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Sample records for crystalline nanostructures show

  1. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  2. Crystalline structure-dependent growth of bimetallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Jiang, Ruibin; Ming, Tian; Fang, Caihong; Wang, Jianfang

    2012-11-21

    Morphological control of multimetallic nanostructures is crucial for obtaining shape-dependent physical and chemical properties. Up to date, control of the shapes of multimetallic nanostructures has remained largely empirical. Multimetallic nanostructures have been produced mostly through seed-mediated growth. Understanding the role played by starting nanocrystal seeds can help in controlling the shape and in turn the plasmonic and catalytic properties of multimetallic nanostructures. In this work, we have studied the effect of the crystalline structure and shape of Au nanocrystal seeds on the morphology of the resultant bimetallic nanostructures. Single-crystalline Au nanorods, multiply twinned Au nanorods, and multiply twinned Au nanobipyramids were employed as the starting seeds. Both silver and palladium exhibit highly preferential growth on the side surfaces of the single-crystalline Au nanorods, giving rise to bimetallic cuboids, whereas they prefer to grow at the ends of the multiply twinned Au nanorods and nanobipyramids, giving rise to bimetallic nanorods. These results indicate that the morphology of the bimetallic nanostructures is highly dependent on the crystalline structure of the Au nanocrystal seeds. Our results will be useful for guiding the preparation of multimetallic nanostructures with desired shapes and therefore plasmonic properties for various plasmon-based applications.

  3. Atomically flat single-crystalline gold nanostructures for plasmonic nanocircuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.; Geisler, P.; Bruening, C.; Kern, J.; Prangsma, J.C.; Wu, X.; Feichtner, Thorsten; Ziegler, J.; Weinmann, P.; Kamp, M.; Forchel, A.; Hecht, B. [Wilhelm-Conrad-Roentgen-Center for Complex Material Systems, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Biagioni, P. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Deep subwavelength integration of high-definition plasmonic nano-structures is of key importance for the development of future optical nanocircuitry. So far the experimental realization of proposed extended plasmonic networks remains challenging, mainly due to the multi-crystallinity of commonly used thermally evaporated gold layers. Resulting structural imperfections in individual circuit elements drastically reduce the yield of functional integrated nanocircuits. Here we demonstrate the use of very large but thin chemically grown single-crystalline gold flakes. After immobilization on any arbitrary surface, they serve as an ideal basis for focused-ion beam milling. We present high-definition ultra-smooth gold nanostructures with reproducible nanosized features over micrometer lengthscales. By comparing multi- and single-crystalline optical antennas we prove that the latter have superior optical properties which are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  4. Self-organized liquid-crystalline nanostructured membranes for water treatment: selective permeation of ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henmi, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Koji; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Tomioka, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Yoshio, Masafumi; Kato, Takashi

    2012-05-02

    A membrane with ordered 3D ionic nanochannels constructed by in situ photopolymerization of a thermotropic liquid-crystalline monomer shows high filtration performance and ion selectivity. The nanostructured membrane exhibits water-treatment performance superior to that of an amorphous membrane prepared from the isotropic melt of the monomer. Self-organized nanostructured membranes have great potential for supplying high-quality water. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Atomically flat single-crystalline gold nanostructures for plasmonic nanocircuitry

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jer-Shing; Geisler, Peter; Brüning, Christoph; Kern, Johannes; Prangsma, Jord C; Weinmann, Pia; Kamp, Martin; Forchel, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Sennhauser, Urs; Hecht, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Deep subwavelength integration of high-definition plasmonic nanostructures is of key importance for the development of future optical nanocircuitry for high-speed communication, quantum computation and lab-on-a-chip applications. So far the experimental realization of proposed extended plasmonic networks consisting of multiple functional elements remains challenging, mainly due to the multi-crystallinity of commonly used thermally evaporated gold layers. Resulting structural imperfections in individual circuit elements will drastically reduce the yield of functional integrated nanocircuits. Here we demonstrate the use of very large (>100 micron^2) but thin (<80 nm) chemically grown single-crystalline gold flakes, which, after immobilization, serve as an ideal basis for focused-ion beam milling and other top-down nanofabrication techniques on any desired substrate. Using this methodology we obtain high-definition ultrasmooth gold nanostructures with superior optical properties and reproducible nano-sized fe...

  6. Nanostructured Dielectric Layer for Ultrathin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary photon management properties. However, due to poor pn junction quality and high surface recombination velocity, typical nanostructured solar cells are not efficient compared with the traditional commercial solar cells. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to design, simulate, and fabricate whole-wafer nanostructures on dielectric layer on thin c-Si for solar cell light trapping. The optical simulation results show that the periodic nanostructure arrays on dielectric materials could suppress the reflection loss over a wide spectral range. In addition, by applying the nanostructured dielectric layer on 40 μm thin c-Si, the reflection loss is suppressed to below 5% over a wide spectra and angular range. Moreover, a c-Si solar cell with 2.9 μm ultrathin absorber layer demonstrates 32% improvement in short circuit current and 44% relative improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Our results suggest that nanostructured dielectric layer has the potential to significantly improve solar cell performance and avoid typical problems of defects and surface recombination for nanostructured solar cells, thus providing a new pathway towards realizing high-efficiency and low-cost c-Si solar cells.

  7. Propagation of plasmons in designed single crystalline silver nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Lu, Ying-Wei; Huck, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate propagation of plasmons in single crystalline silver nanostructures fabricated using a combination of a bottom-up and a top-down approach. Silver nanoplates of thickness around 65 nm and a surface area of about 100 μm2 are made using a wet chemical method. Silver nanotips...... and nanowires are then sculptured by focused ion beam milling. The plasmons are excited by using the fluorescence from the redeposited silver clusters during the milling process. Propagation of plasmons in the nanowires is observed in the visible spectral region. We also observe a cavity effect by measuring...

  8. Three-dimensional crystalline and homogeneous metallic nanostructures using directed assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cihan; Cetin, Arif E; Goutzamanidis, Georgia; Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Altug, Hatice; Wei, Dongguang; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2014-05-27

    Directed assembly of nano building blocks offers a versatile route to the creation of complex nanostructures with unique properties. Bottom-up directed assembly of nanoparticles have been considered as one of the best approaches to fabricate such functional and novel nanostructures. However, there is a dearth of studies on making crystalline, solid, and homogeneous nanostructures. This requires a fundamental understanding of the forces driving the assembly of nanoparticles and precise control of these forces to enable the formation of desired nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate that colloidal nanoparticles can be assembled and simultaneously fused into 3-D solid nanostructures in a single step using externally applied electric field. By understanding the influence of various assembly parameters, we showed the fabrication of 3-D metallic materials with complex geometries such as nanopillars, nanoboxes, and nanorings with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in less than a minute. The fabricated gold nanopillars have a polycrystalline nature, have an electrical resistivity that is lower than or equivalent to electroplated gold, and support strong plasmonic resonances. We also demonstrate that the fabrication process is versatile, as fast as electroplating, and scalable to the millimeter scale. These results indicate that the presented approach will facilitate fabrication of novel 3-D nanomaterials (homogeneous or hybrid) in an aqueous solution at room temperature and pressure, while addressing many of the manufacturing challenges in semiconductor nanoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  9. Ambient Pressure Synthesis of Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Crystalline Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures of the obtained samples have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Raman scattering, respectively. Different morphologies were observed for different substrate temperatures, but otherwise identical growth conditions. The experimental measurements reveal the evolutions of the crystalline states and bond structures following the substrate temperatures. Besides, different substrate materials also affected the tungsten oxide nanostructures. Bundles of wire-type tungsten oxide nanowires with a length of up to 5 mm were obtained on Al2O3 substrate. Furthermore, the sensitive properties of the super long nanowires to the gas and different temperature were investigated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane as a function of the time was obtained. The sensitive properties of the tungsten oxide nanowires have almost linear relationship with the temperature.

  10. Understanding the interfacial properties of nanostructured liquid crystalline materials for surface-specific delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yao-Da; Larson, Ian; Barnes, Timothy J; Prestidge, Clive A; Allen, Stephanie; Chen, Xinyong; Roberts, Clive J; Boyd, Ben J

    2012-09-18

    Nonlamellar liquid crystalline dispersions such as cubosomes and hexosomes have great potential as novel surface-targeted active delivery systems. In this study, the influence of internal nanostructure, chemical composition, and the presence of Pluronic F127 as a stabilizer, on the surface and interfacial properties of different liquid crystalline particles and surfaces, was investigated. The interfacial properties of the bulk liquid crystalline systems with coexisting excess water were dependent on the internal liquid crystalline nanostructure. In particular, the surfaces of the inverse cubic systems were more hydrophilic than that of the inverse hexagonal phase. The interaction between F127 and the bulk liquid crystalline systems depended on the internal liquid crystalline structure and chemical composition. For example, F127 adsorbed to the surface of the bulk phytantriol cubic phase, while for monoolein cubic phase, F127 was integrated into the liquid crystalline structure. Last, the interfacial adsorption behavior of the dispersed liquid crystalline particles also depended on both the internal nanostructure and the chemical composition, despite the dispersions all being stabilized using F127. The findings highlight the need to understand the specific surface characteristics and the nature of the interaction with colloidal stabilizer for understanding and optimizing the behavior of nonlamellar liquid crystalline systems in surface delivery applications.

  11. Dosimetric response for crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide to a high-current pulse electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, S V; Kortov, V S

    2014-11-01

    The main thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of the detectors based on anion-defective crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide after exposure to a high-current pulse electron beam are studied. TL peaks associated with deep-trapping centres are registered. It is shown that the use of deep-trap TL at 200-600°С allows registering absorbed doses up to 750 kGy for single-crystalline detectors and those up to 6 kGy for nanostructured ones. A wide range of the doses registered, high reproducibility of the TL signal and low fading contribute to a possibility of using single-crystalline and nanostructured aluminium oxide for the dosimetry of high-current pulse electron beams.

  12. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  13. Combustion synthesis of Si-related crystalline nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soszyński, Michał; Łabędź, Olga; Huczko, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The unique self propagated high temperature synthesis (SHS technique) allows for an effective, energetically autothermal formation of different novel materials, including nanostructural, non-stoichiometric and bearing new phases, this all during fast reaction in a mixture strong oxidant/strong reducer. This all results from specific characteristics of the process: high temperatures/pressures, short reaction times and very fast quenching of gaseous reaction products during their expansion from combustion zone towards cooling zone. Silicon carbide as so-called refractory special ceramics possesses very special physical and chemical properties, especially in case of its nanostructural morphology this including 1-D (nanofibres). The results of the exploratory runs regarding the application of SiCNFs as polymer modifier, super-hard ceramic composites (SiCNFs/nano-SiC mixtures) or electron emitter are very encouraging indeed. The results will provide the information regarding the possible reaction channels. The fundamental parametric studies concentrate on the relationship between many process variables and SiCNFs formation efficiency. Relatively costly commercial reactants (Aldrich) were previously used which are now replaced by waste Tarflen (as oxidant). Their cost is a few orders of magnitude (!) lower. It will drastically reduce the costs of SiCNFs production since the operational costs of energetically autogenic SSW technique are obviously very low.

  14. Introduction to solid state physics and crystalline nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Iadonisi, Giuseppe; Chiofalo, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This textbook provides conceptual, procedural, and factual knowledge on solid state and nanostructure physics. It is designed to acquaint readers with key concepts and their connections, to stimulate intuition and curiosity, and to enable the acquisition of competences in general strategies and specific procedures for problem solving and their use in specific applications. To these ends, a multidisciplinary approach is adopted, integrating physics, chemistry, and engineering and reflecting how these disciplines are converging towards common tools and languages in the field. Each chapter discusses essential ideas before the introduction of formalisms and the stepwise addition of complications. Questions on everyday manifestations of the concepts are included, with reasoned linking of ideas from different chapters and sections and further detail in the appendices. The final section of each chapter describes experimental methods and strategies that can be used to probe the phenomena under discussion. Solid state...

  15. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of -85° of phase angle at 120 Hz.

  16. Thin nanostructured crystalline TiO{sub 2} films and their applications in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Yajun

    2007-06-15

    morphology of TiO{sub 2} films can also be controlled. The local and long range structures of the titania films were investigated by the combination of imaging techniques (AFM, SEM) and x-ray scattering techniques (X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering). Based on the knowledge of the morphology control, the crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanostructured films with different morphologies were introduced into solid state dye-sensitized solar cells. It has been found that all of the morphologies help to improve the performance of the solar cells. Especially, clustered nanoparticles, worm-like structures, foam-like structures, large collapsed nanovesicles show more pronounced performance improvement than other morphologies such as nanowires, flakes, and nanogranulars. (orig.)

  17. Unstable Growth and Decay of Nanostructures on Crystalline Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Theodore L.

    2001-03-01

    Instabilities during growth are typically attributed to the venerable [step] Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect (SESE), or closely related asymmetries(J.G. Amar and F. Family, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 4584 (1996) for atoms arriving at upper and lower sides of a step. Esp., SESE leads to the well-known Bales-Zangwill (BZ) instability of step edges. We have found(O. Pierre-Louis, M.R. D'Orsogna, and T.L. Einstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82), 3661 (1999) that an analogous in-plane asymmetry of the energy barriers at kinks for atoms moving along step edges, the kink Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect (KESE), can produce a new instability that can supplant the BZ instability. (The relevant edge and corner barriers can be calculated semiempirically; moreover, they can theoretically be tuned in electrochemical cells.(M.I. Haftel and T.L. Einstein, Proc. MRS 580), 195 (2000); Proc. ICSFS-10 (Princeton, 2000), Appl. Surface Sci.) We analyze various contributions to the mass current along the step. Monte Carlo simulations on a simple SOS model are used to illustrate behavior and distinguish between strong and weak KESE. The threshold of stable kink-flow growth is analyzed. KESE can induce mound formation, the orientation of which depends on the strength of the kink ES barrier. Such behavior was observed on Ag(100).(G. Costantini ldots U. Valbusa, Proc. ICSFS-10 (Princeton, 2000), Appl. Surf. Sci.; Surface Sci. 459), L487 (2000) Intriguing experiments observe wavelength selection during step-flow growth on vicinal Cu(100).(T. Maroutian, L. Douillard, and H.-J. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 4353 (1999) KESE also can account for the instability of the Wolf-Villain model, in contrast to the similar Das Sarma-Tamborenea model.(P. Punyindu, Z. Toroczkai, and S. Das Sarma, preprint) At the coarse-grained level, the continuum step model can account for the decay of nanomounds on Si(7x7): the exponents of the decay rate and, more remarkably, the overall rate of these nanostructures (to within a factor of two

  18. Organic single crystals or crystalline micro/nanostructures: Preparation and field-effect transistor applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Organic single crystals hold great promise for the development of organic semiconductor materials,because they could reveal the intrinsic electronic properties of these materials,providing high-performance electronic devices and probing the structureproperty relationships.This article reviews the preparation methods for organic single crystals or crystalline micro/nanostructures,including vapor phase growth methods and solution-processed methods,and summarizes a few methods employed in the fabrication of field-effect transistors along with dozens of examples concerning both small molecules and polymers with high field-effect performance.

  19. Investigation of the nonlinear refractive index of single-crystalline thin gold films and plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Sebastian; Razinskas, Gary; Krauss, Enno; Dreher, Christian; Wurdack, Matthias; Geisler, Peter; Pawłowska, Monika; Hecht, Bert; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear refractive index of plasmonic materials may be used to obtain nonlinear functionality, e.g., power-dependent switching. Here, we investigate the nonlinear refractive index of single-crystalline gold in thin layers and nanostructures on dielectric substrates. In a first step, we implement a z-scan setup to investigate ~100-µm-sized thin-film samples. We determine the nonlinear refractive index of fused silica, n 2(SiO2) = 2.9 × 10-20 m2/W, in agreement with literature values. Subsequent z-scan measurements of single-crystalline gold films reveal a damage threshold of 0.22 TW/cm2 and approximate upper limits of the real and imaginary parts of the nonlinear refractive index, | n 2'(Au)| film). An upper limit for the nonlinear power-dependent phase change between two propagating near-field modes is determined to Δ φ < 0.07 rad.

  20. Fabrication of single-crystalline plasmonic nanostructures on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohiro; Mori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed for producing a high-performance single-crystalline Ag nanostructure on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates for use in plasmonic sensors and circuit components. This technique is based on the epitaxial growth of Ag on a (001)-oriented single-crystalline NaCl substrate, which is subsequently dissolved in ultrapure water to allow the Ag film to be transferred onto a wide range of different substrates. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create an Ag nanoarray structure consisting of 200 cuboid nanoparticles with a side length of 160 nm and sharp, precise edges. This array exhibits a strong signal and a sharp peak in plasmonic properties and Raman intensity when compared with a polycrystalline Ag nanoarray. PMID:28216626

  1. Single-crystalline hyperbranched nanostructure of iron hydroxyl phosphate Fe5(PO4)4(OH)3·2H2O for highly selective capture of phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wei, Chengzhen; Zhang, Yizhou; Pang, Huan; Lu, Qingyi; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-17

    Single-crystalline hyperbranched nanostructures of iron hydroxyl phosphate Fe5(PO4)4(OH)3·2H2O (giniite) with orthorhombic phase were synthesized through a simple route. They have a well-defined dendrite fractal structure with a pronounced trunk and highly ordered branches. The toxicity test shows that the hyperbranched nanostructures have good biocompatibility and low toxicity level, which makes them have application potentials in life science. The study herein demonstrated that the obtained hyperbranched giniite nanostructures show highly selective capture of phosphopeptides and could be used as a kind of promising nanomaterial for the specific capture of phosphopeptides from complex tryptic digests with the detection of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  2. Preparation of Highly Crystalline TiO2 Nanostructures by Acid-assisted Hydrothermal Treatment of Hexagonal-structured Nanocrystalline Titania/Cetyltrimethyammonium Bromide Nanoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Hideki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Highly crystalline TiO2 nanostructures were prepared through a facile inorganic acid-assisted hydrothermal treatment of hexagonal-structured assemblies of nanocrystalline titiania templated by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (Hex-ncTiO2/CTAB Nanoskeleton as starting materials. All samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The influence of hydrochloric acid concentration on the morphology, crystalline and the formation of the nanostructures were investigated. We found that the morphology and crystalline phase strongly depended on the hydrochloric acid concentrations. More importantly, crystalline phase was closely related to the morphology of TiO2 nanostructure. Nanoparticles were polycrystalline anatase phase, and aligned nanorods were single crystalline rutile phase. Possible formation mechanisms of TiO2 nanostructures with various crystalline phases and morphologies were proposed.

  3. Liquid Crystalline Epoxies with Lateral Substituents Showing a Low Dielectric Constant and High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huilong; Lu, Mangeng; Liang, Liyan; Wu, Kun; Ma, Dong; Xue, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this work, liquid crystalline epoxies with lateral substituents were synthesized and cured with aromatic amines or anhydride. The liquid crystalline phase structure of liquid crystalline epoxies with lateral substituents was determined by polarized optical microscopy. The relationship between thermal conductivity and dielectric properties and liquid crystalline domain structure was discussed in the paper. The samples show high thermal conductivity up to 0.29 W/(m × K), due to the orientation of mesogenic units in epoxies. The sample's low dielectric constant of 2.29 is associated with the oriented mesogenic units and long nonpolar lateral substituents. This indicates a new way to obtain materials with high thermal conductivity and a low dielectric constant by introducing oriented mesogenic units into cross-linked epoxy systems. The water repellency is reflected in the contact angles of 92-98°, which are apparently higher than that of conventional epoxy systems. It was also found that the better toughness of liquid crystalline epoxies with lateral substituents was attributed to the existence of long flexible alkyl lateral substituents.

  4. Self-Assembly of Crystalline Structures of Magnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Fabrication of Nanostructured Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaozheng; Wang, Jianchao; Furlani, Edward P

    2015-10-14

    A theoretical study is presented of the template-assisted formation of crystalline superstructures of magnetic-dielectric core-shell particles. The templates produce highly localized gradient fields and a corresponding magnetic force that guides the assembly with nanoscale precision in particle placement. The process is studied using two distinct and complementary computational models that predict the dynamics and energy of the particles, respectively. Both mono- and polydisperse colloids are studied, and the analysis demonstrates for the first time that although the particles self-assemble into ordered crystalline superstructures, the particle formation is not unique. There is a Brownian motion-induced degeneracy in the process wherein various distinct, energetically comparable crystalline structures can form for a given template geometry. The models predict the formation of hexagonal close packed (HCP) and face centered cubic (FCC) structures as well as mixed phase structures due to in-plane stacking disorders, which is consistent with experimental observations. The polydisperse particle structures are less uniform than the monodisperse particle structures because of the irregular packing of different-sized particles. A comparison of self-assembly using soft- and hard-magnetic templates is also presented, the former being magnetized in a uniform field. This analysis shows that soft-magnetic templates enable an order-of-magnitude more rapid assembly and much higher spatial resolution in particle placement than their hard-magnetic counterparts. The self-assembly method discussed is versatile and broadly applies to arbitrary template geometries and multilayered and multifunctional mono- and polydisperse core-shell particles that have at least one magnetic component. As such, the method holds potential for the bottom-up fabrication of functional nanostructured materials for a broad range of applications. This work provides unprecedented insight into the assembly

  5. One-pot, template- and surfactant-free solvothermal synthesis of high-crystalline Fe3O4 nanostructures with adjustable morphologies and high magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yan; Xin, Hongna; Zhang, Jiarui; Li, Xinghua; Feng, Juan; Deng, Xia; Sun, Yong; Zheng, Xinliang

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, high-crystalline and well-defined Fe3O4 nanostructures with tunable morphologies were fabricated through a facile one-pot solvothermal approach. The morphology, crystal structure and chemical compositions of the products were characterized at the nanoscale. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns indicate that the products have a pure spinel phase without the presence of any other impurity. Based on the transmission electron microscope technology, shape evolution of the products were investigated. Several morphologies including irregular particles, clusters, hollow sphere and octahedrons can be obtained by only adjusting the amount of NaOH without using any surfactant. Magnetism investigations show that all the products perform ferromagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization at room temperature, which mainly originates from their high crystalline nature and template-free fabrication process.

  6. Disposition and association of the steric stabilizer Pluronic® F127 in lyotropic liquid crystalline nanostructured particle dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Adam J; Drummond, Calum J; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-02-15

    Liquid crystalline nanostructured particles, such as cubosomes and hexosomes, are most often colloidally stabilised using the tri-block co-polymer Pluronic® F127. Although the effect of F127 on the internal particle nanostructure has been well studied, the associative aspects of F127 with cubosomes and hexosomes are poorly understood. In this study the quantitative association of F127 with phytantriol-based cubosomes and hexosomes was investigated. The amount of free F127 in the dispersions was determined using pressure ultra-filtration. The percentage of F127 associated with the particles plateaued with increasing F127 concentration above the critical aggregation concentration. Hence the free concentration of F127 in the dispersion medium was proposed as a key factor governing association below the CMC, and partitioning of F127 between micelles and particles occurred above the CMC. The association of F127 with the particles was irreversible on dilution. The F127 associated with both the external and internal surfaces of the phytantriol cubosomes. The effects of lipid and F127 concentration, lipid type, dilution of the dispersions and internal nanostructure were also elucidated. A greater amount of F127 was associated with cubosomes comprised of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) than those prepared using phytantriol. Hexosomes prepared using a mixture of phytantriol and vitamin E acetate (vitEA) had a greater amount of F127 associated with them than phytantriol cubosomes. Hexosomes prepared using selachyl alcohol had less F127 associated with them than phytantriol:vitEA-based hexosomes and GMO-based cubosomes. This indicated that both the lipid from which the particles are composed and the particle internal nanostructure have an influence on the association of F127 with lyotropic liquid crystalline nanostructured particles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulatory effect of human plasma on the internal nanostructure and size characteristics of liquid-crystalline nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Intan Diana Mat; Wu, Linping; Wibroe, Peter Popp; Nilsson, Christa; Østergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan; Gammelgaard, Bente; Urtti, Arto; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Yaghmur, Anan

    2015-05-12

    The inverted-type liquid-crystalline dispersions comprising cubosomes and hexosomes hold much potential for drug solubilization and site-specific targeting on intravenous administration. Limited information, however, is available on the influence of plasma components on nanostructural and morphological features of cubosome and hexosome dispersions, which may modulate their stability in the blood and their overall biological performance. Through an integrated approach involving SAXS, cryo-TEM, and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) we have studied the time-dependent effect of human plasma (and the plasma complement system) on the integrity of the internal nanostructure, morphology, and fluctuation in size distribution of phytantriol (PHYT)-based nonlamellar crystalline dispersions. The results indicate that in the presence of plasma the internal nanostructure undergoes a transition from the biphasic phase (a bicontinuous cubic phase with symmetry Pn3m coexisting with an inverted-type hexagonal (H2) phase) to a neat hexagonal (H2) phase, which decreases the median particle size. These observations were independent of a direct effect by serum albumin and dispersion-mediated complement activation. The implication of these observations in relation to soft nanocarrier design for intravenous drug delivery is discussed.

  8. Nanostructured liquid crystalline particles provide long duration sustained-release effect for a poorly water soluble drug after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Hanley, Tracey; Porter, Christopher J H; Boyd, Ben J

    2011-07-30

    This study is the first to demonstrate the ability of nanostructured liquid crystal particles to sustain the absorption of a poorly water soluble drug after oral administration. Cubic (V(2)) liquid crystalline nanostructured particles (cubosomes) formed from phytantriol (PHY) were shown to sustain the absorption of cinnarizine (CZ) beyond 48h after oral administration to rats. Plasma concentrations were sustained within the range of 21.5±1.5ng/mL from 12 to 48h. In stark contrast, cubosomes prepared using glyceryl monooleate (GMO) did not sustain the absorption of CZ and drug concentrations fell below quantifiable levels after 24h. Sustained absorption of CZ from PHY cubosomes lead to a significant enhancement (pnanostructured particles in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed that the V(2)Pn3m nanostructure of PHY cubosomes was maintained for extended periods of time, in contrast to GMO cubosomes where the V(2)Im3m nanostructure was lost within 18h after exposure, suggesting that degradation of the LC nanostructure may limit sustained drug release. In addition, PHY cubosomes were shown to be extensively retained in the stomach (>24h) leading to the conclusion that in the case of non-digestible PHY cubosomes, the stomach may act as a non-sink reservoir that facilitates the slow release of poorly water soluble drugs, highlighting the potential use of non-digestible LC nanostructured particles as novel sustained oral drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of structural patterns and degree of crystallinity on the performance of nanostructured ZnO as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Liang, E-mail: xiaoliang@whut.edu.cn; Mei, Daidi; Cao, Minglei; Qu, Deyu; Deng, Bohua

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • Effects of structural patterns on nanostructured ZnO anode are studied. • Structural patterns with sufficient inner spacing show better capacity retention. • Capacity of nanostructured ZnO increase with the increasing of crystallinity. • Crystallized ZnO with inner spacing are expected to have good performance. - Abstract: The effects of structural patterns and degree of crystallinity on the electrochemical performance of ZnO were systematically studied using a controllable synthesis. The microspheres assembled with distorted nanosheets, hexagonal nanorods and radial assembly of nanorods of ZnO were successfully prepared by the hydrothermal reaction of zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetetramine and different amount of trisodium citrate. ZnO microspheres were calcinated at different temperatures (300, 600 and 900 °C) to increase their degree of crystallization. Constant current charge and discharge measurements show that the capacity retention of the microspheres and radial assembled nanorods are higher than that of hexagonal nanorods. This may be due to their inner spacing of specific structure patterns that can accommodate and restrain the volume changes during cycling. Additionally, the capacity of ZnO microspheres can be improved by short-time calcinations at 600 or 900 °C for their crystallization. The studies of differential capacity versus potential plots indicate that the enhanced degree of crystallization facilitates the alloying and dealloying of the reduction products of ZnO. Therefore, both large specific capacity and good capacity retention can be expected with highly crystallized specific nanostructures of ZnO with the sufficient inner spacing. The ZnO microspheres calcinated at 600 °C show the best performance with a specific capacity of 1328.2 mA h g{sup −1} for the first cycle and 662.8 mA h g{sup −1} for the 50th cycle at 0.1 C with an operating potential of 0.05–3.00 V.

  10. Conversion of single-crystalline C{sub 60} nanodisks and nanorods into graphitic nanostructures via hydrogen thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H; Song, H J; Choi, H C [Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-Gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, H S [UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology), Banyeon-ri 194, Ulsan 689-805 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: choihc@postech.edu

    2009-04-08

    We have developed a process to convert C{sub 60} nanostructures into graphitic nanostructures. Disk-shaped and wire-shaped C{sub 60} nanostructures synthesized by the liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation method, the vapor-solid process, and solvent evaporation were successfully converted into graphitic structures by thermal annealing in hydrogen at 900 deg. C. Scanning electron and tunneling electron microscopic studies confirmed that the converted nanostructures were composed of multi-graphitic structures such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and carbon onions. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and conductance measurements were carried out to further confirm the successful formation of graphitic layers. In the Raman spectra, the nanostructures converted from C{sub 60} disks showed signature D, G, and G{sup '} bands of graphitic structures, while the A{sub g} mode (1469 cm{sup -1}) of the original C{sub 60} molecule disappeared. C{sub 60} nanowire devices fabricated for the conductance measurements of the converted structures showed dramatically decreased resistance (R{approx}100 k{omega}) compared to the pristine C{sub 60} wire (R>100 M{omega}). Further manipulation of the reaction environment, including the gas and the annealing temperature, may reveal a new way to attain diverse graphitic nanostructures economically.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic nanostructured thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Zhi-Qiang; Yutaka Abe; Jiang Dong-Hua; Lin Hai; Yoshitake Yamazakia; Wu Chen-Xu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using Monte Carlo simulation, we have compared the magnetic properties between nanostructured thin films and two-dimensional crystalline solids. The dependence of nanostructured properties on the interaction between particles that constitute the nanostructured thin films is also studied. The result shows that the parameters in the interaction potential have an important effect on the properties of nanostructured thin films at the transition temperatures.

  12. Manipulating the dimensional assembly pattern and crystalline structures of iron oxide nanostructures with a functional polyolefin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingliang; Yuan, Tingting; Wang, Yiran; Guleria, Abhishant; Wei, Suying; Zhang, Guoqi; Sun, Luyi; Liu, Jingjing; Yu, Jingfang; Young, David P; Lin, Hongfei; Khasanov, Airat; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-01-28

    Controlled crystalline structures (α- and γ-phase) and assembly patterns (1-D, 2-D and 3-D) were achieved in the synthesized iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric surfactant-polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) with different concentrations. In addition, the change of the crystalline structure from the α- and γ-phase also led to the significantly increased saturation magnetization and coercivity.

  13. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Soumya Bhattacharya,1 Purbarun Dhar,2 Sarit K Das,2 Ranjan Ganguly,3 Thomas J Webster,4,5 Suprabha Nayar1 1Biomaterials Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, 2Nanofluids, Microfluidics and Bio-MEMS Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai, 3Advanced Materials Research and Applications Laboratory, Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India; 4Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G nanostructures using collagen (CL was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed “biomimetic”. Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the

  14. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas J; Nayar, Suprabha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR) directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G) nanostructures using collagen (CL) was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed “biomimetic”. Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the G flakes from transmission electron microscopy confirm ≤ five layers of G. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows an approximate 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than approximately 0.00005 of G. Thus, through the use of CL, this new material and process may improve the use of G in terms of biocompatibility for numerous medical applications that currently employ G, such as internally controlled drug-delivery assisted thermal ablation of carcinoma cells. PMID:24648728

  15. PEGylation of Phytantriol-Based Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Particles-The Effect of Lipid Composition, PEG Chain Length, and Temperature on the Internal Nanostructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Christa; Ostergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Susan Weng

    2014-01-01

    on phytantriol (PHYT) were investigated by means of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and Transmission Electron Cryo-Microscopy. The results suggest that the used lipopolymers are incorporated into the water-PHYT interfacial area and induce a significant effect on the internal nanostructures...... injectable long-circulating drug nanocarriers based on cubosomes and hexosomes by shielding and coating the dispersed particles enveloping well-defined internal nonlamellar liquid crystalline nanostructures with hydrophilic PEG segments. The present study attempts to shed light on the possible PEGylation...... of these lipidic nonlamellar liquid crystalline particles by using DSPE-mPEGs with three different block lengths of the hydrophilic PEG segment. The effects of lipid composition, PEG chain length, and temperature on the morphology and internal nanostructure of these self-assembled lipidic aqueous dispersions based...

  16. Electron beam-induced structural transformations of MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3-x} crystalline nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Droguett, D. E., E-mail: dodiaz@fis.puc.cl [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica (Chile); Zuniga, A. [Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas (Chile); Solorzano, G. [PUC-RIO, Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia, DCMM (Brazil); Fuenzalida, V. M. [Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas (Chile)

    2012-01-15

    Electron beam-induced damage and structural changes in MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3-x} single crystalline nanostructures were revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination (at 200 kV) after few minutes of concentrating the electron beam onto small areas (diameters between 25 and 200 nm) of the samples. The damage was evaluated recording TEM images, while the structural changes were revealed acquiring selected area electron diffraction patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images after different irradiation times. The as-received nanostructures of orthorhombic MoO{sub 3} were transformed to a Magneli's phase of the oxide ({gamma}-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}) after {approx}10 min of electron beam irradiation. The oxygen loss from the oxide promoted structural changes. HRTEM observations showed that, in the first stage of the reduction, oxygen vacancies generated by the electron beam are accommodated by forming crystallographic shear planes. At a later stage of the reduction process, a polycrystalline structure was developed with highly oxygen-deficient grains. The structural changes can be attributed to the local heating of the irradiated zone combined with radiolysis.

  17. Pd-Pt Alloy with Coral-Like Nanostructures Showing High Performance for Oxygen Electrocatalytic Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-Quan; Chen, Xue-Song; Wu, Jian; Yao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Pd-Pt alloy with coral-like nanostructures were synthesized via bubble dynamic templated electrodeposition method at room temperature. The morphology of the as-prepared nanostructures was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDS, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. Cyclic voltammetry method was adopted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activities of the synthesized electrodes toward oxygen reduction in KCl solution. The electrochemical results indicated that the Pd-Pt alloy with coral-like nanostructures hold the high performance for oxygen reduction.

  18. Hydrothermal preparation of nanostructured MnO2 and morphological and crystalline evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Manganese dioxides with various morphologies were prepared using a common hydrothermal method without any templates or additives.The evolution of the morphology was accompanied by the gradual conversion of the polymorphic forms from γ-type to β-type.Meanwhile,MnO2 microspheres,urchin-like nanostructures and nanowires were successfully synthesized.The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope.The evolution process can be explained by the Ostwald Ripening mechanism.

  19. Dye-Sensitized Nanostructured Crystalline Mesoporous Tin-doped Indium Oxide Films with Tunable Thickness for Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamd, W; Chavarot-Kerlidou, M; Fize, J; Muller, G; Leyris, A; Matheron, M; Courtin, E; Fontecave, M; Sanchez, C; Artero, V; Laberty-Robert, C

    2013-01-01

    A simple route towards nanostructured mesoporous Indium-Tin Oxide (templated nano-ITO) electrodes exhibiting both high conductivities and optimized bicontinuous pore-solid network is reported. The ITO films are first produced as an X-ray-amorphous, high surface area material, by adapting recently established template-directed sol-gel methods using Sn(IV) and In(III) salts. Carefully controlled temperature/atmosphere treatments convert the as-synthesized ITO films into nano-crystalline coatings with the cubic bixbyite structure. Specially, a multi-layered synthesis was successfully undertaken for tuning the film thickness. In order to evaluate the performances of templated nano-ITO as an electrode substrate for photoelectrochemical applications, photoelectrodes were prepared by covalent grafting of a redox-active dye, the complex [Ru(bpy)2(4,4'-(CH2PO3H2)2-bpy)]Cl21 (bpy=bipyridine). Surface coverage was shown to increase with the film thickness, from 0.7 × 10(-9) mol.cm(-2) (one layer, 45 nm) to 3.5 × 10(-9) mol.cm(-2) (ten layers, 470 nm), the latter value being ~ 100 times larger than that for commercially available planar ITO. In the presence of an electron mediator, photocurrents up to 50 μA.cm(-2) have been measured under visible light irradiation, demonstrating the potential of this new templated nano-ITO preparation for the construction of efficient photoelectrochemical devices.

  20. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivadasan, A. K., E-mail: sivankondazhy@gmail.com; Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip, E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  1. Optimized absorption of solar radiations in nano-structured thin films of crystalline silicon via a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexandre; Muller, Jérôme; Herman, Aline; Deparis, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    We developed a genetic algorithm to achieve optimal absorption of solar radiation in nano-structured thin films of crystalline silicon (c-Si) for applications in photovoltaics. The device includes on the front side a periodic array of inverted pyramids, with conformal passivation layer (a-Si:H or AlOx) and anti-reflection coating (SiNx). The device also includes on the back side a passivation layer (a-Si:H) and a flat reflector (ITO and Ag). The geometrical parameters of the inverted pyramids as well as the thickness of the different layers must be adjusted in order to maximize the absorption of solar radiations in the c-Si. The genetic algorithm enables the determination of optimal solutions that lead to high performances by evaluating only a reduced number of parameter combinations. The results achieved by the genetic algorithm for a 40μm thick c-Si lead to short-circuit currents of 37 mA/cm2 when a-Si:H is used for the front-side passivation and 39.1 mA/cm2 when transparent AlOx is used instead.

  2. PEGylation of phytantriol-based lyotropic liquid crystalline particles--the effect of lipid composition, PEG chain length, and temperature on the internal nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Christa; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Susan Weng; Larsen, Claus; Urtti, Arto; Yaghmur, Anan

    2014-06-10

    Poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines (DSPE-mPEGs) are a family of amphiphilic lipopolymers attractive in formulating injectable long-circulating nanoparticulate drug formulations. In addition to long circulating liposomes, there is an interest in developing injectable long-circulating drug nanocarriers based on cubosomes and hexosomes by shielding and coating the dispersed particles enveloping well-defined internal nonlamellar liquid crystalline nanostructures with hydrophilic PEG segments. The present study attempts to shed light on the possible PEGylation of these lipidic nonlamellar liquid crystalline particles by using DSPE-mPEGs with three different block lengths of the hydrophilic PEG segment. The effects of lipid composition, PEG chain length, and temperature on the morphology and internal nanostructure of these self-assembled lipidic aqueous dispersions based on phytantriol (PHYT) were investigated by means of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and Transmission Electron Cryo-Microscopy. The results suggest that the used lipopolymers are incorporated into the water-PHYT interfacial area and induce a significant effect on the internal nanostructures of the dispersed submicrometer-sized particles. The hydrophilic domains of the internal liquid crystalline nanostructures of these aqueous dispersions are functionalized, i.e., the hydrophilic nanochannels of the internal cubic Pn3m and Im3m phases are significantly enlarged in the presence of relatively small amounts of the used DSPE-mPEGs. It is evident that the partial replacement of PHYT by these PEGylated lipids could be an attractive approach for the surface modification of cubosomal and hexosomal particles. These PEGylated nanocarriers are particularly attractive in designing injectable cubosomal and hexosomal nanocarriers for loading drugs and/or imaging probes.

  3. Well-Defined Nanostructured, Single-Crystalline TiO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongmin; Song, Seulki; Hörantner, Maximilian T; Snaith, Henry J; Park, Taiho

    2016-06-28

    An electron transporting layer (ETL) plays an important role in extracting electrons from a perovskite layer and blocking recombination between electrons in the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and holes in the perovskite layers, especially in planar perovskite solar cells. Dense TiO2 ETLs prepared by a solution-processed spin-coating method (S-TiO2) are mainly used in devices due to their ease of fabrication. Herein, we found that fatal morphological defects at the S-TiO2 interface due to a rough FTO surface, including an irregular film thickness, discontinuous areas, and poor physical contact between the S-TiO2 and the FTO layers, were inevitable and lowered the charge transport properties through the planar perovskite solar cells. The effects of the morphological defects were mitigated in this work using a TiO2 ETL produced from sputtering and anodization. This method produced a well-defined nanostructured TiO2 ETL with an excellent transmittance, single-crystalline properties, a uniform film thickness, a large effective area, and defect-free physical contact with a rough substrate that provided outstanding electron extraction and hole blocking in a planar perovskite solar cell. In planar perovskite devices, anodized TiO2 ETL (A-TiO2) increased the power conversion efficiency by 22% (from 12.5 to 15.2%), and the stabilized maximum power output efficiency increased by 44% (from 8.9 to 12.8%) compared with S-TiO2. This work highlights the importance of the ETL geometry for maximizing device performance and provides insights into achieving ideal ETL morphologies that remedy the drawbacks observed in conventional spin-coated ETLs.

  4. Real time evolution of liquid crystalline nanostructure during the digestion of formulation lipids using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Dallas B; Anby, Mette U; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2011-08-02

    The role of the digestion of lipids in facilitating absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds, such as vitamins, is not only an important nutritional issue but is increasingly being recognized as an important determinant in the effectiveness of lipid-based drug formulations. It has been known for some time that lipids often form complex liquid crystalline structures during digestion and that this may impact drug solubilization and absorption. However, until recently we have been unable to detect and characterize those structures in real time and have been limited in establishing the interplay between composition, digestion, and nanostructure. Here, we establish the use of an in vitro lipid digestion model used in conjunction with synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering by first confirming its validity using known, nondigestible liquid crystalline systems, and then extend the model to study the real time evolution of nanostructure during the digestion of common formulation lipids. The formation of liquid crystalline structures from unstructured liquid formulations is discovered, and the kinetics of formation and dependence on composition is investigated.

  5. Thermal and structural studies of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with and without liquid-crystalline phases: the origin of nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Fumiya; Kofu, Maiko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2015-04-16

    To clarify the origin of the nanostructure of ionic liquids (ILs), we have investigated two series of ILs 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (CnmimPF6, n = 4-16, n is an alkyl-carbon number) and 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (CnmimCl, n = 4-14) using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction techniques. The PF6 samples with n > 13 and the Cl samples with n > 10 exhibited the liquid-crystalline (LC) to liquid (L) phase transitions, as reported before. We found that both samples with smaller n also exhibited the LC to L transitions under supercooled states as far as the ionic motions were not frozen-in at the glass transition temperatures Tg. The Tg of the LC phase was close to that of the L phase, indicating that the characteristic length of the glass transition is shorter than that of the nanostructure. A low-Q peak due to the nanostructure in the L phase and a diffraction peak due to the layer structure in the LC phase appeared at almost the same Q positions in both samples. On the basis of the above results and some thermodynamic analysis, we argue that the nanostructures of ILs are essentially the same as the layer structures in the LC phases.

  6. Hydrothermal fabrication of quasi-one-dimensional single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanostructures on FTO glass and their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin-Yun; Lei, Bing-Xin; Wang, Yu-Fen; Liu, Jun-Min; Su, Cheng-Yong; Kuang, Dai-Bin

    2011-01-24

    One-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are desirable for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), since they can provide direct pathways for the rapid collection of photogenerated electrons, which could improve the photovoltaic performance of the device. Quasi-1D single-crystalline anatase TiO(2) nanostructures have been successfully prepared on transparent, conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with a growth direction of [101] through a facile hydrothermal approach. The influences of the initial titanium n-butoxide (TBT) concentration, hydrothermal reaction temperature, and time on the length of quasi-1D anatase TiO(2) nanostructures and on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs have been investigated in detail. A power conversion efficiency of 5.81% has been obtained based on the prepared TiO(2) nanostructure photoelectrode 6.7 μm thick and commercial N719 dye, with a short-circuit current density of 13.3 mA cm(-2) , an open-circuit voltage of 810 mV, and a fill factor of 0.54. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Improving Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Efficiency Using Graded-Refractive-Index SiON/ZnO Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Chun Tu; Shui-Jinn Wang; Chien-Hung Wu; Kow-Ming Chang; Tseng-Hsing Lin; Chien-Hsiung Hung; Jhen-Siang Wu

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxynitride (SiON)/ZnO nanotube (NT) arrays and their application in improving the energy conversion efficiency (η) of crystalline Si-based solar cells (SCs) are reported. The SiON/ZnO NT arrays have a graded-refractive-index that varies from 3.5 (Si) to 1.9~2.0 (Si3N4 and ZnO) to 1.72~1.75 (SiON) to 1 (air). Experimental results show that the use of 0.4 μm long ZnO NT arrays coated with a 150 nm thick SiON film increases Δη/η by 39.2% under AM 1.5 G (100 mW/cm2) ill...

  8. Nanostructured carbon-crystalline titania composites from microphase separation of poly(ethylene oxide-b-acrylonitrile) and titania sols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Morgan; Lee, Jinwoo; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2009-05-14

    A simple "one-pot" method utilizing a graphitic carbon source containing poly(ethylene oxide-b-acrylonitrile) diblock copolymer as a structure directing agent was used to synthesize carbon-crystalline titania composites as well as crystalline mesoporous titania materials after oxidative carbon removal.

  9. Improving Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Efficiency Using Graded-Refractive-Index SiON/ZnO Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chun Tu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of silicon oxynitride (SiON/ZnO nanotube (NT arrays and their application in improving the energy conversion efficiency (η of crystalline Si-based solar cells (SCs are reported. The SiON/ZnO NT arrays have a graded-refractive-index that varies from 3.5 (Si to 1.9~2.0 (Si3N4 and ZnO to 1.72~1.75 (SiON to 1 (air. Experimental results show that the use of 0.4 μm long ZnO NT arrays coated with a 150 nm thick SiON film increases Δη/η by 39.2% under AM 1.5 G (100 mW/cm2 illumination as compared to that of regular SCs with a Si3N4/micropyramid surface. This enhancement can be attributed to SiON/ZnO NT arrays effectively releasing surface reflection and minimizing Fresnel loss.

  10. A hierarchical nanostructure consisting of amorphous MnO 2, Mn 3O 4 nanocrystallites, and single-crystalline MnOOH nanowires for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chi-Chang; Hung, Ching-Yun; Chang, Kuo-Hsin; Yang, Yi-Lin

    In this communication, a porous hierarchical nanostructure consisting of amorphous MnO 2 (a-MnO 2), Mn 3O 4 nanocrystals, and single-crystalline MnOOH nanowires is designed for the supercapacitor application, which is prepared by a simple two-step electrochemical deposition process. Because of the gradual co-transformation of Mn 3O 4 nanocrystals and a-MnO 2 nanorods into an amorphous manganese oxide, the cycle stability of a-MnO 2 is obviously enhanced by adding Mn 3O 4. This unique ternary oxide nanocomposite with 100-cycle CV activation exhibits excellent capacitive performances, i.e., excellent reversibility, high specific capacitances (470 F g -1 in CaCl 2), high power property, and outstanding cycle stability. The highly porous microstructures of this composite before and after the 10,000-cycle CV test are examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. High-Performance Fully Nanostructured Photodetector with Single-Crystalline CdS Nanotubes as Active Layer and Very Long Ag Nanowires as Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qinwei; Meng, Xianquan; Sun, Pan

    2015-10-21

    Long and single-crystalline CdS nanotubes (NTs) have been prepared via a physical evaporation process. A metal-semiconductor-metal full-nanostructured photodetector with CdS NTs as active layer and Ag nanowires (NWs) of low resistivity and high transmissivity as electrodes has been fabricated and characterized. The CdS NTs-based photodetectors exhibit high performance, such as lowest dark currents (0.19 nA) and high photoresponse ratio (Ilight/Idark ≈ 4016) (among CdS nanostructure network photodetectors and NTs netwok photodetectors reported so far) and very low operation voltages (0.5 V). The photoconduction mechanism, including the formation of a Schottky barrier at the interface of Ag NW and CdS NTs and the effect of oxygen adsorption process on the Schottky barrier has also been provided in detail based on the studies of CdS NTs photodetector in air and vacuum. Furthermore, CdS NTs photodetector exhibits an enhanced photosensitivity as compared with CdS NWs photodetector. The enhancement in performance is dependent on the larger surface area of NTs adsorbing more oxygen in air and the microcavity structure of NTs with higher light absorption efficiency and external quantum efficiency. It is believed that CdS NTs can potentially be useful in the designs of 1D CdS-based optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  12. Realizing a facile and environmental-friendly fabrication of high-performance multi-crystalline silicon solar cells by employing ZnO nanostructures and an Al2O3 passivation layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Sun, Long; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Ji, Xin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, the multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells dominate the photovoltaic industry. However, the current acid etching method on mc-Si surface used by firms can hardly suppress the average reflectance value below 25% in the visible light spectrum. Meanwhile, the nitric acid and the hydrofluoric contained in the etching solution is both environmental unfriendly and highly toxic to human. Here, a mc-Si solar cell based on ZnO nanostructures and an Al2O3 spacer layer is demonstrated. The eco-friendly fabrication is realized by low temperature atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 layer as well as ZnO seed layer. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures are prepared by nontoxic and low cost hydro-thermal growth process. Results show that the best passivation quality of the n+ -type mc-Si surface can be achieved by balancing the Si dangling bond saturation level and the negative charge concentration in the Al2O3 film. Moreover, the average reflectance on cell surface can be suppressed to 8.2% in 400-900 nm range by controlling the thickness of ZnO seed layer. With these two combined refinements, a maximum solar cell efficiency of 15.8% is obtained eventually. This work offer a facile way to realize the environmental friendly fabrication of high performance mc-Si solar cells.

  13. Photocontrollable liquid-crystalline actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haifeng [Top Runner Incubation Center for Academia-Industry Fusion and Department of Materials and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Ikeda, Tomiki [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R1-11, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2011-05-17

    Coupling photochromic molecules with liquid crystalline (LC) materials enables one to reversibly photocontrol unique LC features such as phase transition, photoalignment, and molecular cooperative motion. LC elastomers show photomechanical and photomobile properties, directly converting light energy into mechanical energy. In well-defined LC block copolymers, regular patternings of nanostructures in macroscopic scales are fabricated by photo-manipulation of LC actuators. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Single-crystalline C60 nanostructures by sonophysical preparation: tuning hollow nanobowls as catalyst supports for methanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Lang; Li, Hui; Fan, Louzhen; Hu, Wenping; Wang, Chunru; Li, Yongfang; Yang, Shihe

    2011-04-18

    Large-scale single-crystalline hollow nanobowls of pure C(60) were prepared by applying a sonophysical strategy in a binary organic solution. Through the simple adjustment of the concentration of the C(60) /m-xylene solution and the volume ratio of m-xylene to acetonitrile, C(60) nanorings, nanoplates, nanorods, and nanowires were also selectively synthesized. The promise of the C(60) hollow structures as Pt catalyst supports is heightened by the significantly enhanced catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation for a given amount of C(60) used, which demonstrates their potential application in fuel cells.

  15. Morphology and Crystallinity-controlled Synthesis of Manganese Cobalt Oxide/Manganese Dioxides Hierarchical Nanostructures for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei; Li; Gang; Li; Hao; Chen; Jia; Qi; Jia; Fan; Dong; Yao; Bo; Hu; Zheng; Guo; Shang; 张育新

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel preparative strategy for the well-controlled MnCo2O4.5@MnO2 hierarchical nanostructures.Bothδ-MnO2 nanosheets andα-MnO2 nanorods can uniformly decorate the surface of MnCo2O4.5nanowires to form core-shell heterostructures.Detailed electrochemical characterization reveals that MnCo2O4.5@δ-MnO2 pattern exhibits not only high specific capacitance of 357.5 F g-1at a scan rate of 0.5 A g-1,but also good cycle stability(97%capacitance retention after 1000 cycles at a scan rate of 5 A g-1),which make it have a promising application as a supercapacitor electrode material.

  16. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.

  17. Crystallinity and stoichiometry of nano-structured sol-gel-derived BaTiO{sub 3} monolithic gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimooka, Hirokazu [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Kuwabara, Makoto [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science

    1996-11-01

    The crystallization behavior and stoichiometric changes of barium titanium alkoxide-derived monolithic gels prepared by the sol-gel process using a high-concentration Ba,Ti precursor solution (0.8 mol/L) were investigated during aging at room temperature. Crystallization of the gels (which were amorphous, per X-ray diffraction analysis immediately after gelation) into the BaTiO{sub 3} perovskite phase increased during aging and was associated with significant shrinkage of the gels. Crystallization reached a value of {approximately}82% by the final stage of shrinkage, assuming the degree of crystallization of a gel treated at 600 C to be 100%. The stoichiometry of the gels (Ba/Ti molar ratio) also changed considerably during aging, as estimated by the concentrations of Ba and Ti that remained in the expelled liquid resulting from syneresis at any time during the aging process. Deviation in the Ba/Ti ratio of the precursor solution ranged from 0.015 at the initial stage of shrinkage to 0.003 at the final stage, a value determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The present study demonstrates the great advantage of using high-concentration precursor solutions of barium titanium alkoxides, rather than low-concentration solutions, to obtain BaTiO{sub 3} gel monoliths with high density and crystallinity and little stoichiometric deviation, by sol-gel processing at room temperature.

  18. Si and Ge nanostructures epitaxy on a crystalline insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Jean-Luc; Mortada, Hussein; Dentel, Didier; Derivaz, Mickael [Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), LRC 7228 CNRS-UHA, Universite de Haute Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Ben Azzouz, Chiraz; Akremi, Abdelwahab; Chefi, Chaabanne [Equipe Surface et Interface (ESI) - Faculte des Sciences, Bizerte (Tunisia); Morales, Francisco Miguel; Herrera, Miriam; Manuel, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Rafael [Department of Materials Science, Metallurgical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, Cadiz University (Spain); Diani, Mustapha [Equipe de Recherche en Mecanique, Materiaux et Metallurgie, FST, Tanger (Morocco)

    2012-04-15

    We present a comparative structural study of the growth of Si and Ge deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a c(2 x 2) reconstructed LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrate. Our findings are based on complementary experimental techniques such as in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). While the layers are amorphous and wet uniformly the substrate in a low deposition temperature range, above 500 C both Si and Ge growths proceed in a Volmer-Weber (VW) mode leading to the formation of nanocrystals (NCs). The islands are found to be composed of pure Si and Ge and to have abrupt interfaces with the substrate. Both semiconductors (SCs) crystallize in their own diamond structure leading to relaxed NCs. No facets could be observed on the crystalline islands. An epitaxial relationship is established for which the (001) planes of Si and Ge are parallel to the LaAlO{sub 3}(001) surface but are rotated by 45 around the [001] growth axis. The Ge lattice undergoes a second rotation of 6 with respect to the (001) growth axis. This 6 tilt is an original mechanism to partially compensate the strain in the Ge islands induced by the large misfit. Whereas a unique epitaxial relationship is pointed out for Si NCs, many Ge NCs are randomly orientated on the surface. This is interpreted by the fact that the Ge islands are less anchored to the substrate due to a large misfit and to the fact that the Ge-O bonds are weaker than the Si-O ones. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. The cataract-associated V41M mutant of human γS-crystallin shows specific structural changes that directly enhance local surface hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat, Somireddy Venkata; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti, E-mail: jpande@albany.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We present NMR analysis of V41M, a cataract-causing mutant of human γS-crystallin. •Mutation alters strand–strand interactions throughout the N-terminal domain. •Mutation directly affects Trp46 due to key Met41-S–Trp46-pi interactions. •We identify the basis of the surface hydrophobicity increase and residues involved. -- Abstract: The major crystallins expressed in the human lens are γS-, γC- and γD-crystallins. Several mutations in γS-crystallin are associated with hereditary cataracts, one of which involves the substitution of a highly conserved Valine at position 41 to Methionine. According to a recent report, the mutant protein, V41M, shows lower stability and increased surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type, and a propensity for self-aggregation. Here we address the structural differences between the two proteins, with residue-level specificity using NMR spectroscopy. Based on the structural model of the mutant protein, our results clearly show that the mutation creates a major local perturbation almost at the junction of the first and second “Greek-key” motifs in the N-terminal domain. A larger section of the second motif (residues 44–86) appears to be mainly affected. Based on the sizeable chemical shift of the imino proton of the indole side-chain of Trp46 in V41M, we suggest that the sulphur atom of Met41 is involved in an S–π interaction with Trp46. This interaction would bring the last β-strand of the first “Greek-key” motif closer to the first β-strand of the second motif. This appears to lead to a domino effect, towards both the N- and C-terminal ends, even as it decays off substantially beyond the domain interface. During this process discreet hydrophobic surface patches are created, as revealed by ANS-binding. Such changes would not affect the secondary structure or cause a major change in the tertiary structure, but can lead to self-aggregation or aberrant binding interactions of the mutant

  20. The clinical efficacy of cosmeceutical application of liquid crystalline nanostructured dispersions of alpha lipoic acid as anti-wrinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Saly; Bendas, Ehab R; Badawy, Sabry

    2014-02-01

    Topical 5% alpha lipoic acid (ALA) has shown efficacy in treatment of photo-damaged skin. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of poloxamer (P407) gel as a vehicle for the novel lipid base particulate system (cubosome dispersions) of ALA. Cubosome dispersions were formulated by two different approaches, emulsification of glyceryl monoolein (GMO) and poloxamer (P407) in water followed by ultrasonication, and the dilution method using a hydrotrope. Three different concentrations of GMO were used to formulate the cubosome dispersions using the first method, 5% (D1), 10% (D2) and 15% w/w (D3). In the second technique an isotropic liquid was produced by combining GMO with ethanol, and this isotropic liquid was then diluted with a P407 solution (D4). The dispersions were characterized by zeta potential, light scattering techniques, optical and transmission electron microscopy, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. Results showed that D4 was not a uniform dispersion and that D1, D2 and D3 were uniform dispersions, in which by increasing the GMO content in the dispersion, the size of the cubosomes decreased, zeta potential became more negative, encapsulation efficiency increased up to 86.48% and the drug release rate was slower. P407 gels were prepared using the cold method. Two concentrations of P407 gel were fabricated, 20 and 30% w/w. P407 gels were loaded with either ALA or dispersions containing ALA cubosomes. P407 gels were characterized by critical gelation temperature, rheological measurements and in vitro drug release studies. Results suggested that by increasing P407 concentration, the gelation temperature decreases and viscosity increases. Drug release in both cases was found to follow the Higuchi square root model. Gel loaded with ALA cubosomes provided a significantly lower release rate than the gel loaded with the un-encapsulated ALA. A double blinded placebo controlled clinical study was conducted, aiming to evaluate the efficacy

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of ZnTe Hierarchical Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystalline ZnTe hierarchical nanostructures have been successfully synthesized by a simple thermal evaporation technology. The as-prepared products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microcopy (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and photoluminescence spectrum (PL. These results showed that the ZnTe hierarchical nanostructures consisted of nanowires and nanolumps. The room temperature PL spectrum exhibited a pure green luminescence centered at 545nm. The growth mechanism of hierarchical nanostructure was also discussed.

  2. Catalyst-nanostructure interaction in the growth of 1-D ZnO nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C; Müller, S; Stichtenoth, D; Schwen, D; Ronning, C

    2006-02-02

    Vapor-liquid-solid is a well-established process in catalyst guided growth of 1-D nanostructures, i.e., nanobelts and nanowires. The catalyst particle is generally believed to be in the liquid state during growth, and is the site for impinging molecules. The crystalline structure of the catalyst may not have any influence on the structure of the grown nanostructures. In this work, using Au guided growth of ZnO, we show that the interfaces between the catalyst droplet and the nanostructure grow in well-defined mutual crystallographic relationships. The nanostructure defines the crystallographic orientation of the solidifying Au droplet. Possible alloy, intermetallic, or eutectic phase formation during catalysis are elucidated with the help of a proposed ternary Au-Zn-O phase diagram.

  3. Nanostructured SnO2-ZnO heterojunction photocatalysts showing enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Tamez; Nicolas, Yohann; Olivier, Céline; Toupance, Thierry; Servant, Laurent; Müller, Mathis M; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Ziegler, Jürgen; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2012-07-16

    Nanoporous SnO(2)-ZnO heterojunction nanocatalyst was prepared by a straightforward two-step procedure involving, first, the synthesis of nanosized SnO(2) particles by homogeneous precipitation combined with a hydrothermal treatment and, second, the reaction of the as-prepared SnO(2) particles with zinc acetate followed by calcination at 500 °C. The resulting nanocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption-desorption analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The SnO(2)-ZnO photocatalyst was made of a mesoporous network of aggregated wurtzite ZnO and cassiterite SnO(2) nanocrystallites, the size of which was estimated to be 27 and 4.5 nm, respectively, after calcination. According to UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the evident energy band gap value of the SnO(2)-ZnO photocatalyst was estimated to be 3.23 eV to be compared with those of pure SnO(2), that is, 3.7 eV, and ZnO, that is, 3.2 eV, analogues. The energy band diagram of the SnO(2)-ZnO heterostructure was directly determined by combining XPS and the energy band gap values. The valence band and conduction band offsets were calculated to be 0.70 ± 0.05 eV and 0.20 ± 0.05 eV, respectively, which revealed a type-II band alignment. Moreover, the heterostructure SnO(2)-ZnO photocatalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue than those of individual SnO(2) and ZnO nanomaterials. This behavior was rationalized in terms of better charge separation and the suppression of charge recombination in the SnO(2)-ZnO photocatalyst because of the energy difference between the conduction band edges of SnO(2) and ZnO as evidenced by the band alignment determination. Finally, this mesoporous SnO(2)-ZnO heterojunction nanocatalyst was stable and could be easily recycled several times opening new avenues for potential industrial

  4. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  5. Effect of the morphology on the optical properties of ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zao; Ye, Zhizhen; Xu, Zheng; zhao, Binghui

    2009-12-01

    ZnO nanostructures are fabricated by citric acid-assisted annealing process. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), FTIR spectrophotometer, ultraviolet-visible-near IR spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction pattern of these samples shows that ZnO nanostructures are single crystalline and pure. The effect of morphology of ZnO nanostructures on the optical properties of ZnO nanostructures is analyzed on the basis of these results. Our results clearly demonstrate that tunable optical properties of ZnO nanostructures can be attained by changing the morphology of ZnO nanostructures.

  6. Freestanding single-crystalline magnetic structures fabricated by ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenherr, P.; Bischof, A.; Boehm, B.; Eib, P.; Grimm, S.; Gross, L.; Allenspach, R., E-mail: ral@zurich.ibm.com [IBM Research – Zurich, 8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Alvarado, S. F. [Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-01-19

    Starting from an ultrathin Fe film grown epitaxially on top of a GaAs(001) substrate, we show that freestanding structures can be created by ion-beam treatment. These structures are single-crystalline blisters and only a few nanometers thick. Anisotropic stress in the rim of a blister induces magnetic domain states magnetized in the direction normal to the blister edge. Experimental evidence is provided that the lateral size can be confined by starting from a nanostructured template.

  7. Nanostructured copper/porous silicon hybrid systems as efficient sound-emitting devices.

    OpenAIRE

    Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the photo-acoustic emission from nanostructured copper/porous silicon hybrid systems was studied. Copper nanoparticles were grown by photo-assisted electroless deposition on crystalline silicon and nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS). Both the optical and photo-acoustic responses from these systems were determined. The experimental results show a remarkable increase in the photo-acoustic intensity when copper nanoparticles are incorporated to the porous structure. The ...

  8. Lyotropic, liquid crystalline nanostructures of aqueous dilutions of SMEDDS revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering: impact on solubility and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddeeris, Caroline; Goderis, Bart; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2010-05-12

    The present study was conducted to characterise the liquid crystalline phases that occur upon diluting a SMEDDS and to elucidate the role of these phases on drug solubilisation and release. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to probe the structures in aqueous dilutions of 3 SMEDDS consisting of propylene glycol mono- and dicaprylate and mono- and dicaprate (PGDCDC) and d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate 1000 (TPGS 1000), polysorbate 80 (P80) or polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (P40HC). The scattering patterns revealed the formation of either a random periodic or a lamellar phase when 10% (w/w) water was added. All formulations exhibited lamellar structures at 20% (w/w) aqueous dilution, of which the layer-to-layer distance increased upon further addition of water. At 40% (w/w) water, a hexagonal or lamellar phase was formed, depending on the geometry of the surfactant. Temperature did not alter the phases formed. Incorporation of the drug UC 781 only slightly enlarged the characteristic dimensions of the liquid crystalline phases. Drug solubility decreased upon aqueous dilution, although 10% (w/w) dilutions of PGDCDC-P80 SMEDDS and PGDCDC-TPGS 1000 SMEDDS revealed a highly increased solubility as compared to the pure formulations. Drug release data revealed that UC 781 release could not be linked to the solubilisation capacity of the SMEDDS, but could be associated with the solubility of UC 781 in the phases formed at water concentrations above 10% (w/w).

  9. Nanostructure formation on silicon surfaces by using low energy helium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Yamada, Kohei; Maenaka, Shiro; Fujita, Kazunobu; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A new technology for obtaining nanostructure on silicon surface for potential applications to optical devices is represented. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a grown nanostructure of dense forest consisting of long cylindrical needle cones with a length of approximately 300 nm and a mutual distance of approximately 200 nm. Raman spectroscopy and spectrophotometry showed a good crystallinity and photon trapping, and reduced light reflectance after helium plasma exposure. The present technique consists of a simple maskless process that circumvents the use of chemical etching liquid, and utilizes soft ion bombardment on silicon substrate, keeping a good crystallinity.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic nanostructures: Shape tuning by the addition of a polymer at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Md. Harunar; Raula, Manoj; Mandal, Tarun K., E-mail: psutkm@iacs.res.in

    2014-06-01

    We report a simple method for shape-controlled synthesis of iron oxide spinels such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures using a thermoresponsive polymer poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) by the alkaline hydrolysis of iron salt at low temperature (20 °C). Microscopic analysis confirmed the formation of needle- and flower-shaped iron oxide nanostructures depending on reaction conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis of the needle- and flower-shaped nanostructures as well as their corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the formed nanostructures are crystalline in nature. X-ray diffraction study reveals the formation of well-crystalline pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures under different reaction conditions. Fourier transform Infra-red spectroscopic analysis confirms the adsorption of PVME on the surface of iron oxide nanostructures. Finally, the magnetic properties of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures is studied that shows the superparamagnetic behavior of the formed iron oxide nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: A simple method for shape-controlled synthesis of iron oxide spinels such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures using a thermoresponsive polymer poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) by the alkaline hydrolysis of iron salt at low temperature (20 °C) is described. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Low-temperature method for iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures is described. • Shape of iron oxide nanostructures can be tuned by varying the reaction parameter. • Needle- and flower-shaped iron oxide nanostructures are obtained with polymer. • HRTEM analysis shows iron oxide nanostructures are crystalline in nature. • Both γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures shows superparamagnetic behavior.

  11. Crystalline nanostructured Cu doped ZnO thin films grown at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition technique and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drmosh, Qasem A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Rao, Saleem G.; Yamani, Zain H. [Laser Research Group, Department of Physics, Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gondal, Mohammed A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Laser Research Group, Department of Physics, Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-04-01

    We report structural and optical properties of Cu doped ZnO (ZnO:Cu) thin films deposited on glass substrate at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method without pre and post annealing contrary to all previous reports. For preparation of (ZnO:Cu) composites pure Zn and Cu targets in special geometrical arrangements were exposed to 248 nm radiations generated by KrF exciter laser. The laser energy was 200 mJ with 10 Hz frequency and 20 ns pulse width. The effect of Cu concentration on crystal structure, morphology, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, FESEM and photoluminescence spectrometer respectively. A systematic shift in ZnO (0 0 2) peak with Cu concentration observed in XRD spectra demonstrated that Cu ion has been incorporated in ZnO lattice. Uniform film with narrow size range grains were observed in FESEM images. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra measured at room temperature revealed a systematic red shift in ZnO emission peak and decrease in the band gap with the increase in Cu concentration. These results entail that PLD technique can be realized to deposit high quality crystalline ZnO and ZnO:Cu thin films without pre and post heat treatment which is normally practiced worldwide for such structures.

  12. Optical characterization of double-side-textured silicon wafer based on photonic nanostructures for thin-wafer crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Furuta, Daichi; Aonuma, Osamu; Takahashi, Isao; Hoshi, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Usami, Noritaka

    2017-04-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers have found extensive use in photovoltaic applications. In this regard, to enable advanced light manipulation in thin-wafer c-Si solar cells, we demonstrate the fabrication of double-side-textured Si wafers composed of a front-surface photonic nanotexture fabricated with quantum dot arrays and a rear-surface microtexture. The addition of the rear-surface microtexture to a Si wafer with the front-surface photonic nanotexture increases the wafer’s optical absorption in the near-infrared region, thus enabling enhanced light trapping. Excitation spectroscopy reveals that the photoluminescence intensity in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture is higher than that in the Si wafer without the rear-surface microtexture, thus indicating an increase in true optical absorption in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture. Our results indicate that the double-sided textures, i.e., the front-surface photonic nanotexture and rear-surface microtexture, can effectively reduce the surface reflection loss and provide enhanced light trapping, respectively.

  13. Facile Synthesis and Tensile Behavior of TiO2 One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu-you

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-yield synthesis of TiO2 one-dimensional (1D nanostructures was realized by a simple annealing of Ni-coated Ti grids in an argon atmosphere at 950 °C and 760 torr. The as-synthesized 1D nanostructures were single crystalline rutile TiO2 with the preferred growth direction close to [210]. The growth of these nanostructures was enhanced by using catalytic materials, higher reaction temperature, and longer reaction time. Nanoscale tensile testing performed on individual 1D nanostructures showed that the nanostructures appeared to fracture in a brittle manner. The measured Young’s modulus and fracture strength are ~56.3 and 1.4 GPa, respectively.

  14. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  15. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  16. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  17. Doping effect on SILAR synthesized crystalline nanostructured Cu-doped ZnO thin films grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaygude, H. D.; Shinde, S. K.; Velhal, Ninad B.; Takale, M. V.; Fulari, V. J.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, a novel chemical route is used to synthesize the undoped and Cu-doped ZnO thin films in aqueous solution by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The synthesized thin films are characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), contact angle goniometer and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. XRD study shows that the prepared films are polycrystalline in nature with hexagonal crystal structure. The change in morphology for different doping is observed in the studies of FE-SEM. EDAX spectrum shows that the thin films consist of zinc, copper and oxygen elements. Contact angle goniometer is used to measure the contact angle between a liquid and a solid interface and after detection, the nature of the films is initiated from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The optical band gap energy for direct allowed transition ranging between 1.60-2.91 eV is observed.

  18. Crystalline Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D; Jiang, F -J; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We show that exotic phases arise in generalized lattice gauge theories known as quantum link models in which classical gauge fields are replaced by quantum operators. While these quantum models with discrete variables have a finite-dimensional Hilbert space per link, the continuous gauge symmetry is still exact. An efficient cluster algorithm is used to study these exotic phases. The $(2+1)$-d system is confining at zero temperature with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. A crystalline phase exhibits confinement via multi-stranded strings between charge-anti-charge pairs. A phase transition between two distinct confined phases is weakly first order and has an emergent spontaneously broken approximate $SO(2)$ global symmetry. The low-energy physics is described by a $(2+1)$-d $\\mathbb{R}P(1)$ effective field theory, perturbed by a dangerously irrelevant $SO(2)$ breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. This model is an ideal candidat...

  19. Stabilizing nanostructures in metals using grain and twin boundary architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.

    2016-05-01

    Forming alloys with impurity elements is a routine method for modifying the properties of metals. An alternative approach involves the incorporation of interfaces into the crystalline lattice to enhance the metal's properties without changing its chemical composition. The introduction of high-density interfaces in nanostructured materials results in greatly improved strength and hardness; however, interfaces at the nanoscale show low stability. In this Review, I discuss recent developments in the stabilization of nanostructured metals by modifying the architectures of their interfaces. The amount, structure and distribution of several types of interfaces, such as high- and low-angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries, are discussed. I survey several examples of materials with nanotwinned and nanolaminated structures, as well as with gradient nanostructures, describing the techniques used to produce such samples and tracing their exceptional performances back to the nanoscale architectures of their interfaces.

  20. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  1. Heat treatment effects on the surface morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainizan Sahdan, M. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Hafiz Mamat, M.; Salina, M.; Noor, Uzer M.; Rusop, Mohamad [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Khusaimi, Zuraida [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have received broad attention due to its wide applications especially for thin-film solar cells and transistors. In this paper, we report the effects of heat treatment on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Zinc oxide nanostructures were synthesized using thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method on glass substrate. The surface morphologies which were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that ZnO nanostructures change its shape and size when the annealing temperature increases from 400 C to 600 C. Structural measurement using X-ray diffraction (XRD) has shown that ZnO nanostructures have the highest crystallinity and smallest crystallite size (20 nm) when annealed at 550 C. Furthermore, the samples were optically characterized using Photoluminescence (PL) spectrometer. The PL spectra indicate that ZnO nanostructures have the highest peak at UV wavelength when annealed at 550 C. The mechanism of the PL properties of ZnO nanostructures is also discussed. We conclude that ZnO nanostructures deposited using thermal CVD have the optimum structural and PL properties when annealed at 550 C. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  3. Decoration of ZnO Nanorods with Coral Reefs like NiO Nanostructures by the Hydrothermal Growth Method and Their Luminescence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Ali Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO/n-type ZnO were synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation shows that the adopted synthesis leads to high crystalline quality nanostructures. The morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures are dominated mainly by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence of the decorated ZnO nanostructures is enhanced by the presence of the NiO.

  4. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  5. Nanostructured copper/porous silicon hybrid systems as efficient sound-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Martín-Palma, Raúl J

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the photo-acoustic emission from nanostructured copper/porous silicon hybrid systems was studied. Copper nanoparticles were grown by photo-assisted electroless deposition on crystalline silicon and nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS). Both the optical and photo-acoustic responses from these systems were determined. The experimental results show a remarkable increase in the photo-acoustic intensity when copper nanoparticles are incorporated to the porous structure. The results thus suggest that the Cu/nanoPS hybrid systems are suitable candidates for several applications in the field of thermoplasmonics, including the development of sound-emitting devices of great efficiency.

  6. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  7. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  8. D. C. plasma-sprayed coatings of nano-structured alumina-titania-silica

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Xian Liang

    2002-01-01

    nano-crystalline powders of omega(Al sub 2 O sub 3) = 95%, omega(TiO sub 2) = 3%, and omega(SiO sub 2) = 2%, were reprocessed into agglomerated particles for plasma spraying, by using consecutive steps of ball milling, slurry forming, spray drying, and heat treatment. D.C. plasma was used to spray the agglomerated nano-crystalline powders, and resultant coatings were deposited on the substrate of stainless steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the morphology of the agglomerated powders and the cross section of the alumina-titania-silica coatings. Experimental results show that the agglomerated nano-crystalline particles are spherical, with a size from (10-90) mu m. The flow ability of the nano-crystalline powders is greatly improved after the reprocessing. The coatings deposited by the plasma spraying are mainly of nano-structure. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, no laminar layer could be found in the nano-structured coatings. Although the nano-structured coatings have a lo...

  9. Optical and morphological properties of ZnO- and TiO2-derived nanostructures synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moloto, N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZnO and TiO2 nanostructures. The experimental results show that the method resulted in crystalline monodispersed ZnO nanorods that have pointed tips with hexagonal crystal phase. TiO2...

  10. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  11. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  12. Size-dependent crystalline fluctuation and growth mechanism of bismuth nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sujuan; Jiang, Yi; Hu, Lijun; Sun, Jianguo; Wan, Piaopiao; Sun, Lidong

    2016-06-01

    Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non-crystalline one. This is promising for applications in nanofabrication where high quality interfaces are desired between two joining parts.Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non-crystalline

  13. Controlled Synthesis of ZnO Nanostructures by Electrodeposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Jiangfeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a systematic study on the synthesis of various ZnO nanostructures by electrodeposition method with ZnCl2 solution as starting reactant. Several reaction parameters were examined to develop an optimal procedure for controlling the size, shape, and surface morphology of the nanostructure. The results showed that the morphology of the products can be carefully controlled through adjusting the concentration of the electrolyte. The products present well-aligned nanorod arrays when the concentration is low. However, they act as anomalous hexangular nanoplates when the concentration of ZnCl2 is higher than 5 mM. Transmission electron microscopy and select area electron diffraction results show that the product presents good crystallinity. A possible formation process has been proposed.

  14. Vibrational Order, Structural Properties, and Optical Gap of ZnO Nanostructures Sintered through Thermal Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The sintering of different ZnO nanostructures by the thermal decomposition of zinc acetate is reported. Morphological changes from nanorods to nanoparticles are exhibited with the increase of the decomposition temperature from 300 to 500°C. The material showed a loss in the crystalline order with the increase in the temperature, which is correlated to the loss of oxygen due to the low heating rate used. Nanoparticles have a greater vibrational freedom than nanorods which is demonstrated in th...

  15. Hydrothermal growth and characterizations of dandelion-like ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Rohidas B., E-mail: rb_kale@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, The Institute of Science, Madam Cama Road, Mumbai 400 032, (M.S.) (India); Lu, Shih-Yuan, E-mail: sylu@nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •The simple, low cost, environmental benign hydrothermal method has been used to synthesize ZnO nanostructure. •The SEM images reveal the interesting 3D dandelion-like morphology of synthesized ZnO nanostructure. The SAED pattern and HRTEM study confirms that the ZnO nanorods are single crystalline. •Change in experimental conditions dramatically changes the morphologies of the synthesized ZnO. •The room temperature PL study reveals strong band edge emission along with much weaker defect related blue emission. •The reaction and growth mechanism of ZnO nanostructure is also discussed. -- Abstract: Three dimensional (3D) ZnO nanostructures have been synthesized by using a facile low-cost hydrothermal method under mild conditions. Aqueous alkaline ammonia solution of Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} is used to grow 3D ZnO nanostructures. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study reveals the well crystallized hexagonal structure of ZnO. SEM observations depict that the ZnO product grows in the form of nanorods united together to form 3D dandelion-like nanostructures. The elemental analysis using EDAX technique confirms the stoichiometry of the ZnO nanorods. The product exhibits special optical properties with red-shifts in optical absorption peak (376 nm) as compared with those of conventional ZnO nanorods. PL spectra show emission peak (396 nm) at the near band-edge and peak (464 nm) originated from defects states that are produced during the hydrothermal growth. TEM and SAED results reveal single crystalline structure of the synthesized product. The reaction and growth mechanisms on the morphological evolution of the ZnO nanostructures are discussed. The morphology of ZnO product is investigated by varying the reaction time, temperature, and type of complexing reagent.

  16. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  17. Highly selective electrodeposition of sub-10 nm crystalline noble metallic nanorods inside vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuyang; Wang, Ranran; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhaohui; Guo, Jun; Chen, Muzi; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Yajun; Chu, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper crystalline noble metallic nanorods including Au and Ag with sub-10 nm diameter, are encapsulated within prealigned and open-ended multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through an electrodeposition method. As the external surface of CNTs has been insulated by the epoxy the CNT channel becomes the only path for the mass transport as well as the nanoreactor for the metal deposition. Highly crystallized Au and Ag2O nanorods parallel to the radial direction of CNTs are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction spectroscopy. The Ag2O nanorods are formed by air oxidation on the Ag metals and show a single crystalline structure with (111) planes. The Au nanorods exhibit a complex crystalline structure including twin-crystal and lattice dislocation with (111) and (200) planes. These crystalline noble metallic nanostructures may have important applications for nanocatalysts for fuel cells as well as nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. This method is deemed to benefit the precise deposition of other crystalline nanostructures inside CNTs with a small diameter.

  18. Curvature-dependent surface energy and implications for nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapadia, P.; Mohammadi, P.; Sharma, P.

    2011-10-01

    At small length scales, several size-effects in both physical phenomena and properties can be rationalized by invoking the concept of surface energy. Conventional theoretical frameworks of surface energy, in both the mechanics and physics communities, assume curvature independence. In this work we adopt a simplified and linearized version of a theory proposed by Steigmann-Ogden to capture curvature-dependence of surface energy. Connecting the theory to atomistic calculations and the solution to an illustrative paradigmatical problem of a bent cantilever beam, we catalog the influence of curvature-dependence of surface energy on the effective elastic modulus of nanostructures. The observation in atomistic calculations that the elastic modulus of bent nanostructures is dramatically different than under tension - sometimes softer, sometimes stiffer - has been a source of puzzlement to the scientific community. We show that the corrected surface mechanics framework provides a resolution to this issue. Finally, we propose an unambiguous definition of the thickness of a crystalline surface.

  19. Synthesis and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, U.; Serrano, J. Garcia; Santiago, P.; Xiong, Gang; Ucer, K. B.; Williams, R. T.

    2006-10-01

    ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies were grown by a low-temperature hydrothermal technique. The morphology, crystallinity and defect content in the nanostructures could be controlled by adjusting the synthesis conditions. Nanostructures prepared with optimum growth conditions were of good structural and optical qualities. Effects of growth conditions and thermal annealing on the optical properties of the nanostructures were studied by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques. It is found that the nanostructures grown with particular initial and final pH values of the reaction mixture and air-annealed at about 250 °C are of best crystalline and optical quality.

  20. Surface States Effect on the Large Photoluminescence Redshift in GaN Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    We report on the large photoluminescence redshift observed in nanostructures fabricated using n-type GaN by ultraviolet (UV) metal-assisted electroless chemical-etching method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization showed nanostructures with size dispersion ranging from 10 to 100 nm. We observed the crystalline structure using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) techniques. In contrast to 362 nm UV emission from the GaN epitaxy, the nanostructures emitted violet visible-light in photoluminescence (PL) characterization with increasing optical excitation. An energy band model was presented to shed light on the large PL redshift under the influence of surface states, which resulted in two competing photoluminescence mechanisms depending on excitation conditions.

  1. Thermal phonon transport in Si thin film with dog-leg shaped asymmetric nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Yuta; Hagino, Harutoshi; Yanagisawa, Ryoto; Maire, Jeremie; Miyazaki, Koji; Nomura, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    Thermal phonon transport in single-crystalline Si thin films with dog-leg shaped nanostructures was investigated. Thermal conductivities for the forward and backward directions were measured and compared at 5 and 295 K by micro thermoreflectance. The Si thin film with dog-leg shaped nanostructures showed lower thermal conductivities than those of nanowires and two-dimensional phononic crystals with circular holes at the same surface-to-volume ratio. However, asymmetric thermal conductivity was not observed at small temperature gradient condition in spite of the highly asymmetric shape though the size of the pattern is within thermal phonon mean free path range. We conclude that strong temperature dependent thermal conductivity is required to observe the asymmetric thermal phonon conduction in monolithic materials with asymmetric nanostructures.

  2. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures and its photoluminescence property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Shanwen; Fang, Xiaoxin; Huang, Honghong; Li, Lun; Wang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Huihu

    2016-12-01

    An ultrathin layer of amorphous carbon coated C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose as precursor in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS) were used for the characterization of as-prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of C@ZnO samples were investigated using PL spectroscopy. The microstructure analysis results show that the glucose content has a great influence on the size, morphology, crystallinity and surface chemical states of C@ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, the as-prepared C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures exhibit the enhanced photocatalytic activity and good photostability for methyl orange dye degradation due to its high adsorption ability and its improved optical characteristics.

  3. Field-emission characteristics of Al-doped ZnO nanostructures hydrothermally synthesized at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Po-Yu; Wang, Jyh-Liang; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Lin, Jia-Chuan; Lee, I-Che; Chang, Chia-Tsung; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2011-07-01

    The aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) nanostructures with different Al concentrations were synthesized on AZO/glass substrate via a simple hydrothermal growth method at a temperature as low as 85 degrees C. The morphologies, crystallinity, optical emission properties, and chemical bonding states of AZO nanostructures show evident dependence on the aluminum dosage. The morphologies of AZO nanostructures were changed from vertically aligned nanowires (NWs), and NWs coexisted with nanosheets (NSs), to complete NSs in respect of the Al-dosages of 0-3 at.%, 5 at.%, and 7 at.%, correspondingly. The undoped ZnO and lightly Al-doped AZO (< or = 3 at.%) NWs are single-crystalline wurtzite structure. In contrast, heavily Al-doped AZO sample is polycrystalline. The AZO nanostructure with 3 at.% Al-dosages reveals the optimal crystallinity and less structural defects, reflecting the longest carrier lifetime and highest conductivity. Consequently, the field-emission characteristics of such an AZO emitter can exhibit the higher current density, larger field-enhancement factor (beta) of 3131, lower turn-on field of 2.17 V/microm, and lower threshold field of 3.43 V/microm.

  4. Effect of amorphisation on the thermal properties of nanostructured membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Verdier, Maxime; Lacroix, David [CNRS, LEMTA, UMR 7563, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Lorraine Univ., Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France). LEMTA UMR 7563

    2017-05-01

    The majority of the silicon devices contain amorphous phase and amorphous/crystalline interfaces which both considerably affect the transport of energy carriers as phonons and electrons. In this article, we investigate the impact of amorphous phases (both amorphous silicon and amorphous SiO{sub 2}) of silicon nanoporous membranes on their thermal properties via molecular dynamics simulations. We show that a small fraction of amorphous phase reduces dramatically the thermal transport. One can even create nanostructured materials with subamorphous thermal conductivity, while keeping an important crystalline fraction. In general, the a-SiO{sub 2} shell around the pores reduces the thermal conductivity by a factor of five to ten compared to a-Si shell. The phonon density of states for several systems is also given to give the impact of the amorphisation on the phonon modes.

  5. Effect of Amorphisation on the Thermal Properties of Nanostructured Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Verdier, Maxime; Lacroix, David

    2017-02-01

    The majority of the silicon devices contain amorphous phase and amorphous/crystalline interfaces which both considerably affect the transport of energy carriers as phonons and electrons. In this article, we investigate the impact of amorphous phases (both amorphous silicon and amorphous SiO2) of silicon nanoporous membranes on their thermal properties via molecular dynamics simulations. We show that a small fraction of amorphous phase reduces dramatically the thermal transport. One can even create nanostructured materials with subamorphous thermal conductivity, while keeping an important crystalline fraction. In general, the a-SiO2 shell around the pores reduces the thermal conductivity by a factor of five to ten compared to a-Si shell. The phonon density of states for several systems is also given to give the impact of the amorphisation on the phonon modes.

  6. Optical and Morphological Properties of ZnO- and TiO2-Derived Nanostructures Synthesized via a Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosipho Moloto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZnO and TiO2 nanostructures. The experimental results show that the method resulted in crystalline monodispersed ZnO nanorods that have pointed tips with hexagonal crystal phase. TiO2 nanotubes were also formed with minimum bundles. The mechanism for the formation of the tubes was validated by HRTEM results. The optical properties of both ZnO and TiO2 nanostructures showed characteristics of strong quantum confinement regime. The photoluminescence spectrum of TiO2 nanotubes shows good improvement from previously reported data.

  7. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  8. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dunwei Wang; Stafford Sheehan; Sa Zhou; Yongjing Lin; Xiaohua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews...

  9. Optical and Morphological Properties of ZnO- and TiO2-Derived Nanostructures Synthesized via a Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Method

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZnO and TiO2 nanostructures. The experimental results show that the method resulted in crystalline monodispersed ZnO nanorods that have pointed tips with hexagonal crystal phase. TiO2 nanotubes were also formed with minimum bundles. The mechanism for the formation of the tubes was validated by HRTEM results. The optical properties of both ZnO and TiO2 nanostructures showed characteristics of strong quantum confinement regime. The...

  10. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  11. Effect of Flame Conditions on Crystalline Structure of TiO2 in Liquid Flame Spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chang-jiu; YANG Guan-jun; WANG Yu-yue

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 is a most promising functional ceramic owing to its potential utilization in photocatalytical, optical and electrical applications. Nanostructured TiO2 coating was deposited through thermal spraying with liquid feedstock. Two types of crystalline structures were present in the synthesized TiO2 coating including anatase phase and rutile phase.The effect of spray flame conditions on the crystalline structure was investigated in order to control the crystalline structure of the coating. The results showed that spray distance, flame power and precursor concentration in the liquid feedstock significantly influenced phase constitutions and grain size in the coating. Anatase phase was formed at spray distance from 150 to 250mm, while rutile phase was evidently observed in the coating deposited at 100 mm. The results suggested that anatase phase was firstly formed in the coating, and rutile phase resulted from the transformation of the deposited anatase phase. The phase transformation from anatase to rutile occurred through the annealing effect of spraying flame. The control of the phase formation can be realized through flame condition and spray distance.

  12. Synthesis of One Dimensional Gold Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchen Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanostructures with shapes of rod, dumbbells, and dog bone have been fabricated by an improved seed-mediated method. It is found that the pH change (the addition of HNO3 or HCl and the presence of Ag+ ions have a great influence on the growth process and aspect ratios of these Au nanocrystals. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra for the Au colloidal show that the transverse plasmon absorption band locates at ~520 nm, while the longitudinal plasmon absorption band shifts in a wide spectra region of 750–1100 nm. The obtained Au nanostructures have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. Based on the characterizations and FDTD simulations, most of the obtained Au nanorods are single crystals, possessing an octagonal cross-section bounded by {110} and {100} faces. One model for the anisotropic growth has been proposed. It is found that slow kinetics favor the formation of single-crystalline Au nanorods.

  13. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  14. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...... index of the nanostructured surfaces was estimated from atomic force micrographs and the theoretical reflectance was calculated using the transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. The measured reflectance shows good agreement with the theory of graded index antireflective nanostructures...

  15. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  16. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  17. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  18. Design of Highly Sensitive C2H5OH Sensors Using Self-Assembled ZnO Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Heun Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Various ZnO nanostructures such as porous nanorods and two hierarchical structures consisting of porous nanosheets or crystalline nanorods were prepared by the reaction of mixtures of oleic-acid-dissolved ethanol solutions and aqueous dissolved Zn-precursor solutions in the presence of NaOH. All three ZnO nanostructures showed sensitive and selective detection of C2H5OH. In particular, ultra-high responses (Ra/Rg = ~1,200, Ra: resistance in air, Rg: resistance in gas to 100 ppm C2H5OH was attained using porous nanorods and hierarchical structures assembled from porous nanosheets, which is one of the highest values reported in the literature. The gas response and linearity of gas sensors were discussed in relation to the size, surface area, and porosity of the nanostructures.

  19. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  20. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  1. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  2. Preparation and Dielectric Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Whiskers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Ling; YUAN Jie; ZHOU Wei; RONG Ji-Li; CAO Mao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    By a novel controlled combustion synthesis method, a large number of nanostructured ZnO whiskers with different morphologies, such as tetra-needles, long-leg tetra-needles and multi-needles, are prepared without any additive in open air at high temperature. The morphologies and crystalline structures of the as-prepared ZnO nanostructured whiskers are investigated by SEM and XRD. The possible growth mechanism on the nanostructured ZnO whiskers is proposed. The experimental results indicate that the dielectric constants and losses of the nanostructured ZnO whiskers are very low, demonstrating that the nanostructured ZnO whiskers are low-loss materials for microwave absorption in X-band. However, obvious microwave absorption in nanostructured ZnO whiskers is observed. The quasi-microantenna model may be attributed to the microwave absorption of the ZnO whiskers.

  3. Preparation of Copper Oxide Nanostructure Thin Film For Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Yuliarto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the synthesis of nanostructure of CuO thin film using dip coating and chemical bath deposition method. Seed layer was deposited by dip coating method using zinc nitrate as a precursor. The CuO nanostructure has successfully grown on CBD process at 95oC for 6 hours. The X Ray Diffraction characterization result shows that the CuO has monoclinic crystallization and good crystallinity. Moreover, the Scanning Electron Microscope characterization results  shows that CuO has nanospike-like shape. The CuO thin film as a gas sensor shows relatively high response on CO gas at the temperature working above 200oC. The highest response is obtained at 350oC of working temperature toward 30 ppm CO gas at 186% of sensor response.

  4. Annealing induced structural evolution and electrochromic properties of nanostructured tungsten oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ching-Lin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chung-Kwei [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Chun-Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Sheng-Chang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Tainan 710, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Jow-Lay, E-mail: JLH888@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-31

    The effect of microstructure on the optical and electrochemical properties of nanostructured tungsten oxide films was evaluated as a function of annealing temperature. The films using block copolymer as the template were prepared from peroxotungstic acid (PTA) by spin-coating onto the substrate and post-annealed at 250–400 °C to form tungsten oxide films with nanostructure. The microstructure of the films was measured by X-ray diffraction and surface electron microscopy. The films annealed at temperatures below 300 °C are characterized by amorphous or nanocrystalline structures with a pore size of less than 10 nm. The evaluated annealing temperature caused a triclinic crystalline structure and microcracks. Cyclic voltammetry measurements were performed in a LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate electrolyte. The results showed that the ion inserted capacity were maximized for films annealed at 300 °C and decreased with the increasing of annealing temperature. The electrochromic properties of the nanostructured tungsten oxide films were evaluated simultaneously by potentiostat and UV–vis spectroscopy. The films annealed at 300 °C exhibit high transmission modulation (∆T ∼ 40%) at λ = 633 nm and good kinetic properties. As a result, the correlation between the microstructure and kinetic properties was established, and the electrochromic properties have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Surfactant-assisted WO{sub 3} films have been prepared by sol–gel method. • Nanostructure of porous WO{sub 3} film is retained after crystallization. • Kinetic properties of WO{sub 3} can be improved by nanostructure and crystallinity.

  5. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    with macroscopic reinforcements such as fiber, clay, glass mineral and other fillers. The nano-alloyed polymers are particularly useful for producing...applications, including space-sur- vivable materials and seals, gaskets, cosmetics , and personal care. 25 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets B-3 U.S. Patent Mar...the incorporation of fluorinated nanostructured chemicals onto the surface of a secondary material (such as Ti02 , CaC03 , glass or mineral

  6. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  7. Field-emission stability of hydrothermally synthesized aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsang-Yen; Wang, Jyh-Liang; Yang, Po-Yu; Hwang, Chuan-Chou; Shye, Der-Chi

    2012-07-01

    The Al-doped ZnO (AZO) nanostructures field-emission arrays (FEAs) were hydrothermally synthesized on AZO/glass substrate. The samples with Al-dosage of 3 at.% show the morphology as nanowires vertically grown on the substrates and a structure of c-axis elongated single-crystalline wurtzite. The good field-emission (i.e., the large anode current and low fluctuation of 15.9%) can be found by AZO nanostructure FEAs with well-designed Al-dosage (i.e., 3 at.%) because of the vertical nanowires with the less structural defects and superior crystallinity. Moreover, the Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of near band-edge emission (NBE) decreased as the increase of annealing temperature, representing the compensated structural defects during oxygen ambient annealing. After the oxygen annealing at 500 degrees C, the hydrothermal AZO nanostructure FEAs revealed the excellent electrical characteristics (i.e., the larger anode current and uniform distribution of induced fluorescence) and enhanced field-emission stability (i.e., the lowest current fluctuation of 5.97%).

  8. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  9. One-Dimensional Peptide Nanostructure Templated Growth of Iron Phosphate Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susapto, Hepi Hari; Kudu, O Ulas; Garifullin, Ruslan; Yılmaz, Eda; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-07-13

    Template-directed synthesis of nanomaterials can provide benefits such as small crystalline size, high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio, and structural stability. These properties are important for shorter distance in ion/electron movement and better electrode surface/electrolyte contact for energy storage applications. Here nanostructured FePO4 cathode materials were synthesized by using peptide nanostructures as a template inspired by biomineralization process. The amorphous, high surface area FePO4 nanostructures were utilized as a cathode for lithium-ion batteries. Discharge capacity of 155 mAh/g was achieved at C/20 current rate. The superior properties of biotemplated and nanostructured amorphous FePO4 are shown compared to template-free crystalline FePO4.

  10. Magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram S. Khattak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A compilation of magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures with Curie temperature (TC between 260 and 340 K has been tabulated. The tabulated data show that nanostructure plays an important role in enhancing the magnetocaloric properties of a material, namely by reducing the peak of magnetic entropy, but broadening of the magnetocaloric effect curve with an average of 10 K sliding window for Curie temperature. A second table lists all bulk metallic and intermetallic materials, in which there is no nanostructural data, with an entropy change of at least 20 J/kg K and a Curie temperature between 260 and 340 K. We propose that further experiments should be made on the nanostructured form of these materials.

  11. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  12. Nanoscience with liquid crystals from self-organized nanostructures to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the exciting topic of nanoscience with liquid crystals: from self-organized nanostructures to applications. The elegant self-organized liquid crystalline nanostructures, the synergetic characteristics of liquid crystals and nanoparticles, liquid crystalline nanomaterials, synthesis of nanomaterials using liquid crystals as templates, nanoconfinement and nanoparticles of liquid crystals are covered and discussed, and the prospect of fabricating functional materials is highlighted. Contributions, collecting the scattered literature of the field from leading and active player

  13. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  14. Synthesis of TiO2 visible light catalysts with controllable crystalline phase and morphology from Ti-bearing electric arc furnace molten slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Liu, Lulu; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei

    2016-09-01

    TiO2 visible light catalysts with different crystalline phases and morphologies were synthesized from titanium-bearing electric arc furnace molten slag (Ti-bearing EAF slag) by using a simple acidolysis process. The effects of the pH of the HCl solution, liquid to solid ratio (RL/S, HCl solution to the residue ratio, mL/g) and acidolysis time on the micro-morphology and crystalline phase of as-prepared TiO2 photocatalysts were systematically investigated. The results indicated that with decreasing pH in the HCl solution and increasing RL/S, the crystalline phase and micro-morphology of the obtained TiO2 nanostructures tended to transform from anatase type TiO2 with spherical nanoparticle structures to rutile type TiO2 with needle-like nanorod structures. The acidolysis time had little influence on the crystalline phase but great impact on the size of the obtained TiO2. The growth mechanism of TiO2 from Ti-bearing EAF slag during the acidolysis process was also discussed. In addition, the influence of RL/S on the photocatalytic properties of the synthesized nanostructured TiO2 was studied. The results showed that the photodegradation efficiency for Rhodamine B solution could reach 91.00% in 120min when the RL/S was controlled at 50:1.

  15. Growth and humidity sensing properties of plate-like CuO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayansal, F.; Çetinkara, H. A.; Çankaya, G.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a simple, low-temperature and cost-effective liquid-phase method to synthesize homogenous plate-like CuO nanostructures and their sensitivity to humidity. Scanning electron microscopy illustrated that the synthesized CuO nanoplates have thicknesses of ~100 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the CuO nanostructures have high crystallinity with monoclinic crystal structure preferentially in ? and ? directions. From the temperature-dependant dark electrical resistivity measurements, the ionization energies of the impurity levels and thermal band gap energies of the films are found as 0.30, 0.32 and 1.37, 1.39 for as-synthesized and annealed films, respectively. Gas sensing characteristics of the films were investigated for different concentrations of humidity, isopropyl alcohol, methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone vapours. It was found that the sensor is sensitive to humidity but not to the other volatile organic compounds.

  16. Vibrational Order, Structural Properties, and Optical Gap of ZnO Nanostructures Sintered through Thermal Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Londono-Calderon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sintering of different ZnO nanostructures by the thermal decomposition of zinc acetate is reported. Morphological changes from nanorods to nanoparticles are exhibited with the increase of the decomposition temperature from 300 to 500°C. The material showed a loss in the crystalline order with the increase in the temperature, which is correlated to the loss of oxygen due to the low heating rate used. Nanoparticles have a greater vibrational freedom than nanorods which is demonstrated in the rise of the main Raman mode E 2(high during the transformation. The energy band gap of the nanostructured material is lower than the ZnO bulk material and decreases with the rise in the temperature.

  17. Coherent 3D nanostructure of γ-Al2O3: Simulation of whole X-ray powder diffraction pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakharukova, V. P.; Yatsenko, D. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Shalygin, A. S.; Martyanov, O. N.; Tsybulya, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and nanostructure features of nanocrystalline γ-Al2O3 obtained by dehydration of boehmite with anisotropic platelet-shaped particles were investigated. The original models of 3D coherent nanostructure of γ-Al2O3 were constructed. The models of nanostructured γ-Al2O3 particles were first confirmed by a direct simulation of powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns using the Debye Scattering Equation (DSE) with assistance of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study. The average crystal structure of γ-Al2O3 was shown to be tetragonally distorted. The experimental results revealed that thin γ-Al2O3 platelets were heterogeneous on a nanometer scale and nanometer-sized building blocks were separated by partially coherent interfaces. The XRD simulation results showed that a specific packing of the primary crystalline blocks in the nanostructured γ-Al2O3 particles with formation of planar defects on {001}, {100}, and {101} planes nicely accounted for pronounced diffuse scattering, anisotropic peak broadening and peak shifts in the experimental XRD pattern. The identified planar defects in cation sublattice seem to be described as filling cation non-spinel sites in existing crystallographic models of γ-Al2O3 structure. The overall findings provided an insight into the complex nanostructure, which is intrinsic to the metastable γ-Al2O3 oxide.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Chemically Etched Nanostructured Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2012-05-01

    particles with a crystal structure different than the common polymorph of Si. These particles emitted UV to blue wavelengths. Iron(III) chloride was also employed as an oxidant, and it created amorphous Si nanostructures from a bulk crystalline Si source. These suspensions showed ultra-bright visible photoluminescence, which could be tuned through engineering the surface.

  19. Nonlinear photoluminescence spectrum of single gold nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Vanessa; Fischer, Marco P; de Roo, Tjaard; Mecking, Stefan; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Brida, Daniele

    2015-01-27

    We investigate the multiphoton photoluminescence characteristics of gold nanoantennas fabricated from single crystals and polycrystalline films. By exciting these nanostructures with ultrashort pulses tunable in the near-infrared range, we observe distinct features in the broadband photoluminescence spectrum. By comparing antennas of different crystallinity and shape, we demonstrate that the nanoscopic geometry of plasmonic devices determines the shape of the emission spectra. Our findings rule out the contribution of the gold band structure in shaping the photoluminescence.

  20. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  1. Preparation of titanium dioxide nanostructures facilitated by poly-L-lysine peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Perez, Carlos A. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico)]. E-mail: camartin@uacj.mx; Garcia-Casillas, Perla E. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Camacho-Montes, Hector [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Monreal-Romero, Humberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Martinez-Villafane, Alberto [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Chacon-Nava, Jose [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico)

    2007-05-31

    In this work, we have synthesized titanium dioxide by sol-gel process using titanium isopropoxide as precursor; the shapes obtained were nanorods ranging in size from 20 to 40 nm in presence of poly-L-lysine (PLL) peptide. The resulting materials were calcinated in order to obtain a crystalline phase; afterwards the powders were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the synthesis of titanium dioxide nanostructures can be achieved in presence of poly-L-lysine.

  2. Application of Nanostructures in Electrochromic Materials and Devices: Recent Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Min; Sun, Xiao Wei; Jiao, Zhihui

    2010-11-26

    The recent progress in application of nanostructures in electrochromic materials and devices is reviewed. ZnO nanowire array modified by viologen and WO₃, crystalline WO₃ nanoparticles and nanorods, mesoporous WO₃ and TiO₂, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes, Prussian blue nanoinks and nanostructures in switchable mirrors are reviewed. The electrochromic properties were significantly enhanced by applying nanostructures, resulting in faster switching responses, higher stability and higher optical contrast. A perspective on the development trends in electrochromic materials and devices is also proposed.

  3. Application of Nanostructures in Electrochromic Materials and Devices: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Min Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent progress in application of nanostructures in electrochromic materials and devices is reviewed. ZnO nanowire array modified by viologen and WO3, crystalline WO3 nanoparticles and nanorods, mesoporous WO3 and TiO2, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene nanotubes, Prussian blue nanoinks and nanostructures in switchable mirrors are reviewed. The electrochromic properties were significantly enhanced by applying nanostructures, resulting in faster switching responses, higher stability and higher optical contrast. A perspective on the development trends in electrochromic materials and devices is also proposed.

  4. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  5. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  6. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  7. The devitrification of artificial fibers: a multimethodic approach to quantify the temperature-time onset of cancerogenic crystalline phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comodi, Paola; Cera, Fabio; Gatta, Giacomo Diego; Rotiroti, Nicola; Garofani, Patrizia

    2010-11-01

    A variety of artificial fibers extensively employed as lining in high-temperature apparatus may undergo a devitrification process that leads to significant changes in the chemical-physical properties of the materials. Among them, the crystallization of carcinogenic minerals, such as cristobalite, has already been documented for alumino-silicate ceramic fibers. Five fibrous samples with different compositions were treated over a wide range of temperatures (20-1500°C) and times (24-336 h) to investigate the rate and the crystalline phases that are formed as well their onset temperatures. The new phases were characterized by using a multimethodic approach: phase transformations were monitored together with thermal analysis and the new phases were investigated by using X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The crystalline:amorphous ratio was monitored by Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the effect of heat treatments on the morphology of fibers, and the nanostructures were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the main crystalline phases are cristobalite, diopside, mullite, and zirconia. The onset of cristobalite was observed at temperature lower than that thermodynamically expected. The TEM analysis showed that protostructures were present in the material vitrified from sol-gel-derived products, which can act as crystallization nuclei. The study shows that the devitrification leads to health hazard due to the formation of inhalable powder of cancerogenic crystalline phases.

  8. Nucleation theory and growth of nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires are promising building blocks of future nanoelectronic, nanophotonic and nanosensing devices. Their physical properties are primarily determined by the epitaxy process which is rather different from the conventional thin film growth. This book shows how the advanced nucleation theory can be used in modeling of growth properties, morphology and crystal phase of such nanostructures.

  9. Facile synthesis of ZnO nanostructures and investigation of structural and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Neeti, E-mail: neetidtripathi@gmail.com; Rath, Shyama

    2013-12-15

    ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by chemical bath deposition method, using zinc nitrate [Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] and hexa-methylene-tetra-amine [(HMT),C(H{sub 2}){sub 6}N{sub 4}] as precursors. Controlled size and shape evolution of ZnO nanostructures were achieved by changing the HMT concentration from 0.025 M to 0.1 M, whereas Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} concentration kept constant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman study confirmed the formation of single crystalline, hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure. Sharp peaks in Raman spectra, corresponding to E{sub 2}(low) and E{sub 2}(high) referred to wurtzite structure with higher order of crystallinity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the shape and size of the nanostructures reduced, with increasing concentration of HMT. Further, effect of structure's size was observed in the band gap (shift). Photoluminescence study showed two peaks at ∼ 380 nm and ∼ 540 nm corresponding to the band to band transition and defect transitions. Modifications of properties are explained in detail on the basis of shape and size change of the structures and possible mechanism is discussed. - Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by chemical bath deposition method. • Particle’s shape and sizes were controlled by varying the HMT concentrations. • Effect of particle’s sizes was observed in the band gap (shift) and photoluminescence. • HMT is an effective suppressor of ZnO directional growth. • Shape evolution of ZnO particles can be tailored by varying the HMT concentrations.

  10. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  11. A facile preparation of crystalline GeS{sub 2} nanoplates and their photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qifan [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Kang, Shi-Zhao, E-mail: kangsz@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Li, Xiangqing [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Yang, Ying-Wei [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College Of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Qin, Lixia [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Mu, Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The crystalline GeS{sub 2} nanoplates have been successfully prepared in the low temperature solvothermal process. Meanwhile, the as-prepared crystalline GeS{sub 2} nanoplates show considerable photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution from water, implying that GeS{sub 2} nanomaterials have great potential in the field of hydrogen generation from light-driven water splitting. - Highlights: • GeS{sub 2} nanoplates were prepared by a low temperature solvothermal process. • GeS{sub 2} nanoplates obtained possess high crystallinity. • Nanostructured GeS{sub 2} is first applied in the photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution. - Abstract: Crystalline GeS{sub 2} nanoplates were prepared by low temperature solvothermal process and characterized with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and UV–vis–NIR diffuse reflectance absorption spectroscopy. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water over the as-prepared GeS{sub 2} nanoplates was explored using Na{sub 2}S and K{sub 2}SO{sub 3} as sacrificial reagents. The results indicate that the crystalline orthorhombic GeS{sub 2} nanoplates can be obtained at 140 °C using this simple method and acetic acid as the solvent plays an important role in the formation of the GeS{sub 2} nanoplates. More importantly, the as-prepared GeS{sub 2} nanoplates can serve as a potential photocatalyst with a rate of H{sub 2} evolution of 144 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1} for hydrogen production from water when a xenon lamp is used as a light source. In addition, the formation mechanism of GeS{sub 2} nanoplates was preliminarily discussed.

  12. Effect of polylactic acid crystallinity on its electret properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzhova, A. A.; Galikhanov, M. F.; Kuznetsova, N. V.; Petrov, V. A.; Khairullin, R. Z.

    2016-09-01

    Electret properties of the polylactic acid films with different degree of crystallinity due to different cooling and annealing conditions were studied. Samples with the higher degree of crystallinity showed more stable electret characteristics resulting from amorphous-crystalline interface boundary growth and capturing bigger amount of injected charge carriers by volume energy traps.

  13. Light-emission from in-situ grown organic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    Organic crystalline nanofibers made from phenylene-based molecules exhibit a wide range of extraordinary optical properties such as intense, anisotropic and polarized luminescence that can be stimulated either optically or electrically, waveguiding and random lasing. For lighting and display...... of morphological characterization and demonstrate how appropriate biasing with an AC gate voltage enables electroluminescence from these in-situ grown organic nanostructures....

  14. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energ...

  15. Direct laser planting of hybrid Au-Ag/C nanostructures - nanoparticles, flakes and flowers

    CERN Document Server

    Manshina, Alina; Bashouti, Muhammad; Povolotskiy, Alexey; Petrov, Yuriy; Koshevoy, Igor; Christiansen, Silke; Tunik, Sergey; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for forming hybrid metal/carbonaceous nanostructures in a controlled direct laser planting process. Au-Ag nanoclusters in amorphous or crystalline carbonaceous matrices are formed with different morphology: nanoparticles, nanoflakes, and nanoflowers. In contrast to other generation techniques our approach is simple, involving only a single laser-induced process transforming supramolecular complexes dissolved in solvent such as acetone, acetophenone, or dichloroethane into hybrid nanostructures in the laser-affected area of the substrate. The morphology of the hybrid nanostructures can be steered by controlling the deposition parameters, the composition of the liquid phase and the type of substrate, amorphous or crystalline. The carbonaceous phase of the hybrid nanostructures consists of hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the case of nanoparticles and of crystalline orthorhombic graphite of nanoscale thickness in the case of flakes and flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is t...

  16. Show Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> Story: Show Time!The whole class presents the story"Under the Sea".Everyone is so excited and happy.Both Leo and Kathy show their parentsthe characters of the play."Who’s he?"asks Kathy’s mom."He’s the prince."Kathy replies."Who’s she?"asks Leo’s dad."She’s the queen."Leo replieswith a smile.

  17. Snobbish Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The State Administration of Radio,Film and Television (SARFT),China's media watchdog,issued a new set of mles on June 9 that strictly regulate TV match-making shows,which have been sweeping the country's primetime programming. "Improper social and love values such as money worship should not be presented in these shows.Humiliation,verbal attacks and sex-implied vulgar content are not allowed" the new roles said.

  18. Micro- and Nanostructures from Liquid Crystalline Cellulose Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    for the helical winding. In order to investigate the origin of the intrinsic curvature found in the cellulosic fibers, morphological and structural...Featured Research” by  SoftMatterWorld  Newsletter , 22, 2010.   The  final part of  the  report  concerns original  results  that are not published and are

  19. Conductive Polymer Synthesis with Single-Crystallinity via a Novel Plasma Polymerization Technique for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon-Sang Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new nanostructured conductive polymer synthesis method that can grow the single-crystalline high-density plasma-polymerized nanoparticle structures by enhancing the sufficient nucleation and fragmentation of the pyrrole monomer using a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM results show that the plasma-polymerized pyrrole (pPPy nanoparticles have a fast deposition rate of 0.93 µm·min−1 under a room-temperature process and have single-crystalline characteristics with porous properties. In addition, the single-crystalline high-density pPPy nanoparticle structures were successfully synthesized on the glass, plastic, and interdigitated gas sensor electrode substrates using a novel plasma polymerization technique at room temperature. To check the suitability of the active layer for the fabrication of electrochemical toxic gas sensors, the resistance variations of the pPPy nanoparticles grown on the interdigitated gas sensor electrodes were examined by doping with iodine. As a result, the proposed APPJ device could obtain the high-density and ultra-fast single-crystalline pPPy thin films for various gas sensor applications. This work will contribute to the design of highly sensitive gas sensors adopting the novel plasma-polymerized conductive polymer as new active layer.

  20. Anisotropic Magnetic Nanostructures For Enhanced Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D.; Das, R.; Alonso, J.; Phan, M. H.; Srikanth, H.

    Magnetic nanoparticles assisted hyperthermia is one of the most promising techniques for cancer treatment. By the use of magnetic nanoparticles in an external AC magnetic field, one can target a specific tumor location and deliver toxic doses of heat to the tumor area without damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Magnetite is typically used in biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility, but the heating efficiency of the commonly used magnetite nanoparticles is not enough to obtain the best results in cancer treatment. Therefore, novel magnetic nanostructures are required in order to improve the heating efficiency. Recently, it has been proposed by different groups that it is possible to increase the heating efficiency of the nanoparticles by tuning their effective anisotropy. Considering this, we have synthesized high aspect ratio magnetic nanorods with increased effective anisotropy. A thorough structural and magnetic characterization has revealed high crystallinity and optimal magnetic properties of these nanorods. The hyperthermia response shows that by increasing the aspect ratio from 5 to 11, their heating efficiency is increased by 150%. In addition, we have observed that a good alignment of the nanorods with the magnetic field ensures the best heating results. Hence, these nanorods appear to be promising candidates for cancer treatment with magnetic hyperthermia.

  1. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  2. EROBATIC SHOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Visitors look at plane models of the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, developer of the count,s first homegrown large passenger jet C919, during the Singapore Airshow on February 16. The biennial event is the largest airshow in Asia and one of the most important aviation and defense shows worldwide. A number of Chinese companies took part in the event during which Okay Airways, the first privately owned aidine in China, signed a deal to acquire 12 Boeing 737 jets.

  3. Zn-catalytic growth and photoluminescence properties of branched MgO nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mass production of uniform MgO nanostructures has been achieved by a thermal evaporation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show the product is composed of pure single-crystalline MgO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the MgO branched nanostructures consist of many slim nanowires growing from the thick MgO rods. The as-synthesized nanowires have a length of several tens of microns and a diameter of several tens of nanometers. The preferred growth direction of the nanowires is [001]. Many nanowires are found to have a dendritic structure and temperature grade is thought to be the main cause of the growth of this structure. Zn nanoparticles scattered on the surface of the MgO rods are thought to be the catalyst of the VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) growth of the MgO nanowires. Room-temperature photoluminescence measurements show that the synthesized MgO nanostructures have a strong emission band at 401 nm and a weak emission band at 502 nm.

  4. Determination of the photoelectron reference plane in nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Mugarza, Aitor [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, CIN2 (CSIC-ICN), Esfera UAB, Campus de la UAB, 08193-Bellaterra (Spain); Ortega, Jose Enrique [Dpto Fisica Aplicada I, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Michel, Enrique G, E-mail: jorge.lobo@cin2.es [Dpto de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) from crystalline solids, wave-vector conservation applies to the two-dimensional (2D) surface, which may thus be defined as the reference plane in ARPES. We investigate whether such reference varies for photoemitted electrons in nanometer-sized systems that expose different crystal planes. To this aim, we exploit the structural tunability of the Ag/Cu(223) system which is capable of offering surfaces with periodic arrays of nanofacets of varying size and orientation. A thorough, photon-energy-dependent analysis of the surface states confined to such nanostructures is performed comparing different reference planes for photoemitted electrons. Assuming the premise that k{sub ||} must be a good quantum number for 2D states, we conclude that the (final state) photoelectron reference direction is not the average optical direction but the local facet that confines the (initial state) surface electrons. Moreover, in the general case of nanostructured systems with uneven surfaces, we show how the photoelectron reference plane can be empirically determined through such a photon-energy-dependent ARPES analysis. (paper)

  5. Biodirected synthesis and nanostructural characterization of anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Torrente, Daniel; Marucho, Marcelo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2015-03-24

    Gold nanoparticles with anisotropic structures have tunable absorption properties and diverse bioapplications as image contrast agents, plasmonics, and therapeutic-diagnostic materials. Amino acids with electrostatically charged side chains possess inner affinity for metal ions. Lysine (Lys) efficiently controlled the growing into star-shape nanoparticles with controlled narrow sizes (30-100 nm) and produced in high yields (85-95%). Anisotropic nanostructures showed tunable absorbance from UV to NIR range, with extraordinary colloidal stability (-26 to -42 mV) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties. Advanced electron microscopy characterization through ultra-high-resolution SEM, STEM, and HR-TEM confirmed the size, nanostructure, crystalline structure, and chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that Lys interacted preferentially with Au(I) through the -COOH group instead of their positive side chains with a binding free energy (BFE) of 3.4 kcal mol(-1). These highly monodisperse and colloidal stable anisotropic particles prepared with biocompatible compounds may be employed in biomedical applications.

  6. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  7. Optical transitions in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupasov, Valery I. [ALTAIR Center LLC, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (United States) and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: rupasov@townisp.com

    2007-03-19

    Employing the Maxwell equations and conventional boundary conditions for the radiation field on the nanostructure interfaces, we compute the radiative spontaneous decay rate of optical transitions in spherical semiconductor nanocrystals, core-shell nanocrystals and nanostructures comprising more than one shell. We also show that the coupling between optical transitions localized in the shell of core-shell nanocrystals and radiation field is determined by both conventional electro-multipole momenta and electro-multipole 'inverse' momenta. The latter are proportional to the core radius even for interband transitions that should result in very strong optical transitions.

  8. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  9. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of silver film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China); He, Min; Bian, Huadong; Yan, Xiaona [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Lu, Bo [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, we report an evolution of surface morphology of silver film irradiated by a 1 kHz femtosecond laser. By SEM observations, it is noted that different nanostructures with respective surface features depend highly on the number of pulses and the laser fluence. Especially when the laser fluence is below the threshold fluence of film breakdown, a textured nanostructure including many nanobumps and nanocavities will appear on the surface of silver film. In order to determine an optimal regime for nanostructuring silver film and to further study the underlying mechanism, we perform a quantitative analysis of laser fluence and pulse number. The results show that this nanostructure formation should be due to a sequential process of laser melting, vapor bubbles bursting, heat stress confinement, and subsequent material redistribution. As a potential application, we find this nanostructured silver film can be used as the active substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. (orig.)

  10. Antibacterial and Blue shift investigations in sol–gel synthesized Cr{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.H., E-mail: ashiqphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); Manikandan, E.; Basheer Ahamed, M. [Department of Physics, B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); Ahmad Mir, Dilawar [Department of Biotechnology, Alagappa University, Karikudi 630003 (India); Ahmad Mir, Sajad [Department of Physics, NIT Srinagar, Hazratbal, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir 190 006 (India)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, a systematic study of structural, morphological, phononic, vibrational and optical properties of Zn{sub 1−x}Cr{sub x}O nanostructures has been reported. These particles are synthesized through simple sol–gel chemical technique at low temperature using simply available laboratory chemicals i,e zinc acetate and sodium hydroxide. The detailed structural studies carried out by X-ray diffraction method (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are well-crystalline and possessing hexagonal wurtzite structure in 54–57 nm range. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the synthesized nanostrucures were grown in high density with less agglomeration and their different morphologies observed after doping. The presences of functional groups were characterized by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Compared with the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of the undoped ZnO, the peak position of ultraviolet (UV) emission of the Cr-doped ZnO nanostructures exhibits remarkable blue shift, also confirmed by Raman studies, and the deep level emission band was sharply suppressed. Band gap of synthesized samples has been evaluated using DRS (UV–Vis mode). It is found that the band gap increases as Cr doping took place which is attributed to the combined effect of size reduction and doping. The synthesized Cr{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O nanostructures showed potential applications in destruction of bacteria. -- Highlights: • Highly Cr–doped ZnO nanostructures were synthesized using aqueous solutions. • We examine the control over the growth of synthesized nanostructures. • Blue shift was observed due doping in ZnO nanostructures. • Enhancement of antibacterial activities in doped ZnO nanostructures.

  11. Structural and optical properties of low temperature synthesized Nanostructured BiFeO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, H.B. [Department of Physics, Manipur University, Imphal 795003, Manipur (India); Bobby Singh, S., E-mail: sbsoram@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Manipur University, Imphal 795003, Manipur (India); Boinis Singh, Ng [Department of Physics, Manipur University, Imphal 795003, Manipur (India)

    2011-02-01

    Nanostructured bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by the sol-gel process. The as-fired film at 250 {sup o}C was found to be amorphous crystallizing to pure rhombohedral phase after annealing at 450 {sup o}C for 2 h in air. The XRD pattern shows that the sample is polycrystalline in nature. The average grain size of the film calculated from the XRD data was found to be 16 nm. The as-fired film show high transmittance that decreases after crystallization. The absorption edge of the films was found to be sharper and shifting towards the lower energy as the annealing temperature increases. The optical energy band gaps of the amorphous and crystalline films were found to be 2.63 and 2.31 eV, respectively. The refractive indices of the amorphous and crystalline films were 2.05 and 2.26, respectively.

  12. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of MoS{sub 2} nanostructures with different morphologies via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lin [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chemistry Science and Technology School, Zhanjiang Normal University, Zhanjiang 524048 (China); Chen Weixiang, E-mail: weixiangchen@css.zju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li Hui; Xu Zhude [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2009-08-15

    MoS{sub 2} nanostructures with different morphologies, such as agaric-like, sphere-like and flower-like, were successfully synthesized via a facile ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal route. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). XRD patterns showed that the layered structures of the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} samples did not completely form, and after their annealing treatment at 800 deg. C for 2 h in the atmosphere of N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, the MoS{sub 2} products had good crystallinities with well-stacked layered structures. The influences of the ionic liquid on the sizes and morphologies of the MoS{sub 2} nanostructures were discussed. It was found that the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanostructures were assembled by nanosheets and the ionic liquid played a crucial role on the formation of the MoS{sub 2} nanostructures in our experiment. A possible formation mechanism of the sphere-like MoS{sub 2} nanostructures was preliminarily presented.

  14. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  15. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by manufactured DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Youngkwon; Shin, Jihoon; Seo, Soonbeom; Park, Sung Ha; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-03-01

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  16. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  17. Au-controlled enhancement of photoluminescence of NiS nanostructures synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Linganiso, EC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nickel sulphide (NiS) nanostructures decorated with gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. Binary phase NiS (a and ß) crystalline nanostructures, bare, and decorated with Au NPs were obtained...

  18. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Birnessite and Cryptomelane Nanostructures in Presence of Hoffmeister Anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Cheney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Hoffmeister anions Cl−, SO42−, and ClO4− on the structure and morphology of birnessite and cryptomelane-type manganese dioxide nanostructures, produced by the reduction reaction of KMnO4 and MnSO4 in aqueous acidic media, was studied. The syntheses were based on the decomposition of aqueous KMnO4 in presence of HCl for birnessite-type and acidified MnSO4 for cryptomelane-type manganese dioxide under soft hydrothermal conditions. They were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM techniques. XRD patterns show the formation of birnessite for the first synthesis and a mixture of cryptomelane and birnessite-types MnO2 for the second synthesis. XRD data revealed that the Hoffmeister anions have a significant effect on the nanostructures of birnessite. The sulphate ion-treated birnessite has the smallest crystals, whereas the chloride ion-treated birnessite has the largest crystals. Their TEM and HRTEM studies revealed a transformation from nanoplatelet morphology for chloride-treated samples to nanofibrous morphology for sulphate-treated birnessite. For the cryptomelane nanostructures, Hoffmeister anions also show a profound effect on their crystalline structures as determined by XRD analyses revealing a transformation of the cryptomelane phase to birnessite phase of MnO2. This transformation is also supported by TEM and HRTEM studies.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured CeO2 with dyes adsorption property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oman Zuas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructured cerium dioxide (CeO2 has been successfully fabricated using a simple precipitation method. Its characteristics were evaluated using TG-DTA, DR-UV-Vis, XRD, FTIR and TEM. The results showed that the nanostructured CeO2 has high purity and good crystalline nature, with face centered cubic (fcc phase and the average diameter of CeO2 single crystal about 14 nm. Performance evaluation of the synthesized CeO2 samples showed that the nanostructured CeO2 has a strong adsorption toward acid orange-10 (AO-10 and congo red (CR in aqueous solution. Under given experimental conditions (dye concentration of 15 mg/l, adsorbent dosage of 1 g/l, reaction temperature of 30 ± 1 °C, it was estimated that the adsorption equilibrium for AO-10 and CR occurred at 60 min and 90 min of reaction time, respectively, with total removal of 96.82% for AO-10 dye and 93.55% for CR dye. The results suggested that the CeO2 nanopowder could be potentially used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of synthetic organic dyes in aqueous solution and may address for future concern in the area.

  1. Hydrogen Gas Sensing Characteristics of Nanostructured NiO Thin Films Synthesized by SILAR Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Çorlu, Tugba; Yıldırım, M. Ali; Ateş, Aytunç; Acar, Selim

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured NiO thin films have been synthesized by a facile, low-cost successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and the effects of the film thickness on their hydrogen gas sensing properties investigated. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. The XRD results revealed that the crystallinity improved with increasing thickness, exhibiting polycrystalline structure. SEM studies showed that all the films covered the glass substrate well. According to optical absorption measurements, the optical bandgap decreased with increasing film thickness. The gas sensing properties of the nanostructured NiO thin films were studied as a function of operating temperature and gas concentration. The samples showed good sensing performance of H2 gas with high response. The maximum response was 75% at operating temperature of 200°C for hydrogen gas concentration of 40 ppm. These results demonstrate that nanostructured NiO thin films synthesized by the SILAR method have potential for application in hydrogen detection.

  2. Semiconductor nanocrystals functionalized with antimony telluride zintl ions for nanostructured thermoelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V; Spokoyny, Boris; Lee, Jong-Soo; Scheele, Marcus; Weber, Andrew; Perera, Susanthri; Landry, Daniel; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2010-05-19

    The energy efficiency of heat engines could be improved by the partial recovery of waste heat using thermoelectric (TE) generators. We show the possibility of designing nanostructured TE materials using colloidal inorganic nanocrystals functionalized with molecular antimony telluride complexes belonging to the family of Zintl ions. The unique advantage of using Zintl ions as the nanocrystal surface ligands is the possibility to convert them into crystalline metal chalcogenides, thus linking individual nanobuilding blocks into a macroscopic assembly of electronically coupled functional modules. This approach allows preserving the benefits of nanostructuring and quantum confinement while enabling facile charge transport through the interparticle boundaries. A developed methodology was applied for solution-based fabrication of nanostructured n- and p-type Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) alloys with tunable composition and PbTe-Sb(2)Te(3) nanocomposites with controlled grain size. Characterization of the TE properties of these materials showed that their Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal conductivities, and ZT values compared favorably with those of previously reported solution-processed TE materials.

  3. 纳米级的一维II-VI族化合物的合成及其电子结构研究%One-dimensional (1D) Ⅱ-Ⅳ Based Nanostructures-synthesis and Electronic Structure Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Various single crystalline IIB-VIA one-dimensional nanostructures have been fabricated using thermal evaporation. Although these nanostructures possess large amount of unpassivated surface, it does not lead to dissociation of excitons, which fact indicates the high purity and high quality of the electronic structure of these nanostructures.

  4. Syntheses of CuO nanostructures in ionic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient approach is developed to fabricate single-crystalline CuO nanostructures through an ionic liquid assisted one-step low-temperature solid-state route.Both nanoparticles(5 nm in size)and nanorods(5-10 nm in diameter and 50-100 nm in length)of monoclinic CuO were obtained. These synthesized CuO nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),selected area electron diffraction(SAED),X-ray photoelectron spectros- copy(XPS),energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS)and nitrogen adsorption analysis.The morpholo- gies of the nanostructures can be controlled by tuning the amount of NaOH and ionic liquids.The growth mechanism of CuO nanostructures is investigated.

  5. Syntheses of CuO nanostructures in ionic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; ZHAO Bin; YUAN ZhongYong; ZHANG XueJun; Wu QingDuan; CHANG LiXian; ZHENG WenJun

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient approach is developed to fabricate single-crystalline CuO nanostructures through an ionic liquid assisted one-step low-temperature solid-state route. Both nanoparticles (5 nm in size) and nanorods (5-10 nm in diameter and 50-100 nm in length) of monoclinic CuO were obtained. These synthesized CuO nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nitrogen adsorption analysis. The morphologies of the nanostructures can be controlled by tuning the amount of NaOH and ionic liquids. The growth mechanism of CuO nanostructures is investigated.

  6. Phosphine-initiated cation exchange for precisely tailoring composition and properties of semiconductor nanostructures: old concept, new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jing; Ji, Muwei; Liu, Jiajia; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Jiatao; Zhu, Hesun

    2015-03-16

    Phosphine-initiated cation exchange is a well-known inorganic chemistry reaction. In this work, different phosphines have been used to modulate the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the cation exchange reaction to synthesize complex semiconductor nanostructures. Besides preserving the original shape and size, phosphine-initiated cation exchange reactions show potential to precisely tune the crystallinity and composition of metal/semiconductor core-shell and doped nanocrystals. Furthermore, systematic studies on different phosphines and on the elementary reaction mechanisms have been performed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fabrication of hierarchically ordered crystalline titania thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeier, Martin; Kaune, Gunar; Rawolle, Monika; Koerstgens, Volker; Ruderer, Matthias; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department LS E13, Garching (Germany); Gutmann, Jochen S. [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Thin films of nanostructured titania have received a lot of attention in various applications such as photovoltaics within the last years. Having a well defined morphology is crucial for the functionality and performance of these films because it defines the volume to surface ratio and thereby the surface being available for interface reactions. Increasing the total film thickness is a common approach in order to increase the surface area. The present work focuses on the fabrication of hierarchically structured titania thin films and their crystallinity. A layer-by-layer spin-coating approach is investigated. A solution based sol-gel process using diblock copolymers as a template to obtain nanocomposite films is followed by calcination to obtain crystalline titania structures. The obtained structures are investigated using several imaging techniques like SEM and AFM. The crystallinity and the thickness of the films are analyzed with XRD and XRR.

  8. Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis growth of ZnO and ZnO:Al nanostructured films: Application to photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenanakis, G., E-mail: gkenanak@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology – Hellas, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katsarakis, N. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology – Hellas, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Al–ZnO thin films and nanostructures were obtained by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. • The texture and morphology of the samples depend on the deposition parameters. • The photocatalytic degradation of stearic acid was studied upon UV-A irradiation. - Abstract: Pure and Al-doped ZnO (Al = 1, 3, 5%) nanostructured thin films were grown at 400 °C on glass substrates by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, a simple, environmental-friendly and inexpensive method, using aqueous solutions as precursors. The structural and morphological characteristics of the samples depend drastically on deposition parameters; ZnO nanostructured films, nanopetals and nanorods were systematically obtained by simply varying the precursor solution and/or the spraying time. Transmittance measurements have shown that all samples are transparent in the visible wavelength region. Finally, the photocatalytic properties of the samples were investigated against the degradation of stearic acid under UV-A light illumination (365 nm); both pure and Al-doped ZnO nanostructured thin films show good photocatalytic activity regarding the degradation of stearic acid, due to their good crystallinity and large surface area.

  9. Templating Sol-Gel Hematite Films with Sacrificial Copper Oxide: Enhancing Photoanode Performance with Nanostructure and Oxygen Vacancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Guijarro, Néstor; Zhang, Xiaoli; Prévot, Mathieu S; Jeanbourquin, Xavier A; Sivula, Kevin; Chen, Hong; Li, Yongdan

    2015-08-12

    Nanostructuring hematite films is a critical step for enhancing photoelectrochemical performance by circumventing the intrinsic limitations on minority carrier transport. Herein, we present a novel sol-gel approach that affords nanostructured hematite films by including CuO as sacrificial templating agent. First, by annealing in air at 450 °C a film comprising an intimate mixture of CuO and Fe2O3 nanoparticles is obtained. The subsequent treatment with NaCl and annealing at 700 °C under Argon reveals a nanostructured highly crystalline hematite film devoid of copper. Photoelectrochemical investigations reveal that the incorporation of CuO as templating agent and the inert conditions employed during the annealing play a crucial role in the performance of the hematite electrodes. Mott-Schottky analysis shows a higher donor concentration when annealing in inert conditions, and even higher when combined with the NaCl treatment. These findings agree well with the presence of an oxygen-deficient shell on the material's surface evidenced by FT-IR and XPS measurements. Likewise, the incorporation of the CuO enhances the photocurrent obtained at 1.23 V from 0.55 to 0.8 mA·cm(-2) because of an improved nanostructure. Optimized films demonstrate an incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) of 52% at 380 nm when applying 1.23 V versus RHE, and a faradaic efficiency for water splitting close to unity.

  10. Theory of Raman Scattering by Phonons in Germanium Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Chen Chumin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWithin the linear response theory, a local bond-polarization model based on the displacement–displacement Green’s function and the Born potential including central and non-central interatomic forces is used to investigate the Raman response and the phonon band structure of Ge nanostructures. In particular, a supercell model is employed, in which along the [001] direction empty-column pores and nanowires are constructed preserving the crystalline Ge atomic structure. An advantage of this model is the interconnection between Ge nanocrystals in porous Ge and then, all the phonon states are delocalized. The results of both porous Ge and nanowires show a shift of the highest-energy Raman peak toward lower frequencies with respect to the Raman response of bulk crystalline Ge. This fact could be related to the confinement of phonons and is in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, a detailed discussion of the dynamical matrix is given in the appendix section.

  11. Calcium-phosphorus interactions at a nano-structured silicate surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Daniel C; Lewis, Trevor W; McFarlane, Andrew J; Borrmann, T; Johnston, Jim H

    2008-03-15

    Nano-structured calcium silicate (NCS), a highly porous material synthesized by controlled precipitation from geothermal fluids or sodium silicate solution, was developed as filler for use in paper manufacture. NCS has been shown to chemisorb orthophosphate from an aqueous solution probably obeying a Freundlich isotherm with high selectivity compared to other common environmental anions. Microanalysis of the products of chemisorption indicated there was significant change from the porous and nano-structured morphology of pristine NCS to fibrous and crystalline morphologies and non-porous detritus. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystalline products showed it to be brushite, CaHPO42H2O, while the largely X-ray amorphous component was a mixture of calcium phosphates. A two-step mechanism was proposed for the chemisorption of phosphate from an aqueous solution by NCS. The first step, which was highly dependent on pH, was thought to be desorption of hydroxide ions from the NCS surface. This was kinetically favoured at lower initial pH, where the predominant form of phosphate present was H2PO(-)4, and led to decreased phosphorus uptake with increasing pH. The second step was thought to be a continuing chemisorption process after stabilization of the pH-value. The formation of brushite as the primary chemisorption product was found to be consistent with the proposed mechanism.

  12. Controllable preparation of CeO2 nanostructure materials and their catalytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wenjuan; Guo Hongjuan; Liu Chang; Wang Xiaonan

    2012-01-01

    Well-crystalline CeO2 nanostructures with the morphology ofnanorods and nanocubes were synthesized by a template-free hydrothermal method.X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements were employed to characterize the synthesized materials.The reducibility and catalytic activity of nanostructured CeO2 were examined by hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and CO oxidation.The results showed that CeO2 nanorods could be converted into CeO2 nanocubes with the increasing of the reaction time and the hydrothermal temperature,CeO2 nanorods became longer gradually with the increasing of the concentrations of NaOH.H2-TPR characterization demonstrated that the intense low-temperature reduction peak in the CeO2 nanorods indicated the amount of hydrogen consumed is larger than CeO2 nanocubes.Meantime the CeO2 nanorods enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation,the total conversion temperature was 340 ℃.The reasons were that CeO2 nanorods have much smaller crystalline sizes and higher surface areas than CeO2 nanocubes.

  13. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...

  14. Single-crystalline self-branched anatase titania nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenquan; Yang, Huang; Wu, Fei; Fu, Jianxun; Wang, Linjun; Yang, Weiguang

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of the anatase titania plays an important role in improving the photovoltaic performance in dye-sensitized solar cells. In this work, single-crystalline self-branched anatase TiO2 nanowires have been synthesized by hydrothermal method using TBAH and CTAB as morphology controlling agents. The obtained self-branched TiO2 nanowires dominated by a large percentage of (010) facets. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency (6.37%) of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the self-branched TiO2 nanowires shows a significant improvement (26.6%) compared to that of P25 TiO2 (5.03%). The enhanced performance of the self-branched TiO2 nanowires-based DSSC is due to heir large percent of exposed (010) facets which have strong dye adsorption capacity and effective charge transport of the self-branched 1D nanostructures.

  15. Single-crystalline self-branched anatase titania nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenquan; Yang, Huang; Wu, Fei; Fu, Jianxun; Wang, Linjun; Yang, Weiguang

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of the anatase titania plays an important role in improving the photovoltaic performance in dye-sensitized solar cells. In this work, single-crystalline self-branched anatase TiO2 nanowires have been synthesized by hydrothermal method using TBAH and CTAB as morphology controlling agents. The obtained self-branched TiO2 nanowires dominated by a large percentage of (010) facets. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency (6.37%) of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the self-branched TiO2 nanowires shows a significant improvement (26.6%) compared to that of P25 TiO2 (5.03%). The enhanced performance of the self-branched TiO2 nanowires-based DSSC is due to heir large percent of exposed (010) facets which have strong dye adsorption capacity and effective charge transport of the self-branched 1D nanostructures.

  16. Antibacterial activity of single crystalline silver-doped anatase TiO2 nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Li, Meng; He, Xiaojing; Hang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yueyue; Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Well-ordered, one-dimensional silver-doped anatase TiO2 nanowire (AgNW) arrays have been prepared through a hydrothermal growth process on the sputtering-deposited AgTi layers. Electron microscope analyses reveal that the as-synthesized AgNW arrays exhibit a single crystalline phase with highly uniform morphologies, diameters ranging from 85 to 95 nm, and lengths of about 11 μm. Silver is found to be doped into TiO2 nanowire evenly and mainly exists in the zerovalent state. The AgNW arrays show excellent efficient antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), and all of the bacteria can be killed within 1 h. Additionally, the AgNW arrays can still kill E. coli after immersion for 60 days, suggesting the long-term antibacterial property. The technique reported here is environmental friendly for formation of silver-containing nanostructure without using any toxic organic solvents.

  17. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P; Shi, Li

    2015-04-01

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  18. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P.; Shi, Li, E-mail: lishi@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  19. Crystallinity of chitin and carbonate mineral components independently record crustacean biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Michel, F. M.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Some of the earliest evidence for crustacean organisms is attributed to the discovery of Peytoia nathorsti, a predatory arthropod from 500 Ma (Cong, P. et al., 2014). These animals presumably began with a soft exoskeleton and evolved to fill diverse ecological niches while adopting a mineralized skeleton that is rarely preserved in its entirety (Klompmaker, A.A. et al., 2015). That is, one or more of the primary skeleton components (calcium carbonate minerals, the polysaccharide chitin, and minor proteins) were subject to decomposition during fossilization and preservation. These missing pieces present a significant obstacle to reconstructing ecosystem variability over long time periods. Our recent study of the exoskeletons from ten Malacostraca species suggests the physical and chemical structure of chitin holds promise as a secondary proxy for reconstructing skeleton reinforcement. Using high-energy X-ray diffraction and a novel Raman spectroscopy technique to enhance resolution, we determined the detailed nanostructures of chitin and the associated calcium carbonate minerals that comprise the cuticles of multiple body parts. Crab cuticles from the order Brachyura (Dungeness and Rock crabs) exhibit elevated crystallinities of the chitin and calcite in the more reinforced structures (such as the claw). In contrast, the cuticle of lobster body parts show a much greater variability of calcium carbonate crystallinity and a very consistent crystallinity of chitin. Calcite and chitin crystallinity exhibit a dependency within a species (body part to body part), but these dependencies can be different between taxa. Insights from this study suggest high resolution structural analyses hold promise for developing new proxies for the paleo-environment and paleo-ecology of specific Malacostraca animals, regardless of how well the specimen is preserved.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  1. Nanostructural evolution of Zn by dry roller vibration milling at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    It remains open to date to produce stable nanostructures of single element by dry mechanical method at room temperature on a large scale. Here we report nanostructural evolution of zinc by dry roller vibration milling at room temperature, which leads to structurally near perfect zinc flakes sized 3-5 nm in diameter. The synthesized nanostructures are single crystalline, transparent, uniform, randomly oriented, almost equiaxed, and mostly free from defects. The evolution seems to open a way to optimize zinc nanostructures by the mechanical method, offer valuable references to prepare nanostructures of other metals optimally, and shed light on how to lower the size limit by mechanical milling. Single elemental metal nanostructures with excellent properties give rise to new opportunities in scientific research and development of nanotechnology.

  2. Comparative study of thermal conductivity in crystalline and amorphous nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2017-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs)/polystyrene (PS) nanocomposite has been observed to have a significant decrease in thermal conductivity in terms of the SiNC fraction with unspecified factors remained unclear. In this paper, amorphous silicon nanoparticles (a-SiNPs) with a mean diameter of 6 nm and PS nanocomposites were synthesized, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was compared with our previous work which investigated well-crystalized SiNPs (6 nm) and PS nanocomposite. The difference between amorphous and crystalline structure is insignificant, but phonon scattering at SiNPs and PS boundary is the key influencing factor of thermal conductivity reduction. The effective thermal conductivity models for nanocomposite revealed that the thermal boundary resistance, explained by Kapitza principle, is estimated to be 4 × 10-7 m2K/W, showing the significant effect of nanostructured heterogenic surface resistance on overall heat transfer behavior. Preservation of unique properties nanoscale materials and low-cost fabrication by silicon inks process at room temperature give the promising potential of SiNPs based heat transfer management.

  3. Effects of nanostructure geometry on polymer chain alignment and device performance in nanoimprinted polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Mielczarek, Kamil; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Among the various organic photovoltaic devices, the conjugated polymer/fullerene approach has drawn the most research interest. The performance of these types of solar cells is greatly determined by the nanoscale morphology of the two components (donor/acceptor) and the molecular orientation/crystallinity in the photoactive layer. This article demonstrates our recent studies on the nanostructure geometry effects on the nanoimprint induced poly(3 hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) chain alignment and photovoltaic performance. Out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffractions are employed to characterize the chain orientations in P3HT nanogratings with different widths and heights. It is found that nanoimprint procedure changes the initial edge-on alignment in non-imprinted P3HT thin film to a vertical orientation which favors the hole transport, with an organization height H≥ 170 nm and width in the range of 60 nmImprinted P3HT/[6,6]-penyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PCBM) solar cells show an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) with the decrease of nanostructure width, and with the increase of height and junction area. Devices with the highest PCE are made by the fully aligned and highest P3HT nanostructures (width w= 60 nm, height h= 170 nm), allowing for the most efficient charge separation, transport and light absorption. We believe this work will contribute to the optimal geometry design of nanoimprinted polymer solar cells.

  4. Growth and properties of electrodeposited transparent Al-doped ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, O.; Mentar, L.; Khelladi, M. R.; Azizi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanostructures were fabricated on fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO)- coated glass substrates by using electrodeposition. The effects of the doping concentration of Al on the morphological, microstructural, electrical and optical properties of the nanostructures were investigated. From the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observation, when the amount of Al was increased in the solution, the grains size was observed to decreases. The observed changes in the morphology indicate that Al acts as nucleation centers in the vacancy sites of ZnO and destroys the crystalline structure at high doping level. Effectively, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the undoped and the doped ZnO nanostructures has a polycrystalline nature and a hexagonal wurtzite structure with a (002) preferential orientation. The photoluminescence (PL) room-temperature measurements showed that the incorporation of Al in the Zn lattice can improve the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) emission, thus suggesting its greater prospects for use in UV optoelectronic devices.

  5. Influence of solvothermal synthesis conditions in BiSI nanostructures for application in ionizing radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, I.; Mombrú, M.; Pérez Barthaburu, M.; Bentos Pereira, H.; Fornaro, L.

    2016-02-01

    BiSI belongs to the A V B VI C VII chalcohalides group of compounds. These compounds show several interesting properties such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity along the c axis, and photoconductivity. Moreover, BiSI is a potential semiconductor material for room-temperature gamma and x-ray detection, given its band gap of 1.57 eV and its high density, 6.41 g cm-3. In this work we present BiSI nanostructures synthesized by the solvothermal method with the intention of using them for ionizing radiation detection. The solvent was varied to study its influence in morphology, particle size and size distribution. Three different conditions were tested, using either water, monoethylene glycol and a mixture of both solvents. Nanostructures were characterized by XRD to determine the phase obtained and reaction completeness; TEM was used to observe nanostructures morphology, size, size distribution and crystallinity; and finally FT-IR diffuse reflectance was used to study monoethylene glycol presence in the samples. Nanorods in the range of 100-200 nm width were obtained in all samples, but round nanoparticles of around 10 nm in diameter were also detected in samples synthesized only with monoethylene glycol. Samples synthesized in monoethylene glycol were used to fabricate pellets to construct detectors. The detectors responded to ionizing radiation and a resistivity in the order of 1013 Ω cm was estimated. This work proposes, to our knowledge, the first study of BiSI for its application in ionizing radiation detection.

  6. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  7. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  8. Programmably Shaped Carbon Nanostructure from Shape-Conserving Carbonization of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Sun, Wei; Ricardo, Karen B; Wang, Dong; Shen, Jie; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2016-03-22

    DNA nanostructures are versatile templates for low cost, high resolution nanofabrication. However, due to the limited chemical stability of pure DNA structures, their applications in nanofabrication have long been limited to low temperature processes or solution phase reactions. Here, we demonstrate the use of DNA nanostructure as a template for high temperature, solid-state chemistries. We show that programmably shaped carbon nanostructures can be obtained by a shape-conserving carbonization of DNA nanostructures. The DNA nanostructures were first coated with a thin film of Al2O3 by atomic layer deposition (ALD), after which the DNA nanostructure was carbonized in low pressure H2 atmosphere at 800-1000 °C. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data showed that carbon nanostructures were produced and the shape of the DNA nanostructure was preserved. Conductive AFM measurement shows that the carbon nanostructures are electrically conductive.

  9. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  10. ZnO-ionic liquid nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanes, Jose; Carrion, Francisco-Jose [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Bermudez, Maria-Dolores, E-mail: mdolores.bermudez@upct.es [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, 30202 Cartagena (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    The mixture of nanostructures derived from the surface interactions and reactivity of ZnO nanoparticles with the room-temperature ionic liquid (IL1) 1-hexyl, 3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate has been studied. Results are discussed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) determinations. Size and morphology changes in ZnO nanoparticles by surface modification with IL1 are observed. ZnF{sub 2} crystalline needles due to reaction with the hexafluorophosphate anion are also formed.

  11. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwei Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed.

  12. Crystalline systems. [Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    The use of two double resonance methods, electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) in the study of free radicals in solids is reviewed. Included are descriptions of how crystalline-phase ENDOR is used to determine small hyperfine splittings, quadrupoly couplings, and reaction mechanisms or radical formation and how crystalline phase ELDOR is used to determine large hyperfine splittings, to identify radicals with large quadrupole moments and to study spin exchange processes. The complementary role played by the ENDOR and ELDOR spectroscopy in the separation of overlapping EPR spectra, in the study of proton-deuterium exchange, in the study of methyl groups undergoing tunneling rotation, and in the determination of the rates of intermolecular motion are dealt with. 13 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  13. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  14. Multiferroic Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4-BaTiO3 nanostructures: Magnetoelectric coupling, dielectric, and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep Chand; Singh, Sukhdeep; Tripathi, S. K.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Multiferroic nanostructures of Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4-BaTiO3 (NZF/BT) have been prepared by two synthesis routes, i.e., chemical combustion (CNZF/BT) and hydrothermal (HNZF/BT). The synthesis of CNZF/BT results in nanoparticles of average size 4 nm at 500 °C annealing. However, the synthesis of HNZF/BT with hydrolysis temperature 180 °C/48 h shows nanowires of diameter 3 nm and length >150 nm. A growth mechanism in the fabrication of nanoparticles and wires is given. X-ray diffraction is used to identify the crystalline phase. The transmission electron microscopy shows the dimensions of NZF/BT nanostructures. The ferromagnetism, ferroelectricity, and magnetoelectric coupling show more enhancements in HNZF/BT nanowires than CNZF/BT nanoparticles. The observed polarization depends upon shape of nanostructures, tetragonal phase, and epitaxial strain. The tension induced by the surface curvature of nanowire counteracts the near-surface depolarizing effect and meanwhile leads to unusual enhancement of polarization. The ferromagnetism depends upon superficial spin canting, spin pinning of nanocomposite, and oxygen vacancy clusters. The magnetoelectric coefficient as the function of applied dc magnetizing field under ac magnetic field 5 Oe and frequency 1093 Hz is measured. The nanodimensions of NZF/BT are observed dielectric constant up to 120 MHz. The optical activity of NZF/BT nanostructures is shown by Fluorescence spectra.

  15. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  16. Syntheses and Assemblies of Noble Metal Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Shape and size control as well as the control of the assembly of nanostructures are current challenges in nano sciences. Focussing on metal nanostructures all of these aspects have been addressed in the frame of the present work. It was possible to develop a new aqueous seeded growth method that produces gold nanoparticles with adjustable diameters over a large range of sizes. The spherical particles obtained show very low polydispersities and a good long term stability. Furthermore it was po...

  17. Zinc Oxide Nanostructured Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. W.Sun; J.X. Wang; A. Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocombs were fabricated by vapor phase transport, and nanorods and hierarchical nanodisk structures by aqueous thermal decomposition. Glucose biosensors were constructed using these ZnO nanostructures as supporting materials for glucose oxidase (GOx) loading. These ZnO glucose biosensors showed a high sensitivity for glucose detection and high affinity of GOx to glucose as well as the low detection limit. The results demonstrate that ZnO nanostructures have potential applications in biosensors.

  18. Reaction Front Evolution during Electrochemical Lithiation of Crystalline Silicon Nanopillars

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2012-12-01

    The high theoretical specific capacity of Si as an anode material is attractive in lithium-ion batteries, although the issues caused by large volume changes during cycling have been a major challenge. Efforts have been devoted to understanding how diffusion-induced stresses cause fracture, but recent observations of anisotropic volume expansion in single-crystalline Si nanostructures require new theoretical considerations of expansion behavior during lithiation. Further experimental investigation is also necessary to better understand the anisotropy of the lithiation process. Here, we present a method to reveal the crystalline core of partially lithiated Si nanopillars with three different crystallographic orientations by using methanol to dissolve the Li atoms from the amorphous Li-Si alloy. The exposed crystalline cores have flat {110} surfaces at the pillar sidewalls; these surfaces represent the position of the reaction front between the crystalline core and the amorphous Li-Si alloy. It was also found that an amorphous Si structure remained on the flat surfaces of the crystalline core after dissolution of the Li, which was presumed to be caused by the accumulation of Si atoms left over from the removal of Li from the Li-Si alloy. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nano-structured alloy and composite coatings for high temperature applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structured materials often possess special properties that materials with identical compositions but ordinary grain size do not have. This paper reports our work on the surface nano-crystallisation and nano-structured alloy and composite coatings. A number of processing methods including magnetron sputtering, thermal spray and pulse electro-spark deposition have been used to produce surface nano-crystalline structure. The compositions and microstructures can be well controlled by using different targets or electrodes, nano-structured composites and adjusting processing parameters. Surface nano-structured coatings can provide special chemical, mechanical and electronic properties such as high temperature corrosion and corrosive wear resistance. It has potential applications such as turbine blades, engine parts for petrochemical, aerospace and electronic device industries. This paper is focused on the study of the interrelations between processing, microstructure and properties. Physical models have been established to explain the effects of nano-crystalline structure on the properties.

  20. Synthese de nanostructures d'oxyde de zinc par procede laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauteux, Christian

    films and nanoparticles. One of the secondary objectives of this thesis was to improve the properties of the deposits for one of the target applications of ZnO, photoluminescent devices. For this reason, a parametric study was carried out during which the influence of the laser-related parameters (irradiation time, intensity) and of the solution-related parameters (precursor, additives, concentration) on morphology and crystallinity was studied. The use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that an increase in laser intensity and irradiation time increased nanostructure length and XII crystallite size. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the nanorods grew along the c axis of the crystal lattice, at the apex of randomly oriented ZnO crystals forming a seed layer on the substrate. Additionally, an increase in precursor concentration was found to increase the thickness of this seed layer and the introduction of additives in the solution had the effect of promoting the vertically aligned growth of nanorods. Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy also showed that the deposits were of high quality with few crystalline defects. In particular, the PL spectroscopy results gave evidence that the ZnO nanostructured deposits produced by the laser process were good for ultraviolet emission applications with the presence of an intense peak at 390 nm. The extensive characterization of the samples also allowed the development of a qualitative growth model for the laser-grown ZnO nanostructures inspired by the growth and nucleation models used for conventional chemical synthesis in a liquid medium. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. Atomic-Level Sculpting of Crystalline Oxides: Toward Bulk Nanofabrication with Single Atomic Plane Precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; He, Qian; Lupini, Andrew R; Leonard, Donovan N; Oxley, Mark P; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Unocic, Raymond R; Tselev, Alexander; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pennycook, Stephen J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2015-11-25

    The atomic-level sculpting of 3D crystalline oxide nanostructures from metastable amorphous films in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is demonstrated. Strontium titanate nanostructures grow epitaxially from the crystalline substrate following the beam path. This method can be used for fabricating crystalline structures as small as 1-2 nm and the process can be observed in situ with atomic resolution. The fabrication of arbitrary shape structures via control of the position and scan speed of the electron beam is further demonstrated. Combined with broad availability of the atomic resolved electron microscopy platforms, these observations suggest the feasibility of large scale implementation of bulk atomic-level fabrication as a new enabling tool of nanoscience and technology, providing a bottom-up, atomic-level complement to 3D printing.

  2. Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation from Coupled Asymmetric Plasmonic Metal Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Yildiz, Bilge Can; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Coskun, Sahin; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Bek, Alpan

    2014-01-01

    We show that second harmonic generation can be enhanced by Fano resonant coupling of asymmetric plasmonic metal nanostructures. We develop a theoretical model examining the effects of electromagnetic interaction between two metal nanostructures on the second harmonic generation. We compare the second harmonic generation efficiency of a single plasmonic metal nanostructure with that of two coupled ones. We show that second harmonic generation from a single metal nanostructure can be enhanced about 30 times by attaching a second metal nanostructure with a 10 times higher quality factor than that of the first one. The origin of this enhancement is Fano resonant coupling of the two metal nanostructures. We support our findings on Fano enhancement of second harmonic generation by an experimental study of a coupled plasmonic system composed of a silver nanoparticle and a silver nanowire on glass surface in which the ratio of the quality factors are also estimated to be around 10 times.

  3. Comparative Incorporation of PNA into DNA Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie O. Pedersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA has shown great promise as a building material for self-assembling nanoscale structures. To further develop the potential of this technology, more methods are needed for functionalizing DNA-based nanostructures to increase their chemical diversity. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA holds great promise for realizing this goal, as it conveniently allows for inclusion of both amino acids and peptides in nucleic acid-based structures. In this work, we explored incorporation of a positively charged PNA within DNA nanostructures. We investigated the efficiency of annealing a lysine-containing PNA probe with complementary, single-stranded DNA sequences within nanostructures, as well as the efficiency of duplex invasion and its dependence on salt concentration. Our results show that PNA allows for toehold-free strand displacement and that incorporation yield depends critically on binding site geometry. These results provide guidance for the design of PNA binding sites on nucleic acid nanostructures with an eye towards optimizing fabrication yield.

  4. Electrical Breakdown Characteristic of Nanostructured W-Cu Contacts Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Junbo; CHEN Wen'ge; DING Bingjun

    2006-01-01

    Nanostructured (NS) W- Cu composite powder was prepared by mechanical alloying ( MA ), and nanostructured bulk of W- Cu contact material was fabricated by hot press sintering in an electrical vacuum furnace. The microstructure, electric conductivity, hardness and break down voltage of NS W-Cu alloys were measured and compared to those of conventional W- Cu alloys prepared by powder metallurgy. The experimental results show that microstructural refinement and uniformity can improve the breakdown behavior and the electric arc stability of nanostructured W- Cu contacts materials. Also, the nanostructured W- Cu contact material shows the characteristic of spreading electric arcs, which is of benefit to electric arc erosion.

  5. Comparison of microstructure and magnetic properties of 3% Si-steel, amorphous and nanostructure Finemet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, M.; Rahmani, Kh.; Amiri Kerahroodi, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a comparison of microstructure and magnetic properties of polycrystalline 3%Si-steel, amorphous and nano-crystalline alloy Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (known as Finemet). Si-steels are industrially produced by casting, hot and cold rolling, annealing and coating. Samples of thin amorphous ribbons were prepared by the planar flow casting (PFC) method. Nano-crystalline samples are obtained after annealing in vacuum furnace at 560 °C for 1 h. The structure of specimens was investigated by XRD, SEM and FE-SEM. Also, magnetic properties were measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that, hysteresis losses in as-quenched and nano-crystalline ribbons were by 94.75% and 96.06% less than 3%Si-steel, respectively. After the heat treatment of amorphous specimens, hysteresis area was decreased by 25% in comparison with heat treated specimen. This decreasing is occurred due to the formation of Fe3Si nanostructure with size of 10-17 nm and removing segregation after heat treatment.

  6. Epicrystal modification of construction composites of different purpose with application of granulated nanostructured aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STROKOVA Valeria Valerievna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that the volume impregnation of the concrete matrix in case of using granular nanostructured aggregate is an example of several anthropogenic metasomatosis such as phase replacement with the change of the chemical composition, as well as formation of new paragenesises, transformation of characteristics of final material. It is shown the impregnation of concrete with modifying solution results in microstructure impaction and homogenization; grain surface is covered with micro- and nano-sized new formations with different morphology. Considering the relevance of researches related to the development of new lightweight concrete aggregates and modification of traditionally used aggregates application of nanostructured granular aggregate for the implementation epicrystal modification of lightweight concrete based on inorganic binders is proposed. It allows creating composite macroporous structure with joint modification of the matrix on nano- and microlevel. Also, in view of increase in number of researches devoted to alkali-activated silicate and aluminosilicate systems for application as individually and as modifiers for increasing of hydrophobic properties of building materials, the possibility of creating a fine-grained concrete with low water absorption by the introduction of hydrophobic additives into the composition of granular nanostructured aggregate is demonstrated. During the steam treatment the fluids from solutions of sodium polysilicates and hydrophobic additives are form at the core of the granular aggregate with its later migration through the shell of the granules and spreading in the volume of the concrete matrix. Improving of performance characteristics presented construction composites for various purposes is defined by the infiltrational metasomatic transformation of crystalline matrix with the activated functional systems, obtained during the thermal activation of granulated nanostructured aggregate.

  7. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  8. Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian

    2011-12-01

    solar cell as anode. Further, we report the fabrication of highly conductive, large surface-area 3D pillar graphene nanostructures (PGN) films from assembly of vertically aligned CNT pillars on flexible copper foils and directly employed for the application in electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC). The PGN films with MWCNTs on graphene layers, which were one-step synthesized on flexible copper foil (25 um) by CVD process, exhibit high conductivity with sheet resistance as low as 1.6 Ohm per square and high mechanical flexibility. The fabricated EDLC supercapacitor based on high surface-area PGN electrodes (563m 2/g) showed high performance with high specific capacitance of 330F/g. We demonstrate the synthesis and characterization of three dimensional heterostructures graphene hybrid nanostructures (HGN) comprising continuous large area graphene layers and ZnO nanostructures, fabricated via two-step CVD process. The material characterizations exhibit the highly crystalline ZnO nanostructures synthesized on few-layer graphene film. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy indicate that the CVD grown HGN layers has excellent optical properties. The electrical study on the graphene/ZnO/graphene devices suggests that graphene readily form Ohmic contact to ZnO, although rarely Shockley may exist. The electron transport properties highly depend on the temperature. Devices show photoconductive effect under UV illumination. A combination of electrical and optical properties of graphene and ZnO building blocks in ZnO based HGN provides unique characteristics for opportunities in future optoelectronic devices.

  9. Effects of annealing temperature on the physicochemical, optical and photoelectrochemical properties of nanostructured hematite thin films prepared via electrodeposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phuan, Yi Wen [School of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Discipline, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia); Chong, Meng Nan, E-mail: Chong.Meng.Nan@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Discipline, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia); Sustainable Water Alliance, Advanced Engineering Platform, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia); Zhu, Tao; Yong, Siek-Ting [School of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Discipline, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia); Chan, Eng Seng [School of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Discipline, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia); Sustainable Water Alliance, Advanced Engineering Platform, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway 46150 Selangor DE (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured hematite thin films were synthesized via electrodeposition method. • Effects of annealing on size, grain boundary and PEC properties were examined. • Photocurrents generation was enhanced when the thin films were annealed at 600 °C. • The highest photocurrent density of 1.6 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V vs Ag/AgCl was achieved. - Abstract: Hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is a promising photoanode material for hydrogen production from photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting due to its wide abundance, narrow band-gap energy, efficient light absorption and high chemical stability under aqueous environment. The key challenge to the wider utilisation of nanostructured hematite-based photoanode in PEC water splitting, however, is limited by its low photo-assisted water oxidation caused by large overpotential in the nominal range of 0.5–0.6 V. The main aim of this study was to enhance the performance of hematite for photo-assisted water oxidation by optimising the annealing temperature used during the synthesis of nanostructured hematite thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-based photoanodes prepared via the cathodic electrodeposition method. The resultant nanostructured hematite thin films were characterised using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for their elemental composition, average nanocrystallites size and morphology; phase and crystallinity; UV-absorptivity and band gap energy; and the functional groups, respectively. Results showed that the nanostructured hematite thin films possess good ordered nanocrystallites array and high crystallinity after annealing treatment at 400–600 °C. FE-SEM images illustrated an increase in the average hematite nanocrystallites size from 65 nm to 95 nm when the annealing temperature was varied from 400 °C to 600

  10. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces.

  11. Nanostructured germanium deposited on heated substrates with enhanced photoelectric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Stavarache

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining high-quality materials, based on nanocrystals, at low temperatures is one of the current challenges for opening new paths in improving and developing functional devices in nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report a detailed investigation of the optimization of parameters for the in situ synthesis of thin films with high Ge content (50 % into SiO2. Crystalline Ge nanoparticles were directly formed during co-deposition of SiO2 and Ge on substrates at 300, 400 and 500 °C. Using this approach, effects related to Ge–Ge spacing are emphasized through a significant improvement of the spatial distribution of the Ge nanoparticles and by avoiding multi-step fabrication processes or Ge loss. The influence of the preparation conditions on structural, electrical and optical properties of the fabricated nanostructures was studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, electrical measurements in dark or under illumination and response time investigations. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of the procedure by the means of an Al/n-Si/Ge:SiO2/ITO photodetector test structure. The structures, investigated at room temperature, show superior performance, high photoresponse gain, high responsivity (about 7 AW−1, fast response time (0.5 µs at 4 kHz and great optoelectronic conversion efficiency of 900% in a wide operation bandwidth, from 450 to 1300 nm. The obtained photoresponse gain and the spectral width are attributed mainly to the high Ge content packed into a SiO2 matrix showing the direct connection between synthesis and optical properties of the tested nanostructures. Our deposition approach put in evidence the great potential of Ge nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 matrix for hybrid integration, as they may be employed in structures and devices individually or with other materials, hence the possibility of fabricating various heterojunctions on Si, glass or flexible substrates for future development of Si

  12. Effect of pH on the morphology of ZnO nanostructures and its influence on structural and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayerfrancis, Arokiyadoss [Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); SSN Research Center, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Balaji Bhargav, P., E-mail: balajibhargavp@ssn.edu.in [Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); SSN Research Center, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Ahmed, Nafis; Chandra, Balaji [SSN Research Center, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Dhara, Sandip [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Pristine ZnO nanostructure of rods, flakes and flowers are synthesized by hydrothermal method, using equimolar aqueous solutions of zinc-nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at different pH. The influence of pH value on the formation of different morphological structures of ZnO is investigated. The structural and morphological properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) analyses. The XRD results confirm that the crystallinity of ZnO nanostructures are improved after annealing with the wurtzite crystal structure. FTIR studies are carried out in order to ascertain the presence of various functional groups present in the material. Optical studies, using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy shows presence of novel defects with newly assigned zone boundary phonon mode.

  13. Effect of pH on the morphology of ZnO nanostructures and its influence on structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayerfrancis, Arokiyadoss; Balaji Bhargav, P.; Ahmed, Nafis; Chandra, Balaji; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Pristine ZnO nanostructure of rods, flakes and flowers are synthesized by hydrothermal method, using equimolar aqueous solutions of zinc-nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at different pH. The influence of pH value on the formation of different morphological structures of ZnO is investigated. The structural and morphological properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) analyses. The XRD results confirm that the crystallinity of ZnO nanostructures are improved after annealing with the wurtzite crystal structure. FTIR studies are carried out in order to ascertain the presence of various functional groups present in the material. Optical studies, using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy shows presence of novel defects with newly assigned zone boundary phonon mode.

  14. Nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia coatings deposited by air plasma spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong; LI Fei; HE Bo; WANG Jun; SUN Bao-de

    2007-01-01

    Nanostructured yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying with reconstituted nanosized powder. The microstructures and phase compositions of the powder and the as-sprayed nanostructured coatings were characterized by transmission electron microscopy(TEM), scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD). The results demonstrate that the microstructure of as-sprayed nanostructured zirconia coating exhibits a unique tri-modal distribution including the initial nanostructure of the powder, equiaxed grains and columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed nanostructured zirconia coatings consist of only the nontransformable tetragonal phase, though the reconstituted nanostructured powder shows the presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal and the cubic phases. The mean grain size of the coating is about 42 nm.

  15. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... counterparts, due to the promising advantages, such as transparency, flexibility, ease of processing etc. But their efficiencies cannot be compared to the inorganic ones. Boosting the efficiency of OSCs by nanopatterning has thus been puzzling many researchers within the past years. Therefore various methods...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...

  16. High Throughput Synthesis of Multifunctional Oxide Nanostructures within Nanoreactors Defined by Beam Pen Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing; Huang, Yi-Kai; Mirkin, Chad A; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2017-05-23

    Reliably obtaining nanostructures of complex oxides over large area with nanoscale resolution and well-controlled shape, spacing, and pattern symmetry remains a major challenge. In this article, millions of nanowells have been routinely generated by beam pen lithography. Each attoliter volume nanowell functions as a "nanoreactor", inside which oxide nanostructures are synthesized from their sol-gel precursors. Importantly, these nanometer scale entities are in single crystalline or textured forms and epitaxial to the underlying substrates, which promises functionalities including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and multiferroicity. This method provides a general solution which allows one to rapidly screen structural parameters of oxide nanostructures comprising of three or more elements for prominent properties.

  17. Titania Nanostructures for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Malekshahi Byranvand; A Nemati Kharat; M H Bazargan

    2012-01-01

    Titania is one kind of important materials, which has been extensively investigated because of its unique electronic and optical properties. Research efforts have largely focused on the optimization of the dye, but recently the titania nanostructures electrode itself has attracted more attention. It has been shown that particle size, shape, crystallinity, surface morphology, and chemistry of the TiO2 material are key parameters which should be controlled for optimized performance of the solar cell. Titania can be found in different shape of nanostructures including mesoporous, nanotube, nanowire, and nanorod structures. The present article reviews the structural, synthesis, electronic, and optical properties of TiO2 nanostructures for dye sensitized solar cells.

  18. Embedded silicene nanostructures in partly-dehydrogenated polysilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuling; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Xiaojun

    2017-04-05

    Developing freestanding silicene nanostructures with tunable electronic and magnetic properties is of particular importance for their applications in nanoelectronics, but still faces big challenges. On the basis of first-principles calculations, here we predict that embedded silicene nanoflakes and nanoribbons can be realized by partly dehydrogenating a freestanding polysilane (Si6H6) sheet. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the embedded silicene nanostructures show good thermal stability at 500 K. In particular, the embedded silicene nanostructures exhibit similar electronics properties to those of isolated ones. These findings imply a practical solution to produce embedded silicene nanostructures from partly dehydrogenated freestanding polysilane.

  19. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  20. Morphology of Low Density Foams from Crystalline Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, G.; Schaefer, D. W.; Lagasse, R. R.; Aubert, J. A.; Ehrlich, P.; Stein, R. S.; Whaley, P.; Kulkarni, S.

    1996-03-01

    Low-density polymer foams are often derived via supercritical extraction of crystalline gels. The nano-structural basis of these foams and gels, in a wide variety of systems, is distorted lamellae. We present an uncorrelated lamellar model which describes the small-angle scattering over 5 orders of size in these systems. Our approach is based on the unified approach to small-angle scattering and scattering data from 4 instruments. This approach is equally applicable to olefin foams from gelation in supercritical propane (Whaley, Kulkarni, Stein, Ehrlich), polyacrylonitrile foams and gels from DMF/ethylene glycol followed by supercritical extraction in CO2 (Lagasse) and isotactic PS foams and gels from decalin and extracted in supercritical CO2 (Aubert). Distortion of conventional crystalline morphologies can be rationalized in terms of the extent of entanglement of the polymer chains during crystallization and the deformability of lamellar platelets during supercritical drying. Correlations between melt and dilute solution morphologies are given.

  1. Single-crystalline nanoporous Nb2O5 nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Single-crystalline nanoporous Nb2O5 nanotubes were fabricated by a two-step solution route, the growth of uniform single-crystalline Nb2O5 nanorods and the following ion-assisted selective dissolution along the [001] direction. Nb2O5 tubular structure was created by preferentially etching (001 crystallographic planes, which has a nearly homogeneous diameter and length. Dense nanopores with the diameters of several nanometers were created on the shell of Nb2O5 tubular structures, which can also retain the crystallographic orientation of Nb2O5 precursor nanorods. The present chemical etching strategy is versatile and can be extended to different-sized nanorod precursors. Furthermore, these as-obtained nanorod precursors and nanotube products can also be used as template for the fabrication of 1 D nanostructured niobates, such as LiNbO3, NaNbO3, and KNbO3.

  2. Colloidal-crystal-assisted patterning of crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Qi, Limin

    2010-04-06

    Colloidal crystals have shown great potential as versatile templates for the fabrication of patterned micro- and nanostructures with complex architectures and novel properties. The patterning of functional crystalline materials in two and three dimensions is essential to the realization of their applications in many technologically important fields. This article highlights some recent progress in the fabrication of 2D and 3D patterned crystalline materials with the assistance of colloidal crystals. By combining a bioinspired synthetic strategy based on a transient amorphous phase with a colloidal-crystal templating method, unique 3D ordered macroporous (3DOM) calcite single crystals can be created. Moreover, patterned arrays of regular ZnO nanopillars with controlled size, shape, and orientation can be fabricated via a facile wet chemical approach by using masks derived from monolayer colloidal crystals (MCC).

  3. Nanostructures of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric multiple properties. Using a solid-vapor phase thermal sublimation technique, nanocombs, nanorings, nanohelixes/nanosprings, nanobows, nanobelts, nanowires, and nanocages of ZnO have been synthesized under specific growth conditions. These unique nanostructures unambiguously demonstrate that ZnO is probably the richest family of nanostructures among all materials, both in structures and properties. The nanostructures could have novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, and biomedical science because it is bio-safe.

  4. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  5. Synthesis and functional properties of nanostructured ceria materials; Synthese und funktionelle Eigenschaften nanostrukturierter Ceroxidmaterialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, Meike

    2014-06-02

    Nanostructured ceria tubes have been synthesised using electro spun polymer fibers as templating material. These polymer mats are produced by electro spinning starting with a polymer solution. In a next step polymer fibers are decorated with cer containing sol, which is then dried. To receive ceria tubes the polymer is removed on the one hand by thermal decomposition of the polymer or on the other hand by oxygen plasma treatment of ceria/polymer hybrid material. The resulting ceria tubes have a specific surface area of 98 m2 g-1. TEM, XRD, SAED and Raman investigations show a fully nanostructured crystallinity with cubic fluorine type structure. This obtained material shows a photo catalytic activity within decomposition of methylene blue in the Vis part of the electromagnetic spectrum. This photo catalytic activity can be increased using doping ions of transition and rare earth elements that are introduced in the sol-gel synthesis. Also here XRD and TEM investigations show a fully nano crystalline structure of ceria. Raman spectroscopy verifies the doping of ceria by transition and rare earth elements up to 22% of doping. No phase separation can be observed. The photo catalytic activity can be increased using these doped materials. Additionally a catalytic activity of pure ceria and mixed ceria/zirconia materials have been investigated synthesis of dimethylcarboxilate without water addition. Here a direct dependence between turn over and doping cannot be detected. The dependence can be deduced to the synthesis process of the catalyst. Terminal sensoric properties of doped and undoped ceria (n-type semiconductor) are investigated. The prepared materials are used as chemiresistors against oxygen at temperatures of 700 C. These investigations show a reversible increase of the electrical resistance against oxygen.

  6. Birefringence Measurements on Crystalline Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Christoph; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarisation-dependent resonance frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of $\\Delta\\, n \\approx 10^{-7}$ at a laser wavelength of 1550nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  7. Synthesis, electronic and optical properties of Si nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L.N.

    1996-09-01

    Silicon and silicon oxide nanostructures have been deposited on solid substrates, in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber, by laser ablation or thermal vaporization. Laser ablation followed by substrate post annealing produced Si clusters with average size of a few nanometers, on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces. This technique, which is based on surface diffusion, is limited to the production of less than one layer of clusters on a given surface. The low coverage of Si clusters and the possibility of nonradiative decay of excitation in the Si cores to the HOPG substrates in these samples rendered them unsuitable for many optical measurements. Thermal vaporization of Si in an Ar buffer gas, on the contrary, yielded multilayer coverage of Si nanoclusters with a fairly narrow size distribution of about 2 nm, full width at half maximum (FWHM). As a result, further study was performed only on Si nanoclusters synthesized by thermal vaporization in a buffer gas. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that these nanoclusters were crystalline. However, during synthesis, if oxygen was the buffer gas, a network of amorphous Si oxide nanostructures (an-SiO{sub x}) with occasional embedded Si dots was formed. All samples showed strong infrared and/or visible photoluminescence (PL) with varying decay times from nanoseconds to microseconds depending on synthesis conditions. There were differences in PL spectra for hydrogen and oxygen passivated nc-Si, while many common PL properties between oxygen passivated nc-Si and an SiO{sub x} were observed. The observed experimental results can be best explained by a model involving absorption between quantum confined states in the Si cores and emission for which the decay times are very sensitive to surface and/or interface states.

  8. Nanostructured CNx (0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongiorno, G; Blomqvist, M; Piseri, P; Milani, P; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Caruso, T; Rudolf, P; Wachtmeister, S; Csillag, S; Coronel, E

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured CNx thin films were prepared by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) and systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporat

  9. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  10. Nanostructured Bi2Te3 Prepared by a Straightforward Arc-Melting Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsallah, M.; Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Bermúdez, J.; Nemes, N. M.; Martínez, J. L.; Elhalouani, F.; Alonso, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric materials constitute an alternative source of sustainable energy, harvested from waste heat. Bi2Te3 is the most utilized thermoelectric alloy. We show that it can be readily prepared in nanostructured form by arc-melting synthesis, yielding mechanically robust pellets of highly oriented polycrystals. This material has been characterized by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electronic and thermal transport measurements. A microscopic analysis from NPD data demonstrates a near-perfect stoichiometry of Bi2Te3 and a fair amount of anharmonicity of the chemical bonds. The as-grown material presents a metallic behavior, showing a record-low resistivity at 320 K of 2 μΩ m, which is advantageous for its performance as a thermoelectric material. SEM analysis shows a stacking of nanosized sheets, each of them presumably single-crystalline, with large surfaces perpendicular to the c crystallographic axis. This nanostructuration notably affects the thermoelectric properties, involving many surface boundaries that are responsible for large phonon scattering factors, yielding a thermal conductivity as low as 1.2 W m-1 K-1 around room temperature.

  11. Nanostructured Bi2Te3 Prepared by a Straightforward Arc-Melting Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsallah, M; Serrano-Sánchez, F; Bermúdez, J; Nemes, N M; Martínez, J L; Elhalouani, F; Alonso, J A

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric materials constitute an alternative source of sustainable energy, harvested from waste heat. Bi2Te3 is the most utilized thermoelectric alloy. We show that it can be readily prepared in nanostructured form by arc-melting synthesis, yielding mechanically robust pellets of highly oriented polycrystals. This material has been characterized by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electronic and thermal transport measurements. A microscopic analysis from NPD data demonstrates a near-perfect stoichiometry of Bi2Te3 and a fair amount of anharmonicity of the chemical bonds. The as-grown material presents a metallic behavior, showing a record-low resistivity at 320 K of 2 μΩ m, which is advantageous for its performance as a thermoelectric material. SEM analysis shows a stacking of nanosized sheets, each of them presumably single-crystalline, with large surfaces perpendicular to the c crystallographic axis. This nanostructuration notably affects the thermoelectric properties, involving many surface boundaries that are responsible for large phonon scattering factors, yielding a thermal conductivity as low as 1.2 W m(-1) K(-1) around room temperature.

  12. Hierarchical Si/ZnO trunk-branch nanostructure for photocurrent enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Chang Fu; Chong, Su Kong; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Omar, Fatin Saiha; Huang, Nay Ming; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop; Salleh, Muhamad Mat

    2014-09-01

    Hierarchical Si/ZnO trunk-branch nanostructures (NSs) have been synthesized by hot wire assisted chemical vapor deposition method for trunk Si nanowires (NWs) on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate and followed by the vapor transport condensation (VTC) method for zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) which was laterally grown from each Si nanowires (NWs). A spin coating method has been used for zinc oxide (ZnO) seeding. This method is better compared with other group where they used sputtering method for the same process. The sputtering method only results in the growth of ZnO NRs on top of the Si trunk. Our method shows improvement by having the growth evenly distributed on the lateral sides and caps of the Si trunks, resulting in pine-leave-like NSs. Field emission scanning electron microscope image shows the hierarchical nanostructures resembling the shape of the leaves of pine trees. Single crystalline structure for the ZnO branch grown laterally from the crystalline Si trunk has been identified by using a lattice-resolved transmission electron microscope. A preliminary photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell testing has been setup to characterize the photocurrent of sole array of ZnO NR growth by both hydrothermal-grown (HTG) method and VTC method on ITO substrates. VTC-grown ZnO NRs showed greater photocurrent effect due to its better structural properties. The measured photocurrent was also compared with the array of hierarchical Si/ZnO trunk-branch NSs. The cell with the array of Si/ZnO trunk-branch NSs revealed four-fold magnitude enhancement in photocurrent density compared with the sole array of ZnO NRs obtain from VTC processes.

  13. Tin-Doped Indium Oxide-Titania Core-Shell Nanostructures for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luping Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs hold great promise in the pursuit of reliable and cheap renewable energy. In this work, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO-TiO2 core-shell nanostructures are used as the photoanode for DSSCs. High-density, vertically aligned ITO nanowires are grown via a thermal evaporation method and TiO2 is coated on nanowire surfaces via TiCl4 treatment. It is found that high TiO2 annealing temperatures increase the crystallinity of TiO2 shell and suppress electron recombination in the core-shell nanostructures. High annealing temperatures also decrease dye loading. The highest efficiency of 3.39% is achieved at a TiO2 annealing temperature of 500°C. When HfO2 blocking layers are inserted between the core and shell of the nanowire, device efficiency is further increased to 5.83%, which is attributed to further suppression of electron recombination from ITO to the electrolyte. Open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD measurements show that the electron lifetime increases by more than an order of magnitude upon HfO2 insertion. ITO-TiO2 core-shell nanostructures with HfO2 blocking layers are promising photoanodes for DSSCs.

  14. COLD DRAWING IN CRYSTALLINE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    alcohols, phenol) in Nylon 6 produced changes in the crystalline structure as well as plasticizer action; these two effects must therefore be carefully...distinguished. Changes in the crystalline structure were followed by changes in the infrared spectrum. Dynamic mechanical and thermogravimetric analysis

  15. Effects of spatial confinement on conduction electrons in semiconductor nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germeau, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures show electrical and optical properties which can be very different from bulk semiconductors. The various effects that occur due to the spatial confinement of electrons in such structures are of scientific importance. In addition, semiconductor nanostructures are very pro

  16. Structure, Morphology and Reducibility of Epitaxial Cerium Oxide Ultrathin Films and Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Luches

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide is a very interesting material that finds applications in many different fields, such as catalysis, energy conversion, and biomedicine. An interesting approach to unravel the complexity of real systems and obtain an improved understanding of cerium oxide-based materials is represented by the study of model systems in the form of epitaxial ultrathin films or nanostructures supported on single crystalline substrates. These materials often show interesting novel properties, induced by spatial confinement and by the interaction with the supporting substrate, and their understanding requires the use of advanced experimental techniques combined with computational modeling. Recent experimental and theoretical studies performed within this field are examined and discussed here, with emphasis on the new perspectives introduced in view of the optimization of cerium oxide-based materials for application in different fields.

  17. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  18. Simultaneous synthesis of anatase colloidal and multiple-branched rutile TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trong Tung; Duong, Ngoc Huyen [School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Mai, Xuan Dung [Dept. of Chemistry, Hanoi Pedagogical University No2, Vinh Phuc (Viet Nam)

    2017-03-15

    Facile synthesis of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2} ) nanostructures with controllability over their cystallinity, dimensions, and shape is in demand for diverse optoelectronic applications. Anatase colloidal particles and precipitates of rutile bundles were synthesized simultaneously using HCl catalyzed sol–gel process with titanium tetrachloride as Ti precursor. The crystallinity and the morphology of these two separable TiO{sub 2} phases were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that by varying HCl concentration during synthesis, dimensions of colloidal anatase can be tuned from spherical particles with a diameter of 2–5 nm to nanorods of dimension of 4 nm (width) × 14 nm (length). The rutile bundles whose size increased with aging time consisted of multiple branches with elongation along c-axis. Both anatase nanorods and rutile bundles can be applied as highly efficient photocatalysts or electron conduits.

  19. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  20. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanujan

    2003-02-01

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials are provided. Advantages of nanocrystalline magnetic materials in the context of both materials and devices are discussed. Several high technology examples of the use of nanostructured magnetic materials are presented. Methods of processing nanostructured materials are described and the examples of sol gel, rapid solidification and powder injection moulding as potential processing methods for making nanostructured materials are outlined. Some opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  1. Laser Nanostructurization of the Metal and Alloy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavin, Andrei; Kozlovskaya, Natalia; Krokhin, Oleg; Zavestovskaya, Irina

    2010-10-01

    The results from experimental and theoretical investigation of material pulsed laser treatment aimed at obtaining nano- and microstructured surface are presented. An experiment has been performed on the modification of indium surface using a solid-state diode-pumped laser. It has been shown that nano- and micro-size structures are formed under laser melting and fast crystallization of the metal surface. The kinetics of the crystallization of metals under superfast cooling. The distribution function for crystalline nuclei dimensions is analytically found within the framework of the classical kinetic equation in case of superfast temperature changing. The average number of particles in the crystalline nuclei and relative volume of the crystalline phase are determined as functions of thermodynamic and laser treatment regime parameters. Good agreement is observed with experimental results for ultrashort laser pulses induced micro- and nanostructures production.

  2. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  3. Synthesis of graphene and graphene nanostructures by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotie; Berke, Kara; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G.; Fridmann, Joel; Hebard, Arthur F.; Ren, Fan; Gila, Brent P.; Appleton, Bill R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report a systematic study that shows how the numerous processing parameters associated with ion implantation (II) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) can be manipulated to control the quantity and quality of graphene (G), few-layer graphene (FLG), and other carbon nanostructures selectively synthesized in crystalline SiC (c-SiC). Controlled implantations of Si- plus C- and Au+ ions in c-SiC showed that both the thickness of the amorphous layer formed by ion damage and the doping effect of the implanted Au enhance the formation of G and FLG during PLA. The relative contributions of the amorphous and doping effects were studied separately, and thermal simulation calculations were used to estimate surface temperatures and to help understand the phase changes occurring during PLA. In addition to the amorphous layer thickness and catalytic doping effects, other enhancement effects were found to depend on other ion species, the annealing environment, PLA fluence and number of pulses, and even laser frequency. Optimum II and PLA conditions are identified and possible mechanisms for selective synthesis of G, FLG, and carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  4. Dark-field electron holography for the mapping of strain in nanostructures: correcting artefacts and aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hytch, M J; Houdellier, F; Snoeck, E; Huee, F, E-mail: hytch@cemes.f [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2010-07-01

    We present details of the new electron holographic dark-field technique (HoloDark) for mapping strain in nanostructures. A diffracted beam emanating from an unstrained region of crystal is interfered (with the aid of an electrostatic biprism) with a diffracted beam from the strained region of interest. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) of the holographic fringes determines the relative deformation of the two crystalline lattices. Strain can be measured to high precision, with nanometre spatial resolution and for micron fields of view. Experiments are carried out on the SACTEM-Toulouse, a Tecnai F20 (FEI) equipped with imaging aberration corrector (CEOS), field-emission gun and rotatable biprism (FEI). We operate the microscope in free-lens control with the main objective lens switched off and using the corrector transfer lenses as a Lorentz lens. We will present measurements of strain in test nanostructures and show how artefacts from thickness variations can be removed. Finally, we show our first results using a recently developed aberration-corrected Lorentz mode (CEOS).

  5. Nanostructure formation in the lecithin/isooctane/water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Naama; Schnabel-Lubovsky, Maya; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2013-08-15

    We present here for the first time a study of the self-assembled nanostructures in the lecithin/isooctane/water system by direct-imaging techniques, namely, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Along the dilution line [water]/[lecithin] = 5, we identified a nanostructural development with the increase of lecithin concentration. The system changes from a single reverse micellar phase, through a reverse micellar phase coexisting with a lamellar phase, and finally to a reverse liquid crystalline cubic phase and a lamellar phase. We compared the nanostructures formed when phosphatidylcholine rather than naturally occurring lecithin is used and found that both phase behavior and nanostructure are significantly different. The use of the two complementary cryo-EM techniques proved very efficient in the nanostructural characterization of the system. We also performed small-angle X-ray scattering to confirm our findings. Since the system is very sensitive to changes in composition, the cryo-EM specimens were prepared in a Controlled Environment Vitrification System (CEVS) that has been modified for our specimen preparation needs. We were able to overcome the challenges involved in directly imaging this nonaqueous (oil-rich), concentrated complex liquid systems, thus extending the usefulness of those characterization techniques.

  6. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  7. Localized surface plasmon of quasi-one-dimensional metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhao

    2007-05-01

    The plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles provides interesting optical properties in the visible and near-infrared region, and is highly tunable by varying the shape and the composition of the nanoparticles. The rod-like gold nanostructures can be synthesized by a seed-mediated method in aqueous surfactant solutions. Starting from different types of gold seeds, either single crystalline gold nanorods or penta-fold twinned gold bipyramids can be synthesized in decent yield with silver(I) added into the growth solution. These nanostructures have pronounced plasmon resonance varying in the 1˜2 eV range. The bipyramids are strikingly monodisperse in shape, which leads to the sharpest ensemble longitudinal plasmon resonance reported so far for metal colloid solutions. A mechanism based on the underpotential deposition of silver was thus suggested to explain the essential role of Ag(I) in the growth process. The optical spectra of the gold colloids were simulated with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results show excellent agreement with recent experimental optical spectra. The local field enhancement (|E|/|E0|) was studied at the plasmon resonance. Sharper structural features produce more significant enhancement and the largest enhancement of more than a factor of 200 is seen around the poles of the bipyramid. A large internal field enhancement by more than a factor of 30 is found for the bipyramids, which suggests that they will exhibit very strong optical nonlinearities. The plasmon can be further tuned by introducing the core/shell nanostructures such as metal/metal or metal/semiconductor nanorods. Following a simple procedure, a homogeneous layer of silver with 1-4 nm thickness can be plated onto the gold nanorods, which shifts the longitudinal plasmon mode of the nanorods toward blue. The silver layer can be converted to semiconductors silver sulfide or selenide, with the longitudinal plasmon resonance tuned toward red. The metal

  8. Dry Powder Precursors of Cubic Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles (cubosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Patrick T.; Small, William B.; Small, William B.; Lynch, Matthew L.; Burns, Janet L.

    2002-08-01

    Cubosomes are dispersed nanostructured particles of cubic phase liquid crystal that have stimulated significant research interest because of their potential for application in controlled-release and drug delivery. Despite the interest, cubosomes can be difficult to fabricate and stabilize with current methods. Most of the current work is limited to liquid phase processes involving high shear dispersion of bulk cubic liquid crystalline material into sub-micron particles, limiting application flexibility. In this work, two types of dry powder cubosome precursors are produced by spray-drying: (1) starch-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying a dispersion of cubic liquid crystalline particles in an aqueous starch solution and (2) dextran-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying an emulsion formed by the ethanol-dextran-monoolein-water system. The encapsulants are used to decrease powder cohesion during drying and to act as a soluble colloidal stabilizer upon hydration of the powders. Both powders are shown to form (on average) 0.6 μm colloidally-stable cubosomes upon addition to water. However, the starch powders have a broader particle size distribution than the dextran powders because of the relative ease of spraying emulsions versus dispersions. The developed processes enable the production of nanostructured cubosomes by end-users rather than just specialized researchers and allow tailoring of the surface state of the cubosomes for broader application.

  9. Ultrahard magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, P. K.; Liu, Y.; Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Zhang, R.; Franchin, M.; Fangohr, H.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of hard-magnetic nanostructures is investigated by analyzing the size and geometry dependence of thin-film hysteresis loops. Compared to bulk magnets, weight and volume are much less important, but we find that the energy product remains the main figure of merit down to very small features sizes. However, hysteresis loops are much easier to control on small length scales, as epitomized by Fe-Co-Pt thin films with magnetizations of up to 1.78 T and coercivities of up to 2.52 T. Our numerical and analytical calculations show that the feature size and geometry have a big effect on the hysteresis loop. Layered soft regions, especially if they have a free surface, are more harmful to coercivity and energy product than spherical inclusions. In hard-soft nanocomposites, an additional complication is provided by the physical properties of the hard phases. For a given soft phase, the performance of a hard-soft composite is determined by the parameter (Ms - Mh)/Kh.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  11. A Versatile Route for the Synthesis of Single Crystalline Oxide Nanorods : Growth Behavior and Field Emission Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhenguo; Pei, F.; Pei, Y.T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    The exploration of novel synthetic methodologies that control both size and shape of functional nanostructures opens new avenues for the functional application of nanomaterials. Here we report a new and versatile approach to synthesize single crystalline oxides nanorods: thermal conversion from

  12. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  13. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  14. Ultrathin silicon solar cells with enhanced photocurrents assisted by plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Stassen, Erik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    nanostructures. By placing a one-dimensional plasmonic nanograting on the bottom of the solar cell, the generated photocurrent for a 200 nm-thickness crystalline silicon solar cell can be enhanced by 90% in the considered wavelength range, while keeping insensitive to the incident angle. These results are paving...

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of alpha- and beta-HgS nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galain, Isabel; María, Pérez Barthaburu; Ivana, Aguiar; Laura, Fornaro

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized HgS nanostructures by the hydrothermal method in order to use them as electron acceptors in hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. We employed different mercury sources (HgO and Hg(CH3COO)2) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or hexadecanethiol (HDT) as stabilizing/capping agent for controlling size, crystallinity, morphology and stability of the obtained nanostructures. We also used thiourea as sulfur source, and a temperature of 180 °C during 6 h. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by powder X-Ray Diffraction, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Transmission Electron Microscopy. When PVP acts as stabilizing agent, the mercury source has influence on the size -but not in morphology- of the beta-HgS obtained nansostructures. HDT has control over nanostructures' size and depending on the relation Hg:HDT, we obtained a mixture of alpha and beta HgS which can be advantageous in the application in solar cells, due their absorption in different spectral regions. The smallest nanostructures obtained have a mean diameter of 20 nm when using HDT as capping agent. Also, we deposited the aforementioned nanostructures onto flat glass substrates by the spin coating technique as a first approach of an active layer of a solar cell. The depositions were characterized by atomic force microscopy. We obtained smaller particle deposition and higher particle density -but a lower area coverage (5%) - in samples with HDT as capping agent. This work presents promising results on nanostructures for future application on hybrid solar cells. Further efforts will be focused on the deposition of organic-inorganic layers.

  16. Advanced fabrication of single-crystalline silver nanopillar on SiO{sub 2} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Tomohiro, E-mail: tomohiro-mori@wakayama-kg.jp, E-mail: kenzo@eng.kagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Kagawa University, Hayashicho 2217-20, Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0396 (Japan); Industrial Technology Center of Wakayama Prefecture, Ogura 60, Wakayama 649-6261 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo, E-mail: tomohiro-mori@wakayama-kg.jp, E-mail: kenzo@eng.kagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Kagawa University, Hayashicho 2217-20, Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0396 (Japan)

    2016-01-25

    Nanoscale crystallographic textures have received very little attention in research on surface plasmons using metallic nanostructures. A single-crystalline metallic nanostructure with a controlled crystallographic texture is expected to reduce optical losses. We elucidated the grain growth mechanism in silver thin films deposited on a highly transparent SiO{sub 2} substrate by electron backscatter diffraction methods with nanoscale resolution. At higher substrate temperatures, the grain growth was facilitated but the preferred orientation was not achieved. Moreover, we fabricated a single-crystalline silver nanopillar in a (111)-oriented large growing grain, which was controlled by varying the substrate temperature during film deposition by focused ion-beam milling. Furthermore, the light intensity of the scattering spectrum was measured for a single-crystalline silver nanopillar (undersurface diameter: 200 nm) for which surface plasmon resonance was observed. The single-crystalline silver nanopillar exhibits a stronger and sharper spectrum than the polycrystalline silver nanopillar. These results can be applied to the direct fabrication of a single-crystalline silver nanopillar using only physical processing.

  17. The Cosmic Crystallinity Conundrum: Clues from IRAS 17495-2534

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Angela K; Tartar, Josh B

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, cosmic crystalline silicates have presented several challenges to understanding dust formation and evolution. The mid-infrared spectrum of IRAS 17495$-$2534, a highly obscured oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, is the only source observed to date which exhibits a clear crystalline silicate absorption feature. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to test competing hypotheses for dust formation. Observed spectral features suggest that both amorphous and crystalline dust is dominated by forsterite (Mg\\_2 SiO\\_4) rather than enstatite (MgSiO\\_3) or other silicate compositions. We confirm that high mass-loss rates should produce more crystalline material, and show why this should be dominated by forsterite. The presence of Mg\\_2 SiO\\_4 glass suggests that another factor (possibly C/O) is critical in determining astromineralogy. Correlation between crystallinity, mass-loss rate and initial stellar mass suggests that only the most massive AGB stars contribute significant qua...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  19. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  20. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Crystalline and Non-Crystalline Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parrott, Edward P. J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy of crystalline and non-crystalline solids is probably one of the most active research fields within the terahertz community. Many potential applications, amongst which spectral recognition is probably one of the most prominent, have significantly stimulated the development...... selected examples, the potential the technique holds for various different applications. A particular focus will be given to data analysis and, in particular, how we may account for effects resulting from non-ideal sample preparation....

  1. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  2. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  3. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  4. Group III-nitrides nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Caro, M.; Ramírez-López, M.; Rojas-Ramírez, J. S.; Martínez-Velis, I.; Casallas-Moreno, Y.; Gallardo-Hernández, S.; Babu, B. J.; Velumani, S.; López-López, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of self-assembled InGaN columnar nanostructures grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) on Si(111) substrates. At a zero concentration of Ga, InN nanocolumns (NCs) were successfully grown. In the case of InGaN, the surface morphology is dependent on composition; however, in general, InGaN samples exhibit columnar features. At concentrations near 50%, the samples show phase separation; this result is explained in terms of solid phase immiscibility.

  5. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  6. Ontogeny and localization of γ-crystallin antigen in the developing pigeon (Columba livia) lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; Rabaey, M.; Doorenmaalen, W.J. van

    Ontogeny and localization of the lens γ-crystallin antigen were investigated in the embryonic and post-embryonic pigeon lenses by the indirect immunofluorescence with antiserum from rabbit immunized with isolated pigeon lens γ-crystallin. The results show that γ-crystallin appears for the first time

  7. Ontogeny and localization of γ-crystallin antigen in the developing pigeon (Columba livia) lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; Rabaey, M.; Doorenmaalen, W.J. van

    1972-01-01

    Ontogeny and localization of the lens γ-crystallin antigen were investigated in the embryonic and post-embryonic pigeon lenses by the indirect immunofluorescence with antiserum from rabbit immunized with isolated pigeon lens γ-crystallin. The results show that γ-crystallin appears for the first time

  8. Synthesis, characterization and application of semiconducting oxide (Cu2O and ZnO) nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Singh; Jai Singh; P R Mishra; R S Tiwari; O N Srivastava

    2008-06-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis, characterization and application of nanostructured oxide materials. The oxide materials (Cu2O and ZnO) have been synthesized by electrolysis based oxidation and thermal oxidation methods. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanostructures have been synthesized by anodic oxidation of copper through a simple electrolysis process employing plain water (with ionic conductivity, ∼ 6 S/m) as electrolyte. In this method no special electrolytes, chemicals and surfactants are needed. The method is based on anodization pursuant to the simple electrolysis of water at different voltages. Two different types of Cu2O nanostructures have been found. One type got delaminated from copper anode and was collected from the bottom of the electrochemical cell and the other was located on the copper anode itself. The nanostructures collected from the bottom of the cell are either nanothreads embodying beads of different diameters, ∼ 10–40 nm or nanowires (length, ∼ 600–1000 nm and diameter, ∼ 10–25 nm). Those present on the copper anode were nanoblocks with preponderance of nanocubes (nanocube edge, ∼ 400 nm). The copper electrode served as a sacrificial anode for the synthesis of different nanostructures. Aligned ZnO nanorod array has been successfully synthesized by simple thermal evaporation catalyst free method. Detailed structural characterizations revealed that the as synthesized aligned ZnO nanorods are single crystalline, with a hexagonal phase, and with growth along the [0001] direction. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectra showed a weak ultraviolet emission at 380 nm, a broad blue band at 435 nm and a strong orange–red emission at 630 nm. Structural/microstructural characterization of these nanomaterials have been carried out employing scanning (XL-20) and transmission electron microscopic (Philips EM, CM-12 and Technai 20G2) techniques and X-ray diffraction techniques having graphite monochromater with CuK radiation

  9. Effect of precipitating agent NaOH on the preparation of copper oxide nanostructures for electrochemical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramaniam, M.; S Balakumar

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide for electrochemical applications such as supercapacitors have been synthesized using a simple and low-cost precipitation method. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of CuO nanostructures without any impurities and further confirmed its highly crystalline, single phase, monoclinic nature. UV-diffuse reflectance spectral (UVDRS) studies provided the absorption edge of the material and the estimated...

  10. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  11. The low resistive and transparent Al-doped SnO{sub 2} films: p-type conductivity, nanostructures and photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benouis, C.E. [Department of Material Technology, Physics Faculty, USTOMB University, BP1505 Oran (Algeria); Benhaliliba, M., E-mail: mbenhaliliba@gmail.com [Department of Material Technology, Physics Faculty, USTOMB University, BP1505 Oran (Algeria); Mouffak, Z. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering California State University, Fresno, CA (United States); Avila-Garcia, A. [Cinvestav-IPN, Dept. Ingeniería Eléctrica-SEES, Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiburcio-Silver, A. [ITT-DIE, Apdo, Postal 20, Metepec 3, 52176 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortega Lopez, M.; Romano Trujillo, R. [Centro de Investigación en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Instituto de Ciencias-BUAP, 14 Sur y Av. San Claudio, C.U. Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Ocak, Y.S. [Dicle University, Education Faculty, Science Department, 21280 Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Low resistive and high transparency Al doped SnO{sub 2} films. • Films are deposited onto ITO substrate by spray pyrolysis. • Nanostructured films are revealed. • p-Type conductivity is exhibited. • Photoluminescence of films is studied. - Abstract: In this work, we study the crystalline structure, surface morphology, transmittance, optical bandgap and n/p type inversion of tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}). The Nanostructured films of Al-doped SnO{sub 2} were successfully produced onto ITO-coated glass substrates via the spray pyrolysis method at a deposition temperature of 300 °C. A (1 0 1) and (2 1 1)-oriented tetragonal crystal structure was confirmed by X-ray patterns; and grain sizes varied within the range 8−42 nm. The films were polycrystalline, showing a high transparency in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) spectra. The optical bandgap was estimated to be around 3.4 eV. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed the nanostructures consisting of nanotips, nanopatches, nanopits and nanobubbles. The samples exhibited high conductivity that ranged from 0.55 to 10{sup 4} (S/cm) at ambient and showed an inversion from n to p-type as well as a degenerate semiconductor characters with a bulk concentration reaching 1.7 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The photoluminescence measurements reveal the detection of violet, green and yellow emissions.

  12. Liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the recent developments in the field of liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes. The role of trivalent lanthanide ions as the central metal ion in metallomesogens is considered. An outlook for the future is given.

  13. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2012-01-01

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso-

  14. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  15. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Production and characterization of the nanostructured hollow iron oxide spheres and nanoparticles by aerosol route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurmen, Sebahattin, E-mail: gurmen@itu.edu.t [Metallurgical and Materials Eng. Dept., Istanbul Technical University, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey); Ebin, Burcak [Metallurgical and Materials Eng. Dept., Istanbul Technical University, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-03-04

    Nanoshell hollow iron oxide ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) spheres and nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) method from iron(III) chloride salts. Iron oxide nanostructures were obtained by thermal decomposition of aerosol formed in the ultrasonic generator from aqueous solution of FeCl{sub 3} as a precursor. Hollow structure of iron oxide particles was controlled by reaction temperature changing between 600 and 200 {sup o}C and with the addition of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) iron oxide nanoparticles were fabricated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and Scherrer crystalline size calculations show that the crystal sizes of the nanostructured iron oxide were between 33 and 18 nm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation gave detailed information about particle size and morphology. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to confirm the hollow structure of the particles and identify the thickness of the shell.

  17. Electrodeposited nanostructured raspberry-like gold-modified electrodes for electrocatalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manivannan, Shanmugam; Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com [Madurai Kamaraj University, Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry (India)

    2013-10-15

    A facile method for fabrication of raspberry-like Au nanostructures (Au NRBs)-modified electrode by electrodeposition and its applications toward the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol (MOR) in alkaline medium and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in both alkaline and acidic media are demonstrated. The Au NRBs are characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectra, SEM, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical measurements. The growth of Au NRBs was monitored by recording the in-situ absorption spectral changes during electrodeposition using spectroelectrochemical technique. Here we systematically studied the MOR by varying several reaction parameters such as potential scan rate and methanol concentration. The electrocatalytic poisoning effect due to the MOR products are not observed at the Au NRBs-modified electrode. At the alkaline medium the Au NRBs-modified electrode shows the better catalytic activities toward the MOR and ORR when compared to the poly crystalline gold and bare glassy carbon electrodes. The Au NRBs-modified electrode is a promising and inexpensive electrode material for other electrocatalytic applications.Graphical AbstractRaspberry-like Au nanostructures modified electrode is prepared and used for electrocatalytic applications.

  18. Bactericidal performance of visible-light responsive titania photocatalyst with silver nanostructures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Show Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Titania dioxide (TiO(2 photocatalyst is primarily induced by ultraviolet light irradiation. Visible-light responsive anion-doped TiO(2 photocatalysts contain higher quantum efficiency under sunlight and can be used safely in indoor settings without exposing to biohazardous ultraviolet light. The antibacterial efficiency, however, remains to be further improved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using thermal reduction method, here we synthesized silver-nanostructures coated TiO(2 thin films that contain a high visible-light responsive antibacterial property. Among our tested titania substrates including TiO(2, carbon-doped TiO(2 [TiO(2 (C] and nitrogen-doped TiO(2 [TiO(2 (N], TiO(2 (N showed the best performance after silver coating. The synergistic antibacterial effect results approximately 5 log reductions of surviving bacteria of Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that crystalline silver formed unique wire-like nanostructures on TiO(2 (N substrates, while formed relatively straight and thicker rod-shaped precipitates on the other two titania materials. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggested that proper forms of silver on various titania materials could further influence the bactericidal property.

  19. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  20. Geometry induced entanglement transitions in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P; D'Amico, I

    2010-01-01

    We model quantum dot nanostructures using a one-dimensional system of two interacting electrons. We show that strong and rapid variations may be induced in the spatial entanglement by varying the nanostructure geometry. We investigate the position-space information entropy as an indicator of the entanglement in this system. We also consider the expectation value of the Coulomb interaction and the ratio of this expectation to the expectation of the confining potential and their link to the entanglement. We look at the first derivative of the entanglement and the position-space information entropy to infer information about a possible quantum phase transition.

  1. Diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone)-assisted solvothermal synthesis and optical properties of one-dimensional CdS nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jing [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhao Gaoling, E-mail: glzhao@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Jinjian; Han Gaorong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-06-09

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > 1-Dimensional CdS is prepared by diphenylthiocarbazone-assisted solvothermal method. > Diphenylthiocarbazone promotes the preferential growth of CdS along [0 0 2] direction. > CdS nanowires are synthesized with an appropriate diphenylthiocarbazone amount. > CdS nanowires exhibit unique optical absorption properties due to nanometer effect. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanostructures with various aspect ratios were successfully synthesized by a diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone)-assisted solvothermal method. The results showed that the dithizone-assisted synthesized samples had larger aspect ratio than that prepared in the absence of dithizone, and CdS nanowires with the highest aspect ratio were obtained with an appropriate dithizone amount (0.03 g/50 ml ethylenediamine in the present system). All the 1D CdS nanostructures were in hexagonal wurtzite phase. The as-synthesized large-scale CdS nanowires were in diameters ranging from 70 to 80 nm, length up to 20 {mu}m, and aspect ratios of 250-285. Further characterization indicated that the CdS nanowires were single crystalline with a preferential growth orientation of [0 0 2], c-axis. Two optical absorption peaks were observed at about 488 nm and 502 nm for the CdS nanowire sample with high aspect ratio in the optical absorption spectroscopy, which could be attributed to the nanometer effect of nanowires. It was found that the additive dithizone was a crucial factor in controlling the morphology and optical properties of the 1D CdS nanostructures. The growth mechanism of 1D CdS nanostructure and the effects of dithizone in the present system were discussed.

  2. Liquid crystal alignment on ZnO nanostructure films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yueh-Feng; Chen, Mu-Zhe; Yang, Sheng-Hsiung; Jeng, Shie-Chang

    2016-03-01

    The study of liquid crystal (LC) alignment is important for fundamental researches and industrial applications. The tunable pretilt angles of liquid crystal (LC) molecules aligned on the inorganic zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure films with controllable surface wettability are demonstrated in this work. The ZnO nanostructure films are deposited on the ITO- glass substrates by the two-steps hydrothermal process, and their wettability can be modified by annealing. Our experimental results show that the pretilt angles of LCs on ZnO nanostructure films can be successfully adjusted over a wide range from ~90° to ~0° as the surface energy on the ZnO nanostructure films changes from ~30 to ~70 mJ/m. Finally we have applied this technique to fabricate a no-bias optically-compensated bend (OCB) LCD with ZnO nanostructure films annealed at 235 °C.

  3. Gold nanostructures as photothermal therapy agent for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Yang, Jaemoon; Jang, Eunji; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Lee, Kwangyeol; Haam, Seungjoo

    2011-12-01

    Well-designed photothermal nanostructures have attracted many scientists pursuing a better means to accurately diagnose cancer and assess the efficacy of treatment. Recently, gold-based nanostructures (nanoshells, nanorods and nanocages) have enabled photothermal ablation of cancer cells with near-infrared (NIR) light without damaging normal human tissues and in particular, animal studies and early clinical testing showed the great promise for these materials. In this review article, we first discuss the mechanism of the cellular death signaling by thermal stress and introduce the intrinsic properties of gold nanostructures as photothermal agent for cancer treatment. Then the overview follows for evolving researches for the synthesis of various types of gold nanostructures and for their biomedical applications. Finally we introduce the optimized therapeutic strategies involving nanoparticle surface modification and laser operation method for an enhanced accumulation of gold nanostructures to the target cancer as well as for an effective cancer cell ablation.

  4. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  5. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  6. Facile Growth of Multi-twined Au Nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Kumar Bera; Asim Bhaumik; C Retna Raj

    2015-12-01

    We describe a facile growth of chain-like Au nanostructures and their spontaneous transformation to multi-twined nanostructure using a mild reducing agent bisphenol A (BPA). The growth Au nanostructures involves the chemical reduction of HAuCl4 by BPA in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as capping agent in alkaline condition without any seeds. Wire and chain-like Au nano-network structures with diameter in the range of 4 to 9 nm are obtained in the initial stage of the reaction. These chainlike nanostructures undergo spontaneous transformation into multi-twined nanostructures within 24 h. These nanocrystalline multi-twined structures have an average size of 80-90 nm. X-ray and selected area electron diffraction measurements reveal that the Au nanoparticles have (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes of a face centered cubic structure. High resolution transmission electron microscopic measurement shows that the nanostructures are mainly composed of (111) lattice plane with twin boundaries. The concentration of HAuCl4, BPA and CTAB has pronounced effect in the growth of nanostructures. The multi-twined nanostructures are highly stable at room temperature over a period of one month and can be used for catalytic applications.

  7. Gas Slug Microfluidics: A Unique Tool for Ultrafast, Highly Controlled Growth of Iron Oxide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea, Ane; Sebastian, Victor; Ibarra, Alfonso; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2015-06-23

    The use of nanomaterials in real life applications is often hampered by our inability to produce them in large quantities while preserving their desired properties in terms of size, shape, and crystalline phase. Here we present a novel continuous method to synthesize nanostructures with an unprecedented degree of control regarding their properties. In particular, the excellent properties of microreactors for chemical synthesis are enhanced by the introduction of gas slugs of tailored composition. Slug dynamics accelerate mixing, reduce processing times (from hours in batch processes to minutes or even seconds), and, depending on the gas atmosphere used, allows one to accurately control the crystalline phase and shape of the resulting nanostructures. Inert (N2), oxidizing (O2), or reducing (CO, H2) gases were used, leading to different morphologies and crystalline structures in a high yield, highly reproducible fabrication process.

  8. Quasi-one-dimensional nanostructured cobalt (Co) intercalated vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}): Peroxovanadate sol gel synthesis and structural study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langie da Silva, Douglas, E-mail: douglas.langie@ufpel.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas 96010-900 (Brazil); Moreira, Eduardo Ceretta [Laboratório de Espectroscopia, Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Bagé 96400-970 (Brazil); Dias, Fábio Teixeira; Neves Vieira, Valdemar das [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas 96010-900 (Brazil); Brandt, Iuri Stefani; Cas Viegas, Alexandre da; Pasa, André Avelino [Laboratório de Filmes Finos e Superfícies, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, Florianópolis 88.040-900 (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructured cobalt vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) xerogels spread onto crystalline Si substrates were synthesized via peroxovanadate sol gel route. The resulting products were characterized by distinct experimental techniques. The surface morphology and the nanostructure of xerogels correlate with Co concentration. The decrease of the structural coherence length is followed by the formation of a loose network of nanopores when the concentration of intercalated species was greater than 4 at% of Co. The efficiency of the synthesis route also drops with the increase of Co concentration. The interaction between the Co(OH{sub 2}){sub 6}{sup 2+} cations and the (H{sub 2}V{sub 10}O{sub 28}){sup 4−} anions during the synthesis was suggested as a possible explanation for the incomplete condensation of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} gel. Finally the experimental results points for the intercalation of Co between the bilayers of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. In this scenario two possible preferential occupation sites for the metallic atoms in the framework of the xerogel were proposed. - Graphical abstract: Quasi-one-dimensional nanostructured cobalt (Co) intercalated vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) nanoribbons synthesized by peroxovanadate sol gel route. - Highlights: • Nanostructured cobalt V{sub 2}O{sub 5} gel spread onto c{sub S}i were synthesized via peroxovanadate sol gel route. • The micro and nanostructure correlates with the cobalt content. • The efficiency of the synthesis route shows to be also dependent of Co content. • The experimental results points for the intercalation of Co between the bilayers of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} xerogel.

  9. Soft chemical routes to semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjal K Gautam; Kripsindhu Sardar; F L Deepak; C N R Rao

    2005-10-01

    Soft chemistry has emerged as an important means of generating nanocrystals, nanowires and other nanostructures of semiconducting materials. We describe the synthesis of CdS and other metal chalcogenide nanocrystals by a solvothermal route. We also describe the synthesis of nanocrystals of AlN, GaN and InN by the reaction of hexamethyldisilazane with the corresponding metal chloride or metal cupferronate under solvothermal conditions. Nanowires of Se and Te have been obtained by a self-seeding solution-based method. A single source precursor based on urea complexes of metal chlorides gives rise to metal nitride nanocrystals, nanowires and nanotubes. The liquid-liquid interface provides an excellent medium for preparing single-crystalline films of metal chalcogenides.

  10. Volatile organic compound detection using nanostructured copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Sauvé, Genevieve; Iovu, Mihaela C; Jeffries-El, Malika; Zhang, Rui; Cooper, Jessica; Santhanam, Suresh; Schultz, Lawrence; Revelli, Joseph C; Kusne, Aaron G; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Snyder, Jay L; Weiss, Lee E; Fedder, Gary K; McCullough, Richard D; Lambeth, David N

    2006-08-01

    Regioregular polythiophene-based conductive copolymers with highly crystalline nanostructures are shown to hold considerable promise as the active layer in volatile organic compound (VOC) chemresistor sensors. While the regioregular polythiophene polymer chain provides a charge conduction path, its chemical sensing selectivity and sensitivity can be altered either by incorporating a second polymer to form a block copolymer or by making a random copolymer of polythiophene with different alkyl side chains. The copolymers were exposed to a variety of VOC vapors, and the electrical conductivity of these copolymers increased or decreased depending upon the polymer composition and the specific analytes. Measurements were made at room temperature, and the responses were found to be fast and appeared to be completely reversible. Using various copolymers of polythiophene in a sensor array can provide much better discrimination to various analytes than existing solid state sensors. Our data strongly indicate that several sensing mechanisms are at play simultaneously, and we briefly discuss some of them.

  11. Optics in magnetic multilayers and nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Visnovsky, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    In the continuing push toward optical computing, the focus remains on finding and developing the right materials. Characterizing materials, understanding the behavior of light in these materials, and being able to control the light are key players in the search for suitable optical materials. Optics in Magnetic Multilayers and Nanostructures presents an accessible introduction to optics in anisotropic magnetic media.While most of the literature presents only final results of the complicated formulae for the optics in anisotropic media, this book provides detailed explanations and full step-by-step derivations that offer insight into the procedure and reveal any approximations. Based on more than three decades of experimental research on the subject, the author explains the basic concepts of magnetooptics; nonreciprocal wave propagation; the simultaneous effect of crystalline symmetry and arbitrarily oriented magnetization on the form of permittivity tensors; spectral dependence of permittivity; multilayers at...

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of bulk highly faulted fcc/hcp nanostructured cobalt microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Aliou Hamady [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Laboratoire Chimie des Matériaux, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Technique, Université de Nouakchott (Mauritania, Islamic Republic of); Dirras, Guy, E-mail: dirras@unv-paris13.fr [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Tétard, Florent; Jouini, Noureddine [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured cobalt powders with an average particle size of 50 nm were synthesized using a polyol method and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS experiments performed at 650 °C with sintering times ranging from 5 to 45 min under a pressure of 100 MPa, yielded to dense bulk nanostructured cobalt (relative density greater than 97%). X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-prepared powders showed only a face centered cubic (fcc) crystalline phase, whereas the consolidated samples exhibited a mixture of both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed a lamellar substructure with a high density of nanotwins and stacking faults in every grain of the sintered samples. Room temperature compression tests, carried out at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, yielded to highest strain to fracture values of up to 5% for sample of holding time of 15 min, which exhibited a yield strength of 1440 MPa, an ultimate strength as high as 1740 MPa and a Young's modulus of 205 GPa. The modulus of elasticity obtained from the nanoindentation tests, ranges from 181 to 218 GPa. The lowest modulus value of 181 GPa was obtained for the sample with the highest sintering time (45 min), which could be related to mass density loss as a consequence of trapped gases releasing. - Highlights: • Co nanopowder (50 nm) was prepared by reduction in polyol medium. • SPS was used to process bulk nanostructured Co specimens. • Microstructures were made of intricate fcc/hcp, along with nanotwins and SFs. • High strengths and moderate compressive ductility were obtained. • Deformation mechanisms related to complex interplay of different length scales.

  13. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Abdulraheem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause

  14. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  15. Nanoscale growth and patterning of inorganic oxides using DNA nanostructure templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Wei, Bryan; Sun, Wei; Powell, Anna; O'Donnell, Christina; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-05-08

    We describe a method to form custom-shaped inorganic oxide nanostructures by using DNA nanostructure templates. We show that a DNA nanostructure can modulate the rate of chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 and TiO2 with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. The resulting oxide nanostructure inherits its shape from the DNA template. This method generates both positive-tone and negative-tone patterns on a wide range of substrates and is compatible with conventional silicon nanofabrication processes. Our result opens the door to the use of DNA nanostructures as general-purpose templates for high-resolution nanofabrication.

  16. Growth and magnetization study of transition metal doped GaN nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Shalini; Kang, Hun; Park, Eun-Hyun [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kane, Matthew H.; Ferguson, Ian T. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents the MOCVD growth and characterization of optically active GaN nanostructures which have been doped with the transition metals manganese and iron for potential spintronic applications. Introduction of both these transition metals in GaN nanostructures enhanced the nucleation of the nanostructures resulting in reduced lateral dimensions and increased nanostructure density. Both Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N and Ga{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}N nanostructures showed hysteresis behaviour at 5 K. Further VSM measurements on Ga{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}N nanostructures at 300 K showed a hysteresis curve with a reduced coercive filed and displayed superparamagnetic behaviour. These magnetically active nanostructures are promising and provide an incentive to further study them with the aim of eventually utilizing them in spintronic applications and improving device efficiency. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Nanostructured intense-laser cleaner

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiao Feng; Kong, Qing; Wang, Ping Xiao; Yu, Qin; Gu, Yan Jan; Qu, Jun Fan

    2016-01-01

    A nanostructured target is proposed to enhance an intense-laser contrast: when a laser prepulse is injected on a nanostructured solid target surface, the prepulse is absorbed effectively by the nanostructured surface. The nanostructure size should be less than the laser wavelength. After the prepulse absorption, the front part of the main pulse destroys the microstructure and makes the surface a flat plasma mirror. The body of the main pulse is reflected almost perfectly. Compared with the plasma mirrors, the nanostructured surface is effective for the absorption of the intense laser prepulse, higher than 10^14 W/cm2. By the nanostructured laser cleaner, the laser pulse contrast increases about a hundredfold. The nanostructured laser cleaner works well for near-future intense lasers.

  18. Effect of Crystallinity on Electrical Conduction in Polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezaki, Kazuo; Kaneko, Takanobu; Sakakibara, Toshio

    1981-03-01

    The electrical conduction of 20 μm thick polypropylene films with different crystallinities has been studied at 72°C below 400 kV/cm. The field dependence of the current shows that the conduction mechanism in this polymer is ion hopping. The estimated ionic jump distance strongly depends on the polymer crystallinity, and it decreases from 100 Å to 45 Å as the crystallinity increases from 50.5% to 78%. Preheating of samples seriously affects the electrical conduction in polypropylene, so differences in conductivity, activation energy and jump distance obtained by different authors can be explained partly by differences in the thermal history of the samples used.

  19. Unilateral Crystalline Vitreoretinopathy: A Rare Entity Associated with Intraocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh B. Harshey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old Indian male presented with floaters and diminution of vision in the right eye. Ocular examination showed features of old anterior uveitis with posterior subcapsular cataract and fine, refractile crystals in the vitreous cavity and on the retinal surface. A thorough workup for all known causes of crystalline retinopathy was inconclusive. Unilateral crystalline retinopathy has been sparingly reported. This is the first report of unilateral, crystalline vitreoretinopathy in the absence of any demonstrable and known cause for intraocular crystals.

  20. Magnetic Nano-structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永德

    2004-01-01

    Fabrication of magnetic nano-structures with dots array and wires has been paid attention recently due to the application of high-density magnetic recording. In this study, we fabricated the magnetic dots array and wires through several ways that ensure the arrangement of magnetic dots and wires to be the structures we designed. Their magnetic properties are studied experimentally.

  1. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  2. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of nano crystalline nickel zinc ferrite for chlorine gas sensor at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, C. S., E-mail: charudutta-p@yahoo.com [Material Science and Thin Film Research Laboratory, Department of Physics,Shankarrao Mohite Mahavidyalaya, Akluj India (India); Gujar, M. P. [Shri. Shivaji Junior College, Bawada, Dist: Pune (India); Mathe, V. L. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune – 411 007 India (India)

    2015-06-24

    Nano crystalline Nickel Zinc ferrite (Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) thin films were synthesized by Sol Gel method for gas response. The phase and microstructure of the obtained Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanostructured Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film shows single spinel phase. Magnetic study was obtained with the help of VSM. The effects of working temperature on the gas response were studied. The results reveal that the Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film gas sensor shows good selectivity to chlorine gas at room temperature. The sensor shows highest sensitivity (∼50%) at room temperature, indicating its application in detecting chlorine gas at room temperature in the future.

  4. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchical WO{sub 3} nanostructures for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, M.M. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan, P.O. Box 87, Cairo (Egypt); Shalan, A.E. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan, P.O. Box 87, Cairo (Egypt); Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology (i-MEET), Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Hierarchical architectures consisting of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures are of great interest for potential use in energy and environmental applications in recent years. In this work, hierarchical tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route from ammonium metatungstate hydrate and implemented as photoelectrode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The urchin-like WO{sub 3} micro-patterns are constructed by self-organized nanoscale length 1D building blocks, which are single crystalline in nature, grown along (001) direction and confirm an orthorhombic crystal phase. The obtained powders were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on WO{sub 3} photoanodes was investigated. With increasing the calcination temperature of the prepared nanopowders, the light-electricity conversion efficiency (η) was increased. The results were attributed to increase the crystallinity of the particles and ease of electron movement. The DSSC based on hierarchical WO{sub 3} showed a short-circuit current, an open-circuit voltage, a fill factor, and a conversion efficiency of 4.241 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.656 V, 66.74, and 1.85 %, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Ionic liquid-assisted sonochemical synthesis of SnS nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Gómez, Nora A.; Parra-Arcieniega, Salomé M. de la; Garza-Tovar, Lorena L.; Torres-González, Luis C.; Sánchez, Eduardo M., E-mail: eduardo.sanchezcv@uanl.edu.mx

    2014-03-05

    Highlight: • Obtention of SnS nanostructures using novel ionic liquid assisted sonochemical method. • Influence of the (BMImBF{sub 4}) ionic liquid in SnS morphology. • Inhibitory effect in SnS crystallinity by structuring agents in ionic environments. -- Abstract: SnS nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by the ionic liquid-assisted sonochemical method (ILASM). The starting reagents were anhydrous SnCl{sub 2}, thioacetamide, dissolved in ethanol and ionic liquid (IL)1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMImBF{sub 4}) mixtures. Our experiments showed that IL plays an important role in the morphology of SnS. A 1:1 ethanol:IL mixture was found to yield the more interesting features. The lower concentration of Sn (II) in solution favored the presence of nanoplatelets. An increase in ultrasonic time favored crystalline degree and size as well. Also, the effect of additives as 3-mercaptopropionic acid, diethanolamine, ethylene glycol, and trioctyl phosphine oxide is reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis-DRS) were used to characterize the obtained products.

  7. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, J.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  8. Direct ArF laser photopatterning of metal oxide nanostructures prepared by the sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridaoui, Hassan; Wieder, Fernand; Ponche, Arnaud; Soppera, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.soppera@uha.fr [Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), CNRS-LRC 7228, Universite de Haute Alsace, 15 rue Jean Starcky, Mulhouse (France)

    2010-02-10

    We developed specific negative tone resists suitable for preparing periodic inorganic nanostructures by ArF photolithography. This approach is based on the sol-gel chemistry of modified metal alkoxides followed by DUV laser irradiation. Patterning at the nanoscale was demonstrated by using an achromatic interferometer operating at 193 nm. In a second step, thermal treatment could be used to obtain metal oxide nanostructures (ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}). Such thermal treatment did not affect the integrity of the nanostructures. The DUV-induced modifications of the physico-chemical properties of the sol-gel thin film were followed by ellipsometry, XPS and AFM. The crystalline structure of the material after thermal treatment was proved by DRX analysis. Examples of periodic nanostructures are given in order to illustrate the possibilities opened by this new route that provides a convenient method to create transparent, robust, high refractive index nanostructures compatible with a wide variety of substrates.

  9. Effects of shape and size of cobalt ferrite nanostructures on their MRI contrast and thermal activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Lin, Yen Po; Aslam, Mohammed; Prasad, P. V.; Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Edelman, Robert; Meade, Thomas; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures were synthesized via a high temperature solution phase method. Spherical nanostructures of various sizes were synthesized with the help of seed mediated growth of the nanostructures in organic phase, while faceted irregular (FI) cobalt ferrite nanostructures were synthesized via the same method but in the presence of a magnetic field. Magnetic properties were characterized by SQUID magnetometry, relaxivity measurements and thermal activation under RF field, as a function of size and shape. The results show that the saturation magnetization of the nanostructures increases with an increase in size, and the FI nanostructures exhibit lower saturation magnetization than their spherical counterparts. The relaxivity coefficient of cobalt ferrite nanostructures increases with increase in size; while FI nanostructures show a higher relaxivity coefficient than spherical nanostructures with respect to their saturation magnetization. In the case of RF thermal activation, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of nanostructures increases with increase in the size. The contribution sheds light on the role of size and shape on important magnetic properties of the nanostructures in relation to their biomedical applications. PMID:21850276

  10. HETEROGENEOUS SOOT NANOSTRUCTURE IN ATMOSPHERIC AND COMBUSTION SOURCE AEROSOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microscopic images of soot emissions from wildfire and a wide range of anthropogenic combustion sources show that the nanostructures of individual particles in these emissions are predominantly heterogeneous, decidedly influenced by the fuel composition and by the particular comb...

  11. One-Dimensional Perovskite Manganite Oxide Nanostructures: Recent Developments in Synthesis, Characterization, Transport Properties, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liang, Lizhi; Wu, Heng; Zhu, Xinhua

    2016-12-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures, including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanofibers, and nanobelts, have promising applications in mesoscopic physics and nanoscale devices. In contrast to other nanostructures, one-dimensional nanostructures can provide unique advantages in investigating the size and dimensionality dependence of the materials' physical properties, such as electrical, thermal, and mechanical performances, and in constructing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among the one-dimensional nanostructures, one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures have been received much attention due to their unusual electron transport and magnetic properties, which are indispensable for the applications in microelectronic, magnetic, and spintronic devices. In the past two decades, much effort has been made to synthesize and characterize one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in the forms of nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanobelts. Various physical and chemical deposition techniques and growth mechanisms are explored and developed to control the morphology, identical shape, uniform size, crystalline structure, defects, and homogenous stoichiometry of the one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on the rational synthesis, structural characterization, fundamental properties, and unique applications of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in nanotechnology. It begins with the rational synthesis of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures and then summarizes their structural characterizations. Fundamental physical properties of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures are also highlighted, and a range of unique applications in information storages, field-effect transistors, and spintronic devices are discussed. Finally, we conclude this review with some perspectives/outlook and future

  12. Formation of different gold nanostructures by silk nanofibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Guangqiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Yang, Yuhong [Research Centre for Analysis and Measurement, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Chen, Xin, E-mail: chenx@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Metal nanostructures that have unique size- and shape-dependent electronic, optical and chemical properties gain more and more attention in modern science and technology. In this article, we show the possibility that we are able to obtain different gold nanostructures simply with the help of silk nanofibrils. We demonstrate that only by varying the pH of the reaction solution, we get gold nanoparticles, nano-icosahedrons, nanocubes, and even microplates. Particularly, we develop a practical method for the preparation of gold microplates in acid condition in the presence of silk nanofibrils, which is impossible by using other forms of silk protein. We attribute the role of silk nanofibrils in the formation of gold nanostructure to their reduction ability from several specific amino acid residues, and the suitable structural anisotropic features to sustain the crystal growth after the reduction process. Although the main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that silk nanofibrils are able to mediate the formation of different gold nanostructure, we show the potential applications of these resulting gold nanostructures, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and photothermal transformation effect, as same as those produced by other methods. In conclusion, we present in this communication a facile and green synthesis route to prepare various gold nanostructures with silk nanofibrils by simply varying pH in the reaction system, which has remarkable advantages in future biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained by a facile and green protein reduction method. • Silk nanofibrils serve as both reductant and template in the formation of Au nanostructures. • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained simply by regulating the pH in the medium. • Large Au microplates can be obtained with a cheap, abundant, sustainable silk protein. • Silk/Au hybrid nanocomposites show potential application in SERS and

  13. Crystalline 'Genes' in Metallic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, M J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The underlying structural order that transcends the liquid, glass and crystalline states is identified using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). GA identifies the most common energetically favorable packing motif in crystalline structures close to the alloy's Al-10 at.% Sm composition. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid structures using a cluster-alignment method which reveals the average topology. Conventional descriptions of the short-range order, such as Voronoi tessellation, are too rigid in their analysis of the configurational poly-types when describing the chemical and topological ordering during transition from undercooled metallic liquids to crystalline phases or glass. Our approach here brings new insight into describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter physics.

  14. Enhanced visible emission from vertically aligned ZnO nanostructures by aqueous chemical growth process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiruddin, R., E-mail: amirphy9@yahoo.com; Kumar, M.C. Santhosh, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu

    2014-11-15

    ZnO nanostructures consisting of nanowires and nanorods have been grown by aqueous chemical growth (ACG) process on the ZnO seed layers. ACG process has been carried out for 5 h and 15 h to obtain the one dimensional nanostructures. This ZnO nanostructure comprises mixture of vertically aligned nanorods and nanowires. Structural analysis reveals that the crystal orientation is along (002) plane exhibiting a hexagonal wurtzite structure. The crystallinity of ZnO nanostructures increases after aqueous chemical treatment with respect to the growth duration. Optical studies revealed that when the duration of aqueous chemical treatment is increased, the transmittance of the films decreases considerably. The as-deposited ZnO seed layers exhibit electron carrier concentration of 4.69×10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and the value increases to 9.44×10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} after 5 h and 1.53×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} after 15 h of aqueous chemical treatment. It has been observed that ZnO nanostructures exhibit enhanced luminescence properties in visible region which covers the entire visible region of the spectrum. - Highlights: • Mixture of nanorods and nanowires are grown upon same glass substrates. • The grown nanostructures are found to be vertically aligned. • Improved electron carrier concentration is observed. • Luminescence properties of these ZnO nanostructures are highly enhanced.

  15. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  16. Impurity induced crystallinity and optical emissions in ZnO nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N. R.; Acharya, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth of ZnO nanocrystallites doped with impurities such as B, N and S by green chemistry route using ultrasound. The effect of intrinsic defects and impurity doping on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures has been studied and discussed. Characterization studies carried out using x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the change in lattice parameters and crystallinity of ZnO in the presence of dopant. This has been explained on the basis of the dopant substitution at regular anion and interstitial sites. Study on surface morphology by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) shows a change from particle-like structure to aligned nanorods nucleated at definite sites. Elemental analysis such as x-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) has been carried out to ascertain the dopant configuration in ZnO. This has been corroborated by the results obtained from FTIR and Raman studies. UV-vis light absorption and PL studies show an expansion of the band gap which has been explained on the basis of Moss-Burstein shift in the electronic band gap of ZnO by impurity incorporation. The optical emissions corresponding to excitonic transition and defect centres present in the band gap of ZnO is found to shift towards lower/higher wavelength sides. New PL bands observed have been assigned to the transitions related to the impurity states present in the band gap of ZnO along with intrinsic defects.

  17. Positronium diffusion in crystalline polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-12-16

    The analysis in four components of the positron lifetime spectra of nine different and structurally well characterised lamellar polyethylene samples has allowed to associate the two longest-lived components to positronium annihilation in the crystalline and amorphous phases. Further assumption on positronium tunneling through the interface between both phases, and a simple geometrical model, led to a value for the positronium diffusion coefficient in the crystalline phase of the order of 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/s. Interfaces have thicknesses around 1.5 nm and are shallow traps for positronium. (orig.).

  18. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, W.D. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Koropecki, R.R. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.ar; Arce, R.D. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Busso, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina)

    2008-04-30

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium.

  19. Physicochemical Properties of Gold Nanostructures Deposited on Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Novotna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of gold films sputtered onto borosilicate glass substrate were studied. UV-Vis absorption spectra were used to investigate optical parameters. XRD analysis provided information about the gold crystalline nanostructure, the texture, and lattice parameter and biaxial tension was also determined by the XRD method. The surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM; chemical structure of sputtered gold nanostructures was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS. The gold crystallites are preferentially [111] oriented on the sputtered samples. Gold deposition leads to dramatic changes in the surface morphology in comparison to pristine glass substrate. Oxygen is not incorporated into the gold layer during gold deposition. Experimental data on lattice parameter were also confirmed by theoretical investigations of nanoclusters using tight-binding potentials.

  20. Nanostructure assembly of indium sulphide quantum dots and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneashwari, B; Ravichandran, V; Parameswaran, P; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K

    2008-02-01

    Nanocrystals (approximately 5 nm) of the semiconducting wide band gap material beta-In2S3 obtained by chemical synthesis through a hydrothermal route were characterized for phase and compositional purity. These nanoparticles exhibited quantum confinement characteristics as revealed by a blue-shifted optical absorption. These quantum dots of beta-In2S3 were electrically driven from a monodisperse colloidal suspension on to conducting glass substrates by Electophoretic Deposition (EPD) technique and nanostructural thin films were obtained. The crystalline and morphological structures of these deposits were investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoscopic techniques. We report here that certain interesting nanostructural morphologies were observed in the two-dimensional quantum dot assemblies of beta-In2S3. The effect of the controlling parameters on the cluster growth and deposit integrity was also systematically studied through a series of experiments and the results are reported here.

  1. Ternary oxide nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Park, Tae-Jin

    2009-09-08

    A single crystalline ternary nanostructure having the formula A.sub.xB.sub.yO.sub.z, wherein x ranges from 0.25 to 24, and y ranges from 1.5 to 40, and wherein A and B are independently selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, F, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Ho, I, In, Ir, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, Os, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, Rh, Ru, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Tc, Te, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, and Zn, wherein the nanostructure is at least 95% free of defects and/or dislocations.

  2. Fabrication, characterization and photocatalytic properties of millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} fiber with nanostructures using cellulose fiber as a template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yun; Sun, Qingfeng [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Tongchao; Yang, Dongjiang [College of Chemistry, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Liu, Yixing [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Li, Jian, E-mail: jianli@nefu.edu.cn [Material Science and Engineering College, Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Millimeter-long nanostructured TiO{sub 2} was fabricated using cellulose as a template. •The as-prepared TiO{sub 2} showed a superior photocatalytic ability to decompose phenol. •A feasible method for fabricating TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was introduced. -- Abstract: We report a millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} fiber with nanostructures fabricated using bamboo cellulose fiber as a template. The method includes the in situ synthesis of titanium oxide nanoparticles in the cellulose fiber template and subsequent removal of the cellulose matrix by calcination. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. XRD pattern confirmed the crystalline phase of the prepared TiO{sub 2} is anatase phase. From the observation of SEM image, the cellulose-templated TiO{sub 2} inherited the initial millimetric length of the bamboo cellulose. TEM image revealed the millimeter-long TiO{sub 2} was comprised of the spherical nanoparticles with the diameter of about 30 nm. Meanwhile, the as-fabricated TiO{sub 2} presented a superior photocatalytic ability to decompose phenol under ultraviolet irradiation. This approach is facile, and would provide ready access to metallic oxide nanostructures of desired morphology and size with the appropriate templates.

  3. Development of nanostructured protective "sight glasses" for IR gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Davis, Zachary James; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Clausen, Sønnik; Boisen, Anja; Jensen, Jens Møller; Buchner, Rainer; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2011-06-01

    In this work protective "sight glasses" for infrared gas sensors showing a sub-wavelength nanostructure with random patterns have been fabricated by reactive ion etching (RIE) in an easy and comparable cheap single step mask-less process. By an organic coating, the intrinsic water repellent property of the surface could be enhanced, shown by contact angle and roll-off angle measurements. The "self-cleaning" surface property and chemical robustness towards aggressive environments are demonstrated. FT-IR spectroscopy concerning the optical properties of these nanostructured silicon windows revealed a stable anti-reflective "moth-eye" effect in certain wavelength ranges owing to the nanostructures.

  4. Enhancement of Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren

    This thesis reports research on enhancement of light-matter interaction in semi- conductor quantum nanostructures by means of nanostructure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. Photonic crystal membranes of very high quality and samples for studies of quantum dots...... coupling between quantum dot excitons and a photonic crystal waveguide. We show theoretically that the dipole approximation is not valid a priori for quantum dots and wells in nanostructures. A many-particle exciton formalism is developed by which the Wigner-Weisskopf result for spontaneous emission......-matter interaction is investigated. For the rst time the vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in an electrically tunable device....

  5. Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbazyan, Tigran V

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantum-mechanical theory for Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures larger that the characteristic length for nonlocal effects. We show that the electron surface scattering, which facilitates plasmon decay in small nanostructures, can be incorporated into the metal dielectric function on par with phonon and impurity scattering. The derived surface scattering rate is determined by the plasmon local field polarization relative to the metal surface, and is highly sensitive to the system geometry. We illustrate our model by providing analytical results for surface scattering rate in some common shape nanostructures.

  6. Mn-based nanostructured building blocks: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran Huarac, Juan

    The quest for smaller functional elements of devices has stimulated increased interest in charge-transfer phenomena at the nanoscale. Mn-based nanostructured building blocks are particularly appealing given that the excited states of high-spin Mn2+ ions induce unusual d-d energy transfer processes, which is critical for better understanding the performance of electronic and spintronic devices. These nanostructures also exhibit unique properties superior to those of common Fe- and Co-based nanomaterials, including: excellent structural flexibility, enhanced electrochemical energy storage, effective ion-exchange dynamics, more comprehensive transport mechanisms, strong quantum yield, and they act as effective luminescent centers for more efficient visible light emitters. Moreover, Mn-based nanostructures (MBNs) are crucial for the design and assembly of inexpensive nanodevices in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), optoelectronics, magneto-optics, and field-effect transistors, owing to the great abundance and low-cost of Mn. Nonetheless, the paucity of original methods and techniques to fabricate new multifunctional MBNs that fulfill industrial demands limits the sustainable development of innovative technology in materials sciences. In order to meet this critical need, in this thesis we develop and implement novel methods and techniques to fabricate zero- and one-dimensional highly-crystalline new-generation MBNs conducive to the generation of new technology, and provide alternative and feasible miniaturization strategies to control and devise at nanometric precision their size, shape, structure and composition. Herein, we also establish the experimental conditions to grow Mn-based nanowires (NWs), nanotubes (NTs), nanoribbons (NRs), nanosaws (NSs), nanoparticles (NPs) and nanocomposites (NCs) via chemical/physical deposition and co-precipitation chemical routes, and determine the pertinent arrangements to our experimental schemes in order to extend our bottom

  7. Reactive oxygen plasma-enabled synthesis of nanostructured CdO: tailoring nanostructures through plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvelbar, Uros; Mozetic, Miran [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ostrikov, Kostya [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)], E-mail: Uros.Cvelbar@ijs.si, E-mail: Kostya.Ostrikov@csiro.au

    2008-10-08

    Plasma-assisted synthesis of nanostructures is one of the most precise and effective approaches used in nanodevice fabrication. Here we report on the innovative approach of synthesizing nanostructured cadmium oxide films on Cd substrates using a reactive oxygen plasma-based process. Under certain conditions, the surface morphology features arrays of crystalline CdO nano/micropyramids. These nanostructures grow via unconventional plasma-assisted oxidation of a cadmium foil exposed to inductively coupled plasmas with a narrow range of process parameters. The growth of the CdO pyramidal nanostructures takes place in the solid-liquid-solid phase, with the rates determined by the interaction of plasma-produced oxygen atoms and ions with the surface. It is shown that the size of the pyramidal structures can be effectively controlled by the fluxes of oxygen atoms and ions impinging on the cadmium surface. The unique role of the reactive plasma environment in the controlled synthesis of CdO nanopyramidal structures is discussed as well.

  8. Optical and electrical studies of possible VO2 thin film nanostructures grown using laser ablated V2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzuvadiya, Sushant; Joshi, U. S.

    2017-05-01

    The metal insulator transition (MIT) has been a focus of study for many years to researchers as the results are expected to help its future device applications in electronics. VO2 in its pure crystalline phase exhibit reversible MIT at about 68 °C, making it promising for memory based devices. Due to the multivalent nature of vanadium, synthesis of stoichiometric VO2 is a challenge. In this communication, we report the results of electrical and surface structural studies of Vanadium Oxide thin film nanostructures. The films were prepared using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Technique on quartz substrates. XRD revealed single orthorhombic phase. A smooth surface topography showing 58 nm average grain size with highly mono-dispersed grain distribution as studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The temperatures dependant resistance measurements exhibited a clear and reversible MIT near 280° C. The band-gap was estimated to be 3.5 eV using the UV-Vis. spectroscopy.

  9. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    or a few electrons. Such few-electron devices are expected to form the building blocks of future electrical circuits and it is thus necessary to develop a thorough theoretical understanding of the physics of electrons in nanostructures. Re- garding applications there is a particular interest......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method......This thesis concerns theoretical aspects of electrons in man-made nanostruc- tures. Advances in nanofabrication technology during recent decades have made it possible to produce electrical devices on the nano-scale, whose func- tionality is determined by the quantum mechanical nature of a single...

  10. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  12. Epoxy + liquid crystalline epoxy coreacted network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchaipetch, Prakaipetch

    2000-10-01

    Molecular reinforcement through in-situ polymerization of liquid crystalline epoxies (LCEs) and a non-liquid crystalline epoxy has been investigated. Three LCEs: diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenol (DGE-DHBP) and digylcidyl ether of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4″-hydroxybiphenyl-4 '-carboxylate (DGE-HHC), were synthesized and blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBP-F) and subsequently cured with anhydride and amine curing agents. Curing kinetics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Parameters for autocatalytic curing kinetics of both pure monomers and blended systems were determined. The extent of cure for both monomers was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The glass transitions were evaluated as a function of composition using DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results show that the LC constituent affects the curing kinetics of the epoxy resin and that the systems are highly miscible. The effects of molecular reinforcement of DGEBP-F by DGE-DHBP and DGE-HHC were investigated. The concentration of the liquid crystalline moiety affects mechanical properties. Tensile, impact and fracture toughness tests results are evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces shows changes in failure mechanisms compared to the pure components. Results indicate that mechanical properties of the blended samples are improved already at low concentration by weight of the LCE added into epoxy resin. The improvement in mechanical properties was found to occur irrespective of the absence of liquid crystallinity in the blended networks. The mechanism of crack study indicates that crack deflection and crack bridging are the mechanisms in case of LC epoxy. In case of LC modified epoxy, the crack deflection is the main mechanism. Moreover, the effect of coreacting an epoxy with a reactive monomer liquid crystalline epoxy as a matrix for glass fiber composites was investigated. Mechanical

  13. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  14. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  15. Modular color evolution facilitated by a complex nanostructure in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Chad M; Maia, Rafael; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2015-02-01

    The way in which a complex trait varies, and thus evolves, is critically affected by the independence, or modularity, of its subunits. How modular designs facilitate phenotypic diversification is well studied in nonornamental (e.g., cichlid jaws), but not ornamental traits. Diverse feather colors in birds are produced by light absorption by pigments and/or light scattering by nanostructures. Such structural colors are deterministically related to the nanostructures that produce them and are therefore excellent systems to study modularity and diversity of ornamental traits. Elucidating if and how these nanostructures facilitate color diversity relies on understanding how nanostructural traits covary, and how these traits map to color. Both of these remain unknown in an evolutionary context. Most dabbling ducks (Anatidae) have a conspicuous wing patch with iridescent color caused by a two-dimensional photonic crystal of small (100-200 nm) melanosomes. Here, we ask how this complex nanostructure affects modularity of color attributes. Using a combination of electron microscopy, spectrophotometry, and comparative methods, we show that nanostructural complexity causes functional decoupling and enables independent evolution of different color traits. These results demonstrate that color diversity is facilitated by how nanostructures function and may explain why some birds are more color-diverse than others.

  16. Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0059 Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films RODNEY PRIESTLEY TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 12/23/2014...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/01/2012-08/31/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films 5a. CONTRACT...properties is due to the film morphology, i.e., the films are nanostructured . The aim of this proposal was to understand the mechanism of film formation and

  17. Sonoelectrochemical Approach Towards Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Clemens; Qiu, Xiaofeng

    2006-03-01

    We will report on the sonoelectrochemical synthesis of nanostructured semiconductor materials. The talk will focus on the control of the nanostructure size, shape, and composition using sonolectrochemistry as a versatile synthesis tool. The synthesis of targeted nanostructures requires thorough control of the redox chemistry during the growth process. The composition of the product can be controlled by changing the initial metal-ligand concentration. Futhermore, the properties of the novel materials will be discussed. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products confirmed the compositional change in the nanomaterials. Control of the involved sonoelectrochemistry also allows for the formation of highly monodispersed 1-D Nanorods. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yongbing; Samia, Anna C. S.; Devadoss, Anando; Burgess, James D.; Dayal, Smita; Burda, Clemens. PbTe nanorods by sonoelectrochemistry. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2005), 44(36), 5855-5857. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens; Fu, Ruiling; Pu, Lin; Chen, Hongyuan; Zhu, Junjie. Heterostructured Bi2Se3 Nanowires with Periodic Phase Boundaries. Journal of the American Chemical Society (2004), 126(50), 16276-16277.

  18. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Efimov, Anatoly [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  19. Experimental measurement of plasmonic nanostructures embedded in silicon waveguide gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Soria, Alba; Martínez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report numerical simulations and experiments of the optical response of a gold nanostrip embedded in a silicon strip waveguide gap at telecom wavelengths. We show that the spectral features observed in transmission and reflection when the metallic nanostructure is inserted in the gap are extremely different to those observed in free-space excitation. First, we find that interference between the guided field and the electric dipolar resonance of the metallic nanostructure results in high-contrast (> 10) spectral features showing an asymmetric Fano spectral profile. Secondly, we reveal a crossing in the transmission and reflection responses close to the nanostructure resonance wavelength as a key feature of our system. This approach, which can be realized using standard semiconductor nanofabrication tools, could lead to fully exploit the extreme properties of subwavelength metallic nanostructures in an on-chip configuration, with special relevance in fields such as biosensing or optical switchi...

  20. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  1. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  2. Microwave-assisted Synthesis of Hierarchical ZnO Nanostructures and Their Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical ZnO nanostructures were fabricated via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted route with different zinc salts as reactants. The obtained hierarchical ZnO nanostructures have good crystallinity and high purity. Moreover, it was found that various zinc salts have an obvious effect on the morphologies and microstructures of the final products. Additionally, the photocatalytic activity of the obtained ZnO samples under visible-light irradiation was also evaluated by degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB.

  3. Ordered macroporous bimetallic nanostructures: design, characterization, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lehui; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    different types of ordered bimetallic nanostructures with hierarchical porosity by using a general template technique. The applications of the resulting nanostructures in catalysis and as substrates for SERS are described. Taking the ordered porous Au/Pt nanostructures as examples for applications as catalysts, the experimental results show that both the ordered hollow Au/Pt nanostructure and the ordered macroporous Au/Pt nanostructure exhibit high catalytic ability due to their special structural characteristics, and their catalytic activity is component-dependent. As for SERS applications, primary experimental results show that these ordered macroporous Au/Ag nanostructured films are highly desirable for detection of DNA bases by the SERS technique in terms of a high Raman intensity enhancement, good stability, and reproducibility, suggesting that these nanostructures may find applications in the rapid detection of DNA and DNA fragments.

  4. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  5. Random Si nanopillars for broadband antireflection in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhee; Lee, Taek Sung; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Inho

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of shallow Si nanopillar structures at a submicron scale which provides broadband antireflection for crystalline Si (c-Si) solar cells in the wavelength range of 350 nm-1100 nm. The Si random nanopillars were made by reactive ion etch (RIE) processing with thermally dewetted Sn metals as an etch mask. The diameters and coverages of the Si nanopillars were adjusted in a wide range of the nanoscale to microscale by varying the nominal thickness of the Sn metals and subsequent annealing temperatures. The height of the nanopillars was controlled by the RIE process time. The optimal size of the nanopillars, which are 340 nm in diameter and 150 nm in height, leads to the lowest average reflectance of 3.6%. We showed that the power conversion efficiency of the c-Si solar cells could be enhanced with the incorporation of optimally designed Si random nanopillars from 13.3% to 14.0%. The fabrication scheme of the Si nanostructures we propose in this study would be a cost-effective and promising light trapping technique for efficient c-Si solar cells.

  6. Nanoparticle Decorated Ultrathin Porous Nanosheets as Hierarchical Co3O4 Nanostructures for Lithium Ion Battery Anode Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujtaba, Jawayria; Sun, Hongyu; Huang, Guoyong;

    2016-01-01

    We report a facile synthesis of a novel cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hierarchical nanostructure, in which crystalline core-amorphous shell Co3O4 nanoparticles with a bimodal size distribution are uniformly dispersed on ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. When tested as anode materials for lithium ion batteries...

  7. Phase diagrams of binary crystalline-crystalline polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkar, Rushikesh A; Kyu, Thein

    2006-08-17

    A thermodynamically self-consistent theory has been developed to establish binary phase diagrams for two-crystalline polymer blends by taking into consideration all interactions including amorphous-amorphous, crystal-amorphous, amorphous-crystal, and crystal-crystal interactions. The present theory basically involves combination of the Flory-Huggins free energy for amorphous-amorphous isotropic mixing and the Landau free energy of polymer solidification (e.g., crystallization) of the crystalline constituents. The self-consistent solution via minimization of the free energy of the mixture affords determination of eutectic, peritectic, and azeotrope phase diagrams involving various coexistence regions such as liquid-liquid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid coexistence regions bound by liquidus and solidus lines. To validate the present theory, the predicted eutectic phase diagrams have been compared with the reported experimental binary phase diagrams of blends such as polyethylene fractions as well as polycaprolactone/trioxane mixtures.

  8. Nanostructured Thermoelectrics and the New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2012-02-01

    A comprehensive and stable energy strategy would require proportionate attention to all three legs of the ``energy stool''; supply (sources), demand (efficiency) and storage/transport (delivery). Thermoelectric materials, that convert waste thermal energy into useful electrical energy, have an important role to play in any and all these three legs. The efficacy and efficiency of thermoelectrics is reflected in the figure of merit ZT, which is directly proportional to the power factor (comprising electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient) and inversely proportional to thermal conductivity (comprising carrier and lattice contributions). The recent emergence of nanostructured thermoelectrics has ushered in a new era for bulk thermoelectrics, which show considerable promise to enhance the ``contra-indicating'' parameters of high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. This is achieved by introducing nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric host materials to significantly reduce lattice thermal conductivity via effective scattering of heat carrying phonon through hierarchical architecture of nanostructured thermoelectrics. The presentation will cover recent developments, current research in our EFRC and future prospects for high performance bulk materials. Systems based on lead chalcogenides (e.g., PbTe, PbSe, PbS) present key science challenges with promising properties and are given particular emphasis. We have achieved excellent control of synthesis and crystal growth of such materials resulting in record enhancements in the figure of merit. These enhancements derive from very large reductions in lattice thermal conductivity possible with nanostructuring. We have experimentally realized concurrent synergistic effect of phonon blocking and charge transmission via the endotaxial placement of nanocrystals in thermoelectric material host. In particular, we have shown that the enhanced performance is due to nanostructuring of thermoelectric host matrix

  9. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  10. Characterization of perovskite layer on various nanostructured silicon wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostan, Nur Fairuz Mohd; Sepeai, Suhaila; Ramli, Noor Fadhilah; Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Ludin, Norasikin Ahmad; Teridi, Mohd Asri Mat; Ibrahim, Mohd Adib; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2017-05-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell dominates 90% of photovoltaic (PV) market. The c-Si is the most mature of all PV technologies and expected to remain leading the PV technology by 2050. The attractive characters of Si solar cell are stability, long lasting and higher lifetime. Presently, the efficiency of c-Si solar cell is still stuck at 25% for one and half decades. Tandem approach is one of the attempts to improve the Si solar cell efficiency with higher bandgap layer is stacked on top of Si bottom cell. Perovskite offers a big potential to be inserted into a tandem solar cell. Perovskite with bandgap of 1.6 to 1.9 eV will be able to absorb high energy photons, meanwhile c-Si with bandgap of 1.124 eV will absorb low energy photons. The high carrier mobility, high carrier lifetime, highly compatible with both solution and evaporation techniques makes perovskite an eligible candidate for perovskite-Si tandem configuration. The solution of methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) was prepared by single step precursor process. The perovskite layer was deposited on different c-Si surface structure, namely planar, textured and Si nanowires (SiNWs) by using spin-coating technique at different rotation speeds. The nanostructure of Si surface was textured using alkaline based wet chemical etching process and SiNW was grown using metal assisted etching technique. The detailed surface morphology and absorbance of perovskite were studied in this paper. The results show that the thicknesses of MAPbI3 were reduced with the increasing of rotation speed. In addition, the perovskite layer deposited on the nanostructured Si wafer became rougher as the etching time and rotation speed increased. The average surface roughness increased from ˜24 nm to ˜38 nm for etching time range between 5-60 min at constant low rotation speed (2000 rpm) for SiNWs Si wafer.

  11. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  12. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  13. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Savini, L.; Bonetti, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Bosco, E.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica I.F.M. and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Torino (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  14. Facile method to prepare CdS nanostructure based on the CdTe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ligang; Chen, Yuehui; Wei, Zelu; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: xswu@nju.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS nanostructure is directly fabricated on CdTe film only by heating treatment under H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed atmosphere at a relatively low temperature (450 °C) with gold layer as the intermediate. • Nanostructure of CdS layer, varying from nanowires to nanosheets, may be controlled by the thickness of gold film. • The change of morphology adjusts its luminescence properties. - Abstract: Nanostructured cadmium sulfide (CdS) plays critical roles in electronics and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report a method to fabricate CdS nanostructure directly on CdTe film, via a thermal annealing method in H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed gas flow at a relatively low temperature (450 °C). The microstructure and optical properties of CdS nanostructure are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence. The morphology of CdS nanostructure, evolving from nanowires to nanosheets, can be controlled by the thickness of Au film deposited on the CdTe film. And CdS nanostructures are single crystalline with the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Raman spectroscopy under varying the excitation wavelengths confirm that synthesized CdS-CdTe films contain two layers, i.e., CdS nanostructure (top) and CdTe layer (bottom). The change of morphology modifies its luminescence properties. Obviously, through simply thermal annealing in H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed gas, fabricating CdS nanostructure on CdTe film can open up the new possibility for obtaining high efficient CdTe solar cell.

  15. The Poisson ratio of crystalline surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Falcioni, Marco; Bowick, Mark; Guitter, Emmanuel; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1996-01-01

    A remarkable theoretical prediction for a crystalline (polymerized) surface is that its Poisson ratio (\\sigma) is negative. Using a large scale Monte Carlo simulation of a simple model of such surfaces we show that this is indeed true. The precise numerical value we find is (\\sigma \\simeq -0.32) on a (128^2) lattice at bending rigidity (kappa = 1.1). This is in excellent agreement with the prediction (\\sigma = -1/3) following from the self-consistent screening approximation of Le Doussal and ...

  16. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  17. Water Droplet Spreading and Wicking on Nanostructured Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Jiannan; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Song, Yu; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue

    2017-07-11

    Phase-change heat transfer on nanostructured surfaces is an efficient cooling method for high heat flux devices due to its superior wettability. Liquid droplet spreading and wicking effect then dominate the heat transfer. Therefore, this study investigates the flow behavior after a droplet touches a nanostructured surface focusing on the ZnO nanowire surface with three different nanowire sizes and two array types (regular and irregular). The spreading diameter and the wicking diameter are measured against time. The results show that the average spreading and wicking velocities on a regular nanostructured surface are both smaller than those on an irregular nanostructured surface and that the nanowire size affects the liquid spreading and capillary wicking.

  18. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  19. EXAFS studies of crystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, G.S.; Georgopoulos, P.

    1982-01-01

    The application of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique to the study of crystalline materials is discussed, and previously published work on the subject is reviewed with 46 references being cited. The theory of EXAFS, methods of data analysis, and the experimental techniques, including those based on synchrotron and laboratory facilities are all discussed. Absorption and fluorescence methods of detecting EXAFS also receive attention. (BLM)

  20. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  1. Facile production of nanostructured cellulose from Elaeis guineensis empty fruit bunch via one pot oxidative-hydrolysis isolation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You Wei; Lee, Hwei Voon; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-02-10

    Cellulose in nanostructures was successfully isolated from empty fruit bunch biomass via a novel one-pot oxidative-hydrolysis technique. The physicochemical properties of nanocellulose prepared via one-pot process have shown comparable characteristics as products isolated via conventional multistep purification approach (namely dewaxing, chlorite bleaching process, alkalization, and acid hydrolysis). The chemical composition study indicated that the one-pot oxidative-hydrolysis process successfully extracted cellulose (91.0%), with the remaining minority being hemicellulose and lignin (∼6%) in the final product. Crystallinity profile of one-pot treated product (80.3%) was higher than that of multistep isolated nanocellulose (75.4%), which indicated that the disorder region (amorphous) in cellulose fibers was successfully removed. In additional to that, the morphology study demonstrated that nanocellulose prepared by one-pot process rendered spider-web-like network nanostructure, with an average diameter of fibers at a range of 51.6±15.4nm. The nanocellulose product showed high thermal stability (320°C), which was ready for nanocomposite application. One-pot oxidative-hydrolysis technique is a simple and versatile route for the preparation of nanocellulose from complex biomass within 90°C and 6h period, with minimum wastewater as compared to the multistep process.

  2. Coating of biodegradable magnesium alloy bone implants using nanostructured diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Mehdi, E-mail: mehdi.razavi@okstate.edu [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabinejad Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81746-73461 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81746-73461 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Savabi, Omid [Torabinejad Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81746-73461 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beni, Batoul Hashemi [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81746-73461 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Seyed Mohammad [School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81746-73461 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vashaee, Daryoosh [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK 74106 (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys with their biodegradable characteristic can be a very good candidate to be used in orthopedic implants. However, magnesium alloys may corrode and degrade too fast for applications in the bone healing procedure. In order to enhance the corrosion resistance and the in vitro bioactivity of a magnesium alloy, a nanostructured diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) film was coated on AZ91 magnesium alloy through combined micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) methods. The crystalline structures, morphologies and compositions of the coated and uncoated substrates were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion test in simulated body fluid (SBF) were employed to evaluate the corrosion resistance and the in vitro bioactivity of the samples. The results of our investigation showed that the nanostructured diopside coating deposited on the MAO layer increases the corrosion resistance and improves the in vitro bioactivity of the biodegradable magnesium alloy.

  3. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  4. ADVANCES IN LIQUID CRYSTALLINE POLYESTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. J. Jackson

    1992-01-01

    Advances have been made in understanding the interactions of composition, molecular weight,liquid crystallinity, orientation, and three-dimensional crystallinity on the properties of injection-molded and melt-spun liquid crystalline polyesters (LCP's). Two classes of potentially low-cost LCP's were compared : (1) semiflexible LCP's prepared from 1,6-hexanediol and the dimethyl ester of either trans-4, 4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid or 4.4 ′-biphenyldicarboxylic acid and (2) all-aromatic LCP's prepared from terephthalic acid, 2, 6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid, the diacetate of hydroquinone,and the acetate of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The effects of composition on the plastic properties of the 4-component all-aromatic LCP's were determined with the aid of a 3 × 3 factorial statistically designed experiment, the generation of equations with a computer program, and the plotting of three-dimensional figures and contour diagrams. The effects of absolute molecular weight (Mw) on the tensile strengths of the semiflexible LCP's and one of the all-aromatic LCP's having an excellent balance of plastic properties were also compared, and it was observed that the semiflexible LCP's required Mw's about 4 times higher than the all-aromatic LCP to attain a given strength. Persistence lengths and molecular modeling were used to explain these differences.

  5. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  6. Heat Generation by Irradiated Complex Composite Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan; Tian, Pengfei; Pello, Josselin;

    2014-01-01

    Heating of irradiated metallic e-beam generated nanostructures was quantified through direct measurements paralleled by novel model-based numerical calculations. By comparing discs, triangles, and stars we showed how particle shape and composition determines the heating. Importantly, our results ...... revealed that substantial heat is generated in the titanium adhesive layer between gold and glass. Even when the Ti layer is as thin as 2 nm it absorbs as much as a 30 nm Au layer and hence should not be ignored....

  7. Computer construction and analysis of protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ke; SUN Zhao-hui; SHENTU Xing-chao; WANG Kai-jun; TAN Jian

    2005-01-01

    Background γD-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation. Being highly stable, γD-crystallin proteins are composed of two domains. In this study we constructed and analyzed protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene, which caused a special fasciculiform congenital cataract affecting a large Chinese family. Methods γD-crystallin protein structure was predicted by Swiss-Model software using bovine γD-crystallin as a template and Prospect software using human βb2-crystallin as a template. The models were observed with a Swiss-Pdb viewer.Results The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Swiss-Model software showed that proline23 was an exposed surface residue and P23T change made a decreased hydrogen bond distance between threonine23 and asparagine49. The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Prospect software showed that the P23T change exerted a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure and yielded hydrogen bonds with aspartic acid21, asparagine24, asparagine49 and serine74.Conclusion The mutant γD-crystallin gene has a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure, supporting that alteration of γ-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation.

  8. Nonaqueous seeded growth of flower-like mixed-phase titania nanostructures for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Huang-Ching; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Liao, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chia-Min

    2010-09-01

    A nonaqueous seeded-grown synthesis of three-dimensional TiO 2 nanostructures in the benzyl alcohol reaction system was reported. The synthesis was simple, high-yield, and requires no structural directing or capping agents. It could be largely accelerated by applying microwave heating. The TiO 2 nanostructures had a unique flower-like morphology and high surface area. Furthermore, the structural analyses suggested that the nanostructures had a non-uniform distribution of crystalline phases, with the inner part rich in anatase and the outer part rich in rutile. After heat treatments, the mixed-phase TiO 2 nanostructures exhibited high photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of methylene blue as compared to Degussa P25. The high photoactivities may be associated with the high surface area and the synergistic effect resulting from the anisotropic mixed-phase nanostructures. The results demonstrate the uniqueness of the nonaqueous seeded growth and the potential of the TiO 2 nanostructures for practical applications.

  9. Unexpected Au Alloying in Tailoring In-Doped SnTe Nanostructures with Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Atherton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Materials with strong spin-orbit interaction and superconductivity are candidates for topological superconductors that may host Majorana fermions (MFs at the edges/surfaces/vortex cores. Bulk-superconducting carrier-doped topological crystalline insulator, indium-doped tin telluride (In-SnTe is one of the promising materials. Robust superconductivity of In-SnTe nanostructures has been demonstrated recently. Intriguingly, not only 3-dimensional (3D nanostructures but also ultra-thin quasi-2D and quasi-1D systems can be grown by the vapor transport method. In particular, nanostructures with a controlled dimension will give us a chance to understand the dimensionality and the quantum confinement effects on the superconductivity of the In-SnTe and may help us work on braiding MFs in various dimensional systems for future topological quantum computation technology. With this in mind, we employed gold nanoparticles (GNPs with well-identified sizes to tailor In-SnTe nanostructures grown by vapor transport. However, we could not see clear evidence that the presence of the GNPs is necessary or sufficient to control the size of the nanostructures. Nevertheless, it should be noted that a weak correlation between the diameter of GNPs and the dimensions of the smallest nanostructures has been found so far. To our surprise, the ones grown under the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism, with the use of the GNPs, contained gold that is widely and inhomogeneously distributed over the whole body.

  10. The surface nanostructures of titanium alloy regulate the proliferation of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Lai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of surface nanostructures on the behaviors of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, surface nanostructured titanium alloy (Ti-3Zr2Sn-3Mo-25Nb, TLM was fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT technique. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were employed to characterize the surface nanostructures of the TLM, respectively. The results demonstrated that nano-crystalline structures with several tens of nanometers were formed on the surface of TLM substrates. The HUVECs grown onto the surface nanostructured TLM spread well and expressed more vinculin around the edges of cells. More importantly, HUVECs grown onto the surface nanostructured TLM displayed significantly higher (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05 cell adhesion and viabilities than those of native titanium alloy. HUVECs cultured on the surface nanostructured titanium alloy displayed significantly higher (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05 productions of nitric oxide (NO and prostacyclin (PGI2 than those of native titanium alloy, respectively. This study provides an alternative for the development of titanium alloy based vascular stents.

  11. Printable nanostructured silicon solar cells for high-performance, large-area flexible photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Biswas, Roshni; Li, Weigu; Kang, Dongseok; Chan, Lesley; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-10-28

    Nanostructured forms of crystalline silicon represent an attractive materials building block for photovoltaics due to their potential benefits to significantly reduce the consumption of active materials, relax the requirement of materials purity for high performance, and hence achieve greatly improved levelized cost of energy. Despite successful demonstrations for their concepts over the past decade, however, the practical application of nanostructured silicon solar cells for large-scale implementation has been hampered by many existing challenges associated with the consumption of the entire wafer or expensive source materials, difficulties to precisely control materials properties and doping characteristics, or restrictions on substrate materials and scalability. Here we present a highly integrable materials platform of nanostructured silicon solar cells that can overcome these limitations. Ultrathin silicon solar microcells integrated with engineered photonic nanostructures are fabricated directly from wafer-based source materials in configurations that can lower the materials cost and can be compatible with deterministic assembly procedures to allow programmable, large-scale distribution, unlimited choices of module substrates, as well as lightweight, mechanically compliant constructions. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties, photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling elucidate important design rules for nanoscale photon management with ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells and their interconnected, mechanically flexible modules, where we demonstrate 12.4% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency for printed ultrathin (∼ 8 μm) nanostructured silicon solar cells when configured with near-optimal designs of rear-surface nanoposts, antireflection coating, and back-surface reflector.

  12. Palladium urchin-like nanostructures and their H{sub 2} sorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksar, F; Sharma, G K; Audonnet, F; Remita, H [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000-CNRS, Batiment 349, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Beaunier, P, E-mail: fabrice.audonnet@u-psud.fr, E-mail: hynd.remita@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, UMR 7197-CNRS, UPMC Universite Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2011-07-29

    Urchin-like palladium nanostructures were synthesized by slow radiolytic reduction of Pd{sup II} in cetylpyridinium chloride (CPCl) micellar solution. They were formed by polycrystalline nanowires originating from the same core. The growth process leading to these urchin-like structures has been studied. These three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures were obtained at high Pd concentration (0.1 M) which led to a relatively large quantity of nanomaterials. These nanostructures show very interesting cycling sorption properties for hydrogen storage.

  13. Hemocompatibility of polymeric nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S; Popat, Ketul C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin (ALB) adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen (FIB) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG) adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces.

  14. Hybrid nanostructured thin-films by PLD for enhanced field emission performance for radiation micro-nano dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA AFNET in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS–National Research Foundation (NRF), 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); Materials Science Group (MSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMCH), Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai 600044 (India); Kennedy, J. [UNESCO-UNISA AFNET in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS–National Research Foundation (NRF), 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Kavitha, G. [UNESCO-UNISA AFNET in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS–National Research Foundation (NRF), 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, PO Box 722, Western Cape (South Africa); PG& Research Dept of Physics, AM Jain College Affiliated to University of Madras, Chennai 600114 (India); and others

    2015-10-25

    We report the observation of hybrid nanostructured thin-films such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) signature on the ZnO epitaxial thin-films grown onto the device silicon/quartz substrate by reactive pulsed laser deposition (r-PLD) under the argon–oxygen (Ar|O{sub 2}) ambient at 573 K. Undoped and Carbon (C) doped epitaxial ZnO thin-film layer formation is revealed by the accelerator based ion-beam analysis (IBA) technique of resonant Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RRBS), glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) pattern, micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and field-emission (F-E) studies. The RRBS and GIXRD results show the deposition of epitaxial thin-films containing C into ZnO. The μ-RS technique is a standard nondestructive tool (NDT) for the characterization of crystalline, nano-crystalline, and amorphous carbons (a-C). As grown ZnO and C-doped ZnO thin-films μ-RS result reveal the doping effect of C-impurities that appear in the form of DLC evident from Raman peaks at 1357 and 1575 cm{sup −1} along with a wurtzite structure peak at 438 cm{sup −1} with E{sub 2}(h) phonon of ZnO. The electron transport F-E result shows the hybrid thin-films has high conductivity than the un-doped film. Fabricated hybrid nanostructured thin-films materials could be very useful for the emerging applications of micro-nano dosimetry. - Highlights: • Observation of hybrid nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC) on ZnO epitaxial thin-films at 573 K. • Carbon doped epitaxial ZnO thin-film layer formation is revealed by RRBS, Micro-Raman. • Field-emission (F-E) study. • DLC formation evident from Raman peaks at 1357 and 1575 cm{sup −1} along with a wurtzite structure peak of ZnO. • The electron transport F-E result shows the hybrid thin-film has high conductivity than the undoped thin-film.

  15. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    The concerns on the increase of polluting plastic wastes as well as the U.S. dependence on imported petrochemical products have driven an attention towards alternative biodegradable polymers from renewable resources. Zein protein, a co-product from ethanol production from corn, is a good candidate. This research project aims to increase zein value by adopting nanotechnology for fabricating advanced zein packaging films and zein microfluidic devices. Two nanotechnology approaches were focused: the polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique where the nanocomposite structures were created in the zein matrix, and the soft lithography and the microfluidic devices where the micro and nanopatterns were created on the zein film surfaces. The polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique was adopted in the commonly used zein film fabrication processes which were solvent casting and extrusion blowing methods. The two methods resulted in partially exfoliated nanocomposite structures. The impact of nanoclays on the physical properties of zein films strongly depended on the film preparation techniques. The impact of nanoclay concentration was more pronounced in the films made by extrusion blowing technique than by the solvent casting technique. As the processability limitation for the extrusion blowing technique of the zein sample containing hight nanoclay content, the effect of the nanoclay content on the rheological properties of zein hybrid resins at linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regions were further investigated. A pristine zein resin exhibited soft solid like behavior. On the other hand, the zein hybrid with nanoclay content greater than 5 wt.% showed more liquid like behavior, suggesting that the nanoclays interrupted the entangled zein network. There was good correspondence between the experimental data and the predictions of the Wagner model for the pristine zein resins. However, the model failed to predict the steady shear properties of the zein nanoclay nanocomposite

  16. Multiferroic properties of nanostructured barium doped bismuth ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El–Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@suezuniv.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Ayoua, M.S.; Mostafa, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Ahmed, M.A. [Materials Science Lab (1), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-04-15

    Multiferroic nanoparticles of Bi{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (x=0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25 mol%) samples were prepared using conventional solid-state method. The nanostructural, multiferroic properties of the prepared samples was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show the formation of BiBaFeO{sub 3} with single-phase rhombohedral-hexagonal structure. Spin canting or impurity phase could be a probable reason for the origin of ferromagnetism. At room temperature, remnant magnetization increased 18 times more than its initial value. A change in the magnetization is observed around 742–833 K. Néel temperature (T{sub N}) registers an increase of 30 times of Ba-doped BiFeO{sub 3} in comparison with undoped BiFeO{sub 3}. The dielectric properties were affected by the properties of the substitutional ions as well as the crystalline structure of the present samples. Substitution with Ba{sup 2+} ions also improved the ferroelectric polarization with remanent polarization of 89 μC/cm{sup 2}. The simultaneous occurrence of ferromagnetism and ferroelectric hysteresis loops in BiBaFeO{sub 3} multiferroic nanoparticles system at room temperature makes it a potential candidate for information storage and spintronics. - Highlights: • We prepared multiferroic nanoparticles of Bi{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}FeO{sub 3}. • A change in the magnetization is observed around 742–833 K. • We conclude that this nanomaterial is suitable for information storage and spintronics.

  17. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  18. Enhanced non-volatile resistive switching in suspended single-crystalline ZnO nanowire with controllable multiple states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xuejiao; Feng, Zhihong; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching nanostructures are a promising candidate for next-generation non-volatile memories. In this report, we investigate the switching behaviors of single-crystalline ZnO nanowires suspended in air. They exhibit significantly higher current density, lower switching voltage, and more pronounced multiple conductance states compared to nanowires in direct contact with substrate. We attribute the effect to enhanced Joule heating efficiency, reduced surface scattering, and more significantly, the positive feedback established between the current density and local temperature in the suspended nanowires. The proposed mechanism has been quantitatively examined by finite element simulations. We have also demonstrated an innovative approach to initiating the current-temperature mutual enhancement through illumination by ultraviolet light, which further confirmed our hypothesis and enabled even greater enhancement. Our work provides further insight into the resistive switching mechanism of single-crystalline one-dimensional nanostructures, and suggests an effective means of performance enhancement and device optimization.

  19. Alkali-etching growth of nest-like Ag@mTiO2 hierarchical nanostructures and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongnan; Zhang, Haijiao

    2017-06-01

    Porous nanomaterials have attracted extensive interests in adsorption, catalysis, biosensors, and biomedicine due to their high surface area, well-defined pore structure and tunable pore size. However, how to obtain porous nanomaterials of desirable component and unique structure with multifunctionalities and synergetic properties is still a great challenge. In this work, a novel nest-like Ag@mTiO2 hierarchical nanostructure with Ag nanoparticle as the core and a mesoporous crystalline TiO2 as the protective shell was successfully prepared by layer-by-layer assembly technique and alkali-etching hydrothermal route. By simply changing the conditions of alkali etching, different nanostructures could be obtained, such as core-shell or rattle type. In the process, the thickness of coating silica layer and TiO2 shell both played important roles for the formation of desired nanostructures. The as-prepared products had a large specific surface area of 301m(2)/g and a tailored TiO2 outer shell. Raman spectra results showed perfect SERS signal of the tags enhanced and remained good stability even after one month. Doxycycline (Doxy) was chosen to evaluate their drug loading and controlled release properties. The results indicated that the obtained Ag@mTiO2 nanoparticles exhibited good biocompatibility and excellent drug-loading capacity. Consequently, they are also expected to serve as ideal candidates for more potential applications including photocatalysis, drug controlled release, biosensor and cell imaging, etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo human crystalline lens topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-10-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye with known surfaces geometry and on a human lens in vitro, and demonstrated on three human lenses in vivo. Not correcting for distortion overestimated the anterior lens radius by 25% and the posterior lens radius by more than 65%. In vivo lens surfaces were fitted by biconicoids and Zernike polynomials after distortion correction. The anterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 10.27 to 14.14 mm, and the posterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 6.12 to 7.54 mm. Surface asphericities ranged from -0.04 to -1.96. The lens surfaces were well fitted by quadrics (with variation smaller than 2%, for 5-mm pupils), with low amounts of high order terms. Surface lens astigmatism was significant, with the anterior lens typically showing horizontal astigmatism ([Formula: see text] ranging from -11 to -1 µm) and the posterior lens showing vertical astigmatism ([Formula: see text] ranging from 6 to 10 µm).

  1. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    then, using a sonication process, a uniform lipid bilayer that supports the incorporation of membrane proteins is formed. These bilayer-coated carbon nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution, and they can be used in development of various biosensors and energy producing devices. In the other hybrid nanostructure, the lipid bilayer of a liposome is covalently anchored to a biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel core using double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) linkers. Release studies shows that nano-size hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exceptionally stable, and they can be used as biomimetic model membranes that mimic the connectivity between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. After lipid bilayer removal, dsDNA linkers can provide programmable nanogels decorated with oligonucleotides with potential sites for further molecular assembly. These stable nanostructures can be useful for oligonucleotide and drug delivery applications. The developed hydrogel-anchored liposomes are exploited for encapsulation and intracellular delivery of therapeutic peptide. Peptides with anti-cancer properties are successfully encapsulated in hydrogel core of pH-sensitive liposomes during rehydration process. Liposomes release their cargo at acidic pH. Confocal microscopy confirms the intracellular delivery of liposomes through an endocytotic pathway.

  2. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  3. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials.

  4. Vitamin E-TPGS stabilized self-assembled tripeptide nanostructures for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh; Rai, Vartika; Mahato, Manohar; Singh, Mahak; Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled peptides and specifically small peptide based nanostructures have been the focus of research in past decade due to their potential biological applications. In this study, we prepared a protected peptide, Boc-Pro-Phe-Gly-OMe, which self-assembled in aqueous solutions leading to the formation of nanostructures and ability to act as a drug carrier. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed nanostructures with average size of 119.6 nm containing hydrophobic core, wherein hydrophobic drugs, viz, eosin, aspirin and curcumin, were successfully encapsulated. These encapsulated nanostructures, were further stabilized with Vitamin E-TPGS. In-vitro drug release studies revealed the release of drugs in controlled fashion from the nanostructures. The results advocate the potential of the proposed peptide nanostructures as controlled drug delivery systems and could be used in other biomedical applications.

  5. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  6. Gas Slug Microfluidics: A Unique Tool for Ultrafast, Highly Controlled Growth of Iron Oxide Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Larrea, Ane; Sebastian, Victor; Ibarra, Alfonso; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials in real life applications is often hampered by our inability to produce them in large quantities while preserving their desired properties in terms of size, shape, and crystalline phase. Here we present a novel continuous method to synthesize nanostructures with an unprecedented degree of control regarding their properties. In particular, the excellent properties of microreactors for chemical synthesis are enhanced by the introduction of gas slugs of tailored composit...

  7. Growth of α-sexithiophene nanostructures on C60 thin film layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Madsen, Morten; Balzer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Organic molecular beam grown -sexithiophene (-6T) forms nanostructured thin films on buckminsterfullerene (C60) thin film layers. At substrate temperatures of 300K during growth a rough continuous film is observed, which develop to larger elongated islands and dendritic- as well as needle like ...... fluorescence polarimetry measurements the in-plane orientation of the crystalline sites within the needle like structures is determined. The polarimetry investigations strongly indicate that the needle like structures consist of lying molecules....

  8. Fabrication and Multiprobe Electrical Characterization of Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2013-01-01

    Engineering of graphene for modifying electrical properties, such as opening an electronic band gap, has been shown both theoretically and experimentally by creating periodic holes in the graphene sheet, however at the price of lower carrier mobility. Such holes can be made with special fabrication...... to the current direction. The results show a decrease in carrier mobility with increasing number of rows, but does not indicate a band gap opening with holes sizes of 50 nm and a pitch of 100 nm, which suggests that smaller holes and pitch are necessary for creating band gap in graphene. Electrical...... characterization of graphene and other nanostructures usually involves lithographic processing which can alter or damage fragile materials, and metal electrodes are permanently placed to the sample. This project presents a fast method for electrical characterization for graphene and other nanostructures by the use...

  9. Tunable random lasing behavior in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashish; Zhong, Liubiao; Sun, Jun; Jiang, Lin; Cheng, Gary J.; Chi, Lifeng

    2017-01-01

    Random lasing is desired in plasmonics nanostructures through surface plasmon amplification. In this study, tunable random lasing behavior was observed in dye molecules attached with Au nanorods (NRs), Au nanoparticles (NPs) and Au@Ag nanorods (NRs) respectively. Our experimental investigations showed that all nanostructures i.e., Au@AgNRs, AuNRs & AuNPs have intensive tunable spectral effects. The random lasing has been observed at excitation wavelength 532 nm and varying pump powers. The best random lasing properties were noticed in Au@AgNRs structure, which exhibits broad absorption spectrum, sufficiently overlapping with that of dye Rhodamine B (RhB). Au@AgNRs significantly enhance the tunable spectral behavior through localized electromagnetic field and scattering. The random lasing in Au@AgNRs provides an efficient coherent feedback for random lasers.

  10. Vertically Aligned Nanostructured Arrays of Inorganic Materials: Synthesis, Distinctive Physical Phenomena, and Device Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Jesus Manuel

    The manifestation of novel physical phenomena upon scaling materials to finite size has inspired new device concepts that take advantage of the distinctive electrical, mechanical, and optical, properties of nanostructures. The development of fabrication approaches for the preparation of their 1D nanostructured form, such as nanowires and nanotubes, has contributed greatly to advancing fundamental understanding of these systems, and has spurred the integration of these materials in novel electronics, photonic devices, power sources, and energy scavenging constructs. Significant progress has been achieved over the last decade in the preparation of ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes, II---VI and III---V semiconductors, and some binary oxides such as ZnO. In contrast, relatively less attention has been focused on layered materials with potential for electrochemical energy storage. Here, we describe the catalyzed vapor transport growth of vertical arrays of orthorhombic V2O 5 nanowires. In addition, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to precisely probe the alignment, uniformity in crystal growth direction, and electronic structure of single-crystalline V2O5 nanowire arrays prepared by a cobalt-catalyzed vapor transport process. The dipole selection rules operational for core-level electron spectroscopy enable angle-dependant NEXAFS spectroscopy to be used as a sensitive probe of the anisotropy of these systems and provides detailed insight into bond orientation and the symmetry of the frontier orbital states. The experimental spectra are matched to previous theoretical predictions and allow experimental verification of features such as the origin of the split-off conduction band responsible for the n-type conductivity of V2O5 and the strongly anisotropic nature of vanadyl-oxygen-derived (V=O) states thought to be involved in catalysis. We have also invested substantial effort in obtaining shape and size control of metal oxide

  11. Novel Crystalline SiO2 Nanoparticles via Annelids Bioprocessing of Agro-Industrial Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola-Gonzalez, A.; Martínez-Hernández, A. L.; Angeles-Chávez, C.; Castaño, V. M.; Velasco-Santos, C.

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles silica oxide from rice husk, sugar cane bagasse and coffee husk, by employing vermicompost with annelids ( Eisenia foetida) is reported. The product ( humus) is calcinated and extracted to recover the crystalline nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) show that the biotransformation allows creating specific crystalline phases, since equivalent particles synthesized without biotransformation are bigger and with different crystalline structure.

  12. Quasiparticle specific heats for the crystalline color superconducting phase of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, R; Mannarelli, M; Nardulli, G; Ruggieri, M; Stramaglia, S; 10.1016/j.physletb.2003.09.071

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the specific heats of quasiparticles of two-flavor QCD in its crystalline phases for low temperature. We show that for the different crystalline structures considered here there are gapless modes contributing linearly in temperature to the specific heat. We evaluate also the phonon contributions which are cubic in temperature. These features might be relevant for compact stars with an inner shell in a color superconducting crystalline phase. (21 refs).

  13. Quasi-particle Specific Heats for the Crystalline Color Superconducting Phase of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Mannarelli, M; Nardulli, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Marco; Stramaglia, S

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the specific heats of quasi-particles of two-flavor QCD in its crystalline phases for low temperature. We show that for the different crystalline structures considered here there are gapless modes contributing linearly in temperature to the specific heat. We evaluate also the phonon contributions which are cubic in temperature. These features might be relevant for compact stars with an inner shell in a color superconducting crystalline phase.

  14. Quasi-particle specific heats for the crystalline color superconducting phase of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalbuoni, R.; Gatto, R.; Mannarelli, M.; Nardulli, G.; Ruggieri, M.; Stramaglia, S

    2003-11-27

    We calculate the specific heats of quasi-particles of two-flavor QCD in its crystalline phases for low temperature. We show that for the different crystalline structures considered here there are gapless modes contributing linearly in temperature to the specific heat. We evaluate also the phonon contributions which are cubic in temperature. These features might be relevant for compact stars with an inner shell in a color superconducting crystalline phase.

  15. Novel Crystalline SiO2 Nanoparticles via Annelids Bioprocessing of Agro-Industrial Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles-Chávez C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The synthesis of nanoparticles silica oxide from rice husk, sugar cane bagasse and coffee husk, by employing vermicompost with annelids (Eisenia foetida is reported. The product (humus is calcinated and extracted to recover the crystalline nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS show that the biotransformation allows creating specific crystalline phases, since equivalent particles synthesized without biotransformation are bigger and with different crystalline structure.

  16. Functionalization of DNA Nanostructures for Cell Signaling Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ronnie O.

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is an important cytokine responsible for a wide range of different cellular functions including extracellular matrix formation, angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We have sought to use self-assembling DNA nanostructures to influence TGF-beta signaling. The predictable Watson Crick base pairing allows for designing self-assembling nanoscale structures using oligonucleotides. We have used the method of DNA origami to assemble structures functionalized with multiple peptides that bind TGF-beta receptors outside the ligand binding domain. This allows the nanostructures to cluster TGF-beta receptors and lower the energy barrier of ligand binding thus sensitizing the cells to TGF-beta stimulation. To prove efficacy of our nanostructures we have utilized immunofluorescent staining of Smad2/4 in order to monitor TGF-beta mediated translocation of Smad2/4 to the cell nucleus. We have also utilized Smad2/4 responsive luminescence constructs that allows us to quantify TGF-beta stimulation with and without nanostructures. To functionalize our nanostructures we relied on biotin-streptavidin linkages. This introduces a multivalency that is not necessarily desirable in all designs. Therefore we have investigated alternative means of functionalization. The first approach is based on targeting DNA nanostructure by using zinc finger binding proteins. Efficacy of zinc finger binding proteins was assayed by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). While ELISA indicated a relative specificity of zinc finger proteins for target DNA sequences AFM showed a high degree of non-specific binding and insufficient affinity. The second approach is based on using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) incorporated in the nanostructure through base pairing. PNA is a synthetic DNA analog consisting of a backbone of repeating N-(2-aminoethyl)-glycine units to which purine and pyrimidine bases are linked by

  17. Explorations of Crystalline Effects on 4-(Benzyloxy)Benzaldehyde Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harismah, Kun; Ozkendir, O. Murat; Mirzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    The properties of 4-(benzyloxy)benzaldehyde (BBA), as a pharmaceutically important compound, have been investigated through the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The properties of original crystalline and optimised gaseous structures have been evaluated to recognise the crystalline effects. In addition to the structural properties, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties have also been evaluated for both investigated systems to better detect the effects in atomic levels. The results indicated that the structural shape of BBA is significantly changed in the optimised gaseous system, showing significant crystalline effects on the geometrical positions. Moreover, the magnitudes for energies and dipole moments indicate notable effects on the electronic properties. The evaluated NMR properties also show that the atoms of aromatic systems detect significant changes more than the atoms of aliphatic systems in the investigated BBA. And finally, the oxygen bridge atom plays a dominant role in combining two benzene rings of BBA.

  18. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  19. Plasma Spray Forming of Nanostructured Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nanostructure composite coating is obtained via plasma spraying of Al2O3-13 wt pct TiO2 powder. Brittle and hard lamella results from melted nanostructured powder. Ductile nanostructured matrix forms from unmelted nanostructured particles. Through the adjustment of constituent and nanostructure, hardness/strength and toughness/ductility are balanced and overall properties of the structure composite are achieved.

  20. Studies on growth and characterization of heterogeneous tungsten oxide nanostructures for photoelectrochemical and gas sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, R.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanostructures were developed on indium tin oxide coated glass substrates by modified thermal evaporation process without using catalyst and vacuum. Depending on the substrate temperature and vapor concentration, different nanostructures like rod, sheet and pyramid were formed. Morphology, phase structure and crystallinity of the nanostructure films were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and HR-TEM. The samples were investigated under dark current and photocurrent and in H2SO4 aqueous solution as a function of applied potential. The saturated photocurrent density of tungsten oxide was found to be ≈14.4 μA cm-2. The films were also investigated as resistive gas sensor for ethanol gases (10-50 ppm) at room temperature. The response and recovery time were also determined.

  1. A facile and fast route to prepare antimony (Sb) nanostructures without additives

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, M.A.

    2011-12-01

    Herein, we report a safe, low cost and reproducible approach for the synthesis of antimony (Sb) nanostructures with most of them having prism like morphology and having well defined faces in the range of ∼70210 nm. The organics free approach is based on a reaction of antimony powder and pure water at ∼210 °C without using any harmful additives and amines. The XRD pattern confirmed the composition and crystallinity of the grown nanostructures. The reported method besides being organics free is economical, fast and free of pollution, which will make it suitable for large scale production. Furthermore, it is well expected that such a technique could be extended to prepare many other important metal and metal oxide nanostructures. The prospects of the process are bright and promising. © 2012 Sharif University of Technology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Silica Nanostructures in Poly(ethylene oxide)-Based Composite Polymer Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Anwar, Shahid; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-06-01

    The present work describes the synthesis of some poly(ethylene oxide)-based nanocomposite polymer electrolyte films using various silica nanostructures as the inorganic filler by simple solution mixing technique, in which the nature of the silica nanostructures play a vital role in modulating their electrochemical performances at room temperature. The silica nanostructures are prepared by ammonical hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate following the modified St6ber method. The resulting films are characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimeter to study their crystallinity. Room temperature AC impedance spectroscopy is utilized to determine the Li+ ion conductivity of the resulting films. The observed conductivity values of various NCPE films depend on the nature of silica filling as well as on their surface characteristics and also on the varying PEO-Li+ ratio, which is observed to be in the order of 10(-7)-10(-6) S cm(-1).

  3. Morphology dependent catalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures towards photodegradation of Rose Bengal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Ritu; Kumar, Ashok; Rana, Pawan S., E-mail: drpawansrana.phy@dcrustm.org [Department of Physics, D.C.R. University of Science & Technology, Murthal (Sonepat) Haryana, 131039 (India); Nehra, S. P. [Centre of Excellence for Energy and Environmental Studies, D.C.R. University of Science & Technology, Murthal (Sonepat) Haryana, 131039 (India)

    2015-08-28

    This work deals with the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures using sol-gel and hydrothermal method for evaluating their photodegradation performance towards decolorization of Rose Bengal (RB). A combination of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV–Vis spectroscopy were utilized to evaluate the structural, morphological and optical properties of the obtained nanostructures. It was observed that the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared using hydrothermal method were highly crystalline and possess higher band gap value, even when same conditions of temperature, pressure, precursor ratios and solvent amount was kept constant while synthesizing TiO{sub 2} nanostructures via sol-gel method. The obvious effect of porous morphology exhibited by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared using hydrothermal route is reflected in its decolorization performance whereby 92.5% of the RB dye solution was degraded in 70 min of irradiation time.

  4. CuO three-dimensional flowerlike nanostructures: Controlled synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Guo, Yong-Gang; Liu, Wei-Min; Hao, Jing-Cheng

    2008-06-01

    CuO three-dimensional (3D) flowerlike nanostructures were successfully synthesized on copper surface by a simple solution method. CuO nanostructure was systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectrum. The factors to control the morphology and size of the CuO nanostructures were explored, showing that the reaction time and the concentration of starting regents play important roles in the formation of the CuO 3D nanostructures.

  5. Through-focal HAADF-STEM of buried nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Pizarro, J; Guerrero, E; Galindo, P L; Yanez, A [Department Lenguajes y Sist. Informaticos, Universidad de Cadiz (Spain); Molina, S I, E-mail: maria.guerrero@uca.e [Department Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I. Universidad de Cadiz (Spain)

    2010-02-01

    High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) in combination with strain mapping techniques provides a powerful tool for quantitative analysis of crystalline semiconductor materials. Due to the complex interaction of a focused probe and a sample in HAADF, the calculation of each pixel in a simulation process requires a complete multislice iteration, making the overall computing process a rather demanding task in time and memory. SICSTEM is a parallel software code recently developed for running on the University of Cadiz Supercomputer (3.75 Tflops) that allows the simulation of images from large nanostructures containing more than one million atoms. The software has been designed to be able to generate not only one dimensional line scans or two dimensional images, but also to perform optical sectioning in the STEM simulation process, providing an easy way to simulate 3D HAADF-STEM images. In this work we consider GaAs capped GaSb nanostructures epitaxially oriented on a GaAs substrate. A methodology has been developed by combining the through-focal series STEM imaging and image analysis to estimate shape and position of buried GaSb nanostructures.

  6. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  7. Photoluminescence study of ZnO nanostructures grown on silicon by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biethan, J.-P., E-mail: biethan@hfe.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of High Frequency Electronics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Sirkeli, V.P., E-mail: vsirkeli@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Comrat State University, Galatsan str. 17, MD-3800 Comrat, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Considine, L. [Department of High Frequency Electronics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Nedeoglo, D.D. [Department of Physics, Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Pavlidis, D., E-mail: pavlidis@hfe.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of High Frequency Electronics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Hartnagel, H.L., E-mail: hartnagel@mwe.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of High Frequency Electronics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Department of Microwave Electronics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size and shape of ZnO nanostructures depend on growth temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size reduction of ZnO nanostructures causes a UV shift of the edge-band PL line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A higher growth temperature can decrease the number of deep level defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen appears to be an impurity donor in the ZnO nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PL line at 373.7 nm can be attributed to oxygen vacancies. - Abstract: ZnO nanostructures with a size ranging from 20 to 100 nm were successfully deposited on (1 0 0)-Si substrates at different temperatures (500-800 Degree-Sign C) using MOCVD. It could be confirmed that the size of ZnO nanostructures decreased with increasing growth temperature. From photoluminescence (PL) studies it was found, that intensive band-edge PL of ZnO nanostructures consists of emission lines with maxima at 368.6 nm, 370.1 nm, 373.7 nm, 383.9 nm, 391.7 nm, 400.7 nm and 412 nm. These lines can be dedicated to free excitons and impurity donor-bound excitons, where hydrogen acts as donor impurity with an activation energy of about 65 meV. A UV shift of the band-edge PL line with increasing growth temperature of ZnO nanostructures was observed as a result of the quantum confinement effect. The results suggest that an increase of growth temperature leads to increased band-edge PL intensity. Moreover, the ratio of band-edge PL intensity to green- (red-) band intensity also increases, indicating better crystalline quality of ZnO nanostructures with increasing growth temperature.

  8. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  9. Topology of nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological classification in our previous paper [K. Shiozaki and M. Sato, Phys. Rev. B 90, 165114 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.165114] is extended to nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors. Using the twisted equivariant K theory, we complete the classification of topological crystalline insulators and superconductors in the presence of additional order-two nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. The order-two nonsymmorphic space groups include half-lattice translation with Z2 flip, glide, twofold screw, and their magnetic space groups. We find that the topological periodic table shows modulo-2 periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two nonsymmorphic space group. It is pointed out that the nonsymmorphic space groups allow Z2 topological phases even in the absence of time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries. Furthermore, the coexistence of the nonsymmorphic space group with time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries provides novel Z4 topological phases, which have not been realized in ordinary topological insulators and superconductors. We present model Hamiltonians of these new topological phases and analytic expressions of the Z2 and Z4 topological invariants. The half-lattice translation with Z2 spin flip and glide symmetry are compatible with the existence of boundaries, leading to topological surface gapless modes protected by the order-two nonsymmorphic symmetries. We also discuss unique features of these gapless surface modes.

  10. Solution growth of single crystal methylammonium lead halide perovskite nanostructures for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongping; Meng, Fei; Rowley, Matthew B; Thompson, Blaise J; Shearer, Melinda J; Ma, Dewei; Hamers, Robert J; Wright, John C; Jin, Song

    2015-05-01

    Understanding crystal growth and improving material quality is important for improving semiconductors for electronic, optoelectronic, and photovoltaic applications. Amidst the surging interest in solar cells based on hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites and the exciting progress in device performance, improved understanding and better control of the crystal growth of these perovskites could further boost their optoelectronic and photovoltaic performance. Here, we report new insights on the crystal growth of the perovskite materials, especially crystalline nanostructures. Specifically, single crystal nanowires, nanorods, and nanoplates of methylammonium lead halide perovskites (CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3) are successfully grown via a dissolution-recrystallization pathway in a solution synthesis from lead iodide (or lead acetate) films coated on substrates. These single crystal nanostructures display strong room-temperature photoluminescence and long carrier lifetime. We also report that a solid-liquid interfacial conversion reaction can create a highly crystalline, nanostructured MAPbI3 film with micrometer grain size and high surface coverage that enables photovoltaic devices with a power conversion efficiency of 10.6%. These results suggest that single-crystal perovskite nanostructures provide improved photophysical properties that are important for fundamental studies and future applications in nanoscale optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  11. Facile synthesis of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures for DSSC applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, T.; Anandhan, N., E-mail: anandhan-kn@rediffmail.com [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, School of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi – 630 003, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    Development of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure based third generation dye sensitized solar cell is interesting compared to conventional silicon solar cells. ZnO nanostructured thin films were electrochemically deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate. The effect of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on structural, morphological and optical properties is investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) meter, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and micro Raman spectroscopy. XRD patterns reveal that the prepared nanostructures are hexagonal wutrzite structures with (101) plane orientation, the nanostructure prepared using EDTA exhibits better crystallinity. FE-SEM images illustrate that the morphological changes are observed from nanorod structure to cauliflower like structure as EDTA is added. Micro Raman spectra predict that cauliflower like structure possesses a higher crystalline nature with less atomic defects compared to nanorod structures. Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is constructed for the optimized cauliflower structure, and open circuit voltage, short circuit density, fill factor and efficiency are estimated from the J-V curve.

  12. Facile synthesis of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures for DSSC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, T.; Anandhan, N.

    2016-05-01

    Development of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructure based third generation dye sensitized solar cell is interesting compared to conventional silicon solar cells. ZnO nanostructured thin films were electrochemically deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate. The effect of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on structural, morphological and optical properties is investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) meter, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and micro Raman spectroscopy. XRD patterns reveal that the prepared nanostructures are hexagonal wutrzite structures with (101) plane orientation, the nanostructure prepared using EDTA exhibits better crystallinity. FE-SEM images illustrate that the morphological changes are observed from nanorod structure to cauliflower like structure as EDTA is added. Micro Raman spectra predict that cauliflower like structure possesses a higher crystalline nature with less atomic defects compared to nanorod structures. Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is constructed for the optimized cauliflower structure, and open circuit voltage, short circuit density, fill factor and efficiency are estimated from the J-V curve.

  13. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  14. Room temperature synthesis of crystalline Sb2S3 for SnO2 photoanode-based solar cell application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil N Kulkarni; Sandeep A Arote; Habib M Pathan; Rajendra S Patil

    2015-04-01

    The preparation of crystalline antimony sulphide (Sb2S3) by chemical route at room temperature was reported in this paper. The structural, morphological and optical properties of as-synthesized sample were system- atically investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirms the orthorhombic crystal phase for prepared Sb2S3. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show uniform, dense spherical morphology having diameter around 200–220 nm. Energy band gap calculated from optical absorption spectra was observed around 2.17 eV. Contact angle measurement confirms the hydrophilic nature of the deposited film. The photoluminescence analysis shows low green luminescence as well as Stoke's shift for as-prepared Sb2S3. The nanostructured solar cell is fabricated for energy harvesting purpose with Sb2S3-sensitized SnO2 photoanode and polysulphide electrolyte. The solar cell with FTO/SnO2/Sb2S3 photoanode shows OC ∼ 240 mV, sc ∼ 0.640 mA cm−2 and FF ∼ 35%. The working mechanism and energy level diagram of Sb2S3/SnO2 system have been discussed.

  15. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  16. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay A Singh; Manoj K Harbola; Praveen Pathak

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  17. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  18. Biogenic nanostructured silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is by far the most abundant element in the earth crust and also is an essential element for higher plants, yet its biology and mechanisms in plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses are poorly understood. Based on the molecular mechanisms of the biosilicification in marine organisms such as diatoms and sponges, the cell wall template-mediated self-assembly of nanostructured silica in marine organisms and higher plants as well as the related organic molecules are discussed. Understanding of the templating and structure-directed effects of silicon-processing organic molecules not only offers the clue for synthesizing silicon-based materials, but also helps to recognize the anomaly of silicon in plant biology.

  19. Structural Analysis of Aromatic Liquid Crystalline Polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpad Somogyi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory preparations of liquid crystalline prepolymers, distillates accompanying prepolymers, final polymers, and sublimates accompanying final polymers were examined. NaOD/D2O depolymerization of prepolymers and polymers back to monomers with integration of the 1H NMR spectra showed up to 6% excess of carboxyls over phenol groups, caused partly by loss of the low-boiling comonomer hydroquinone through distillation during prepolymerization and leaving anhydride units in the polymer chain. ESI− MS and MS/MS of hexafluoroisopropanol extracts of the prepolymer detected small molecules including some containing anhydride groups; ESI+ MS showed the presence of small cyclic oligomers. 1H NMR (including TOCSY spectra provided more quantitative analyses of these oligomers. The final polymerization increases the length of the polymer chains and sublimes out the small oligomers. Anhydride linkages remaining in the polymer must make LCP’s more susceptible to degradation by nucleophilic reagents such as water, alkalis, and amines.

  20. Nanostructured TiO2 thin films for DSSCs prepared by sol gel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Siti Noraini Abu; Abdullah, Huda; Mahbor, Kamisah Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    In this research, nanostructured TiO2 thin films were prepared by sol-gel technique for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were investigated. The nanostructured thin films were prepared using commercial Titania powder (Degussa P25) and titanium (IV) ethoxide (TEOT). The resulting solution were spin-coated on pieces of indium-doped tin oxide (InO2:Sn, ITO) transparent glass (8 Ω/sq, TEC GlassTM) with an area of 10 × 10 mm2 at a rate of 2000 rpm for 30 seconds. The films were annealed in furnace at 450 °C for 60 min. The working electrode was then immersed in the solution of N-719 (Ruthenium) dye at room temperature for 24 h. A thin film of platinum (Pt) was deposited on the ITO-glass substrate as the counter electrode using print-screen technique. The structures, morphological and optical properties of the films, were examined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and UV-VIS spectrometer respectively. The XRD results showed that the crystalline phase of the film was anatase. The micrograph obtained using FESEM demonstrated that the prepared TiO2 film has a nanosructured characteristic. The photovoltaic properties of DSSC was studied under an incident irradiation of 100 mW/cm2. The energy conversion efficiency (η) of the DSSC with nanostuctured TiO2 (P25) and TiO2 was 0.3% and 0.2 % respectively.

  1. Evaluation of nanostructured Pt-Ru catalyst for application in DMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, A.L.; Gamboa, S.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico); Sebastien, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)]|[Chiapas Politecnica Univ., Chiapas (Mexico); Morgado, J.; Montoya, J.A. [IMP, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas, (Mexico); Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire d' electrochimie et de materiaux energetiques

    2006-07-01

    Slow methanol oxidation kinetics and the poisoning of the anode catalyst are the major factors that limit the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Catalysts with higher catalytic activity are needed in order to overcome these challenges. Although platinum (Pt) is a good catalyst for methanol oxidation, it can be highly affected by carbon monoxide (CO) reaction intermediates. Superior catalytic activity occurs in Pt based alloys, such as platinum ruthenium (Pt-Ru), platinum molybdenum (Pt-Mo), platinum tin (Pt-Sn), and platinum osmium (Pt-Os). This is due to the bifunctional mechanism and/or by the electronic effect, which indicates a promotional effect of the alloyed metal on Pt. The most studied binary system is the Pt-Ru (ruthenium), which has shown the best catalytic activity. There are many factors that influence the physical properties and the electrochemical performance of the Pt-Ru catalyst. These include the preparation method; the atomic ratio between platinum and ruthenium; the nature of the catalyst support; and, an optional heat treatment. Other important factors such as the particle size, the morphology, the electrochemically active area, and the crystalline phase influence the physical properties. In this study, nanostructured Pt-Ru catalysts were fabricated and evaluated physicochemically and electrochemically for its use in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The catalysts were synthesized from the carbonyl compounds of Pt and Ru via a pyrolysis-condensation reaction. The high resolution results showed a homogenous distribution of the nanostructured catalysts on Vulcan support. The catalyst was evaluated by XRD, HRTEM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the methanol oxidation on the catalyst was studied using volt-amperometry. The performance of the catalyst was found to be similar or better than the commercial one. It was concluded that it is possible to synthesize Pt-Ru/C with good morphological characteristics and improve it

  2. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  3. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Ouk, E-mail: sangouk.kim@kaist.ac.kr [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp{sup 2} hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystalline LGO aqueous dispersions are spontaneous parallel aligned between geometric confinement for highly aligned LGO/polymer composite fabrication. - Highlights: • A simple fabrication method for highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites is proposed. • LGO aqueous dispersion shows nematic liquid crystalline phase at 0.8 mg/ml. • In nematic phase, LGO flakes are highly aligned by geometric confinement. • Infiltration of PDMS into freeze-dried LGO allows highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites.

  4. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yun-Yuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Su, Wei-Fang; Chen, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Novel liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced polymerization shrinkage and effectively bond to tooth structures, can be applied in esthetic dentistry, including core and post systems, direct and indirect restorations, and dental brackets. The purposes of this study were to investigate the properties of liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites including biocompatibility, microhardness, and frictional forces of bracket-like blocks with different filler contents for further clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials that exhibited various filler contents, by assessing their cell activity performance using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and their microhardness with or without thermocycling. We also evaluated the frictional force between bracket-like duplicates and commercially available esthetic bracket systems using Instron 5566. The liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials showed good biocompatibility. The materials having high filler content demonstrated greater microhardness compared with commercially available bracket materials, before and after the thermocycling treatment. Thus, manufacturing processes are important to reduce frictional force experienced by orthodontic brackets. The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The effect of solvent on the morphology of ZnO nanostructure assembly by dielectrophoresis and its device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferrara, Vera; Pacheri Madathil, Aneesh; De Girolamo Del Mauro, Anna; Massera, Ettore; Polichetti, Tiziana; Rametta, Gabriella

    2012-07-01

    Different zinc oxide nanostructured morphologies were grown on photolithographically patterned silicon/silicon dioxide substrates by dielectrophoresis technique using different solvents, such as water and ethanol, obtaining rod-like and net-like nanostructures, respectively. The formation of continuous nanostructures was confirmed by scanning electron microscopic, atomic force microscopic images, and electrical characterizations. The rod-like zinc oxide nanostructures were observed in the 10 μm gap between the fingers in the pattern, whereas net-like nanostructures were formed independently of microgap. A qualitative study about the mechanism for the assembly of zinc oxide continuous nanostructures was presented. Devices were electrically characterized, at room temperature, in controlled environment to measure the conductance behavior in ultraviolet and humidity environment. Devices based on zinc oxide nanostructures grown in ethanol medium show better responses under both ultraviolet and humidity, because of the net-like structure with high surface-to-volume ratio.

  6. Dating the time of birth: a radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye lens crystallines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth......, in accordance with expectations. Moreover, it has been possible to develop an age model for the formation of the eye-lens crystallines. From this model a radiocarbon calibration curve for lens crystallines has been calculated. As a consequence, the time of birth of humans can be determined with an accuracy...

  7. Nanostructured materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    This book applies nanostructures and nanomaterials to energy and organic electronics, offering advanced deposition and processing methods and theoretical and experimental aspects for nanoparticles, nanotubes and thin films for organic electronics applications.

  8. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  9. Nanostructured optical microchips for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhua; He, Yuan; Wei, Jianjun; Que, Long

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the label-free detection of a cancer biomarker using newly developed arrayed nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) microchips. Specifically, the prostate cancer biomarker free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the receptor. Experiments found that the limit-of-detection of current nanostructured FPI microchip for f-PSA is about 10 pg/mL and the upper detection range for f-PSA can be dynamically changed by varying the amount of the PSA mAb immobilized on the sensing surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the immunoassay protocol used in the experiments shows excellent specificity and selectivity, suggesting the great potential to detect the cancer biomarkers at trace levels in complex biofluids. In addition, given its nature of low cost, simple-to-operation and batch fabrication capability, the arrayed nanostructured FPI microchip-based platform could provide an ideal technical tool for point-of-care diagnostics application and anticancer drug screen and discovery.

  10. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  11. Photocurrent generation in nanostructured organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R

    2008-05-01

    Photocurrent generation in nanostructured organic solar cells is simulated using a dynamical Monte Carlo model that includes the generation and transport properties of both excitons and free charges. Incorporating both optical and electrical properties, we study the influence of the heterojunction nanostructure (e.g., planar vs bulk junctions) on donor-acceptor organic solar cell efficiencies based on the archetype materials copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and C(60). Structures considered are planar and planar-mixed heterojunctions, homogeneous and phase-separated donor-acceptor (DA) mixtures, idealized structures composed of DA pillars, and nanocrystalline DA networks. The thickness dependence of absorption, exciton diffusion, and carrier collection efficiencies is studied for different morphologies, yielding results similar to those experimentally observed. The influences of charge mobility and exciton diffusion length are studied, and optimal device thicknesses are proposed for various structures. Simulations show that, with currently available materials, nanocrystalline network solar cells optimize both exciton diffusion and carrier collection, thus providing for highly efficient solar energy conversion. Estimations of achievable energy conversion efficiencies are made for the various nanostructures based on current simulations used in conjunction with experimentally obtained fill factors and open-circuit voltages for conventional small molecular weight materials combinations.

  12. Dopant Profiling of III-V Nanostructures for Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alexandra Caroline

    2011-12-01

    utilized to investigate the intrinsic electron transport properties as a function of nanowire radius. From C-V characterization, the densities of thermally-activated fixed charges and trap states on the surface of as-grown (unpassivated) nanowires are investigated to allow the accurate measurement of the gate oxide capacitance. This allows the direct assessment of the electron field-effect mobility. The field-effect mobility is found to monotonically decrease as the radius is reduced to sub-10 nm, with the low temperature transport data highlighting the impact of surface roughness scattering on the mobility degradation for smaller radius nanowires. Next, the electrical properties of the InAs XOI transistors are studied, showing the critical role of quantum confinement in the transport properties of ultrathin XOI layers. Following the investigation of the electrical properties of undoped InAs nanostructures, post-growth, surface doping processes for InAs nanostructures are addressed. Nanoscale, sulfur doping of InAs planar substrates with high dopant areal dose and uniformity by using a self-limiting monolayer doping approach is demonstrated as a means to create ultrashallow junctions. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a dopant profile abruptness of ˜3.5 nm/decade is observed without significant lattice damage. The n+/ p+ junctions fabricated using this doping method exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior, demonstrating the utility of this approach for device fabrication with high electrically active sulfur concentrations of ˜8x1018 cm-3. Next, a gas phase doping approach for InAs nanowires and ultrathin XOI layers using zinc is demonstrated as an effective means for enabling post-growth dopant profiling of nanostructures. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated by the fabrication of gated diodes and p-MOSFETs. Electrically active zinc concentrations of ˜1x1019 cm-3 are achieved which is

  13. Solitary myeloma with massive extracellular crystalline structures--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y G; Yang, K H; Gang, S J; Kim, B K; Kim, S M

    1991-06-01

    We describe a case of solitary myeloma showing cystic change filled with massive crystalline structures in a 54-year-old woman. A bone X-ray showed a solitary cystic osteolytic lesion in the right iliac bone. Serum and urine protein electrophoresis showed no demonstrable M-protein, and bone-marrow aspirates did not show any myeloma cells. Histologic examination of the tumor revealed aggregation of plasma cells with massive extracellular infiltration of the rhomboid-shaped crystalline structures. In immunoperoxidase staining, both these crystalline structures and the cytoplasms of the myeloma cells demonstrated a positive reaction for lambda light chain. By electron microscope, the large extracellular crystalline structures were observed, and we found unique rhomboid or rectangular-shaped crystalline structures in the cytoplasms of the myeloma cells.

  14. Dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process. As known, the transients of crystallization dictate the microstructures of semi-crystalline polymer during solidification. In turn, the properties of finished products can be determined by adjustable variables in polymer film casting process such as temperature of chill roll. In this work, an experimental model of the solidification in film casting process is derived by a system identification technique. This model is used to design a digital feedback controller including a state estimator. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control technique on an extruded film.

  15. Sharp and Bright Photoluminescence Emission of Single Crystalline Diacetylene Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Kima, Seokho; Kima, Hyeong Tae; Cuic, Chunzhi; Park, Dong Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous nanoparticles (NPs) of diacetylene (DA) molecules were prepared by using a reprecipitation method. After crystallization through solvent-vapor annealing process, the highly crystalline DA NPs show different structural and optical characteristics compared with the amorphous DA NPs. The single crystal structure of DA NPs was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The luminescence color and photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of the DA NPs were measured using color charge-coupled device (CCD) images and high-resolution laser confocal microscope (LCM). The crystalline DA NPs emit bright green light emission compared with amorphous DA NPs and the main PL peak of the crystalline DA NPs exhibits relative narrow and blue shift phenomena due to enhanced interaction between DA molecular in the nano-size crystal structure.

  16. Crystalline beams in dispersion-free storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Generating a multidimensional crystalline beam in a storage ring has been known to be difficult without a special cooling force, i.e., tapered cooling, because of the momentum dispersion induced by bending magnets. It is, however, possible to eliminate the dispersion all around the ring by adding an electric dipole field in each magnetic bending region. A storage ring with such unique deflectors should enable us to reach multidimensional crystalline states with an ordinary untapered cooling force. In order to verify this expectation, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study beam crystallization in several dispersion-free storage rings including the S-LSR at Kyoto University. The present results show that various crystalline states can be established without relying on the tapered force.

  17. A single crystalline InP nanowire photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Li, Bang; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2016-08-01

    Single crystalline nanowires are critical for achieving high-responsivity, high-speed, and low-noise nanoscale photodetectors. Here, we report a metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector based on a single crystalline InP nanowire. The nanowires are grown by a self-catalyzed method and exhibit stacking-fault-free zinc blende crystal structure. The nanowire exhibits a typical n-type semiconductor property and shows a low room temperature dark current of several hundred pA at moderate biases. A photoresponsivity of 6.8 A/W is obtained at a laser power density of 0.2 mW/cm2. This work demonstrates that single crystalline InP nanowires are good candidates for future optoelectronic device applications.

  18. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  19. Fullerene-based one-dimensional crystalline nanopolymer formed through topochemical transformation of the parent nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Junfeng; Solov'yov, Ilia; Reid, David G.

    2010-01-01

    displays a well-defined crystalline nanostructure, exceptionally large length-to-width ratio and excellent thermal stability. The material is prepared by first growing the corresponding nanowire through a solution phase of C_60 followed by a topochemical polymerization reaction in the solid state. Gas...... chromatography, mass spectrometry and ^13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence is provided for the nature of the covalent bonding mode adopted by the polymeric chains. Theoretical analysis based on detailed calculations of the reaction energetics and structural analysis provides an in-depth understanding...

  20. Review of crystalline structures of some selected homologous series of rod-like molecules capable of forming liquid crystalline phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugenmaier, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of four homologous series of rod-like molecules are reviewed, two of which form hydrogen bonds and two with a symmetric chemical constitution. Many of the compounds investigated turn into liquid crystalline phases upon temperature increase. It is of valuable interest to know possible conformations and possible packing arrangements as prerequisites to model liquid crystalline structures. The hydrogen bonds of homologous series of pure 4-(ω-hydroxyalkyloxy)-4'-hydroxybiphenyl (HnHBP, n the alkyloxy tail length) are realized through head to tail arrangements of the hydroxyl groups and crystallize except one compound in chiral space groups without the molecules containing any asymmetric carbon. The hydrogen bonds of the homologous series of 4-substituted benzoic acids with various lengths of the tail provide dimers through strong polar bonding of adjacent carboxyl groups and thus provide the stiff part of a mesogenic unit prerequisite for liquid crystalline phases. The homologous series of dialkanoyloxybiphenyls (BP-n, n = 1, 19), of which nine compounds could be crystallized, show liquid crystalline behavior for longer alkane chain lengths, despite the high mobility of the alkane chain ends already detectable in the crystal phase. A single molecule, half a molecule or two half molecules form the asymmetric unit in a centrosymmetric space group. The homologous series of 1,4-terephthalidene-bis-N-(4'-n-alkylaniline) (TBAA-n) exhibit a large variety of packing arrangements in the crystalline state, with or without relying on the symmetry center within the molecules.

  1. Deformation Behavior of Nanostructured Ceramic Coatings Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianliang JIANG; Eric Jordan; Leon Shaw; Maurice Gell

    2004-01-01

    Al2O3-13 wt pct TiO2 coating deposited by direct current plasma spray consists of nanostructured region and microlamellae. Bend test shows that the ceramic coating can sustain some deformation without sudden failure. The deformation is achieved through the movement of nano-particles in the nanostructured region under tensile stress.

  2. Microfluidic reactors for the morphology controlled synthesis and photocatalytic study of ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Arabinda; Jindal, Amandeep; Acharya, Chhayakanta; Prakash, Bhanu; Basu, Suddhasatwa; Ganguli, Ashok Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Facile surfactant-free microfluidic synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with varying morphology (spindles, sheets and spheres) has been achieved using polydimethylsiloxane microreactors having different channel geometry. Synthesized ZnO nanostructures show excellent photocatalytic dye degradation efficiency (>80%) when investigated using fixed bed photocatalytic microreactors under UV radiation.

  3. Enhanced superconductivity and superconductor to insulator transition in nano-crystalline molybdenum thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpam; Amaladass, E. P.; Sharma, Neha; Harimohan, V.; Amirthapandian, S.; Mani, Awadhesh

    2017-06-01

    Disorder driven superconductor to insulator transition via intermediate metallic regime is reported in nano-crystalline thin films of molybdenum. The nano-structured thin films have been deposited at room temperature using DC magnetron sputtering at different argon pressures. The grain size has been tuned using deposition pressure as the sole control parameter. A variation of particle sizes, room temperature resistivity and superconducting transition has been studied as a function of deposition pressure. The nano-crystalline molybdenum thin films are found to have large carrier concentration but very low mobility and electronic mean free path. Hall and conductivity measurements have been used to understand the effect of disorder on the carrier density and mobilities. Ioffe-Regel parameter is shown to correlate with the continuous metal-insulator transition in our samples.

  4. Plasma etching on large-area mono-, multi- and quasi-mono crystalline silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We use plasma etched Black Si (BS)[1][2] nanostructures to achieve low reflectance due to the resulting graded refractive index at the Si-air interface. The goal of this investigation is to develop a suitable texturing method for Si solar cells. Branz et al. [3]report below 3% average reflectance...... advantages such as; (i) excellent light trapping, (ii) dry, single-sided and scalable process method and (iii) etch independence on crystallinity of Si, RIE-texturing has so far not been proven superior to standard wet texturing, primarily as a result of lower power conversion efficiency due to increased...... using maskless RIE in a O2 and SF6 plasma, and the surface topology was optimized for solar cell applications by varying gas flows, pressure, power and process time. The starting substrates were 156x156 mm p-type, CZ mono-, multi- and quasi-mono crystalline Si wafers, respectively, with a thickness...

  5. Determination of crystallinity of ceramic materials from the Ruland Method; Determinacao da cristalinidade de materiais ceramicos atraves do metodo de Ruland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniess, C.T. [Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), SP (Brazil); Prates, P.B.; Gomes Junior, J.C.; Lima, J.C. de; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C., E-mail: kniesscl@gmail.com, E-mail: patybp@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), SC (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Some methods found in literature approach the different characteristics between crystalline and amorphous phases by X ray diffraction technique. These methods use the relation between the intensities of the crystalline peaks and background amorphous or the absolute intensity of one of these to determine the relative amount of crystalline and amorphous material. However, a crystalline substance presents shows coherent diffuse scattering and a loss in the intensity of the peaks of diffraction in function of thermal vibrations of atoms and imperfections in the crystalline structure. A correct method for the determination of the crystallinity must take in account these effects. This work has as objective to determine the crystallinity of ceramic materials obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ashes, using the X ray diffraction technique and the Ruland Method, that considers the diminution of the intensity of the crystalline peak because of the disorder affects. The Ruland Method shows adequate for the determination of the crystallinity of the ceramic materials. (author)

  6. Thermal oxidation synthesis of crystalline iron-oxide nanowires on low-cost steel substrates for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosch, T.; Chnani, A.; Muralidhar, P.; Schirmer, A.; Biskupek, J.; Strehle, S.

    2017-08-01

    Iron-oxide and in particular its crystallographic phase hematite (α-Fe2O3) is a promising candidate for non-toxic, earth abundant and low cost photo-anodes in the field of photo-electrochemical water splitting. We report here on the synthesis of α-Fe2O3 nanowires by thermal oxidation of low-cost steel substrates. Nanowires grown in this manner exhibit often a blade-like shape but can also possess a wire-like geometry partly decorated at their tip with an iron-rich ellipsoidal head consisting also of crystalline iron-oxide. We show furthermore that these ellipsoidal heads represent suitable growth sites leading in some cases to an additional growth of so-called antenna nanowires. Besides nanowires also nanoflakes were frequently observed at the surface. We discuss the influence of the oxidation temperature and other synthesis parameters as well as dispute the current growth models. Finally, we show that our α-Fe2O3 nanostructures on steel are also photo-electrochemically active supporting in principle their use as photo-anode material.

  7. Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures for Photovoltaic Applications: Ab-Initio Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulci Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Actually, most of the electric energy is being produced by fossil fuels and great is the search for viable alternatives. The most appealing and promising technology is photovoltaics. It will become truly mainstream when its cost will be comparable to other energy sources. One way is to significantly enhance device efficiencies, for example by increasing the number of band gaps in multijunction solar cells or by favoring charge separation in the devices. This can be done by using cells based on nanostructured semiconductors. In this paper, we will present ab-initio results of the structural, electronic and optical properties of (1 silicon and germanium nanoparticles embedded in wide band gap materials and (2 mixed silicon-germanium nanowires. We show that theory can help in understanding the microscopic processes important for devices performances. In particular, we calculated for embedded Si and Ge nanoparticles the dependence of the absorption threshold on size and oxidation, the role of crystallinity and, in some cases, the recombination rates, and we demonstrated that in the case of mixed nanowires, those with a clear interface between Si and Ge show not only a reduced quantum confinement effect but display also a natural geometrical separation between electron and hole.

  8. Nanostructured anatase TiO2 densified at high pressure as advanced visible light photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Giovanni; Parrino, Francesco; Palmisano, Giovanni; Scandura, Gabriele; Citro, Ilaria; Calogero, Giuseppe; Bartolotta, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano

    2015-09-26

    This study reports on characterization and photoactivity of nanostructured TiO2 samples, which have been permanently densified under high pressures, up to 2.1 GPa. Commercial Mirkat 211 anatase has been used as a benchmark sample, in order to investigate the effect of unidirectional high pressure on structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of TiO2. Vibrational Raman spectroscopy shows that the treatment does not cause transitions among the different crystalline phases of titanium dioxide. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra reveal that increasing pressure gives rise to a shift of the absorption onset towards higher wavelength enhancing the photoactivity under visible radiation. Samples are also photo-electrochemically characterized and tested in the gas phase with partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde under visible irradiation. Compaction up to 0.8 GPa depresses both the alcohol conversion and the aldehyde yield, while samples treated under higher pressures show enhanced characteristics of conversion compared to the pristine material. Moreover, promising results in the reduction of CO2 are also obtained under UV-visible radiation.

  9. Effects of alkaline or liquid-ammonia treatment on crystalline cellulose: changes in crystalline structure and effects on enzymatic digestibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmel Michael E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In converting biomass to bioethanol, pretreatment is a key step intended to render cellulose more amenable and accessible to cellulase enzymes and thus increase glucose yields. In this study, four cellulose samples with different degrees of polymerization and crystallinity indexes were subjected to aqueous sodium hydroxide and anhydrous liquid ammonia treatments. The effects of the treatments on cellulose crystalline structure were studied, in addition to the effects on the digestibility of the celluloses by a cellulase complex. Results From X-ray diffractograms and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, it was revealed that treatment with liquid ammonia produced the cellulose IIII allomorph; however, crystallinity depended on treatment conditions. Treatment at a low temperature (25°C resulted in a less crystalline product, whereas treatment at elevated temperatures (130°C or 140°C gave a more crystalline product. Treatment of cellulose I with aqueous sodium hydroxide (16.5 percent by weight resulted in formation of cellulose II, but also produced a much less crystalline cellulose. The relative digestibilities of the different cellulose allomorphs were tested by exposing the treated and untreated cellulose samples to a commercial enzyme mixture (Genencor-Danisco; GC 220. The digestibility results showed that the starting cellulose I samples were the least digestible (except for corn stover cellulose, which had a high amorphous content. Treatment with sodium hydroxide produced the most digestible cellulose, followed by treatment with liquid ammonia at a low temperature. Factor analysis indicated that initial rates of digestion (up to 24 hours were most strongly correlated with amorphous content. Correlation of allomorph type with digestibility was weak, but was strongest with cellulose conversion at later times. The cellulose IIII samples produced at higher temperatures had comparable crystallinities to the initial cellulose I

  10. Potassium Iodide and Acrylamide Fluorescence Quenching Studies on Gamma-Crystallins of Human Lenses in Development and Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    γ_1-γ_2-and γ_3-crystallin(corresponding to γs-,γC-and γD- crys-tallin respectively)of human fetal,2 year and 20~+ year old lenses areseparated by Sephadex gel chromatography.lodide and acrylamide are usedto quench the tryptophane fluorescence of sub-γ-crystalline fractions and Ksvand fa values are calculated.The results show that iodide has no clear quench-ing effects on all γ-crystallins,the quenching effects of acrylamide on the tryp-tophan fluorescences of γ1-γ2-and γ3-crystallin from lenses of the ...

  11. Synthesis of New Liquid Crystalline Diglycidyl Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Ahmed Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic Schiff bases I–VI were synthesized by condensation reactions between various diamines, namely o-dianisidine, o-tolidine and ethylenediamine with vanillin or p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and subsequent reactions between these phenolic Schiff bases and epichlorohydrin to produce new diglycidyl ethers Ia–VIa. The structures of these compounds were confirmed by CHN, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Their thermotropic liquid crystalline behavior was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and polarizing optical microscopy (POM. All the diglycidyl ethers prepared exhibit nematic mesophases, except for Va and VIa, which did not show any transition mesophases, but simply flow to liquids.

  12. Synthesis and properties of liquid crystalline polyurethanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Haobo; Zhang Yunfeng; Xing Zheng

    2006-01-01

    1,4-Bis(p-hydroxybenzoate)phenylene was prepared using 1,4-bis(trimethylsiloxy)benzene and p-hydroxybenzoyl chloride as starting materials.A series of novel 1,4-bis(p-hydroxyalkoxybenzoate)phenylene were synthesized by reaction of 1,4-bis(p-hydroxybenzoate)phenylene with 3-bromopropanol and 4-bromobutanol,respectively,The liquid crystal polyurethanes were prepared by 1,4-bis(p-hydroxyalkoxybenzoate)phenylene with MDI (p-methylene diphenylenediisocyanate) and 2,4-TDI(2,4-toluenediisocyanate),respectively.The thermotropic properties,the melting point (Tm) and the isotropization temperature (Ti) of the synthesized polyurethanes were characterized by DSC,IR and POM.It showed that all of the polyurethane polymers exhibited thermotropic liquid crystalline properties between 144℃ and 260℃.The transition temperature (Tm and Ti) decreased with an increase in the length of the methylene spacer.

  13. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K S Pillai; Neethu Sundaresan; M Radhakrishnan Pillai; T Thomas; T J Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physicochemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li-DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  14. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, C. K. S.; Sundaresan, Neethu; Radhakrishnan Pillai, M.; Thomas, T.; Thomas, T. J.

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physico-chemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li--DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  15. Influence of Crystal Allomorph and Crystallinity on the Products and Behavior of Cellulose during Fast Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukarakate, Calvin; Mittal, Ashutosh; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Budhi, Sridhar; Thompson, Logan; Iisa, Kristiina; Nimlos, Mark R.; Donohoe, Bryon S.

    2016-09-06

    Cellulose is the primary biopolymer responsible for maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity of cell walls and, during the fast pyrolysis of biomass, may be restricting cell wall expansion and inhibiting phase transitions that would otherwise facilitate efficient escape of pyrolysis products. Here, we test whether modifications in two physical properties of cellulose, its crystalline allomorph and degree of crystallinity, alter its performance during fast pyrolysis. We show that both crystal allomorph and relative crystallinity of cellulose impact the slate of primary products produced by fast pyrolysis. For both cellulose-I and cellulose-II, changes in crystallinity dramatically impact the fast pyrolysis product portfolio. In both cases, only the most highly crystalline samples produced vapors dominated by levoglucosan. Cellulose-III, on the other hand, produces largely the same slate of products regardless of its relative crystallinity and produced as much or more levoglucosan at all crystallinity levels compared to cellulose-I or II. In addition to changes in products, the different cellulose allomorphs affected the viscoelastic properties of cellulose during rapid heating. Real-time hot-stage pyrolysis was used to visualize the transition of the solid material through a molten phase and particle shrinkage. SEM analysis of the chars revealed additional differences in viscoelastic properties and molten phase behavior impacted by cellulose crystallinity and allomorph. Regardless of relative crystallinity, the cellulose-III samples displayed the most obvious evidence of having transitioned through a molten phase.

  16. Antibacterial activity of single crystalline silver-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiangyu, E-mail: zhangxiangyu@tyut.edu.cn; Li, Meng; He, Xiaojing; Hang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yueyue; Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Bin, E-mail: tangbin@tyut.edu.cn

    2016-05-30

    Graphical abstract: The silver-doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays on titanium foil substrate were synthesized via a two-step process. It includes: deposition of AgTi films on titanium foil by magnetron sputtering; preparation of AgNW arrays on AgTi films via alkali (NaOH) hydrothermal treatment and ion-exchange with HCl, followed by calcinations. - Highlights: • Ag-doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays have been prepared by a duplex-treatment. • The duplex-treatment consisted of magnetron sputtering and hydrothermal growth. • Ag-doped nanowire arrays show excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli. - Abstract: Well-ordered, one-dimensional silver-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanowire (AgNW) arrays have been prepared through a hydrothermal growth process on the sputtering-deposited AgTi layers. Electron microscope analyses reveal that the as-synthesized AgNW arrays exhibit a single crystalline phase with highly uniform morphologies, diameters ranging from 85 to 95 nm, and lengths of about 11 μm. Silver is found to be doped into TiO{sub 2} nanowire evenly and mainly exists in the zerovalent state. The AgNW arrays show excellent efficient antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), and all of the bacteria can be killed within 1 h. Additionally, the AgNW arrays can still kill E. coli after immersion for 60 days, suggesting the long-term antibacterial property. The technique reported here is environmental friendly for formation of silver-containing nanostructure without using any toxic organic solvents.

  17. Terahertz-field-induced photoluminescence of nanostructured gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim;

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate photoluminescence from nanostructured ultrathin gold films subjected to strong single-cycle terahertz transients with peak electric field over 300 kV/cm. We show that UV-Vis-NIR light is being generated and the efficiency of the process is strongly enhanced at the pe......We experimentally demonstrate photoluminescence from nanostructured ultrathin gold films subjected to strong single-cycle terahertz transients with peak electric field over 300 kV/cm. We show that UV-Vis-NIR light is being generated and the efficiency of the process is strongly enhanced...

  18. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, F. M.; Teleki, A.; Krumeich, F.; Büchel, R.; Hurrell, R. F.; Pratsinis, S. E.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2009-11-01

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe2O4) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  19. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, F M; Hurrell, R F; Zimmermann, M B [Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Teleki, A; Buechel, R; Pratsinis, S E [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Krumeich, F, E-mail: michael.zimmermann@ilw.agrl.ethz.c [Electron Microscopy Center (EMEZ), ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-11-25

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  20. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, F M; Teleki, A; Krumeich, F; Büchel, R; Hurrell, R F; Pratsinis, S E; Zimmermann, M B

    2009-11-25

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe2O4) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  1. Pattern Growth and Field Emission Characteristics of Flower-Like RuO2 Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuei-Yi; Chen, Ching-An; Lian, Huan-Bin; Chen, Yi-Min; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Keiser, Gerd

    2010-10-01

    A flower-like RuO2 nanostructure was selectively synthesized on a Si substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl) ruthenium(II), Ru[(C2H5)C5H4]2, was shower sprayed onto the Si substrate with oxygen gas. Prior to the growth of the flower-like RuO2 nanostructure, patterns of Al and Fe films were deposited on the Si substrate by photolithography and electron beam (e-beam) evaporation deposition. The synthesized flower-like RuO2 nanostructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicated that the flower-like nanostructures were RuO2 rutile structures with high crystallinity. For the particular synthesized morphology and design pattern, the current density and long-term stability characteristics of electron field-emission characteristics demonstrated that the flower-like RuO2 nanostructure has the potential to be used in a practical field-emission display.

  2. Silver and Gold Nanostructures: Engineering their Optical Properties for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Younan

    2006-03-01

    We have focused on shape-controlled synthesis of silver and gold nanostructures. While the synthetic methodology mainly involves solution-phase redox chemistry, we have been working diligently to understand the complex physics behind the simple chemistry -- that is, the nucleation and growth mechanisms leading to the formation of nanostructures with a specific shape. Polyol synthesis of silver nanostructures provides a good example to illustrate this concept. We discovered that the shape of silver nanostructures were dictated by both the crystallinity and shape of nanocrystallite seeds, which were, in turn, controlled by factors such as reduction rate, oxidative etching, and surface capping. We also exploited the galvanic replacement reaction between silver and chloroauric acid to transform silver nanocubes into gold nanocages with controlled void size, wall thickness, and wall porosity. We were able to engineer the optical properties of resulting gold nanocages with optical resonance peaks ranging from the blue (400 nm) to the near infrared (1200 nm) simply by controlling the molar ratio of silver to chloroauric acid. Thanks to their exceptionally large scattering and absorption coefficients in the transparent window for soft tissues, this novel class of gold nanostructures has great potential emerging as both a contrast agent for optical imaging in early-stage tumor detection, and a therapeutic agent for photothermal cancer treatment.

  3. Facile synthesis of nanostructured WO{sub 3} thin films and their characterization for ethanol sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Z., E-mail: zamharir@gmail.com [Mechanisation and Automation Research Center, MARDI HQ, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 Australia (Australia); Sadek, Abu Z. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Ou, Jian Z. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 Australia (Australia); Yaacob, M.H. [Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Latham, Kay [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Wlodarski, Wojtek [Mechanisation and Automation Research Center, MARDI HQ, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-09-16

    A simple technique to fabricate nanostructured WO{sub 3} thin films onto conductomeric transducers has been employed for ethanol sensing application. Initially, pure tungsten (W) thin films were deposited onto the substrate employing RF sputterer and followed by an etching process. Three types of etching agent were used: nitric (HNO{sub 3}), sulphuric (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), and phosphoric (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) acid. It was found that the surface morphology and crystallinity of the WO{sub 3} films were heavily dependant to the etchants employed during the fabrication process. The developed sensors were tested towards ethanol vapor of different concentrations (10–200 ppm) at temperatures between room and 450 °C. The sensors showed stable and reproducible response at optimum operating temperatures. High sensor response towards vaporized ethanol as well as fast τ{sub res} and τ{sub rec} was observed during the “adsorption” and “desorption” interval. The recorded maximum response for these devices when exposed towards 100 ppm ethanol was measured to be 8 (R{sub o} = 4.6 kΩ), 5.8 (R{sub o} = 22.5 GΩ), and 5 (R{sub o} = 0.29 MΩ) for HNO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, respectively. The optimum operating temperatures were determined to be 400, 300–380, and 360 °C for the sensors developed using HNO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, respectively. - Highlights: • 3 different nanostructured WO{sub 3} based ethanol sensors were developed. • Simple acid etching method was used to fabricate the nanostructures. • Fast response, excellent baseline stability and signal reproducibility were observed. • To our best knowledge, this method to develop such sensors is for the first time.

  4. Semiconductor nanostructures for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2012-02-01

    Nanowires, with their unique capability to bridge the nanoscopic and macroscopic worlds, have already been demonstrated as important materials for different energy conversion. One emerging and exciting direction is their application for solar to fuel conversion. The generation of fuels by the direct conversion of solar energy in a fully integrated system is an attractive goal, but no such system has been demonstrated that shows the required efficiency, is sufficiently durable, or can be manufactured at reasonable cost. One of the most critical issues in solar water splitting is the development of a suitable photoanode with high efficiency and long-term durability in an aqueous environment. Semiconductor nanowires represent an important class of nanostructure building block for direct solar-to-fuel application because of their high surface area, tunable bandgap and efficient charge transport and collection. Nanowires can be readily designed and synthesized to deterministically incorporate heterojunctions with improved light absorption, charge separation and vectorial transport. Meanwhile, it is also possible to selectively decorate different oxidation or reduction catalysts onto specific segments of the nanowires to mimic the compartmentalized reactions in natural photosynthesis. In this talk, I will highlight several recent examples in this lab using semiconductor nanowires and their heterostructures for the purpose of direct solar water splitting.

  5. Photocurrent Properties of Undoped and Pb-Doped SnS Nanostructures Grown Using Electrodeposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknia, Farhad; Jamali-Sheini, Farid; Yousefi, Ramin

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured Pb-doped SnS thin films were deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates by electrochemical deposition. The films were characterized using different techniques to study their structural, morphological, and optical properties. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the films were polycrystalline in nature and had an orthorhombic crystal structure. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the Pb dopant could significantly change the morphology of the nanostructures. Energy dispersive spectroscopy showed different concentrations of Pb for different morphologies. Optical measurements suggested a red shift for the band gap values from 1.46 eV to 1.40 eV with an increase in the Pb concentration. Finally, the photocurrent responses of the nanostructures were studied. The results revealed that Pb-doped SnS nanostructures exhibited better response than the undoped SnS nanostructures.

  6. Impact of internal crystalline boundaries on lattice thermal conductivity: Importance of boundary structure and spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghababaei, Ramin, E-mail: ramin.aghababaei@epfl.ch; Anciaux, Guillaume; Molinari, Jean-François [Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory, Civil Engineering Institute (School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering), Institute of Materials (School of Engineering), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-11-10

    The low thermal conductivity of nano-crystalline materials is commonly explained via diffusive scattering of phonons by internal boundaries. In this study, we have quantitatively studied phonon-crystalline boundaries scattering and its effect on the overall lattice thermal conductivity of crystalline bodies. Various types of crystalline boundaries such as stacking faults, twins, and grain boundaries have been considered in FCC crystalline structures. Accordingly, the specularity coefficient has been determined for different boundaries as the probability of the specular scattering across boundaries. Our results show that in the presence of internal boundaries, the lattice thermal conductivity can be characterized by two parameters: (1) boundary spacing and (2) boundary excess free volume. We show that the inverse of the lattice thermal conductivity depends linearly on a non-dimensional quantity which is the ratio of boundary excess free volume over boundary spacing. This shows that phonon scattering across crystalline boundaries is mainly a geometrically favorable process rather than an energetic one. Using the kinetic theory of phonon transport, we present a simple analytical model which can be used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of nano-crystalline materials where the ratio can be considered as an average density of excess free volume. While this study is focused on FCC crystalline materials, where inter-atomic potentials and corresponding defect structures have been well studied in the past, the results would be quantitatively applicable for semiconductors in which heat transport is mainly due to phonon transport.

  7. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  8. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, P.

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Precipitation of Co(2+) carbonates from aqueous solution: insights on the amorphous to crystalline transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Ángeles; Jiménez, Amalia

    2016-04-01

    water content. It was surprising the low solubility product (Ksp) of the new phase Co2CO3(OH)2 in the order of 10-30 and this could explain its appearance only after 7 days of aging. On the other hand, the high solubility product of amorphous is consistent with its instantaneous precipitation at the beginning of the reaction. Solution calorimetry shows a higher value of exothermic solution enthalpy for crystalline cobalt hydroxide carbonate and hence, the solubility result are confirmed. Although geochemical models indicated that aqueous solution was supersaturated with respect both phases, the sequence of obtained phases (first amorphous and next crystalline) indicate that the evolution of the saturation index has to be dropped with respect to amorphous phase with time. These results points towards a simultaneous dissolution of the amorphous and the precipitation of crystalline phase Co2CO3(OH)2 at the first stages of the reaction. González-López, J. ; Fernández-González, Á. ; Jiménez, A. (2015) Prepublication: Crystallization of nanostructured cobalt hydroxide carbonate at ambient conditions: a key precursor of Co3O4. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1180/minmag.2015.079.7.02

  10. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  11. Solitary myeloma with massive extracellular crystalline structures--a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y. G.; Yang, K. H.; Gang, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a case of solitary myeloma showing cystic change filled with massive crystalline structures in a 54-year-old woman. A bone X-ray showed a solitary cystic osteolytic lesion in the right iliac bone. Serum and urine protein electrophoresis showed no demonstrable M-protein, and bone-marrow aspirates did not show any myeloma cells. Histologic examination of the tumor revealed aggregation of plasma cells with massive extracellular infiltration of the rhomboid-shaped crystalline structur...

  12. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  13. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  14. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  15. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  16. Bone integration capability of nanopolymorphic crystalline hydroxyapatite coated on titanium implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Yamada*, Takeshi Ueno*, Naoki Tsukimura, Takayuki Ikeda, Kaori Nakagawa, Norio Hori, Takeo Suzuki, Takahiro OgawaLaboratory of Bone and Implant Sciences, The Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Biomaterials and Hospital Dentistry, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The mechanism by which hydroxyapatite (HA-coated titanium promotes bone–implant integration is largely unknown. Furthermore, refining the fabrication of nanostructured HA to the level applicable to the mass production process for titanium implants is challenging. This study reports successful creation of nanopolymorphic crystalline HA on microroughened titanium surfaces using a combination of flame spray and low-temperature calcination and tests its biological capability to enhance bone–implant integration. Sandblasted microroughened titanium implants and sandblasted + HA-coated titanium implants were subjected to biomechanical and histomorphometric analyses in a rat model. The HA was 55% crystallized and consisted of nanoscale needle-like architectures developed in various diameters, lengths, and orientations, which resulted in a 70% increase in surface area compared to noncoated microroughened surfaces. The HA was free from impurity contaminants, with a calcium/phosphorus ratio of 1.66 being equivalent to that of stoichiometric HA. As compared to microroughened implants, HA-coated implants increased the strength of bone–implant integration consistently at both early and late stages of healing. HA-coated implants showed an increased percentage of bone–implant contact and bone volume within 50 µm proximity of the implant surface, as well as a remarkably reduced percentage of soft tissue intervention between bone and the implant surface. In contrast, bone volume outside the 50 µm border was lower around HA-coated implants. Thus, this study

  17. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31

    understanding of fundamental scientific basis for the irradiation-induced self-organization processes. The fundamental physical mechanisms underlying ordered pattern formation, which include defect production and migration, ion sputtering, redeposition, viscous flow and diffusion, are investigated through a combination of modeling and in situ and ex-situ observations [3,9,11]. In addition, these nanostructured materials exhibit considerable improvement of optical properties [9,12,13]. For example, patterned Ge with a hexagonally ordered, honeycomb-like structure of nanoscale holes possesses a high surface area and a considerably blue-shifted energy gap [9], and oxidation of ordered Ga droplets shows noticeable enhancement of optical transmission [12]. This research has addressed nanopattern formation in a variety of materials under ion bombardment and provided a fundamental understanding of the dynamic mechanisms involved. In addition, have also stared to systematically investigate pattern formation under ion irradiation for more systems with varied experimental conditions and computation, including the collaboration with Dr. Veena Tikare of Sandia National Laboratory with a hybrid computation method at the ending this grant. A more detailed relationship between nanostructure formation and experimental conditions will be revealed with our continued efforts.

  18. Optical nano artifact metrics using silicon random nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Nishio, Shumpei; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Tate, Naoya; Naruse, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Nano-artifact metrics exploit unique physical attributes of nanostructured matter for authentication and clone resistance, which is vitally important in the age of Internet-of-Things where securing identities is critical. However, expensive and huge experimental apparatuses, such as scanning electron microscopy, have been required in the former studies. Herein, we demonstrate an optical approach to characterise the nanoscale-precision signatures of silicon random structures towards realising low-cost and high-value information security technology. Unique and versatile silicon nanostructures are generated via resist collapse phenomena, which contains dimensions that are well below the diffraction limit of light. We exploit the nanoscale precision ability of confocal laser microscopy in the height dimension; our experimental results demonstrate that the vertical precision of measurement is essential in satisfying the performances required for artifact metrics. Furthermore, by using state-of-the-art nanostructuring technology, we experimentally fabricate clones from the genuine devices. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the genuine and clone devices are successfully exploited, showing that the liveness-detection-type approach, which is widely deployed in biometrics, is valid in artificially-constructed solid-state nanostructures. These findings pave the way for reasonable and yet sufficiently secure novel principles for information security based on silicon random nanostructures and optical technologies.

  19. Antibacterial Carbon Nanotubes by Impregnation with Copper Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palza, Humberto; Saldias, Natalia; Arriagada, Paulo; Palma, Patricia; Sanchez, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    The addition of metal-based nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes (CNT) is a relevant method producing multifunctional materials. In this context, CNT were dispersed in an ethanol/water solution containing copper acetate for their impregnation with different copper nanostructures by either a non-thermal or a thermal post-synthesis treatment. Our simple method is based on pure CNT in an air atmosphere without any other reagents. Particles without thermal treatment were present as a well-dispersed layered copper hydroxide acetate nanostructures on CNT, as confirmed by scanning and transmission (TEM) electron microscopies, and showing a characteristic x-ray diffraction peak at 6.6°. On the other hand, by thermal post-synthesis treatment at 300°C, these layered nanostructures became Cu2O nanoparticles of around 20 nm supported on CNT, as confirmed by TEM images and x-ray diffraction peaks. These copper nanostructures present on the CNT surface rendered antibacterial behavior to the resulting hybrid materials against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. These findings present for the first time a simple method for producing antibacterial CNT by direct impregnation of copper nanostructures.

  20. Optical nano artifact metrics using silicon random nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Nishio, Shumpei; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Tate, Naoya; Naruse, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Nano-artifact metrics exploit unique physical attributes of nanostructured matter for authentication and clone resistance, which is vitally important in the age of Internet-of-Things where securing identities is critical. However, expensive and huge experimental apparatuses, such as scanning electron microscopy, have been required in the former studies. Herein, we demonstrate an optical approach to characterise the nanoscale-precision signatures of silicon random structures towards realising low-cost and high-value information security technology. Unique and versatile silicon nanostructures are generated via resist collapse phenomena, which contains dimensions that are well below the diffraction limit of light. We exploit the nanoscale precision ability of confocal laser microscopy in the height dimension; our experimental results demonstrate that the vertical precision of measurement is essential in satisfying the performances required for artifact metrics. Furthermore, by using state-of-the-art nanostructuring technology, we experimentally fabricate clones from the genuine devices. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the genuine and clone devices are successfully exploited, showing that the liveness-detection-type approach, which is widely deployed in biometrics, is valid in artificially-constructed solid-state nanostructures. These findings pave the way for reasonable and yet sufficiently secure novel principles for information security based on silicon random nanostructures and optical technologies. PMID:27578146