. Contours were propagated by DIR from CT to the CBCTs of the first and last...... consequences of uncertainties in DIR were reviewed. Results: Mean DSC values of ≥0.8 were considered adequate and were achieved in tongue base (0.91), esophagus (0.85), glottic (0.81) and supraglottic larynx (0.83), inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (0.84), spinal cord (0.89) and all salivary glands...... in the first CBCT. For the last CBCT by direct propagation, adequate DSC values were achieved for tongue base (0.85), esophagus (0.84), spinal cord (0.87) and all salivary glands. Using indirect propagation only tongue base (0.80) and parotid glands (0.87) were ≥0.8. Mean relative dose difference between...

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of the detection of bone change using panoramic TMJ projection. Comparative study with limited cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kazuyuki; Okano, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Ryuta; Honda, Kazuya; Endo, Atsushi; Kaneko, Norikazu; Funahashi, Itsuo

    2008-01-01

    Panoramic temporoman joint (TMJ) projection is one of the alternative methods of conventional radiography, such as transcranial projection, for diagnosing temporomandibular joint disorder. There have been a few reports describing the diagnostic ability of this method. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of detecting bone change with panoramic TMJ projection. Fifty TMJs in 25 patients were examined. All TMJs were examined by panoramic TMJ projection (Hyper XF) and limited cone-beam CT (3D Accuitomo FPD; 3DX). Two observers evaluated the presence of bone change in the TMJ region using panoramic TMJ projection. One other observer evaluated the limited cone-beam CT for the presence and the pattern of bone changes in the TMJ region as the gold standard. Panoramic TMJ findings were evaluated with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the panoramic TMJ projection were 0.86, 0.76, and 0.82, respectively. These results and those of previous reports on other radiographic methods for TMJ suggest that panoramic TMJ projection is a useful method of screening for bone change due to TMJ disorder. (author)

  5. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT : an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Zhao, Yingru; Snijder, R.A.; van Ooijen, P.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Oudkerk, M.; de Bock, G.H.; Vliegenthart, R.; Greuter, M.J.

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100

  6. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Ii, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation x 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current

  7. How far can the radiation dose be lowered in head CT with iterative reconstruction? Analysis of imaging quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Sun, Jing-Yi [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Hung, Sheng-Che; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiu, Chen Fen; Liu, Min-Jsuan; Teng, Michael Mu Huo; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Cheng-Yen [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Lin, Chung-Hsien [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2013-09-15

    To evaluate the imaging quality of head CT at lowered radiation dose by combining filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms. Experimental group A (n = 66) underwent CT with 43 % tube current reduction, and group B (n = 58) received an equivalent reduced dose by lowering the tube voltage. An age- and sex-matched control group (n = 72) receiving the conventional radiation dose was retrospectively collected. Imaging for the control group was reconstructed by FBP only, while images for groups A and B were reconstructed by FBP and IR. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), sharpness, number of infarcts and severity of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) were compared to assess imaging quality and diagnostic accuracy. There were no significant differences in SNRs and CNRs between group A and the control group. There were significantly decreased SNRs and increased CNRs in group B. Image sharpness decreased in both groups. Correlations between detected infarcts and severity of SAE across FBP and IR were high (r = 0.73-0.93). Head diameter was the only significant factor inversely correlated with infratentorial imaging quality. Head CT with 43 % reduced tube current reconstructed by IR provides diagnostic imaging quality for outpatient management. (orig.)

  8. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A.

    2018-01-01

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  9. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A. [Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2018-04-15

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  10. Classifying features in CT imagery: accuracy for some single- and multiple-species classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Jing He; A. Lynn Abbott

    1998-01-01

    Our current approach to automatically label features in CT images of hardwood logs classifies each pixel of an image individually. These feature classifiers use a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) and feature vectors that include a small, local neighborhood of pixels and the distance of the target pixel to the center of the log. Initially, this type of...

  11. Accuracy and reliability of different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices for structural analysis of alveolar bone in comparison with multislice CT and micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dessel, Jeroen; Nicolielo, Laura Ferreira Pinheiro; Huang, Yan; Coudyzer, Walter; Salmon, Benjamin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    for the i-CAT Next Generation CBCT (ICC 0.26 min to 0.86 max) and standard resolution MSCT (ICC 0.10 min to 0.62 max). This study demonstrated that most CBCT machines may be able to quantitatively assess alveolar bone quality, with a level of accuracy and reliability that approaches micro-CT. One may therefore propose to extrapolate this to clinical CBCT imaging, certainly when there is a need for implant rehabilitation in dentate jaw bones. Conflict-of-interest statement: There is no conflict of interest to declare. Fellowship support was received from Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) from the Belgian government and from the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) programme, Science without Borders, from the Brazilian government.

  12. Influence of the number of energy groups on the accuracy of neutron fluence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.U.; Konheiser, J.

    1999-01-01

    The question how many groups are necessary to obtain all needed integral quantities for the neutron load of pressure vessels and detector positions outside the vessel with sufficient accuracy is of general interest. Until now, there are no systematic investigations on this question. In principle 3-dimensional consideration is required for such neutron load calculations. Therefore, an estimation of the needed number of groups can be of interest to minimize calculation time. One general problem is the P L -approximation of the angular distributions for the transfers between different groups. For elastic scattering this P L -approximation becomes poorer with increasing number of groups. As deterministic methods generally use the P L -approximation they cannot be used for investigations of the errors caused by the group approximation. We have investigated this problem applying group Monte-Carlo but nearly exact representation of this elastic slowing down without P L -approximation. The calculations were directed to assess the neutron fluence of a Russian WWER-1000 reactor. For that a simplified geometrical model of this reactor type has been used. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Coronary CT Angiography for the Evaluation of Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collet, Carlos; Chevalier, Bernard; Cequier, Angel

    2018-01-01

    : 44 to 90) and a specificity of 82% (95% CI: 75 to 87). The diagnostic accuracy of coronary CTA was similar to coronary angiography in its ability to identify patients with a significant lesion based on the IVUS criteria (p = 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: Coronary CTA has good diagnostic accuracy to detect in-scaffold...... luminal obstruction and to assess luminal dimensions after BVS implantation. Coronary angiography and coronary CTA yielded similar diagnostic accuracy to identify the presence and severity of obstructive disease. Coronary CTA might become the method of choice for the evaluation of patients treated......OBJECTIVES: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) for bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) evaluation. BACKGROUND: Coronary CTA has emerged as a noninvasive method to evaluate patients with suspected or established coronary artery disease...

  14. Software-based hybrid perfusion SPECT/CT provides diagnostic accuracy when other pulmonary embolism imaging is indeterminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nishant; Xie, Karen; Mar, Winnie; Anderson, Thomas M.; Carney, Benjamin; Mehta, Nikhil; Machado, Roberto; Blend, Michael J.; Lu, Yang [University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (Q-SPECT/CT) in patients suspected to have pulmonary embolism (PE) but with indeterminate computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) or planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans. This retrospective study included two groups of patients. Group I consisted of 49 patients with nondiagnostic CTPA. These 49 patients underwent subsequent V/Q scans. Further Q-SPECTs were obtained in patients with indeterminate planar images and fused with existing CTPA. Group II consisted of 182 non-CTPA patients with indeterminate V/Q scans. These 182 patients underwent further Q-SPECT and separate noncontrast low-dose CT chest. Fusion Q-SPECT/CT scans were obtained through FDA-approved software and interpreted according to published criteria as positive, negative, or indeterminate for PE. Upon retrospective analyses, the final diagnosis was made using composite reference standards including all available clinical and imaging information for at least 6-month follow-up. In group I patients, 1 was positive, 24 were negative, and another 24 (49 %, 24/49) were indeterminate. In the subsequent 24 Q-SPECT/CTPAs, 4 were positive, 19 were negative, and 1 was indeterminate (4.2 %, 1/24). In group II patients, 9 (4.9 %, 9/182) were indeterminate, 33 were positive, and 140 were negative. The combined nondiagnostic rate for Q-SPECT/CT was only 4.9 % (10/206). There was six false-negative and one false-positive Q-SPECT/CT examinations. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of Q-SPECT/CT were 85.7 % (36/42), 99.4 % (153/154), 97.3 % (36/37) and 96.2 % (153/159), respectively. Q-SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic rate with promising accuracy in diagnosing PE that yields a satisfactory clinical verdict, especially when the CTPA and planar V/Q scan are indeterminate.

  15. SU-E-T-396: Dosimetric Accuracy of Proton Therapy for Patients with Metal Implants in CT Scans Using Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) Artifacts Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Kantor, M; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Sahoo, N; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs. DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction

  16. Evaluation of reduced-dose CT for acute non-traumatic abdominal pain: evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in comparison to standard-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Bongers, Malte Niklas; Zinsser, Dominik; Schabel, Christoph; Wichmann, Julian L; Arshid, Rami; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain often undergo abdominal computed tomography (CT). However, abdominal CT is associated with high radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate diagnostic performance of a reduced-dose 100 kVp CT protocol with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction as compared to a linearly blended 120 kVp protocol for assessment of acute, non-traumatic abdominal pain. Material and Methods Two radiologists assessed 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series of 112 consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic pain (onset diagnostic confidence. Both 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series were quantitatively evaluated regarding radiation dose and image noise. Comparative statistics and diagnostic accuracy was calculated using receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics, with final clinical diagnosis/clinical follow-up as reference standard. Results Image quality was high for both series without detectable significant differences ( P = 0.157). Image noise and artifacts were rated low for both series but significantly higher for 100 kVp ( P ≤ 0.021). Diagnostic accuracy was high for both series (120 kVp: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.950, sensitivity = 0.958, specificity = 0.941; 100 kVp: AUC ≥ 0.910, sensitivity ≥ 0.937, specificity = 0.882; P ≥ 0.516) with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (Kappa = 0.939). Diagnostic confidence was high for both dose levels without significant differences (100 kVp 5, range 4-5; 120 kVp 5, range 3-5; P = 0.134). The 100 kVp series yielded 26.1% lower radiation dose compared with the 120 kVp series (5.72 ± 2.23 mSv versus 7.75 ± 3.02 mSv, P diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  17. Cone beam CT evaluation of patient set-up accuracy as a QA tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Bertelsen, Anders; Westberg, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify by means of cone beam CT the random and systematic uncertainty involved in radiotherapy, and to determine if this information can be used for e.g. technical quality assurance, evaluation of patient immobilization and determination of margins for the treatment planning. Patients...... and lateral directions). In the CC direction, the margin has to be 5 mm for the Thorax patients. The total uncertainty on the patient position grows during the treatment course, especially in the CC direction for patients receiving thoracical irradiation. This may stem from problems in the immobilization...... and methods. Eighty four cancer patients have been cone beam CT scanned at treatment sessions 1, 2, 3, 10 and 20. Translational and rotational errors are analyzed. Results and conclusions. For the first three treatment sessions the mean translational error in the AP direction is 1 mm; this indicates a small...

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of CT in assessing extra-regional lymphadenopathy in pancreatic and peri-ampullary cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Dorine S J; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2014-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most widely used method to assess resectability of pancreatic and peri-ampullary cancer. One of the contra-indications for curative resection is the presence of extra-regional lymph node metastases. This meta-analysis investigates the accuracy of CT in assessing extra-regional lymph node metastases in pancreatic and peri-ampullary cancer. We systematically reviewed the literature according to the PRISMA guidelines. Studies reporting on CT assessment of extra-regional lymph nodes in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy were included. Data on baseline characteristics, CT-investigations and histopathological outcomes were extracted. Diagnostic accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity were calculated for individual studies and pooled data. After screening, 4 cohort studies reporting on CT-findings and histopathological outcome in 157 patients with pancreatic or peri-ampullary cancer were included. Overall, diagnostic accuracy, specificity and NPV varied from 63 to 81, 80-100% and 67-90% respectively. However, PPV and sensitivity ranged from 0 to 100% and 0-38%. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 25%, 86%, 28% and 84% respectively. CT has a low diagnostic accuracy in assessing extra-regional lymph node metastases in pancreatic and peri-ampullary cancer. Therefore, suspicion of extra-regional lymph node metastases on CT alone should not be considered a contra-indication for exploration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of living renal donors: accuracy of three-dimensional 16-section CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, N; Sahani, D.V.; Blake, M.A.; Ko, D.C.; Mueller, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the sensitivity and specificity of three-dimensional (3D) 16-section computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of vessels, pelvicalyceal system, and ureters in living renal donors, with surgical findings as the reference standard. Materials and methods: This was a HIPAA-compliant study. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the review of subjects' medical records and data analysis, with waiver of informed consent. Forty-six renal donors (18 men, 28 women; mean age, 42 years) were examined with 16-section CT. Two blinded reviewers independently studied renal vascular and urographic anatomy of each donor CT scans by fist using 3D images alone, then transverse images alone, and finally transverse and 3D data set. Image quality, degree of diagnostic confidence, and time used for review were recorded. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: For 3D images, transverse images, and transverse in conjunction with 3D data sets, the respective sensitivity and specificity of CT in evaluation of accessory arteries by reviewer 1 were 100% and 100%, 89% and 100%, and 100% and 100%, and those by reviewer 2 were 89% and 97%, 89% and 100%, and 89% and 100%; the respective sensitivity and specificity in evaluation of venous anomalies by reviewer 1 were 100% and 98%, 100% and 98%, and 100% and 98%, and those by reviewer 2 were 100% and 98%, 100% and 95%, and 100% and 98%. For focused comprehensive assessment of renal donors with 3D scans alone, a reviewer on average (average of reviewers 1 and 2) used 2.4 minutes per scan, demonstrated full confidence in 93%, and rated the quality as excellent in 76%. Conclusion: For focused assessment of renal vascular and urographic anatomy, review of 3D data set alone provides high sensitivity and specificity with regard to findings seen at surgery. (author)

  20. Evaluation of living renal donors: accuracy of three-dimensional 16-section CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, N; Sahani, D.V.; Blake, M.A.; Ko, D.C.; Mueller, P.R. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the sensitivity and specificity of three-dimensional (3D) 16-section computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of vessels, pelvicalyceal system, and ureters in living renal donors, with surgical findings as the reference standard. Materials and methods: This was a HIPAA-compliant study. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the review of subjects' medical records and data analysis, with waiver of informed consent. Forty-six renal donors (18 men, 28 women; mean age, 42 years) were examined with 16-section CT. Two blinded reviewers independently studied renal vascular and urographic anatomy of each donor CT scans by fist using 3D images alone, then transverse images alone, and finally transverse and 3D data set. Image quality, degree of diagnostic confidence, and time used for review were recorded. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: For 3D images, transverse images, and transverse in conjunction with 3D data sets, the respective sensitivity and specificity of CT in evaluation of accessory arteries by reviewer 1 were 100% and 100%, 89% and 100%, and 100% and 100%, and those by reviewer 2 were 89% and 97%, 89% and 100%, and 89% and 100%; the respective sensitivity and specificity in evaluation of venous anomalies by reviewer 1 were 100% and 98%, 100% and 98%, and 100% and 98%, and those by reviewer 2 were 100% and 98%, 100% and 95%, and 100% and 98%. For focused comprehensive assessment of renal donors with 3D scans alone, a reviewer on average (average of reviewers 1 and 2) used 2.4 minutes per scan, demonstrated full confidence in 93%, and rated the quality as excellent in 76%. Conclusion: For focused assessment of renal vascular and urographic anatomy, review of 3D data set alone provides high sensitivity and specificity with regard to findings seen at surgery. (author)

  1. CT-Guided Biopsy of Small Liver Lesions: Visibility, Artifacts, and Corresponding Diagnostic Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stattaus, Joerg; Kuehl, Hilmar; Ladd, Susanne; Schroeder, Tobias; Antoch, Gerald; Baba, Hideo A.; Barkhausen, Joerg; Forsting, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Our study aimed to determine the visibility of small liver lesions during CT-guided biopsy and to assess the influence of lesion visibility on biopsy results. Material and Methods. Fifty patients underwent CT-guided core biopsy of small focal liver lesions (maximum diameter, 3 cm); 38 biopsies were performed using noncontrast CT, and the remaining 12 were contrast-enhanced. Visibility of all lesions was graded on a 4-point-scale (0 = not visible, 1 = poorly visible, 2 = sufficiently visible, 3 = excellently visible) before and during biopsy (with the needle placed adjacent to and within the target lesion). Results. Forty-three biopsies (86%) yielded diagnostic results, and seven biopsies were false-negative. In noncontrast biopsies, the rate of insufficiently visualized lesions (grades 0-1) increased significantly during the procedure, from 10.5% to 44.7%, due to needle artifacts. This resulted in more (17.6%) false-negative biopsy results compared to lesions with good visualization (4.8%), although this difference lacks statistical significance. Visualization impairment appeared more often with an intercostal or subcostal vs. an epigastric access and with a subcapsular vs. a central lesion location, respectively. With contrast-enhanced biopsy the visibility of hepatic lesions was only temporarily improved, with a risk of complete obscuration in the late phase. Conclusion. In conclusion, visibility of small liver lesions diminished significantly during CT-guided biopsy due to needle artifacts, with a fourfold increased rate of insufficiently visualized lesions and of false-negative histological results. Contrast enhancement did not reveal better results

  2. [Accuracy and relevance of CT volumetry in open ocular injuries with intraocular foreign bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneschg, O A; Volek, E; Lohinai, Z; Resch, M D; Papp, A; Korom, C; Karlinger, K; Németh, J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the volume of intraocular foreign bodies (IOFB) using computed tomography (CT) volumetry as a prognostic factor for clinical outcome in open ocular injuries. This study compared the volume of 11 IOFBs more than 5 mm(3) in size based on CT volumetry with the real size determined by in vitro measurement. A retrospective evaluation of clinical data, visual acuity, complications and relation of size of IOFBs with clinical outcome in 33 patients (mean age 41.0 ± 13.5 years) with open ocular injuries treated at our department between January 2005 and December 2010 was carried out. No significant differences were found between pairwise in vitro measurement and CT volumetric size (p = 0.07). All patients were surgically treated by pars plana vitrectomy. The mean follow-up time was 7.6± 6.2 months and the mean preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.063 ± 0.16 (logMAR 1.2 ± 0.79). Postoperatively, a mean BCVA of 0.25 ± 0.2 (logMAR 0.6 ± 0.69) could be achieved. Clinical outcomes were significantly better in injuries with small IOFBs measuring volumetry is an accurate method for measurement of IOFBs. Exact data about the size and measurement of volume are also an important factor for the prognosis of clinical outcome in open ocular injuries with IOFBs and CT volumetry can also provide important information about the localization of IOFBs.

  3. Three-dimensional CT pyelography for planning of percutaneous nephrostolithotomy: accuracy of stone measurement, stone depiction and pelvicalyceal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Uday [St George' s Hospital and Medical School, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Princess Grace Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Walkden, Richard Miles [St George' s Hospital and Medical School, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ghani, Khurshid R. [St George' s Hospital and Medical School, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Anson, Ken [St George' s Hospital and Medical School, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Princess Grace Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    Retrospective evaluation of computed tomographic (CT) pyelography before percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL). Twenty patients with renal calculi underwent CT pyelography using a dedicated protocol. Calculus size, uniformity of contrast excretion and accuracy of calculus and pelvicalyceal (PC) system reconstructions were scored and compared on axial and coronal maximum intensity projections (MIP) and volume reconstructions (VRmovie loops). After contrast medium administration, the size of calculi is accurate on axial images, but underestimated on coronal studies: mean 14.7 mm vs. 14.4 mm (axial) and 17.2 mm vs. 16.1 mm (coronal) for measurements before and after enhancement, respectively (p = 0.11 and 0.03). Uniform contrast medium excretion (median 228 HU; 95% CI 209-266 HU) was sufficiently lower than calculus density (median 845 HU; 95% CI 457-1,193 HU) for precise calculus and pelvicalyceal reconstructions in 87% and 85%, respectively. Coronal MIP scans were rated best for calculus depiction (mean score 2.68 vs. 2.50 and 2.41 for coronal, axial and VRs, respectively; p = 0.14) and VR studies best for PC anatomy (mean score 4.4 vs. 3.73 and 2.89 for VR, coronal and axial studies, respectively; p = <0.0001). Three-dimensional CT pyelography can accurately demonstrate calculus position and spatial relationships of the collecting system before PCNL. (orig.)

  4. Three-dimensional CT pyelography for planning of percutaneous nephrostolithotomy: accuracy of stone measurement, stone depiction and pelvicalyceal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Uday; Walkden, Richard Miles; Ghani, Khurshid R.; Anson, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of computed tomographic (CT) pyelography before percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL). Twenty patients with renal calculi underwent CT pyelography using a dedicated protocol. Calculus size, uniformity of contrast excretion and accuracy of calculus and pelvicalyceal (PC) system reconstructions were scored and compared on axial and coronal maximum intensity projections (MIP) and volume reconstructions (VRmovie loops). After contrast medium administration, the size of calculi is accurate on axial images, but underestimated on coronal studies: mean 14.7 mm vs. 14.4 mm (axial) and 17.2 mm vs. 16.1 mm (coronal) for measurements before and after enhancement, respectively (p = 0.11 and 0.03). Uniform contrast medium excretion (median 228 HU; 95% CI 209-266 HU) was sufficiently lower than calculus density (median 845 HU; 95% CI 457-1,193 HU) for precise calculus and pelvicalyceal reconstructions in 87% and 85%, respectively. Coronal MIP scans were rated best for calculus depiction (mean score 2.68 vs. 2.50 and 2.41 for coronal, axial and VRs, respectively; p = 0.14) and VR studies best for PC anatomy (mean score 4.4 vs. 3.73 and 2.89 for VR, coronal and axial studies, respectively; p = <0.0001). Three-dimensional CT pyelography can accurately demonstrate calculus position and spatial relationships of the collecting system before PCNL. (orig.)

  5. Accuracy of automated software-guided detection of significant coronary artery stenosis by CT angiography: comparison with invasive catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Petit, Isabel; Daniel, Werner G.; Pflederer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    True automated detection of coronary artery stenoses might be useful whenever expert evaluation is not available, or as a ''second reader'' to enhance diagnostic confidence. We evaluated the accuracy of a PC-based stenosis detection tool alone and combined with expert interpretation. One hundred coronary CT angiography datasets were evaluated with the automated software alone, by manual interpretation (axial images, multiplanar reformations and maximum intensity projections in free double-oblique planes), and by expert interpretation aware of the automated findings. Stenoses ≥ 50 % were noted per-vessel and per-patient, and compared with invasive angiography. Automated post-processing was successful in 90 % of patients (88 % of vessels). When excluding uninterpretable datasets, per-patient sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 89 %, 79 %, 74 % and 92 % (per-vessel: 82 %, 85 %, 48 % and 96 %). All 100 datasets were evaluable by expert interpretation. Per-patient sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 95 %, 95 %, 93 % and 97 % (per-vessel: 89 %,98 %, 88 % and 98 %). Knowing the results of automated interpretation did not improve the performance of expert readers. Automated off-line post-processing of coronary CT angiography shows adequate sensitivity, but relatively low specificity in coronary stenosis detection. It does not increase accuracy of expert interpretation. Failure of post-processing in 10 % of all patients necessitates additional manual image work-up. (orig.)

  6. Detection of pulmonary metastases with pathological correlation: effect of breathing on the accuracy of spiral CT. Editor`s note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, F.V. [Abdominal Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cohen, M.D. [Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Waters, D.J. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Davis, M.M. [Department of Pathology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Karmazyn, B. [Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gonin, R. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hanna, M.P. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Background. CT of the chest for suspected pulmonary metastases in adults is generally performed using a breath-hold technique. The results may not be applicable to young children in whom breath-holding may be impossible. Objective. Determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary metastasis detection by spiral CT (SCT). Materials and methods. Prior to euthanasia four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent SCT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2, during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted at postmortem. Hard-copy SCT images were reviewed by ten radiologists, each of whom circled all suspected metastases. SCT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true and false positives. Results. The pathologist identified 132 macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases. For metastasis detection, there was no significant difference between breath-hold SCT and breathing SCT. Conclusion. In our animal model, SCT can be performed during normal resting breathing without significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases. (orig.). With 3 tabs.

  7. Detection of pulmonary metastases with pathological correlation: effect of breathing on the accuracy of spiral CT. Editor's note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, F.V.; Cohen, M.D.; Waters, D.J.; Davis, M.M.; Karmazyn, B.; Gonin, R.; Hanna, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Background. CT of the chest for suspected pulmonary metastases in adults is generally performed using a breath-hold technique. The results may not be applicable to young children in whom breath-holding may be impossible. Objective. Determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary metastasis detection by spiral CT (SCT). Materials and methods. Prior to euthanasia four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent SCT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2, during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted at postmortem. Hard-copy SCT images were reviewed by ten radiologists, each of whom circled all suspected metastases. SCT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true and false positives. Results. The pathologist identified 132 macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases. For metastasis detection, there was no significant difference between breath-hold SCT and breathing SCT. Conclusion. In our animal model, SCT can be performed during normal resting breathing without significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases. (orig.). With 3 tabs

  8. WE-FG-207B-08: Dual-Energy CT Iodine Accuracy Across Vendors and Platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, M; Wood, C; Cody, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although a major benefit of dual-energy CT is its quantitative capabilities, it is critical to understand how results vary by scanner manufacturer and/or model before making clinical patient management decisions. Each manufacturer utilizes a specific dual-energy CT approach; cross-calibration may be required for facilities with more than one dual-energy CT scanner type. Methods: A solid dual-energy quality control phantom (Gammex, Inc.; Appleton, WI) representing a large body cross-section containing three Iodine inserts (2mg/ml, 5mg/ml, 15 mg/ml) was scanned on these CT systems: GE HD-750 (80/140kVp), prototype GE Revolution CT with GSI (80/140kVp), Siemens Flash (80/140kVp and 100/140kVp), and Philips IQon (120kVp and 140kVp). Iodine content was measured in units of concentration (mg/ml) from a single 5mm-thick central image. Three to five acquisitions were performed on each scanner platform in order to compute standard deviation. Scan acquisitions were approximately dose-matched (∼25mGy CTDIvol) and image parameters were as consistent as possible (thickness, kernel, no noise reduction applied). Results: Iodine measurement error ranges were −0.24-0.16 mg/ml for the 2mg/ml insert (−12.0 − 8.0%), −0.28–0.26 mg/ml for the 5mg/ml insert (−5.6 − 5.2%), and −1.16−0.99 mg/ml for the 15mg/ml insert (−7.7 − 6.6%). Standard deviations ranged from 0 to 0.19 mg/ml for the repeated acquisitions from each scanner. The average iodine measurement error and standard deviation across all systems and inserts was −0.21 ± 0.48 mg/ml (−1.5 ± 6.48%). The largest absolute measurement error was found in the 15mg/ml iodine insert. Conclusion: There was generally good agreement in Iodine quantification across 3 dual-energy CT manufacturers and 4 scanner models. This was unexpected given the widely different underlying dual-energy CT mechanisms employed. Future work will include additional scanner platforms, independent verification of the Iodine

  9. Influence of density and mean atomic number on CT attenuation corrected PET: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintas, D.; Houzard, C.; Galy, G.; Maintas, C.; Itti, R.; Cachin, F.; Mognetti, Th.; Slosman

    2007-01-01

    Aim: the aim of this work is to study the influence of medium density on the CT or external source attenuation corrected images, by simulation on a phantom, with various positron emission tomographs. Material and method: a series of experiments on a cylindrical phantom filled with water marked with [18 F]-FDG, containing six vials filled per pair with mediums of different densities or solutions of KI, CaCl 2 and saccharose with various densities, was carried out under comparable conditions on three different tomographs. In only one of the vials of each pair, an identical radioactivity of [18 F]-FDG was added, three to five fold the surrounding activity. The reconstructions and attenuation corrections suggested by the manufacturers, were carried out under the usual conditions of each site. The activity of each structure was estimated by the methods of profiles and regions of interest, on the non attenuation corrected images (N.A.C.), the images corrected by CT (C.T.A.C.), and/or external source (G.P.A.C.). Results: with all three tomographs, the activities estimated on the N.A.C. images present an inverse correlation to the medium density (important absorption by dense material). On C.T.A.C. images, we observed with only two of the three tomographs, an overestimation of the activity in the 'radioactive' vials, depending on the medium mean Z number and density (over correction), and a artifactual 'activity' in the denser 'cold' vial (incorrect attenuation correction. The dense saccharose solutions, with non elevated Z number, do not affect the CT attenuation correction. (authors)

  10. CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Disease by 256-Slice Scanner: Accuracy, Advantages and Disadvantages Compared to Digital Subtraction Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Atul; Jain, Narendra; Bhagwat, Anand

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) may cause disabling claudication or critical limb ischemia. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) technology has evolved to the level of 256-slice CT scanners which has significantly improved the spatial and temporal resolution of the images. This has provided the capability of chasing the contrast bolus at a fast speed enabling angiographic imaging of long segments of the body. These images can be reconstructed in various planes and various modes for detailed analysis of the peripheral vascular diseases which helps in making treatment decision. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the CT angiograms (CTAs) of all cases of PAOD done by 256-slice CT scanner at a tertiary care vascular center and comparing these images with the digital subtraction angiograms (DSAs) of these patients. The retrospective study included 53 patients who underwent both CTA and DSA at our center over a period of 3 years from March 2013 to March 2016. The CTA showed high sensitivity (93%) and specificity (92.7%) for overall assessment of degree of stenosis in a vascular segment in cases of aortic and lower limb occlusive disease. The assessment of lesions of infrapopliteal segment was comparatively inferior (sensitivity 91.6%, accuracy 73.3%, and positive predictive value 78.5%), more so in the presence of significant calcification. The advantages of CTA were its noninvasive nature, ability to image large area of body, almost no adverse effects to the patients, and better assessment of vessel wall disease. However, the CTA assessment of collaterals was inferior with a sensitivity of only 62.7% as compared to DSA. Overall, 256-slice CTA provides fast and accurate imaging of vascular tree which can restrict DSA only in few selected cases as a problem-solving tool where clinico-radiological mismatch is present.

  11. Prospective versus retrospective ECG-gated multislice CT coronary angiography: A systematic review of radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhonghua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of prospective versus retrospective ECG-gated multislice CT coronary angiography. Materials and methods: A search of Pubmed/Medline and Sciencedirect databases for English literature was performed to identify studies comparing prospective and retrospective ECG-gated multislice CT angiography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Effective dose, dose length product, image quality and diagnostic value were compared between two groups of studies. Results: 22 studies were included for analysis. The mean effective dose of prospective ECG-gated scans was 4.5 mSv (95% CI: 3.6, 5.3 mSv), which is significantly lower than that of retrospective scans, which is 13.8 mSv (95% CI: 11.5, 16.0 mSv) (p < 0.001). The mean dose length product was 225 mGy cm (95% CI: 188, 262 mGy cm) and 822 mGy cm (95% CI: 630, 1013 mGy cm) for the prospective and retrospective ECG-gated scans, respectively, indicating a statistically significant difference between these two protocols (p < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity and specificity of multislice CT angiography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was 97.7% (95% CI: 93.7%, 100%) and 92.1% (95% CI: 87.2%, 97%) for prospective ECG-gated scans; 95.2% (95% CI: 91%, 99.5%) and 94.4% (95% CI: 88.5%, 100%) for retrospective ECG-gated scans, respectively, with no significant difference for sensitivity but significant difference for specificity (p = 0.047). Conclusion: Multislice CT coronary angiography with prospective ECG-gating leads to a significant reduction of radiation dose when compared to that of retrospective ECG-gating, while offering comparable image quality and diagnostic value.

  12. Accuracy evaluation of fusion of CT, MR, and SPECT images using commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongioj, Valeria; Brusa, Anna; Loi, Gianfranco; Pignoli, Emanuele; Gramaglia, Alberto; Scorsetti, Marta; Bombardieri, Emilio; Marchesini, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A problem for clinicians is to mentally integrate information from multiple diagnostic sources, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), whose images give anatomic and metabolic information. Methods and Materials: To combine this different imaging procedure information, and to overlay correspondent slices, we used commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS). The algorithms utilize a fiducial-based coordinate system (or frame) with 3 N-shaped markers, which allows coordinate transformation of a clinical examination data set (9 spots for each transaxial section) to a stereotactic coordinate system. The N-shaped markers were filled with fluids visible in each modality (gadolinium for MR, calcium chloride for CT, and 99m Tc for SPECT). The frame is relocatable, in the different acquisition modalities, by means of a head holder to which a face mask is fixed so as to immobilize the patient. Position errors due to the algorithms were obtained by evaluating the stereotactic coordinates of five sources detectable in each modality. Results: SPECT and MR position errors due to the algorithms were evaluated with respect to CT: Δx was ≤ 0.9 mm for MR and ≤ 1.4 mm for SPECT, Δy was ≤ 1 mm and ≤ 3 mm for MR and SPECT, respectively. Maximal differences in distance between estimated and actual fiducial centers (geometric mismatch) were in the order of the pixel size (0.8 mm for CT, 1.4 mm for MR, and 1.8 mm for SPECT). In an attempt to distinguish necrosis from residual disease, the image fusion protocol was studied in 35 primary or metastatic brain tumor patients. Conclusions: The image fusion technique has a good degree of accuracy as well as the potential to improve the specificity of tissue identification and the precision of the subsequent treatment planning

  13. Influence of the number of elongated fiducial markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, Johan; De Bois, Josien; Van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Implanting fiducial markers for localization purposes has become an accepted practice in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. While many correction strategies correct for translations only, advanced correction protocols also require knowledge of the rotation of the prostate. For this purpose, typically, three or more markers are implanted. Elongated fiducial markers provide more information about their orientation than traditional round or cylindrical markers. Potentially, fewer markers are required. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the number of elongated markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate. To quantify the localization error, we developed a model that estimates, at arbitrary locations in the prostate, the registration error caused by translational and rotational uncertainties of the marker registration. Every combination of one, two and three markers was analysed for a group of 24 patients. The average registration errors at the prostate surface were 0.3–0.8 mm and 0.4–1 mm for registrations on, respectively, three markers and two markers located on different sides of the prostate. Substantial registration errors (2.0–2.2 mm) occurred at the prostate surface contralateral to the markers when two markers were implanted on the same side of the prostate or only one marker was used. In conclusion, there is no benefit in using three elongated markers: two markers accurately localize the prostate if they are implanted at some distance from each other. (paper)

  14. Influence of the number of elongated fiducial markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Johan; de Bois, Josien; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-10-01

    Implanting fiducial markers for localization purposes has become an accepted practice in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. While many correction strategies correct for translations only, advanced correction protocols also require knowledge of the rotation of the prostate. For this purpose, typically, three or more markers are implanted. Elongated fiducial markers provide more information about their orientation than traditional round or cylindrical markers. Potentially, fewer markers are required. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the number of elongated markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate. To quantify the localization error, we developed a model that estimates, at arbitrary locations in the prostate, the registration error caused by translational and rotational uncertainties of the marker registration. Every combination of one, two and three markers was analysed for a group of 24 patients. The average registration errors at the prostate surface were 0.3-0.8 mm and 0.4-1 mm for registrations on, respectively, three markers and two markers located on different sides of the prostate. Substantial registration errors (2.0-2.2 mm) occurred at the prostate surface contralateral to the markers when two markers were implanted on the same side of the prostate or only one marker was used. In conclusion, there is no benefit in using three elongated markers: two markers accurately localize the prostate if they are implanted at some distance from each other.

  15. Registration accuracy and image quality of time averaged mid-position CT scans for liver SBRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jansen, Edwin P. M.; van Herk, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to validate the accuracy of motion models derived from deformable registration from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and breath-hold contrast enhanced computed tomography (BHCCT) scans for liver SBRT. Additionally, the image quality of the time averaged mid-position (MidP)

  16. Diagnostic accuracies of MR enterography and CT enterography in symptomatic Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2011-01-01

    diagnostic accuracies for detection of small bowel CD and stenosis. In symptomatic patients with CD and high disease prevalence, positive predictive values are favorable but negative predictive values are low. Consequently, MRE and CTE can be relied upon, if a positive result is obtained whereas a negative...

  17. Methodological quality of diagnostic accuracy studies on non-invasive coronary CT angiography: influence of QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies included in systematic reviews) items on sensitivity and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, Sabine; Walther, Stefan; Schuetz, Georg M. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schlattmann, Peter [University Hospital of Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Documentation, Jena (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    To evaluate the methodological quality of diagnostic accuracy studies on coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography using the QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies included in systematic reviews) tool. Each QUADAS item was individually defined to adapt it to the special requirements of studies on coronary CT angiography. Two independent investigators analysed 118 studies using 12 QUADAS items. Meta-regression and pooled analyses were performed to identify possible effects of methodological quality items on estimates of diagnostic accuracy. The overall methodological quality of coronary CT studies was merely moderate. They fulfilled a median of 7.5 out of 12 items. Only 9 of the 118 studies fulfilled more than 75 % of possible QUADAS items. One QUADAS item (''Uninterpretable Results'') showed a significant influence (P = 0.02) on estimates of diagnostic accuracy with ''no fulfilment'' increasing specificity from 86 to 90 %. Furthermore, pooled analysis revealed that each QUADAS item that is not fulfilled has the potential to change estimates of diagnostic accuracy. The methodological quality of studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive coronary CT is only moderate and was found to affect the sensitivity and specificity. An improvement is highly desirable because good methodology is crucial for adequately assessing imaging technologies. (orig.)

  18. Methodological quality of diagnostic accuracy studies on non-invasive coronary CT angiography: influence of QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies included in systematic reviews) items on sensitivity and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, Sabine; Walther, Stefan; Schuetz, Georg M.; Schlattmann, Peter; Dewey, Marc

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the methodological quality of diagnostic accuracy studies on coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography using the QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies included in systematic reviews) tool. Each QUADAS item was individually defined to adapt it to the special requirements of studies on coronary CT angiography. Two independent investigators analysed 118 studies using 12 QUADAS items. Meta-regression and pooled analyses were performed to identify possible effects of methodological quality items on estimates of diagnostic accuracy. The overall methodological quality of coronary CT studies was merely moderate. They fulfilled a median of 7.5 out of 12 items. Only 9 of the 118 studies fulfilled more than 75 % of possible QUADAS items. One QUADAS item (''Uninterpretable Results'') showed a significant influence (P = 0.02) on estimates of diagnostic accuracy with ''no fulfilment'' increasing specificity from 86 to 90 %. Furthermore, pooled analysis revealed that each QUADAS item that is not fulfilled has the potential to change estimates of diagnostic accuracy. The methodological quality of studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive coronary CT is only moderate and was found to affect the sensitivity and specificity. An improvement is highly desirable because good methodology is crucial for adequately assessing imaging technologies. (orig.)

  19. Indication for and accuracy of CT and MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, H.; Anders, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent pains of the temporomandibular joint represent a frequent symptom with numerous different causes. CT and MRI can reliably show the cause of these disorders and therefore have substituted conventional X-ray imaging. Modern multi-slice-CT (MSCT) allows for examination of the skull base including the mandible in a very short time with thinnest slice collimation (0.75 mm). With 2D- and 3D- reformations reconstructed out of this volume data set in parasagittal, coronal or any other arbitrary slice orientation excellent imaging of fractures and bony changes of arthrosis as well as benign and malignant tumors of the temporomandibular joint can be performed. MRI offers very good soft tissue contrast in order to visualize the intra-articular disc, the ligaments and muscles, as well the possibility to acquire cross sectional images in any user-defined orientation. MRI is the method of choice to diagnose 'internal derangement', particularly displacement of the intra-articular disc and inflammatory disease of the temporomandibular joint. The present paper will provide diagnostic strategies for the use of MSCT or MRI imaging concerning the different causes of disorders to the temporomandibular joint. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with that of contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magometschnigg, Heinrich F.; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Fueger, Barbara; Helbich, Thomas H.; Weber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Dubsky, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of prone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with that of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) at 3 T in suspicious breast lesions. To evaluate the influence of tumour size on diagnostic accuracy and the use of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub MAX}) thresholds to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions. A total of 172 consecutive patients with an imaging abnormality were included in this IRB-approved prospective study. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI of the breast at 3 T in the prone position. Two reader teams independently evaluated the likelihood of malignancy as determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI independently. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT data were qualitatively evaluated by visual interpretation. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculation of SUV{sub MAX}. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, area under the curve and interreader agreement were calculated for all lesions and for lesions <10 mm. Histopathology was used as the standard of reference. There were 132 malignant and 40 benign lesions; 23 lesions (13.4 %) were <10 mm. Both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI achieved an overall diagnostic accuracy of 93 %. There were no significant differences in sensitivity (p = 0.125), specificity (p = 0.344) or diagnostic accuracy (p = 1). For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated to 91 % with both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI. Although no significant difference was found for lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed to be more sensitive but less specific than {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Interreader agreement was excellent (κ = 0.85 and κ = 0.92). SUV{sub MAX} threshold was not helpful in differentiating benign from malignant lesions. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T showed equal diagnostic accuracies in breast cancer diagnosis. For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated, but was equal for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T. For lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  2. Prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma without invasion to pelvic structures: accuracy of preoperative CT, MR, and DWIBS assessments relative to histopathologic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance (MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS in the prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty-two subjects with primary rectal cancer were preoperatively assessed by CT and MRI at 1.5 T with a phased-array coil. Preoperative lymph node staging with imaging modalities (CT, MRI, and DWIBS were compared with the final histological findings. RESULTS: The accuracy of CT, MRI, and DWIBS were 57.7%, 63.5%, and 40.4%. The accuracy of DWIBS with higher sensitivity and negative predictive value for evaluating primary rectal cancer patients was lower than that of CT and MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was fairly strong for CT and MRI (Kappa value = 0.331 and 0.348, P<0.01 but was relatively weaker for DWIBS (Kappa value = 0.174, P<0.05. The accuracy was 57.7% and 59.6%, respectively, for CT and MRI when the lymph node border information was used as the criteria, and was 57.7% and 61.5%, respectively, for enhanced CT and MRI when the lymph node enhancement pattern was used as the criteria. CONCLUSION: MRI is more accurate than CT in predicting nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. DWIBS has a great diagnostic value in differentiating small malignant from benign lymph nodes.

  3. Prognostic and accuracy data of multidetector CT coronary angiography in an established clinical service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lingen, R. [Department of Cardiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Robin.vanLingen@rcht.cornwall.nhs.uk; Kakani, N.; Veitch, A.; Manghat, N.E.; Roobottom, C.A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom); Morgan-Hughes, G.J. [Department of Cardiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of clinical coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data compared to invasive coronary angiography, and to determine the prognostic value of a negative coronary CTA examination in symptomatic, intermediate-risk patients. Methods: Thirty-seven months of coronary CTA data were audited. Seventy-eight patients were identified who had undergone coronary CTA followed by invasive coronary angiography (ICA) to determine the accuracy of CTA versus ICA. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were identified who had a 'negative' coronary CTA to enable evaluation of the prognostic value of a negative CTA examination. Results: Of the 78 patients in the accuracy analysis group there were 43 true-negative, two false-negative, 26 true-positive, and seven false-positive results producing a sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 86%, negative predictive value of 95.6%, and positive predictive value of 78.8%. The 178 patients who had a negative coronary CTA examination were followed up for a mean of 366 days and were all alive (0% mortality) with no episodes of myocardial infarction or unstable angina; two patients underwent elective revascularization procedures (1.1%). Conclusion: According to medium-term analysis, the accuracy of the clinical coronary CTA programme is in line with published trial data, producing excellent sensitivity and negative predictive values. The finding of a negative coronary CTA in symptomatic, intermediate-risk patients appears to confer a good prognosis, at mean follow-up of 1 year, with no deaths or episodes of myocardial infarction or unstable angina. This suggests that the prognostic value of a negative coronary CTA may be similar to that conferred by negative myocardial perfusion scintigraphy or stress echocardiography.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of dual energy CT angiography in patients with diabetes mellitus; Diagnostische Genauigkeit der Dual-energy-CT-Angiographie bei Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabel, C.; Bongers, M.N.; Syha, R. [Klinikum der Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Klinikum der Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Sektion fuer Experimentelle Radiologie der Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Ketelsen, D.; Homann, G.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Nikolaou, K.; Bamberg, F. [Klinikum der Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Thomas, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) represents a major and highly prevalent complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. The diagnostic, non-invasive work-up by computed tomography angiography (CTA) is limited in the presence of extensive calcification. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of dual energy CTA (DE-CTA) for the detection and characterization of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study 30 diabetic patients with suspected or known PAD were retrospectively included in the analysis. All subjects underwent DE-CTA (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) prior to invasive angiography, which served as the reference standard. Blinded analysis included assessment of the presence and degree of peripheral stenosis on curved multiplanar reformatting (MPR) and maximum intensity projections (MIP). Conventional measures of diagnostic accuracy were derived. Among the 30 subjects included in the analysis (83 % male, mean age 70.0 ± 10.5 years, 83 % diabetes type 2), the prevalence of critical stenosis in 331 evaluated vessel segments was high (30 %). Dual energy CT identified critical stenoses with a high sensitivity and good specificity using curved MPR (100 % and 93.1 %, respectively) and MIP images (99 % and 91.8 %, respectively). In stratified analysis, the diagnostic accuracy was higher for stenosis pertaining to the pelvic and thigh vessels as compared with the lower extremities (curved MPR accuracy 97.1 % vs. 99.2 vs. 90.9 %; respectively, p < 0.001). The use of DE-CTA allows reliable detection and characterization of peripheral arterial stenosis in patients with diabetes mellitus with higher accuracy in vessels in the pelvic and thigh regions compared with the vessels in the lower legs. (orig.) [German] Die periphere arterielle Verschlusskrankheit (PAVK) ist eine wesentliche Komplikation des Diabetes mellitus und stellt aufgrund ausgepraegter Gefaessverkalkungen eine diagnostische

  5. Accuracy of preoperative CT T staging of renal cell carcinoma: which features predict advanced stage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, A.J.; MacDonald, L.; Whiteside, S.; Johnson, R.J.; Ramani, V.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To characterise CT findings in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and establish which features are associated with higher clinical T stage disease, and to evaluate patterns of discrepancy between radiological and pathological staging of RCC. Materials and methods: Preoperative CT studies of 92 patients with 94 pathologically proven RCCs were retrospectively reviewed. CT stage was compared with pathological stage using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), 7 th edition (2010). The presence or absence of tumour necrosis, perinephric fat standing, thickening of Gerota's fascia, collateral vessels were noted, and correlated with pT stage. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for predicting pT stage ≥pT3a were derived separately for different predictors using cross-tabulations. Results: Twenty-four lesions were pathological stage T1a, 21 were T1b, seven were T2a, 25 were T3a, 11 were T3b, four were T3c, and two were T4. There were no stage T2b. Sixty-three (67%) patients had necrosis, 27 (29%) thickening of Gerota's fascia (1 T1a), 25 had collateral vessels (0 T1a), 28 (30%) had fat stranding of <2 mm, 20 (21%) of 2–5mm and one (1%) of >5 mm. For pT stage ≥pT3a, the presence of perinephric fat stranding had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 74%, 65%, 63%, and 76%, respectively. Presence of tumour necrosis had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 81%, 44%, 54%, and 72%, respectively. Thickening of Gerota's fascia had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 52%, 90%, 81% and 70%, respectively; and enlarged collateral vessels had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV value of 52%, 94%, 88%, and 71% respectively. Conclusion: The presence of perinephric stranding and tumour necrosis were not reliable signs for pT stage >T3a. Thickening of Gerota's fascia and the presence of collateral vessels in the peri- or paranephric fat had 90% and 94% specificity, with 82% and 88

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography: a randomized comparison of different acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neefjes, Lisan A.; Kate, Gert-Jan R. ten; Rossi, Alexia; Nieman, Koen; Papadopoulou, Stella L.; Dharampal, Anoeshka S.; Dedic, Admir; Feyter, Pim J. de; Mollet, Nico R.; Genders, Tessa S.S.; Hunink, M.G.M.; Schultz, Carl J.; Weustink, Annick C.; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van; Cademartiri, Filippo; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance and radiation exposure of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) protocols to detect coronary stenosis with more than 50 % lumen obstruction. We prospectively included 459 symptomatic patients referred for CTCA. Patients were randomized between high-pitch spiral vs. narrow-window sequential CTCA protocols (heart rate below 65 bpm, group A), or between wide-window sequential vs. retrospective spiral protocols (heart rate above 65 bpm, group B). Diagnostic performance of CTCA was compared with quantitative coronary angiography in 267 patients. In group A (231 patients, 146 men, mean heart rate 58 ± 7 bpm), high-pitch spiral CTCA yielded a lower per-segment sensitivity compared to sequential CTCA (89 % vs. 97 %, P = 0.01). Specificity, PPV and NPV were comparable (95 %, 62 %, 99 % vs. 96 %, 73 %, 100 %, P > 0.05) but radiation dose was lower (1.16 ± 0.60 vs. 3.82 ± 1.65 mSv, P 0.05). Radiation dose of sequential CTCA was lower compared to retrospective CTCA (6.12 ± 2.58 vs. 8.13 ± 4.52 mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic performance was comparable in both groups. Sequential CTCA should be used in patients with regular heart rates using 128-slice dual-source CT, providing optimal diagnostic accuracy with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation dose. circle 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography offers several different acquisition protocols. (orig.)

  7. An assessment of the number of CT slices necessary to plan breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, D.; Beckham, W.; Delaney, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the number of CT slices required to produce satisfactory dose distribution for tangential field irradiation of the chest wall and breast and to assess correlation of this with the volume of breast tissue treated. We conclude that a single-slice plan is unsatisfactory in providing sufficient information about the dose variation across the treatment volume and that ideally a 3D plan with DVHs should be produced. If the required data is unavailable then a minimum of three slices should be used as an approximation. We also propose a software tool for treatment planning systems, which calculates the percentage of the total PTV having dose outside the ICRU 50 radiation dose distribution homogeneity guideline range

  8. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction of Limited-Range CT in the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Michael; Sanchez, Thomas R; Lamba, Ramit; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Corwin, Michael T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of limited-range CT prescribed from the top of L2 to the top of the pubic symphysis in children with suspected acute appendicitis. We performed a retrospective study of 210 consecutive pediatric patients from December 11, 2012, through December 11, 2014, who underwent abdominopelvic CT for suspected acute appendicitis. Two radiologists independently reviewed the theoretic limited scans from the superior L2 vertebral body to the top of the pubic symphysis, to assess for visualization of the appendix, acute appendicitis, alternative diagnoses, and incidental findings. Separately, the same parameters were assessed on the full scan by the same two reviewers. Whole-body effective doses were determined for the full- and limited-range scans and were compared using the paired t test. The appendix or entire cecum was visualized on the limited scan in all cases, and no cases of acute appendicitis were missed on the simulated limited scan compared with the full scan. Two alternative diagnoses were missed with the limited scan: one case of hydronephrosis and one of acute acalculous cholecystitis. The mean effective dose for the original scan was 5.6 mSv and that for the simulated limited scan was 3.0 mSv, resulting in a dose reduction of 46.4% (p appendicitis and reduces the dose by approximately 46%.

  9. Precision and accuracy in CT attenuation measurement of vascular wall using region-of-interest supported by differentiation curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kidouchi, Takashi; Kuwahara, Sadatoshi; Vembar, Mani; Takei, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Asako

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the precision and accuracy in CT attenuation measurement of vascular wall using region-of-interest (ROI) supported by differentiation curves. Study design: We used vascular models (actual attenuation value of the wall: 87 HU) with wall thicknesses of 1.5, 1.0, or 0.5 mm, filled with contrast material of 250, 348, or 436 HU. The nine vascular models were scanned with a 64-detector CT. The wall attenuation values were measured using three sizes (diameter: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm) of ROIs without differentiation curves. Sixteen measurements were repeated for each vascular model by each of two operators. Measurements supported by differentiation curves were also performed. We used analyses of variance with repeated measures for the measured attenuations for each size of the ROI. Results: Without differentiation curves, there were significant differences in the attenuation values of the wall among the three densities of contrast material, and the attenuation values tended to be overestimated more as the contrast material density increased. Operator dependencies were also found in measurements for 0.5- and 1.5-mm thickness models. With differentiation curves, measurements were not possible for 0.5- and 1.0-mm thickness models. Using differentiation curves for 1.5-mm thickness models with a ROI of 1.0- or 1.5-mm diameter, the wall attenuations were not affected by the contrast material densities and were operator independent, measuring between 75 and 103 HU. Conclusions: The use of differentiation curves can improve the precision and accuracy in wall attenuation measurement using a ROI technique, while measurements for walls of ≤1.0 mm thickness are difficult.

  10. Accuracy of multidetector-row CT in diagnosing lymph node metastasis in patients with gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takuro; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro [Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-08-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal cut-off value of lymph node size for diagnosing metastasis in gastric cancer with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) after categorizing perigastric lymph nodes into three regions. The study included 90 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy. The long-axis diameter (LAD) and short-axis diameter (SAD) of all visualized lymph nodes were measured with transverse MDCT images. The locations of lymph nodes were categorized into three regions: lesser curvature, greater curvature, and suprapancreatic. The diagnostic value of lymph node metastasis was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The area under the curve was larger for SAD than LAD in all groups. The optimal cut-off values of SAD were determined as follows: overall, 9 mm; differentiated type, 9 mm; undifferentiated type, 8 mm; lesser curvature region, 7 mm; greater curvature region, 6 mm; and suprapancreatic region, 9 mm. The diagnostic accuracies for lymph node metastasis using individual cut-off values were 71.1 % based on histological type and 76.6 % based on region of lymph node location. The diagnostic accuracy of lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer was improved by using individual cut-off values for each lymph node region. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of Estimation of Graft Size for Living-Related Liver Transplantation: First Results of a Semi-Automated Interactive Software for CT-Volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokry, Theresa; Bellemann, Nadine; Müller, Dirk; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Klauß, Miriam; Stampfl, Ulrike; Radeleff, Boris; Schemmer, Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Sommer, Christof-Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate accuracy of estimated graft size for living-related liver transplantation using a semi-automated interactive software for CT-volumetry. Materials and Methods Sixteen donors for living-related liver transplantation (11 male; mean age: 38.2±9.6 years) underwent contrast-enhanced CT prior to graft removal. CT-volumetry was performed using a semi-automated interactive software (P), and compared with a manual commercial software (TR). For P, liver volumes were provided either with or without vessels. For TR, liver volumes were provided always with vessels. Intraoperative weight served as reference standard. Major study goals included analyses of volumes using absolute numbers, linear regression analyses and inter-observer agreements. Minor study goals included the description of the software workflow: degree of manual correction, speed for completion, and overall intuitiveness using five-point Likert scales: 1–markedly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 2–slightly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 3–identical for P and TR, 4–slightly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P, and 5–markedly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P. Results Liver segments II/III, II–IV and V–VIII served in 6, 3, and 7 donors as transplanted liver segments. Volumes were 642.9±368.8 ml for TR with vessels, 623.8±349.1 ml for P with vessels, and 605.2±345.8 ml for P without vessels (Pvolumetry performed with P can predict accurately graft size for living-related liver transplantation while improving workflow compared with TR. PMID:25330198

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Detecting Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent Thyroid Surgery: Comparison of Ultrasonography, Positron Emission Tomography/CT, Contrast Enhanced CT, and Anti-Thyroid Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gyun; Lee, Tae Hyun; Park, Dong Hee; Nam, Sang Been [Dept. of Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography (US), F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), contrast enhanced CT (CECT), serum anti-thyroid antibody for detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis in thyroid cancer patients who underwent neck surgery. A total of 150 patients with suspicious for thyroid cancer, who had previously undergone US guided needle aspiration of thyroid, were evaluated with the use of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. The four studies were performed within two months before neck surgery. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was confirmed by histopathological results. The diagnostic accuracy of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody were calculated statistically. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 51 out of the 150 patients, following neck surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US were 76.5%, 92.9%, 84.8%, 88.5%, and 87.3%, respectively. The corresponding values of PET/CT were 37.3%, 96.0%, 82.6%, 74.8%, and 76.0%, and CECT were 62.7%, 89.9%, 76.2%, 82.4%, and 80.7%, and serum anti-thyroid antibody level were 90.2%, 93.9%, 88.5%, 94.9%, and 92.7%, respectively. McNemar test revealed significant difference among PET/CT and others, but no significant differences among US, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. Overall, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed most accurate diagnostic performance. In detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed higher diagnostic accuracy than others. US also showed relatively high diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Detecting Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent Thyroid Surgery: Comparison of Ultrasonography, Positron Emission Tomography/CT, Contrast Enhanced CT, and Anti-Thyroid Antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Gyun; Lee, Tae Hyun; Park, Dong Hee; Nam, Sang Been

    2012-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography (US), F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), contrast enhanced CT (CECT), serum anti-thyroid antibody for detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis in thyroid cancer patients who underwent neck surgery. A total of 150 patients with suspicious for thyroid cancer, who had previously undergone US guided needle aspiration of thyroid, were evaluated with the use of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. The four studies were performed within two months before neck surgery. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was confirmed by histopathological results. The diagnostic accuracy of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody were calculated statistically. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 51 out of the 150 patients, following neck surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US were 76.5%, 92.9%, 84.8%, 88.5%, and 87.3%, respectively. The corresponding values of PET/CT were 37.3%, 96.0%, 82.6%, 74.8%, and 76.0%, and CECT were 62.7%, 89.9%, 76.2%, 82.4%, and 80.7%, and serum anti-thyroid antibody level were 90.2%, 93.9%, 88.5%, 94.9%, and 92.7%, respectively. McNemar test revealed significant difference among PET/CT and others, but no significant differences among US, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. Overall, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed most accurate diagnostic performance. In detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed higher diagnostic accuracy than others. US also showed relatively high diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of modified CT severity index in assessing severity of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehan, A.; Shaukat, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum iron and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) in detection of iron deficiency. Study Design: Descriptive, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, from January 2013 to October 2015. Methodology: Data of 1,815 patients with results of serum iron, TIBC and ferritin from January 2013 to October 2015 was retrieved from Laboratory information System (LIMS) of AFIP. Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) guidelines were followed. Subjects of either gender, aged 1 - 68 years were included. Cases with raised serum ferritin levels (male > 336 ng/ml, female > 307 ng/ml) were excluded. Serum Ferritin was taken as gold standard with specificity of 99% and sensitivity of 80% at concentration of 30 ng/ml. Transferrin saturation was determined by dividing serum iron by TIBC and multiplying by 100. Results: Out of 1,815 subjects, 931 (51.29%) were males and 884 (48.71%) were females. The median age of the patients were 29.1 years (Inter-quartile range, IQR 19.1). Taking ferritin as gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of serum iron was 63.5% and 38.6%, respectively; while that of TIBC was 64.5 % and 42.8%, respectively. Ferritin showed poor correlation with iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation. Conclusion: Serum iron and TIBC give no additional information in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and these tests are redundant for the diagnosis of iron deficiency state, if serum ferritin is available. (author)

  15. A formulation of tissue- and water-equivalent materials using the stoichiometric analysis method for CT-number calibration in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Kolditz, Daniel; Langner, Oliver; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-03-01

    Tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) are widely used in quality assurance and calibration procedures, both in radiodiagnostics and radiotherapy. In radiotherapy, particularly, the TEMs are often used for computed tomography (CT) number calibration in treatment planning systems. However, currently available TEMs may not be very accurate in the determination of the calibration curves due to their limitation in mimicking radiation characteristics of the corresponding real tissues in both low- and high-energy ranges. Therefore, we are proposing a new formulation of TEMs using a stoichiometric analysis method to obtain TEMs for the calibration purposes. We combined the stoichiometric calibration and the basic data method to compose base materials to develop TEMs matching standard real tissues from ICRU Report 44 and 46. First, the CT numbers of six materials with known elemental compositions were measured to get constants for the stoichiometric calibration. The results of the stoichiometric calibration were used together with the basic data method to formulate new TEMs. These new TEMs were scanned to validate their CT numbers. The electron density and the stopping power calibration curves were also generated. The absolute differences of the measured CT numbers of the new TEMs were less than 4 HU for the soft tissues and less than 22 HU for the bone compared to the ICRU real tissues. Furthermore, the calculated relative electron density and electron and proton stopping powers of the new TEMs differed by less than 2% from the corresponding ICRU real tissues. The new TEMs which were formulated using the proposed technique increase the simplicity of the calibration process and preserve the accuracy of the stoichiometric calibration simultaneously.

  16. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 ± 1.5% error, 4.4 ± 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 ± 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  17. The accuracy of CT-based inhomogeneity corrections and in vivo dosimetry for the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essers, M.; Lanson, J.H.; Leunens, G.; Schnabel, T.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of dose calculations based on CT-densities for lung cancer patients irradiated with an anterioposterior parallel-opposed treatment technique and to evaluate, for this technique, the use of diodes and an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for absolute exit dose and relative transmission dose verification, respectively. Materials and methods: Dose calculations were performed using a 3-dimensional treatment planning system, using CT-densities or assuming the patient to be water-equivalent. A simple inhomogeneity correction model was used to take CT-densities into account. For 22 patients, entrance and exit dose calculations at the central beam axis and at several off-axis positions were compared with diode measurements. For 12 patients, diode exit dose measurements and exit dose calculations were compared with EPID transmission dose values. Results: Using water-equivalent calculations, the actual exit dose value under lung was, on average, underestimated by 30%, with an overall spread of 10% (1 SD) in the ratio of measurement and calculation. Using inhomogeneity corrections, the exit dose was, on average, overestimated by 4%, with an overall spread of 6% (1 SD). Only 2% of the average deviation was due to the inhomogeneity correction model. The other 2% resulted from a small inaccuracy in beam fit parameters and the fact that lack of backscatter is not taken into account by the calculation model. Organ motion, resulting from the ventilatory or cardiac cycle, caused an estimated uncertainty in calculated exit dose of 2.5% (1 SD). The most important reason for the large overall spread was, however, the inaccuracy involved in point measurements, of about 4% (1 SD), which resulted from the systematic and random deviation in patient set-up and therefore in the diode position with respect to patient anatomy. Transmission and exit dose values agreed with an average difference of 1.1%. Transmission dose profiles also showed good

  18. Dual-energy CT perfusion and angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic accuracy and concordance with radionuclide scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dournes, Gael; Verdier, Damien; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Lederlin, Mathieu [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Medical Imaging, Pessac (France); University Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Bullier, Eric; Riviere, Annalisa [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pessac (France); Dromer, Claire [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Respiratory Diseases, Pessac (France); Picard, Francois [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Cardiology, Pessac (France); Billes, Marc-Alain [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Pessac (France); Corneloup, Olivier [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Medical Imaging, Pessac (France)

    2014-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) perfusion and angiography versus ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and to assess the per-segment concordance rate of DECT and scintigraphy. Forty consecutive patients with proven pulmonary hypertension underwent V/Q scintigraphy and DECT perfusion and angiography. Each imaging technique was assessed for the location of segmental defects. Diagnosis of CTEPH was established when at least one segmental perfusion defect was detected by scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy of DECT perfusion and angiography was assessed and compared with scintigraphy. In CTEPH patients, the per-segment concordance between scintigraphy and DECT perfusion/angiography was calculated. Fourteen patients were diagnosed with CTEPH and 26 with other aetiologies. DECT perfusion and angiography correctly identified all CTEPH patients with sensitivity/specificity values of 1/0.92 and 1/0.93, respectively. At a segmental level, DECT perfusion showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.44) with scintigraphy. Agreement between CT angiography and scintigraphy ranged from fair (κ = 0.31) to slight (κ = 0.09) depending on whether completely or partially occlusive patterns were considered, respectively. Both DECT perfusion and angiography show satisfactory performance for the diagnosis of CTEPH. DECT perfusion is more accurate than angiography at identifying the segmental location of abnormalities. (orig.)

  19. Dual-energy CT perfusion and angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic accuracy and concordance with radionuclide scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dournes, Gael; Verdier, Damien; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Lederlin, Mathieu; Bullier, Eric; Riviere, Annalisa; Dromer, Claire; Picard, Francois; Billes, Marc-Alain; Corneloup, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) perfusion and angiography versus ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and to assess the per-segment concordance rate of DECT and scintigraphy. Forty consecutive patients with proven pulmonary hypertension underwent V/Q scintigraphy and DECT perfusion and angiography. Each imaging technique was assessed for the location of segmental defects. Diagnosis of CTEPH was established when at least one segmental perfusion defect was detected by scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy of DECT perfusion and angiography was assessed and compared with scintigraphy. In CTEPH patients, the per-segment concordance between scintigraphy and DECT perfusion/angiography was calculated. Fourteen patients were diagnosed with CTEPH and 26 with other aetiologies. DECT perfusion and angiography correctly identified all CTEPH patients with sensitivity/specificity values of 1/0.92 and 1/0.93, respectively. At a segmental level, DECT perfusion showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.44) with scintigraphy. Agreement between CT angiography and scintigraphy ranged from fair (κ = 0.31) to slight (κ = 0.09) depending on whether completely or partially occlusive patterns were considered, respectively. Both DECT perfusion and angiography show satisfactory performance for the diagnosis of CTEPH. DECT perfusion is more accurate than angiography at identifying the segmental location of abnormalities. (orig.)

  20. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-01-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ 2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ 2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies

  1. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, Sabar [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, Rokiah [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  2. Accuracy of CT angiography in the assessment of a fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugt, A. van der; Buter, T.C.; Govaere, F.; Siepman, D.A.M.; Tanghe, H.L.J.; Dippel, D.W.J. [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-09-01

    An uncommon cause of cerebral ischemia in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is the combination of a fetal origin of the PCA and atherosclerotic disease in the internal carotid artery. This study compared the accuracy of CTA with DSA in the assessment of a fetal origin of the PCA. Patients in whom an intracranial DSA and CTA had been performed were reviewed. A fetal origin was defined as a normal-sized patent posterior communicating artery (PCoA) with hypoplasia or aplasia of the ipsilateral P1 segment. One hundred PCAs in 51 patients were analyzed. A fetal origin was present in ten vessels (10%, eight patients). CTA revealed all of them. CTA considered an additional three vessels as having a fetal origin, while DSA revealed a PCoA with the same diameter as the P1 segment of the PCA. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA in the assessment of a fetal origin could be estimated at 100 and 97%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 77 and 100%, respectively. CTA can be considered a valid diagnostic tool for the assessment of a fetal origin of the PCA in patients with a cerebral ischemic event in the territory of the PCA. (orig.)

  3. A theoretical analysis of the accuracy of single-energy CT bone-mineral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, E.O.; Evans, W.D.; Owen, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    A relationship has been derived between the in vivo concentration of calcium hydroxyapatite and the in vitro concentration of K 2 HPO 4 solution in a single-energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT) bone-mineral determination. Under certain simplifying assumptions this relationship is linear. The gradient term has been calculated as a function of scanner effective energy using the measured variation of solvent water density with K 2 HPO 4 concentration; it ranges from 1.17 at 60 keV to 1.21 at 80 keV. The intercept term has been calculated as a function of effective energy, patient age and trabecular bone volume (TBV) by modelling the constituents of whole trabecular bone and using published normal composition data. It varies from about 15 to 25 mg cm -3 at an effective energy of 70 keV and within a TBV range of 5 to 20%. This intercept term may be used as an additive correction which improves the accuracy of single-energy QCT results without significant loss of precision. However, the method is limited by the uncertainties of tissue composition in an individual patient. (author)

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of single photon emission CT in Alzheimer-type dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruki; Abe, Shinei; Arai, Hisayuki; Asano, Tetsuichi; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Suzuki, Takanari [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1992-06-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [sup 123]I-IMP in Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD), we studied 46 ATD patients and 23 healthy controls. The patients fulfilled the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable or definite ATD and were classified as having mild, moderate, and severe ATD by neuropsychological examinations. To assess regional cerebral blood flow, we performed qualitative SPECT image analysis without any knowledge of the subject's clinical classification. The image was regarded as abnormal if cerebral blood flow was reduced in the unlilateral or bilateral temporoparietal association areas, with or without any reduction of flow in other brain regions. The diagnostic sensitivity (abnormal image/ patient) of [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT in mild, moderate and severe ATD was 67%, 86% and 92%, because an abnormal image was found in only 2/23 healthy controls. Eight ATD patients without reduced temporoparietal perfusion showed normal perfusion or frontal hypoperfusion. These results suggest that [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT may provide an accurate and sensitive diagnostic marker for ATD. The detection of these characteristic abnormalities of cerebral perfusion could well be applied to the clinical diagnosis of ATD. (author).

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of single photon emission CT in Alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruki; Abe, Shinei; Arai, Hisayuki; Asano, Tetsuichi; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Suzuki, Takanari

    1992-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123 I-IMP in Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD), we studied 46 ATD patients and 23 healthy controls. The patients fulfilled the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable or definite ATD and were classified as having mild, moderate, and severe ATD by neuropsychological examinations. To assess regional cerebral blood flow, we performed qualitative SPECT image analysis without any knowledge of the subject's clinical classification. The image was regarded as abnormal if cerebral blood flow was reduced in the unlilateral or bilateral temporoparietal association areas, with or without any reduction of flow in other brain regions. The diagnostic sensitivity (abnormal image/ patient) of 123 I-IMP SPECT in mild, moderate and severe ATD was 67%, 86% and 92%, because an abnormal image was found in only 2/23 healthy controls. Eight ATD patients without reduced temporoparietal perfusion showed normal perfusion or frontal hypoperfusion. These results suggest that 123 I-IMP SPECT may provide an accurate and sensitive diagnostic marker for ATD. The detection of these characteristic abnormalities of cerebral perfusion could well be applied to the clinical diagnosis of ATD. (author)

  6. Multidetector CT angiography in living donor renal transplantation: accuracy and discrepancies in right venous anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S; Emre, S; Arvelakis, A; Asch, W; Bia, M; Formica, R; Israel, G

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography is a reliable technique for assessing pre-operative renal anatomy in living kidney donors. The method has largely evolved into protocols that eliminate dedicated venous phase and instead utilize a combined arterial/venous phase to delineate arterial and venous anatomy simultaneously. Despite adoption of this protocol, there has been no study to assess its accuracy. To assess whether or not MDCT angiography compares favorably to intra-operative findings, 102 donors underwent MDCT angiography without a dedicated venous phase with surgical interpretation of renal anatomy. Anatomical variants included multiple arteries (12%), multiple veins (7%), early arterial bifurcation (13%), late venous confluence (5%), circumaortic renal veins (5%), retroaortic vein (1%), and ureteral duplication (2%). The sensitivity and specificity of multiple arterial anomalies were 100% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of multiple venous anomalies were 92% and 98%, respectively. The most common discrepancy was noted exclusively in the interpretation of right venous anatomy as it pertained to the renal vein/vena cava confluence (3%). MDCT angiography using a combined arterial/venous contrast-enhanced phase provides suitable depiction of renal donor anatomy. Careful consideration should be given when planning a right donor nephrectomy whether the radiographic interpretation is suggestive of a late confluence. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Accuracy of CT angiography in the assessment of a fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugt, A. van der; Buter, T.C.; Govaere, F.; Siepman, D.A.M.; Tanghe, H.L.J.; Dippel, D.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    An uncommon cause of cerebral ischemia in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is the combination of a fetal origin of the PCA and atherosclerotic disease in the internal carotid artery. This study compared the accuracy of CTA with DSA in the assessment of a fetal origin of the PCA. Patients in whom an intracranial DSA and CTA had been performed were reviewed. A fetal origin was defined as a normal-sized patent posterior communicating artery (PCoA) with hypoplasia or aplasia of the ipsilateral P1 segment. One hundred PCAs in 51 patients were analyzed. A fetal origin was present in ten vessels (10%, eight patients). CTA revealed all of them. CTA considered an additional three vessels as having a fetal origin, while DSA revealed a PCoA with the same diameter as the P1 segment of the PCA. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA in the assessment of a fetal origin could be estimated at 100 and 97%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 77 and 100%, respectively. CTA can be considered a valid diagnostic tool for the assessment of a fetal origin of the PCA in patients with a cerebral ischemic event in the territory of the PCA. (orig.)

  8. Understanding less than nothing: Children’s neural response to negative numbers shifts across age and accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M Gullick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the brain activity underlying the development of our understanding of negative numbers, which are amounts lacking direct physical counterparts. Children performed a paired comparison task with positive and negative numbers during an fMRI session. As previously shown in adults, both pre-instruction fifth graders and post-instruction seventh graders demonstrated typical behavioral and neural distance effects to negative numbers, where response times and parietal and frontal activity increased as comparison distance decreased. We then determined the factors impacting the distance effect in each age group. Behaviorally, the fifth grader distance effect for negatives was significantly predicted only by positive comparison accuracy, indicating that children who were generally better at working with numbers were better at comparing negatives. In seventh graders, negative comparison accuracy significantly predicted their distance effect, indicating that children who were better at working with negative numbers demonstrated a more typical distance effect. Across children, as age increased, the negative number distance effect increased in the bilateral IPS and decreased frontally, indicating a frontoparietal shift consistent with previous numerical development literature. In contrast, as task accuracy increased, the parietal distance effect increased in the left IPS and decreased in the right, possibly indicating a change from an approximate understanding of negatives’ values to a more exact, precise representation (particularly supported by the left IPS with increasing expertise. These shifts separately indicate the effects of increasing maturity generally in numeric processing and specifically in negative number understanding.

  9. CT Accuracy of Extrinsic Tongue Muscle Invasion in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, J C; Baugnon, K L; Lacayo, E A; Hudgins, P A; Patel, M R; Magliocca, K R; Corey, A S; El-Deiry, M; Wadsworth, J T; Beitler, J J; Saba, N F; Liu, Y; Aiken, A H

    2017-02-01

    Extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in oral cavity cancer upstages the primary tumor to a T4a. Despite this American Joint Committee on Cancer staging criterion, no studies have investigated the accuracy or prognostic importance of radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion, the feasibility of standardizing extrinsic tongue muscle invasion reporting, or the degree of agreement across different disciplines: radiology, surgery, and pathology. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement among radiology, surgery, and pathology for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion and to determine the imaging features most predictive of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion with surgical/pathologic confirmation. Thirty-three patients with untreated primary oral cavity cancer were included. Two head and neck radiologists, 3 otolaryngologists, and 1 pathologist prospectively evaluated extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Fourteen of 33 patients had radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion; however, only 8 extrinsic tongue muscle invasions were confirmed intraoperatively. Pathologists were unable to determine extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in post-formalin-fixed samples. Radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion had 100% sensitivity, 76% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value with concurrent surgical-pathologic evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion as the criterion standard. On further evaluation, the imaging characteristic most consistent with surgical-pathologic evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion was masslike enhancement. Evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion is a subjective finding for all 3 disciplines. For radiology, masslike enhancement of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion most consistently corresponded to concurrent surgery/pathology evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Intraoperative surgical and pathologic evaluation should be encouraged to verify radiologic extrinsic tongue

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-brain CT perfusion in the detection of acute infratentorial infarctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollwein, Christine; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plate, Annika; Straube, Andreas; Baumgarten, Louisa von [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Hendrik [South Nuremberg Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Although the diagnostic performance of whole-brain computed tomographic perfusion (WB-CTP) in the detection of supratentorial infarctions is well established, its value in the detection of infratentorial strokes remains less well defined. We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. Out of a cohort of 1380 patients who underwent WB-CTP due to suspected stroke, we retrospectively included all patients with MRI-confirmed infratentorial strokes and compared it to control patients without infratentorial strokes. Two blinded readers evaluated NECT and four different CTP maps independently for the presence and location of infratentorial ischemic perfusion deficits. The study was designed as a retrospective case-control study and included 280 patients (cases/controls = 1/3). WB-CTP revealed a greater diagnostic sensitivity than NECT (41.4 vs. 17.1 %, P = 0.003). The specificity, however, was comparable (93.3 vs. 95.0 %). Mean transit time (MTT) and time to drain (TTD) were the most sensitive (41.4 and 40.0 %) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) the most specific (99.5 %) perfusion maps. Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml; P = 0.0007); infarct location, however, did not influence the detection rate. The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-brain CT perfusion in the detection of acute infratentorial infarctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollwein, Christine; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Plate, Annika; Straube, Andreas; Baumgarten, Louisa von; Janssen, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnostic performance of whole-brain computed tomographic perfusion (WB-CTP) in the detection of supratentorial infarctions is well established, its value in the detection of infratentorial strokes remains less well defined. We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. Out of a cohort of 1380 patients who underwent WB-CTP due to suspected stroke, we retrospectively included all patients with MRI-confirmed infratentorial strokes and compared it to control patients without infratentorial strokes. Two blinded readers evaluated NECT and four different CTP maps independently for the presence and location of infratentorial ischemic perfusion deficits. The study was designed as a retrospective case-control study and included 280 patients (cases/controls = 1/3). WB-CTP revealed a greater diagnostic sensitivity than NECT (41.4 vs. 17.1 %, P = 0.003). The specificity, however, was comparable (93.3 vs. 95.0 %). Mean transit time (MTT) and time to drain (TTD) were the most sensitive (41.4 and 40.0 %) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) the most specific (99.5 %) perfusion maps. Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml; P = 0.0007); infarct location, however, did not influence the detection rate. The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. (orig.)

  12. Accuracy of multidetector CT in detecting anastomotic leaks following stapled left-sided colonic anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, P.; Karandikar, S.S.; Roy-Choudhury, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and individual radiological signs in the diagnosis of anastomotic leaks. Materials and methods: Patients undergoing anterior resection with a stapled anastomosis over a 2 year period were identified. Electronic and clinical records of these patients were reviewed. Unenhanced and/or enhanced MDCT was performed with intravenous and/or per-rectal contrast medium and read by a radiologist blinded to the patients' clinical details to determine the sensitivity and specificity of specific findings at MDCT for identifying leaks. Results: Seventeen percent (30/170) of the anterior resections were suspected to have an anastomotic leak. Ninety-three percent (28/30) of patients underwent MDCT. Seven point six percent (11+2/170) had a confirmed leak. Two patients underwent surgery without MDCT. A leak was confirmed by MDCT in 91% (10/11) of patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT in diagnosing a leak was 0.91, 1, 1, and 0.95, respectively. The sensitivity of peri-anastomotic air, peri-anastomotic collection, extravasation of rectal contrast medium, and staple line integrity was 0.81, 0.63, 0.54, and 0.72, respectively. Use of rectal contrast medium (8/11 cases) increased the subjective ease of diagnosis and was the only sign in one patient. Conclusions: Presence of peri-anastomotic air is a reliable marker of anastomotic leaks at MDCT. Leakage of rectal contrast medium is highly accurate and increases confidence of diagnosis. The appearance of the staple line itself is not accurate in assessing anastomotic integrity

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Pal, Sujoy [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, New Delhi (India); Julka, Pramod Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, New Delhi (India); Thulkar, Sanjay [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma, suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. This was a retrospective study. Data from 180 patients (age 56.3 ± 10.4 years; 126 men, 54 women) with histopathologically proven oesophageal carcinoma (squamous cell 115, adenocarcinoma 59, neuroendocrine carcinoma 4, small cell 1, poorly differentiated 1) who had undergone 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies for suspected recurrence were analysed. Recurrence was suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. PET/CT images were revaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus. Findings were grouped into local, nodal and distant recurrence. Results were compared to those from contrast-enhanced (CE) CT when available (109 patients). Clinical/imaging follow-up (minimum 6 months) with histopathology (when available) was taken as the reference standard. Of the 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies,166 were positive and 61 were negative for recurrent disease. PET/CT showed local recurrence in 134, nodal recurrence in 115 and distant recurrence in 47, with more than one site of recurrence in 34. The PET/CT findings were true-positive in 153 studies, true-negative in 54, false-positive in 13 and false-negative in 7. The sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 96 %, the specificity was 81 %, the positive and negative predictive values were 92 % and 89 %, respectively, and the accuracy was 91 %. PET/CT showed similar accuracy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and in those with adenocarcinoma (P = 0.181).{sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was more specific than CECT (67 % vs. 21 %; P < 0.0001). PET/CT was superior to CECT for the detection of nodal recurrence (P < 0.0001), but not local recurrence (P = 0.093) or distant metastases (P = 0.441). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT shows high accuracy in the detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma. It is more specific than

  14. Systematic radiation dose optimization of abdominal dual-energy CT on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner: assessment of the accuracy of iodine uptake measurement and image quality in an in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Zaehringer, Caroline; D'Errico, Luigia; Schwartz, Fides; Kekelidze, Maka; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Benz, Matthias R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of iodine quantification in a phantom study at different radiation dose levels with dual-energy dual-source CT and to evaluate image quality and radiation doses in patients undergoing a single-energy and two dual-energy abdominal CT protocols. In a phantom study, the accuracy of iodine quantification (4.5-23.5 mgI/mL) was evaluated using the manufacturer-recommended and three dose-optimized dual-energy protocols. In a patient study, 75 abdomino-pelvic CT examinations were acquired as follows: 25 CT scans with the manufacturer-recommended dual-energy protocol (protocol A); 25 CT scans with a dose-optimized dual-energy protocol (protocol B); and 25 CT scans with a single-energy CT protocol (protocol C). CTDI vol and objective noise were measured. Five readers scored each scan according to six subjective image quality parameters (noise, contrast, artifacts, visibility of small structures, sharpness, overall diagnostic confidence). In the phantom study, differences between the real and measured iodine concentrations ranged from -8.8% to 17.0% for the manufacturer-recommended protocol and from -1.6% to 20.5% for three dose-optimized protocols. In the patient study, the CTDI vol of protocol A, B, and C were 12.5 ± 1.9, 7.5 ± 1.2, and 6.5 ± 1.7 mGycm, respectively (p dual-energy and the single-energy protocol. A dose reduction of 41% is feasible for the manufacturer-recommended, abdominal dual-energy CT protocol, as it maintained the accuracy of iodine measurements and subjective image quality compared to a single-energy protocol.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours: a systematic review and a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Salsano, Marco; Stefanelli, Antonella; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyse literature data on the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours (ESFT). PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for articles that evaluated FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with ESFT from inception to 31 May 2011. Studies that fulfilled the three following criteria were included in the systematic review: FDG-PET or PET/CT performed in patients with ESFT; articles about the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT; sample size of at least 10 patients with ESFT were included. Studies in which there were sufficient data to reassess sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were included in the meta-analysis, excluding duplicate publications. Finally, pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were calculated. We found 13 studies comprising a total of 342 patients with ESFT. The main findings of the studies included are presented. The meta-analysis of five selected studies provided these results about FDG-PET and PET/CT in ESFT: pooled sensitivity: 96% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-99%); pooled specificity: 92% (95% CI 87-96%); area under the ROC curve: 0.97. With regard to the staging and restaging of patients with ESFT, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT are high; the combination of FDG-PET or PET/CT with conventional imaging is a valuable tool for the staging and restaging of ESFT and has a relevant impact on the treatment strategy plan. (orig.)

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours: a systematic review and a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treglia, Giorgio [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Positron Emission Tomography Centre, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Salsano, Marco; Stefanelli, Antonella; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To systematically review and meta-analyse literature data on the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumours (ESFT). PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for articles that evaluated FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients with ESFT from inception to 31 May 2011. Studies that fulfilled the three following criteria were included in the systematic review: FDG-PET or PET/CT performed in patients with ESFT; articles about the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT; sample size of at least 10 patients with ESFT were included. Studies in which there were sufficient data to reassess sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were included in the meta-analysis, excluding duplicate publications. Finally, pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of FDG-PET or PET/CT in ESFT were calculated. We found 13 studies comprising a total of 342 patients with ESFT. The main findings of the studies included are presented. The meta-analysis of five selected studies provided these results about FDG-PET and PET/CT in ESFT: pooled sensitivity: 96% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-99%); pooled specificity: 92% (95% CI 87-96%); area under the ROC curve: 0.97. With regard to the staging and restaging of patients with ESFT, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG-PET and PET/CT are high; the combination of FDG-PET or PET/CT with conventional imaging is a valuable tool for the staging and restaging of ESFT and has a relevant impact on the treatment strategy plan. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT in mediastinal lymph nodal staging of the non-small cell lung cancer: prospective study with PET/CT of 182 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Kang, W. J.; Kim, B. S.; Lee, D. S.; Jeong, J. K.; Lee, M. C.

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the accuracy of fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the mediastinal lymph nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer as compared with CT. Between March 2004 and February 2006, 182 patients (126 men and 56 women; mean age, 60.7 y) with non-small cell lung cancer underwent FDG PET/CT and enhanced chest CT. PET/CT and CT images were acquired in a prospective manner. These images were evaluated separately by 2 different physicians and nodal stages were determined by using American Joint Committee on Cancer staging systems. The maxSUV, location, size, calcification and pattern of FDG uptake of lymph nodes were considered. Surgical and histological findings served as the reference standard. A total of 182 patients with 778 mediastinal nodal stations were evaluated. Among them, metastases were found in 36 patients with 53 nodal stations. The respective values for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging were 36%, 80%, 30%, 84% and 71% with CT and 75%, 89%, 63%, 94% and 86% with PET/CT on per-patient basis, and 23%, 92%, 18%, 94% and 88% with CT and 66%, 96%, 54%, 98% and 94% with PET/CT on per-nodal-station basis. The maxSUVs of metastatic lymph nodes were significantly higher than those of benign nodes (p = 0.0008). Seventy seven percent (27/35) of the metastatic lymph nodes on FDG-PET/CT images were less than a 1cm in the short axis. Moreover, some benign lymph node patterns, such as bilateral symmetric nodes with similar FDG uptake, benign pattern of nodal calcification and small-sized lymph node with much higher maxSUV than primary tumor, were noted during the evaluation of FDG-PET/CT images. This prospective study suggests that FDG-PET/CT is more accurately stage the mediastinal lymph node staging than CT, and that it provides high specificity and a negative predictive value

  18. Accuracy of estimation of graft size for living-related liver transplantation: first results of a semi-automated interactive software for CT-volumetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Mokry

    Full Text Available To evaluate accuracy of estimated graft size for living-related liver transplantation using a semi-automated interactive software for CT-volumetry.Sixteen donors for living-related liver transplantation (11 male; mean age: 38.2±9.6 years underwent contrast-enhanced CT prior to graft removal. CT-volumetry was performed using a semi-automated interactive software (P, and compared with a manual commercial software (TR. For P, liver volumes were provided either with or without vessels. For TR, liver volumes were provided always with vessels. Intraoperative weight served as reference standard. Major study goals included analyses of volumes using absolute numbers, linear regression analyses and inter-observer agreements. Minor study goals included the description of the software workflow: degree of manual correction, speed for completion, and overall intuitiveness using five-point Likert scales: 1--markedly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 2--slightly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 3--identical for P and TR, 4--slightly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P, and 5--markedly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P.Liver segments II/III, II-IV and V-VIII served in 6, 3, and 7 donors as transplanted liver segments. Volumes were 642.9±368.8 ml for TR with vessels, 623.8±349.1 ml for P with vessels, and 605.2±345.8 ml for P without vessels (P<0.01. Regression equations between intraoperative weights and volumes were y = 0.94x+30.1 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001 for TR with vessels, y = 1.00x+12.0 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001 for P with vessels, and y = 1.01x+28.0 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001 for P without vessels. Inter-observer agreement showed a bias of 1.8 ml for TR with vessels, 5.4 ml for P with vessels, and 4.6 ml for P without vessels. For the degree of manual correction, speed for completion and overall intuitiveness, scale values were 2.6±0.8, 2.4±0.5 and 2.CT-volumetry performed with P can predict accurately graft

  19. Tracker-on-C for cone-beam CT-guided surgery: evaluation of geometric accuracy and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Otake, Y.; Uneri, A.; Schafer, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Nithiananthan, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Khanna, A. J.; Reh, D. D.; Gallia, G. L.; Taylor, R. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional surgical tracking configurations carry a variety of limitations in line-of-sight, geometric accuracy, and mismatch with the surgeon's perspective (for video augmentation). With increasing utilization of mobile C-arms, particularly those allowing cone-beam CT (CBCT), there is opportunity to better integrate surgical trackers at bedside to address such limitations. This paper describes a tracker configuration in which the tracker is mounted directly on the Carm. To maintain registration within a dynamic coordinate system, a reference marker visible across the full C-arm rotation is implemented, and the "Tracker-on-C" configuration is shown to provide improved target registration error (TRE) over a conventional in-room setup - (0.9+/-0.4) mm vs (1.9+/-0.7) mm, respectively. The system also can generate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the perspective of a tracked tool ("x-ray flashlight"), the tracker, or the C-arm ("virtual fluoroscopy"), with geometric accuracy in virtual fluoroscopy of (0.4+/-0.2) mm. Using a video-based tracker, planning data and DRRs can be superimposed on the video scene from a natural perspective over the surgical field, with geometric accuracy (0.8+/-0.3) pixels for planning data overlay and (0.6+/-0.4) pixels for DRR overlay across all C-arm angles. The field-of-view of fluoroscopy or CBCT can also be overlaid on real-time video ("Virtual Field Light") to assist C-arm positioning. The fixed transformation between the x-ray image and tracker facilitated quick, accurate intraoperative registration. The workflow and precision associated with a variety of realistic surgical tasks were significantly improved using the Tracker-on-C - for example, nearly a factor of 2 reduction in time required for C-arm positioning, reduction or elimination of dose in "hunting" for a specific fluoroscopic view, and confident placement of the x-ray FOV on the surgical target. The proposed configuration streamlines the integration of C

  20. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: Prospective, multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.J. Van Asch (Charlotte J.J.); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); G.J.E. Rinkel (Gabriël J.E.); A. Algra (Ale); G.A.P. de Kort (G. A P); T.D. Witkamp (Theo); J.C.M. De Ridder (Johanna C.M.); K.M. Van Nieuwenhuizen (Koen M.); F.-E. De Leeuw (Frank-Erik); W.J. Schonewille (Wouter); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); T.W.M. Raaymakers (Theodora W.M.); J. Hofmeijer; M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); H. Kerkhoff (Henk); K. Jellema (Korné); I.M. Bronner (Irene M.); M.J.M. Remmers (Michel ); H.P. Bienfait (Henri); R.J.G.M. Witjes (Ron J.G.M.); J.P. Greving (Jacoba); C.J.M. Klijn (Catharina J.M.); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); H.B. Boogaarts; E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); W.J. Schonewille; W.M.J. Pellikaan; C. Puppels-De Waard; P.L.M. De Kort; J.P. Peluso; J. van Tuijl (Jordie); J. Hofmeijer; F.B.M. Joosten (Frank); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); L. Khajeh (Ladbon); T.W.M. Raaijmakers; M.J. Wermer; M.A.A. van Walderveen (Marianne); H. Kerkhoff; E. Zock; K. Jellema (Korné); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); I.M. Bronner; M.J.M. Remmers; R.J.G.M. Witjes; H.P. Bienfait; K.E. Droogh-Greve; R. Donders (Rogier); V.I.H. Kwa; T.H.C.M.L. Schreuder (Tobien H. C. M. L.); C.L. Franke (Cees); J.S. Straver; C. Jansen; S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); C.C. Pleiter (C.); M.C. Visser; C.J.J. Van Asch; B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); G.J.E. Rinkel (Gabriel); K.M. Van Nieuwenhuizen; C.J.M. Klijn (Catharina J.M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStudy question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This

  1. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-01-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A z ) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  2. SU-C-18A-05: Registration Accuracy of MR-Based Images to On-Board Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT for Brain Patient Setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, D S; Chen, J; Descovich, M; Pouliot, J; Hwang, Ken-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in isocenter shifts when co-registering MR and MR-based pseudo CTs (pCT) with on-board megavoltage conebeam CT (CBCT) images. Methods: Fast Spoiled Gradient Echo MRs were used to generate pCTs (research version of Advantage Sim MD™, GE Healthcare) for ten patients who had prior brain radiotherapy. The planning CT (rCT) for each was co-registered with the MR, and the plan isocenter and two other reference points were transferred to the MR and pCT. CBCT images (with the machine isocenter) from a single treatment day were coregistered with the 3 test images (MR, pCT and rCT), by two observers and by an automated registration algorithm. The reference points were used to calculate patient shifts and rotations from the registrations. The shifts calculated from the test image registrations were compared to each other and to the shifts performed by the therapists who treated the patients on that day. Results: The average difference in absolute value between the isocenter shifts from the MR-, pCT- and rCT-CBCT registrations, and the therapist shifts, were 2.02, 3.01 and 0.89 mm (craniocaudal), 1.14, 1.34 and 0.46 mm (lateral), and 1.37, 3.43 and 1.43 mm (vertical), respectively. The MR- and pCT-CBCT registrations differed by 1.99, and 2.53 mm (craniocaudal), 1.36, and 1.37 mm (lateral), and 0.74 and 2.34 mm (vertical), respectively, from the average rCT-CBCT shifts. On average, differences of 2.39 (craniocaudal), 1.28 (lateral) and 2.84 mm (vertical) were seen between the MR and pCT shifts. Rotations relative to the CBCT coordinate system were on average <2° for the MR and rCT, and <6° for the pCT. Conclusion: In this study, FSPGR MR-CBCT registrations were more precise compared to the pCT-CBCT registrations. For improved accuracy, MR sequences that are optimal for bony anatomy visualization are necessary. GE healthcare has provided a research version of Advantage Sim MD to UCSF. No financial support was provided

  3. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Patients with Rising Prostatic-Specific Antigen After Definitive Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Detection Efficacy and Diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Maged Abdel Galil; Basha, Mohammad Abd Alkhalik; Ahmed, Hussien; Obaya, Ahmed Ali; Afifi, Amira Hamed Mohamed; Abdelbary, Eman H

    2018-06-20

    68 Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen-11 ( 68 Ga-PSMA-11) is a recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer that can detect prostate cancer (PC) relapses and metastases with high contrast resolution. The aim of this study was to assess the detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT image in patients with rising prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) after treatment of PC. The present prospective study included 188 patients who exhibited rising of PSA level on a routine follow-up examination after definitive treatment of PC. All patients underwent a 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination. For each patient, we determined the disease stage, the Gleason score, and the maximum standardized uptake value of the local recurrence and extraprostatic metastases. The detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT were established by histopathology and clinical and imaging follow-up as the reference standards. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT detected tumour relapse in 165 patients (35 patients had local recurrence, 106 patients had extraprostatic metastases, and 24 patients had combined lesions). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination in the detection of PC recurrence were 98.8%, 100%, and 98.8%, respectively. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT revealed an overall detection rate of 87.8% (165/188) in patients with rising PSA (median of 2.2 ng/mL, and range of 0.01-70 ng/mL). 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a valuable tool for the detection of PC local recurrence or extraprostatic metastases following rising PSA levels after primary definitive therapy and should be incorporated during routine work-up. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen; McCombe, David

    2015-01-01

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  5. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen [St Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); McCombe, David [St Vincent' s Hospital and Victorian Hand Surgery Associates, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  6. Hybrid Brain–Computer Interface Techniques for Improved Classification Accuracy and Increased Number of Commands: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Khan, Muhammad Jawad

    2017-01-01

    In this article, non-invasive hybrid brain–computer interface (hBCI) technologies for improving classification accuracy and increasing the number of commands are reviewed. Hybridization combining more than two modalities is a new trend in brain imaging and prosthesis control. Electroencephalography (EEG), due to its easy use and fast temporal resolution, is most widely utilized in combination with other brain/non-brain signal acquisition modalities, for instance, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), electromyography (EMG), electrooculography (EOG), and eye tracker. Three main purposes of hybridization are to increase the number of control commands, improve classification accuracy and reduce the signal detection time. Currently, such combinations of EEG + fNIRS and EEG + EOG are most commonly employed. Four principal components (i.e., hardware, paradigm, classifiers, and features) relevant to accuracy improvement are discussed. In the case of brain signals, motor imagination/movement tasks are combined with cognitive tasks to increase active brain–computer interface (BCI) accuracy. Active and reactive tasks sometimes are combined: motor imagination with steady-state evoked visual potentials (SSVEP) and motor imagination with P300. In the case of reactive tasks, SSVEP is most widely combined with P300 to increase the number of commands. Passive BCIs, however, are rare. After discussing the hardware and strategies involved in the development of hBCI, the second part examines the approaches used to increase the number of control commands and to enhance classification accuracy. The future prospects and the extension of hBCI in real-time applications for daily life scenarios are provided. PMID:28790910

  7. Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Techniques for Improved Classification Accuracy and Increased Number of Commands: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Khan, Muhammad Jawad

    2017-01-01

    In this article, non-invasive hybrid brain-computer interface (hBCI) technologies for improving classification accuracy and increasing the number of commands are reviewed. Hybridization combining more than two modalities is a new trend in brain imaging and prosthesis control. Electroencephalography (EEG), due to its easy use and fast temporal resolution, is most widely utilized in combination with other brain/non-brain signal acquisition modalities, for instance, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), electromyography (EMG), electrooculography (EOG), and eye tracker. Three main purposes of hybridization are to increase the number of control commands, improve classification accuracy and reduce the signal detection time. Currently, such combinations of EEG + fNIRS and EEG + EOG are most commonly employed. Four principal components (i.e., hardware, paradigm, classifiers, and features) relevant to accuracy improvement are discussed. In the case of brain signals, motor imagination/movement tasks are combined with cognitive tasks to increase active brain-computer interface (BCI) accuracy. Active and reactive tasks sometimes are combined: motor imagination with steady-state evoked visual potentials (SSVEP) and motor imagination with P300. In the case of reactive tasks, SSVEP is most widely combined with P300 to increase the number of commands. Passive BCIs, however, are rare. After discussing the hardware and strategies involved in the development of hBCI, the second part examines the approaches used to increase the number of control commands and to enhance classification accuracy. The future prospects and the extension of hBCI in real-time applications for daily life scenarios are provided.

  8. Hybrid Brain–Computer Interface Techniques for Improved Classification Accuracy and Increased Number of Commands: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Shik Hong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, non-invasive hybrid brain–computer interface (hBCI technologies for improving classification accuracy and increasing the number of commands are reviewed. Hybridization combining more than two modalities is a new trend in brain imaging and prosthesis control. Electroencephalography (EEG, due to its easy use and fast temporal resolution, is most widely utilized in combination with other brain/non-brain signal acquisition modalities, for instance, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS, electromyography (EMG, electrooculography (EOG, and eye tracker. Three main purposes of hybridization are to increase the number of control commands, improve classification accuracy and reduce the signal detection time. Currently, such combinations of EEG + fNIRS and EEG + EOG are most commonly employed. Four principal components (i.e., hardware, paradigm, classifiers, and features relevant to accuracy improvement are discussed. In the case of brain signals, motor imagination/movement tasks are combined with cognitive tasks to increase active brain–computer interface (BCI accuracy. Active and reactive tasks sometimes are combined: motor imagination with steady-state evoked visual potentials (SSVEP and motor imagination with P300. In the case of reactive tasks, SSVEP is most widely combined with P300 to increase the number of commands. Passive BCIs, however, are rare. After discussing the hardware and strategies involved in the development of hBCI, the second part examines the approaches used to increase the number of control commands and to enhance classification accuracy. The future prospects and the extension of hBCI in real-time applications for daily life scenarios are provided.

  9. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xyda, Argyro; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst; Jung, Klaus; Bock, Hans Christoph; Schramm, Ramona; Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Respiratory management of CT-transmission for accuracy fusion in PET/CT. A comparison between normal expiration and free breathing in 600 experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Tomohiro; Tamura, Shintaro; Ohashi, Takashi; Miwa, Kenta; Akimoto, Kenta; Wagatsuma, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Image misregistration can occur in fusion positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, because of motion artifacts caused by the management of respiration. The standard imaging protocol of the CT component of PET/CT is normal expiration (NormExp) or free breathing (FB). The objective of this study was to compare NormExp and FB for the optimal breathing protocol for PET/CT scans. A total of 600 consecutive patients were examined using lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT. CT was acquired during NormExp (id est (i.e.), the level reached when the patient exhaled without forcing expiration and then held the breath) in 300 patients and during FB in 300 patients. The profile of liver measured along body axis was assessed. The distance of profile centers between the PET image and the CT image was measured. The misalignment between profile centers (PET) and profile centers (CT) was compared between NormExp and FB using the histogram of patients. An F test was used to test if the variances of two misalignments are equal. Next, the relationship between misalignment and age was evaluated in two managements of respiration. There was no significant difference between NormExp and FB in the histogram. However, significant misalignments (>10 cm) were found with NormExp. Patient age may have influenced the mismatch. FB is recommended for geriatric patients during acquisition of attenuation correction CT data sets. (author)

  11. Accuracy of Liver Fat Quantification With Advanced CT, MRI, and Ultrasound Techniques: Prospective Comparison With MR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Harald; Pickhardt, Perry J; Kliewer, Mark A; Hernando, Diego; Chen, Guang-Hong; Zagzebski, James A; Reeder, Scott B

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of proton-density fat-fraction, single- and dual-energy CT (SECT and DECT), gray-scale ultrasound (US), and US shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) in the quantification of hepatic steatosis with MR spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard. Fifty adults who did not have symptoms (23 men, 27 women; mean age, 57 ± 5 years; body mass index, 27 ± 5) underwent liver imaging with un-enhanced SECT, DECT, gray-scale US, US-SWE, proton-density fat-fraction MRI, and MRS for this prospective trial. MRS voxels for the reference standard were colocalized with all other modalities under investigation. For SECT (120 kVp), attenuation values were recorded. For rapid-switching DECT (80/140 kVp), monochromatic images (70-140 keV) and fat density-derived material decomposition images were reconstructed. For proton-density fat fraction MRI, a quantitative chemical shift-encoded method was used. For US, echogenicity was evaluated on a qualitative 0-3 scale. Quantitative US shear-wave velocities were also recorded. Data were analyzed by linear regression for each technique compared with MRS. There was excellent correlation between MRS and both proton-density fat-fraction MRI (r 2 = 0.992; slope, 0.974; intercept, -0.943) and SECT (r 2 = 0.856; slope, -0.559; intercept, 35.418). DECT fat attenuation had moderate correlation with MRS measurements (r 2 = 0.423; slope, 0.034; intercept, 8.459). There was good correlation between qualitative US echogenicity and MRS measurements with a weighted kappa value of 0.82. US-SWE velocity did not have reliable correlation with MRS measurements (r 2 = 0.004; slope, 0.069; intercept, 6.168). Quantitative MRI proton-density fat fraction and SECT fat attenuation have excellent linear correlation with MRS measurements and can serve as accurate noninvasive biomarkers for quantifying steatosis. Material decomposition with DECT does not improve the accuracy of fat quantification over

  12. Effects of x-ray and CT image enhancements on the robustness and accuracy of a rigid 3D/2D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Yin Fangfang; Zhao Yang; Kim, Jae Ho

    2005-01-01

    A rigid body three-dimensional/two-dimensional (3D/2D) registration method has been implemented using mutual information, gradient ascent, and 3D texturemap-based digitally reconstructed radiographs. Nine combinations of commonly used x-ray and computed tomography (CT) image enhancement methods, including window leveling, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization, were examined to assess their effects on accuracy and robustness of the registration method. From a set of experiments using an anthropomorphic chest phantom, we were able to draw several conclusions. First, the CT and x-ray preprocessing combination with the widest attraction range was the one that linearly stretched the histograms onto the entire display range on both CT and x-ray images. The average attraction ranges of this combination were 71.3 mm and 61.3 deg in the translation and rotation dimensions, respectively, and the average errors were 0.12 deg and 0.47 mm. Second, the combination of the CT image with tissue and bone information and the x-ray images with adaptive histogram equalization also showed subvoxel accuracy, especially the best in the translation dimensions. However, its attraction ranges were the smallest among the examined combinations (on average 36 mm and 19 deg). Last the bone-only information on the CT image did not show convergency property to the correct registration

  13. Accuracy of portable chest X-ray film in detection of intrathoracic abnormal findings in patients after esophagectomy in comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Muneaki; Takeda, Junzo; Ochiai, Ryoichi; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Kouda, Eiichi

    1992-01-01

    To determine an accuracy of portable chest radiographs (CXR) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax, consolidation, passive collapse, subsegmental atelectasis, left and right pleural effusion, findings of 35 pairs of chest CT (CT) and CXR were compared in 21 patients after esophagectomy. The presence of abnormal findings on CXR and CT was evaluated separately by radiologists. Assuming that the diagnoses through CT were correct, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for CXR were examined in each of 6 abnormal findings. Comparison of CT findings with those of CXR resulted in the following sensitivities (SN) and specificities (SP): pneumothorax: SN=0.17, SP=1.0; consolidation: SN=0.82, SP=1.0; passive collapse: SN=0.83, SP=0.58; subsegmental atelectasis: SN=0.61, SP=1.0; left pleural effusion: SN=0.79, SP=0.29; right pleural effusion: SN=0.9, SP=0.8. These results demonstrated that CXR might miss pneumothorax and overestimate left pleural effusion. Positive predictive value was over 0.79 in each of 6 abnormal findings, which indicated an accuracy of abnormal findings seen on CXR was high. However, negative predictive value in left pleural effusion, which was 0.25, indicated difficulty in correct estimation of left pleural effusion. (author)

  14. Hybrid Brain–Computer Interface Techniques for Improved Classification Accuracy and Increased Number of Commands: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Khan, Muhammad Jawad

    2017-01-01

    In this article, non-invasive hybrid brain–computer interface (hBCI) technologies for improving classification accuracy and increasing the number of commands are reviewed. Hybridization combining more than two modalities is a new trend in brain imaging and prosthesis control. Electroencephalography (EEG), due to its easy use and fast temporal resolution, is most widely utilized in combination with other brain/non-brain signal acquisition modalities, for instance, functional near infrared spec...

  15. The relative contribution of band number to phylogenetic accuracy in AFLP data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pereira, M J; Caballero, A; Quesada, H

    2011-11-01

    We examined the effect of increasing the number of sampled amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) bands to reconstruct an accurate and well-supported AFLP-based phylogeny. In silico AFLP was performed using simulated DNA sequences evolving along balanced and unbalanced model trees with recent, uniform and ancient radiations and average branch lengths (from the most internal node to the tip) ranging from 0.02 to 0.05 substitutions per site. Trees were estimated by minimum evolution (ME) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods from both DNA sequences and virtual AFLP fingerprints. The comparison of the true tree with the estimated AFLP trees suggests that moderate numbers of AFLP bands are necessary to recover the correct topology with high bootstrap support values (i.e. >70%). Fewer numbers of bands are necessary for shorter tree lengths and for balanced than for unbalanced tree topologies. However, branch length estimation was rather unreliable and did not improve substantially after a certain number of bands were sampled. These results hold for different levels of genome coverage and number of taxa analysed. In silico AFLP using bacterial genomic DNA sequences recovered a well-supported tree topology that mirrored an empirical phylogeny based on a set of 31 orthologous gene sequences when as few as 263 AFLP bands were scored. These results suggest that AFLPs may be an efficient alternative to traditional DNA sequencing for accurate topology reconstruction of shallow trees when not very short ancestral branches exist. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. C-arm cone-beam CT virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsy: Diagnostic accuracy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungjin [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Aerospace Medical Group, Air Force Education and Training Command, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To assess the usefulness of C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsy in terms of diagnostic accuracy and complication rates. Seventy-eight CBCT virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsies were performed in 75 patients (M:F, 38:37; mean age, 48.55 ± 18.76 years). The procedural details, diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and complication rate were investigated. Mean lesion size was 6.80 ± 3.08 cm, skin-to-target distance was 3.67 ± 1.80 cm, core needle biopsy rate was 96.2 % (75/78), needle indwelling time was 9.29 ± 4.34 min, total procedure time was 13.26 ± 5.29 min, number of biopsy specimens obtained was 3.13 ± 1.02, number of CBCTs performed was 3.03 ± 0.68, rate of lesion border discrimination from abutting mediastinal structures on CBCT was 26.9 % (21/78), technical success rate was 100 % (78/78), estimated effective dose was 5.33 ± 4.99 mSv, and the dose area product was 12,723.68 ± 10,665.74 mGy.cm{sup 2}. Among the 78 biopsies, 69 were malignant, 7 were benign and 2 were indeterminate. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancies were 97.1 % (67/69), 100 % (7/7) and 97.4 % (74/76), respectively, with a complication rate of 3.85 % (3/78), all of which were small pneumothoraces. CBCT virtual navigation-guided biopsy is a highly accurate and safe procedure for the evaluation of mediastinal lesions. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of whole-body FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ming-Che; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liang, Ji-An; Yang, Kuang-Tao; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT in M staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Through a search of relevant English language studies from October 1996 to September 2011, pooled estimated sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves of whole-body PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC were calculated. Results: Three PET and 5 PET/CT studies were identified. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of FDG-PET or PET/CT were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77–0.88), 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95–0.98), 23.38 (95% CI, 16.22–33.69), and 0.19 (95% CI, 0.13–0.25), respectively. The area under curve was 0.9764 and Q* index estimate was 0.9307 for FDG-PET or PET/CT. Conclusion: Current evidence confirms the good diagnostic performance of the whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT in M staging of NPC

  18. Accuracy, calibration and clinical performance of the EuroSCORE: can we reduce the number of variables?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Marco; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Frigiola, Alessandro; Pelissero, Gabriele

    2010-03-01

    The European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is currently used in many institutions and is considered a reference tool in many countries. We hypothesised that too many variables were included in the EuroSCORE using limited patient series. We tested different models using a limited number of variables. A total of 11150 adult patients undergoing cardiac operations at our institution (2001-2007) were retrospectively analysed. The 17 risk factors composing the EuroSCORE were separately analysed and ranked for accuracy of prediction of hospital mortality. Seventeen models were created by progressively including one factor at a time. The models were compared for accuracy with a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis and area under the curve (AUC) evaluation. Calibration was tested with Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics. Clinical performance was assessed by comparing the predicted with the observed mortality rates. The best accuracy (AUC 0.76) was obtained using a model including only age, left ventricular ejection fraction, serum creatinine, emergency operation and non-isolated coronary operation. The EuroSCORE AUC (0.75) was not significantly different. Calibration and clinical performance were better in the five-factor model than in the EuroSCORE. Only in high-risk patients were 12 factors needed to achieve a good performance. Including many factors in multivariable logistic models increases the risk for overfitting, multicollinearity and human error. A five-factor model offers the same level of accuracy but demonstrated better calibration and clinical performance. Models with a limited number of factors may work better than complex models when applied to a limited number of patients. Copyright (c) 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement methods and accuracy in copy number variation: failure to replicate associations of beta-defensin copy number with Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhous, Marian C.; Abu Bakar, Suhaili; Prescott, Natalie J.; Palla, Raquel; Soo, Kimberley; Mansfield, John C.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Satsangi, Jack; Armour, John A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The copy number variation in beta-defensin genes on human chromosome 8 has been proposed to underlie susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, but presents considerable challenges for accurate typing on the scale required for adequately powered case–control studies. In this work, we have used accurate methods of copy number typing based on the paralogue ratio test (PRT) to assess beta-defensin copy number in more than 1500 UK DNA samples including more than 1000 cases of Crohn's disease. A subset of 625 samples was typed using both PRT-based methods and standard real-time PCR methods, from which direct comparisons highlight potentially serious shortcomings of a real-time PCR assay for typing this variant. Comparing our PRT-based results with two previous studies based only on real-time PCR, we find no evidence to support the reported association of Crohn's disease with either low or high beta-defensin copy number; furthermore, it is noteworthy that there are disagreements between different studies on the observed frequency distribution of copy number states among European controls. We suggest safeguards to be adopted in assessing and reporting the accuracy of copy number measurement, with particular emphasis on integer clustering of results, to avoid reporting of spurious associations in future case–control studies. PMID:20858604

  20. Measurement methods and accuracy in copy number variation: failure to replicate associations of beta-defensin copy number with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhous, Marian C; Abu Bakar, Suhaili; Prescott, Natalie J; Palla, Raquel; Soo, Kimberley; Mansfield, John C; Mathew, Christopher G; Satsangi, Jack; Armour, John A L

    2010-12-15

    The copy number variation in beta-defensin genes on human chromosome 8 has been proposed to underlie susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, but presents considerable challenges for accurate typing on the scale required for adequately powered case-control studies. In this work, we have used accurate methods of copy number typing based on the paralogue ratio test (PRT) to assess beta-defensin copy number in more than 1500 UK DNA samples including more than 1000 cases of Crohn's disease. A subset of 625 samples was typed using both PRT-based methods and standard real-time PCR methods, from which direct comparisons highlight potentially serious shortcomings of a real-time PCR assay for typing this variant. Comparing our PRT-based results with two previous studies based only on real-time PCR, we find no evidence to support the reported association of Crohn's disease with either low or high beta-defensin copy number; furthermore, it is noteworthy that there are disagreements between different studies on the observed frequency distribution of copy number states among European controls. We suggest safeguards to be adopted in assessing and reporting the accuracy of copy number measurement, with particular emphasis on integer clustering of results, to avoid reporting of spurious associations in future case-control studies.

  1. A study on the difference in the accuracy between radiographs and CT in detecting pulmonary lesions of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noumi, Fumiko; Kaneko, Takeshi; Inoue, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Classification of pulmonary tuberculosis designated by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis is a classification of pulmonary tuberculosis on radiographs findings. We analyzed both radiographs and CT in 150 patients with lung tuberculosis at the diagnosis based on the society classification. In 52 patients, the classification by radiographs was not consistent with that by CT. Generally, radiographs missed small and faint opacities in the lung. There were cases which showed tuberculous opacities in CT, diagnosed as normal by Radiographs. It is concluded that the diagnosis of the pulmonary tuberculosis by chest radiographs may lead to underdiagnosis and underestimation of its severity. Hence, chest CT is very useful for making an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  2. SU-E-J-272: Auto-Segmentation of Regions with Differentiating CT Numbers for Treatment Response Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C; Noid, G; Dalah, E; Paulson, E; Li, X; Gilat-Schmidt, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that the change of CT number (CTN) during and after radiation therapy (RT) may be used to assess RT response. The purpose of this work is to develop a tool to automatically segment the regions with differentiating CTN and/or with change of CTN in a series of CTs. Methods: A software tool was developed to identify regions with differentiating CTN using K-mean Cluster of CT numbers and to automatically delineate these regions using convex hull enclosing method. Pre- and Post-RT CT, PET, or MRI images acquired for sample lung and pancreatic cancer cases were used to test the software tool. K-mean cluster of CT numbers within the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) delineated based on PET SUV (standard uptake value of fludeoxyglucose) and/or MRI ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) map was analyzed. The cluster centers with higher value were considered as active tumor volumes (ATV). The convex hull contours enclosing preset clusters were used to delineate these ATVs with color washed displays. The CTN defined ATVs were compared with the SUV- or ADC-defined ATVs. Results: CTN stability of the CT scanner used to acquire the CTs in this work is less than 1.5 Hounsfield Unit (HU) variation annually. K-mean cluster centers in the GTV have difference of ∼20 HU, much larger than variation due to CTN stability, for the lung cancer cases studied. The dice coefficient between the ATVs delineated based on convex hull enclosure of high CTN centers and the PET defined GTVs based on SUV cutoff value of 2.5 was 90(±5)%. Conclusion: A software tool was developed using K-mean cluster and convex hull contour to automatically segment high CTN regions which may not be identifiable using a simple threshold method. These CTN regions were reasonably overlapped with the PET or MRI defined GTVs

  3. Accuracy and reliability of thyroid volumetry using spiral CT and thyroid volume in a healthy, non-iodine-deficient Chinese adult population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Jian, E-mail: shujiannc@163.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhao Jiannong, E-mail: zhaojiannong@tom.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Guo Dajing, E-mail: guodaj@163.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Luo Yindeng, E-mail: yindengluo_1019@163.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhong Weijia, E-mail: zhongweijia2003@eyou.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Xie Weibo, E-mail: radiologycq@163.com [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 74 Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of thyroid volumetry using spiral CT and to investigate thyroid volumes for a healthy, non-iodine-deficient adult population in southwestern region of China. Materials and methods: Spiral CT was performed in phantoms and adult subjects with normal thyroid, and the volumes were measured by observers with 5 years or more of CT experience. The phantom volumes and the thyroid volumes of all subjects were noted. Results: For the thyroid phantoms, there was no significant difference between the true and CT calculated volumes (t = 0.862, P = 0.399), and the correlation was excellent (ICC = 0.9995, P = 0.000). In the subjects for reliability analysis, the intraobserver or interobserver differences for CT volumetric measurement of thyroid were not significant (P > 0.05). The intraobserver or interobserver correlations were very high (ICC > 0.99, P < 0.001). In the subjects for population analysis, the median of the thyroid volumes was 11.45 cm{sup 3}. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test showed no significant difference for the thyroid volume between sexes (U = 4388.00, Z = -1.118, P = 0.264). The nonparametric Kruskall-Wallis test showed no significant difference in all age groups ({chi}{sup 2} = 13.466, P = 0.062). There was a slight negative correlation between the thyroid volume and age (r{sub s} = -0.166, P = 0.019). Conclusion: The accuracy and reliability of multi-slice spiral CT in measuring thyroid volume are very high. The thyroid volumes are not significantly difference between genders or among decades for the healthy, non-iodine-deficient adult population in southwestern region of China.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of C-arm CT during selective transcatheter angiography for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with intravenous contrast-enhanced, biphasic, dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashihara, Hiroki; Osuga, Keigo; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Maeda, Noboru; Hori, Masatoshi; Kim, Tonsok; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    This study was aimed to compare the accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of C-arm CT (CACT) during selective transcatheter angiography with those of multidetector CT (MDCT) in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this prospective study, 30 patients (mean age, 73 years) with unresectable HCC were examined with CACT before chemoembolisation. Images of a combination of CACT during arterial portography (CACTAP) and dual-phase CACT during hepatic arteriography (CACTHA) was obtained and images of intravenous contrast-enhanced, biphasic, dynamic, MDCT was also obtained beforehand. Three blinded observers independently reviewed CACT and MDCT. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by the alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (AFROC) method. Sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPV) were analyzed with the paired t-test. In the mean area under the AFROC curve (Az), there was no significant difference between MDCT and CACT (MDCT, mean Az value, 0.83; CACT, 0.85, respectively) (P = 0.32). There was also no significant difference between the two techniques in sensitivity (MDCT, mean 0.65; CACT, 0.60) and PPV (MDCT, mean 0.98; CACT, 0.97) (P = 0.40, P = 0.68, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CACT was equivalent to that of biphasic CT in the diagnosis of HCC. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of virtual non-contrast enhanced dual-energy CT for diagnosis of adrenal adenoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Michael J.; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Schieda, Nicola [University of Ottawa Department of Radiology, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (United States); El-Khodary, Mohamed [McMaster University Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McGrath, Trevor A. [University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy (DE) virtual non-contrast computed tomography (vNCT) to non-contrast CT (NCT) for the diagnosis of adrenal adenomas. Search of multiple databases and grey literature was performed. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS-2. Summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy were generated and sources of heterogeneity were assessed. Five studies (170 patients; 192 adrenal masses) were included for diagnostic accuracy assessment; all used dual-source dual-energy CT. Pooled sensitivity for adrenal adenoma on vNCT was 54% (95% CI: 47-62%). Pooled sensitivity for NCT was 57% (95% CI: 45-69%). Pooling of specificity was not performed since no false positives were reported. There was a trend for overestimation of HU density on vNCT as compared to NCT which appeared related to contrast timing. Potential sources of bias were seen regarding the index test and reference standard for the included studies. Potential sources of heterogeneity between studies were seen in adenoma prevalence and intravenous contrast timing. vNCT images generated from dual-energy CT demonstrated comparable sensitivity to NCT for the diagnosis of adenomas; however the included studies are heterogeneous and at high risk for some types of bias. (orig.)

  8. TU-H-207A-03: CT Hounsfield Unit Accuracy: Effect of Beam Hardening On Phantom and Clinical Whole-Body CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H; Wendt, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of beam hardening on measured CT HU values. Methods: An anthropomorphic knee phantom was scanned with the CT component of a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT scanner (120kVp, 300mAs, 40?0.625mm collimation, pitch=0.984, FOV=500mm, matrix=512?512) with four different scan setups, each of which induces different degrees of beam hardening by introducing additional attenuation media into the field of view. Homogeneous voxels representing “soft tissue” and “bone” were segmented by HU thresholding followed by a 3D morphological erosion operation which removes the non-homogenous voxels located on the interface of thresholded tissue mask. HU values of segmented “soft tissue” and “bone” were compared.Additionally, whole-body CT data with coverage from the skull apex to the end of toes were retrospectively retrieved from seven PET/CT exams to evaluate the effect of beam hardening in vivo. Homogeneous bone voxels were segmented with the same method previously described. Total In-Slice Attenuation (TISA) for each CT slice, defined as the summation of HU values over all voxels within a CT slice, was calculated for all slices of the seven whole-body CT datasets and evaluated against the mean HU values of homogeneous bone voxels within that slice. Results: HU values measured from the phantom showed that while “soft tissue” HU values were unaffected, added attenuation within the FOV caused noticeable decreases in the measured HU values of “bone” voxels. A linear relationship was observed between bone HU and TISA for slices of the torso and legs, but not of the skull. Conclusion: Beam hardening effect is not an issue of concern for voxels with HU in the soft tissue range, but should not be neglected for bone voxels. A linear relationship exists between bone HU and the associated TISA in non-skull CT slices, which can be exploited to develop a correction strategy.

  9. Accuracy of renal volume assessment in children by three-dimensional sonography; Nierenvolumetrie im Kindesalter: Genauigkeit der dreidimensionalen Sonographie im Vergleich zur konventionellen Sonographie und CT/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, G.A.; Riccabona, M.; Bohdal, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Graz (Austria); Quehenberger, F. [Inst. fuer medizinische Informatik, Statistik und Dokumentation, Universitaetsklinikum Graz (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of the accuracy of three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) to assess the renal parenchymal volume. Materials and Methods: CT, MRI, 2DUS and 3DUS were used to measure the renal volume in 40 patients (range: neonate to 17 years; mean age: 8.95 years). The 3DUS was determined with a Voluson 730 (Kretztechnik, GE) or an external 3D-system (EchoTech, GE) using electromagnetic positioning sensors attached to conventional 2DUS-equipment. The 2DUS volume was calculated with the ellipsoid equation and the 3DUS volume computed with the system integrated software. For CT and MRI, planimetric analysis was used to determine the renal parenchymal volume, whereby the dilated collecting system of a hydronephrosis was subtracted to obtain the real renal parenchymal volume. The results of 2DUS and 3DUS were compared to the results of CT and MRI, and inter- and intraobserver variabilities were calculated. Results: In 74 of 77 kidneys, the 3DUS study was of diagnostic quality. The accuracy of the 3DUS volumes compared well to the CT and MRI volumes with a mean difference of -1.8 {+-} 4.6% versus a mean difference of -2.4 {+-} 15.4% for 2DUS. In normal kidneys, the accuracy was -2.6 {+-} 4.4% for 3DUS and -3.8 {+-} 14.7% for 2DUS. In hydronephrosis, the accuracy was +4.0 {+-} 5.9% and +9.6 {+-} 21.3%, respectively, indicating that 3DUS is more accurate than 2DUS, particularly in kidneys with a dilated collecting system. Inter- and intraobserver variabilities were {+-} 7.3% and {+-} 5.3%. Conclusion: For assessing the renal parenchymal volume in children, 3DUS is feasible and comparable to CT and MRI. (orig.) [German] Studienziel: Prospektive Evaluation der Genauigkeit des drei-dimensionalen Ultraschalls (3DUS) bei der Volumetrie der kindlichen Niere im Vergleich zur CT/MRT. Methode: Bei 40 Patienten (Alter: 0 - 17 Jahre) mit einer klinisch indizierten CT/MRT des Abdomens oder des Harntrakts wurde zusaetzlich ein 2D- und 3DUS inklusive Volumetrie des

  10. CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions : a comparison of diagnostic accuracy and complication rate between automated gun biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keon Woo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of CT-guided automated gun biopsy with those of fine needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Under CT guidance, we performed automated gu biopsies in 115 cases of 109 patients and fine needle aspiration biopsies in 119 cases of 108 patients with pulmonary lesions. Between the two methods, we compared the diagnostic rate, diagnostic accuracy and frequency of compilations according to the depth and diameter of pulmonary lesions. The overall diagnostic rates of automated gun biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy were 76.5 % (88/115) and 64.7 % (77/119) respectively. There was a significant statistical difference (p=0.048), especially in the case of malignant lesions less than 3 cm (p=0.027) and more than 6 cm in maximal diameter (p=0.008), and in the lesions located from 1 cm to less than 3 cm from the pleural (p=0.030), as seen on CT. There was no significant statistical difference in the frequency of complications. Automated gun biopsy of pulmonary lesions under CT guidance is safe, with complications rate comparable to those of fine needle aspiration biopsy. A higher overall diagnostic rate can be achieved by automated gun biopsy than by fine needle aspiration biopsy. For the diagnosis of pulmonary lesions under CT guidance, automated gun biopsy is therefore a more useful procedure than fine needle aspiration biopsy. (author). 24 refs., 3 tabs

  11. In-vivo and ex-vivo assessment of the accuracy of the computer-aided volumetry of porcine kidney in CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, W.; Harris, G.; Holalkere, N.; Sahani, D.; Yoshida, H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Measurement of kidney volume by computed tomography (CT), called renal volumetry, is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases. Computer-aided volumetry (CAV) of kidney relies on an efficient and accurate segmentation method of the kidney. The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of our CAV of kidney scheme using dynamic-threshold (DT) level set method, based on in-vivo and ex-vivo reference standards. Eight Yorkshire breed anesthetized pigs were scanned on a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens) after an injection of iodinated (300 mgl/ml) contrast agent through an IV cannula. The kidneys of the pigs were then surgically resected and scanned on CT in the same manner. Both in-vivo and ex-vivo CT images were subjected to our volumetry scheme. The resulting volumes of the kidneys were compared with the in-vivo and ex-vivo reference standards: the former was established by manual contouring of the kidneys on the CT images by an experienced radiologist, and the latter was established as the water displacement volume of the resected kidney. Our CAV of kidney scheme demonstrated accurate in-vivo and ex-vivo measurement of kidney volume, despite a large difference between the two reference standards. (orig.)

  12. Pretreatment evaluation of distant-site status in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: accuracy of whole-body MRI at 3-Tesla and FDG-PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wai, Yau-Yau; Wang, Hung-Ming; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Chen, Min-Chi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of 3.0-Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) and integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (FDG-PET-CT), and their combined interpretation for the assessment of distant-site status in 150 patients with untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Eighteen (12%) patients were diagnosed as having distant malignancies (15 patients had distant metastases, and three distant synchronous tumours). On a patient-based analysis, WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed similar sensitivity (77.8% vs 72.2%, P > 0.999), specificity (98.5% vs 97.7%, P > 0.999) and diagnostic capability (0.905 vs 0.878, P = 0.669). Combined interpretation of WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed no significant benefit over either technique alone. In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla WB-MRI is a feasible, non-ionising technique that showed similar diagnostic capacity to FDG-PET-CT in assessing distant-site status in patients with untreated NPC and can be recommended as the first-line imaging technique for comprehensive evaluation of such patients. (orig.)

  13. In-vivo and ex-vivo assessment of the accuracy of the computer-aided volumetry of porcine kidney in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, W.; Harris, G.; Holalkere, N.; Sahani, D.; Yoshida, H.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of kidney volume by computed tomography (CT), called renal volumetry, is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases. Computer-aided volumetry (CAV) of kidney relies on an efficient and accurate segmentation method of the kidney. The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of our CAV of kidney scheme using dynamic-threshold (DT) level set method, based on in-vivo and ex-vivo reference standards. Eight Yorkshire breed anesthetized pigs were scanned on a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens) after an injection of iodinated (300 mgl/ml) contrast agent through an IV cannula. The kidneys of the pigs were then surgically resected and scanned on CT in the same manner. Both in-vivo and ex-vivo CT images were subjected to our volumetry scheme. The resulting volumes of the kidneys were compared with the in-vivo and ex-vivo reference standards: the former was established by manual contouring of the kidneys on the CT images by an experienced radiologist, and the latter was established as the water displacement volume of the resected kidney. Our CAV of kidney scheme demonstrated accurate in-vivo and ex-vivo measurement of kidney volume, despite a large difference between the two reference standards. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in the assessment of mandibular invasion of lower gingival carcinoma: Comparison with conventional panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momin, Mohammad A.; Okochi, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Akiko; Omura, Ken; Amagasa, Teruo; Okada, Norihiko; Ohbayashi, Naoto; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in assessing mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma and compare it with that of panoramic radiography. Patients and methods: Fifty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower gingiva who were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT before surgery were included in this study. Five radiologists used a 6-point rating scale to independently evaluate cone-beam CT and panoramic images for the presence or absence of alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement by tumor. Using the histopathogical findings as the gold standard, we calculated and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value) and the sensitivity and specificity of the two imaging modalities. Results: In evaluations of both alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement, the mean Az value for cone-beam CT (0.918 and 0.977, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (0.793 and 0.872, respectively). The mean sensitivity for cone-beam CT (89% and 99%, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (73% and 56%, respectively). There was no significant difference in the mean specificity. While cone-beam CT could provide high-resolution three-dimensional images, the image quality around the alveolar crest was often hampered by severe dental artifacts and image noise, resulting in difficulties in detecting subtle alveolar invasion. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT was significantly superior to panoramic radiography in evaluating mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma. Its diagnostic value in detecting subtle alveolar invasion, however, may be limited by severe dental artifacts and image noise.

  15. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, Erica [SimonMed Imaging, Department of Radiology, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Zhang, Wei [Texas Children' s Hospital, Outcomes and Impact Service, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-10-15

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor; Yang, Erica; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar

    2017-01-01

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast abdominal CT scans performed as follow-up for patients with an established cancer diagnosis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Hassan; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F; Siesel, Geoffrey; Aldinger, Paul; Obri, Tawfik

    2018-03-01

    To determine the accuracy and non-detection rate of cancer related findings (CRFs) on follow-up non-contrast-enhanced CT (NECT) versus contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) images of the abdomen in patients with a known cancer diagnosis. A retrospective review of 352 consecutive CTs of the abdomen performed with and without IV contrast between March 2010 and October 2014 for follow-up of cancer was included. Two radiologists independently assessed the NECT portions of the studies. The reader was provided the primary cancer diagnosis and access to the most recent prior NECT study. The accuracy and non-detection rates were determined by comparing our results to the archived reports as a gold standard. A total of 383 CRFs were found in the archived reports of the 352 abdominal CTs. The average non-detection rate for the NECTs compared to the CECTs was 3.0% (11.5/383) with an accuracy of 97.0% (371.5/383) in identifying CRFs. The most common findings missed were vascular thrombosis with a non-detection rate of 100%. The accuracy for non-vascular CRFs was 99.1%. Follow-up NECT abdomen studies are highly accurate in the detection of CRFs in patients with an established cancer diagnosis, except in cases where vascular involvement is suspected.

  18. Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of 70 kVp whole brain volumetric CT perfusion imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiao Kun; Ni, Qian Qian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Luo, Song; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); Fuller, Stephen R.; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy for acute infarct detection and radiation dose of 70 kVp whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed from CTP source data. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 50 each): group A, 80 kVp, 21 scanning time points; groups B, 70 kVp, 21 scanning time points; group C, 70 kVp, 17 scanning time points. Objective and subjective image quality of CTP and CTA were compared. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and cerebral artery stenosis ≥ 50 % was calculated for CTP and CTA with diffusion weighted imaging and digital subtraction angiography as reference standards. Effective radiation dose was compared. There were no differences in any perfusion parameter value between three groups (P > 0.05). No difference was found in subjective image quality between three groups (P > 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and vascular stenosis showed no difference between three groups (P > 0.05). Compared with group A, radiation doses of groups B and C were decreased by 28 % and 37 % (both P < 0.001), respectively. Compared with 80 kVp protocol, 70 kVp brain CTP allows comparable vascular and perfusion assessment and lower radiation dose while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute infarct. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography using 3{sup rd}-generation dual-source CT and automated tube voltage selection: Clinical application in a non-obese and obese patient population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Tesche, Christian [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Heart Centre Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Steinberg, Daniel H.; Bayer, Richard R. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Varga-Szemes, Akos; Stubenrauch, Andrew C.; Biancalana, Matthew; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of 3{sup rd}-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography in obese and non-obese patients. We retrospectively analyzed 76 patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography. Prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition was performed with automated tube voltage selection (ATVS). Patients were dichotomized based on body mass index in groups A (<30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 37) and B (≥30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 39) and based on tube voltage in groups C (<120 kV, n = 46) and D (120 kV, n = 30). Coronary arteries were assessed for significant stenoses (≥50 % luminal narrowing) and diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Per-patient overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were 96.9 %, 95.5 %, 93.9 %, 97.7 % and 96.1 %, respectively. Sensitivity and NPV were lower in groups B and D compared to groups A and C, but no statistically significant differences were observed (group A vs. B: sensitivity, 100.0 % vs. 93.3 %, p = 0.9493; NPV, 100 % vs. 95.5 %, p = 0.9812; group C vs. D: sensitivity, 100.0 % vs. 92.3 %, p = 0.8462; NPV, 100.0 % vs. 94.1 %, p = 0.8285). CCTA using 3{sup rd}-generation DSCT and (ATVS) provides high diagnostic accuracy in both non-obese and obese patients. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography using 3"r"d-generation dual-source CT and automated tube voltage selection: Clinical application in a non-obese and obese patient population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, Stefanie; Wichmann, Julian L.; Schoepf, U.J.; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Steinberg, Daniel H.; Bayer, Richard R.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Stubenrauch, Andrew C.; Biancalana, Matthew; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of 3"r"d-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography in obese and non-obese patients. We retrospectively analyzed 76 patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography. Prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition was performed with automated tube voltage selection (ATVS). Patients were dichotomized based on body mass index in groups A (<30 kg/m"2, n = 37) and B (≥30 kg/m"2, n = 39) and based on tube voltage in groups C (<120 kV, n = 46) and D (120 kV, n = 30). Coronary arteries were assessed for significant stenoses (≥50 % luminal narrowing) and diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Per-patient overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were 96.9 %, 95.5 %, 93.9 %, 97.7 % and 96.1 %, respectively. Sensitivity and NPV were lower in groups B and D compared to groups A and C, but no statistically significant differences were observed (group A vs. B: sensitivity, 100.0 % vs. 93.3 %, p = 0.9493; NPV, 100 % vs. 95.5 %, p = 0.9812; group C vs. D: sensitivity, 100.0 % vs. 92.3 %, p = 0.8462; NPV, 100.0 % vs. 94.1 %, p = 0.8285). CCTA using 3"r"d-generation DSCT and (ATVS) provides high diagnostic accuracy in both non-obese and obese patients. (orig.)

  1. Does Antibiotic Treatment Affect the Diagnostic Accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT Studies in Patients with Suspected Infectious Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagna, Olga; Kurash, Marina; Ghanem-Zoubi, Nesrin; Keidar, Zohar; Israel, Ora

    2017-11-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT plays a significant role in the assessment of various infectious processes. Patients with suspected or known sites of infection are often referred for 18 F-FDG imaging while already receiving antibiotic treatment. The current study assessed whether antibiotic therapy affected the detectability rate of infectious processes by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Methods: A 5-y retrospective study of all adult patients who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT in search of a focal source of infection was performed. The presence, duration, and appropriateness of antibiotic treatment before 18 F-FDG imaging were recorded. Diagnosis of an infectious process was based on microbiologic or pathologic data as well as on clinical and radiologic follow-up. Results: Two hundred seventeen patients underwent 243 PET/CT studies in search of a focal source of infection and were included in the study. Sixty-seven studies were excluded from further analysis because of a final noninfectious etiology or lack of further follow-up or details regarding the antibiotic treatment. The final study population included 176 18 F-FDG PET/CT studies in 153 patients (107 men, 46 women; age range, 18-86 y). One hundred nineteen studies (68%) were performed in patients receiving antibiotic therapy for a range of 1-73 d. A diagnosis of infection was made in 107 true-positive cases (61%), including 63 studies (59%) in patients receiving appropriate antibiotic therapy started before the performance of the 18 F-FDG PET/CT study. There were 52 true-negative (29%) and 17 false-positive (10%) 18 F-FDG PET/CT studies. No false-negative results were found. Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT correctly identified foci of increased uptake compatible with infection in most patients, including all patients receiving appropriate antimicrobial therapy, with no false-negative cases. On the basis of the current study results, the administration of antibiotics appears to have no clinically significant impact on the diagnostic accuracy of 18

  2. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  3. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging

  4. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET): Staging accuracy of MDCT and its diagnostic performance for the differentiation of PNET with uncommon CT findings from pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Hyo Won [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Seodaemun-ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jae [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 657 Hannam-Dong, Youngsan-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To investigate staging accuracy of multidetector CT (MDCT) for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) and diagnostic performance for differentiation of PNET from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We included 109 patients with surgically proven PNET (NETG1 = 66, NETG2 = 31, NEC = 12) who underwent MDCT. Two reviewers assessed stage and presence of predefined CT findings. We analysed the relationship between CT findings and tumour grade. Using PNETs with uncommon findings, we also estimated the possibility of PNET or adenocarcinoma. Accuracy for T stage was 85-88 % and N-metastasis was 83-89 %. Common findings included well circumscribed, homogeneously enhanced, hypervascular mass, common in lower grade tumours (p < 0.05). Uncommon findings included ill-defined, heterogeneously enhanced, hypovascular mass and duct dilation, common in higher grade tumours (p < 0.05). Using 31 PNETs with uncommon findings, diagnostic performance for differentiation from adenocarcinoma was 0.760-0.806. Duct dilatation was an independent predictor for adenocarcinoma (Exp(B) = 4.569). PNETs with uncommon findings were associated with significantly worse survival versus PNET with common findings (62.7 vs. 95.7 months, p < 0.001). MDCT is useful for preoperative evaluation of PNET; it not only accurately depicts the tumour stage but also prediction of tumour grade, because uncommon findings were more common in higher grade tumours. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Matheus L. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Tosoni, Guilherme M. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Araraquara (Brazil); Lindsey, David H.; Mendoza, Kristopher; Tetradis, Sotirios; Mallya, Sanjay M. [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of the clinical and CT findings for differentiating Kikuchi's disease and tuberculous lymphadenitis presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Ha Young; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2014-11-01

    To determine the optimal clinical and CT findings for differentiating Kikuchi's disease (KD) and tuberculous lymphadenitis (TB) in patients presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy. From 2006 to 2010, 87 consecutive patients who were finally diagnosed with KD or TB were enrolled. Two radiologists performed independent analysis of contrast-enhanced neck CT images with regard to the involvement pattern, nodal or perinodal changes, and evidence of the previous infection. Significant clinical and CT findings of KD were determined by statistical analyses. Of the 87 patients, 27 (31%) were classified as having KD and 60 (69%) as having TB. Statistically significant findings of KD patients were younger age, presence of fever, involvement of ≥5 nodal levels or the bilateral neck, no or minimal nodal necrosis, marked perinodal infiltration, and no evidence of upper lung lesion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The presence of four or more statistically significant clinical and CT findings of KD had the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (A z = 0.861; 95% confidence intervals 0.801, 0.909), with a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 83%. CT can be a helpful tool for differentiating KD from TB, especially when it is combined with the clinical findings.

  7. The diagnostic accuracy of US, CT, MRI and 1H-MRS for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis compared with liver biopsy: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohte, Anneloes E.; Werven, Jochem R. van; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    To meta-analyse the diagnostic accuracy of US, CT, MRI and 1 H-MRS for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis. From a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane (up to November 2009), articles were selected that investigated the diagnostic performance imaging techniques for evaluating hepatic steatosis with histopathology as the reference standard. Cut-off values for the presence of steatosis on liver biopsy were subdivided into four groups: (1) >0, >2 and >5% steatosis; (2) >10, >15 and >20%; (3) >25, >30 and >33%; (4) >50, >60 and >66%. Per group, summary estimates for sensitivity and specificity were calculated. The natural-logarithm of the diagnostic odds ratio (lnDOR) was used as a single indicator of test performance. 46 articles were included. Mean sensitivity estimates for subgroups were 73.3-90.5% (US), 46.1-72.0% (CT), 82.0-97.4% (MRI) and 72.7-88.5% ( 1 H-MRS). Mean specificity ranges were 69.6-85.2% (US), 88.1-94.6% (CT), 76.1-95.3% (MRI) and 92.0-95.7% ( 1 H-MRS). Overall performance (lnDOR) of MRI and 1 H-MRS was better than that for US and CT for all subgroups, with significant differences in groups 1 and 2. MRI and 1 H-MRS can be considered techniques of choice for accurate evaluation of hepatic steatosis. (orig.)

  8. The diagnostic accuracy of US, CT, MRI and {sup 1}H-MRS for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis compared with liver biopsy: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohte, Anneloes E.; Werven, Jochem R. van; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    To meta-analyse the diagnostic accuracy of US, CT, MRI and {sup 1}H-MRS for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis. From a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane (up to November 2009), articles were selected that investigated the diagnostic performance imaging techniques for evaluating hepatic steatosis with histopathology as the reference standard. Cut-off values for the presence of steatosis on liver biopsy were subdivided into four groups: (1) >0, >2 and >5% steatosis; (2) >10, >15 and >20%; (3) >25, >30 and >33%; (4) >50, >60 and >66%. Per group, summary estimates for sensitivity and specificity were calculated. The natural-logarithm of the diagnostic odds ratio (lnDOR) was used as a single indicator of test performance. 46 articles were included. Mean sensitivity estimates for subgroups were 73.3-90.5% (US), 46.1-72.0% (CT), 82.0-97.4% (MRI) and 72.7-88.5% ({sup 1}H-MRS). Mean specificity ranges were 69.6-85.2% (US), 88.1-94.6% (CT), 76.1-95.3% (MRI) and 92.0-95.7% ({sup 1}H-MRS). Overall performance (lnDOR) of MRI and {sup 1}H-MRS was better than that for US and CT for all subgroups, with significant differences in groups 1 and 2. MRI and {sup 1}H-MRS can be considered techniques of choice for accurate evaluation of hepatic steatosis. (orig.)

  9. Variability and accuracy of coronary CT angiography including use of iterative reconstruction algorithms for plaque burden assessment as compared with intravascular ultrasound - an ex vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolzmann, Paul [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schlett, Christopher L.; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Scheffel, Hans; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Karolyi, Mihaly; Hoffmann, Udo [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Maehara, Akiko; Ma, Shixin; Mintz, Gary S. [Columbia University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    To systematically assess inter-technique and inter-/intra-reader variability of coronary CT angiography (CTA) to measure plaque burden compared with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and to determine whether iterative reconstruction algorithms affect variability. IVUS and CTA data were acquired from nine human coronary arteries ex vivo. CT images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBPR) and iterative reconstruction algorithms: adaptive-statistical (ASIR) and model-based (MBIR). After co-registration of 284 cross-sections between IVUS and CTA, two readers manually delineated the cross-sectional plaque area in all images presented in random order. Average plaque burden by IVUS was 63.7 {+-} 10.7% and correlated significantly with all CTA measurements (r = 0.45-0.52; P < 0.001), while CTA overestimated the burden by 10 {+-} 10%. There were no significant differences among FBPR, ASIR and MBIR (P > 0.05). Increased overestimation was associated with smaller plaques, eccentricity and calcification (P < 0.001). Reproducibility of plaque burden by CTA and IVUS datasets was excellent with a low mean intra-/inter-reader variability of <1/<4% for CTA and <0.5/<1% for IVUS respectively (P < 0.05) with no significant difference between CT reconstruction algorithms (P > 0.05). In ex vivo coronary arteries, plaque burden by coronary CTA had extremely low inter-/intra-reader variability and correlated significantly with IVUS measurements. Accuracy as well as reader reliability were independent of CT image reconstruction algorithm. (orig.)

  10. SU-F-P-32: A Phantom Study of Accuracy of Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT (4D-CBCT) Vs. Three-Dimensional Cone Beam CT (3D-CBCT) in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, R; Morris, B; Duggar, N; Markovich, A; Standford, J; Lu, J; Yang, C [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: SymmetryTM 4D IGRT system of Elekta has been installed at our institution, which offers the 4D CBCT registration option. This study is to evaluate the accuracy of 4D CBCT system by using the CIRS 4D motion phantom and to perform a feasibility study on the implementation of 4D-CBCT as image guidance for SBRT treatment. Methods: The 3D and 4D CT image data sets are acquired using the CIRS motion phantom on a Philips large bore CT simulator. The motion was set as 0.5 cm superior and inferior directions with 6 seconds recycle time. The 4D CT data were sorted as 10 phases. One identifiable part of the 4D CT QA insert from CIRS phantom was used as the target. The ITV MIP was drawn based on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and transferred as a planning structure into 4D CBCT system. Then the 3D CBCT and 4D CBCT images were taken and registered with the free breath (3D), MIP (4D) and average intensity projection (AIP)(4D) reference data sets. The couch shifts (X, Y, Z) are recorded and compared. Results: Table 1 listed the twelve couch shifts based on the registration of MIP, AIP and free breath CT data sets with 3D CBCT and 4D CBCT for both whole body and local registration. X, Y and Z represent couch shifts in the direction of the right-left, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior. The biggest differences of 0.73 cm and 0.57 cm are noted in the free breath CT data with 4D CBCT and 3D CBCT data registration. Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 are the shift analysis in diagram. Fig. 3 shows the registration. Conclusion: Significant differences exist in the shifts corresponding with the direction of target motion. Further investigations are ongoing.

  11. Accuracy of Genomic Prediction in Synthetic Populations Depending on the Number of Parents, Relatedness, and Ancestral Linkage Disequilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopp, Pascal; Müller, Dominik; Technow, Frank; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2017-01-01

    Synthetics play an important role in quantitative genetic research and plant breeding, but few studies have investigated the application of genomic prediction (GP) to these populations. Synthetics are generated by intermating a small number of parents ([Formula: see text] and thereby possess unique genetic properties, which make them especially suited for systematic investigations of factors contributing to the accuracy of GP. We generated synthetics in silico from [Formula: see text]2 to 32 maize (Zea mays L.) lines taken from an ancestral population with either short- or long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD). In eight scenarios differing in relatedness of the training and prediction sets and in the types of data used to calculate the relationship matrix (QTL, SNPs, tag markers, and pedigree), we investigated the prediction accuracy (PA) of Genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) and analyzed contributions from pedigree relationships captured by SNP markers, as well as from cosegregation and ancestral LD between QTL and SNPs. The effects of training set size [Formula: see text] and marker density were also studied. Sampling few parents ([Formula: see text]) generates substantial sample LD that carries over into synthetics through cosegregation of alleles at linked loci. For fixed [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] influences PA most strongly. If the training and prediction set are related, using [Formula: see text] parents yields high PA regardless of ancestral LD because SNPs capture pedigree relationships and Mendelian sampling through cosegregation. As [Formula: see text] increases, ancestral LD contributes more information, while other factors contribute less due to lower frequencies of closely related individuals. For unrelated prediction sets, only ancestral LD contributes information and accuracies were poor and highly variable for [Formula: see text] due to large sample LD. For large [Formula: see text], achieving moderate accuracy requires

  12. Accuracy of Combined Computed Tomography Colonography and Dual Energy Iiodine Map Imaging for Detecting Colorectal masses using High-pitch Dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Han, Ruijuan; Han, Yang; Shi, Xuesen; Hu, Jiang; Lu, Bin

    2018-02-28

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of combined computed tomography colonography (CTC) and dual-energy iodine map imaging for detecting colorectal masses using high-pitch dual-source CT, compared with optical colonography (OC) and histopathologic findings. Twenty-eight consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients were underwent contrast-enhanced CTC acquisition using dual-energy mode and OC and pathologic examination. The size of the space-occupied mass, the CT value after contrast enhancement, and the iodine value were measured and statistically compared. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy rate, and positive predictive and negative predictive values of dual-energy contrast-enhanced CTC were calculated and compared between conventional CTC and dual-energy iodine images. The iodine value of stool was significantly lower than the colonic neoplasia (P dual-energy iodine maps imaging was 95.6% (95% CI = 77.9%-99.2%). The specificity of the two methods was 42.8% (95% CI = 15.4%-93.5%) and 100% (95% CI = 47.9%-100%; P = 0.02), respectively. Compared with optical colonography and histopathology, combined CTC and dual-energy iodine maps imaging can distinguish stool and colonic neoplasia, distinguish between benign and malignant tumors initially and improve the diagnostic accuracy of CTC for colorectal cancer screening.

  13. Dual-energy CT angiography in peripheral arterial occlusive disease - accuracy of maximum intensity projections in clinical routine and subgroup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kau, Thomas; Eicher, Wolfgang; Reiterer, Christian; Niedermayer, Martin; Rabitsch, Egon; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Senft, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of dual-energy CT angiography (DE-CTA) maximum intensity projections (MIPs) in symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). In 58 patients, DE-CTA of the lower extremities was performed on dual-source CT. In a maximum of 35 arterial segments, severity of the most stenotic lesion was graded (<10%, 10-49% and 50-99% luminal narrowing or occlusion) independently by two radiologists, with DSA serving as the reference standard. In DSA, 52.3% of segments were significantly stenosed or occluded. Agreement of DE-CTA MIPs with DSA was good in the aorto-iliac and femoro-popliteal regions (κ = 0.72; κ = 0.66), moderate in the crural region (κ = 0.55), slight in pedal arteries (κ = 0.10) and very good in bypass segments (κ = 0.81). Accuracy was 88%, 78%, 74%, 55% and 82% for the respective territories and moderate (75%) overall, with good sensitivity (84%) and moderate specificity (67%). Sensitivity and specificity was 82% and 76% in claudicants and 84% and 61% in patients with critical limb ischaemia. While correlating well with DSA above the knee, accuracy of DE-CTA MIPs appeared to be moderate in the calf and largely insufficient in calcified pedal arteries, especially in patients with critical limb ischaemia. (orig.)

  14. A dual centre study of setup accuracy for thoracic patients based on Cone-Beam CT data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Vibeke N; Westberg, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare setup uncertainties at two different institutions by using identical imaging and analysis techniques for thoracic patients with different fixation equipments. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patient registration results from Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) scans of 174 patients were...... increase of the systematic setup uncertainties in between imaging fractions. A margin reduction of ⩾0.2cm can be achieved for patients with peak-to-peak respiration amplitudes of ⩾1.2cm when changing from 4D-CT to Active Breathing Coordinator™ (ABC). CONCLUSIONS: The setup uncertainties at the two...

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT in young infant with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yu Min; Sun, Ai Min; Wang, Qian; Ouyang, Rong Zhen; Hu, Li Wei; Qiu, Han Sheng; Wang, Shi Yu; Li, Jian Ying

    2016-06-01

    To explore the clinical value and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv low-dose prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT (CCT) in young infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 102 consecutive infant patients (53 boys and 49 girls with mean age of 2.9 ± 2.4 m and weight less than 5 kg) with complex CHD were prospectively enrolled. Scans were performed on a 64-slice high definition CT scanner with low dose prospective ECG-triggering mode and reconstructed with 80 % adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. All studies were performed during free breathing with sedation. The subjective image quality was evaluated by 5-point grading scale and interobserver variability was calculated. The objective image noise (standard deviation, SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The effective radiation dose from the prospective ECG-triggering mode was recorded and compared with the virtual conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode. The detection rate for the origin of coronary artery was calculated. All patients also underwent echocardiography before CCT examination. 81 patients had surgery and their preoperative CCT and echocardiography findings were compared with the surgical results and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were calculated for separate cardiovascular anomalies. Heart rates were 70-161 beats per minute (bpm) with mean value of 129.19 ± 14.52 bpm. The effective dose of 0.53 ± 0.15 mSv in the prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT was lower than the calculated value in a conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode (2.00 ± 0.35 mSv) (p ECG-triggering CCT with sub-mSv effective dose provides excellent imaging quality and high diagnostic accuracy for young infants with complex CHD.

  16. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68 Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  17. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  18. SU-F-R-50: Radiation-Induced Changes in CT Number Histogram During Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X; Schott, D; Song, Y; Li, D; Hall, W; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort of early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in CT number histogram of GTV during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 28 fractions. On each daily CT set, the contours of the pancreatic head and the spinal cord were delineated. The Hounsfiled Units (HU) histogram in these contourswere extracted and processed using MATLAB. Eight parameters of the histogram including the mean HU over all the voxels, peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy, and entropy were calculated for each fraction. The significances were inspected using paired two-tailed t-test and the correlations were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation tests. Results: In general, HU histogram in pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the first to the last fraction in mean HU in pancreatic head ranged from −13.4 to 3.7 HU with an average of −4.4 HU, which was significant (P<0.001). Among other quantities, the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less sharp) during the CRT delivery. The changes of mean HU, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response status is associated with the changes of SD (ΔSD), i.e., ΔSD= 1.85 (average of 7 patients) for good reponse, −0.08 (average of 6 patients) for moderate and poor response. Conclusion: Significant changes in HU histogram and the histogram-based metrics (e.g., meam HU, skewness, and kurtosis) in tumor were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for pancreas cancer. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response.

  19. SU-F-R-50: Radiation-Induced Changes in CT Number Histogram During Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Schott, D; Song, Y; Li, D; Hall, W; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In an effort of early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in CT number histogram of GTV during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 28 fractions. On each daily CT set, the contours of the pancreatic head and the spinal cord were delineated. The Hounsfiled Units (HU) histogram in these contourswere extracted and processed using MATLAB. Eight parameters of the histogram including the mean HU over all the voxels, peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy, and entropy were calculated for each fraction. The significances were inspected using paired two-tailed t-test and the correlations were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation tests. Results: In general, HU histogram in pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the first to the last fraction in mean HU in pancreatic head ranged from −13.4 to 3.7 HU with an average of −4.4 HU, which was significant (P<0.001). Among other quantities, the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less sharp) during the CRT delivery. The changes of mean HU, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response status is associated with the changes of SD (ΔSD), i.e., ΔSD= 1.85 (average of 7 patients) for good reponse, −0.08 (average of 6 patients) for moderate and poor response. Conclusion: Significant changes in HU histogram and the histogram-based metrics (e.g., meam HU, skewness, and kurtosis) in tumor were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for pancreas cancer. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response.

  20. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyn, P.B.; Tatli, S.; Sahni, V.A.; Sadow, C.A.; Forgione, K.; Mauri, G.; Morrison, P.R.; Catalano, P.J.; Silverman, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  1. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, S. J.; Rowshanfarzad, P.; Ebert, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    ) and the radiation field centre (RFC) is calculated. A software package was developed for accurate calculation of the linac isocentre position. This requires precise determination of the position of the ball bearing and the RFC. Results: Data were acquired for 6 MV, 18 MV and flattening filter free (FFF) 6 MV FFF...... radiation isocentre prior to routine use of the cone-beam CT system. The isocentre determination method used in the XVI software is not available to users. The aim of this work is to perform an independent evaluation of the Elekta XVI 4.5 software for isocentre verification with focus on the robustness...... iView GT software. Two images were acquired at each cardinal gantry angle (-180o, -90o , 0o, 90o) at two opposing collimator angles. The images were exported to the conebeam CT software XVI 4.5 where the difference between the ball bearing position in the XYZ-room coordinates (IEC61217...

  2. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd; Laule, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p 74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  3. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael [Department of Cardiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p < 0.05, <65 bpm, 38 patients), 85 vs. 66% (p < 0.05, 65-74 bpm, 47 patients), and 78% vs. 41% (p < 0.001, >74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  4. Feasibility of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast material: assessment of image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rihyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of 320-row area detector CT (320-ADCT) coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast material in comparison with 60-mL protocol. This retrospective study included 183 patients who underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast and additional 183 sex- and body mass index-matched patients using 60 mL of contrast constituting the control group. Both groups used the same 5-mL/sec injection rate. Quantitative image quality measurements and diagnostic accuracies were calculated and compared. Mean attenuation and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at the aorta and all coronary arteries were lower in the 40-mL group than in the 60-mL group (all, p < 0.05), except for the CNR at proximal coronary arteries at 100 kVp (p = 0.073). However, the proportion of coronary segments with vessel attenuation >250 HU was not different between groups (all, p > 0.05), except for distal coronary arteries at 80 kVp (p = 0.001). Furthermore, there were no differences in per-patient and per-segment diagnostic accuracies between the groups (all, p > 0.05). 320-ADCT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast showed image quality and diagnostic accuracy comparable to the 60-mL protocol, demonstrating the clinical feasibility of lowering the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy through contrast volume reduction. (orig.)

  5. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 {+-} 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 {+-} 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 {+-} 8.5 % (P < 0.01) semi-automatically. In an anthropomorphic phantom study, the sensitivity of detection is 100 % for nodules of >5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  6. Accuracy of the CT-estimated weight of the right hepatic lobe prior to living related liver donation (LRLD) for predicting the intraoperatively measured weight of the graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.-J.; Brinkmann, M.; Felix, R.; Pascher, A.; Steinmueller, T.; Settmacher, U.; Neuhaus, P.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the shortage of cadaver donors, living related liver donation (LRLD) has emerged as an alternative to cadaver donation. The expected graft weight is one of the main determinants for donor selection. This study investigates the accuracy of preoperatively performed CT-volumetry to predict the actual weight of the right liver lobe graft. Materials and methods: In a prospective study the weight of the right hepatic lobe was calculated by volumetric analysis based on CT in 33 patients (21 females, 12 males, mean age 42.1 years, median age 41 years) prior to living related liver donation. Graft weight was calculated as the product of CT-based graft volume and 1.00 g/ml (the approximated density of healthy liver parenchyma). The calculated weight was compared with the intraoperatively measured weight of the harvested right hepatic lobe. The difference was used to determine a correction factor for estimating the actual graft weight. Results: Based on the assumption of a parenchymal density of 1.00 g/ml, the preoperatively estimated graft weight (mean 980 g ± 168 g) deviated + 33% from the intraoperatively measured right hepatic lobe weight (mean 749 g ± 170 g). By reducing the preoperatively predicted weight of the right hepatic lobe with a correction factor of 0.75, the actual graft weight can be calculated [de

  7. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Jong, Pim A. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Bock, Geertruida H. de

    2013-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 ± 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 ± 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 ± 8.5 % (P 5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  8. 18F-Fluorocholine PET/CT as a complementary tool in the follow-up of low-grade glioma: diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Rio, Manuel; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Antonio; Llamas-Elvira, Jose M.; Testart Dardel, Nathalie; Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia; Olivares Granados, Gonzalo; Luque Caro, Raquel; Zurita Herrera, Mercedes; Chamorro Santos, Clara E.; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The follow-up of treated low-grade glioma (LGG) requires the evaluation of subtle clinical changes and MRI results. When the result is inconclusive, additional procedures are required to assist decision-making, such as the use of advanced MRI (aMRI) sequences and nuclear medicine scans (SPECT and PET). The aim of this study was to determine whether incorporating 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT in the follow-up protocol for treated LGG improves diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility. This was a prospective case-series study in patients with treated LGG during standard follow-up with indeterminate clinical and/or radiological findings of tumour activity. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, aMRI, 201 Tl-SPECT and 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT. Images were interpreted by visual evaluation complemented with semiquantitative analysis. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 18 patients were included in this study. The final diagnosis was established by histology (five surgical specimens, one biopsy specimen) or by consensus of the Neuro-Oncology Group (11 patients) after a follow-up of >6 months (mean 14.9 ± 2.72 months). The global diagnostic accuracies were 90.9 % for aMRI (38.8 % inconclusive), 69.2 % for 201 Tl-SPECT (11.1 % inconclusive), and 100 % for 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT. 201 Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the initial approach in 38.9 % of patients but might have led to error in 27.8 %. The use of 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT alone rather than 201 Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the approach suggested by routine follow-up in 72.2 % of patients and endorsed the approach in the remaining 27.8 %. Our results support the need to complement structural MRI with aMRI and nuclear medicine procedures in selected patients. 18 F-Fluorocholine PET/CT can be useful in the individualized management of patients with treated LGG with uncertain clinical and/or radiological evidence of tumour activity. (orig.)

  9. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT as a complementary tool in the follow-up of low-grade glioma: diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Rio, Manuel; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Antonio; Llamas-Elvira, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigacion Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada (Spain); University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Granada (Spain); Testart Dardel, Nathalie [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Granada (Spain); Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Radiology, Granada (Spain); Olivares Granados, Gonzalo [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Neurosurgery, Granada (Spain); Luque Caro, Raquel [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Medical Oncology, Granada (Spain); Zurita Herrera, Mercedes [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, Granada (Spain); Chamorro Santos, Clara E. [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Pathology, Granada (Spain); Lardelli-Claret, Pablo [Instituto de Investigacion Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada (Spain); Centros de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Granada (Spain); University of Granada, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Granada (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    The follow-up of treated low-grade glioma (LGG) requires the evaluation of subtle clinical changes and MRI results. When the result is inconclusive, additional procedures are required to assist decision-making, such as the use of advanced MRI (aMRI) sequences and nuclear medicine scans (SPECT and PET). The aim of this study was to determine whether incorporating {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT in the follow-up protocol for treated LGG improves diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility. This was a prospective case-series study in patients with treated LGG during standard follow-up with indeterminate clinical and/or radiological findings of tumour activity. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, aMRI, {sup 201}Tl-SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT. Images were interpreted by visual evaluation complemented with semiquantitative analysis. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 18 patients were included in this study. The final diagnosis was established by histology (five surgical specimens, one biopsy specimen) or by consensus of the Neuro-Oncology Group (11 patients) after a follow-up of >6 months (mean 14.9 ± 2.72 months). The global diagnostic accuracies were 90.9 % for aMRI (38.8 % inconclusive), 69.2 % for {sup 201}Tl-SPECT (11.1 % inconclusive), and 100 % for {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT. {sup 201}Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the initial approach in 38.9 % of patients but might have led to error in 27.8 %. The use of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT alone rather than {sup 201}Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the approach suggested by routine follow-up in 72.2 % of patients and endorsed the approach in the remaining 27.8 %. Our results support the need to complement structural MRI with aMRI and nuclear medicine procedures in selected patients. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT can be useful in the individualized management of patients with treated LGG with uncertain clinical and/or radiological evidence of tumour activity. (orig.)

  10. Intervertebral anticollision constraints improve out-of-plane translation accuracy of a single-plane fluoroscopy-to-CT registration method for measuring spinal motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Hsu, Shih-Jung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Shih, Ting-Fang; Wang, Ting-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to propose a new single-plane fluoroscopy-to-CT registration method integrated with intervertebral anticollision constraints for measuring three-dimensional (3D) intervertebral kinematics of the spine; and to evaluate the performance of the method without anticollision and with three variations of the anticollision constraints via an in vitro experiment. Methods: The proposed fluoroscopy-to-CT registration approach, called the weighted edge-matching with anticollision (WEMAC) method, was based on the integration of geometrical anticollision constraints for adjacent vertebrae and the weighted edge-matching score (WEMS) method that matched the digitally reconstructed radiographs of the CT models of the vertebrae and the measured single-plane fluoroscopy images. Three variations of the anticollision constraints, namely, T-DOF, R-DOF, and A-DOF methods, were proposed. An in vitro experiment using four porcine cervical spines in different postures was performed to evaluate the performance of the WEMS and the WEMAC methods. Results: The WEMS method gave high precision and small bias in all components for both vertebral pose and intervertebral pose measurements, except for relatively large errors for the out-of-plane translation component. The WEMAC method successfully reduced the out-of-plane translation errors for intervertebral kinematic measurements while keeping the measurement accuracies for the other five degrees of freedom (DOF) more or less unaltered. The means (standard deviations) of the out-of-plane translational errors were less than −0.5 (0.6) and −0.3 (0.8) mm for the T-DOF method and the R-DOF method, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed single-plane fluoroscopy-to-CT registration method reduced the out-of-plane translation errors for intervertebral kinematic measurements while keeping the measurement accuracies for the other five DOF more or less unaltered. With the submillimeter and subdegree accuracy, the WEMAC method was

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography and unenhanced proton MR imaging compared with CT pulmonary angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Smitha [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Academic Unit of Radiology, C Floor, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Swift, Andrew J.; Wild, Jim M. [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sheffield Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Capener, David; Telfer, Adam [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charles; Kiely, David G. [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sheffield Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hurdman, Judith [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and the added benefit of unenhanced proton MR angiography compared with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with chronic thromboembolic disease (CTE). A 2 year retrospective study of 53 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent CTPA and MRI for suspected pulmonary hypertension and a control group of 36 patients with no CT evidence of pulmonary embolism. The MRI was evaluated for CTE and the combined diagnostic accuracy of ce-MRA and unenhanced proton MRA was determined. CE-MRA generated lung perfusion maps were also assessed. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA in diagnosing proximal and distal CTE were 98% and 94%, respectively. The sensitivity improved from 50% to 88% for central vessel disease when CE-MRA images were analysed with unenhanced proton MRA. The CE-MRA identified more stenoses (29/18), post-stenosis dilatation (23/7) and occlusions (37/29) compared with CTPA. The CE-MRA perfusion images showed a sensitivity of 92% for diagnosing CTE. CE-MRA has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CTE. The sensitivity of CE-MRA for visualisation of adherent central and lobar thrombus significantly improves with the addition of unenhanced proton MRA which delineates the vessel wall. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography and unenhanced proton MR imaging compared with CT pulmonary angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, Smitha; Swift, Andrew J.; Wild, Jim M.; Capener, David; Telfer, Adam; Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charles; Kiely, David G.; Hurdman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and the added benefit of unenhanced proton MR angiography compared with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with chronic thromboembolic disease (CTE). A 2 year retrospective study of 53 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent CTPA and MRI for suspected pulmonary hypertension and a control group of 36 patients with no CT evidence of pulmonary embolism. The MRI was evaluated for CTE and the combined diagnostic accuracy of ce-MRA and unenhanced proton MRA was determined. CE-MRA generated lung perfusion maps were also assessed. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA in diagnosing proximal and distal CTE were 98% and 94%, respectively. The sensitivity improved from 50% to 88% for central vessel disease when CE-MRA images were analysed with unenhanced proton MRA. The CE-MRA identified more stenoses (29/18), post-stenosis dilatation (23/7) and occlusions (37/29) compared with CTPA. The CE-MRA perfusion images showed a sensitivity of 92% for diagnosing CTE. CE-MRA has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CTE. The sensitivity of CE-MRA for visualisation of adherent central and lobar thrombus significantly improves with the addition of unenhanced proton MRA which delineates the vessel wall. (orig.)

  13. A priori estimation of accuracy and of the number of wells to be employed in limiting dilution assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Chaui-Berlinck

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of limiting dilution assay (LDA for assessing the frequency of responders in a cell population is a method extensively used by immunologists. A series of studies addressing the statistical method of choice in an LDA have been published. However, none of these studies has addressed the point of how many wells should be employed in a given assay. The objective of this study was to demonstrate how a researcher can predict the number of wells that should be employed in order to obtain results with a given accuracy, and, therefore, to help in choosing a better experimental design to fulfill one's expectations. We present the rationale underlying the expected relative error computation based on simple binomial distributions. A series of simulated in machina experiments were performed to test the validity of the a priori computation of expected errors, thus confirming the predictions. The step-by-step procedure of the relative error estimation is given. We also discuss the constraints under which an LDA must be performed.

  14. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 ± 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 ± 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 ± 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 ± 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 ± 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 ± 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 ± 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask systems with 3D

  15. Influence of Co-57 and CT Transmission Measurements on the Quantification Accuracy and Partial Volume Effect of a Small Animal PET Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Schmid, Andreas M; Pichler, Bernd J

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) provides high detection sensitivity in the nano- to picomolar range and in addition to other advantages, the possibility to absolutely quantify the acquired data. The present study focuses on the comparison of transmission data acquired with an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner or a Co-57 source for the Inveon small animal PET scanner (Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, TN, USA), as well as determines their influences on the quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE). A special focus included the impact of the performed calibration on the quantification accuracy. Phantom measurements were carried out to determine the quantification accuracy, the influence of the object size on the quantification, and the PVE for different sphere sizes, along the field of view and for different contrast ratios. An influence of the emission activity on the Co-57 transmission measurements was discovered (deviations up to 24.06 % measured to true activity), whereas no influence of the emission activity on the CT attenuation correction was identified (deviations influenced by the applied calibration factor and by the object size. The PVE demonstrated a dependency on the sphere size, the position within the field of view, the reconstruction and correction algorithms and the count statistics. Depending on the reconstruction algorithm, only ∼30-40 % of the true activity within a small sphere could be resolved. The iterative 3D reconstruction algorithms uncovered substantially increased recovery values compared to the analytical and 2D iterative reconstruction algorithms (up to 70.46 % and 80.82 % recovery for the smallest and largest sphere using iterative 3D reconstruction algorithms). The transmission measurement (CT or Co-57 source) to correct for attenuation did not severely influence the PVE. The analysis of the quantification accuracy and the PVE revealed an influence of the object size, the reconstruction

  16. Prospective versus retrospective ECG gating for dual source CT of the coronary stent: Comparison of image quality, accuracy, and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Lei, E-mail: zhaolei219@sohu.com [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Zhang Zhaoqi; Fan Zhanming; Yang Lin; Du Jing [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To compare image quality, diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of prospective and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gated dual source computed tomography (DSCT) for the evaluation of the coronary stent, using conventional coronary angiography (CA) as a standard reference. Design, setting and patients: Sixty patients (heart rates {<=}70 bpm) with previous stent implantation who were scheduled for CA were divided in two groups, receiving either prospective or retrospective ECG gated DSCT separately. Two reviewers scored coronary stent image quality and evaluated stent lumen. Results: There was no significant difference in image quality between the two groups. In the prospective group, there were 86.4% (51/59) stents with interpretable images, in the retrospective group, there were 87.5% (49/56) stents with interpretable images. Image quality was not influenced by age, body mass index or heart rate in either group, but heart rate variability had a weak impact on the image quality of the prospective group. Image noise was higher in the prospective group, but this difference reached statistical significance only by using a smooth kernel reconstruction. Per-stent based sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were 100%, 84.1%, 68.2%, and 100%, respectively, in the prospective CT angiography group and 94.4%, 86.8%, 77.3%, and 97.1%, respectively, in the retrospective CT angiography group. There was a significant difference in the effective radiation dose between the two groups, mean effective dose in the prospective and retrospective group was 2.2 {+-} 0.5 mSv (1.5-3.2 mSv) and 14.6 {+-} 3.3 mSv (10.0-20.4 mSv) (p < .001) respectively. Conclusions: Compared with retrospective CT angiography, prospective CT angiography has a similar performance in assessing coronary stent patency, but a lower effective dose in selected patients with regular heart rates {<=}70 bpm.

  17. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard Riis, Hans; Moltke, Lars N; Zimmermann, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate determination of the megavoltage (MV) radiation isocentre of a linear accelerator (linac) is an important task in radiotherapy. The localization of the MV radiation isocentre is crucial for correct calibration of the in-room lasers and the cone-beam CT scanner used for patient positioning...... orientation or the phantom asymmetry in the longitudinal direction do not appear to cause the discrepancy. The main cause of the differences could not be clearly identified. However, it is our opinion that the commercial software delivered by the linac manufacturer should be improved to reach better stability...

  18. Quantitative accuracy of denoising techniques applied to dynamic 82Rb myocardial blood flow PET/CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    with suspected ischemic heart disease underwent a dynamic 7 minute 82Rb scan under resting and adenosine induced hyperaemic conditions after injection of 1100 MBq of 82Rb on a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT. Dynamic images were filtered using HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) and a Hotelling filter of which...... the latter was evaluated using a range of 4 to 7 included factors and for both 2D and 3D filtering. Data were analyzed using Cardiac VUer and obtained MBF values were compared with those obtained when no denoising of the dynamic data was performed. Results: Both HYPR and Hotelling denoising could...

  19. Accuracy and inter-observer variability of 3D versus 4D cone-beam CT based image-guidance in SBRT for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, Reinhart A; Seubert, Benedikt; Stark, Silke; Homann, Vanessa; Müller, Gerd; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the accuracy and inter-observer variability of image-guidance (IG) using 3D or 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) technology in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Twenty-one consecutive patients treated with image-guided SBRT for primary and secondary lung tumors were basis for this study. A respiration correlated 4D-CT and planning contours served as reference for all IG techniques. Three IG techniques were performed independently by three radiation oncologists (ROs) and three radiotherapy technicians (RTTs). Image-guidance using respiration correlated 4D-CBCT (IG-4D) with automatic registration of the planning 4D-CT and the verification 4D-CBCT was considered gold-standard. Results were compared with two IG techniques using 3D-CBCT: 1) manual registration of the planning internal target volume (ITV) contour and the motion blurred tumor in the 3D-CBCT (IG-ITV); 2) automatic registration of the planning reference CT image and the verification 3D-CBCT (IG-3D). Image quality of 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT images was scored on a scale of 1–3, with 1 being best and 3 being worst quality for visual verification of the IGRT results. Image quality was scored significantly worse for 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: the worst score of 3 was given in 19 % and 7.1 % observations, respectively. Significant differences in target localization were observed between 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT based IG: compared to the reference of IG-4D, tumor positions differed by 1.9 mm ± 0.9 mm (3D vector) on average using IG-ITV and by 3.6 mm ± 3.2 mm using IG-3D; results of IG-ITV were significantly closer to the reference IG-4D compared to IG-3D. Differences between the 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT techniques increased significantly with larger motion amplitude of the tumor; analogously, differences increased with worse 3D-CBCT image quality scores. Inter-observer variability was largest in SI direction and was significantly larger in IG using 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: 0.6 mm versus 1.5 mm

  20. SU-F-207-09: Evaluating the Dosimetric Accuracy of Extended Field-Of-View CT Reconstructions Using Clinical Data with Real Patient Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugard, E; Cheung, J; Pouliot, J; Chen, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco (United States); Mistry, N [Siemens Healthcare USA, Malvern, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of dose calculations performed with CT images reconstructed using extended field of view (FOV) algorithms. Methods: In this study we selected 6 radiotherapy patients (3 head and neck & 3 chest/pelvis) whose body circumferences extended past the 50 cm scan FOV in the treatment planning CT. Images acquired on a Siemens Sensation Open scanner, were reconstructed using the standard FOV (sFOV) and two different extended FOV algorithms, eFOV and HDFOV. A physician and dosimetrist identified the radiation target, critical organs, and external patient contour. A benchmark CT was created for each patient, consisting of an average of the 3 CT reconstructions with a density override applied to regions containing truncation artifacts, and was used to create an optimal radiation treatment plan. The plan was copied onto each reconstruction without density override and dose was recalculated. Results: The native sFOV dose calculations had the largest deviation from the benchmark (0.4 – 6.0%). Both the HDFOV and eFOV calculations showed improvement over the sFOV. For patients with a smooth patient contour, the HDFOV calculation had the least deviation from the benchmark (0.1–0.5%) compared to eFOV (0.4–1.8%). In cases with large amounts of tissue and irregular skin folds, the eFOV deviated the least from the benchmark (0.2–0.6%) compared to HDFOV (1.3–1.8%). It was observed that the eFOV scan has large image artifact in air with an average HU of −600 compared to the ideal of −1000. In these cases, the artifact in air appears to attenuate the dose and compensate for the missing tissue density. The HDFOV demonstrated minimal artifact in air. Conclusion: Both eFOV and HDFOV provide improved dose calculation accuracy. The HDFOV reconstruction provides a clearer patient border than the eFOV allowing for well-defined density overrides to be applied with minimal air artifact. This research was supported by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  1. The CT (Hounsfield unit) number of brain tissue in healthy infants. A new reliable method for detection of possible degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, P; Bundgaard, F; Olsen, A

    1987-01-01

    It is difficult to correlate CT Hounsfield unit (H. U.) numbers from one CT investigation to another and from one CT scanner to another, especially when dealing with small changes in the brain substance, as in degenerative brain diseases in children. By subtracting the mean value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the mean value of grey and white matter, it is possible to remove most of the errors due, for example, to maladjustments, short and long-term drift, X-ray fan, and detector asymmetry. Measurements of white and grey matter using these methods showed CT H. U. numbers changing from 15 H. U. to 22 H. U. in white matter and 23 H. U. to 30 H. U. in grey matter in 86 healthy infants aged 0-5 years. In all measurements, the difference between grey and white matter was exactly 8 H. U. The method has proven to be highly accurate and reproducible.

  2. How does arm positioning of polytraumatized patients in the initial computed tomography (CT) affect image quality and diagnostic accuracy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Johannes; Grupp, Ulrich; Maurer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different arm positions on abdominal image quality during initial whole-body CT (WBCT) in polytraumatized patients and to assess the risk of missing potentially life-threatening injuries due to arm artifacts. Materials and methods: Between July 2011 and February 2013, WBCT scans of 203 patients with arms in the abdominal area during initial WBCT were analyzed. Six different arms-down positions were defined: patients with both (group A)/one arm(s) (group B) down alongside the torso, patients with both (group C)/one arm(s) (group D) crossed in front of the upper abdomen, patients with both (group E)/one arm(s) (group F) crossed in front of the pelvic area. A group of 203 patients with elevated arms beside the head served as a control group. Two observers jointly evaluated image quality of different organ regions using a 4-point scale system. Follow-up examinations (CT scans and/or ultrasound) were analyzed to identify findings missed during initial WBCT due to reduced image quality. Results: Image quality for most of the organ regions analyzed was found to be significantly different among all groups (p < 0.05). Image quality was most severely degraded in group A, followed by groups E and C. Positioning with one arm up resulted in significantly better image quality than both arms down (p < 0.05). Overall, arms-up positioning showed significantly better image quality than arms-down positions (p < 0.05). In one case, liver hemorrhage missed in the initial WBCT because of arm artifacts, was revealed by follow-up CT. Conclusion: In WBCT arms-down positioning significantly degrades abdominal image quality and artifacts might even conceal potentially life-threatening injuries. If the patient's status does not allow elevation of both arms, image quality can benefit from raising at least one arm. Otherwise, arms should be placed in front of the upper abdomen instead of alongside the torso

  3. Accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism - development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens. Development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ries, B.G.; Kauczor, H.U.; Thelen, M.; Konerding, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for simulation the CT morphologic situation of acute pulmonary embolism, to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of artificial emboli and to investigate the influence of the orientation of emboli depending on z-axis orientation. Materials and Methods: Standardized artificial emboli made of wax and of defined size and shape were positioned into the pulmonary arteries of porcine lungs. Castings of the embolized pulmonary arterial trees were made by injection of a special opaque resin. After performance of spiral CT the data sets of the emboli and the pulmonary arteries were post-processed. The 3D segmentations were compared with the anatomic preparation to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT/3D reconstruction-technique. Technical specimens simulating CT-morphology of acute embolized vessels underwent spiral CT in six different positions with respect to the z-axis. The CT data were reconstructed using a standardized and a contrastadapted method with interactive correction. The 3D emboli were analysed under qualitative aspects, and measurements of their extent were done. Results: In nearly 91%, there was complete agreement between CT and the corresponding findings at the anatomical preparation. Measurements of the 3D reconstructed technical specimens showed discrepancies of shape and size in dependence of the size of the original preparation, orientation and reconstruction technique. Overestimation up to 4 mm and underestimation to 2,2 mm were observed. Measurements of preparations with heights from 14 to 26 mm showed variances of ±1,5 mm (∝6-11%). Conclusion: The presented models are suitable to simulate CT morphology of acute pulmonary embolism under ex-vivo conditions. Accuracy in the detection of artificial emboli using spiral CT/3D reconstruction is affected by localization, size and orientation of the emboli and the reconstruction technique. (orig.) [de

  4. Post-operative 3D CT feedback improves accuracy and precision in the learning curve of anatomic ACL femoral tunnel placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirleo, Luigi; Innocenti, Massimo; Innocenti, Matteo; Civinini, Roberto; Carulli, Christian; Matassi, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feedback from post-operative three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) on femoral tunnel placement in the learning process, to obtain an anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A series of 60 consecutive patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstrings single-bundle outside-in technique were prospectively included in the study. ACL reconstructions were performed by the same trainee-surgeon during his learning phase of anatomic ACL femoral tunnel placement. A CT scan with dedicated tunnel study was performed in all patients within 48 h after surgery. The data obtained from the CT scan were processed into a three-dimensional surface model, and a true medial view of the lateral femoral condyle was used for the femoral tunnel placement analysis. Two independent examiners analysed the tunnel placements. The centre of femoral tunnel was measured using a quadrant method as described by Bernard and Hertel. The coordinates measured were compared with anatomic coordinates values described in the literature [deep-to-shallow distance (X-axis) 28.5%; high-to-low distance (Y-axis) 35.2%]. Tunnel placement was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision. After each ACL reconstruction, results were shown to the surgeon to receive an instant feedback in order to achieve accurate correction and improve tunnel placement for the next surgery. Complications and arthroscopic time were also recorded. Results were divided into three consecutive series (1, 2, 3) of 20 patients each. A trend to placing femoral tunnel slightly shallow in deep-to-shallow distance and slightly high in high-to-low distance was observed in the first and the second series. A progressive improvement in tunnel position was recorded from the first to second series and from the second to the third series. Both accuracy (+52.4%) and precision (+55.7%) increased from the first to the third series (p process to improve accuracy and precision of femoral

  5. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Positioning accuracy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy patients determined by on-treatment cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, N D; Pilling, K E; Peedell, C; Shakespeare, D; Walker, C P

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer is an emerging treatment option in the UK. Since relatively few high-dose ablative fractions are delivered to a small target volume, the consequences of a geometric miss are potentially severe. This paper presents the results of treatment delivery set-up data collected using Elekta Synergy (Elekta, Crawley, UK) cone-beam CT imaging for 17 patients immobilised using the Bodyfix system (Medical Intelligence, Schwabmuenchen, Germany). Images were acquired on the linear accelerator at initial patient treatment set-up, following any position correction adjustments, and post-treatment. These were matched to the localisation CT scan using the Elekta XVI software. In total, 71 fractions were analysed for patient set-up errors. The mean vector error at initial set-up was calculated as 5.3±2.7 mm, which was significantly reduced to 1.4±0.7 mm following image guided correction. Post-treatment the corresponding value was 2.1±1.2 mm. The use of the Bodyfix abdominal compression plate on 5 patients to reduce the range of tumour excursion during respiration produced mean longitudinal set-up corrections of −4.4±4.5 mm compared with −0.7±2.6 mm without compression for the remaining 12 patients. The use of abdominal compression led to a greater variation in set-up errors and a shift in the mean value. PMID:22665927

  7. Anatomical accuracy of lesion localization. Retrospective interactive rigid image registration between 18F-FDG-PET and X-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noemayr, A.; Roemer, W.; Kuwert, T.; Hothorn, T.; Pfahlberg, A.; Hornegger, J.; Bautz, W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical accuracy and reproducibility of retrospective interactive rigid image registration (RIR) between routinely archived X-ray computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography performed with 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in oncological patients. Methods: two observers registered PET and CT data obtained in 37 patients using a commercially available image fusion tool. RIR was performed separately for the thorax and the abdomen using physiological FDG uptake in several organs as a reference. One observer performed the procedure twice (01a and 01b), another person once (02). For 94 malignant lesions, clearly visible in CT and PET, the signed and absolute distances between their representation on PET and CT were measured in X-, Y-, and Z-direction with reference to a coordinate system centered in the CT representation of each lesion (X-, Y-, Z-distances). Results: the mean differences of the signed and absolute distances between 01a, 01b, and 02 did not exceed 3 mm in any dimension. The absolute X-, Y-, and Z-distances ranged between 0.57 ± 0.58 cm for 01a (X-direction) and 1.12 ± 1.28 cm for 02 (Z-direction). When averaging the absolute distances measured by 01a, 01b, and 02, the percentage of lesions misregistered by less than 1.5 cm was 91% for the X-, 88% for the Y-, and 77% for the Z-direction. The larger error of fusion determined for the remaining lesions was caused by non-rigid body transformations due to differences in breathing, arm position, or bowel movements between the two examinations. Mixed effects analysis of the signed and absolute X-, Y-, and Z-distances disclosed a significantly greater misalignment in the thorax than in the abdomen as well as axially than transaxially. Conclusion: the anatomical inaccuracy of RIR can be expected to be <1.5 cm for the majority of neoplastic foci. errors of alignment are bigger in the thorax and in Z-direction, due to non-rigid body transformations caused, e

  8. TU-A-12A-12: Improved Airway Measurement Accuracy for Low Dose Quantitative CT (qCT) Using Statistical (ASIR), at Reduced DFOV, and High Resolution Kernels in a Phantom and Swine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, G; Imai, Y; Hsieh, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative accuracy of Iodine Hounsfield Unit (HU) in conventional single-kVp scanning is susceptible to beam-hardening effect. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities of quantification using monochromatic CT images, but this scanning mode requires the availability of the state-of-the-art CT scanner and, therefore, is limited in routine clinical practice. Purpose of this work was to develop a beam-hardening-correction (BHC) for single-kVp CT that can linearize Iodine projections at any nominal energy, apply this approach to study Iodine response with respect to keV, and compare with dual-energy based monochromatic images obtained from material-decomposition using 80kVp and 140kVp. Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms (Gammex Inc.), containing solid-Iodine inserts of different concentrations, were scanned using GE multi-slice CT scanner at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. A model-based BHC algorithm was developed where Iodine was estimated using re-projection of image volume and corrected through an iterative process. In the correction, the re-projected Iodine was linearized using a polynomial mapping between monochromatic path-lengths at various nominal energies (40 to 140 keV) and physically modeled polychromatic path-lengths. The beam-hardening-corrected 80kVp and 140kVp images (linearized approximately at effective energy of the beam) were used for dual-energy material-decomposition in Water-Iodine basis-pair followed by generation of monochromatic images. Characterization of Iodine HU and noise in the images obtained from singlekVp with BHC at various nominal keV, and corresponding dual-energy monochromatic images, was carried out. Results: Iodine HU vs. keV response from single-kVp with BHC and dual-energy monochromatic images were found to be very similar, indicating that single-kVp data may be used to create material specific monochromatic equivalent using modelbased projection linearization. Conclusion: This approach may enable quantification of

  9. Time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of new automated myocardial perfusion analysis software in 320-row CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzei, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter; Dewey, Marc [Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Universiteitsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy and tolerability of contrast enhanced CT colonoscopy in symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsunar, Yelda; Coskun, Guelten; Delibas, Naciye; Uz, Burcin; Yuekselen, Vahit

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We compared the accuracy and tolerability of intravenous contrast enhanced spiral computed tomography colonography (CTC) and optical colonoscopy (OC) for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic patients for colorectal neoplasia. Methods: A prospective study was performed in 48 patients with symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer. Spiral CTC was performed in supine and prone positions after colonic cleansing. The axial, 2D MPR and virtual endoluminal views were analyzed. Results of spiral CTC were compared with OC which was done within 15 days. The psychometric tolerance test was asked to be performed for both CTC and colonoscopy after the procedure. Results: Ten lesions in 9 of 48 patients were found in CTC and confirmed with OC. Two masses and eight polyps, consisted of 1 tubulovillous, 1 tubular, 2 villous adenoma, 4 adenomatous polyp, 4 adenocarcinoma, were identified. Lesion prevalence was 21%. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values were found 100%, 87%, 89%, 67% and 100%, respectively. Psychometric tolerance test showed that CTC significantly more comfortable comparing with OC (p = 0.00). CTC was the preferred method in 37% while OC was preferred in 6% of patients. In both techniques, the most unpleasant part was bowel cleansing. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced CTC is a highly accurate method in detecting colorectal lesions. Since the technique was found to be more comfortable and less time consuming compare to OE, it may be preferable in management of symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer.

  11. Accuracy of CT-guided joint aspiration in patients with suspected infection status post-total hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, Xavier; Garcia-Diez, Ana Isabel; Pomes, Jaime [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Bori, Guillem; Garcia, Sebastian; Gallart, Xavier; Martinez, Juan Carlos; Riba, Josep [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Soriano, Alex; Mensa, Josep [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Rios, Jose [Statistical Unit de Suport a la Estadistica I Metodologia IDIBAPS, Barcelona (Spain); Almela, Manel [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Microbiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    To determine the accuracy of guided computed tomography aspiration in the detection of septic hip prosthesis before surgery. Sixty-three patients (35 women and 28 men; age range, 29-86 years; mean age, 71 years) with clinically suspected septic hip prosthesis were prospectively studied with independent review board (IRB) approval. Volume and microbiological cultures of aspirated fluid and several computed tomography imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections, prosthetic acetabular malposition, and heterotopic ossification were analyzed. All patients underwent revision surgery and infection was finally diagnosed in 33 patients. Statistical comparative analysis was performed comparing computed tomography aspiration and surgical findings (95% CI; level of significance at P = 0.05 two-sided) with 70% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 84% accuracy, 100% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value. Using Fisher's exact test, the presence of periprosthetic fluid collections (P = 0.001), prosthetic acetabular malposition (P = 0.025) and aspirated fluid volume (P = 0.009) were significantly higher in infected than in non-infected prostheses, whereas heterotopic ossification was not (P = 0.429). Computed tomography aspiration is accurate to preoperatively diagnose septic hip prosthesis on the basis of volume and bacterial cultures of aspirated joint fluid. Furthermore, imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections and prosthetic acetabular malposition strongly suggest infected prosthesis. (orig.)

  12. Accuracy of CT-guided joint aspiration in patients with suspected infection status post-total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas, Xavier; Garcia-Diez, Ana Isabel; Pomes, Jaime; Bori, Guillem; Garcia, Sebastian; Gallart, Xavier; Martinez, Juan Carlos; Riba, Josep; Soriano, Alex; Mensa, Josep; Rios, Jose; Almela, Manel

    2011-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of guided computed tomography aspiration in the detection of septic hip prosthesis before surgery. Sixty-three patients (35 women and 28 men; age range, 29-86 years; mean age, 71 years) with clinically suspected septic hip prosthesis were prospectively studied with independent review board (IRB) approval. Volume and microbiological cultures of aspirated fluid and several computed tomography imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections, prosthetic acetabular malposition, and heterotopic ossification were analyzed. All patients underwent revision surgery and infection was finally diagnosed in 33 patients. Statistical comparative analysis was performed comparing computed tomography aspiration and surgical findings (95% CI; level of significance at P = 0.05 two-sided) with 70% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 84% accuracy, 100% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value. Using Fisher's exact test, the presence of periprosthetic fluid collections (P = 0.001), prosthetic acetabular malposition (P = 0.025) and aspirated fluid volume (P = 0.009) were significantly higher in infected than in non-infected prostheses, whereas heterotopic ossification was not (P = 0.429). Computed tomography aspiration is accurate to preoperatively diagnose septic hip prosthesis on the basis of volume and bacterial cultures of aspirated joint fluid. Furthermore, imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections and prosthetic acetabular malposition strongly suggest infected prosthesis. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of segmental enhancement inversion for diagnosis of renal oncocytoma at biphasic contrast enhanced CT: systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieda, Nicola; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Cao, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    To use systematic review to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of segmental enhancement inversion (SEI) at contrast-enhanced biphasic multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma. Several electronic databases were searched through October 2013. Two reviewers independently selected studies that met the inclusion criteria and extracted data. Study quality was assessed with the QUADAS-2 tool. The primary 2 x 2 data were investigated with forest plot and ROC plot of sensitivity and specificity. Four studies met the inclusion criteria (307 patients). Considerable heterogeneity between studies precluded meta-analysis. Two studies from the same group of investigators demonstrated reasonable diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 59-80 % and specificity 87-99 %), while two others did not (sensitivity 0-6 %, specificity 93-100 %). Possible reasons for this include timing of biphasic MDCT and methods of interpretation but not size of lesion. SEI is a specific imaging finding of renal oncocytoma with highly variable sensitivity. This substantial heterogeneity across studies and between institutions suggests that further validation of this imaging finding is necessary prior to application in clinical practice. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of segmental enhancement inversion for diagnosis of renal oncocytoma at biphasic contrast enhanced CT: systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Cao, Lilly [Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    To use systematic review to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of segmental enhancement inversion (SEI) at contrast-enhanced biphasic multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma. Several electronic databases were searched through October 2013. Two reviewers independently selected studies that met the inclusion criteria and extracted data. Study quality was assessed with the QUADAS-2 tool. The primary 2 x 2 data were investigated with forest plot and ROC plot of sensitivity and specificity. Four studies met the inclusion criteria (307 patients). Considerable heterogeneity between studies precluded meta-analysis. Two studies from the same group of investigators demonstrated reasonable diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 59-80 % and specificity 87-99 %), while two others did not (sensitivity 0-6 %, specificity 93-100 %). Possible reasons for this include timing of biphasic MDCT and methods of interpretation but not size of lesion. SEI is a specific imaging finding of renal oncocytoma with highly variable sensitivity. This substantial heterogeneity across studies and between institutions suggests that further validation of this imaging finding is necessary prior to application in clinical practice. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy of FNAC and CT in the differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumours in a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavín-Clavero, Marina A; Usón-Bouthelier, Tomás; Jariod-Ferrer, Úrsula M; Fernández-Larrañaga, Arancha; Pantilie, Bianca; Lobera-Molina, Fernando; Simón-Sanz, M Victoria; Nadal Cristóbal, Bartolomé

    Parotid tumours, in addition to the wide variety of types, are histologically complex. Differentiating between benign and malignant tumours in preoperative diagnosis is important in deciding the type of surgery required. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a simple, quick, low-cost, low-invasive and well-tolerated tool used in the preoperative diagnosis of these tumours. we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, predictive positive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of FNAC and computed tomography (CT) in the differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumours operated between 2010 to 2014 in the oral and maxillofacial surgery department of the University Hospital Miguel Servet. The sensitivity of FNAC is 50%, while the specificity is high, at 98.7%. FNAC offers high reliability in the diagnosis of malignant tumours, despite its low sensitivity. However, when the diagnosis is indeterminate or benign, other than pleomorphic adenoma or Whartin tumour, the reliability to exclude malignancy decreases. The low sensitivity of FNAC to differentiate malignant from benign parotid tumours, means that we cannot rule out other diagnostic tests, clinical symptoms and especially the intraoperative vision of each surgeon. Especially when the diagnosis is indeterminate. Nevertheless, it is a technique used in a systematised way and helps in pre-surgical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  16. Explaining Air and Water Transport in Undisturbed Soils By X-Ray CT Derived Macroporosity and CT- Number-Derived Matrix Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important to predict the fluxes of air, water and solutes through soil and understand soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) -derived parameters were evaluated as predictors of water, air and solute transport through soil....... Forty five soil columns (20-cm × 20-cm) were collected at an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark. The soil columns were scanned in a medical CT-scanner. Subsequent to this, non-reactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory together with measurements of air permeability (Ka...... is considered a robust indicator of preferential flow. Meanwhile, CT-derived limiting macro-porosity was the best predictor for Ka and log10Ksat. A best subsets regression analysis was performed combining macroporosity, limiting macroporosity and CTmatrix. The predictions of water and air flow improved using...

  17. Relocatable fixation systems in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Accuracy of serial CT scans and patient acceptance in a randomized design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theelen, A; Martens, J; Bosmans, G; Houben, R; Jager, J J; Rutten, I; Lambin, P; Minken, A W; Baumert, B G

    2012-01-01

    The goal was to provide a quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of three different fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy and to evaluate patients' acceptance for all fixations. A total of 16 consecutive patients with brain tumours undergoing fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SCRT) were enrolled after informed consent (Clinical trials.gov: NCT00181350). Fixation systems evaluated were the BrainLAB® mask, with and without custom made bite-block (fixations S and A) and a homemade neck support with bite-block (fixation B) based on the BrainLAB® frame. The sequence of measurements was evaluated in a randomized manner with a cross-over design and patients' acceptance by a questionnaire. The mean three-dimensional (3D) displacement and standard deviations were 1.16 ± 0.68 mm for fixation S, 1.92 ± 1.28 and 1.70 ± 0.83 mm for fixations A and B, respectively. There was a significant improvement of the overall alignment (3D vector) when using the standard fixation instead of fixation A or B in the craniocaudal direction (p = 0.037). Rotational deviations were significantly less for the standard fixation S in relation to fixations A (p = 0.005) and B (p = 0.03). EPI imaging with off-line correction further improved reproducibility. Five out of 8 patients preferred the neck support with the bite-block. The mask fixation system in conjunction with a bite-block is the most accurate fixation for SCRT reducing craniocaudal and rotational movements. Patients favoured the more comfortable but less accurate neck support. To optimize the accuracy of SCRT, additional regular portal imaging is warranted.

  18. Relocatable fixation systems in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Accuracy of serial CT scans and patient acceptance in a randomized design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theelen, A.; Martens, J.; Bosmans, G.; Houben, R.; Jager, J.J.; Rutten, I.; Lambin, P.; Baumert, B.G.; Minken, A.W.; Radiotherapeutic Inst. RISO, Deventer

    2012-01-01

    The goal was to provide a quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of three different fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy and to evaluate patients' acceptance for all fixations. Methods A total of 16 consecutive patients with brain tumours undergoing fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SCRT) were enrolled after informed consent (Clinical trials.gov: NCT00181350). Fixation systems evaluated were the BrainLAB registered mask, with and without custom made bite-block (fixations S and A) and a homemade neck support with bite-block (fixation B) based on the BrainLAB registered frame. The sequence of measurements was evaluated in a randomized manner with a cross-over design and patients' acceptance by a questionnaire. Results The mean three-dimensional (3D) displacement and standard deviations were 1.16 ± 0.68 mm for fixation S, 1.92 ± 1.28 and 1.70 ± 0.83 mm for fixations A and B, respectively. There was a significant improvement of the overall alignment (3D vector) when using the standard fixation instead of fixation A or B in the craniocaudal direction (p = 0.037). Rotational deviations were significantly less for the standard fixation S in relation to fixations A (p = 0.005) and B (p = 0.03). EPI imaging with off-line correction further improved reproducibility. Five out of 8 patients preferred the neck support with the bite-block. Conclusion The mask fixation system in conjunction with a bite-block is the most accurate fixation for SCRT reducing craniocaudal and rotational movements. Patients favoured the more comfortable but less accurate neck support. To optimize the accuracy of SCRT, additional regular portal imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy and impact on management of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET/CT in colorectal liver metastasis: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rubello, Domenico [S.M. della Misericordia Hospital, PET Unit, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rovigo (Italy); Lopci, Egesta [Humanitas Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Giammarile, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud Biophysique, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France)

    2015-01-15

    The first aim of the review (aim 1) was to obtain the diagnostic performance values of {sup 18}F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), the second aim (aim 2) was to compare PET and conventional imaging modalities, and the third aim (aim 3) was to evaluate the impact of PET on patient management. The incidence of extrahepatic disease (EHD) detected by PET is also reviewed. A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE for studies evaluating PET and PET/CT in CRC patients with liver metastases up to June 2014. For inclusion PET had to have been performed prior to surgery, there had to be at least 18 patients in the study, and the reported data had to allow calculation of 2 x 2 contingency tables (for aim 1). A total of 18 studies were eligible for at least one of the three intended subanalyses including a total of 1,059 patients. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and accuracy and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals were derived from the contingency tables on a patient basis (patient-based analysis, PBA) and a lesion basis (lesion-based analysis, LBA) for eight studies. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET on PBA were both 93 %. Corresponding values for LBA were 60 % and 79 %, respectively. Areas under the summary ROC were 0.97 for PBA and 0.67 for LBA. Regarding aim 2, PET had a slightly lower sensitivity than MRI and CT on PBA (93 %, 100 % and 98 %, respectively) and LBA (66 %, 89 % and 79 %, respectively) but appeared to be more specific than MRI and CT (86 %, 81 % and 67 %, respectively). PET findings resulted in changes in the management of a mean of 24 % of patients. The mean incidence of PET-based EHD was 32 %. This meta-analysis suggests that FDG PET/CT is highly accurate for the detection of liver metastases on a patient basis but less accurate on a lesion basis. Compared to MRI, PET is less sensitive but more specific and affects the management of about one-quarter of patients

  20. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ Q ), electronic noise (σ E ), and view aliasing (σ view ). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N proj ), dose (D tot ), and voxel size (b vox ). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN proj at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N proj due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N proj proj due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f  β —and a general model of individual noise components (σ Q , σ E , and σ view ) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N proj , D tot , and b vox . Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN proj ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N proj than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis explicitly relates view aliasing and quantum noise in a manner that includes aspects of the object (“clutter”) and imaging chain

  1. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Sun Yi; Denis, Kathleen; Hassan, Bassam; Li Limin; Pauwels, Ruben; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  2. CT in neuromuscular disorders: A comparison of CT and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, A.M. van der; Thijssen, H.O.M.; Merx, J.L.; Joosten, E.

    1988-01-01

    The value of CT-examination of the muscles compared to histology was studied in a retrospective analysis of 30 patients with clinical suspicion of neuromuscular disorder. In the evaluation of the CT-results descriptive criteria were used. The histologic diagnosis came from needle-biopsies taken from the quadriceps muscle. Considering the whole group of neuromuscular disorders, CT has an overall accuracy of 84.8%, a positive predictive value of 95.5% and a negative predictive value of 63.6%. This makes the use of CT as a diagnostic tool in neuromuscular disorders a reliable examination technique. In patients with a polymyositis there is even a 100% correlation between CT findings and biopsy results. Discrepancy between the biopsy results is remarkable of the quadriceps muscle and the CT findings: The number of abnormal histological findings is twice the number of abnormal CT findings. Using the more proximal gluteal region as a biopsy site would have decreased this discrepancy and would therefore have given a better correlation between CT and histology. The choice of protocol in determining the levels to be scanned is of great importance in achieving good reproducability in follow-up CT examinations. (orig.)

  3. Relationship between accuracy and number of samples on statistical quantity and contour map of environmental gamma-ray dose rate. Example of random sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu; Minato, Susumu

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of statistical quantity like the mean value and contour map obtained by measurement of the environmental gamma-ray dose rate was evaluated by random sampling of 5 different model distribution maps made by the mean slope, -1.3, of power spectra calculated from the actually measured values. The values were derived from 58 natural gamma dose rate data reported worldwide ranging in the means of 10-100 Gy/h rates and 10 -3 -10 7 km 2 areas. The accuracy of the mean value was found around ±7% even for 60 or 80 samplings (the most frequent number) and the standard deviation had the accuracy less than 1/4-1/3 of the means. The correlation coefficient of the frequency distribution was found 0.860 or more for 200-400 samplings (the most frequent number) but of the contour map, 0.502-0.770. (K.H.)

  4. Obtaining the conversion curve of CT numbers to electron density from the effective energy of the CT using the dummy SEFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Viera Cueto, J. A.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Moreno Saiz, E. M.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Caudepon Moreno, F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain the conversion curve of Hounsfield units (A) versus electron densities using a mannequin with different tissue equivalent materials. This provides for the effective energy beam CT and is used to characterize the linear coefficients of absorption of different materials that comprise the dummy.

  5. Accuracy and feasibility of frameless stereotactic and robot-assisted CT-based puncture in interventional radiology. A comparative phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffner, R.; Widmann, G.; Bale, R.; Augschoell, C.; Boehler, D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of frameless stereotactic and robot-assisted puncture in vitro based on computed tomography (CT) imaging with a slice thickness of 1, 3, and 5 mm. Materials and Methods: 300 punctures were carried out with help of the Atlas aiming device guided by the optical navigation system Stealth Station TREONplus and 150 punctures were guided by the robotic assistance system Innomotion. Conically shaped rods were punctured with Kirschner wires. The accuracy was evaluated on the basis of control CTs by measuring the Euclidean distance between the wire tip and target and the normal distance between the target and wire. Results: With the Stealth Station a mean Euclidean distance of 1.94±0.912, 2.2±1.136, and 2.74±1.166 mm at a slice thickness of 1, 3 and 5 mm, respectively, was reached. The mean normal distance was 1.64±0.919, 1.84±1.189, and 2.48±1.196 mm, respectively. The Innomotion system resulted in a mean Euclidean distance of 1.69±0.772, 1.91±0.673, and 2.30±0.881 mm, respectively, while the mean normal distance was (1.42±0.78), 1.60±0.733, and 1.98±1.002 mm, respectively. A statistical significance between accuracies with both systems with 1 mm and 3 mm slices could not be detected (p > 0.05). At a slice thickness of 5 mm, the robot was significantly more accurate, but not as accurate as when using thinner slices (p < 0.05). The procedure time is longer for the Innomotion system (∝30 vs. ∝18 min), and the practicability is higher with the Stealth Station. (orig.)

  6. Interdependencies of acquisition, detection, and reconstruction techniques on the accuracy of iodine quantification in varying patient sizes employing dual-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Daniele; Pratts-Emanuelli, Jose J.; Mileto, Achille; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Nelson, Rendon C.; Boll, Daniel T. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Husarik, Daniela B. [University Hospital Zurich, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-03

    To assess the impact of patient habitus, acquisition parameters, detector efficiencies, and reconstruction techniques on the accuracy of iodine quantification using dual-source dual-energy CT (DECT). Two phantoms simulating small and large patients contained 20 iodine solutions mimicking vascular and parenchymal enhancement from saline isodensity to 400 HU and 30 iodine solutions simulating enhancement of the urinary collecting system from 400 to 2,000 HU. DECT acquisition (80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp) was performed using two DECT systems equipped with standard and integrated electronics detector technologies. DECT raw datasets were reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP), and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE I/V). Accuracy for iodine quantification was significantly higher for the small compared to the large phantoms (9.2 % ± 7.5 vs. 24.3 % ± 26.1, P = 0.0001), the integrated compared to the conventional detectors (14.8 % ± 20.6 vs. 18.8 % ± 20.4, respectively; P = 0.006), and SAFIRE V compared to SAFIRE I and FBP reconstructions (15.2 % ± 18.1 vs. 16.1 % ± 17.6 and 18.9 % ± 20.4, respectively; P ≤ 0.003). A significant synergism was observed when the most effective detector and reconstruction techniques were combined with habitus-adapted dual-energy pairs. In a second-generation dual-source DECT system, the accuracy of iodine quantification can be substantially improved by an optimal choice and combination of acquisition parameters, detector, and reconstruction techniques. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT and conventional angiography in detecting congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedaghat, Fariborz; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Motevalli, Marzieh; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Armand, Sandbad

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) is primarily used for coronary arteries. There are limited studies about the application of DSCT for congenital heart diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of DSCT in the cardiac anomalies. The images of DSCTs and conventional angiographies of 36 patients (21 male; mean age: 8.5 month) with congenital heart diseases were reviewed and the parameters of diagnostic value of these methods were compared. Cardiac surgery was the gold standard. A total of 105 cardiac anomalies were diagnosed at surgery. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of DSCT were 98.25%, 97.9%, 98.1%, 99.07%, and 98.2%, respectively. The corresponding values of angiography were 95.04%, 98.7%, 97.8%, 98.1%, and 98%, respectively. Only one atrial septal defect (ASD) and two patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were missed by DSCT. Angiography missed two ASD and two PDA. DSCT also provided important additional findings (n=35) about the intrathoracic or intraabdominal organs. DSCT is a highly accurate diagnostic modality for congenital heart diseases, obviating the need for invasive modalities. Beside its noninvasive nature, the advantage of DSCT over the angiography is its ability to provide detailed anatomical information about the heart, vessels, lungs and intraabdominal organs

  8. Assessment of the accuracy of a Bayesian estimation algorithm for perfusion CT by using a digital phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Goodwin, Jonathan; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Yamashita, Fumio; Boutelier, Timothe; Pautot, Fabrice; Christensen, Soren

    2013-01-01

    A new deconvolution algorithm, the Bayesian estimation algorithm, was reported to improve the precision of parametric maps created using perfusion computed tomography. However, it remains unclear whether quantitative values generated by this method are more accurate than those generated using optimized deconvolution algorithms of other software packages. Hence, we compared the accuracy of the Bayesian and deconvolution algorithms by using a digital phantom. The digital phantom data, in which concentration-time curves reflecting various known values for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), and tracer delays were embedded, were analyzed using the Bayesian estimation algorithm as well as delay-insensitive singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms of two software packages that were the best benchmarks in a previous cross-validation study. Correlation and agreement of quantitative values of these algorithms with true values were examined. CBF, CBV, and MTT values estimated by all the algorithms showed strong correlations with the true values (r = 0.91-0.92, 0.97-0.99, and 0.91-0.96, respectively). In addition, the values generated by the Bayesian estimation algorithm for all of these parameters showed good agreement with the true values [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.90, 0.99, and 0.96, respectively], while MTT values from the SVD algorithms were suboptimal (ICC = 0.81-0.82). Quantitative analysis using a digital phantom revealed that the Bayesian estimation algorithm yielded CBF, CBV, and MTT maps strongly correlated with the true values and MTT maps with better agreement than those produced by delay-insensitive SVD algorithms. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of the accuracy of a Bayesian estimation algorithm for perfusion CT by using a digital phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Goodwin, Jonathan; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Yahaba (Japan); Boutelier, Timothe; Pautot, Fabrice [Olea Medical, Department of Research and Innovation, La Ciotat (France); Christensen, Soren [University of Melbourne, Department of Neurology and Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    A new deconvolution algorithm, the Bayesian estimation algorithm, was reported to improve the precision of parametric maps created using perfusion computed tomography. However, it remains unclear whether quantitative values generated by this method are more accurate than those generated using optimized deconvolution algorithms of other software packages. Hence, we compared the accuracy of the Bayesian and deconvolution algorithms by using a digital phantom. The digital phantom data, in which concentration-time curves reflecting various known values for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), and tracer delays were embedded, were analyzed using the Bayesian estimation algorithm as well as delay-insensitive singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms of two software packages that were the best benchmarks in a previous cross-validation study. Correlation and agreement of quantitative values of these algorithms with true values were examined. CBF, CBV, and MTT values estimated by all the algorithms showed strong correlations with the true values (r = 0.91-0.92, 0.97-0.99, and 0.91-0.96, respectively). In addition, the values generated by the Bayesian estimation algorithm for all of these parameters showed good agreement with the true values [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.90, 0.99, and 0.96, respectively], while MTT values from the SVD algorithms were suboptimal (ICC = 0.81-0.82). Quantitative analysis using a digital phantom revealed that the Bayesian estimation algorithm yielded CBF, CBV, and MTT maps strongly correlated with the true values and MTT maps with better agreement than those produced by delay-insensitive SVD algorithms. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-J-271: Correlation of CT Number Change with Radiation Treatment Response for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalah, E; Tai, A; Oshima, K; Hall, W; Knechtges, P; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that radiation can induce CT number (CTN) change during radiation therapy (RT) delivery. In the effort to explore whether CTN can be used to assess RT response, we analyze the relationship between the pathological treatment response (PTR) and the changes of CTN, MRI, and PET before and after the neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The preand post-nCR CT, MRI, and PET data for a total of 8 patients with resectable, or borderline resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated with nCR were retrospectively analyzed. Radiographic characteristics were correlated to PTR data. The histograms, means and standard derivations (SD) of the CTNs in pancreatic head (CTNPH), the GTV defined by ADC (CTNGTV), and the rest of pancreatic head (CTNPH-CTNGTV) were compared. Changes before and after nCR were correlated with the corresponding changes of ADC, lean body mass normalized SUV (SUVlb), and PTR using Pearson’ s correlation coefficient test. Results: The average mean and SD in CTPH for all the patients analyzed were higher in post-nCR (53.17 ± 31.05 HU) compared to those at pre-nCR (28.09 ± 4.253 HU). The CTNGTV were generally higher than CTNPH and CTNPH-CTNGTV, though the differences were not significant. The post-nCR changes of mean CTN, ADC, and SUVlb values in pancreatic head were correlated with PTR (R=0.3273/P=0.5357, R=−0.5455/P<0.0001, and R=0.7638/P=0.0357, respectively). The mean difference in the maximum tumor dimension measured from CTN, ADC, and SUVlb as compared with pathological measurements was −2.1, −0.5, and 0.22 cm, respectively. Conclusion: The radiation-induced change of CTN in pancreas head after chemoradiation therapy of pancreatic cancer was observed, which may be related to treatment responses as assessed by biological imaging and pathology. More data are needed to determine whether the CTN can be used as a quantitative biomarker for response to neoadjuvant therapy.

  11. Accuracy and inter-observer variability of 3D versus 4D cone-beam CT based image-guidance in SBRT for lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney Reinhart A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the accuracy and inter-observer variability of image-guidance (IG using 3D or 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT technology in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors. Materials and methods Twenty-one consecutive patients treated with image-guided SBRT for primary and secondary lung tumors were basis for this study. A respiration correlated 4D-CT and planning contours served as reference for all IG techniques. Three IG techniques were performed independently by three radiation oncologists (ROs and three radiotherapy technicians (RTTs. Image-guidance using respiration correlated 4D-CBCT (IG-4D with automatic registration of the planning 4D-CT and the verification 4D-CBCT was considered gold-standard. Results were compared with two IG techniques using 3D-CBCT: 1 manual registration of the planning internal target volume (ITV contour and the motion blurred tumor in the 3D-CBCT (IG-ITV; 2 automatic registration of the planning reference CT image and the verification 3D-CBCT (IG-3D. Image quality of 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT images was scored on a scale of 1–3, with 1 being best and 3 being worst quality for visual verification of the IGRT results. Results Image quality was scored significantly worse for 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: the worst score of 3 was given in 19 % and 7.1 % observations, respectively. Significant differences in target localization were observed between 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT based IG: compared to the reference of IG-4D, tumor positions differed by 1.9 mm ± 0.9 mm (3D vector on average using IG-ITV and by 3.6 mm ± 3.2 mm using IG-3D; results of IG-ITV were significantly closer to the reference IG-4D compared to IG-3D. Differences between the 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT techniques increased significantly with larger motion amplitude of the tumor; analogously, differences increased with worse 3D-CBCT image quality scores. Inter-observer variability was largest in SI direction and was

  12. Development of re-locatable head frame system using hydraulic arms for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and CT evaluation of repositioning accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masayuki; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ando, Yutaka; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Shiba, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel re-locatable head frame system consisting of a dental cast and hydraulic arms as an immobilization device for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and to evaluate the repositioning accuracy by measurement of landmark coordinates in repeated computed tomography (CT) examinations. The acrylic dental casts were customized for each patient. First the dental cast was attached to the upper jaw of the patient, then the dental cast was connected to a Leksell stereotactic frame, which was finally secured by two hydraulic arms. Since this system is compatible with the Leksell frame, stereotactic indicators could be used to obtain coordinates of anatomical landmarks of the head. Seven patients treated by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy underwent repeated quality-assurance CTs during their treatment courses. We evaluated the coordinates of the short process of incus and the top of crista galli as reference points for evaluation of variation in a total of 26 repeat CT data sets, and then x, y, and z fluctuations relative to their positions in the treatment-planning CTs. The distances among the reference points of both processes of incus and the top of crista galli were calculated to evaluate the feasibility of the method. The distances were less than 0.5 mm on averages and less than 1 mm in the standard deviations. The respective fluctuations in the x, y and z directions were less than 1 mm in mean values and less than 2 mm in standard deviations. The fluctuations in distance were less than 2 mm on average and in standard deviations. The fluctuation of the center of three reference points was 0.7 mm on average and the rotation of the cranium was 1.0 degree in average. We concluded that our evaluation method is feasible and the reproducibility of the fixation system is acceptable for its routine use in stereotactic radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Increasing the Accuracy of Volume and ADC Delineation for Heterogeneous Tumor on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Correlation with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Nan-Jie [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Chun-Sing, E-mail: drcswong@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Yiu-Ching [Department of Radiology, Kwong Wah Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Guo, Hua [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Huang, Bingsheng [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a method based on thresholding both the b0 images and the ADC maps. Methods and Materials: In 21 heterogeneous lesions from patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), gross lesion were manually contoured, and corresponding volumes and ADCs were denoted as gross tumor volume (GTV) and gross ADC (ADC{sub g}), respectively. Using a k-means clustering algorithm, the probable high-cellularity tumor tissues were selected based on b0 images and ADC maps. ADC and volume of the tissues selected using the proposed method were denoted as thresholded ADC (ADC{sub thr}) and high-cellularity tumor volume (HCTV), respectively. The metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) was measured using 40% maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the lower threshold, and corresponding mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) was also measured. Results: HCTV had excellent concordance with MTV according to Pearson's correlation (r=0.984, P<.001) and linear regression (slope = 1.085, intercept = −4.731). In contrast, GTV overestimated the volume and differed significantly from MTV (P=.005). ADC{sub thr} correlated significantly and strongly with SUV{sub mean} (r=−0.807, P<.001) and SUV{sub max} (r=−0.843, P<.001); both were stronger than those of ADC{sub g}. Conclusions: The proposed lesion-adaptive semiautomatic method can help segment high-cellularity tissues that match hypermetabolic tissues in PET/CT and enables more accurate volume and ADC delineation on diffusion-weighted MR images of GIST.

  14. Accuracy of a clinical PET/CT vs. a preclinical μPET system for monitoring treatment effects in tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Karin [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Winz, Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Rix, Anne; Bzyl, Jessica [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F.; Verburg, Frederic A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Academic Radiology Baden Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Small animal imaging is of growing importance for preclinical research and drug development. Tumour xenografts implanted in mice can be visualized with a clinical PET/CT (cPET); however, it is unclear whether early treatment effects can be monitored. Thus, we investigated the accuracy of a cPET versus a preclinical μPET using {sup 18}F-FDG for assessing early treatment effects. Materials and methods: The spatial resolution and the quantitative accuracy of a clinical and preclinical PET were evaluated in phantom experiments. To investigate the sensitivity for assessing treatment response, A431 tumour xenografts were implanted in nude mice. Glucose metabolism was measured in untreated controls and in two therapy groups (either one or four days of antiangiogenic treatment). Data was validated by γ-counting of explanted tissues. Results: In phantom experiments, cPET enabled reliable separation of boreholes ≥ 5 mm whereas μPET visualized boreholes ≥ 2 mm. In animal studies, μPET provided significantly higher tumour-to-muscle ratios for untreated control tumours than cPET (3.41 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± .0.28, respectively; p < 0.01). During treatment, cPET detected significant therapy effects at day 4 (p < 0.05) whereas μPET revealed highly significant therapy effects even at day one (p < 0.01). Correspondingly, γ-counting of explanted tumours indicated significant therapy effects at day one and highly significant treatment response at day 4. Correlation with γ-counting was good for cPET (r = 0.74; p < 0.01) and excellent for μPET (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Clinical PET is suited to investigate tumour xenografts ≥ 5 mm at an advanced time-point of treatment. For imaging smaller tumours or for the sensitive assessment of very early therapy effects, μPET should be preferred.

  15. CTC-ask: a new algorithm for conversion of CT numbers to tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculations applying DICOM RS knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Rickard; Behrens, Claus F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the building blocks in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning is to convert patient CT data to MC compatible phantoms, consisting of density and media matrices. The resulting dose distribution is highly influenced by the accuracy of the conversion. Two major contributing factors are precise c...... outside of the lungs for the two cases studied, respectively. This was completely avoided by CTC-ask. CTC-ask is able to reduce anatomically irrational media assignment. The CTC-ask source code can be made available upon request to the authors....

  16. Over-deterministic method: The influence of rounding numbers on the accuracy of the values of williams’ expansion terms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, V.; Malíková, Lucie; Seitl, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 42 (2017), s. 128-135 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01589S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Over-deterministic * Fracture mechanics * Rounding numbers * Stress field * Williams’ expansion Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  17. Stable measures of number sense accuracy in math learning disability: Is it time to proceed from basic science to clinical application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júlio-Costa, Annelise; Starling-Alves, Isabella; Lopes-Silva, Júlia Beatriz; Wood, Guilherme; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2015-12-01

    Math learning disability (MLD) or developmental dyscalculia is a highly prevalent and persistent difficulty in learning arithmetic that may be explained by different cognitive mechanisms. The accuracy of the number sense has been implicated by some evidence as a core deficit in MLD. However, research on this topic has been mainly conducted in demographically selected samples, using arbitrary cut-off scores to characterize MLD. The clinical relevance of the association between number sense and MLD remains to be investigated. In this study, we aimed at assessing the stability of a number sense accuracy measure (w) across five experimental sessions, in two clinically defined cases of MLD. Stable measures of number sense accuracy estimate are required to clinically characterize subtypes of MLD and to make theoretical inferences regarding the underlying cognitive mechanisms. G. A. was a 10-year-old boy with MLD in the context of dyslexia and phonological processing impairment and his performance remained steadily in the typical scores range. The performance of H. V., a 9-year-old girl with MLD associated with number sense inaccuracy, remained consistently impaired across measurements, with a nonsignificant tendency to worsen. Qualitatively, H. V.'s performance was also characterized by greater variability across sessions. Concomitant clinical observations suggested that H. V.'s difficulties could be aggravated by developing symptoms of mathematics anxiety. Results in these two cases are in line with the hypotheses that at least two reliable patterns of cognitive impairment may underlie math learning difficulties in MLD, one related to number sense inaccuracy and the other to phonological processing impairment. Additionally, it indicates the need for more translational research in order to examine the usefulness and validity of theoretical advances in numerical cognition to the clinical neuropsychological practice with MLD. © 2015 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese

  18. Effects of CT Number-Derived Matrix Density on Preferential Flow 1 and Transport in a Macroporous Agricultural Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Moldrup, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    risks to public health. This study was focused on establishing links between the structural pore space and preferential transport using a combination of standard physical measurement methods for air and water permeabilities, breakthrough experiments, and X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) on large soil...... columns. Substantial structural heterogeneity that resulted in significant variations of flow and tracer transport was observed, despite the textural similarity of investigated samples. Quantification of macropore characteristics with X-ray CT was useful but not sufficient to explain the variability...

  19. Determination of the integrated CT number of the whole liver in patients with severe hepatitis. As an indicator of the functional reserve of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumahara, Tadashi; Muto, Yasutoshi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yoshida, Takashi; Tomita, Eiichi (Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the functional reserve of the liver of patients with severe hepatitis by computed tomography (CT), in particular employing the integrated CT number of the whole liver (ICTN). ICTN was calculated by integrating the product of 'area' times 'mean CT number' of the liver in each CT slice for the entire height of the liver. The following results were obtained: (1) In patients with fulminant hepatitis (FH) as well as those with subacute hepatitis (SAH), ICTN was found to be significantly lower as compared to that of patients with acute hepatitis (AH) or non-hepatic diseases. In addition, in FH and SAH patients, ICTN showed a larger degree of decrease when compared with such conventional parameters as either estimated liver volume or mean hepatic CT number. Thus, ICTN seems to more sensitively reflect the changes in functional reserve of the liver. (2) ICTN showed significant positive correlations with prothrombin time and plasma BCAA/AAA ratio, and a significant negative correlation with plasma methionine level. (3) Time course of changes in ICTN correlated well with the clinical features of severe hepatitis. In particular, patients with initial ICTN values above 20 lcenter dotHU/m/sup 2/ of body surface area showed significantly higher survival rate than those with initial ICTN below 20. In conclusion, ICTN well indicates the functional reserve of the liver, and is further suggested to be valuable as a parameter to predict the prognosis of patients with severe hepatitis. (author).

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign pleural lesions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Sadeghi, Ramin; Annunziata, Salvatore; Lococo, Filippo; Cafarotti, Stefano; Bertagna, Francesco; Prior, John O; Ceriani, Luca; Giovanella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyze published data about the diagnostic accuracy of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign pleural lesions. A comprehensive literature search of studies published through June 2013 regarding the diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of pleural lesions was carried out. All retrieved studies were reviewed and qualitatively analyzed. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+ and LR-) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of (18)F-FDG-PET or PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of pleural lesions on a per-patient-based analysis were calculated. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to measure the accuracy of these methods. Subanalyses considering device used (PET or PET/CT) were performed. Sixteen studies including 745 patients were included in the systematic review. The meta-analysis of 11 selected studies provided the following results: sensitivity 95% (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 92-97%), specificity 82% (95%CI: 76-88%), LR+ 5.3 (95%CI: 2.4-11.8), LR- 0.09 (95%CI: 0.05-0.14), DOR 74 (95%CI: 34-161). The AUC was 0.95. No significant improvement of the diagnostic accuracy considering PET/CT studies only was found. (18)F-FDG-PET and PET/CT demonstrated to be accurate diagnostic imaging methods in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign pleural lesions; nevertheless, possible sources of false-negative and false-positive results should be kept in mind. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose versus ultra-low-dose CT for lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis in patients with low back pain with MRI correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Yun, Seong Jong; Jo, Hyeon Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyeon; Song, Jae Gwang; Park, Yong Sung

    2018-01-01

    To compare the image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic performance between low-dose (LD) and ultra-low-dose (ULD) lumbar-spine (L-spine) CT with iterative reconstruction (IR) for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 260 patients with chronic LBP who underwent L-spine CT between November 2015 and September 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Of these, 143 underwent LD-CT with IR and 117 underwent ULD-CT with IR. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into BMI1 (<22.9 kg/m 2 ), BMI2 (23.0-24.9 kg/m 2 ), and BMI3 (≥25 kg/m 2 ) groups. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), qualitative image quality, and final diagnoses (lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis). L-spine MRIs interpreted by consensus were used as the reference standard. All data were statistically analyzed. ULD protocol showed significantly lower SNR for all patients (p < 0.001) except the vertebral bodies and lower qualitative image quality for BMI3 patients (p ≤ 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference between ULD (sensitivity, 95.1-98.1%; specificity, 92.5-98.7%; accuracy, 94.6-98.0%) and LD protocols (sensitivity, 95.6-100%; specificity, 95.5-98.9%; accuracy, 97.4-98.1%), (all p≥0.1) in the BMI1 and BMI2; while dose was 60-68% lower with the ULD protocol. Interobserver agreements were excellent or good with regard to image quality and final diagnoses. For the BM1 and BMI2 groups, ULD-CT provided an acceptable image quality and exhibited a diagnostic accuracy similar to that of LD-CT. These findings suggest that it is a useful diagnostic tool for patients with chronic LBP who exhibit a BMI of <25 kg/m 2 . (orig.)

  2. The effects of sweep numbers per average and protocol type on the accuracy of the p300-based concealed information test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Ariana B; Hu, Xiaoqing; Rosenfeld, J Peter

    2014-03-01

    In the first of two experiments, we compared the accuracy of the P300 concealed information test protocol as a function of numbers of trials experienced by subjects and ERP averages analyzed by investigators. Contrary to Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), we found no evidence that 100 trial based averages are more accurate than 66 or 33 trial based averages (all numbers led to accuracies of 84-94 %). There was actually a trend favoring the lowest trial numbers. The second study compared numbers of irrelevant stimuli recalled and recognized in the 3-stimulus protocol versus the complex trial protocol (Rosenfeld in Memory detection: theory and application of the concealed information test, Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 63-89, 2011). Again, in contrast to expectations from Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), there were no differences between protocols, although there were more irrelevant stimuli recognized than recalled, and irrelevant 4-digit number group stimuli were neither recalled nor recognized as well as irrelevant city name stimuli. We therefore conclude that stimulus processing in the P300-based complex trial protocol-with no more than 33 sweep averages-is adequate to allow accurate detection of concealed information.

  3. Screening for lung cancer with digital chest radiography: sensitivity and number of secondary work-up CT examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Gietema, Hester A.; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram; van Klaveren, Rob J.; Prokop, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the performance of digital chest radiography for detection of lung cancer. The study had ethics committee approval, and a nested case-control design was used and included 55 patients with lung cancer detected at computed tomography (CT) and confirmed with histologic examination and a

  4. Development and validation of an automated and marker-free CT-based spatial analysis method (CTSA) for assessment of femoral hip implant migration: In vitro accuracy and precision comparable to that of radiostereometric analysis (RSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerlinck, Thierry; Polfliet, Mathias; Deklerck, Rudi; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef

    2016-01-01

    We developed a marker-free automated CT-based spatial analysis (CTSA) method to detect stem-bone migration in consecutive CT datasets and assessed the accuracy and precision in vitro. Our aim was to demonstrate that in vitro accuracy and precision of CTSA is comparable to that of radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Stem and bone were segmented in 2 CT datasets and both were registered pairwise. The resulting rigid transformations were compared and transferred to an anatomically sound coordinate system, taking the stem as reference. This resulted in 3 translation parameters and 3 rotation parameters describing the relative amount of stem-bone displacement, and it allowed calculation of the point of maximal stem migration. Accuracy was evaluated in 39 comparisons by imposing known stem migration on a stem-bone model. Precision was estimated in 20 comparisons based on a zero-migration model, and in 5 patients without stem loosening. Limits of the 95% tolerance intervals (TIs) for accuracy did not exceed 0.28 mm for translations and 0.20° for rotations (largest standard deviation of the signed error (SD(SE)): 0.081 mm and 0.057°). In vitro, limits of the 95% TI for precision in a clinically relevant setting (8 comparisons) were below 0.09 mm and 0.14° (largest SD(SE): 0.012 mm and 0.020°). In patients, the precision was lower, but acceptable, and dependent on CT scan resolution. CTSA allows detection of stem-bone migration with an accuracy and precision comparable to that of RSA. It could be valuable for evaluation of subtle stem loosening in clinical practice.

  5. Impact of mesh points number on the accuracy of deterministic calculations of control rods worth for Tehran research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boustani, Ehsan; Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran; Khakshournia, Samad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for calculation of the control rods worth of the Tehran research reactor. For the deterministic approach the MTRPC package composed of the WIMS code and diffusion code CITVAP was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was applied. On comparing our results obtained by the Monte Carlo approach and those previously reported in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of Tehran research reactor produced by the deterministic approach large discrepancies were seen. To uncover the root cause of these discrepancies, some efforts were made and finally was discerned that the number of spatial mesh points in the deterministic approach was the critical cause of these discrepancies. Therefore, the mesh optimization was performed for different regions of the core such that the results of deterministic approach based on the optimized mesh points have a good agreement with those obtained by the Monte Carlo approach.

  6. Impact of mesh points number on the accuracy of deterministic calculations of control rods worth for Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boustani, Ehsan [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Engineering and Physics Dept.; Khakshournia, Samad [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Engineering and Physics Dept.

    2016-12-15

    In this paper two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for calculation of the control rods worth of the Tehran research reactor. For the deterministic approach the MTRPC package composed of the WIMS code and diffusion code CITVAP was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was applied. On comparing our results obtained by the Monte Carlo approach and those previously reported in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of Tehran research reactor produced by the deterministic approach large discrepancies were seen. To uncover the root cause of these discrepancies, some efforts were made and finally was discerned that the number of spatial mesh points in the deterministic approach was the critical cause of these discrepancies. Therefore, the mesh optimization was performed for different regions of the core such that the results of deterministic approach based on the optimized mesh points have a good agreement with those obtained by the Monte Carlo approach.

  7. Accuracy and differential bias in copy number measurement of CCL3L1 in association studies with three auto-immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Walker, Susan; Prescott, Natalie; Schalkwijk, Joost; Armour, John Al

    2011-08-18

    Copy number variation (CNV) contributes to the variation observed between individuals and can influence human disease progression, but the accurate measurement of individual copy numbers is technically challenging. In the work presented here we describe a modification to a previously described paralogue ratio test (PRT) method for genotyping the CCL3L1/CCL4L1 copy variable region, which we use to ascertain CCL3L1/CCL4L1 copy number in 1581 European samples. As the products of CCL3L1 and CCL4L1 potentially play a role in autoimmunity we performed case control association studies with Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis clinical cohorts. We evaluate the PRT methodology used, paying particular attention to accuracy and precision, and highlight the problems of differential bias in copy number measurements. Our PRT methods for measuring copy number were of sufficient precision to detect very slight but systematic differential bias between results from case and control DNA samples in one study. We find no evidence for an association between CCL3L1 copy number and Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis. Differential bias of this small magnitude, but applied systematically across large numbers of samples, would create a serious risk of false positive associations in copy number, if measured using methods of lower precision, or methods relying on single uncorroborated measurements. In this study the small differential bias detected by PRT in one sample set was resolved by a simple pre-treatment by restriction enzyme digestion.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem CT with targeted coronary angiography versus autopsy for coroner-requested post-mortem investigations: a prospective, masked, comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutty, Guy N; Morgan, Bruno; Robinson, Claire; Raj, Vimal; Pakkal, Mini; Amoroso, Jasmin; Visser, Theresa; Saunders, Sarah; Biggs, Mike; Hollingbury, Frances; McGregor, Angus; West, Kevin; Richards, Cathy; Brown, Laurence; Harrison, Rebecca; Hew, Roger

    2017-07-08

    England and Wales have one of the highest frequencies of autopsy in the world. Implementation of post-mortem CT (PMCT), enhanced with targeted coronary angiography (PMCTA), in adults to avoid invasive autopsy would have cultural, religious, and potential economic benefits. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of PMCTA as a first-line technique in post-mortem investigations. In this single-centre (Leicester, UK), prospective, controlled study, we selected cases of natural and non-suspicious unnatural death referred to Her Majesty's (HM) Coroners. We excluded cases younger than 18 years, known to have had a transmittable disease, or who weighed more than 125 kg. Each case was assessed by PMCTA, followed by autopsy. Pathologists were masked to the PMCTA findings, unless a potential risk was shown. The primary endpoint was the accuracy of the cause of death diagnosis from PMCTA against a gold standard of autopsy findings, modified by PMCTA findings only if additional substantially incontrovertible findings were identified. Between Jan 20, 2010, and Sept 13, 2012, we selected 241 cases, for which PMCTA was successful in 204 (85%). Seven cases were excluded from the analysis because of procedural unmasking or no autopsy data, as were 24 cases with a clear diagnosis of traumatic death before investigation; 210 cases were included. In 40 (19%) cases, predictable toxicology or histology testing accessible by PMCT informed the result. PMCTA provided a cause of death in 193 (92%) cases. A major discrepancy with the gold standard was noted in 12 (6%) cases identified by PMCTA, and in nine (5%) cases identified by autopsy (because of specific findings on PMCTA). The frequency of autopsy and PMCTA discrepancies were not significantly different (p=0·65 for major discrepancies and p=0·21 for minor discrepancies). Cause of death given by PMCTA did not overlook clinically significant trauma, occupational lung disease, or reportable disease, and did not significantly affect

  9. Effect of Small Numbers of Test Results on Accuracy of Hoek-Brown Strength Parameter Estimations: A Statistical Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgzadeh, Nezam; Yanagimura, Yoko; Harrison, John P.

    2017-12-01

    The Hoek-Brown empirical strength criterion for intact rock is widely used as the basis for estimating the strength of rock masses. Estimations of the intact rock H-B parameters, namely the empirical constant m and the uniaxial compressive strength σc, are commonly obtained by fitting the criterion to triaxial strength data sets of small sample size. This paper investigates how such small sample sizes affect the uncertainty associated with the H-B parameter estimations. We use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to generate data sets of different sizes and different combinations of H-B parameters, and then investigate the uncertainty in H-B parameters estimated from these limited data sets. We show that the uncertainties depend not only on the level of variability but also on the particular combination of parameters being investigated. As particular combinations of H-B parameters can informally be considered to represent specific rock types, we discuss that as the minimum number of required samples depends on rock type it should correspond to some acceptable level of uncertainty in the estimations. Also, a comparison of the results from our analysis with actual rock strength data shows that the probability of obtaining reliable strength parameter estimations using small samples may be very low. We further discuss the impact of this on ongoing implementation of reliability-based design protocols and conclude with suggestions for improvements in this respect.

  10. Diagnostic test accuracy study of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT, 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate SPECT/CT, and planar bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Randi F; Zacho, Helle D; Langkilde, Niels C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare planar, bone scan (BS) versus SPECT/CT and NaF PET/CT in detecting bone metastases in prostate cancer. Thirty-seven consecutive, newly diagnosed, prostate cancer patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels ≥ 50 ng/mL and who were...... considered eligible for androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) were included in this study. BS, SPECT/CT, and NaF PET/CT, were performed prior to treatment and were repeated after six months of ADT. Baseline images from each index test were independently read by two experienced readers. The reference standard......%, and 96%, respectively, and the negative predictive values were 60%, 77% and 75%, respectively. No statistically significant difference among the three imaging modalities was observed. All three imaging modalities showed high sensitivity and specificity. NaF PET/CT and SPECT/CT showed numerically improved...

  11. The accuracy of three-dimensional fused deposition modeling (FDM) compared with three-dimensional CT-Scans on the measurement of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitri, I. T.; Badri, C.; Sulistyani, L. D.

    2017-08-01

    Presurgical treatment planning plays an important role in the reconstruction and correction of defects in the craniomaxillofacial region. The advance of solid freeform fabrication techniques has significantly improved the process of preparing a biomodel using computer-aided design and data from medical imaging. Many factors are implicated in the accuracy of the 3D model. To determine the accuracy of three-dimensional fused deposition modeling (FDM) models compared with three-dimensional CT scans in the measurement of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle. Eight 3D models were produced from the CT scan data (DICOM file) of eight patients at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Three measurements were done three times by two examiners. The measurements of the 3D CT scans were made using OsiriX software, while the measurements of the 3D models were made using a digital caliper and goniometry. The measurement results were then compared. There is no significant difference between the measurements of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle using 3D CT scans and FDM 3D models. FDM 3D models are considered accurate and are acceptable for clinical applications in dental and craniomaxillofacial surgery.

  12. The accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in predicting the pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. A meta-analysis and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Fangfang; Shen, Guohua; Diao, Wei; Jia, Zhiyun [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Deng, Yunfu [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Oncology, Chengdu (China)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in predicting the pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in breast cancer (BC) patients. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library (Central), and the Web of Science (SCI-Expanded) were systematically searched to identify pertinent studies. The methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to explore the existence of a threshold effect. Heterogeneity was assessed by the likelihood ratio I {sup 2} index. The pooled values calculated with a mixed-effects model for the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were 81.9% (76.0-86.6%), 79.3% (72.1-85.1%) and 17.35 (10.98-27.42), respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a moderate accuracy in predicting the pathological response during the early process of NAC in breast cancer patients. To increase the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in monitoring the therapy response, future prospective studies are needed to explore how chemotherapy regimens and different subtypes affect the levels of glucose metabolism. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic test accuracy study of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT, 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate SPECT/CT, and planar bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Randi F; Zacho, Helle D; Langkilde, Niels C

    2017-01-01

    %, and 96%, respectively, and the negative predictive values were 60%, 77% and 75%, respectively. No statistically significant difference among the three imaging modalities was observed. All three imaging modalities showed high sensitivity and specificity. NaF PET/CT and SPECT/CT showed numerically improved...

  14. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT: A lesion-by-lesion analysis in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnebeek, S. van; Vanbilloen, B.; Baete, K.; Terwinghe, C.; Koole, M.; Mortelmans, L. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Mottaghy, F.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Clement, P.M. [KU Leuven, Medical Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaerts, K. [KU Leuven and UHasselt, Department of Public Health and Primary Care (I-BioStat), Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, K. [KU Leuven, Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [University Hospitals Leuven, Pulmonology, Leuven (Belgium); Cutsem, E. van; Verslype, C. [KU Leuven, Division of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, A. [KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C.M. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with metastatic-neuroendocrine tumour (NET) scheduled for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Incremental lesions (ILs) were defined as lesions observed on only one modality. Fifty-three metastatic-NET-patients underwent {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy (24 h post-injection; planar+single-photon emission CT (SPECT) abdomen) and whole-body {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. SPECT and PET were compared in a lesion-by-lesion and organ-by-organ analysis, determining the total lesions and ILs for both modalities. Significantly more lesions were detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT versus {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy. More specifically, we observed 1,098 lesions on PET/CT (range: 1-105; median: 15) versus 660 on SPECT (range: 0-73, median: 9) (p<0.0001), with 439 PET-ILs (42/53 patients) and one SPECT-IL (1/53 patients). The sensitivity for PET/CT was 99.9 % (95 % CI, 99.3-100.0), for SPECT 60.0 % (95 % CI, 48.5-70.2). The organ-by-organ analysis showed that the PET-ILs were most frequently visualized in liver and skeleton. Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT is superior for the detection of NET-metastases compared to {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy and differential bias in copy number measurement of CCL3L1 in association studies with three auto-immune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Danielle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variation (CNV contributes to the variation observed between individuals and can influence human disease progression, but the accurate measurement of individual copy numbers is technically challenging. In the work presented here we describe a modification to a previously described paralogue ratio test (PRT method for genotyping the CCL3L1/CCL4L1 copy variable region, which we use to ascertain CCL3L1/CCL4L1 copy number in 1581 European samples. As the products of CCL3L1 and CCL4L1 potentially play a role in autoimmunity we performed case control association studies with Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis clinical cohorts. Results We evaluate the PRT methodology used, paying particular attention to accuracy and precision, and highlight the problems of differential bias in copy number measurements. Our PRT methods for measuring copy number were of sufficient precision to detect very slight but systematic differential bias between results from case and control DNA samples in one study. We find no evidence for an association between CCL3L1 copy number and Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis. Conclusions Differential bias of this small magnitude, but applied systematically across large numbers of samples, would create a serious risk of false positive associations in copy number, if measured using methods of lower precision, or methods relying on single uncorroborated measurements. In this study the small differential bias detected by PRT in one sample set was resolved by a simple pre-treatment by restriction enzyme digestion.

  16. Accuracy of 16-slice multi-detector CT to quantify the degree of coronary artery stenosis: Assessment of cross-sectional and longitudinal vessel reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Ricardo C. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: rcury@partners.org; Ferencik, Maros [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Erlangen (Germany); Pomerantsev, Eugene [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Nieman, Koen [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Moselewski, Fabian [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Abbara, Suhny [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jang, Ik-Kyung [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Background: Sixteen-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits reliable noninvasive detection of significant coronary stenosis based on qualitative visual assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of MDCT to quantify the degree of coronary stenosis as compared to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) using two different reconstruction methods. Methods: We studied 69 coronary artery lesions from 38 consecutive patients that underwent 16-slice MDCT as a part of research study, which enrolled consecutive subjects scheduled for clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography. Nine coronary artery lesions with motion artifacts, heavily calcified plaques or stents were excluded from the analysis. The degree of stenosis was calculated by two independent readers non-blinded to the location of the stenosis, but blinded to the results of the QCA. MDCT luminal diameters were measured in cross-sectional multi-planar reformatted (CS-MPR) images created perpendicular to the centerline of the vessel and in 5 mm thin-slab maximum intensity projections (MIP) parallel to the long axis of the vessel. Both MDCT methods were compared against QCA. Results: The mean degree of stenosis as measured by MDCT was closely correlated to QCA for both methods (CS-MPR versus QCA: 61 {+-} 23% versus 64 {+-} 29%; r {sup 2} = 0.83, p < 0.001 and MIP versus QCA: 64 {+-} 22% versus 64 {+-} 29%; r {sup 2} = 0.84, p < 0.001 for MIP. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a negative bias of the degree of stenosis of -2.8 {+-} 12% using CS-MPR and a minimally positive bias of 0.6 {+-} 12% for MIP. In stratified analysis for lesion severity (mild, 0-40%; moderate, 41-70% or severe, >70%) the agreement between both CS-MPR and MIP was high when compared to QCA ({kappa} = 0.74 and 0.71, respectively). Conclusion: Multi-detector spiral CT permits accurate quantitative assessment of the degree of coronary stenosis in selected data sets of sufficient quality using both

  17. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  18. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Lauri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 180, Helsinki 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  19. Accuracy evaluation of a six-degree-of-freedom couch using cone beam CT and IsoCal phantom with an in-house algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Driewer, Joseph; Wang, Shuo; Li, Sicong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Dandan; Cao, Yijian; Zhang, Jiaju; Jamshidi, Abolghassem; Cox, Brett W; Knisely, Jonathan P S; Potters, Louis; Klein, Eric E

    2017-08-01

    The accuracy of a six degree of freedom (6DoF) couch was evaluated using a novel method. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of a 3D phantom (IsoCal) were acquired with different, known combinations of couch pitch and roll angles. Pitch and roll angles between the maximum allowable values of 357 and 3 degrees were tested in one degree increments. A total of 49 combinations were tested at 0 degrees of yaw (couch rotation angle). The 3D positions of 16 tungsten carbide ball bearings (BBs), each 4 mm in diameter and arranged in a known geometry within the IsoCal phantom, were determined in the 49 image sets with in-house software. The BB positions at different rotation angles were determined using a rotation matrix from the original BB positions at zero pitch and roll angles. A linear least squares fit method estimated the rotation angles and differences between detected and nominal rotation angles were calculated. This study was conducted for the case with and without extra weight on the couch. Couch walk shifts for the system were investigated using eight combinations of rotation, roll and pitch. A total of 49 CBCT images with voxel sizes 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm 3 were taken for the case without extra weight on the couch. The 16 BBs were determined to evaluate the isocenter translation and rotation differences between the calculated and nominal couch values. Among all 49 calculations, the maximum rotation angle differences were 0.10 degrees for pitch, 0.15 degrees for roll and 0.09 degrees for yaw. The corresponding mean and standard deviation values were 0.028 ± 0.032, -0.043 ± 0.058, and -0.009 ± 0.033 degrees. The maximum translation differences were 0.3 mm in the left-right direction, 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior direction and 0.4 mm in the superior-inferior direction. The mean values and corresponding standard deviations were 0.07 ± 0.12, -0.05 ± 0.25, and -0.12±0.14 mm for the planes described above. With an 80 kg phantom on the couch, the

  20. Absolute number of new lesions on 18F-FDG PET/CT is more predictive of clinical response than SUV changes in metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Hoda; Sachpekidis, Christos; Winkler, Julia; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hassel, Jessica C; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of response to immunotherapy is a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of metastatic melanoma to treatment with ipilimumab by means of 18 F-FDG PET/CT, using the patients' clinical response as reference. The final cohort included in the analyses consisted of 41 patients with metastatic melanoma who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT before and after administration of ipilimumab. After determination of the best clinical response, the PET/CT scans were reviewed and a separate independent analysis was performed, based on the number and functional size of newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions, as well as on the SUV changes after therapy. The median observation time of the patients after therapy was 21.4 months (range 6.3-41.9 months). Based on their clinical response, patients were dichotomized into those with clinical benefit (CB) and those without CB (No-CB). The CB group (31 patients) included those with stable disease, partial remission and complete remission, and the No-CB group (10 patients) included those with progressive disease. The application of a threshold of four newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions on the posttherapy PET/CT scan led to a sensitivity (correctly predicting CB) of 84% and a specificity (correctly predicting No-CB) of 100%. This cut-off was lower for lesions with larger functional diameters (three new lesions larger than 1.0 cm and two new lesions larger than 1.5 cm). SUV changes after therapy did not correlate with clinical response. Based on these findings, we developed criteria for predicting clinical response to immunotherapy by means of 18 F-FDG PET/CT (PET Response Evaluation Criteria for Immunotherapy, PERCIMT). Our results show that a cut-off of four newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions on posttherapy PET/CT gives a reliable indication of treatment failure in patients under ipilimumab treatment. Moreover, the functional size of the new lesions plays an important role in predicting the clinical

  1. The effect of sterilization and number of use on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fayaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical torque limiting devices (MTLDs are necessary tools to control a peak torque and achieving target values of screw component of dental implants. Due to probable effect of autoclaving and number of use on the accuracy of these devices, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of sterilization and number of use on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices (F-S MTLDs in achieving their target torque values. Materials and Methods: Peak torque measurements of 15 new F-S MTLDs from three different manufacturers (Astra Tech, BioHorizons, Dr. Idhe were measured ten times before and after 100 steam sterilization using a digital torque gauge. To simulate the clinical situation of aging (number of use target torque application process was repeated 10 times after each sterilization cycle and the peak torque values were registered. Comparison of the mean differences with target torque in each cycle was performed using one sample t test. Considering the type of MTLDs as inter subject comparison, One-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to evaluate the absolute values of differences between devices of each manufacturer in each group (α = 0.05. Results: The results of this study in Dr. Idhe group showed that, mean of difference values significantly differed from the target torque (P = 0.002 until 75 cycles. In Astra Tech group, also mean of difference values with under estimation trend, showed a significant difference with the target torque (P < 0.001. Mean of difference values significantly differed from the target torque with under estimation trend during all the 100 cycles in BioHorizons group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The torque output of each individual device stayed in 10% difference from target torque values before 100 sterilization cycles, but more than 10% difference from the target torque was seen in varying degrees during these consequent cycles.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose versus ultra-low-dose CT for lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis in patients with low back pain with MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Hwa [Inje University College of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Nowon-gu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Seong Jong; Jo, Hyeon Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyeon [Republic of Korea Air Force, Department of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Gwang [Republic of Korea Air Force, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Sung [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-04-15

    To compare the image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic performance between low-dose (LD) and ultra-low-dose (ULD) lumbar-spine (L-spine) CT with iterative reconstruction (IR) for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 260 patients with chronic LBP who underwent L-spine CT between November 2015 and September 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Of these, 143 underwent LD-CT with IR and 117 underwent ULD-CT with IR. The patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into BMI1 (<22.9 kg/m{sup 2}), BMI2 (23.0-24.9 kg/m{sup 2}), and BMI3 (≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) groups. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), qualitative image quality, and final diagnoses (lumbar disc disease and facet joint osteoarthritis). L-spine MRIs interpreted by consensus were used as the reference standard. All data were statistically analyzed. ULD protocol showed significantly lower SNR for all patients (p < 0.001) except the vertebral bodies and lower qualitative image quality for BMI3 patients (p ≤ 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference between ULD (sensitivity, 95.1-98.1%; specificity, 92.5-98.7%; accuracy, 94.6-98.0%) and LD protocols (sensitivity, 95.6-100%; specificity, 95.5-98.9%; accuracy, 97.4-98.1%), (all p≥0.1) in the BMI1 and BMI2; while dose was 60-68% lower with the ULD protocol. Interobserver agreements were excellent or good with regard to image quality and final diagnoses. For the BM1 and BMI2 groups, ULD-CT provided an acceptable image quality and exhibited a diagnostic accuracy similar to that of LD-CT. These findings suggest that it is a useful diagnostic tool for patients with chronic LBP who exhibit a BMI of <25 kg/m{sup 2}. (orig.)

  3. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing

  4. Effects of the number of markers per haplotype and clustering of haplotypes on the accuracy of QTL mapping and prediction of genomic breeding values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrooten Chris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of haplotype definition on the precision of QTL-mapping and on the accuracy of predicted genomic breeding values. In a multiple QTL model using identity-by-descent (IBD probabilities between haplotypes, various haplotype definitions were tested i.e. including 2, 6, 12 or 20 marker alleles and clustering base haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55, 0.75 or 0.95. Simulated data contained 1100 animals with known genotypes and phenotypes and 1000 animals with known genotypes and unknown phenotypes. Genomes comprising 3 Morgan were simulated and contained 74 polymorphic QTL and 383 polymorphic SNP markers with an average r2 value of 0.14 between adjacent markers. The total number of haplotypes decreased up to 50% when the window size was increased from two to 20 markers and decreased by at least 50% when haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55 instead of > 0.95 were clustered. An intermediate window size led to more precise QTL mapping. Window size and clustering had a limited effect on the accuracy of predicted total breeding values, ranging from 0.79 to 0.81. Our conclusion is that different optimal window sizes should be used in QTL-mapping versus genome-wide breeding value prediction.

  5. Increasing the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of “mildly positive” mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, F.; Ryan, D.; McCarthy, L.; McCarthy, J.; Burke, L.; Henry, M.T.; Kennedy, M.P.; Hinchion, J.; McSweeney, S.; Maher, M.M.; O’Regan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods: This was a retrospective, interdisciplinary, per-node analysis study. We included patients with NSCLC and mediastinal nodes with an SUV max in the range of 2.5–4.0 on PET-CT. We hypothesized that the greatest number of false positive cases would occur in this cohort of patients. Results: A total of 92 mediastinal lymph nodes were analyzed in 44 patients. Mediastinal disease (N2/N3) was histologically confirmed in 15 of 44 patients and in 34 of 92 lymph nodes; positive predictive value of 37% and false positive rate of 63%. Lymph node SUV max, tumor size, ratio of node SUV max to tumor SUV max (SUVn/SUVp), and ratio of node SUV max to node size (SUV n/SADn) were significantly higher in true positive cases. Using a threshold of 0.3 for SUV node/tumor and 3 for SUV node/size yielded sensitivities of 91% and 71% and specificities of 71% and 69% respectively for the detection of mediastinal disease. Using both ratios in combination resulted in a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 88%. Concurrent benign lung disease was observed significantly more frequently in false-positive cases. Conclusion: SUVn/SUVpt and SUVn/SADn may be complimentary to conventional visual interpretation and SUV max measurement in the assessment of mediastinal disease in patients with NSCLC

  6. Accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism - development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens. Development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens; Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie mittels Spiral-CT und 3D-Rekonstruktion. Entwicklung eines Tiermodells und technischer Probekoerper im Ex-vivo-Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ries, B.G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Kauczor, H.U.; Thelen, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Konerding, M.A. [Anatomisches Inst., Mainz Univ (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for simulation the CT morphologic situation of acute pulmonary embolism, to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of artificial emboli and to investigate the influence of the orientation of emboli depending on z-axis orientation. Materials and Methods: Standardized artificial emboli made of wax and of defined size and shape were positioned into the pulmonary arteries of porcine lungs. Castings of the embolized pulmonary arterial trees were made by injection of a special opaque resin. After performance of spiral CT the data sets of the emboli and the pulmonary arteries were post-processed. The 3D segmentations were compared with the anatomic preparation to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT/3D reconstruction-technique. Technical specimens simulating CT-morphology of acute embolized vessels underwent spiral CT in six different positions with respect to the z-axis. The CT data were reconstructed using a standardized and a contrastadapted method with interactive correction. The 3D emboli were analysed under qualitative aspects, and measurements of their extent were done. Results: In nearly 91%, there was complete agreement between CT and the corresponding findings at the anatomical preparation. Measurements of the 3D reconstructed technical specimens showed discrepancies of shape and size in dependence of the size of the original preparation, orientation and reconstruction technique. Overestimation up to 4 mm and underestimation to 2,2 mm were observed. Measurements of preparations with heights from 14 to 26 mm showed variances of {+-}1,5 mm ({proportional_to}6-11%). Conclusion: The presented models are suitable to simulate CT morphology of acute pulmonary embolism under ex-vivo conditions. Accuracy in the detection of artificial emboli using spiral CT/3D reconstruction is affected by localization, size and orientation of the emboli and the reconstruction technique. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Entwicklung

  7. A technique of evaluating most probable stochastic valuables from a small number of samples and their accuracies and degrees of confidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, K [Ibaraki Pref. Univ. Health Sci., (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A problem of estimating stochastic characteristics of a population from a small number of samples is solved as an inverse problem, from view point of information theory and with the Bayesian statistics. For both Poisson-process and Bernoulli-process, the most probable values of the characteristics of the mother population and their accuracies and degrees of confidence are successfully obtained. Mathematical expressions are given to the general case where a limit amount of information and/or knowledge with the stochastic characteristics are available and a special case where no a priori information nor knowledge are available. Mathematical properties of the solutions obtained, practical appreciation to the problem to radiation measurement are also discussed.

  8. Analyzing indirect effects in cluster randomized trials. The effect of estimation method, number of groups and group sizes on accuracy and power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop eHox

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster randomized trials assess the effect of an intervention that is carried out at the group or cluster level. Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour is often used to model the effect of the intervention as an indirect effect mediated in turn by attitude, norms and behavioural intention. Structural equation modelling (SEM is the technique of choice to estimate indirect effects and their significance. However, this is a large sample technique, and its application in a cluster randomized trial assumes a relatively large number of clusters. In practice, the number of clusters in these studies tends to be relatively small, e.g. much less than fifty. This study uses simulation methods to find the lowest number of clusters needed when multilevel SEM is used to estimate the indirect effect. Maximum likelihood estimation is compared to Bayesian analysis, with the central quality criteria being accuracy of the point estimate and the confidence interval. We also investigate the power of the test for the indirect effect. We conclude that Bayes estimation works well with much smaller cluster level sample sizes such as 20 cases than maximum likelihood estimation; although the bias is larger the coverage is much better. When only 5 to 10 clusters are available per treatment condition even with Bayesian estimation problems occur.

  9. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a