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Sample records for crystalline calcium silicate

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Different Crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate: Application for the Removal of Aflatoxin B1 from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CSH were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions and several methods were used to analyze samples. Amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (ACSH mainly consists of disordered calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CCSH consists of crystallized tobermorite. The adsorption of carcinogenic aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 onto ACSH and CCSH was investigated. The adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and intraparticle diffusion model. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best correlation and the intraparticle diffusion controlled the adsorption process of AFB1 onto CCSH. Adsorption isotherm parameters were obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich and the adsorption data fitted to Freundlich much better. Based on the results of N2 adsorption/desorption, adsorption kinetics, and adsorption isotherms, the adsorption mechanism of AFB1 onto CCSH was developed. All results indicate that CCSH has a great potential to be a safe, easy-made, and cost-effective material for the control of AFB1 contamination.

  2. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Fuller's Earth, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the extensive pulmonary damage in humans was the result of direct occupational inhalation of the dusts and noted that lesions seen in animals were affected by particle size, fiber length, and concentration. The Panel considers that most of the formulations are not respirable and of the preparations that are respirable, the concentration of the ingredient is very low. Even so, the Panel considered that any spray containing these solids should be formulated to minimize their inhalation. With this admonition to the cosmetics industry, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as currently used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel did note that the cosmetic ingredient, Talc, is a hydrated magnesium silicate

  3. The crystalline fraction of interstellar silicates in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Woods, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    We present a model using the evolution of the stellar population in a starburst galaxy to predict the crystallinity of the silicates in the interstellar medium of this galaxy. We take into account dust production in stellar ejecta, and amorphisation and destruction in the interstellar medium and find that a detectable amount of crystalline silicates may be formed, particularly at high star formation rates, and in case supernovae are efficient dust producers. We discuss the effect of dust destruction and amorphisation by supernovae, and the effect of a low dust-production efficiency by supernovae, and find that when taking this into account, crystallinity in the interstellar medium becomes hard to detect. Levels of 6.5-13% crystallinity in the interstellar medium of starburst galaxies have been observed and thus we conclude that not all these crystalline silicates can be of stellar origin, and an additional source of crystalline silicates associated with the Active Galactic Nucleus must be present.

  4. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  5. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  6. Crystalline silicates in AGB and post-AGB stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, LBFM; Molster, FJ; LeBertre, T; Lebre, A; Waelkens, C

    1999-01-01

    We discuss ISO spectroscopy of oxygen-rich dust shells surrounding evolved stars. The dust that condenses in the outflows of stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch consists mainly of amorphous silicates and simple oxides. For high mass loss rates, crystalline silicates begin to appear at modest abunda

  7. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  8. Measurement of the efficacy of calcium silicate for the protection and repair of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alexander S; Patel, Anisha N; Al Botros, Rehab; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the formation of hydroxyapatite (HAP) from calcium silicate and the deposition of calcium silicate onto sound and acid eroded enamel surfaces in order to investigate its repair and protective properties. Calcium silicate was mixed with phosphate buffer for seven days and the resulting solids analysed for crystalline phases by Raman spectroscopy. Deposition studies were conducted on bovine enamel surfaces. Acid etched regions were produced on the enamel surfaces using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) with acid filled pipettes and varying contact times. Following treatment with calcium silicate, the deposition was visualised with FE-SEM and etch pit volumes were measured by AFM. A second set of bovine enamel specimens were pre-treated with calcium silicate and fluoride, before acid exposure with the SECCM. The volumes of the resultant acid etched pits were measured using AFM and the intrinsic rate constant for calcium loss was calculated. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that HAP was formed from calcium silicate. Deposition studies demonstrated greater delivery of calcium silicate to acid eroded than sound enamel and that the volume of acid etched enamel pits was significantly reduced following one treatment (penamel was 0.092 ± 0.008 cm/s. This was significantly reduced, 0.056 ± 0.005 cm/s, for the calcium silicate treatments (penamel surfaces. Calcium silicate can provide significant protection of sound enamel from acid challenges. Calcium silicate is a material that has potential for a new approach to the repair of demineralised enamel and the protection of enamel from acid attacks, leading to significant dental hard tissue benefits. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  10. Photostable Solid Dispersion of Nifedipine by Porous Calcium Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yumi; Hirai, Nobuaki; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine (NIF) is a typical light-sensitive drug requiring protection from light during manufacture, storage, and handling of its dosage forms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of porous calcium silicate (PCS) for maintaining the photostability of NIF in a solid dispersion formulation. Adsorption solid dispersion (ASD) prepared using NIF and PCS as an amorphous formulation was more stable to light irradiation than a physical mixture of NIF and microcrystalline cellulose (a control physical mixture) as a crystalline formulation. In addition, PCS in physical mixtures with NIF adequately protected NIF from photodegradation, suggesting that this protective effect could be because of some screening effect by the porous structure of PCS blocking the passage of light reaching NIF in pores of PCS. These findings suggest that PCS is useful for improving the solubility and photostability of NIF in solid dispersion formulation.

  11. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  12. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  13. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z=0.89 Absorber Towards PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E; Som, Debopam

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of a >10-sigma detection of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of tau_10=0.27+/-0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources wit...

  14. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral, E-mail: obuyuk@mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yip, Sidney [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  15. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vladilo, Giovanni, E-mail: ALLERM@mailbox.sc.edu [Osservatorio Astonomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  16. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate (Casio3) Using Calcium Fluoride, Quartz and Microbes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Gopal Krishna; M. Jagannadha Rao

    2015-01-01

    .... In this paper, synthesis of calcium silicate (CaSiO3) using calcium fluoride (CaF2) and quartz (SiO2) under microbial environment in a laboratory is being adopted to produce the required material...

  17. Decreased water flowing from a forest amended with calcium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark B. Green; Amey S. Bailey; Scott W. Bailey; John J. Battles; John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Timothy J. Fahey; Lucie C. Lepine; Gene E. Likens; Scott V. Ollinger; Paul G. Schaberg

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition during the 20th century caused widespread depletion of available soil calcium (Ca) throughout much of the industrialized world. To better understand how forest ecosystems respond to changes in a component of acidification stress, an 11.8-ha watershed was amended with wollastonite, a calcium silicate mineral, to restore available soil Ca to preindustrial...

  18. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  19. Nanoscale Charge Balancing Mechanism in Alkali Substituted Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate Gels

    CERN Document Server

    Özçelik, V Ongun

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-activated materials and related alternative cementitious systems are sustainable material technologies that have the potential to substantially lower CO$_2$ emissions associated with the construction industry. However, the impact of augmenting the chemical composition of the material on the main binder phase, calcium-silicate-hydrate gel, is far from understood, particularly since this binder phase is disordered at the nanoscale. Here, we reveal the presence of a charge balancing mechanism at the molecular level, which leads to stable structures when alkalis (i.e., Na or K) are incorporated into a calcium-silicate-hydrate gel, as modeled using crystalline 14{\\AA} tobermorite. These alkali containing charge balanced structures possess superior mechanical properties compared to their charge unbalanced counterparts. Our results, which are based on first-principles simulations using density functional theory, include the impact of charge balancing on the optimized geometries of the new model phases, format...

  20. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate silicate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuxin; Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Ruse, N Dorin; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A novel calcium phosphate silicate bone cement (CPSC) was synthesized in a process, in which nanocomposite forms in situ between calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The cement powder consists of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S) and calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM). During cement setting, C(3)S hydrates to produce C-S-H and calcium hydroxide (CH); CPM reacts with the CH to precipitate HAP in situ within C-S-H. This process, largely removing CH from the set cement, enhances its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The testing results of cell culture confirmed that the biocompatibility of CPSC was improved as compared to pure C(3)S. The results of XRD and SEM characterizations showed that CPSC paste induced formation of HAP layer after immersion in simulated body fluid for 7 days, suggesting that CPSC was bioactive in vitro. CPSC cement, which has good biocompatibility and low/no cytotoxicity, could be a promising candidate as biomedical cement.

  1. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  2. Reaction of Calcium Silicates with Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-26

    for Ca3SiO5 to 22.9 kcal/mole for CaSiO3 . The reaction products were calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and a calcium silicate hydrate of variable...Ca3SiO5, beta-Ca2SiO4, and gamma-Ca2SiO4 if free water is present. Aragonite forms in the absence of free H2O and in the carbonation of CaSiO3 . The

  3. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  4. Nanoindentation investigation of creep properties of calcium silicate hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Vandamme, Matthieu; ULM, Franz Josef

    2013-01-01

    The creep properties of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) are assessed by means of nanoindentation creep experiments on a wide range of substoichiometric cement pastes. We observe that, after a few seconds, the measured creep compliance of C-S-H is very well captured by a logarithmic time function. The rate of the logarithmic creep is found to scale in a unique manner with indentation modulus, indentation hardness, and packing density, independent of processing, mix proportions, indenter geom...

  5. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates; Etude par RMN de la structure des silicates de calcium hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klur, I

    1996-02-26

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.) 101 refs.

  6. Calcium-phosphorus interactions at a nano-structured silicate surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Daniel C; Lewis, Trevor W; McFarlane, Andrew J; Borrmann, T; Johnston, Jim H

    2008-03-15

    Nano-structured calcium silicate (NCS), a highly porous material synthesized by controlled precipitation from geothermal fluids or sodium silicate solution, was developed as filler for use in paper manufacture. NCS has been shown to chemisorb orthophosphate from an aqueous solution probably obeying a Freundlich isotherm with high selectivity compared to other common environmental anions. Microanalysis of the products of chemisorption indicated there was significant change from the porous and nano-structured morphology of pristine NCS to fibrous and crystalline morphologies and non-porous detritus. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystalline products showed it to be brushite, CaHPO42H2O, while the largely X-ray amorphous component was a mixture of calcium phosphates. A two-step mechanism was proposed for the chemisorption of phosphate from an aqueous solution by NCS. The first step, which was highly dependent on pH, was thought to be desorption of hydroxide ions from the NCS surface. This was kinetically favoured at lower initial pH, where the predominant form of phosphate present was H2PO(-)4, and led to decreased phosphorus uptake with increasing pH. The second step was thought to be a continuing chemisorption process after stabilization of the pH-value. The formation of brushite as the primary chemisorption product was found to be consistent with the proposed mechanism.

  7. A Spitzer-IRS Detection of Crystalline Silicates in a Protostellar Envelope

    CERN Document Server

    Poteet, Charles A; Watson, Dan M; Calvet, Nuria; Remming, Ian S; McClure, Melissa K; Sargent, Benjamin A; Fischer, William J; Furlan, Elise; Allen, Lori E; Bjorkman, Jon E; Hartmann, Lee; Muzerolle, James; Tobin, John J; Ali, Babar

    2011-01-01

    We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the Orion A protostar HOPS-68. The mid-infrared spectrum reveals crystalline substructure at 11.1, 16.1, 18.8, 23.6, 27.9, and 33.6 microns superimposed on the broad 9.7 and 18 micron amorphous silicate features; the substructure is well matched by the presence of the olivine end-member forsterite. Crystalline silicates are often observed as infrared emission features around the circumstellar disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. However, this is the first unambiguous detection of crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling, protostellar envelope. We estimate the crystalline mass fraction along the line-of-sight by first assuming that the crystalline silicates are located in a cold absorbing screen and secondly by utilizing radiative transfer models. The resulting crystalline mass fractions of 0.14 and 0.17, respectively, are significantly greater than the upper limit found in the interstellar medium (< 0.02-0.05). W...

  8. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate (Casio3 Using Calcium Fluoride, Quartz and Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gopal Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbes like bacteria, algae, fungi and virus play an important role to catalyst chemical reactions. In Nature, ores or minerals of different compounds are formed due to microbial environment and other factors like weathering. Microbial environment is also instrumental in forming calcium containing silicate minerals. Chemical reactions occur under microbial environment because microbes have the ability to control or modify different factors like pH, chemical potential and temperature during reactions. In this paper, synthesis of calcium silicate (CaSiO3 using calcium fluoride (CaF2 and quartz (SiO2 under microbial environment in a laboratory is being adopted to produce the required material. XRD technique is used to confirm the formation of CaSiO3.

  9. Control of crystallinity and composition in calcium phosphate coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, M.; Cabanas, M.V.; Vallet-Regi, M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica y Bioinorganica

    2001-07-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings were prepared by the so-called pyrosol method. Both crystallinity and composition of obtained films can be controlled by modifying the composition of the precursor solution, surrounding atmosphere and substrate temperature. In this way, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite or biphasic hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate with different crystallinity and microstructure have been prepared. (orig.)

  10. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  11. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  12. Process for the preparation of composite crystalline aluminium silicates and their use as catalyst (carrier)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erp, W.A.; Huizinga, T.; Seelen-Kruijssen, J.

    1989-01-31

    A process is presented for the preparation of a composite crystalline aluminum silicate by maintaining an aqueous alkaline starting mixture comprising one or more silicon compounds, one or more aluminium compounds, one or more compounds of metals from Group Ia of the Periodic Table and organic nitrogen compounds at an elevated temperature, until composite crystalline aluminium silicate has formed. Subsequently, crystalline silicate is separated from the mother liquor, wherein the various compounds are present in the starting mixture in defined molar ratios. These silicates can be used as catalyst or catalyst carrier in dewaxing hydrocarbon oils, to which process this invention further relates. To be used in such a process, the alkali metal content of the composite silicates must be reduced to less than 0.1 wt%. If desired, the performance of the silicates can be improved by using them simultaneously as carrier for one or more catalytically active metals from Groups VIb, VIIb and VIII8 of the Periodic Table or compounds thereof. The hydrocarbon oils which are to be dewaxed are preferably selected from the group consisting of lubricating oils and transformer oils (in order to reduce their pour point), and kerosenes and gas oils (in order to reduce their freezing point). Additionally, this invention relates to hydrocarbon oils which have been dewaxed according to the process of the invention. Furthermore, the invention relates to molecular sieves which comprise a composite crystalline aluminum silicate prepared as hereinbefore described, and to the application of such molecular sieves in a process for separating hydrocarbons. 5 tabs.

  13. Synthesis and reaction behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in basic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 贺强; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2004-01-01

    At the molar ratio of CaO to SiO2 of 1, with calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate, calcium silicate hydrate was synthesized at 50, 100, 170 ℃, respectively. The results show that temperature favors the formation of calcium silicate hydrate with perfect structure. When calcium silicate hydrate reacts with caustic solution, the decomposition rate of calcium silicate hydrate increases with the increasing caustic concentration and decreases with the raising synthesis temperature and the prolongation of reaction time. The decomposition rate is all less than 1.2 % in caustic solution, and XRD pattern of the residue after reaction with caustic solution is found as the same as that of original calcium silicate hydrate, which indicates the stable existence of calcium silicate hydrate in caustic solution.When reacted with soda solution, the decomposition rate increases with the increasing soda concentration and reaction time, while decreases with the synthesis temperature. The decomposition rate is more than 2% because CaO · SiO2 · H2O(CSH( Ⅰ )), except Ca5 (OH)2Si6O16 · 4H2O and Ca6Si6O17 (OH)2, is decomposed. So the synthesis temperature and soda concentration should be controlled in the process of transformation of sodium aluminosilicate hydrate into calcium silicate hydrate.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  15. A Comprehensive Study of Osteogenic Calcium Phosphate Silicate Cement: Material Characterization and In Vitro/In Vivo Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxing; Wang, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yixi; Zhang, Yubiao; Hou, Mingxiao; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Lejun; Ruse, N Dorin; Troczynski, Tom; Häfeli, Urs O

    2016-02-18

    Vertebral compression fractures can be successfully restored by injectable bone cements. Here the as-yet unexplored in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo biodegradation, and osteoconductivity of a new calcium phosphate silicate cements (CPSC) are studied, where monocalcium phosphate (MCP; 5, 10, and 15 wt%) is added to calcium silicate cement (CSC). Setting rate and compressive strength of CPSC decrease with the addition of MCP. The crystallinity, microstructure, and porosity of hardened CPSC are evaluated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and microcomputed tomography (CT). It is found that MCP reacts with calcium hydroxide, one of CSC hydration products, to precipitate apatite. While the reaction accelerates the hydration of CSC, the formation of calcium silicate hydrate gel is disturbed and highly porous microstructures form, resulting in weaker compressive strength. In vitro studies demonstrate that CPSC is noncytotoxic to osteoblast cells and promotes their proliferation. In the rabbit tibia implantation model, clinical X-ray and CT scans demonstrate that CPSC biodegrades slower and osseointegrates better than clinically used calcium phosphate cement (CPC). Histological studies demonstrate that CPSC is osteoconductive and induces higher bone formation than CPC, a finding that might warrant future clinical studies.

  16. ON APPLICATION OF MATERIALS BASED ON DISPERSE HYDRATED CALCIUM SILICATE FOR PROTECTIVE LAYER OF LOCAL AUTOMOBILE ROADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Road construction is one of the most material-intensive industrial production. In this context, the urgent task for this branch is the maximum reduction in consumption of materials through usage of effective local materials, decrease energy intensity of processes by using new materials. The developed network of local roads require constant care and maintenance, thus it is advisable to consider the use of protective coatings for such roads on the basis of contactcondensation hardening, which can be obtained on the basis of local raw materials. One of the representatives of such material is disperse hydrated calcium silicate, which found wide practical application as the main components in the production of building materials, glass, glass ceramics and ceramic products. For example, relatively cheap highly dispersed crystalline material is intermediate product of hydrochemical synthesis of wollastonite xonotlite Ca6(Si6O17(OH2. A variety of calcium and silicon-containing raw materials, suitable to obtain various types hydrated calcium silicate, as well as increasing requirements for physical and chemical properties, caused by actuality of problems of search and study the best ways of synthesis hydrated calcium silicate from man-made and natural materials. The theoretical basis of the proposed technology for material production for road pavement lower categories is the ability of silicate dispersed materials transferred in an unstable state, forming a rock-like waterproof body at the time of application of mechanical load. Disperse hydrated calcium silicate are the most typical representatives of contactcondensation hardening binders. It should be noted that the technology of obtaining these binders is not related to high-temperature processes and the synthesis of HCS realized when wet treatment of available cheap raw materials on the standard equipment, what determines their practical significance.

  17. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  18. Gasification slag rheology and crystalline phase formation in titanium-calcium-alumina-silica-rich glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, D.D. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States); Oh, M.S. [Hongik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    The Texaco Gasification Process employs a high temperature and pressure slagging gasifier, in which the viscosity of the slag plays a key role in determining operating conditions. The empirical models available in the literature as well as laboratory testing have concentrated on low titanium feeds. During the gasification of waste material, titanium oxide will become an important element in controlling the ash and slag behavior. Slag viscosity was measured at temperatures in the range of 1150-1500{degrees}C under reducing atmosphere with 0-30% titanium in combination with calcium-alumina-silica rich feeds to gain a better understanding of the slag theology. The slag viscosities with most titanium-rich slags showed the behavior of a crystalline slag with T{sub cv} of 1250{degrees}C. Crystalline phase analyses of the slag samples revealed that titanium oxide crystal will nucleate, but the glass phase is dominated by calcium-titanium-silicate and calcium-alumina-silicate glasses which have low melting points.

  19. New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, M.E.

    1996-02-28

    A search is being carried out for new calcium-based SO{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The current year objectives include the study of sorbents made by hydrating ordinary or Type I portland cement or portland cement clinker (a cement intermediate) under carefully selected conditions. Results of this study show that an excellent portland cement sorbent can be prepared by milling cement at 120{degrees}C at 600 rpm for 15 minutes with MgO-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} beads. They also show that clinker, which is cheaper than cement can be used interchangeably with cement as a starting material. Further, it is clear that while a high surface area may be a desirable property of a good sorbent, it is not a requisite property. Among the hydration reaction variables, milling time is highly important, reaction temperature is important and stirring rate and silicate-to-H{sub 2}O ratio are moderately important. The components of hydrated cement sorbent are various combinations of C-S-H, calcium silicate hydrate:Ca(OH){sub 2};AFm. a phase in hydrated cement.

  20. Apatite bone cement reinforced with calcium silicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motisuke, Mariana; Santos, Verônica R; Bazanini, Naiana C; Bertran, Celso A

    2014-10-01

    Several research efforts have been made in the attempt to reinforce calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with polymeric and carbon fibers. Due to their low compatibility with the cement matrix, results were not satisfactory. In this context, calcium silicate fibers (CaSiO3) may be an alternative material to overcome the main drawback of reinforced CPCs since, despite of their good mechanical properties, they may interact chemically with the CPC matrix. In this work CaSiO3 fibers, with aspect ratio of 9.6, were synthesized by a reactive molten salt synthesis and used as reinforcement in apatite cement. 5 wt.% of reinforcement addition has increased the compressive strength of the CPC by 250% (from 14.5 to 50.4 MPa) without preventing the cement to set. Ca and Si release in samples containing fibers could be explained by CaSiO3 partial hydrolysis which leads to a quick increase in Ca concentration and in silica gel precipitation. The latter may be responsible for apatite precipitation in needle like form during cement setting reaction. The material developed presents potential properties to be employed in bone repair treatment.

  1. Discrete dipole approximation models of chrystalline forsterite: Applications to cometary crystalline silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean Stephen

    The shape, size, and composition of crystalline silicates observed in comet comae and external proto-planetary disks are indicative of the formation and evolution of the dust grains during the processes of planetary formation. In this dissertation, I present the 3 -- 40 mum absorption efficiencies( Qabs) of irregularly shaped forsterite crystals computed with the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT developed by Draine and Flatau and run on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility Pleiades. An investigation of grain shapes ranging from spheroidal to irregular indicate that the strong spectral features from forsterite are sensitive to grain shape and are potentially degenerate with the effects of crystal solid state composition (Mg-content). The 10, 11, 18, 23, and 33.5 mum features are found to be the most crystal shape sensitive and should be avoided in determining Mg-content. The distinct spectral features for the three shape classes are connected with crystal formation environment using a condensation experiment by (Kobatake et al., 2008). The condensation experiment demonstrates that condensed forsterite crystal shapes are dependent on the condensation environmental temperature. I generate DDSCAT target analog shapes to the condensed crystal shapes. These analog shapes are represented by the three shape classes: 1) equant, 2) a, c-columns, and 3) b-shortened platelets. Each of these shape classes exhibit distinct spectral features that can be used to interpret grain shape characteristics from 8 --- 40 mum spectroscopy of astronomical objects containing crystalline silicates. Synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the coma of Hale-Bopp at rh = 2.8 AU are generated by thermally modeling the flux contributions of 5 mineral species present in comets. The synthetic SEDs are constrained using a chi2- minimization technique. The mineral species are amorphous carbon, amorphous pyroxene, amorphous olivine, crystalline enstatite, and crystalline

  2. Absorption at 11 microns in the interstellar medium and embedded sources: evidence for crystalline silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Christopher M; Lawson, Warrick

    2016-01-01

    An absorption feature is occasionally reported around 11 ?microns in astronomical spectra, including those of forming stars. Candidate carriers include water ice, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), silicon carbide, crystalline silicates or even carbonates. All are known constituents of cosmic dust in one or more types of environments, though not necessarily together. In this paper we present new ground-based 8-13 ?micron spectra of one evolved star, several embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) and a background source lying behind a large column of the interstellar medium (ISM) toward the Galactic Centre. Our observations, obtained at a spectral resolution of ?approximately 100, are compared with previous lower resolution data, as well as data obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) on these and other targets. By presenting a subset of a larger sample our aim is to establish the reality of the feature and subsequently speculate on its carrier. All evidence points toward crystalline silicate. ...

  3. A Study of Ca-Mg Silicate Crystalline Glazes--An Analysis on Forms of Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Pei-de; YU Ping-li; WU Ji-huai

    2004-01-01

    In the study on Ca-Mg silicate crystalline glazes, we found some disequilibrated crystallization phenomena,such as non-crystallographic small angle forking and spheroidal growth, parasitism and wedging-form of crystals, dendritic growth, secondary nucleation, etc. Those phenomena possibly resulted from two factors:(1) partial temperature gradient, which is caused by heat asymmetry in the electrical resistance furnace,when crystals crystalize from silicate melt ; (2) constitutional supercooling near the surface of crystals. The disparity of disequilibrated crystallization phenomena in different main crystalline phases causes various morphological features of the crystal aggregates. At the same time, disequilibrated crystallization causes great stress retained in the crystals, which results in cracks in glazes when the temperature drops. According to the results, the authors analyzed those phenomena and displayed correlative figures and data.

  4. Crystalline silicates and dust processing in the protoplanetary disks of the Taurus young cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Dan M; Furlan, Elise; Bohac, J; Sargent, B; Forrest, W J; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Nordhaus, Jason T; Green, Joel D; Kim, K H; Sloan, G C; Chen, C H; Keller, L D; dAlessio, Paola; Najita, J; Uchida, Keven I; Houck, J R

    2007-01-01

    We characterize the crystalline silicate content and spatial distribution of small dust grains in a large sample of protoplanetary disks in the Taurus-Auriga young cluster, using Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectra. In turn we use the results to analyze the evolution of structure and composition of these 1-2 Myr-old disks around Solar- and later-type young stars, and test the standard models of dust processing which result in the conversion of originally amorphous dust into minerals. We find strong evidence of evolution of the dust crystalline mass fraction in parallel with that of the structure of the disks, in the sense that increasing crystalline mass fraction is strongly linked to dust settling to the disk midplane. We also confirm that the crystalline silicates are confined to small radii, r < 10 AU. However, we see no significant correlation of crystalline mass fraction with stellar mass or luminosity, stellar accretion rate, disk mass, or disk/star mass ratio, as would be expected in the st...

  5. Dust in the wind: Crystalline silicates, corundum and periclase in PG 2112+059

    CERN Document Server

    Markwick-Kemper, F; Hines, D C; Bouwman, J

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the mineralogical composition of dust in the Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar PG 2112+059 using mid-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. From spectral fitting of the solid state features, we find evidence for Mg-rich amorphous silicates with olivine stoichiometry, as well as the first detection of corundum (Al_2O_3) and periclase (MgO) in quasars. This mixed composition provides the first direct evidence for a clumpy density structure of the grain forming region. The silicates in total encompass 56.5% of the identified dust mass, while corundum takes up 38 wt.%. Depending on the choice of continuum, a range of mass fractions is observed for periclase ranging from 2.7% in the most conservative case to 9% in a less constrained continuum. In addition, we identify a feature at 11.2 micron as the crystalline silicate forsterite, with only a minor contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The 5% crystalline silicate fraction requires high temperatures such ...

  6. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition.

  7. Mesoporous Calcium Silicate Nanoparticles with Drug Delivery and Odontogenesis Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yuang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Wu, Yuan-Haw; Chen, Wan-Chen; Shie, Ming-You

    2017-01-01

    Calcium silicate (CS) -based materials play an important role in the development of endodontic materials that induce bone/cementum tissue regeneration and inhibit bacterial viability. The aim of this study was to prepare novel mesoporous CS (MesoCS) nanoparticles that have osteogenic, drug delivery, and antibacterial characteristics for endodontic materials and also have an excellent ability to develop apatite mineralization. The MesoCS nanoparticles were prepared using sol-gel methods. In addition, the mesoporous structure, specific surface area, pore volume, and morphology of the MesoCS nanoparticles were analyzed. The apatite mineralization ability, in vitro odontogenic differentiation, drug delivery, and antibacterial properties of the MesoCS nanoparticles were further investigated. The results indicate that the 200-nm-sized MesoCS nanoparticles synthesized using a facile template method exhibited a high specific surface area and pore volume with internal mesopores (average pore size = 3.05 nm). Furthermore, the MesoCS nanoparticles can be used as drug carriers to maintain sustained release of gentamicin and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The MesoCS-loaded FGF-2 might stimulate more odontogenic-related protein than CS because of the FGF-2 release. Based on this work, it can be inferred that MesoCS nanoparticles are potentially useful endodontic materials for biocompatible and osteogenic dental pulp tissue regenerative materials. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abundant crystalline silicates in the disk of a very low mass star

    CERN Document Server

    Merin, B; Van Dishoeck, E F; Kessler-Silacci, J; Dullemond, C P; Blake, G A; Lahuis, F; Brown, J M; Geers, V C; Pontoppidan, K M; Comeron, F; Frasca, A; Guieu, S; Alcalá, J M; Boogert, A C A; II, N J E; D'Alessio, P; Mundy, L G; Chapman, N

    2007-01-01

    We announce the discovery of SST-Lup3-1, a very low mass star close to the brown dwarf boundary in Lupus III with a circum(sub)stellar disk, discovered by the `Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Program from mid-, near-infrared and optical data, with very conspicuous crystalline silicate features in its spectrum. It is the first of such objects with a full 5 to 35 micron spectrum taken with the IRS and it shows strong 10 and 20 micron silicate features with high feature to continuum ratios and clear crystalline features out to 33 micron. The dust in the disk upper layer has a crystalline silicate grain fraction between 15% and 33%, depending on the assumed dust continuum. The availability of the full Spitzer infrared spectrum allows an analysis of the dust composition as a function of temperature and position in the disk. The hot (~ 300 K) dust responsible for the 10 micron feature consists of a roughly equal mix of small (~ 0.1 micron) and large (~ 1.5 micron) grains, whereas the cold (~ 70 K) dust responsible f...

  9. A systematic search for the spectra with features of crystalline silicates in the Spitzer IRS Enhanced Products

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, Biwei

    2016-01-01

    The crystalline silicates features are mainly reflected in infrared bands. The Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) collected numerous spectra of various objects and provided a big database to investigate crystalline silicates in a wide range of astronomical environments. We apply the manifold ranking algorithm to perform a systematic search for the spectra with crystalline silicates features in the Spitzer IRS Enhanced Products available. In total, 868 spectra of 790 sources are found to show the features of crystalline silicate. These objects are cross-matched with the SIMBAD database as well as with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)/DR2. The average spectrum of young stellar objects show a variety of features dominated either by forsterite or enstatite or neither, while the average spectrum of evolved objects consistently present dominant features of forsterite in AGB, OH/IR, post-AGB and planetary nebulae. They are identified optically as early-type stars, evolved stars...

  10. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-05

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  11. Osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts induced by calcium silicate and calcium silicate/β-tricalcium phosphate composite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Lisha; Wang, Chen; Xue, Yang; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Sun, Jiao

    2012-07-01

    In this study, calcium silicate (CS) and CS/β-tricalcium phosphate (CS/β-TCP) composites were investigated on their mechanism of osteogenic proliferation and differentiation through regulating osteogenic-related gene and proteins. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the extracts of these CS-based bioceramics and pure β-TCP, respectively. The main ionic content in extracts was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The cell viability, mineralization, and differentiation were evaluated by MTT assay, Alizarin Red-S staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay. The expressions of BMP-2, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin (OCN) at both gene and protein level were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot. The result showed that the extracts of CS-based bioceramics promoted cells proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization when compared with pure β-TCP. Accordingly, pure CS and CS/β-TCP composites stimulated osteoblast-like cells to express BMP-2/TGF-β gene and proteins, and further regulate the expression of Runx2 gene and protein, and ultimately affect the ALP activity and OCN deposition. This study suggested that the CS-based bioceramics could not only promote the expression of osteogenic-related genes but also enhance the genes to encode the corresponding proteins, which could finally control osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Evaluation of calcium-releasing and apatite-forming abilities of fast-setting calcium silicate-based endodontic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, L; Kodama, S; Okiji, T

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate two fast-setting calcium silicate-based endodontic materials (Endocem mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Endocem Zr) with regard to their ability to release calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and produce apatite-like precipitates after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Endocem MTA, Endocem Zr and white ProRoot MTA (WMTA) were used. Chemical composition of the powder of each material was analysed with a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyser with image observation function (SEM-EPMA). The amount of Ca(2+) released from water-immersed set cements was measured with an EDTA titration method. Morphology and chemical composition of surface precipitates formed on the surface of PBS-immersed cements were analysed with the SEM-EPMA. Data obtained were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test with a significance level of 5%. Endocem MTA and WMTA contained calcium (Ca), silicon (Si) and bismuth as the major elemental constituents, whereas Endocem Zr contained zirconium as the most abundant element, followed by Ca and Si. The amount of Ca(2+) release was WMTA >Endocem MTA ≥Endocem Zr. After immersion in PBS for 14 days, the three materials produced Ca- and phosphorus (P)-containing apatite-like surface precipitates. WMTA showed higher Ca/P ratio of the precipitates compared with the other cements, with statistical significance between WMTA and Endocem Zr (P < 0.05). Compared with WMTA, Endocem MTA and Endocem Zr were associated with significantly less Ca ions release and, when immersed in PBS, produced apatite-like crystalline precipitates of significantly lower Ca/P ratios. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Calcium silicate and organic mineral fertilizer applications reduce phytophagy by Thrips palmi Karny (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on eggplants (Solanum melongena L.)

    OpenAIRE

    De Almeida, Gustavo Dia; Pratissoli, Dirceu; Zanuncio, José Cola; Vicentini,Victor Bernardo; Holtz,Anderson Mathias; Serrão,José Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Thrips palmi Karny (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is a phytophagous insect associated with the reduction of eggplant productivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium silicate and/or an organic mineral fertilizer, together or separately, in increasing the resistance of eggplants to T. palmi. The treatments were calcium silicate, organic mineral fertilizer, calcium silicate associated with this fertilizer and the control. Mortality and number of lesions caused by nymphs of t...

  14. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  15. EFFECT OF AGING TIME TOWARD CRYSTALLINITY OF PRODUCTS IN SYNTHESIS OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches about the effects of aging time toward crystallinity of products in the synthesis of mesoporous silicates MCM-41 have been done. MCM-41 was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment to the mixture of sodium silicate, sodium hydroxide, cetyltrimetylammoniumbromide (CTMAB and aquadest in the molar ratio of 8Na2SiO3 : CTMAB : NaOH : 400H2O. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at 110 °C in a teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave heated in the oven, with variation of aging time, i.e.: 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h respectively. The solid phase were filtered, then washed with deionised water, and dried in the oven at 100 °C for 2 h. The surfactant CTMAB was removed by calcinations at 550 °C for 10 h with heating rate 2 °C/min. The as-synthesized and calcined powders were characterized by using FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction method. The relative crystallinity of products was evaluated based on the intensity of d100 peaks. The best product was characterized by using N2 physisorption method in order to determine the specific surface area, mean pore diameter, lattice parameter, and pore walls thickness. It was concluded that the relative crystallinity of the products was sensitively influenced by the aging time. The highest relative crystallinity was achieved when used 36 h of aging time in hydrothermal treatment. In this optimum condition the product has 946.607 m2g-1 of specific surface area, 3.357 nm of mean pore diameter, 4.533 nm of lattice parameter, and 1.176 nm of pore walls thickness.

  16. On the metallicity dependence of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, O C; Sargent, B A; McDonald, I; Gielen, C; Woods, Paul M; Sloan, G C; Boyer, M L; Zijlstra, A A; Clayton, G C; Kraemer, K E; Srinivasan, S; Ruffle, P M E

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars across a range of metallicities and mass-loss rates. It has been suggested that the crystalline silicate feature strength increases with increasing mass-loss rate, implying a correlation between lattice structure and wind density. To test this, we analyse Spitzer IRS and Infrared Space Observatory SWS spectra of 217 oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and 98 red supergiants in the Milky Way, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and Galactic globular clusters. These encompass a range of spectral morphologies from the spectrally-rich which exhibit a wealth of crystalline and amorphous silicate features to 'naked' (dust-free) stars. We combine spectroscopic and photometric observations with the GRAMS grid of radiative transfer models to derive (dust) mass-loss rates and temperature. We then measure the strength of the crystalline silicate bands at 23, 28 and 33 microns. We detect crystalline silicates in stars with dust ma...

  17. Alleviating aluminium toxicity on an acid sulphate soils in Peninsular Malaysia with application of calcium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted to alleviate Al toxicity of an acid sulphate soils collected from paddy cultivation area in Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. For this purpose, the collected acid sulphate soils were treated with calcium silicate. The treated soils were incubated for 120 days in submerged condition in a glasshouse. Subsamples were collected every 30 days throughout the incubation period. Soil pH and exchangeable Al showed positive effect; soil pH increased from 2.9 to 3.5, meanwhile exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 to 0.82 cmolc kg-1, which was well below the critical Al toxicity level for rice growth of 2 cmolc kg-1. It was noted that the dissolution of calcium silicate (CaSiO3) supplied substantial amount of Ca2+ and H4SiO42- ions into the soil, noted with increment in Si (silicate) content from 21.21 to 40 mg kg-1 at day 30 and reduction of exchangeable Al at day 90 from 4.26 to below 2 cmolc kg-1. During the first 60 days of incubation, Si content was positively correlated with soil pH, while the exchangeable Al was negatively correlated with Si content. It is believed that the silicate anions released by calcium silicate were active in neutralizing H+ ions that governs the high acidity (pH 2.90) of the acid sulphate soils. This scenario shows positive effect of calcium silicate to reduce soil acidity, therefore creates a favourable soil condition for good rice growth during its vegetative phase (30 days). Thus, application of calcium silicate to alleviate Al toxicity of acid sulphate soils for rice cultivation is a good soil amendment.

  18. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate based on Steel Slag with Various Alkalinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuping; PENG Xiaoqin; GENG Jianqiang; LI Bin; WANG Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the hydraulic potential properties of the slag. Therefore, a method of dynamic hydrothermal synthesis was applied to synthesize calcium silicate hydrate. The phases and nanostructures were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, and BET nitrogen adsorption. The influence of alkalinity of steel slag on its structures and properties was discussed. The experimental results show that, the main product is amorphous calcium silicate hydrate gel with flocculent or fibrous pattern with a BET specific surface area up to 77 m2/g and pore volume of 0.34 mL/g. Compared with low alkalinity steel slag, calcium silicate hydrate synthesized from higher alkalinity steel slag is prone to transform to tobermorite structure.

  19. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  20. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with (29)Si and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca(2+) concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca(2+) and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of calcium silicate-reduced graphene oxide composites on titanium substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Akhiani, Amir Reza; Talebian, Sepehr

    2016-01-01

    silicate-reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) composites were synthesized, using an in situ hydrothermal method. CS nanowires were uniformly decorated on the rGO, with an appropriate interfacial bonding. The CS-rGO composites behaved like hybrid composites when deposited on a titanium substrate by cathodic......Calcium silicate (CS)/graphene coatings have been used to improve the biological and mechanical fixation of metallic prosthesis. Among the extraordinary features of graphene is its very high mechanical strength, which makes it an attractive nanoreinforcement material for composites. Calcium...

  2. Crystalline calcium carbonate and hydrogels as microenvironment for stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astachov, Liliana; Nevo, Zvi; Aviv, Moran; Vago, Razi

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell development and fate decisions are dictated by the microenvironment in which the stem cell is embedded. Among the advanced goals of tissue engineering is the creation of a microenvironment that will support the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cell--based on embryonic and adult stem cells as potent, cellular sources--for a variety of clinical applications. This review discusses some of the approaches used to create regulatory and instructive microenvironments for the directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using three-dimensional crystalline calcium carbonate biomaterials of marine origin combined with a hydrated gel based on hyaluronan.

  3. Thermal conductivity measurements on xonotlite-type calcium silicate by the transient hot-strip method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The experimental results of the thermal conductivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate insulation materials were presented at different temperatures and pressures.Two appropriative surroundings,i.e.an elevated temperature surrounding from ambient temperature to 1450 K and a vacuum surrounding from atmosphere pressure to 10-3 Pa,were designed for the transient hot-strip (THS) method.The thermal conduetivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate with four densities from ambient temperature to 1000 K and 0.045 Pa to atmospheric pressure were measured.The results show that the thermal conductivity of xunotlite-type calcium silicate decreases apparently with the fall of density,and decreases apparently with the drop of pressure,and reaches the least value at about 100 Pa.The thermal conductivity of xonotlite-type calcium silicate increases almost linearly with T3,and increases more abundantly with low density than with high density.The thermal conductivity measurement uncertainty is estimated to be approximately 3% at ambient temperature,and 6% at 800 K.

  4. Porosity distribution in root canals filled with gutta percha and calcium silicate cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moinzadeh, A.T.; Zerbst, W.; Boutsioukis, C.; Shemesh, H.; Zaslansky, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gutta percha is commonly used in conjunction with a sealer to produce a fluid-tight seal within the root canal fillings. One of the most commonly used filling methods is lateral compaction of gutta percha coupled with a sealer such as calcium silicate cement. However, this technique may re

  5. Synthesis of calcium silicates by Pechini method and exchanging ions of sodium alginate-calcium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Garay, K.A.; Martinez-Luevanos, A.; Cruz-Ortiz, B.R.; Garcia-Cerda, L.A.; Lopez-Badillo, C.M.

    2016-07-01

    Calcium silicates samples were synthesized using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and by Pechini methodology assisted with ion-exchange of sodium alginate, followed by a heat treatment of 800°C by two hours. A, B and C samples were obtained using 1.7×10−3M, 3.4×10−3M and 5.1×10−3M of TEOS, respectively, and without heat treatment; these samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR). Furthermore, samples A800, B800 and C800 obtained using a heat treatment of 800° by two hours were characterized by FTIR-ATR, absorption technique (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by scanning electron microscopy. The XRD patterns indicate that sample A800 contains olivine (Ca2SiO4) in orthorhombic phase and wollastonite-2M (CaSiO3); sample B800 showed the earlier phases and quartz (SiO2), whereas sample C800 contains wollastonite phases and larnite-2M (Ca2SiO4). (Author)

  6. Effect of Barium Oxide on the Formation and Coexistence of Tricalcium Silicate and Calcium Sulphoaluminate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; SHEN Xiaodong; MA Suhua; HUANG Yeping; ZHONG Baiqian

    2009-01-01

    Formation and coexistence of tricalcium silicate(C_3S)and calcium sulphoaluminate (C_4 A 3(S))minerals in Portland cement clinker containing calcium sulphoaluminate were investigated. The f-CaO content,mineral composite and formation of mineral in the clinker were analyzed respectively by chemical analysis,differential scanning calorimetry(DSC)and X-ray diffraction.The results show that,adding a suitable amount of BaO can improve the burnability of raw meal and promote the f-CaO absorption.Tricalcium silicate and calcium sulphoaluminate minerals can form and coexist in clinkers at 1 234-1 317 ℃by the addition of BaO to the raw meal.A suitable amount of BaO expanded the coexistence temperature of two minerals by 58℃.

  7. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  9. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  10. Synthesis of pure zeolite P2 from calcium silicate hydrate; tobermorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Y. Mostafa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate hydrate phases offer the possibility to become potential zeolites precursors due to its high silica contents. Pure calcium silicate hydrate phase; tobermorite (Ca5Si6O16(OH2·4H2O, was prepared by hydrothermal method at 175°C. Tobermorite was sucssefully converted to Zeolite P2 for the first time via refluxing in 3 M NaOH solution and in the presence of Al source. Sodium hydroxide removed calcium ions from the interlayers of calcium silicate phase and form mesoporous zeolite. The pure zeolite was obtained after extraction of Ca(OH2 with sugar solution. The zeolite products were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM with microanalysis (EDX. The Si/Al molar ratio of zeolite P can be controlled by vering the initinal Si/Al molar ratio. The cation-exchange capacity (CEC of the produced zeolite P was higher than those produced from fly ash.

  11. Phase transformations, microstructure formation and in vitro osteoblast response in calcium silicate/brushite cement composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopcak, T; Medvecky, L; Giretova, M; Kovalcikova, A; Stulajterova, R; Durisin, J

    2016-08-10

    Self-setting simple calcium silicate/brushite (B) biocements with various Ca/P ratios were prepared by mutual mixing of both monocalcium silicate hydrate (CSH) or β-wollastonite (woll) powders with B and the addition of 2 wt% NaH2PO4 solution as a hardening liquid. The phase composition of the final composites and the texture of the surface calcium phosphate/silica layer were controlled by the starting Ca/P ratio in composites and the pH during setting. It was verified that the presence of continuous bone-like calcium phosphate coating on the surface of the samples was not essential for in vitro osteoblast proliferation. The nanocrystalline calcium deficient hydroxyapatite and amorphous silica were found as the main setting products in composite mixtures with a Ca/P ratio close to the region of the formation of deficient hydroxyapatite-like calcium phosphates. No CSH phase with a lower Ca/Si ratio was identified after transformation. The results confirmed a small effect of the monocalcium silicate addition on the compressive strength (CS) of cements up to 30 wt% (around 20-25 MPa) and a significant rise of the value in 50 woll/B cement (65 MPa). The final setting times of the cement composites varied between 5 and 43 min depending on the P/L ratio and the type of monocalcium silicate phase in the cement mixture. 10CSH/B and 50 woll/B cements with different textures but free of both the needle-like and perpendicularly-oriented hydroxyapatite particles on the surface of the samples had low cytotoxicity.

  12. Preparation and characterization of bioactive and degradable composites containing ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jiajin [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Dong, Xieping, E-mail: jxzhyxh@163.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jiangxi People' s Hospital, Nanchang 330006 (China); Ma, Xuhui [Polymer Science (Shenzhen) New Materials Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518101 (China); Tang, Songchao, E-mail: schtang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wu, Zhaoying; Xia, Ji; Wang, Quanxiang; Wang, Yutao; Wei, Jie [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide) composite was fabricated. • The composite has good hydrophilicity, in vitro degradation and bioactivity. • The composite could support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. - Abstract: Polylactide (PLA) and its copolymers have been widely used for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, a bioactive composite of ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (m-CMS) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was fabricated by melt blending method. The results indicated that the m-CMS particles were entrapped by polymer phase, and crystallinity of PLLA significantly decreased while the thermal stability of the m-CMS/PLLA composites was not obviously affected by addition of the m-CMS into PLLA. In addition, compared to PLLA, incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA significantly improved the hydrophilicity, in vitro degradability and bioactivity (apatite-formation ability) of the m-CMS/PLLA composite, which were m-CMS content dependent. Moreover, it was found that incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA could neutralize the acidic degradation by-products and thus compensated for the decrease of pH value. In cell culture experiments, the results showed that the composite enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were m-CMS content dependent. The results indicated that the addition of bioactive materials to PLLA could result in a composite with improved properties of hydrophilicity, degradability, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  13. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  14. Analysis of the color alteration and radiopacity promoted by bismuth oxide in calcium silicate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Angelica Marciano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine if the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide is related to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cement. Calcium silicate cement (CSC was mixed with 0%, 15%, 20%, 30% and 50% of bismuth oxide (BO, determined by weight. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was the control group. The radiopacity test was performed according to ISO 6876/2001. The color was evaluated using the CIE system. The assessments were performed after 24 hours, 7 and 30 days of setting time, using a spectrophotometer to obtain the ΔE, Δa, Δb and ΔL values. The statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn and ANOVA/Tukey tests (p 3 mm equivalent of Al. The MTA group was statistically similar to the CSC / 30% BO group (p > 0.05. In regard to color, the increase of bismuth oxide resulted in a decrease in the ΔE value of the calcium silicate cement. The CSC group presented statistically higher ΔE values than the CSC / 50% BO group (p < 0.05. The comparison between 24 hours and 7 days showed higher ΔE for the MTA group, with statistical differences for the CSC / 15% BO and CSC / 50% BO groups (p < 0.05. After 30 days, CSC showed statistically higher ΔE values than CSC / 30% BO and CSC / 50% BO (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide has no relation to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cements.

  15. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  16. A Novel Synthesis Method of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on the Calcium Oxide/Polyethylene Glycol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel method to prepare porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH based on the calcium oxide/polyethylene glycol (CaO/PEG2000 composites as the calcium materials. The porosity formation mechanism was revealed via X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The reactivity of silica materials (SiO2 enhanced by increasing pH value. Ca2+ could not sustain release from CaO/PEG2000 and reacted with caused by silica to form CSH until the hydrothermal temperature reached to 170°C, avoiding the hardly dissolved intermediates formation efficiently. The as-prepared CSH, due to the large specific surface areas, exhibited excellent release capability of Ca2+ and OH−. This porous CSH has potential application in reducing the negative environmental effects of continual natural phosphate resource depletion.

  17. Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2011-05-01

    Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Xonotlite-type Calcium Silicate Insulation Material Using Industrial Zirconium Waste Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jinguo; CUI Chong; LIU Jinqiang; LIAO Wenli

    2011-01-01

    Xonotlite-type insulation material was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis technology using industrial zirconium waste residue in this paper, and the phase analysis together with the observation of micro-morphology were also carried out by XRD, SEM and TEM. The density and thermal conductivity were measured finally. The results indicate, chlorine ion impurity contained in zirconium waste residue can be removed effectively via water washed process, and the reactive activity of silicon dioxide is almost not affected,which make it be a good substitution of silicon material for the preparation of calcium silicate insulation material by hydrothermal synthesis technique. The density and thermal conductivity of xonotlite-type calcium silicate insulation material obtained by hydrothermal synthesis technique can reach 159 kg/m3, 0.049 W/(m·°C), respectively, meeting with National Standard well, when synthesis conditions are selected as follows: Ca/Si molar ratio equal to 1, synthesis temperature at 210 ℃ and kept for 8 hrs. It provides a new approach to realize lightweight and low thermal conductivity of calcium silicate insulation material.

  19. Bond strength of a calcium silicate-based sealer tested in bulk or with different main core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagas, Emre; Cehreli, Zafer; Uyanik, Mehmet Ozgur; Durmaz, Veli

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP), with or without a core material, on bond strength to radicular dentin, in comparison with various contemporary root filling systems. Root canals of freshly extracted single-rooted teeth (n = 60) were instrumented using rotary instruments. The roots were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental groups: (1) a calcium silicate-based sealer without a core material (bulk-fill); (2) a calcium silicate-based sealer + gutta-percha; (3) a calcium silicate-based sealer + Resilon; (4) a methacrylate resin-based sealer (RealSeal SE) + Resilon; (5) an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus) + gutta-percha, and (6) a mineral trioxide aggregate-based endodontic sealer (MTA Fillapex) + gutta-percha. Four 1-mm-thick sections were obtained from the coronal aspect of each root (n = 40 slices/group). Push-out bond strength testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min, and the bond strength data were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (p core filling materials. When the calcium silicate-based sealer was placed in bulk, its dislocation resistance was similar to that of commonly used sealer + core root filling systems. Thus, the concept of using a calcium silicate-based sealer in bulk can be more easily advocated in clinical practice.

  20. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  1. In vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Qinghui; Qian Jiangchao [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhou Huanjun; Yuan Yuan; Mao Yuhao; Liu Changsheng, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.c, E-mail: csliu@sh163.ne [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the interaction between calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement (CS/CPC) and osteogenesis, in particular the in vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to CS/CPC. The effect of CS/CPC on cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation of murine osteoblast-like cell MC3T3-E1, as well as the influence on the cell attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), was studied in detail. Our results indicated that CS/CPC exhibited excellent biocompatibility to the osteoblast-like cells. Moreover, the morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MC3T3-E1 cultured on the CS/CPC disks suggested that CS/CPC induced better cell adhesion and cell spreading. Simultaneously, cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 were significantly improved after 3 and 7 days of culture on CS/CPC disks in comparison with CPC disks. Additionally, on CS/CPC disks, HUVEC attached well on day 1 and cell proliferation was also greatly enhanced by day 7. Collectively, these results suggest that the introduction of calcium silicate may improve the cell response involved in the osteogenesis and thus may be beneficial to further modify CPC as a better bone repairing material.

  2. Effect of physicochemical properties of a cement based on silicocarnotite/calcium silicate on in vitro cell adhesion and in vivo cement degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Julia Lucas; Rueda, Carmen; Manchón, Ángel; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2016-08-02

    A silicon calcium phosphate cement (Si-CPC) was developed to produce a composite of calcium phosphate and calcium silicate. The silicon cements prepared with low silicon (Si) content were composed of crystalline phases of brushite and silicocarnotite. However, the cements prepared with high Si content were mainly composed of amorphous phases of silicocarnotite, hydroxyapatite and calcium silicate. The cement porosity was about 40% with a shift of the average pore diameter to the nanometric range with increasing Si content. Interestingly, this new cement system provides a matrix with a high specific surface area of up to 29 m(2) g(-1). The cytocompatibility of the new Si-doped cements was tested with a human osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) showing an enhancement of cell proliferation (up to threefold) when compared with unsubstituted material. Cements with a high silica content also improved the cell attachment. The in vivo results indicated that Si-CPCs induce the formation of new bone tissue, and modify cement resorption. We conclude that this cement provides an optimal environment to enhance osteoblast growth and proliferation that could be of interest in bone engineering.

  3. XANES analysis of calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates and hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 co-sintered bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkiran, Hande [Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States); Hu Yongfeng; Zuin, Lucia [Beamline Scientist, Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Appathurai, Narayana [Beamline Scientist, Synchrotron Radiation Center, Madison, WI (United States); Aswath, Pranesh B., E-mail: aswath@uta.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2011-03-12

    Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was co-sintered with hydroxyapatite at 1200 deg. C. When small amounts (< 5 wt.%) of Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was added it behaved as a sintering aid and also enhanced the decomposition of hydroxyapatite to {beta}-tricalcium phosphate. However when 10 wt.% and 25 wt.% Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was used it resulted in the formation of Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in an amorphous silicate matrix respectively. These chemistries show improved bioactivity compared to hydroxyapatite and are the subject of this study. The structure of several crystalline calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates as well as the co-sintered hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 bioceramics were examined using XANES spectroscopy. The nature of the crystalline and amorphous phases were studied using silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) K- and L{sub 2,3}-edge and calcium (Ca) K-edge XANES. Si L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra of sintered bioceramic compositions indicates that the primary silicates present in these compositions are sodium silicates in the amorphous state. From Si K-edge spectra, it is shown that the silicates are in a similar structural environment in all the sintered bioceramic compositions with 4-fold coordination. Using P L{sub 2,3}-edge it is clearly shown that there is no evidence of sodium phosphate present in the sintered bioceramic compositions. In the P K-edge spectra, the post-edge shoulder peak at around 2155 eV indicates that this shoulder to be more defined for calcium phosphate compounds with decreasing solubility and increasing thermodynamic stability. This shoulder peak is more noticeable in hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP indicating greater stability of the phosphate phase. The only spectra that does not show a noticeable peak is the composition with Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in a silicate matrix indicating that it is more soluble compared to the other compositions.

  4. Experimental study and modelling of sulfate sorption on calcium silicate hydrates; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l'adsorption de sulfates sur des silicates de calcium hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarulo, R.; Peycelon, H. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie DPC/SCCME/LECBA, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Prene, St. [Electricite de France, Dept. MMC, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France)

    2003-07-01

    A detailed study of the interactions between Calcium Silicate Hydrates (C-S-H) and sulfate is reported in this paper. C-S-H of Ca/Si ratio w 0.7-1.6 were synthesized from CaO and SiO{sub 2} in suspension, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was added to the system, kept at 20 or 85 deg C. The results of sulfate sorption show that the capacity of C-S-H to bind sulfate increases with the Ca/Si ratio of the C-S-H, and that temperature seems to have little influence for a given Ca/Si ratio. From these results, a modeling of sulfate binding on C-S-H is proposed. (authors)

  5. Balancing strength and toughness of calcium-silicate-hydrate via random nanovoids and particle inclusions: Atomistic modeling and statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2016-11-01

    As the most widely used manufactured material on Earth, concrete poses serious societal and environmental concerns which call for innovative strategies to develop greener concrete with improved strength and toughness, properties that are exclusive in man-made materials. Herein, we focus on calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the major binding phase of all Portland cement concretes, and study how engineering its nanovoids and portlandite particle inclusions can impart a balance of strength, toughness and stiffness. By performing an extensive +600 molecular dynamics simulations coupled with statistical analysis tools, our results provide new evidence of ductile fracture mechanisms in C-S-H - reminiscent of crystalline alloys and ductile metals - decoding the interplay between the crack growth, nanovoid/particle inclusions, and stoichiometry, which dictates the crystalline versus amorphous nature of the underlying matrix. We found that introduction of voids and portlandite particles can significantly increase toughness and ductility, specially in C-S-H with more amorphous matrices, mainly owing to competing mechanisms of crack deflection, voids coalescence, internal necking, accommodation, and geometry alteration of individual voids/particles, which together regulate toughness versus strength. Furthermore, utilizing a comprehensive global sensitivity analysis on random configuration-property relations, we show that the mean diameter of voids/particles is the most critical statistical parameter influencing the mechanical properties of C-S-H, irrespective of stoichiometry or crystalline or amorphous nature of the matrix. This study provides new fundamental insights, design guidelines, and de novo strategies to turn the brittle C-S-H into a ductile material, impacting modern engineering of strong and tough concrete infrastructures and potentially other complex brittle materials.

  6. Mechanical and physical properties of calcium silicate/alumina composite for biomedical engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F S; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Abu Osman, N A

    2014-02-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of Al2O3 on α-calcium silicate (α-CaSiO3) ceramic. α-CaSiO3 was synthesized from CaO and SiO2 using mechanochemical method followed by calcinations at 1000°C. α-CaSiO3 and alumina were grinded using ball mill to create mixtures, containing 0-50w% of Al2O3 loadings. The powders were uniaxially pressed and followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) in order to achieve greater uniformity of compaction and to increase the shape capability. Afterward, the compaction was sintered in a resistive element furnace at both 1150°C and 1250°C with a 5h holding time. It was found that alumina reacted with α-CaSiO3 and formed alumina-rich calcium aluminates after sintering. An addition of 15wt% of Al2O3 powder at 1250°C were found to improve the hardness and fracture toughness of the calcium silicate. It was also observed that the average grain sizes of α-CaSiO3 /Al2O3 composite were maintained 500-700nm after sintering process.

  7. Biocompatibility of a new nanomaterial based on calcium silicate implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate rat connective tissue response to a new calcium silicate system 7, 15, 30 and 60 days after implantation. Twenty Wistar albino male rats received two tubes half-filled with a new calcium silicate system (NCSS or MTA in subcutaneous tissue. The empty half of the tubes served as controls. Five animals were sacrificed after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and samples of the subcutaneous tissue around implanted material were submitted to histological analysis. The intensity of inflammation was evaluated based on the number of inflammatory cells present. Statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA and Holm Sidak's multiple comparison tests. Mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was observed after 7, 15 and 30 days around a NCSS while mild inflammatory reaction was detected after 60 days of implantation. In the MTA group, mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was found after 7 and 15 days while mild inflammatory reaction was present after 30 and 60 days. There was no statistically significant difference in the intensity of inflammatory reactions between the tested materials and control groups in any experimental period (ANOVA p>0.05. Regarding the intensity of inflammatory reactions at different experimental periods, a statistically significant difference was observed between 7 and 30 days, 7 and 60 days and 15 to 60 days for both materials. For the controls, a statistically significant difference was found between 7 and 60 days and 15 and 60 days of the experiment (Holm Sidak < p 0.001. Subcutaneous tissue of rats showed good tolerance to a new calcium silicate system. Inflammatory reaction was similar to that caused by MTA. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  8. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus.Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs.Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP; MTA Fillapex (MTAF and FillCanal (FC. Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT. Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution. All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%.Results MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%. Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure.Conclusions The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materialsin vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments.

  9. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Pei [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Wei, Pingpin [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Pengjian; Gao, Chengde [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Shuai, Cijun, E-mail: shuai@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Peng, Shuping, E-mail: shuping@csu.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m{sup 1/2}) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability.

  10. Fabrication of nano-structured calcium silicate coatings with enhanced stability, bioactivity and osteogenic and angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuhui; Zhou, Yuning; Xia, Lunguo; Zhao, Cancan; Chen, Lei; Yi, Deliang; Chang, Jiang; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhu, Huiying; Xie, Youtao; Xu, Yuanjin; Lin, Kaili

    2015-02-01

    The bioactivity and stability of coatings on alloy implants play critical roles in the fast osseointegration and maintenance of a long-term life span of the implants, respectively. Herein, nano-sheet surface on bioactive calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) coatings on metal substrates was fabricated by combining atmosphere plasma spraying (APS) and hydrothermal technology (HT). The glassy phase in CS coatings generated by APS was converted into crystalline sheet-like nano-structures after HT treatment. Compared with the original CS coating samples, HT treatment decreased the degradation rate of the CS coatings. Moreover, the fabricated nano-structured topography of CS coatings increased the apatite mineralization ability and significantly enhanced the cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic genes and angiogenic factors of rat bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs). Our results suggest that the nano-structured CS coatings have immense potential in improving the clinical performance of medical implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and Enhanced Phosphate Recovery Property of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Using Polyethyleneglycol as Pore-Generation Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Pei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this paper was to synthesize a porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH with enhanced phosphate recovery property using polyethyleneglycol (PEG as pore-generation agent. The formation mechanism of porous CSH was proposed. PEG molecules were inserted into the void region of oxygen–silicon tetrahedron chains and the layers of CSH. A steric hindrance layer was generated to prevent the aggregation of solid particles. A porous structure was formed due to the residual space caused by the removal of PEG through incineration. This porous CSH exhibited highly enhanced solubility of Ca2+ and OH− due to the decreased particle size, declined crystalline, and increased specific surface area (SBET and pore volume. Supersaturation was increased in the wastewater with the enhanced solubility, which was beneficial to the formation of hydroxyapatite (HAP crystallization. Thus, phosphate can be recovered from wastewater by producing HAP using porous CSH as crystal seed. In addition, the regenerated phosphate-containing products (HAP can be reused to achieve sustainable utilization of phosphate. The present research could provide an effective approach for the synthesis of porous CSH and the enhancement of phosphate recovery properties for environmental applications.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel/calcium silicate composites manufactured by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeng; Wang, Lianfeng; Jia, Min; Cheng, Lingyu; Yan, Biao

    2017-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is raised as one kind of additive manufacturing (AM) which is based on the discrete-stacking concept. This technique can fabricate advanced composites with desirable properties directly from 3D CAD data. In this research, 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and different fractions of calcium silicate (CaSiO3) composites (weight fractions of calcium silicate are 0%, 5%,10% and 15%, respectively) were prepared by SLM technique with a purpose to develop biomedical metallic materials. The relative density, tensile, microhardness and elastic modulus of the composites were tested, their microstructures and fracture morphologies were observed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the addition of CaSiO3 particles influenced the microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens significantly. The CaSiO3 precipitates from the overlap of adjacent tracks and became the origin of the defects. The tensile strength of specimens range 320-722MPa. The microhardness and elastic modulus are around 250HV and 215GPa respectively. These composites were ductile materials and the fracture mode of the composites was mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. The 316L SS/CaSiO3 composites can be a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field.

  13. 演化晚期恒星中的结晶硅酸盐尘埃%Crystalline Silicates in Evolved Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳明; 姜碧沩

    2014-01-01

    Silicate is the most abundant cosmic dust which may present in two forms:amorphous and crystalline. Due to the difference in structure, the two types of silicate dust can be distinguished from their spectral features in the infrared. The amorphous silicate dust was discovered early in 1960s by their smooth and broad features at 10 and 18 micron. In particular, the all-sky survey by InfraRed Astronomical Satellite/Low Resolution Spectrometer revealed the popularity of amorphous silicate dust in the circumstellar envelope of evolved stars such as AGB and post-AGB stars. Meanwhile, the crystalline silicate outside the solar system was not definitely identified until the successful observation in the even longer wavelength range by the high resolution spectrometers board on the Infrared Space Observatory. It was found that the crystalline silicate dust emits a series of narrow and sharp features spanning the infrared spectrum from 10 to 70 micron, with the most prominent features being the complexes around 10, 18, 23, 28, 33, 40 and 60 micron. These features are detected in various scales, from our solar system ob jects to distant galaxies, including comets, the pre-planetary disk around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars, the debris disk of main-sequence stars, circumstellar envelop around evolved stars, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and even quasars. On the other hand, there has been no clear detection of crystalline silicate in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way galaxy, which addresses a question how the crystalline silicate dust evolves in the interstellar medium. The crystalline silicate dust is detected in every phase of late stellar evolution, i.e, red giants, AGB stars, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae at the low-mass end, and red supergiants, luminous blue variables, supernova remnants at the high-mass end. The char-acteristics (such as peak wavelength and FWHM) of the spectral features (in particular the features at 33.6 and 69 microns) in the evolved

  14. Tridimensional quantitative porosity characterization of three set calcium silicate-based repair cements for endodontic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Erika Thuanne Gonçalves; Nunes Tameirão, Michele Dias; Roter, Juliana Marins; De Assis, Joaquim Teixeira; De Almeida Neves, Aline; De-Deus, Gustavo André

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the this study was to quantitatively evaluate in three-dimensional (3D), the porosity degree of three improved silicate-based endodontic repair cements (iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete) compared to a gold-standard calcium silicate bioactive cement (Pro Root® MTA). From each tested cement, four samples were prepared by a single operator following the manufacturer's instructions in terms of proportion, time, and mixing method, using cylindrical plastic split-ring moulds. The moulds were lubricated and the mixed cements were inserted with the aid of a cement spatula. The samples were scanned using a compact micro-CT device (Skyscan 1174, Bruker micro-CT, Kontich, Belgium) and the projection images were reconstructed into cross-sectional slices (NRecon v.1.6.9, Bruker micro-CT). From the stack of images, 3D models were rendered and the porosity parameters of each tested material were obtained after threshold definition by comparison with standard porosity values of Biodentine®. No statistically significant differences in the porosity parameters among the different materials were seen. Regarding total porosity, iRoot BP Plus® showed a higher percentage of total porosity (9.58%), followed by Biodentine® (7.09%), Pro Root® MTA (6.63%), and Ceramicrete (5.91%). Regarding closed porosity, Biodentine® presented a slight increase in these numbers compared to the other sealers. No significant difference in porosity between iRoot BP Plus®, Biodentine®, and Ceramicrete were seen. In addition, no significant difference in porosity between the new calcium silicate-containing repair cements and the gold-standard MTA were found.

  15. Cytotoxicity and Osteogenic Potential of Silicate Calcium Cements as Potential Protective Materials for Pulpal Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Niu, Li-na; Palani, Chithra D.; El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Hammond, Barry D.; Pei, Dan-dan; Tian, Fu-cong; Cutler, Christopher W.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In pulpal revascularization, a protective material is placed coronal to the blood clot to prevent recontamination and to facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchynal stem cells to produce new dental tissues. Although mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been the material of choice for clot protection, it is easily displaced into the clot during condensation. The present study evaluated the effects of recently-introduced calcium silicate cements (Biodentine and TheraCal LC) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing with MTA Angelus. Methods Cell viability was assessed using XTT assay and flow cytometry. The osteogenic potential of hDPSCs exposed to calcium silicate cements was examined using qRT-PCR for osteogeic gene expressions, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, Alizarin red S staining and transmission electron microscopy of extracellular calcium deposits. Parametric statistical methods were employed for analyses of significant difference among groups, with α=0.05. Results The cytotoxic effects of Biodentine and TheraCal LC on hDPSCs were time- and concentration-dependent. Osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs was enhanced after exposure to Biodentine that was depleted of its cytotoxic components. This effect was less readily observed in hDPSCs exposed to TheraCal LC, although both cements supported extracelluar mineralization better than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol–based cement). Significance A favorable tissue response is anticipated to occur with the use of Biodentine as a blood clot-protecting material for pulpal revascularizaiton. Further investigations with the use of in vivo animal models are required to validate the potential adverse biological effects of TheraCal LC on hDPSCs. PMID:26494267

  16. Observation directe de la croissance d'hydrosilicate de calcium sur des surfaces d'alité et de silice par microscopie à force atomique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffinet, Sandrine; Finot, Éric; Lesniewska, Eric; Nonat, André

    1998-08-01

    Direct observation of the growth of calcium silicate hydrates, the tricalcium silicate hydration products, at the solid-solution interface were performed by atomic force microscopy. The covering of the surface of alite or silica by a three-dimensional oriented aggregation of nano particles of calcium silicate hydrate is always observed whatever the sample. All observations and quantifications made on calcium silicate growth at the submicronic level are in agreement with the data deduced from the study of the system evolution at the macroscopic level.

  17. New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, M.C.; Chiang, R.K.; Fillgrove, K.L. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    A search is being carried out for new calcium-based S0{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The objectives for the current year include the study of sorbents made from Ca(OH){sub 2}, from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and from portland cement. They also include the study of sorbents made from model compounds. During this year, sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2} were investigated. The results show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents in which the Si-to-Ca reactant ratio is low can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2}. Sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and natural SiO{sub 2} or natural SiO{sub 2} sources were also studied. The results obtained show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents and calcium silicate hydrate sorbents, C-S-H sorbents, can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and diatomite, pumice or perlite, minerals that are readily available. In addition. sorbents prepared from Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} and {beta}-Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and from mixtures of these compounds and SiO{sub 2} were studied. The results secured demonstrate that very good C-S-H rich sorbents can be prepared from these compounds and from mixtures of them with SiO{sub 2}. They also provide information useful for interpreting the cement sorbent results. Sorbents prepared from cement and from mixtures of cement and natural SiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} sources were investigated as well. The results secured show that cement and mixtures of it with diatomite, pumice or perlite rapidly yield excellent sorbents with the proper reaction conditions.

  18. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate - an X-ray spectromicroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07471h

  19. A chemical activity evaluation of two dental calcium silicate-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalas Renata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate-based materials are interesting products widely used in dentistry. The study was designed to compare the chemical reaction between analyzed two preparates and dentin during cavity lining. In our work, dentinal discs were prepared from human extracted teeth filled with Biodentine and MTA+. The samples were then analyzed by way of SEM, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The obtained results revealed differences in elemental composition between both materials. Biodentine showed higher activity in contact with dentine. Moreover, the interfacial layer in the tooth filled by Biodentine was wider than that in the tooth filled with MTA+. The applied methods of analysis confirmed that both materials have a bioactive potential which is a promising ability.

  20. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 1. Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinzadeh, A T; Jongsma, L; de Groot-Kuin, D; Cristescu, R; Neirynck, N; Camilleri, J

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements (HCSCs) constitute a group of materials that have become increasingly popular in endodontics since the introduction of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) in the 1990s. MTA is Portland cement to which bismuth oxide has been added to increase its radiopacity. The most important property of MTA is its capacity to set in water or a humid environment. However, MTA also has important limitations, for example, it's difficult to work with and can discolour teeth. Recently, numerous products based on HCSC chemistry, which can be considered as modifications of MTA intended to reduce its limitations, have become available on the market. Despite their potential advantages, all of these materials have their own specific limitations that are currently insufficiently known and investigated.

  1. Optical properties and Judd–Ofelt analysis of Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barve, R.A., E-mail: rujuta_barve2003@yahoo.com; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B.S.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-15

    Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate was synthesized in stoichiometric ratio using the co-precipitation technique. The phosphors were characterized using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence technique. Based on Judd–Ofelt (J–O) analysis, the intensity parameters Ω{sub 2} and Ω{sub 4} were calculated from the emission spectra for various Europium concentrations. The determined values indicate higher hypersensitive behavior of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition of Eu{sup 3+} ions in the host matrix and a stronger covalency. Different radiative properties have been discussed as the function of Eu{sup 3+} concentration. The lifetime decay pattern recorded for these samples indicated single exponential behavior. The quantum efficiency has been calculated to be 62% from the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime was found to be 2.9 ms.

  2. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could recover phosphorus with content of 18.51%. The law of Ca2+ and OH− release was the key of phosphorus recovery efficiency, and this law depended upon the microstructure of PCSH. When the temperature of synthesis reached to 170°C, the reactions between CaO and amorphous SiO2 were more efficient. Solubility of SiO2 was a limiting factor.

  3. Calcium polyphosphate as an additive to zinc-silicate glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Esther Mae; Gagnier, David; Dickey, Brett Thomas; Boyd, Daniel; Filiaggi, Mark Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum-free glass ionomer cements (GICs) are under development for orthopedic applications, but are limited by their insufficient handling properties. Here, the addition of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) was investigated as an additive to an experimental zinc-silicate glass ionomer cement. A 50% maximum increase in working time was observed with CPP addition, though this was not clinically significant due to the short working times of the starting zinc-silicate GIC. Surprisingly, CPP also improved the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength which increased by ∼33% after 30 days in TRIS buffer solution upon CPP addition up to 37.5 wt%. This strengthening may have been due to the formation of ionic crosslinks between the polyphosphate chains and polyacrylic acid. Thus, CPP is a potential additive to future GIC compositions as it has been shown to improve handling and mechanical properties. In addition, CPP may stimulate new bone growth and provide the ability for drug delivery, which are desirable modifications for an orthopedic cement.

  4. Sorption mechanisms of zinc to calcium silicate hydrate: X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, F; Scheidegger, A M; Johnson, C A; Dähn, R; Wieland, E

    2001-04-01

    In this study, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has been used to further elucidate the binding mechanisms of Zn(II) to calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the quantitatively most important cement mineral. Such knowledge is essential for the assessment of the longterm behavior of cement-stabilized waste materials. XAFS spectra of the Zn(II) equilibrated with C-S-H(I) for up to 28 days are best modeled by tetrahedral coordination of Zn(II) by four O atoms in the first atomic shell. Beyond the first coordination shell, data analysis of more highly concentrated samples suggests the presence of two distinct Zn distances and possibly the presence of an Si shell. On the basis of the comparison with a set of reference compounds, this coordination environment can be reasonably related to the structure of hemimorphite, a naturally occurring zinc silicate, and/or the presence of gamma-Zn(OH)2. At the lowest Zn uptake, the above fitting approach failed and data could be described best with a Zn-Si and a Zn-Ca shell. Previous work has been able to show that Zn(II) diffuses into the C-S-H(I) particles and does not form discrete precipitates, so the findings appear to confirm the incorporation of Zn(II) in the interlayer of C-S-H(I).

  5. Odontoblastic Differentiation, Inflammatory Response, and Angiogenic Potential of 4 Calcium Silicate-based Cements: Micromega MTA, ProRoot MTA, RetroMTA, and Experimental Calcium Silicate Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seok-Woo; Bae, Won-Jung; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Soojung; Lee, Deok-Won; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of different calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) for pulp capping materials including MicroMega MTA (MMTA; MicroMega, Besanchon, France), RetroMTA (RMTA; BioMTA, Seoul, Korea), ProRoot MTA (PMTA; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), and experimental CSC (ECSC) on odontoblastic differentiation, in vitro angiogenesis, and the inflammatory response in human dental pulp cells. Differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the marker genes. The levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by RT-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro angiogenesis was assessed by RT-PCR for angiogenic genes and an endothelial tube formation assay. PMTA, MMTA, and ECSC increased the alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization nodule formation and up-regulated messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of odontoblastic markers compared with RMTA. In addition, PMTA, MMTA, and ECSC up-regulated the mRNA of angiogenic genes in human dental pulp cells and increased the capillary tube formation of endothelial cells compared with RMTA. However, all CSCs showed similar expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein as well as proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA. Taken together, our experimental results suggest that all CSCs are favorable materials for pulp capping, but PMTA, MMTA, and ECSC may be recommended over RMTA. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen, Cuili [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyo Jin, E-mail: hjseo@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO{sub 4} and BO{sub 3} groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation.

  7. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiu-lan; Saigusa Masaihiko

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate(PS)is very effective in decreasing cadmium(Cd)content in brown rice.However,it is unclear whether me PS influences cadmium transformation in soil.The present study examined the effect of PS on pH,cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil,and also compared its effects with CaCO3,acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate(APS)and silica gel.Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable(Exch),bound to carbonates(Carb).bound to iron and manganese oxides(FeMnOx),bound to organic matters(OM)and residual(Res)fraction.ApplicatiOn of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH,while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH.PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnOx-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil,thus reducing the Exch-Cd in me tested soils.However,PS was less effecfive than CaCO3 at the same application rate.Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel.There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS,APS,silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0%CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions.These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS.

  8. Osteogenic and Angiogenic Response to Calcium Silicate-based Endodontic Sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fábio; Sousa Gomes, Pedro; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers are reported to favor the regeneration of periradicular tissues, a process requiring concerted osteogenic and angiogenic events. This study compared 4 calcium silicate-based sealers for the effects of their extracts on osteogenic and angiogenic cell behavior. Extracts from ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), MTA Plus (Prevest Denpro Limited, Jammu City, India), MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses, France) were prepared from freshly mixed sealers (0.1 g/cm(2)/mL extraction medium) and diluted (1:2-1:20). The sealers were compared for the dose- and time-dependent effects on the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). An ex vivo osteogenic assay (regeneration of neonatal mice parietal bone defects) and an in vivo angiogenesis assay (chorioallantoic membrane assay) were performed. Diluted extracts from MTA ProRoot and MTA Plus had evident stimulatory effects on the proliferation of hMSCs, alkaline phosphatase activity, and ex vivo regeneration of bone defects. They also increased HUVEC growth; allowed normal tubularlike network organization; and, in vivo, did not affect angiogenesis. Comparatively, Biodentine also elicited a favorable response on hMSCs and HUVECs, but the overall osteogenic and angiogenic outcome was slightly lower. MTA Fillapex exhibited the highest toxicity in hMSCs and HUVECs and, unlike the other sealers, only allowed a partial regeneration of bone defects. The sealers caused dose- and time-dependent effects on the osteoblastic and endothelial response, eliciting similar cytocompatibility profiles. Results suggest that the induction of both osteogenic and angiogenic events may contribute to the sealers' regenerative outcome. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Formation of a low-crystalline Zn-silicate in a stream in SW Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanty, Richard B.; De Giudici, G.; Onnis, P.; Rutherford, D.; Kimball, B.A.; Podda, F.; Cidu, R.; Lattanzi, P.; Medas, D.

    2013-01-01

    n southwestern Sardinia, Italy, the Rio Naracauli drains a catchment that includes several abandoned mines. The drainage from the mines and associated waste rocks has led to extreme concentrations of dissolved Zn, but because of the near-neutral pH, concentrations of other metals remain low. In the reach from approximately 2300 to 3000 m downstream from the headwaters area, an amorphous Zn-silicate precipitates from the water. In this reach, concentrations of both Zn and silica remain nearly constant, but the loads (measured in mass/time) of both increase, suggesting that new Zn and silica are supplied to the stream, likely from emerging groundwater. Zinc isotope signatures of the solid are heavier than the dissolved Zn by about 0.5 permil in 66/64Zn, suggesting that an extracellular biologically mediated adsorption process may be involved in the formation of the Zn-silicate.

  10. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Küçükkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P>0.05. MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73% after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  11. Anomalous composition-dependent dynamics of nanoconfined water in the interlayer of disordered calcium-silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomi, Mohammad Javad Abdolhosseini; Bauchy, Mathieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M

    2014-02-07

    With shear interest in nanoporous materials, the ultraconfining interlayer spacing of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) provides an excellent medium to study reactivity, structure, and dynamic properties of water. In this paper, we present how substrate composition affects chemo-physical properties of water in ultraconfined hydrophilic media. This is achieved by performing molecular dynamics simulation on a set of 150 realistic models with different compositions of calcium and silicon contents. It is demonstrated that the substrate chemistry directly affects the structural properties of water molecules. The motion of confined water shows a multi-stage dynamics which is characteristic of supercooled liquids and glassy phases. Inhomogeneity in that dynamics is used to differentiate between mobile and immobile water molecules. Furthermore, it is shown that the mobility of water molecules is composition-dependent. Similar to the pressure-driven self-diffusivity anomaly observed in bulk water, we report the first study on composition-driven diffusion anomaly, the self diffusivity increases with increasing confined water density in C-S-H. Such anomalous behavior is explained by the decrease in the typical activation energy required for a water molecule to escape its dynamical cage.

  12. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkaya, Selen; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer; Zeybek, Naciye Dilara; Müftüoğlu, Sevda Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P > 0.05). MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73%) after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  13. Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility of bioactive coatings on porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Alexandra A.P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering of Federal University of Minas Gerais, Rua Espirito Santo, 35/316, Centro, CEP: 30.160-030, Belo Horizonte (Madagascar) (Brazil); Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering of Federal University of Minas Gerais, Rua Espirito Santo, 35/316, Centro, CEP: 30.160-030, Belo Horizonte (Madagascar) (Brazil)

    2010-01-30

    The major goal of this research was to investigate and characterize the deposition of a biomimetic apatite-like coating onto the surface of 3D porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds with suitable bioactivity for potential application in bone tissue engineering. Basically, Portland cement, water, sand and lime were mixed for preparing the slurry which was poured into molds, and fine aluminum powder was added as foaming agent resulting on the formation of porous 3D structures. After aging for 28 days, these porous inorganic scaffolds were immersed in calcium chloride supersaturated solution in PBS for 7 days at 37 deg. C for the biomimetic layer deposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques were used in order to characterize the porous scaffolds and the apatite-like biomimetic coating. The results have showed that 3D constructs were successfully produced with interconnected porosity, compressive strength and cytocompatibility appropriate for potential use as an alternative in trabecular bone repair.

  14. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  15. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0-10mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of cements based on calcium silicate and of dental formocresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunjung; Jeong, Youngdan; Kim, Miri

    2017-03-01

    Increasing interest is being paid to the toxicities of dental materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of endodontic compounds to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) reproductive cells. Cultured CHO-K1 cells were treated with dental formocresol, two types of calcium hydroxide paste, and two types of mineral trioxide aggregate cement for 24h. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was performed on each culture, and the micronucleus frequency was determined by performing a micronucleus assay. Alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay were used to detect DNA damage. Out of the five materials tested, only dental formocresol significantly increased DNA damage. The mineral trioxide aggregate cements based on calcium silicate were not found to be potentially genotoxic. The data suggest that dental formocresol should not be recommended for use in vital pulp therapy on young teeth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation and Evaluation of Solid Dispersion Tablets by a Simple and Manufacturable Wet Granulation Method Using Porous Calcium Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yumi; Hirai, Nobuaki; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate solid dispersion tablets containing a poorly water-soluble drug using porous calcium silicate (PCS) by a wet granulation method. Nifedipine (NIF) was used as the model poorly water-soluble drug. Solid dispersion tablets were prepared with the wet granulation method using ethanol and water by a high-speed mixer granulator. The binder and disintegrant were selected from 7 and 4 candidates, respectively. The dissolution test was conducted using the JP 16 paddle method. The oral absorption of NIF was studied in fasted rats. Xylitol and crospovidone were selected as the binder and disintegrant, respectively. The dissolution rates of NIF from solid dispersion formulations were markedly enhanced compared with NIF powder and physical mixtures. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) confirmed the reduced crystallinity of NIF in the solid dispersion formulations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) showed the physical interaction between NIF and PCS in the solid dispersion formulations. NIF is present in an amorphous state in granules prepared by the wet granulation method using water. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and peak concentration (C(max)) values of NIF after dosing rats with the solid dispersion granules were significantly greater than those after dosing with NIF powder. The solid dispersion formulations of NIF prepared with PCS using the wet granulation method exhibited accelerated dissolution rates and superior oral bioavailability. This method is very simple, and may be applicable to the development of other poorly water-soluble drugs.

  18. Different response of osteoblastic cells to Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) doped calcium silicate coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zhao, Jun; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-03-01

    Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) substitution for Ca(2+) in plasma sprayed calcium silicate (Ca-Si) coatings have been reported to impede their degradation in physiological environment and, more importantly, to improve their biological performance. The reason for the improved biological performance is still elusive and, especially, the contribution of the dopant ions is lack of obvious and direct evidence. In this study, we aim to identify the effect of Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) incorporation on the osteogenic ability of Ca-Si based coatings (Ca2MgSi2O7, Ca2ZnSi2O7 and Sr-CaSiO3) by minimizing the influence of Ca and Si ions release and surface physical properties. Similar surface morphology, crystallinity and roughness were achieved for all samples by optimizing the spray parameters. As expected, Ca and Si ions release from all the coatings showed the comparable concentration with immersing time. The response of MC3T3-E1 cells onto Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) doped Ca-Si coatings were studied in terms of osteoblastic adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. The results showed that the level of cell adhesion and proliferation increased the most on the surface of Mg-modified coating. Gene expressions of early markers of osteoblast differentiation (COL-I and ALP mRNA) were obviously improved on Zn-modified coating. Gene expressions of later markers for osteoblast differentiation (OPN and OC mRNA) and mineralized nodules formation were obviously accelerated on the surface of Sr-modified coating. Since Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) play a regulatory role in different stages of osteogenesis, it may be possible to utilize this in the development of new coating materials for orthopedic application.

  19. Microparticulated and nanoparticulated zirconium oxide added to calcium silicate cement: Evaluation of physicochemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Guilherme F; Bosso, Roberta; Ferino, Rafael V; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Bernardi, Maria I B; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane M; Cerri, Paulo S

    2014-12-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of calcium silicate-based cement (CS) associated to microparticulated (micro) or nanoparticulated (nano) zirconium oxide (ZrO2 ) were compared with CS and bismuth oxide (BO) with CS. The pH, release of calcium ions, radiopacity, setting time, and compression strength of the materials were evaluated. The tissue reaction promoted by these materials in the subcutaneous was also investigated by morphological, immunohistochemical, and quantitative analyses. For this purpose, polyethylene tubes filled with materials were implanted into rat subcutaneous. After 7, 15, 30, and 60 days, the tubes surrounded by capsules were fixed and embedded in paraffin. In the H&E-stained sections, the number of inflammatory cells (ICs) in the capsule was obtained. Moreover, detection of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by immunohistochemistry and number of IL-6 immunolabeled cells were carried out. von Kossa method was also performed. The differences among the groups were subjected to Tukey test (p ≤ 0.05). The solutions containing the materials presented an alkaline pH and released calcium ions. The addition of radiopacifiers increased setting time and radiopacity of CS. A higher compressive strength in the CS + ZrO2 (micro and nano) was found compared with CS + BO. The number of IC and IL-6 positive cells in the materials with ZrO2 was significantly reduced in comparison with CS + BO. von Kossa-positive structures were observed adjacent to implanted materials. The ZrO2 associated to the CS provides satisfactory physicochemical properties and better biological response than BO. Thus, ZrO2 may be a good alternative for use as radiopacifying agent in substitution to BO.

  20. Lime and calcium-magnesium silicate in the ionic speciation of an Oxisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Arthur Antonangelo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Plant residues and certain fertilizers accelerate soil acidification and increase the levels of aluminum-Al+3 in soils under no-tillage (NT. Silicates act as acidity amendments and as a source of silicon as in H4SiO4. An increase in the pH of soil solution causes the deprotonation of H4SiO4 and generates the anionic form (H3SiO4−. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ionic speciation of Si, Al, Ca, Mg and K in aqueous extracts by means of a software calculation. Since 2006, a field experiment has been under way on an Oxisol under NT subjected to lime and calcium-magnesium silicate applications under four crop systems. The amendments were applied in Oct 2006 and in Oct 2011, aiming to raise base saturation to 70 %. Soil samples were collected in Oct 2013, at depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm. Both Ca and Mg formed complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC whereas the same was not observed for potassium. These three basic cations were mostly in their free forms regardless of treatment, while Al was mostly complexed with DOC even at the lowest depths (40-60 cm. The highest value of free Al form was 15 %. Si was almost 100 % as H4SiO4, and its activity was similar to its concentration in solution for all crop systems and at all depths, regardless of amendment applied. The percentages of H3SiO4− and Al-H3SiO42+ were irrelevant, providing more phytoavailable H4SiO4 in soil solution.

  1. Osseointegration of nanohydroxyapatite- or nano-calcium silicate-incorporated polyetheretherketone bioactive composites in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rui Ma,1,2 Zhifeng Yu,1 Songchao Tang,3 Yongkang Pan,3 Jie Wei,3 Tingting Tang1 1Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implants, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK exhibits appropriate biomechanical strength as well as good biocompatibility and stable chemical properties but lacks bioactivity and cannot achieve highly efficient osseointegration after implantation. Incorporating bioceramics into the PEEK matrix is a feasible approach for improving its bioactivity. In this study, nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA and nano-calcium silicate (n-CS were separately incorporated into PEEK to prepare n-HA/PEEK and n-CS/PEEK biocomposites, respectively, using a compounding and injection-molding technique, and the in vitro degradation characteristics were evaluated. Discs with a diameter of 8 mm were inserted in 8 mm full-thickness cranial defects in rabbits for 4 and 8 weeks, and implantation of pure PEEK was used as the control. Three-dimensional microcomputed tomography, histological analysis, fluorescence microscopy of new bone formation, and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the osseointegration performance at the bone/implant interface. The results of the in vitro degradation study demonstrated that degradation of n-CS on the surface of n-CS/PEEK could release Ca and Si ions and form a porous structure. In vivo tests revealed that both n-CS/PEEK and n-HA/PEEK promoted osseointegration at the bone/implant interface compared to PEEK

  2. Graphene-reinforced calcium silicate coatings for load-bearing implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Youtao; Li, Hongqing; Zhang, Chi; Gu, Xin; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Owing to the superior mechanical properties and low coefficient of thermal expansion, graphene has been widely used in the reinforcement of ceramics. In the present study, various ratios of graphene (0.5 wt%, 1.5 wt% and 4 wt%) were reinforced into calcium silicate (CS) coatings for load-bearing implant surface modification. Surface characteristics of the graphene/calcium silicate (GC) composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the graphene plates (less than 4 wt% in the coatings) were embedded in the CS matrix homogeneously. The surfaces of the coatings showed a hierarchical hybrid nano-/microstructure, which is believed to be beneficial to the behaviors of the cell and early bone fixation of the implants. Wear resistance measured by a pin-on-disc model exhibited an obvious enhancement with the adoption of graphene plates. The weight losses of the GC coatings decreased with the increase of graphene content. However, too high graphene content (4 wt% or more) made the composite coatings porous and the wear resistance decreased dramatically. The weight loss was only 1.3 ± 0.2 mg for the GC coating containing 1.5 wt% graphene (denoted as GC1.5) with a load of 10 N and sliding distance of 500 m, while that of the pure CS coating reached up to 28.6 ± 0.5 mg. In vitro cytocompatibility of the GC1.5 coating was evaluated using a human marrow stem cell (hMSC) culture system. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin (OC) osteogenesis-related gene expression of the cells on the GC1.5 coating did not deteriorate with the adoption of graphene. Conversely, even better adhesion of the hMSCs was observed on the GC1.5 coating than on the pure CS coating. All of the results indicate that the GC1.5 coating is a good candidate for load-bearing implants.

  3. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  4. Comparison of osteoblast-like cell responses to calcium silicate and tricalcium phosphate ceramics in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Siyu; Chang, Jiang; Chou, Lee; Zhai, Wanyin

    2007-01-01

    Calcium silicate ceramics have been proposed as new bone repair biomaterials, since they have proved to be bioactive, degradable, and biocompatible. Beta-tricalcium phosphate ceramic is a well-known degradable material for bone repair. This study compared the effects of CaSiO3 (alpha-, and beta-CaSiO3) and beta-Ca3(PO4)2 (beta-TCP) ceramics on the early stages of rat osteoblast-like cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured directly on CaSiO3 (alpha-, and beta-CaSiO3) and beta-TCP ceramics. Attachment of a greater number of cells was observed on CaSiO3 (alpha-, and beta-CaSiO3) ceramics compared with beta-TCP ceramics after incubation for 6 h. SEM observations showed an intimate contact between cells and the substrates, significant cells adhesion, and that the cells spread and grew on the surfaces of all the materials. In addition, the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the cells on the CaSiO3 (alpha-, and beta-CaSiO3) ceramics were improved when compared with the beta-TCP ceramics. In the presence of CaSiO3, elevated levels of calcium and silicon in the culture medium were observed throughout the 7-day culture period. In conclusion, the results of the present study revealed that CaSiO3 ceramics showed greater ability to support cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation than beta-TCP ceramic. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate--an X-ray spectromicroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-21

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.

  6. Porous tablets of crystalline calcium carbonate via sintering of amorphous nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Liu, Xing-Min; Aziz, Baroz; Hedin, Niklas; Zhao, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Porous tablets of crystalline calcium carbonate were formed upon sintering of a precursor powder of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) under compressive stress (20 MPa) at relatively low temperatures (120–400 °C), induced by pulsed direct currents. Infrared spectroscopy ascertained the amorphous nature of the precursor powders. At temperatures of 120–350 °C and rates of temperature increase of 20–100 °C min−1, the nanoparticles of ACC transformed into crystallites of mainly aragonite, which is...

  7. Experimental Calcium Silicate-Based Cement with and without Zirconium Oxide Modulates Fibroblasts Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slompo, Camila; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Gasque, Kellen Cristina da Silva; Damante, Carla Andreotti; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether the use of zirconium oxide as a radiopacifier of an experimental calcium silicate-based cement (WPCZO) leads to cytotoxicity. Fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations (10 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mg/mL) of the cements diluted in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) for periods of 12, 24, and 48 h. Groups tested were white Portland cement (WPC), white Portland cement with zirconium oxide (WPCZO), and white mineral trioxide aggregate Angelus (MTA). Control group cells were not treated. The cytotoxicity was evaluated through mitochondrial-activity (MTT) and cell-density (crystal violet) assays. All cements showed low cytotoxicity. In general, at the concentration of 10 mg/mL there was an increase in viability of those groups treated with WPC and WPCZO when compared to the control group (pzirconium oxide as the radiopacifier showed low cytotoxicity as a promising material to be exploited for root-end filling.

  8. Odontogenic effects of a fast-setting calcium-silicate cement containing zirconium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-A; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Min, Kyung-San

    2015-01-01

    A fast-setting calcium-silicate cement (Endocem) was introduced in the field of dentistry for use in vital pulp therapy. Similar to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), it contains bismuth oxide to provide radiopacity. Recently, another product, EndocemZr, which contains zirconium oxide (ZrO2) as a radiopacifier, was developed by the same company. In this study, the biological/odontogenic effects of EndocemZr were investigated in human primary dental pulp cells (hpDPCs) in vitro and on capped rat teeth in vivo. The biocompatibility of EndocemZr was similar to that of ProRoot and Endocem on the basis of cell viability tests and cell morphological analysis. The mineralization nodule formation, expression of odontogenic-related markers, and reparative dentin formation of EndocemZr group was similar to those of other material groups. Our results suggest that EndocemZr has the potential to be used as an effective material for vital pulp therapy, similar to ProRoot and Endocem.

  9. Nanostructured calcium silicate hydrate seeds accelerate concrete hardening: a combined assessment of benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräu, Michael; Ma-Hock, Lan; Hesse, Christoph; Nicoleau, Luc; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Wiench, Karin; Landsiedel, Robert; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology creates new possibilities to control and improve material properties for civil infrastructure. Special focus in this area is put on Portland cement and gypsum. Together their annual production is by far larger than for any other material worldwide. Nanomodification of these materials can be done during the few hours between dissolution and hardening, especially by nucleation of the re-crystallization with suitable colloids. Here we report first results in homogeneous seeding of the precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates within a real Portland cement composition. The occupational safety during the production phase and during mixing of concrete paste is addressed in detail by in vivo testing. We perform 5-day inhalation with 21-day recovery in rats and analyze organ-specific toxicity and 71 endpoints from bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) and blood. In BALF parameters, no test-related changes were observed, indicating the generally low toxicity of the test material. Some mild lesions were observed in larynx level. In the lungs, all animals of the 50 mg/m³ concentration group revealed a minimal to mild increase in alveolar macrophages, which recovered back to control level.

  10. Influences of calcium silicate on chemical forms and subcellular distribution of cadmium in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Wu, Jingtao; Shen, Yong; Li, Yingwen; Zou, Bi; Tang, Yetao; Zhuang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in grain amaranths (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Cv. ‘K112’) grown in a Cd contaminated soil. Results showed that the dry weight and the photosynthetic pigments contents in grain amaranths increased significantly with the increasing doses of CS treatments, with the highest value found for the treatment of CS3 (1.65 g/kg). Compared with the control, application of CS4 (3.31 g/kg) significantly reduced Cd concentrations in the roots, stems and leaves of grain amaranths by 68%, 87% and 89%, respectively. At subcellular level, CS treatment resulted in redistribution of Cd, higher percentages of Cd in the chloroplast and soluble fractions in leaves of grain amaranths were found, while lower proportions of Cd were located at the cell wall of the leaves. The application of CS enhanced the proportions of pectate and protein integrated forms of Cd and decreased the percentages of water soluble Cd potentially associated with toxicity in grain amaranths. Changes of free Cd ions into inactive forms sequestered in subcellular compartments may indicate an important mechanism of CS for alleviating Cd toxicity and accumulation in plants.

  11. Controlled release calcium silicate based floating granular delivery system of ranitidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish K; Jain, Sunil K; Yadav, Awesh; Agrawal, Govind P

    2006-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to prepare and evaluate floating granular delivery system consisting of (i) calcium silicate (CS) as porous carrier; (ii) ranitidine hydrochloride (RH), an anti-ulcer agent; and (iii) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K4M (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) as matrix forming polymers. The effect of various formulation and process variables on the particle morphology, particle size, micromeritic properties, percent drug content, in vitro floating behavior, and in vitro drug release from the floating granules was studied. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of granules revealed that that more pores of CS in secondary coated granules (SCG) were covered by the polymer film than those in primary coated granules (PCG). The formulation demonstrated favorable in vitro floating and drug release characteristics. The in vivo evaluation for the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters was performed in albino rats. Higher plasma concentration was maintained throughout the study period from the floating granules of RH. The enhanced bioavailability and elimination half-life observed in the present study may be due to the floating nature of the dosage form. The results suggested that CS is a useful carrier for the development of floating and sustained release preparations.

  12. Solubility of a new calcium silicate-based root-end filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare solubility of a new calcium silicate-based cement, Biodentine with three commonly used root-end filling materials viz. glass-ionomer cement (GIC, intermediate restorative material (IRM, and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Materials and Methods: Twenty stainless steel ring molds were filled with cements corresponding to four groups (n = 5. The weight of 20 dried glass bottles was recorded. Samples were transferred to bottles containing 5 ml of distilled water and stored for 24 h. The bottles were dried at 105΀C and weighed. This procedure was repeated for 3, 10, 30, and 60 days. Data was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test (P < 0.05. Results: Biodentine demonstrated significantly higher solubility than MTA for 30- and 60-day immersion periods. Statistical difference was noted between the solubility values of Biodentine samples amongst each of the five time intervals. Conclusions: Biodentine exhibited higher solubility in comparison with all other cements.

  13. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration.

  14. Graphene Nanosheets to Improve Physico-Mechanical Properties of Bioactive Calcium Silicate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nileshkumar Dubey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive calcium silicate cements are widely used to induce mineralization, to cement prosthetic parts, in the management of tooth perforations, and other areas. Nonetheless, they can present clinical disadvantages, such as long setting time and modest physico-mechanical properties. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of graphene nanosheets (GNS to improve two bioactive cements. GNS were obtained via reduction of graphite oxide. GNS were mixed (1, 3, 5, and 7 wt % with Biodentine (BIO and Endocem Zr (ECZ, and the effects on setting time, hardness, push-out strength, pH profile, cell proliferation, and mineralization were evaluated. Statistics were performed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. GNS has not interfered in the composition of the set cements as confirmed by Raman, FT-IR and XRD. GNS (1 and 3 wt % shortened the setting time, increased hardness of both materials but decreased significantly the push-out strength of ECZ. pH was not affected but 1 wt % and 7 wt % to ECZ and 5 wt % to BIO increased the mineralization compared to the controls. In summary, GNS may be an alternative to improve the physico-mechanical properties and bioactivity of cements. Nonetheless, the use of GNS may not be advised for all materials when effective bonding is a concern.

  15. Effects of glass fiber modified with calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H(I)) reinforced cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, M.; Zhang, L.; Ge, S.; Cheng, X.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H(I)) and glass fiber modified with C-S-H(I) (SiF) at ambient temperature were synthesized. SiF and untreated fiber (OF) were incorporated into cement paste. Phase composition of C-S-H(I), SiF and OF was characterized by XRD. The surface morphologies were characterized by SEM. Flexural performance of fiber reinforced cement (FRC) at different curing ages was investigated. Results indicated that both SiF and OF could reinforce cement paste. SiF had a more positive effect on improving the flexural performance of FRC than OF. The strength of SiF reinforced cement was 11.48MPa after 28 days curing when fiber volume was 1.0%, 12.55% higher than that of OF reinforced cement. The flexural strength increased with the addition of fiber volume. However, the large dosage of fiber might cause a decrease in flexural strength of FRC.

  16. Electrodeposition of porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate composite coating on titanium for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Han, Shuguang; Pang, Xiaofeng; Ding, Qionqion; Yan, Yajing

    2013-04-01

    A novel method of electrolytic porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate (HA/CaSiO3) composite coating was conducted on pure titanium in a mixed solution of nano-SiO2, Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. SEM observation showed that the composite layer was porous, thereby providing abundant sites for the osteoblast adhesion. XRD results showed that the composite coating was mainly composed of HA and CaSiO3. Bond strength testing exhibited that HA-CaSiO3/Ti had higher bond strength than HA/Ti. The HA/CaSiO3 coating was more corrosion resistant than the HA coating based on the polarization tests. In vitro cell experiments demonstrated that both the HA and HA/CaSiO3 coatings showed better cell response than the bared titanium. In addition, the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells grown on the HA/CaSiO3 coating were remarkably higher than those on the bared Ti and pure HA coating.

  17. Mechanical and in vitro biological performance of graphene nanoplatelets reinforced calcium silicate composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Seyed Shirazi, Seyed Farid; Baradaran, Saeid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Zandi, Keivan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared using hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150°C. Quantitative microstructural analysis suggests that GNP play a role in grain size and is responsible for the improved densification. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that GNP survived the harsh processing conditions of the selected HIP processing parameters. The uniform distribution of 1 wt.% GNP in the CS matrix, high densification and fine CS grain size help to improve the fracture toughness by ∼130%, hardness by ∼30% and brittleness index by ∼40% as compared to the CS matrix without GNP. The toughening mechanisms, such as crack bridging, pull-out, branching and deflection induced by GNP are observed and discussed. The GNP/CS composites exhibit good apatite-forming ability in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Our results indicate that the addition of GNP decreased pH value in SBF. Effect of addition of GNP on early adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblast cells (hFOB) was measured in vitro. The GNP/CS composites showed good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the cell viability and proliferation are affected by time and concentration of GNP in the CS matrix.

  18. Mechanical and in vitro biological performance of graphene nanoplatelets reinforced calcium silicate composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mehrali

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS ceramic composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP were prepared using hot isostatic pressing (HIP at 1150°C. Quantitative microstructural analysis suggests that GNP play a role in grain size and is responsible for the improved densification. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that GNP survived the harsh processing conditions of the selected HIP processing parameters. The uniform distribution of 1 wt.% GNP in the CS matrix, high densification and fine CS grain size help to improve the fracture toughness by ∼130%, hardness by ∼30% and brittleness index by ∼40% as compared to the CS matrix without GNP. The toughening mechanisms, such as crack bridging, pull-out, branching and deflection induced by GNP are observed and discussed. The GNP/CS composites exhibit good apatite-forming ability in the simulated body fluid (SBF. Our results indicate that the addition of GNP decreased pH value in SBF. Effect of addition of GNP on early adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblast cells (hFOB was measured in vitro. The GNP/CS composites showed good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the cell viability and proliferation are affected by time and concentration of GNP in the CS matrix.

  19. Quantitative Evaluation by Glucose Diffusion of Microleakage in Aged Calcium Silicate-Based Open-Sandwich Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koubi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the in vitro marginal integrity of open-sandwich restorations based on aged calcium silicate cement versus resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Class II cavities were prepared on 30 extracted human third molars. These teeth were randomly assigned to two groups (=10 to compare a new hydraulic calcium silicate cement designed for restorative dentistry (Biodentine, Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Ionolux, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany in open-sandwich restorations covered with a light-cured composite. Positive (=5 and negative (=5 controls were included. The teeth simultaneously underwent thermocycling and mechanocycling using a fatigue cycling machine (1,440 cycles, 5–55°C; 86,400 cycles, 50 N/cm2. The specimens were then stored in phosphate-buffered saline to simulate aging. After 1 year, the teeth were submitted to glucose diffusion, and the resulting data were analyzed with a nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. The Biodentine group and the Ionolux group presented glucose concentrations of 0.074 ± 0.035 g/L and 0.080 ± 0.032 g/L, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two groups. Therefore, the calcium silicate-based material performs as well as the resin-modified glass ionomer cement in open-sandwich restorations.

  20. Preparation and characterization of high-strength calcium silicate boards from coal-fired industrial solid wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cao; Yong-dan Cao; Jin-shan Zhang; Chun-bao Sun; Xian-long Li

    2015-01-01

    To realize the comprehensive utilization of coal-fired industrial solid wastes, a novel high-strength board was prepared from cal-cium silicate slag, fly ash, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. The changes in mineral phases, chemical structure, and morphology during hydration were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron mi-croscopy (SEM). A traditional board made from quartz and lime was prepared as a reference. The novel board not only consumes a lot of solid wastes, but also meets the strength requirement of the class-five calcium silicate board according to the Chinese Standard JC/T 564.2—2008. Microanalysis showed that hydrated calcium silicate gel (C−S−H(I)), ettringite, tobermorite, and xonotlite were successivelygenerated in the novel board by synergistic hydration of the mixed solid wastes. The board strength was improved by the formation of tobermorite and xonotlite but decreased by unhydrated quartz. It was demonstrated that quartz was not completely hydrated in the traditional board. As a re-sult, the flexural strength of the traditional board was much lower than that of the novel board.

  1. Preliminary study of raw material for calcium silicate/PVA coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, Farah ' Atiqah bt Abdul; Shamsudin, Roslinda, E-mail: linda@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Calcium silicate bioceramic was prepared from the rice husk and limestone resources using the sol gel method. The preparations of CaSiO{sub 3} formulation were differ from the previous study due CaO/SiO{sub 2} amount with 45:55 ratio. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was carried out to clarify the amount of SiO{sub 2} and CaO content in the limestone and rice husk ash. The high amount of CaO was found in the limestone with the percentages of 97.22%, whereby 89% of SiO{sub 2} content of the rice husk ash. Several milling time were studied to obtain the optimized milling ti me and speed in progress to obtain nano size particle. The particle size analysis result confirms that increase in milling time does not certainly reduce the size of particle. The addition of 0.05% polyvinyl alcohol as a binder did not change the phases or composition of calcium silicates after examined by X-Ray diffraction analysis which make it suitable to be used as a binder for calcium silicate coating without changing the chemical structure.

  2. Preliminary study of raw material for calcium silicate/PVA coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Farah Atiqah bt Abdul; Shamsudin, Roslinda

    2015-09-01

    Calcium silicate bioceramic was prepared from the rice husk and limestone resources using the sol gel method. The preparations of CaSiO3 formulation were differ from the previous study due CaO/SiO2 amount with 45:55 ratio. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was carried out to clarify the amount of SiO2 and CaO content in the limestone and rice husk ash. The high amount of CaO was found in the limestone with the percentages of 97.22%, whereby 89% of SiO2 content of the rice husk ash. Several milling time were studied to obtain the optimized milling ti me and speed in progress to obtain nano size particle. The particle size analysis result confirms that increase in milling time does not certainly reduce the size of particle. The addition of 0.05% polyvinyl alcohol as a binder did not change the phases or composition of calcium silicates after examined by X-Ray diffraction analysis which make it suitable to be used as a binder for calcium silicate coating without changing the chemical structure.

  3. Effects of Zn Content on Crystal Structure, Cytocompatibility, Antibacterial Activity, and Chemical Stability in Zn-Modified Calcium Silicate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Yu, Jiangming; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Ye, Xiaojian; Zheng, Xuebin

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings possess not only excellent chemical stability but also well antibacterial activity. Still, effects of zinc content on these properties and cytocompatibility remain unclear. In this paper, two kinds of Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings (ZC0.3, ZC0.5) were fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V substrates via plasma spraying technology. X-ray diffraction results and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the ZC0.5 coating was composed of pure hardystonite (Ca2ZnSi2O7) phase, while, besides Ca2ZnSi2O7 phase, the amorphous CaSiO3 phase was also detected in the ZC0.3 coating. Chemical stability in Tris-HCl buffer solution and antibacterial activity of the Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings increased with an increase in zinc content. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation demonstrated that the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen type I (COLI) secretion of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells on Zn-modified coatings were significantly enhanced compared to the Zn-free coating and Ti-6Al-4V control, and no cytotoxicity appeared on Zn-modified coatings. The better antibacterial activity and the enhanced capability to promote MC3T3-E1 cells differentiation of Zn-modified coatings should be attributed to the slow and constant Zn2+ releasing from the coatings.

  4. Leguminous plants nodulated by selected strains of Cupriavidus necator grow in heavy metal contaminated soils amended with calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar Ferreira, Paulo Ademar; Lopes, Guilherme; Bomfeti, Cleide Aparecida; de Oliveira Longatti, Silvia Maria; de Sousa Soares, Cláudio Roberto Fonseca; Guimarães Guilherme, Luiz Roberto; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    2013-11-01

    Increasing concern regarding mining area environmental contamination with heavy metals has resulted in an emphasis of current research on phytoremediation. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of symbiotic Cupriavidus necator strains on different leguminous plants in soil contaminated with heavy metals following the application of inorganic materials. The application of limestone and calcium silicate induced a significant increase in soil pH, with reductions in zinc and cadmium availability of 99 and 94 %, respectively. In addition, improved nodulation of Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica in soil with different levels of contamination was observed. Significant increases in the nitrogen content of the aerial parts of the plant were observed upon nodulation of the root system of Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica by strain UFLA01-659 (36 and 40 g kg(-1)) and by strain UFLA02-71 in Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia (39 g kg(-1)). The alleviating effect of calcium silicate resulted in higher production of dry matter from the aerial part of the plant, an increase in nodule number and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. The results of the present study demonstrate that the combination of rhizobia, leguminous plants and calcium silicate may represent a key factor in the remediation of areas contaminated by heavy metals.

  5. Respirable crystalline silica: Analysis methodologies; Silice cristalina respirable: Metodologias de analisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Tena, M. P.; Zumaquero, E.; Ibanez, M. J.; Machi, C.; Escric, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes different analysis methodologies in occupational environments and raw materials. A review is presented of the existing methodologies, the approximations made, some of the constraints involved, as well as the best measurement options for the different raw materials. In addition, the different factors that might affect the precision and accuracy of the results are examined. With regard to the methodologies used for the quantitative analysis of any of the polymorph s, particularly of quartz, the study centres particularly on the analytical X-ray diffraction method. Simplified methods of calculation and experimental separation are evaluated for the estimation of this fraction in the raw materials, such as separation methods by centrifugation, sedimentation, and dust generation in controlled environments. In addition, a review is presented of the methodologies used for the collection of respirable crystalline silica in environmental dust. (Author)

  6. Directed osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem/precursor cells on silicate substituted calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kate; Travers, Paul; Chander, Chaman; Buckland, Tom; Campion, Charlie; Noble, Brendon

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient, underactive, or inappropriate osteoblast function results in serious clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta and fracture nonunion and therefore the control of osteogenesis is a medical priority. In vitro mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be directed to form osteoblasts through the addition of soluble factors such as β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone; however this is unlikely to be practical in the clinical setting. An alternative approach would be to use a scaffold or matrix engineered to provide cues for differentiation without the need for soluble factors. Here we describe studies using Silicate-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and unmodified hydroxyapatite (HA) to test whether these materials are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in the absence of soluble factors. Si-CaP supported attachment and proliferation of MSCs and induced osteogenesis to a greater extent than HA, as evidenced through upregulation of the osteoblast-related genes: Runx2 (1.2 fold), Col1a1 (2 fold), Pth1r (1.5 fold), and Bglap (1.7 fold) Dmp1 (1.1 fold), respectively. Osteogenic-associated proteins, alkaline phosphatase (1.4 fold), RUNX2, COL1A1, and BGLAP, were also upregulated and there was an increased production of mineralized bone matrix (1.75 fold), as detected by the Von Kossa Assay. These data indicate that inorganic substrates are capable of directing the differentiation programme of stem cells in the absence of known chemical drivers and therefore may provide the basis for bone repair in the clinical setting.

  7. Substitutions of strontium in mesoporous calcium silicate and their physicochemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yufang; Zhu, Min; He, Xing; Zhang, Jianhua; Tao, Cuilian

    2013-05-01

    Calcium silicate (Ca-Si) based bioceramics have been regarded as a potential bioactive materials for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we have successfully prepared ordered mesoporous strontium (Sr)-substituted CaSiO3 (Sr-CaSiO3) materials by using a triblock copolymer (P123) as a structure-directing agent. The microstructure and porosity of mesoporous Sr-CaSiO3 materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and the N2 adsorption-desorption technique. The substitution of Sr for Ca in mesoporous CaSiO3 did not change the mesoporous structure, but the surface area and pore volume decreased with increasing Sr substitution. The effects of the Sr substitution on the physiochemical and biological properties of mesoporous CaSiO3 materials were evaluated by the ion dissolution, apatite-forming ability, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The results showed that the increasing Sr substitution decreased the dissolution rate of Ca and Si ions from mesoporous CaSiO3 materials and enhanced the ability to stabilize the pH environment. Mesoporous Sr-CaSiO3 materials have a similar apatite-forming ability to mesoporous CaSiO3 material, and stimulated the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, using gentamicin as a model drug, mesoporous Sr-CaSiO3 materials exhibited a sustained drug release property which could be used in local drug delivery therapy. Furthermore, the drug release rate decreased to some extent with increasing Sr substitution in mesoporous CaSiO3 materials. Therefore, mesoporous Sr-CaSiO3 materials have more potential for application in bone tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser Sintered Magnesium-Calcium Silicate/Poly-ε-Caprolactone Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yang Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we manufacture and analyze bioactive magnesium–calcium silicate/poly-ε-caprolactone (Mg–CS/PCL 3D scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Mg–CS powder was incorporated into PCL, and we fabricated the 3D scaffolds using laser sintering technology. These scaffolds had high porosity and interconnected-design macropores and structures. As compared to pure PCL scaffolds without an Mg–CS powder, the hydrophilic properties and degradation rate are also improved. For scaffolds with more than 20% Mg–CS content, the specimens become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer after soaking in simulated body fluid for 1 day. In vitro analyses were directed using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs on all scaffolds that were shown to be biocompatible and supported cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased focal adhesion kinase and promoted cell adhesion behavior were observed after an increase in Mg–CS content. In addition, the results indicate that the Mg–CS quantity in the composite is higher than 10%, and the quantity of cells and osteogenesis-related protein of hMSCs is stimulated by the Si ions released from the Mg–CS/PCL scaffolds when compared to PCL scaffolds. Our results proved that 3D Mg–CS/PCL scaffolds with such a specific ionic release and good degradability possessed the ability to promote osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs, indicating that they might be promising biomaterials with potential for next-generation bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  9. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Wen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Nai-Shuo [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Ding, Shinn-Jyh, E-mail: sjding@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  10. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Orozco, Carlos A.

    2017-03-24

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  11. Synthesis, mechanical properties, and in vitro biocompatibility with osteoblasts of calcium silicate-reduced graphene oxide composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Baradaran, Saeid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Zandi, Keivan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-03-26

    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramics are promising bioactive materials for bone tissue engineering, particularly for bone repair. However, the low toughness of CS limits its application in load-bearing conditions. Recent findings indicating the promising biocompatibility of graphene imply that graphene can be used as an additive to improve the mechanical properties of composites. Here, we report a simple method for the synthesis of calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide (CS/rGO) composites using a hydrothermal approach followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Adding rGO to pure CS increased the hardness of the material by ∼40%, the elastic modulus by ∼52%, and the fracture toughness by ∼123%. Different toughening mechanisms were observed including crack bridging, crack branching, crack deflection, and rGO pull-out, thus increasing the resistance to crack propagation and leading to a considerable improvement in the fracture toughness of the composites. The formation of bone-like apatite on a range of CS/rGO composites with rGO weight percentages ranging from 0 to 1.5 has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). The presence of a bone-like apatite layer on the composite surface after soaking in SBF was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The biocompatibility of the CS/rGO composites was characterized using methyl thiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assays in vitro. The cell adhesion results showed that human osteoblast cells (hFOB) can adhere to and develop on the CS/rGO composites. In addition, the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of cells on the CS/rGO composites were improved compared with the pure CS ceramics. These results suggest that calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide composites are promising materials for biomedical applications.

  12. Rapid resorbable, glassy crystalline materials on the basis of calcium alkali orthophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, G; Gildenhaar, R; Ploska, U

    1995-11-01

    Materials based on calcium orthophosphates have been developed to crystallize spontaneously and directly from the melt. The main crystalline phase consists of a new synthesized chemical of formula Ca2KNa(PO4)2. This compound crystallizes in a very wide range of chemical compositions as shown. Furthermore, the solubility was tested and compared with that of self-prepared alpha-tricalcium phosphate ceramics and commercial products of hydroxyapatite ceramics and surface-modified alpha-tricalcium phosphate ceramics. The results show that new materials containing the compound Ca2KNa(PO4)2 had the highest solubility in comparison with other tested materials.

  13. Re-establishing apical patency after obturation with Gutta-percha and two novel calcium silicate-based sealers

    OpenAIRE

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Koursoumis, Anastasios D.; Kontakiotis,Evangelos G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Aim of the present study was to evaluate the retreatability and reestablishment of apical patency of two calcium silicate-based sealers, TotalFill BC Sealer (BCS) and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (MTA F), versus AH Plus, when used in combination with Gutta-percha (GP). Materials and Methods: The canals of 54 single-rooted anterior teeth were instrumented and filled with GP/AH Plus (Group A), GP/MTA F (Group B), or GP/BCS (Group C) using continuous wave obturation technique. ...

  14. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of the Efficacy of Calcium Silicate Indirect Pulp Capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, D.; Mannocci, F.; Patel, S.; Manoharan, A.; Brown, J.E.; Watson, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of calcium silicate cement (Biodentine) versus glass ionomer cement (GIC; control group) as indirect pulp capping materials in patients with reversible pulpitis and to compare the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) versus periapical (PA) radiographs in detecting PA changes at baseline (T0) and at 12 mo (T12) postoperatively. Seventy-two restorations (36 Biodentine, 36 Fuji IX) were placed randomly in 53 patients. CBCT/PA radiographs were taken at T0 and T12. Two calibrated examiners assessed the presence/absence and increase/decrease in the size of existing PA radiolucencies under standardized conditions. The Kappa coefficient evaluated statistically the effectiveness of CBCT versus PA radiographs in detecting PA changes. Chi-square/Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate the association between PA changes in CBCT with various clinical measures. Significance was predetermined at α = 0.05. Clinical success rates for Biodentine and Fuji IX GIC were 83.3%. CBCT was significantly more effective in detecting PA radiolucencies compared with radiographs (P = 0.0069). Of the teeth, 65.4% and 90.4% were deemed healthy using CBCT and PA radiographs, respectively, at T12. Healing/healed rates were 17.3%/0%, while new/progressed radiolucency were 30.8%/9.6% with CBCT/PA radiographs, respectively. Seventy-one percent of healed lesions had received Biodentine; 88% of new/progressed lesions received Fuji IX GIC. Teeth presenting with an initial CBCT PA lesion had a failure rate of 63%, whereas teeth with no initial lesion had a failure rate of 16%. Although no statistically significant difference was detected in the clinical efficacy of Biodentine/Fuji IX when used as indirect pulp capping materials in patients with reversible pulpitis, CBCT showed a significant difference in that most healed CBCT lesions had received Biodentine while most that did not heal received Fuji IX. Longer-term follow-up is

  15. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  16. Amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate distribution in the tergite cuticle of moulting Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neues, Frank; Hild, Sabine; Epple, Matthias; Marti, Othmar; Ziegler, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The main mineral components of the isopod cuticle consists of crystalline magnesium calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate. During moulting isopods moult first the posterior and then the anterior half of the body. In terrestrial species calcium carbonate is subject to resorption, storage and recycling in order to retain significant fractions of the mineral during the moulting cycle. We used synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy to quantify the ACC/calcite ratio, the mineral phase distribution and the composition within the anterior and posterior tergite cuticle during eight different stages of the moulting cycle of Porcellio scaber. The results show that most of the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is resorbed from the cuticle, whereas calcite remains in the old cuticle and is shed during moulting. During premoult resorption of ACC from the posterior cuticle is accompanied by an increase within the anterior tergites, and mineralization of the new posterior cuticle by resorption of mineral from the anterior cuticle. This suggests that one reason for using ACC in cuticle mineralization is to facilitate resorption and recycling of cuticular calcium carbonate. Furthermore we show that ACC precedes the formation of calcite in distal layers of the tergite cuticle.

  17. Fluoride-containing nanoporous calcium-silicate MTA cements for endodontics and oral surgery: early fluorapatite formation in a phosphate-containing solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, M G; Taddei, P; Siboni, F; Modena, E; Ginebra, M P; Prati, C

    2011-10-01

    To test the chemical-physical properties and apatite-forming ability of experimental fluoride-doped calcium silicate cements designed to create novel bioactive materials for use in endodontics and oral surgery. A thermally treated calcium silicate cement (wTC) containing CaCl(2) 5%wt was modified by adding NaF 1%wt (FTC) or 10%wt (F10TC). Cements were analysed by environmental scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, IR and micro-Raman spectroscopy in wet conditions immediately after preparation or after ageing in a phosphate-containing solution (Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline). Calcium and fluoride release and pH of the storage solution were measured. The results obtained were analysed statistically (Tukey's HSD test and two-way anova). The formation of calcium phosphate precipitates (spherulites) was observed on the surface of 24 h-aged cements and the formation of a thick bone-like B-type carbonated apatite layer (biocoating) on 28 day-aged cements. The rate of apatite formation was FTC>F10TC>wTC. Fluorapatite was detected on FTC and F10TC after 1 day of ageing, with a higher fluoride content on F10TC. All the cements released calcium ions. At 5 and 24 h, the wTC had the significantly highest calcium release (Pfluoride release at all times (Pfluoride accelerated apatite formation on calcium silicate cements. Fluoride-doped calcium silicate cements had higher bioactivity and earlier formation of fluorapatite. Sodium fluoride may be introduced in the formulation of mineral trioxide aggregate cements to enhance their biological behaviour. F-doped calcium silicate cements are promising bone cements for clinical endodontic use. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  18. Structural study and crystallography of the major compound of anhydrous cement: tri-calcium silicate; Etude structurale et cristallographie du compose majoritaire du ciment anhydre: le silicate tricalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirfontaine, M.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Anhydrous (Portland) cement is mainly composed of a synthetic material, the clinker, whose major compound is tri-calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), often referred as C{sub 3}S with the compact oxides notations, C = CaO et S = SiO{sub 2}. The polymorphism of C{sub 3}S, still not well known, is the main subject of the thesis. Various crystal structures (rhombohedral R, monoclinic M1, M2, M3 and triclinic T1, T2, T3) can be found, depending on temperature and impurities. The only known structures are T1, M1 and M3, involving large unit cells with an orientational disorder of silicate tetrahedra. The single crystal studies exhibit no clear relation between the various polymorphs. Starting from known results from literature single crystal experiments, we establish the metric and structural relations between the different structures. Averaged structures for the T1, M1 and M3 polymorphs are proposed, together with all the matrices of transformation between the unit cells. We also introduce new 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D structural units, which make easier the understanding of the structures of C{sub 3}S, with the result of a better description of the orientational disorder. The effects of impurities on the structure are discussed. In industrial clinkers, impurities stabilize mainly M1 and M3 monoclinic forms. We propose a space group (Pc) and two structural models (a superstructure and an approximate averaged structure) for the M1 form. All the models are validated on synthetic compounds (M3, M2, M1 et T1) and industrial clinkers analysed by X-Ray powder diffraction with Rietveld analysis. (author)

  19. Preparation of MnO2and calcium silicate hydrate from electrolytic manganese residue and evaluation of adsorption properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌新; 钟宏; 王帅; 薛建荣; 武芳芳; 张振宇

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR), a high volume byproduct resulting from the electrolytic manganese industry, was used as a cheap and abundant chemical source for preparing MnO2 and EMR-made calcium silicate hydrate (EMR-CSH). The MnO2 is successfully synthesized from the metal cations extracted from EMR, which can effectively recycle the manganese in the EMR. By the combination of XRD, SEM and EDX analysis, the as-prepared MnO2 is found to exhibit a single-phase with the purity of 90.3%. Furthermore, EMR-CSH is synthesized from EMR via hydrothermal method. Based on the detailed analyses using XRD, FT-IR, FE-SEM, EDX and BET surface area measurement, the product synthesized under the optimum conditions (pH 12.0 and 100 °C) is identified to be a calcium silicate hydrate with a specific surface area of 205 m2/g incorporating the slag-derived metals (Al and Mg) in its structure. The as-synthesized material shows good adsorption properties for removal of Mn2+ and phosphate ions diluted in water, making it a promising candidate for efficient bulk wastewater treatment. This conversion process, which enables us to fabricate two different kinds of valuable materials from EMR at low cost and through convenient preparation steps, is surely beneficial from the viewpoint of the chemical and economical use of EMR.

  20. Effect of the smear layer on apical seals produced by two calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Maryam; Sadeghalhoseini, Niloufar; Forghani, Maryam; Attaran, Negin

    2014-09-01

    We compared the apical seals of two new calcium silicate-based sealers (iRoot SP and MTA Fillapex) in the presence and absence of a smear layer. Eighty-two human premolars were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. In groups 1 and 3, the smear layer was retained. In groups 2 and 4, the root canals were irrigated with EDTA to remove the smear layer. Canals were filled using gutta-percha/iRoot SP (in groups 1 and 2) or obturated with gutta-percha/MTA Fillapex (in groups 3 and 4). Fluid filtration was used to evaluate apical microleakage. The presence of the smear layer had no significant effect on the sealing properties of the filling materials, except for iRoot SP at 2 weeks (P = 0.007). There was significantly less microleakage with iRoot SP than with MTA Fillapex (P = 0.025 at 2 weeks; P removal of the smear layer had no adverse effect on the sealing properties of calcium silicate-based sealers. In addition, the sealing ability of iRoot SP was superior to that of MTA Fillapex.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of calcium fluoride——Crystalline, superionic, molten and quenched-amorphous phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程兆年; 郏正明; 张静; 陈念贻

    1995-01-01

    The results from the molecular dynamics simulations on crystalline, superionic, molten and quenched-amorphous states of calcium fluoride system are reported. The Ca++ and F- sublattices are studied by using the method of bond order parameters. The result shows that both Ca++ and F- sublattices can be described with the bond-orientation normal distribution model. In the superionic phase the Ca++ cations keep their original stable fcc frame, but in the F- case random distortion generates from their original simple cubic (sc) structure. The simulation on the molten phase gives three radial distribution functions that are difficult to separate from the experimental X-ray diffraction data. The simulation of quenched-amorphous state shows that a dense random packing of equivalent spheres centered by Ca++ cations occurs in the system simulated. However, the system quenched is not stable enough because the Ca++ cation and F- anions around it do not form themselves into a certain configuration.

  2. Calcium silicate nanowires - An effective alternative for improving mechanical properties of chitosan-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Sarang S; Mishra, Satyendra

    2017-08-01

    Nanowires of calcium silicate were successfully synthesized by ultrasonic irradiation process and incorporated into chitosan and hydroxyetheyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer matrix by solution blending for efficacious preparation of biodegradable nanocomposites. Remarkable improvement in mechanical properties of the nanocomposites was noticed after micro-tensile analysis. Enlarged surface area and higher aspect ratio of CaSiO3 nanowires were the key factors responsible for such improvement. This was supported by EDS and XRD analysis in terms of proper distribution of nanofiller through the copolymer matrix and corresponding rise in percentage crystallanity respectively. Contact angle and biodegradation studies further clarified that nano-CaSiO3 did not affect the hydrophilicity and general degradation route of chitosan copolymer respectively. This renders the nano-CaSiO3 as an ideal substitute for preparing high performance nanocomposites to be applicable for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On the Pressure-Induced Loss of Crystallinity in Zinc- and Calcium-Phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhvorostov, D.; Mosey, N; Munoz-Paniagua, D; Pereira, G; Song, Y; Kasrai, M; Norton, P; Müser, M

    2008-01-01

    A recently suggested mechanism for the stress memory of various metal phosphates is investigated experimentally. Based on first-principles simulations [N. J. Mosey et al., Science 307, 1612 (2005)], it had been argued that atoms with flexible coordination, such as zinc or heavy-metal cations, act as network-forming agents, undergoing irreversible pressure-induced changes in bonding that lead to increased connectivity between phosphate anions. In the present study, orthophosphates of zinc and calcium were exposed to high pressures on surfaces and in diamond anvil cells. An additional set of first-principles simulations was accomplished on ?-orthophosphate of zinc, which suggested that this material was already cross-linked before compression but that it nevertheless underwent a reversible coordination change under pressure in agreement with the experimental results presented here. Raman spectra indicate an irreversible, pressure-induced loss of long-range crystallinity. The pressures required to induce these changes are around 7 GPa for the zinc phosphates, while they are close to 21 GPa for the calcium phosphates. Hydrogenation of the metal phosphate lowers the threshold pressure by approximately 2-3 GPa in both cases. Moreover, ?-orthophosphate of zinc could be partially amorphisized under nonisotropic pressure on copper foils.

  4. Preparation and rebinding properties of protein-imprinted polysiloxane using mesoporous calcium silicate grafted non-woven polypropylene as matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Bohong; Feng, Lingzhi; Zhao, Kongyin; Wei, Junfu; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Linhua; Ren, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate particle containing mesoporous SiO2 (CaSiO3@SiO2) was grafted on the surface of non-woven polypropylene. The PP non-woven grafted calcium silicate containing mesoporous SiO2 (PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2) was used as the matrix to prepare bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecularly imprinted polysiloxane (MIP) by using silanes as the functional monomers and BSA as the template. PP non-woven grafted BSA-imprinted polysiloxane (PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 MIP) was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectometry (FTIR) and drilling string compensator (DSC). Influence factors on the rebinding capacity of the MIP were investigated, such as grafting degree, the pH in treating CaSiO3 and the type and proportion of silanes. The rebinding properties of BSA on PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 and MIP were investigated under different conditions. The results indicated that the rebinding capacity of MIP for BSA reached 56.32 mg/g, which was 2.65 times of NIP. The non-woven polypropylene grafted BSA-imprinted polysiloxane could recognize the template protein and the selectivity factor (β) was above 2.4 when using ovalbumin, hemoglobin and γ-globulin as control proteins. The PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 MIP has favorable reusability. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effects of surface application of calcium-magnesium silicate and gypsum on soil fertility and sugarcane yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lime application recommendations for amendment of soil acidity in sugarcane were developed with a burnt cane harvesting system in mind. Sugarcane is now harvested in most areas without burning, and lime application for amendment of soil acidity in this system in which the sugarcane crop residue remains on the ground has been carried out without a scientific basis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in soil acidity and stalk and sugar yield with different rates of surface application of calcium, magnesium silicate, and gypsum in ratoon cane. The experiment was performed after the 3rd harvest of the variety SP 81-3250 in a commercial green sugarcane plantation of the São Luiz Sugar Mill (47º 25' 33" W; 21º 59' 46" S, located in Pirassununga, São Paulo, in southeast Brazil. A factorial arrangement of four Ca-Mg silicate rates (0, 850, 1700, and 3400 kg ha-1 and two gypsum rates (0 and 1700 kg ha-1 was used in the experiment. After 12 months, the experiment was harvested and technological measurements of stalk and sugar yield were made. After harvest, soil samples were taken at the depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.40, and 0.40-0.60 m in all plots, and the following determinations were made: soil pH in CaCl2, organic matter, P, S, K, Ca, Mg, H+Al, Al, Si, and base saturation. The results show that the application of gypsum reduced the exchangeable Al3+ content and Al saturation below 0.05 m, and increased the Ca2+ concentration in the whole profile, the Mg2+ content below 0.10 m, K+ below 0.4 m, and base saturation below 0.20 m. This contributed to the effect of surface application of silicate on amendment of soil acidity reaching deeper layers. From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the silicate rate recommended may be too low, since the greater rates used in this experiment showed greater reduction in soil acidity, higher levels of nutrients at greater depths and an increase in stalk and sugar

  6. Tunable luminescence and white light emission of novel multiphase sodium calcium silicate nanophosphors doped with Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 2+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickens, Matthew A. [Energy and Environmental Systems, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Assefa, Zerihun, E-mail: zassefa@ncat.edu [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This study reports the sol–gel synthesis of sodium calcium multiphase silicate (SCMS) nanophosphors. X-ray powder diffraction indicated the crystallization of devitrite (Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}), wollastonite-2M (CaSiO{sub 3}), and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) phases that consistently occurred together upon repeated syntheses. The multiphase silicate system was used as a host matrix for varied concentrations of Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 2+} dopant ions which resulted in tunable photoluminescence. A broad violet/UV emission band of Ce{sup 3+} (350–425 nm) combined with blue-green emissions of Tb{sup 3+} (488 and 545 nm) and a yellow-orange emission of Mn{sup 2+} (560 nm) resulted in the observance of white light (x=0.31, y=0.32, T{sub C}=6624 K) under midwave UV excitation (300–340 nm). Energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+}→Tb{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 3+}→Mn{sup 2+} was confirmed by steady state and time-resolved emission spectra, lifetime, and quantum yield measurements. The structural properties, morphology, and elemental composition of the nanophosphors were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). -- Highlights: • White light-emitting multiphase silicate nanophosphors were prepared for the first time. • Multiple crystalline silicate phases were reproduced consistently by repeated syntheses. • Energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+}→Tb{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 3+}→Mn{sup 2+} was confirmed by PL, lifetime, and QY measurements.

  7. Silicato de cálcio como amenizante da toxidez de metais pesados em mudas de eucalipto Calcium silicate to reduce heavy metal toxicity in eucalyptus seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria de Aguiar Accioly

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do silicato de cálcio na redução da toxidez de metais pesados no solo para Eucalyptus camaldulensis. Foram utilizadas cinco doses de silicato de cálcio (0, 1,6, 3,2, 4,8 e 6,4 g kg-1, em solos com diferentes graus de contaminação. O experimento foi conduzido em vasos com 1,5 kg de solo, com uma muda por vaso, em esquema fatorial 4x5 (quatro graus de contaminação x cinco doses de silicato. O silicato de cálcio reduziu a toxidez de metais pesados em E.camaldulensis, retardou o aparecimento dos sintomas de toxidez e diminuiu os teores de zinco e cádmio na parte aérea das plantas. Entretanto, não evitou totalmente a depressão no crescimento, nos solos com contaminação elevada. O efeito amenizante do silicato foi crescente com o aumento das doses e mais evidente nos solos com contaminação elevada. O efeito benéfico do silicato de cálcio está relacionado à redução da transferência do zinco para a parte aérea do eucalipto.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium silicate to reduce heavy metal toxicity in Eucalyptus camaldulensis seedlings. Five doses of calcium silicate (0, 1.6, 3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 g kg-1 were used in soils with increasing levels of contamination. The experiment was carried out in pots with 1.5 kg of soil, with one plant each, in a 4x5 factorial array (four levels of contamination x five silicate doses. Calcium silicate minimized heavy metal toxicity to E.camaldulensis, delayed the onset of toxicity symptoms, and decreased zinc and cadmium shoot concentrations. However, calcium silicate did not completely overcome the depressive effect upon plant growth in soils with high metal concentrations. Calcium silicate effects increased with increasing doses and were more evident in highly contaminated soils. The beneficial effects of calcium silicate on metal toxicity were highly related to the decrease in zinc translocation to the eucalyptus shoots.

  8. The role of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans in the conversion of calcium phosphate from amorphous to crystalline state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mathieu; Vali, Hojatollah; Paquette, Jeanne; Guiot, Serge R

    2014-01-01

    Two previously unknown modes of biomineralization observed in the presence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans are presented. Following the addition of NaHCO3 and the formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate precipitate in a DSMZ medium inoculated with C. hydrogenoformans, two distinct crystalline solids were recovered after 15 and 30 days of incubation. The first of these solids occurred as micrometric clusters of blocky, angular crystals, which were associated with bacterial biofilm. The second solid occurred as 30-50 nm nanorods that were found scattered among the organic products of bacterial lysis. The biphasic mixture of solids was clearly dominated by the first phase. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) peaks and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectrum of this biphasic material consistently showed features characteristic of Mg-whitlockite. No organic content or protein could be identified by dissolving the solids. In both cases, the mode of biomineralization appears to be biologically induced rather than biologically controlled. Since Mg is known to be a strong inhibitor of the nucleation and growth of CaP, C. hydrogenoformans may act by providing sites that chelate Mg or form complexes with it, thus decreasing its activity as nucleation and crystal growth inhibitor. The synthesis of whitlockite and nano-HAP-like material by C. hydrogenoformans demonstrates the versatility of this organism also known for its ability to perform the water-gas shift reaction, and may have applications in bacterially mediated synthesis of CaP materials, as an environmentally friendly alternative process.

  9. The role of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans in the conversion of calcium phosphate from amorphous to crystalline state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Haddad

    Full Text Available Two previously unknown modes of biomineralization observed in the presence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans are presented. Following the addition of NaHCO3 and the formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate precipitate in a DSMZ medium inoculated with C. hydrogenoformans, two distinct crystalline solids were recovered after 15 and 30 days of incubation. The first of these solids occurred as micrometric clusters of blocky, angular crystals, which were associated with bacterial biofilm. The second solid occurred as 30-50 nm nanorods that were found scattered among the organic products of bacterial lysis. The biphasic mixture of solids was clearly dominated by the first phase. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD peaks and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectrum of this biphasic material consistently showed features characteristic of Mg-whitlockite. No organic content or protein could be identified by dissolving the solids. In both cases, the mode of biomineralization appears to be biologically induced rather than biologically controlled. Since Mg is known to be a strong inhibitor of the nucleation and growth of CaP, C. hydrogenoformans may act by providing sites that chelate Mg or form complexes with it, thus decreasing its activity as nucleation and crystal growth inhibitor. The synthesis of whitlockite and nano-HAP-like material by C. hydrogenoformans demonstrates the versatility of this organism also known for its ability to perform the water-gas shift reaction, and may have applications in bacterially mediated synthesis of CaP materials, as an environmentally friendly alternative process.

  10. A Low Resistance Calcium/Reduced Titania Passivated Contact for High Efficiency Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Thomas G.

    2017-02-04

    Recent advances in the efficiency of crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have come through the implementation of passivated contacts that simultaneously reduce recombination and resistive losses within the contact structure. In this contribution, low resistivity passivated contacts are demonstrated based on reduced titania (TiOx) contacted with the low work function metal, calcium (Ca). By using Ca as the overlying metal in the contact structure we are able to achieve a reduction in the contact resistivity of TiOx passivated contacts of up to two orders of magnitude compared to previously reported data on Al/TiOx contacts, allowing for the application of the Ca/TiOx contact to n-type c-Si solar cells with partial rear contacts. Implementing this contact structure on the cell level results in a power conversion efficiency of 21.8% where the Ca/TiOx contact comprises only ≈6% of the rear surface of the solar cell, an increase of 1.5% absolute compared to a similar device fabricated without the TiOx interlayer.

  11. Mechanistic study and modeling of radionuclides retention by the hydrated calcium silicates (HCS) of cements; Etude mecanistique et modelisation de la retention de radionucleides par les silicates de calcium hydrates (CSH) des ciments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointeau, I

    2000-09-01

    This work attempts to investigate the modelling of radioisotopes (Cs{sup +}, Pb{sup 2+}, Eu{sup 3+}) immobilization in cement matrix, in the frame of the design of engineered barrier of a deep radwaste repository. The model development concept consists of three major steps: - surface chemistry modelling of the calcium silicate hydrate CSH, used to simulate hydrated cement behaviour; - solid analysis of the batch sorption experiments: identification of the uptake mechanism; - both previous steps are used, with isotherm data, in the modelling of the radioisotopes immobilization in the CSH matrix. Final results: (all modelling are available for all the range of studied Ca/Si ratios and have been validated with predictive calculations). - A thermodynamic modelling of the CSH surface chemistry has been developed. The labile calcium and proton sorption constants on silanol sites (>SiOH) have been extracted. - Cs{sup +} is sorbed on two sites. The silanol site (weak site) has a high site density (10 sites.nm{sup -2}), which accounts for the CSH unsaturation in high [CS{sup +}]. A strong site is also identified. - Pb{sup 2+} immobilization in CSH matrix is modelled with surface equilibria and solubility equilibrium. - Eu{sup 3+} fixation has been investigated with solid analysis: Site-Selective anti Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy, XPS and SEM-EDS. Eu{sup 3+} thus does not precipitate in CSH water but is sorbed on the CSH surface (high hydroxylated environment). Europium is also (minority site) inserted in the CSH framework. (author)

  12. Thermal desorption characteristics of CO, O2 and CO2 on non-porous water, crystalline water and silicate surfaces at sub-monolayer and multilayer coverages

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, J A; Dulieu, F; Fraser, H J

    2011-01-01

    The desorption characteristics of molecules on interstellar dust grains are important for modelling the behaviour of molecules in icy mantles and, critically, in describing the solid-gas interface. In this study, a series of laboratory experiments exploring the desorption of three small molecules from three astrophysically relevant surfaces are presented. The desorption of CO, O2 and CO2 at both sub-monolayer and multilayer coverages was investigated from non-porous water, crystalline water and silicate surfaces. Experimental data was modelled using the Polanyi-Wigner equation to produce a mathematical description of the desorption of each molecular species from each type of surface, uniquely describing both the monolayer and multilayer desorption in a single combined model. The implications of desorption behaviour over astrophysically relevant timescales are discussed.

  13. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  14. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of four calcium silicate-based endodontic cements on human monocytes, a colorimetric MTT assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Khedmat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of four calcium silicate-based endodontic cements at different storage times after mixing. Materials and Methods Capillary tubes were filled with Biodentine (Septodont, Calcium Enriched Mixture (CEM cement, BioniqueDent, Tech Biosealer Endo (Tech Biosealer and ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental. Empty tubes and tubes containing Dycal were used as negative and positive control groups respectively. Filled capillary tubes were kept in 0.2 mL microtubes and incubated at 37℃. Each material was divided into 3 groups for testing at intervals of 24 hr, 7 day and 28 day after mixing. Human monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cocultered with 24 hr, 7 day and 28 day samples of different materials for 24 and 48 hr. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay. Results In all groups, the viability of monocytes significantly improved with increasing storage time regardless of the incubation time (p < 0.001. After 24 hr of incubation, there was no significant difference between the materials regarding monocyte viability. However, at 48 hr of incubation, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were less cytotoxic than CEM cement and Biosealer (p < 0.01. Conclusions Biodentine and ProRoot MTA had similar biocompatibility. Mixing ProRoot MTA with PBS in place of distilled water had no effect on its biocompatibility. Biosealer and CEM cement after 48 hr of incubation were significantly more cytotoxic to on monocyte cells compared to ProRoot MTA and Biodentine.

  16. In-situ observation of the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to crystalline hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammeier, Jessica; Hippler, Dorothee; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Sacher, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2*nH2O; ACP) is often a precursor phase of the mineral (hydroxy-) apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) that can be formed in natural settings during both authigenic and biogenic mineral formation. Particularly, in the biomineralization process of fish tissue, ACP has shown to be an important transient phase. In solution ACP rapidly transforms into the crystalline phase. The transformation rate highly depends on the physico-chemical conditions of the solution: Ca & P availability, pH and temperature. In natural settings Ca can be provided by different sources: from (1) seawater, (2) porewater, or (3) diagenetically-altered carbonates, whereas local supersaturation of P can be induced by microbial activity. In this study, we performed phosphate precipitation experiments in order to monitor the transformation process of the ACP to crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. During the experiments the temperature was kept constant at 20.0 ± 0.01 ° C and pH at 9 ± 0.1. 50 ml of 0.3 CaCl 2H2O was titrated at a rate of 5 ml/min to an equal volume of 0.2 M Na2HPO4. The pH was kept constant by titration of 1 M NaOH. During the experiment samples were taken from the solution and instantly filtered. The obtained solid samples were lyophilized and analyzed with XRD, ATR and SEM. The respective solution samples were analyzed using ion chromatography and ICP OES, coupling the spectroscopic data with detailed solution chemistry data. We observed transformation of ACP to HAP to occur within 14 hours, illustrated in a clear peak shift in Raman spectra from 950 cm-1 to 960 cm-1. The obtained results are discussed in the aspects of distribution of major elements during the formation of phosphates and/or the diagenetic alteration of carbonates to phosphates in geologic settings. Financial support by DFG-FG 736 and NAWI Graz is kindly acknowledged.

  17. Biological assessment of a calcium silicate incorporated hydroxyapatite-gelatin nanocomposite: a comparison to decellularized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Joon; Padilla, Ricardo; Zhang, He; Hu, Wei-Shou; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory utilized biomimicry to develop a synthetic bone scaffold based on hydroxyapatite-gelatin-calcium silicate (HGCS). Here, we evaluated the potential of HGCS scaffold in bone formation in vivo using the rat calvarial critical-sized defect (CSD). Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups: control (defect only), decellularized bone matrix (DECBM), and HGCS with and without multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs). DECBM was prepared by removing all the cells using SDS and NH4OH. After 12 weeks, the CSD specimens were harvested to evaluate radiographical, histological, and histomorphometrical outcomes. The in vitro osteogenic effects of the materials were studied by focal adhesion, MTS, and alizarin red. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the DECBM and the HGCS scaffold groups developed greater radiopaque areas than the other groups. Bone regeneration, assessed using histological analysis and fluorochrome labeling, was the highest in the HGCS scaffold seeded with MAPCs. The DECBM group showed limited osteoinductivity, causing a gap between the implant and host tissue. The group grafted with HGCS+MAPCs resulting in twice as much new bone formation seems to indicate a role for effective bone regeneration. In conclusion, the novel HGCS scaffold could improve bone regeneration and is a promising carrier for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration.

  18. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (pFGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation.

  19. Preparation and characterization of bioactive calcium silicate and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocomposite for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Heo, S J; Liu, Changsheng; Kim, D H; Kim, S E; Hyun, Y T; Shin, Ji-Wang; Shin, Jung-Woog

    2009-09-01

    A novel biocomposite of nanosized calcium silicate (n-CS) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was successfully fabricated directly using n-CS slurry, not dried n-CS powder, in a solvent-casting method. The in vitro bioactivity of the composite was evaluated by investigating the apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid. A proliferation assay with mouse L929 fibroblasts was used to test the in vitro biocompatibility. The composition, hydrophilicity, and mechanical properties were also evaluated. Results suggest that the incorporation of n-CS could significantly improve the hydrophilicity, compressive strength, and elastic modulus of n-CS/PCL composites, with the enhancements mainly dependent on n-CS content. The n-CS/PCL composites exhibit excellent in vitro bioactivity, with surface apatite formation for 40% (w/w) n-CS (C40) exceeding that of 20% (w/w) n-CS (C20) at 7 and 14 days. The Ca/P ratios of apatite formed on C20 and C40 surfaces were 1.58 and 1.61, respectively, indicating nonstoichiometric apatite with defective structure. Composites demonstrated significantly better cell attachment and proliferation than that of PCL alone, with C40 demonstrating the best bioactivity. The apatite layers that formed on the composite surfaces facilitated cell attachment (4 h) and proliferation during the early stages (1 and 4 days). Collectively, these results suggest that the incorporation of n-CS produces biocomposites with enhanced bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  20. Synergistic acceleration in the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells by calcium silicate-graphene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chiang, Wei-Hung; Chen, I-Wen Peter; Liu, Wen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Recent exciting findings of the biological interactions of graphene materials have shed light on potential biomedical applications of graphene-containing composites. Owing to the superior mechanical properties and low coefficient of thermal expansion, graphene has been widely used in the reinforcement of biocomposites. In the present study, various ratios of graphene (0.25wt%, 0.5wt% and 1.0wt%) were reinforced into calcium silicate (CS) for bone graft application. Results show that the graphene was embedded in the composites homogeneously. Adding 1wt% graphene into CS increased the young's modulus by ~47.1%. The formation of bone-like apatite on a range of composites with graphene weight percentages ranging from 0 to 1 has been investigated in simulated body fluid. The presence of a bone-like apatite layer on the composites surface after immersion in simulated body fluid was considered by scanning electron microscopy. In vitro cytocompatibility of the graphene-contained CS composites was evaluated using human marrow stem cells (hMSCs). The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin osteogenesis-related protein expression of the hMSCs on the 1wt% graphene-contained specimens showed better results than on the pure CS. In addition, the angiogenesis-related protein (vWF and ang-1) secretion of cells was significantly stimulated when the graphene concentration in the composites was increased. These results suggest that graphene-contained CS bone graft are promising materials for bone tissue engineering applications.

  1. Re-establishing apical patency after obturation with Gutta-percha and two novel calcium silicate-based sealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Koursoumis, Anastasios D.; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Aim of the present study was to evaluate the retreatability and reestablishment of apical patency of two calcium silicate-based sealers, TotalFill BC Sealer (BCS) and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (MTA F), versus AH Plus, when used in combination with Gutta-percha (GP). Materials and Methods: The canals of 54 single-rooted anterior teeth were instrumented and filled with GP/AH Plus (Group A), GP/MTA F (Group B), or GP/BCS (Group C) using continuous wave obturation technique. The groups were subdivided into subgroups with the master-GP cone placed to the working length (WL) or intentionally 2 mm short. The retreatment procedures were performed using ultrasonics, chloroform, rotary, and hand files. The ability to establish the patency and reach WL was determined as well as the time taken to reach WL was calculated in minutes. Furthermore, the samples were observed under a dental, optical microscope, after vertically splitting them. Results: The WL and patency were reestablished in 100% of specimens in all groups. The Mann–Whitney U-test indicated that there was a significant difference in the amount of time required to reach WL between the groups (P sealers are negotiable under simple root canal anatomy. However, the conventional retreatment techniques are not able to fully remove them. PMID:26929681

  2. Biological Assessment of a Calcium Silicate Incorporated Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin Nanocomposite: A Comparison to Decellularized Bone Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Joon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory utilized biomimicry to develop a synthetic bone scaffold based on hydroxyapatite-gelatin-calcium silicate (HGCS. Here, we evaluated the potential of HGCS scaffold in bone formation in vivo using the rat calvarial critical-sized defect (CSD. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups: control (defect only, decellularized bone matrix (DECBM, and HGCS with and without multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs. DECBM was prepared by removing all the cells using SDS and NH4OH. After 12 weeks, the CSD specimens were harvested to evaluate radiographical, histological, and histomorphometrical outcomes. The in vitro osteogenic effects of the materials were studied by focal adhesion, MTS, and alizarin red. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the DECBM and the HGCS scaffold groups developed greater radiopaque areas than the other groups. Bone regeneration, assessed using histological analysis and fluorochrome labeling, was the highest in the HGCS scaffold seeded with MAPCs. The DECBM group showed limited osteoinductivity, causing a gap between the implant and host tissue. The group grafted with HGCS+MAPCs resulting in twice as much new bone formation seems to indicate a role for effective bone regeneration. In conclusion, the novel HGCS scaffold could improve bone regeneration and is a promising carrier for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration.

  3. In vitro characterization and mechanical properties of β-calcium silicate/POC composite as a bone fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F S; Moghaddam, E; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Zandi, K; Abu, N A

    2014-11-01

    Calcium silicate (CS, CaSiO3 ) is a bioactive, degradable, and biocompatible ceramic and has been considered for its potential in the field of orthopedic surgery. The objective of this study is the fabrication and characterization of the β-CS/poly(1.8-octanediol citrate) (POC) biocomposite, with the goals of controlling its weight loss and improving its biological and mechanical properties. POC is one of the most biocompatible polymers, and it is widely used in biomedical engineering applications. The degradation and bioactivity of the composites were determined by soaking the composites in phosphate-buffered saline and simulated body fluid, respectively. Human osteoblast cells were cultured on the composites to determine their cell proliferation and adhesion. The results illustrated that the flexural and compressive strengths were significantly enhanced by a modification of 40% POC. It was also concluded that the degradation bioactivity and amelioration of cell proliferation increased significantly with an increasing β-CS content. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anticorrosive effects and in vitro cytocompatibility of calcium silicate/zinc-doped hydroxyapatite composite coatings on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Honglei; Qiao, Haixia; Nian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xuejiao; Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Chang, Xiaotong; Han, Shuguang; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    This work elucidated the corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of electroplated Zn- and Si-containing bioactive calcium silicate/zinc-doped hydroxyapatite (ZnHA/CS) ceramic coatings on commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The formation of ZnHA/CS coating was investigated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and inductively coupled plasma analyses. The XRD image showed that the reaction layer was mainly composed of HA and CaSiO3. The fabricated ZnHA/CS coatings presented a porous structure and appropriate thickness for possible applications in orthopaedic surgery. Potentiodynamic polarization tests showed that ZnHA/CS coatings exhibited higher corrosion resistance than CP-Ti. Dissolution tests on the coating also revealed that Si4+ and Zn2+ were leached at low levels. Moreover, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on ZnHA/CS featured improved cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase than those cultured on HA. The high cytocompatibility of ZnHA/CS could be mainly attributed to the combination of micro-porous surface effects and ion release (Zn2+ and Si4+). All these results indicate that ZnHA/CS composite-coated CP-Ti may be a potential material for orthopaedic applications.

  5. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p MTA HP had significantly higher bond strength than White MTA (p MTA HP showed better push-out bond strength than its predecessor, White MTA; however, Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations.

  6. The effects of injectable calcium silicate-based composites with the Chinese herb on an osteogenic accelerator in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shieh, Den-En; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-09-11

    We aimed to investigate the physicochemical and biological effects of calcium silicate (CS)-based cements together with the Chinese medicine Xu Duan (XD) after seeding with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Here, we fabricated CS-based substrates with different ratios of XD (0%, 5% and 10%) as bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites, subsequent to examining their respective effectiveness for bone repair. The setting time, the injectability, the mechanical properties measured by diametral tensile strength (DTS), the in vitro degradation determined by changes in the weight loss of the composites, the characteristic formation of bone-like apatite, and cell growth as well as osteogenesis protein and bone mineralization were comprehensively evaluated before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF), respectively. At the end of testing, with regard to physicochemical effects, the CS-based substrate mixed with the 10% XD group showed significantly sound mechanical properties, an applicable setting time and injectability and the formation of a dense bone-like apatite layer. In terms of biological effects, the CS-based substrate with the 10% XD group showed a significant development of osteogenic activities with sound cell proliferation and higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, as well as indicating osteogenic differentiation, greater osteocalcin (OC) protein secretion and clearly calcified tissue mineralization. The present drug-release strategy with CS-based cements may pave the way for future alternative bone repair therapy.

  7. Effect of Different Irrigation Solutions on the Colour Stability of Three Calcium Silicate-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhnamayan F

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Statement of Problem: Previous studies have shown discoloration of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA in contact with root canal irrigation solutions. However, there are limited data on colour stability of other calcium silicate–based materials (CSMs. Objectives: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the colour stability of three CSMs in contact with different irrigation solutions. Materials and Methods: Three CSMs including White MTA (wMTA Angelus, calcium enriched mixture (CEM, and Biodentine were assessed in this study. Forty five samples of each material were mixed according to the manufactures’ instructions and then placed in silicone tubes. After 24 hours, the materials were removed from the moulds and 9 samples of each material left dry or immersed in normal saline, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL, 2% chlorhexidinegluconate (CHX, or 17%EDTA for 24 hours. Colour changes were measured with a spectrophotometer. Data were evaluated with 2-way analysis of variance, one way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests. Results: The highest discoloration of all materials was observed after contact with CHX. In the MTA Angelus and CEM cement groups, significant differences were observed between CHX and NaOCl and also between these two irrigants with the other three irrigants (p < 0.05. In the Biodentine group, CHX created statistically significant discoloration compared to other irrigants (p < 0.05. Only wMTA Angelus showed a significantly higher discoloration in contact with EDTA compared to normal saline and dry condition (p < 0.05. wMTA Angelus showed a significantly higher colour change compared with CEM cement and Biodentine after contact with NaOCl, CHX, and EDTA (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The contact of wMTA, CEM cement, and Biodentine with CHX should be avoided because this leads to severe discoloration. Contact with sodium hypochlorite also leads to discoloration of wMTA and CEM cements. Among of the three tested materials, w

  8. Vital Pulp Therapy with Calcium-Silicate Cements: Report of Two Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Rahmati, Afsaneh; Amini, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This article describes successful use of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and Biodentine in apexogenesis treatment in two 8-year-old patients, one with immature permanent molar diagnosed primarily with irreversible pulpitis and the other with partially vital maxillary central incisor. After access cavity preparation, partial pulpotomy in molar and full pulpotomy in central was performed, and the remaining pulps was capped with either Biodentine or CEM cement, in each tooth. The crowns were restored with composite filling material at the following visit. The post-operative radiographic and clinical examinations (approx. average of 16 months) showed that both treated teeth remained functional, with complete root development and apex formation. A calcified bridge was produced underneath the capping material. No further endodontic intervention was necessary. Considering the healing potential of immature vital pulps, the use of CEM cement and Biodentine for apexogenesis might be an applicable choice. These new endodontic biomaterials might be appropriate for vital pulp therapies in an immature tooth. However, further clinical studies with longer follow-up periods are recommended. PMID:28179936

  9. Solid-state NMR and short-range order in crystalline oxides and silicates: a new tool in paramagnetic resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Jonathan F; McCarty, Ryan J; Palke, Aaron C

    2017-03-01

    Most applications of high-resolution NMR to questions of short-range order/disorder in inorganic materials have been made in systems where ions with unpaired electron spins are of negligible concentration, with structural information extracted primarily from chemical shifts, quadrupolar coupling parameters, and nuclear dipolar couplings. In some cases, however, the often-large additional resonance shifts caused by interactions between unpaired electron and nuclear spins can provide unique new structural information in materials with contents of paramagnetic cations ranging from hundreds of ppm to several per cent and even higher. In this brief review we focus on recent work on silicate, phosphate, and oxide materials with relatively low concentrations of paramagnetic ions, where spectral resolution can remain high enough to distinguish interactions between NMR-observed nuclides and one or more magnetic neighbors in different bonding configurations in the first, second, and even farther cation shells. We illustrate the types of information available, some of the limitations of this approach, and the great prospects for future experimental and theoretical work in this field. We give examples for the effects of paramagnetic transition metal, lanthanide, and actinide cation substitutions in simple oxides, pyrochlore, zircon, monazite, olivine, garnet, pyrochlores, and olivine structures.

  10. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  11. The physical characteristics of resin composite-calcium silicate interface as part of a layered/laminate adhesive restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Danya F; Foxton, Richard; Manoharan, Andiappan; Watson, Timothy F; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-03-01

    To compare in-vitro micro-shear bond strengths (μSBS) of resin composite to calcium silicate cement (Biodentine™) vs. glass ionomer cement vs. resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) using an adhesive in self-etch (SE)/total etch (TE) mode after aging three substrates and bond and characterizing their failure modes. Resin composite was SE/TE bonded to 920 standardized disks of Biodentine™, GIC & RM-GIC. Dividing samples into two groups, the first underwent early (t=0min, 5min, 20min, 24h) or delayed (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months) substrate aging before bonding and μSBS (t=24h) testing. In the second, adhesive was applied after either early (t=5min) or delayed (t=2wk) substrate aging and then tested after bond aging (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). The failure modes were identified using stereomicroscope. SEM images of selected samples were analyzed. No significant differences were observed between (SE)/(TE) bonding modes (P=0.42). With substrate aging, a significant reduction in μSBS occurred between early and delayed time intervals for Biodentine™ (P=0.001), but none for the GIC/RM-GIC (P=0.465, P=0.512 respectively). With bond aging, there was no significant difference between time intervals for all groups, except at 6 months for the GIC (PBiodentine™ is a weak restorative material in its early setting phase. Placing the overlying resin composite as part of the laminate/layered definitive restoration is best delayed for >2wk to allow sufficient intrinsic maturation to withstand contraction forces from the resin composite. A total-etch or self-etch adhesive may be used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The synergistic effects of CO2 laser treatment with calcium silicate cement of antibacterial, osteogenesis and cementogenesis efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, T.-T.; Kao, C.-T.; Chen, Y.-W.; Huang, T.-H.; Yang, J.-J.; Shie, M.-Y.

    2015-05-01

    Calcium silicate-based material (CS) has been successfully used in dental clinical applications. Some researches show that the antibacterial effects of CO2 laser irradiation are highly efficient when bacteria are embedded in biofilm, due to a photo-thermal mechanism. The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on CS, with regard to both material characterization and human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLs) viability. CS was irradiated with a dental CO2 laser using directly mounted fiber optics in wound healing mode with a spot area of 0.25 cm2, and then stored in an incubator at 100% relative humidity and 37 °C for 1 d to set. The hPDLs cultured on CS were analyzed, along with their proliferation and odontogenic differentiation behaviors. The results indicate that the CO2 laser irradiation increased the amount of Ca and Si ions released from the CS, and regulated cell behavior. CO2 laser-irradiated CS promoted cementogenic differentiation of hPDLs, with the increased formation of mineralized nodules on the substrate’s surface. It also up-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of cementogenic and the expression of cementum attachment protein. The current study provides new and important data about the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on CS. Taking cell functions into account, the Si concentration released from CS with laser irradiated may be lower than a critical value, and this information could lead to the development of new regenerative therapies for dentin and periodontal tissue.

  13. X-ray diffraction: a powerful tool to probe and understand the structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Linard, Yannick; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were calculated and compared to literature data with the aim of investigating the crystal structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main binding phase in hydrated Portland cement pastes. Published XRD patterns from C-S-H of Ca/Si ratios ranging from ~ 0.6 to ~ 1.7 are fully compatible with nanocrystalline and turbostratic tobermorite. Even at a ratio close or slightly higher than that of jennite (Ca/Si = 1.5) this latter mineral, which is required in some models to describe the structure of C-S-H, is not detected in the experimental XRD patterns. The 001 basal reflection from C-S-H, positioned at ~ 13.5 Å when the C-S-H structural Ca/Si ratio is low (< 0.9), shifts towards smaller d values and sharpens with increasing Ca/Si ratio, to reach ~ 11.2 Å when the Ca/Si ratio is higher than 1.5. Calculations indicate that the sharpening of the 001 reflection may be related to a crystallite size along c* (i.e. a mean number of stacked layers) increasing with the C-S-H Ca/Si ratio. Such an increase would contribute to the observed shift of the 001 reflection, but fails to quantitatively explain it. It is proposed that the observed shift could result from interstratification of at least two tobermorite-like layers, one having a high and the other a low Ca/Si ratio with a basal spacing of 11.3 and 14 Å, respectively.

  14. Europium doped di-calcium magnesium di-silicate orange–red emitting phosphor by solid state reaction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar Prasad Sahu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new orange–red europium doped di-calcium magnesium di-silicate (Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ phosphor was prepared by the traditional high temperature solid state reaction method. The prepared Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ phosphor was characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX, fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR, photoluminescence (PL and decay characteristics. The phase structure of sintered phosphor was akermanite type structure which belongs to the tetragonal crystallography with space group P4¯21m, this structure is a member of the melilite group and forms a layered compound. The chemical composition of the sintered Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ phosphor was confirmed by EDX spectra. The PL spectra indicate that Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ can be excited effectively by near ultraviolet (NUV light and exhibit bright orange–red emission with excellent color stability. The fluorescence lifetime of Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ phosphor was found to be 28.47 ms. CIE color coordinates of Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu3+ phosphor is suitable as orange-red light emitting phosphor with a CIE value of (X = 0.5554, Y = 0.4397. Therefore, it is considered to be a new promising orange–red emitting phosphor for white light emitting diode (LED application.

  15. Degradation and silicon excretion of the calcium silicate bioactive ceramics during bone regeneration using rabbit femur defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Liu, Yong; Huang, Hai; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhen; Chang, Jiang

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of the bone regeneration ability, degradation and excretion of the grafts is critical for development and application of the newly developed biomaterials. Herein, the in vivo bone-regeneration, biodegradation and silicon (Si) excretion of the new type calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) bioactive ceramics were investigated using rabbit femur defect model, and the results were compared with the traditional β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca3(PO4)2, β-TCP] bioceramics. After implantation of the scaffolds in rabbit femur defects for 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the bone regenerative capacity and degradation were evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. While urine and some organs such as kidney, liver, lung and spleen were resected for chemical analysis to determine the excretion of the ionic products from CS implants. The histomorphometric analysis showed that the bioresorption rate of CS was similar to that of β-TCP in femur defect model, while the CS grafts could significantly stimulate bone formation capacity as compared with β-TCP bioceramics (P < 0.05). The chemical analysis results showed that Si concentration in urinary of the CS group was apparently higher than that in control group of β-TCP. However, no significant increase of the Si excretion was found in the organs including kidney, which suggests that the resorbed Si element is harmlessly excreted in soluble form via the urine. The present studies show that the CS ceramics can be used as safe, bioactive and biodegradable materials for hard tissue repair and tissue engineering applications.

  16. Predictive model for Pb(II) adsorption on soil minerals (oxides and low-crystalline aluminum silicate) consistent with spectroscopic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usiyama, Tomoki; Fukushi, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    Mobility of Pb(II) in surface condition is governed by adsorption processes on soil minerals such as iron oxides and low-crystalline aluminum silicates. The adsorption effectiveness and the surface complex structures of Pb(II) vary sensitively with solution conditions such as pH, ionic strength, Pb(II) loading, and electrolyte anion type. This study was undertaken to construct a quantitative model for Pb(II) on soil minerals. It can predict the adsorption effectiveness and surface complex structures under any solution conditions using the extended triple layer model (ETLM). The Pb(II) adsorption data for goethite, hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), quartz, and low-crystalline aluminum silicate (LCAS) were analyzed with ETLM to retrieve the surface complexation reactions and these equilibrium constants. The adsorption data on goethite, HFO and quartz were referred from reports of earlier studies. Those data for LCAS were measured under a wide range of pH, ionic strength and Pb(II) loadings in NaNO3 and NaCl solutions. All adsorption data can be reasonably regressed using ETLM with the assumptions of inner sphere bidentate complexation and inner sphere monodentate ternary complexation with electrolyte anions, which are consistent with previously reported spectroscopic evidence. Predictions of surface speciation under widely various solution conditions using ETLM revealed that the inner sphere bidentate complex is the predominant species at neutral to high pH conditions. The inner sphere monodentate ternary complex becomes important at low pH, high surface Pb(II) coverage, and high electrolyte concentrations, of which the behavior is consistent with the spectroscopic observation. Comparisons of the obtained adsorption constants on goethite, HFO and quartz exhibited good linear relations between the reciprocals of dielectric constants of solids and adsorption constants. Those linear relations support predictions of the adsorption constants of all oxides based on Born

  17. Effects of altered crystalline structure and increased initial compressive strength of calcium sulfate bone graft substitute pellets on new bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Robert M; Turner, Thomas M; Hall, Deborah J; Infanger, Susan I; Cheema, Naveed; Lim, Tae-Hong; Moseley, Jon; Carroll, Michael; Roark, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A new, modified calcium sulfate has been developed with a different crystalline structure and a compressive strength similar to many calcium phosphate materials, but with a resorption profile only slightly slower than conventional surgical-grade calcium sulfate. A canine bilateral defect model was used to compare restoration of defects treated with the modified calcium sulfate compared to treatment using conventional calcium sulfate pellets after 6, 13, and 26 weeks. The modified calcium sulfate pellets were as effective as conventional calcium sulfate pellets with regard to the area fraction and compressive strength of newly formed bone in the treated bone defects. Mechanical testing demonstrated that the initial compressive strength of the modified material was increased nearly three-fold compared to that of conventional surgical-grade calcium sulfate. This increase potentially allows for its use in a broader range of clinical applications, such as vertebral and subchondral defects.

  18. Disorder and the extent of polymerization in calcium silicate and aluminosilicate glasses: O-17 NMR results and quantum chemical molecular orbital calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    2006-08-01

    Estimation of the framework connectivity and the atomic structure of depolymerized silicate melts and glasses (NBO/T > 0) remains a difficult question in high-temperature geochemistry relevant to magmatic processes and glass science. Here, we explore the extent of disorder and the nature of polymerization in binary Ca-silicate and ternary Ca-aluminosilicate glasses with varying NBO/T (from 0 to 2.67) using O-17 NMR at two different magnetic fields of 9.4 and 14.1 T in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Non-random distributions among framework cations (Si and Al) are demonstrated in the variation of relative populations of oxygen sites with NBO/T. The proportion of non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Ca-O-Si) in the binary and ternary aluminosilicate glasses increases with NBO/T. While the trend is consistent with predictions from composition, the detailed fractions apparently deviate from the predicted values, suggesting further complications in the nature of polymerization. The proportion of each bridging oxygen in the glasses also varies with NBO/T. The fractions of Al-O-Si and Al-O-Al increase with increasing polymerization as CaO is replaced with Al 2O 3, while that of Si-O-Si seems to decrease, implying that activity of silica may decrease from calcium silicate to polymerized aluminosilicates (X=constant). Quantum chemical molecular orbital calculations based on density functional theory show that a silicate chain with Al-NBO (Ca-O-Al) has an energy penalty (calculated cluster energy difference) of about 108 kJ/mol compared with the cluster with Ca-O-Si, consistent with preferential depolymerization of Si-networks, reported in an earlier O-17 NMR study [Allwardt, J., Lee, S.K., Stebbins, J.F., 2003. Bonding preferences of non-bridging oxygens in calcium aluminosilicate glass: Evidence from O-17 MAS and 3QMAS NMR on calcium aluminate glass. Am. Mineral.88, 949-954]. These prominent types of non-randomness in the distributions suggest significant chemical

  19. Clinical and radiographic comparison of indirect pulp treatment using light-cured calcium silicate and mineral trioxide aggregate in primary molars: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Navya P Menon; Balagopal R Varma; Sureshkumar Janardhanan; Parvathy Kumaran; Arun Mamachan Xavier; Bhat Sangeetha Govinda

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To clinically and radiographically evaluate the reparative dentin formation in indirect pulp treatment (IPT) using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and light cured calcium silicate (TheraCal) in primary molars over a period of 6 months. Materials and Methods: A clinical trial on IPT on 43 primary molars in 21 patients between the age of 4–7 years, divided into two groups: 22 teeth in MTA group and 21 in TheraCal group. Measurement of the variation in dentin thickness was done on the digi...

  20. Effect of addition of nano-hydroxyapatite on physico-chemical and antibiofilm properties of calcium silicate cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2 and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn. Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil; PC (70%+ZrO2 (30%; PC (60%+ZrO2 (30%+HAn (10%; PC (50%+ZrO2 (30%+HAn (20% were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1 in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10% and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20% (p>0.05 and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05. The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10% and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20% (p<0.05. MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05. All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05. Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05 after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%, the final setting time and

  1. Effect of addition of nano-hydroxyapatite on physico-chemical and antibiofilm properties of calcium silicate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; VÁZQUEZ-GARCÍA, Fernando Antonio; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; BERNARDI, Maria Inês Basso; FARIA, Gisele; TANOMARU, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC) and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn). Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil); PC (70%)+ZrO2 (30%); PC (60%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (10%); PC (50%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (20%) were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1) in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p>0.05) and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05). The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p<0.05). MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05). All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05). Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05) after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%), the final setting time

  2. Quantitative X-ray pair distribution function analysis of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: a contribution to the understanding of cement chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Baronnet, Alain; Marty, Nicolas; Poulain, Agnieszka; Elkaïm, Erik; Roosz, Cédric; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Henocq, Pierre; Claret, Francis

    2017-01-01

    The structural evolution of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) as a function of its calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratio has been probed using qualitative and quantitative X-ray atomic pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering data. Whatever the Ca/Si ratio, the C–S–H structure is similar to that of tobermorite. When the Ca/Si ratio increases from ∼0.6 to ∼1.2, Si wollastonite-like chains progressively depolymerize through preferential omission of Si bridging tetrahedra. When the Ca/Si ratio approaches ∼1.5, nanosheets of portlandite are detected in samples aged for 1 d, while microcrystalline portlandite is detected in samples aged for 1 year. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging shows that the tobermorite-like structure is maintained to Ca/Si > 3.

  3. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way.

  4. Promotion of in vivo degradability, vascularization and osteogenesis of calcium sulfate-based bone cements containing nanoporous lithium doping magnesium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qirong; Cui, Jin; Zhao, Yuechao; Shin, Jung-Woog; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous lithium doping magnesium silicate (nl-MS) was introduced into calcium sulfate hemihydrate to prepare calcium sulfate composite (nl-MSC) bone cements. The introduction of nl-MS improved the in vitro degradability of nl-MSC cements, which could neutralize acidic degradable products of calcium sulfate and prevented the pH from dropping. The cements were implanted into the bone defects of femur bone of rabbits, and the results of histological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that massive new bone tissue formed in the defects while the cements were degradable, indicating that the osteogenesis and degradability of the nl-MSC cements were much better than the control calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) cements. Furthermore, the positive expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and collagen type I for nl-MSC cements was higher than CSD, indicating that addition of nl-MS into the cements enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation. The results suggested that the nl-MSC cements with good biocompatibility and degradability could promote vascularization and osteogenesis, and had great potential to treat bone defects. PMID:28260883

  5. Chemical and physical controls on the transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate into crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, C. R.; Giuffre, A.; Mergelsberg, S.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite and other crystalline polymorphs of CaCO3 can form by pathways involving amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Apparent inconsistencies in the literature indicate the relationships between ACC composition, local conditions, and the subsequent crystalline polymorphs are not yet established. This experimental study quantifies the control of solution composition on the transformation of ACC into crystalline polymorphs in the presence of magnesium. Using a mixed flow reactor to control solution chemistry, ACC was synthesized with variable Mg contents by tuning input pH, Mg/Ca, and total carbonate concentration. ACC products were allowed to transform within the output suspension under stirred or quiescent conditions while characterizing the evolving solutions and solids. As the ACC transforms into a crystalline phase, the solutions record a polymorph-specific evolution of pH and Mg/Ca. The data provide a quantitative framework for predicting the initial polymorph that forms from ACC based upon the solution aMg2+/aCa2+ and aCO32-/aCa2+ and stirring versus quiescent conditions. This model reconciles discrepancies among previous studies that report on the nature of the polymorphs produced from ACC and supports the previous claim that monohydrocalcite may be an important, but overlooked, transient phase on the way to forming some aragonite and calcite deposits. By this construct, organic additives and extreme pH are not required to tune the composition and nature of the polymorph that forms. Our measurements show that the Mg content of ACC is recorded in the resulting calcite with a ≈1:1 dependence. By correlating composition of these calcite products with the Mgtot/Catot of the initial solutions, we find a ≈3:1 dependence that is approximately linear and general to whether calcite is formed via an ACC pathway or by the classical step-propagation process. Comparisons to calcite grown in synthetic seawater show a ≈1:1 dependence. The relationships suggest that the

  6. Compaction of functionalized calcium carbonate, a porous and crystalline microparticulate material with a lamellar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnimann, Tanja; Atria, Susanna; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C; Alles, Rainer; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2014-05-15

    In the present study, we aimed to characterize the compressibility and compactibility of the novel pharmaceutical excipient, functionalized calcium carbonate (FCC). We studied three FCC modifications and compared the values for compressibility and compactibility with mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and ground calcium carbonate (CC 330) as well as mixtures of paracetamol and MCC or FCC at drug loads of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% (w/w). We used Heckel analysis, modified Heckel analysis, and Leuenberger analysis to characterize the compaction and compression behavior of the mixtures. Compaction analysis of FCC showed this material to markedly differ from ground calcium carbonate, exhibiting properties, i.e. plastic deformability, similar to those of MCC. This effect was attributed to the highly lamellar structure of FCC particles whose thickness is of the order of a single crystal unit cell. According to Leuenberger parameters, we concluded that FCC-based tablet formulations had mechanical properties equal or superior to those formulated with MCC. FCC tablets with high tensile strength were obtained already at low compressive pressures. Owing to these favorable properties (i.e. marked tensile strength and porosity), FCC promises to be suitable for the preparation of solid dosage forms.

  7. Calcium silicate cement-induced remineralisation of totally demineralised dentine in comparison with glass ionomer cement: tetracycline labelling and two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A R; Chong, E Z; Richard, G; Boyde, A; Festy, F; Watson, T F

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, in combination with tetracycline labelling, was used to observe the remineralising potentials of a calcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine(TM) ) and a glass ionomer cement (GIC:​Fuji​IX) on totally demineralised dentine. Forty demineralised dentine discs were stored with either cement in three different solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) with tetracycline, phosphate-free tetracycline, and tetracycline-free PBS. Additional samples of demineralised dentine were stored alone in the first solution. After 8-week storage at 37 °C, dentine samples were imaged using two-photon fluorescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Samples were later embedded in PMMA and polished block surfaces studied by 20 kV BSE imaging in an SEM to study variations in mineral concentration. The highest fluorescence intensity was exhibited by the dentine stored with Biodentine(TM) in the PBS/tetracycline solution. These samples also showed microscopic features of matrix remineralisation including a mineralisation front and intra- and intertubular mineralisation. In the other solutions, dentine exhibited much weaker fluorescence with none of these features detectable. Raman spectra confirmed the formation of calcium phosphate mineral with Raman peaks similar to apatite, while no mineral formation was detected in the dentine stored in cement-free or PBS-free media, or with GIC. It could therefore be concluded that Biodentine(TM) induced calcium phosphate mineral formation within the dentine matrix when stored in phosphate-rich media, which was selectively detectable using the tetracycline labelling.

  8. Investigations on the crystal-structure and non-ambient behaviour of K2Ca2Si8O19 - a new potassium calcium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidmair, Daniela; Kahlenberg, Volker; Praxmarer, Alessandra; Perfler, Lukas; Mair, Philipp

    2017-09-01

    Within the context of a systematic re-investigation of phase relationships between compounds of the ternary system K2O-CaO-SiO2 a new potassium calcium silicate with the chemical formula K2Ca2Si8O19 was synthesized via solid state reactions as well as the flux method using KCl as a solvent. Its crystal structure was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by applying direct methods. The new compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P 1 bar . Unit cell dimensions are a = 7.4231(7) Å, b = 10.7649(10) Å, c = 12.1252(10) Å, α = 70.193(8)°, β = 83.914(7)° and γ = 88.683(7)°. K2Ca2Si8O19 is built up of corner-connected, slightly distorted [SiO4]-tetrahedra forming double-sheets, which are linked by double-chains of edge-sharing [CaO6]-octahedra. Electroneutrality of the material is provided by additional potassium atoms that are located within the voids of the silicate layers and between adjacent [Ca2O6]-double-chains. Further characterization of the compound was performed by Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis. The behaviour of K2Ca2Si8O19 under high-temperature and high-pressure was investigated by in-situ high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction up to a maximum temperature of 1125 °C and a piston cylinder experiment at 1.5 GPa and 1100 °C. Additionally an overview of known double-layer silicates is given as well as a comparison of K2Ca2Si8O19 to closely related structures.

  9. Preparation of calcium silicate?chitosan polymer and the adsorptive removal of heavy metals in wastewater%硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物制备及其对重金属废水的吸附特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴亚琪; 徐畅; 赵越; 严群

    2016-01-01

    A solution blending method was adopted to prepare calcium silicate?chitosan polymer in this study, and FT?IR and XRD were used to characterize the polymer adsorbent. In addition, a preliminary study was carried on the adsorbent abilities of chitosan, calcium silicate and calcium silicate?chitosan polymer for heavy metal ions in wastewater. The characterization indicated that crystal structure of the polymer changed and crystallinity decreased during the synthesis process. Adsorbent ability of the polymer was the highest among the three adsorbents and the maximum adsorbent ability for Ni2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+and Cr3+reached 167.01, 192.30, 232.47, 174.71 and 162.33 mg·g-1 , respectively. Moreover, it was noteworthy that calcium silicate?chitosan polymer showed a stronger acid resistance for removal of heavy metal ions in wastewater.%使用溶液共混法制备出硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物,同时采用FT?IR、XRD等方法对制备的硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物进行表征,并分别对壳聚糖、硅酸钙、硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物吸附去除重金属废水的特性进行了初步研究.结果表明,硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物在制备过程中晶型发生变化,结晶度降低;硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物对各重金属离子的吸附能力最强,其对Ni2+、Cu2+、Pb2+、Zn2+、Cr3+的最大吸附量分别为167.01、192.30、232.47、174.71、162.33 mg·g-1;重要的是,硅酸钙?壳聚糖聚合物可在酸性环境下更有效吸附去除废水中重金属离子.

  10. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwan, M.M., E-mail: mmahmoudradwan@yahoo.com [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Abd El-Hamid, H.K. [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Mohamed, A.F. [The Holding Company for Production of Vaccines, Sera and Drugs (EGYVAC) (Egypt)

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C{sub 2}S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C{sub 2}S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C{sub 2}S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C{sub 2}S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C{sub 2}S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way.

  11. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients ( L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient ( β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  12. Atributos químicos de solos influenciados pela substituição do carbonato por silicato de cálcio Soil chemical properties influenced by the substitution of calcium carbonate by calcium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ferreira de Souza

    2008-08-01

    ácia do silicato de Ca foi inferior à de carbonato de Ca na melhoria das condições químicas do solo.The application of silicates to soils can result in increased soil cation exchange capacity (CEC, displace anions, especially H2PO4- (diacid phosphate, neutralize the pH and Al toxicity and, in general, increase the nutrient availability to plants. However, calcium silicates may be less efficient than calcium carbonates. To evaluate the effect of calcium carbonate substitution by calcium silicate on the soil chemical properties, especially on phosphorus availability, four experiments were conducted in an entirely randomized design with four replications, in a greenhouse. The treatments consisted of five levels (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of calcium carbonate substitution by calcium silicate, with a 4:1 Ca:Mg stoichiometric and the same amount of CaO, enough to reach a 60 % base saturation. The treatments were applied to 4 dm³ samples of a sandy orthic Quartzarenic Neosol (Quartzpsament, a sandy loam dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol (Oxisol, sandy clay loam dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol (Oxisol and a clayey dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol; each soil represented one experiment. The pH values in H2O, P, phosphorus in the equilibrium solution (P-rem, K, Ca, Mg, Si, Al, H + Al, organic matter (OM, Cu, Mn, Zn and B, sum of bases (S, effective (t ant total (T CEC, base saturation (V and Al saturation (m were submitted to analysis of variance and simple regression models fitted as a function of CaCO3 substitution by CaSiO3 levels. It was observed that carbonate substitution by silicate promoted significant increases in the values of Si, Al, H + Al and m and reduction in the values of P-rem, pH, S, t and V. The values of Mehlich 1 P, K, Mg, OM, T, Mn, Cu, and B were not influenced significantly. A reduction in Zn availability was verified in the dystrophic orthic Quartzarenic Neosol only. Calcium silicate was less efficient than calcium carbonate in the improvement of soil chemical

  13. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  14. Differentiation inducement of calcium phosphate / calcium silicate / bismutite cement to dental pulp cells in vitro%新型复合盖髓材料对人牙髓细胞分化的体外诱导效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晴昳; 陈芳萍; 刘昌胜; 孙皎

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of new calcium phosphate/calcium silicate/bismutite (CPCSBi) cement on differentiation of human dental pulp cells.Methods Dissoluble dentin matrix components (DDMCs) were extracted from powdered sound,human dentine samples by either CPCSBi saturated solution,Ca(OH)2 saturated solution,or 10% EDTA,over a 14-day period.The effects of DDMCs extracts on dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP),osteocalcin (OCN) and TGF-β 1 gene expression in the dental pulp cells were analysed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR following 24 h of exposure.Results All the DDMCs extracts induced DSPP,OCN and TGF-β 1 gene expression in dental pulp cells.While the DDMCs extracted from dentin powder by CPCSBi demonstrated highest inducing effect on expression of DSPP and OCN in human pulp cells.Conclusion These results suggest that CPCSBi plays an important role in the differentiation of dental pulp cells to odontoblast like cells.%目的 研究新型盖髓材料磷酸钙/硅酸钙/泡铋矿复合水门汀(Calcium phosphate-calcium silicate-bismuth compound cement,CPCSBi)诱导牙髓细胞分化的作用.方法 分别采用CPCSBi、氢氧化钙(CH)饱和溶液和10%EDTA溶液,从人牙本质粉末中提取可溶性牙本质基质(DDMCs),通过半定量RT-PCR方法,分析不同材料所提取DDMCs对人牙髓细胞的涎磷蛋白(DSPP)、骨钙素(OCN)、转化生长因子-β1(TGF-β1)基因表达的影响.结果 不同材料提取的DDMCs都能提高体外培养人牙髓细胞DSPP、OCN和TGF-β1基因的表达,其中以CPCSBi溶液提取DDMCs的促进作用最明显.结论 CPCSBi对牙髓细胞分化具有促进作用.

  15. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  16. The role of integrin αv in proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cell response to calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Jr; Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    It has been proved that integrin αv activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the biological functions of integrin αv in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on silicate-based materials have not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of integrin αv in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs cultured with the effect of calcium silicate (CS) cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement. In this study, hDPCs were cultured on CS and TCP materials, and we evaluated fibronectin (FN) secretion and integrin αv expression during the cell attachment stage. After small interfering RNA transfection targeting integrin αv, the proliferation and odontogenesis differentiation behavior of hDPCs were analyzed. The results indicate that CS releases Si ion-increased FN secretion and adsorption, which promote cell attachment more effectively than TCP. The CS cement facilitates FN and αv subintegrin expression. However, the FN adsorption and integrin expression of TCP are similar to that observed in the control dish. Integrin αv small interfering RNA inhibited odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs with the decreased formation of mineralized nodules on CS. It also down-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These results establish composition-dependent differences in integrin binding and its effectiveness as a mechanism regulating cellular responses to biomaterial surface. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sealing ability of a new calcium silicate based material as a dentin substitute in class II sandwich restorations: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Viola Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Class ll sandwich restorations are routinely performed where conventional Glass ionomer cement (GIC or Resin-modified GIC (RMGIC is used as a base or dentin substitute and a light curing composite resin restorative material is used as an enamel substitute. Various authors have evaluated the microleakage of composite resin restorations where glass ionomer cement has been used as a base in class II sandwich restorations, but a literature survey reveals limited studies on the microleakage analysis of similar restorations with biodentine as a dentin substitute, as an alternative to glass ionomer cement. The aim of this study is: To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of a new calcium-silicate-based material (Biodentine as a dentin substitute, at the cervical margins, in posterior class II sandwich restorations.To compare and evaluate the microleakage at the biodentine/composite interface with the microleakage at the resin-modified GIC/composite interface, in posterior class II open sandwich restorations. To compare the efficacy between a water-based etch and rinse adhesive (Scotch bond multipurpose and an acetone-based etch and rinse adhesive (Prime and bond NT, when bonding biodentine to the composite. To evaluate the enamel, dentin, and interfacial microleakage at the composite and biodentine/RMGIC interfaces. Materials and Methods: Fifty class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary third molars, which were randomly divided into five groups of ten cavities each: (G1 Biodentine group, (G2 Fuji II LC GIC group, (G3 Biodentine as a base + prime and bond NT + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G4 Biodentine + scotchbond multi-purpose + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G5 Fuji II LC as a base + prime and bond NT+ Tetric-N Ceram composite. The samples were then subjected to thermocycling, 2500× (5°C to 55°C, followed by the dye penetration test. Scores are given from 0 to 3 based on the depth of

  18. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  19. Comparative evaluation of calcium silicate-based dentin substitute (Biodentine®) and calcium hydroxide (pulpdent) in the formation of reactive dentin bridge in regenerative pulpotomy of vital primary teeth: Triple blind, randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Navneet; Salhan, Rubica; Kaur, Nirapjeet; Patel, Hemal Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the biological concerns of calcium hydroxide (CH) as a pulpotomy agent, an alternative silicate based dentin substitute i.e. Biodentine (Ca3SiO5) was evaluated clinically and radiographically. Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of dentin substitute (Biodentine) in regenerative pulpotomy of vital primary teeth that would giv a biological base to its use in forming reactive dentin bridge and overcoming the drawbacks of calcium hydroxide. Material and Methods: Randomised clinical trial on 40 bilateral carious primary molars in 20 participant children (aged 5-10 years) was carried out by same operator using Ca3SiO5(group-1) and CH (group-2) as vital pulpotomy agents. Blinded clinical and radiographic outcomes were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months interval. Results: Clinical outcomes of both protocols were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test applied at P < 0.05. Descriptive statistics were expressed as mean increase in dentin bridge formation in mms from two reference points in standardized radiographs using paired ‘t’- test at baseline and 12 months and found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) in group-1 when compared with group-2. Conclusion: Group-1 revealed statistically favourable regenerative potential along with clinical success compared to group 2 thereby sharing both indications and mode of action with CH, but without its drawbacks of physical and clinical properties. PMID:27994411

  20. Comparative evaluation of calcium silicate-based dentin substitute (Biodentine® and calcium hydroxide (pulpdent in the formation of reactive dentin bridge in regenerative pulpotomy of vital primary teeth: Triple blind, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Grewal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the biological concerns of calcium hydroxide (CH as a pulpotomy agent, an alternative silicate based dentin substitute i.e. Biodentine (Ca3SiO5 was evaluated clinically and radiographically. Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of dentin substitute (Biodentine in regenerative pulpotomy of vital primary teeth that would giv a biological base to its use in forming reactive dentin bridge and overcoming the drawbacks of calcium hydroxide. Material and Methods: Randomised clinical trial on 40 bilateral carious primary molars in 20 participant children (aged 5-10 years was carried out by same operator using Ca3SiO5(group-1 and CH (group-2 as vital pulpotomy agents. Blinded clinical and radiographic outcomes were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months interval. Results: Clinical outcomes of both protocols were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test applied at P < 0.05. Descriptive statistics were expressed as mean increase in dentin bridge formation in mms from two reference points in standardized radiographs using paired 't'- test at baseline and 12 months and found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05 in group-1 when compared with group-2. Conclusion: Group-1 revealed statistically favourable regenerative potential along with clinical success compared to group 2 thereby sharing both indications and mode of action with CH, but without its drawbacks of physical and clinical properties.

  1. The synergistic effects of Chinese herb and injectable calcium silicate/β-tricalcium phosphate composite on an osteogenic accelerator in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Shieh, Den-En; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the physicochemical and biological effects of traditional Chinese medicines on the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/calcium silicate (CS) composites of bone cells using human dental pulp cell. CS is an osteoconductive and bioactive material. For this research we have combined β-TCP and CS and check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios of Xu Duan (XD) were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. XD has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for hundreds of years as an antiosteoporosis, tonic and antiaging agent for the therapy of low back pain, traumatic hematoma, threatened abortion and bone fractures. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of XD released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPCs) and studied its behavior. The results show the XD-contained paste did not give any demixing when the weight ratio of XD increased to 5-10 % due to the filter-pressing effect during extrusion through the syringe. After immersion in SBF, the microstructure image showed a dense bone-like apatite layer covered on the β-TCP/CS/XD composites. In vitro cell experiments shows that the XD-rich composites promote human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the XD quantity in the composite is more than 5 %, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs were stimulated by XD released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of XD in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials.

  2. The effect of calcium silicate on in vitro physiochemical properties and in vivo osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity of porous β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; Jin, Fangchun; Lin, Kaili; Lu, Jianxi; Sun, Jiao; Chang, Jiang; Dai, Kerong; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-04-01

    Porous β-tricalcium phosphate(TCP)/calcium silicate(CS) composite bioceramics with different weight proportions were prepared to investigate the in vitro effects of CS on the physiochemical properties of TCP and the in vivo effects of CS on the degradability, osteogenesis and bioactivity of TCP. The physiochemical results showed that the addition of CS to porous TCP resulted in a looser and rougher surface and a lower solid density, compressive strength and Young's modulus and a lower pH value as compared to pure CS without any chemical interaction between the TCP and the CS. The in vivo study showed that the material degradation of porous TCP/CS composite bioceramics was slower than that of pure CS, although the osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity were significantly increased in the long term. Thereafter, the introduction of CS into porous TCP bioceramics is an effective way to prepare bioactive bone grafting scaffolds for clinical use and to control properties such as in vivo degradability and osteoinduction of TCP.

  3. Hinokitiol-Loaded Mesoporous Calcium Silicate Nanoparticles Induce Apoptotic Cell Death through Regulation of the Function of MDR1 in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fang Shen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related compound found in heartwood cupressaceous plants. Hinokitiol slows the growth of a variety of cancers through inhibition of cell proliferation. The low water solubility of hinokitiol leads to less bioavailability. This has been highlighted as a major limiting factor. In this study, mesoporous calcium silicate (MCS nanoparticles, both pure and hinokitiol-loaded, were synthesized and their effects on A549 cells were analyzed. The results indicate that Hino-MCS nanoparticles induce apoptosis in higher concentration loads (>12.5 μg/mL for A549 cells. Hino-MCS nanoparticles suppress gene and protein expression levels of multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1. In addition, both the activity and the expression levels of caspase-3/-9 were measured in Hino-MCS nanoparticle-treated A549 cells. The Hino-MCS nanoparticles-triggered apoptosis was blocked by inhibitors of pan-caspase, caspase-3/-9, and antioxidant agents (N-acetylcysteine; NAC. The Hino-MCS nanoparticles enhance reactive oxygen species production and the protein expression levels of caspase-3/-9. Our data suggest that Hino-MCS nanoparticles trigger an intrinsic apoptotic pathway through regulating the function of MDR1 and the production of reactive oxygen species in A549 cells. Therefore, we believe that Hino-MCS nanoparticles may be efficacious in the treatment of drug-resistant human lung cancer in the future.

  4. A food-grade process for isolation and partial purification of bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria that uses diatomite calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, M J; Gordon, J B; Alexander, M; Hickey, M W; Wan, J

    1996-01-01

    Bacteriocins, including nisin, pediocin PO2, brevicin 286, and piscicolin 126, were extracted from fermentation media by adsorption onto Micro-Cel (a food-grade diatomite calcium silicate anticaking agent) and subsequent desorption. The optimal conditions for desorption of piscicolin 126 were determined and applied to other bacteriocins, and the relative purities of the desorbed preparations were compared. Piscicolin was not successfully desorbed from Micro-Cel at pH 1.0 to 12.0, with organic solvents, or by increase of ionic strength up to 1 M NaCl. However, 25 and 75% of the bacteriocin activity was desorbed by using 1% sodium deoxycholate and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), respectively. Higher levels (up to 100%) of desorption were achieved by repeated elution or by an increase in surfactant concentration. Desorption of piscicolin with 1/10 volume of SDS solution resulted in a preparation with 10 times concentration in activity, equivalent to that of ammonium sulfate preparations (409,600 to 819,200 activity units/ml). Determination of organic nitrogen (N) content revealed that the desorbed piscicolin preparations were substantially free of proteinaceous substances (approximately 92 to 99%) compared with original culture supernatants and ammonium sulfate preparations. Nisin, pediocin, and brevicin were also desorbed with 1% SDS with a similar level of purification. PMID:8633875

  5. Determination of uranium(VI) sorbed species in calcium silicate hydrate phases: a laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy and batch sorption study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tits, Jan; Geipel, Gerhard; Macé, Nathalie; Eilzer, Manuela; Wieland, Erich

    2011-07-01

    Batch sorption experiments and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy investigations were carried out to study the U(VI) speciation in calcium silicate hydrates for varying chemical conditions representing both fresh and altered cementitious environments. U(VI) uptake was found to be fast and sorption distribution ratios (R(d) values) were very high indicating strong uptake by the C-S-H phases. In addition a strong dependence of pH and solid composition (Ca:Si mol ratio) was observed. U(VI) luminescence spectroscopy investigations showed that the U(VI) solid speciation continuously changed over a period up to 6 months in contrast to the fast sorption kinetics observed in the batch sorption studies. Decay profile analysis combined with factor analysis of series of spectra of U(VI)-C-S-H suspensions, recorded with increasing delay times, revealed the presence of four luminescent U(VI) species in C-S-H suspensions, in agreement with the batch sorption data. Along with the aqueous UO(2)(OH)(4)(2-) species and a Ca-uranate precipitate, two different sorbed species were identified which are either bound to silanol groups on the surface or incorporated in the interlayer of the C-S-H structure.

  6. The effect of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating on the mechanical, biodegradable, bioactive properties and drug release of porous calcium silicate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lang; Wu, Chengtie; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds for bone tissue engineering require 3D interconnected porous structures, enough mechanical strength for hand of treatment as well as proper bioactivity and biodegradability. Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) scaffolds have been studied for bone tissue engineering application due to their excellent bioactivity. However, the main disadvantages of CS scaffolds are their low mechanical strength and high alkaline ionic products. In this study, sintered CS scaffolds were prepared and coated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and the effect of PLGA coating on the mechanical, biodegradable, bioactive properties and drug release of porous CS scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that the PLGA-coated CS scaffolds maintained large pore size and high porosity. The compressive strength of PLGA/CS scaffolds was significantly improved compared to pure CS scaffolds, and increased with the increase of intrinsic viscosity and concentration of PLGA. In addition, the PLGA coating neutralized alkaline level resulted from the ionic products of CS scaffolds and reduced the pH value of biological solution during the degradation of scaffolds. It was found that PLGA/CS scaffolds still maintained excellent apatite-mineralization ability in SBF. Furthermore, the PLGA coating effectively inhibited the burst release and maintained a sustained release of drugs from the CS scaffolds. Our results indicate that the PLGA/CS scaffolds have great potential for bone tissue engineering application by the virtue of improved mechanical strength, and excellent bioactivity, degradation as well as drug-delivery property.

  7. Clinical and radiographic comparison of indirect pulp treatment using light-cured calcium silicate and mineral trioxide aggregate in primary molars: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navya P Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To clinically and radiographically evaluate the reparative dentin formation in indirect pulp treatment (IPT using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and light cured calcium silicate (TheraCal in primary molars over a period of 6 months. Materials and Methods: A clinical trial on IPT on 43 primary molars in 21 patients between the age of 4–7 years, divided into two groups: 22 teeth in MTA group and 21 in TheraCal group. Measurement of the variation in dentin thickness was done on the digitalized radiograph at baseline, 3 months and 6 months using CorelDRAW X3 software. Results: Statistical analysis using an independent t-test for intragroup and intergroup comparison showed a significant increase in dentin thickness in both the MTA and TheraCal group (intragroup comparison [P 0.05. Conclusion: Clinically and radiographically, both MTA and TheraCal are good IPT materials. The better handling characteristics and comparable reparative dentin-forming ability of TheraCal make this material an alternative to MTA in pediatric restorative procedures.

  8. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  9. Effect of double antibiotic and calcium hydroxide pastes on dislodgement resistance of an epoxy resin-based and two calcium silicate-based root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, Hakan; Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike; Aslan, Tugrul; Ustun, Yakup

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the dislodgement resistance of AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, and Total Fill BC sealer to root canal dentin walls following placement of calcium hydroxide (CH) or double antibiotic paste (DAP) medicaments. Root canals of 90 single-rooted human mandibular premolar teeth were instrumented with Reciproc rotary instruments to a size R50. The teeth were randomly divided into two experimental groups: those receiving an intracanal medicament with either CH or DAP and a control group (n = 30). After 3 weeks, the medicaments were removed by irrigation with 5 mL of 2.5 % NaOCl, 5 mL 17 % EDTA, and 5 mL distilled water under sonic agitation. Each group was then subdivided into three subgroups (n = 10), and the canals were filled with either AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, or Total Fill BC sealer. After 1 week, a push-out test was applied to the specimens and the results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tamhane's tests. Regardless of the type of intracanal medicament used, Total Fill BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex showed the highest and lowest bond strength, respectively (P  0.05). Prior CH placement improved dislodgement resistance of all sealers without statistical difference (P > 0.05). Adhesive failure between core and sealer was the most frequent failure mode. Prior application of CH or DAP did not significantly affect the adhesion of the AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, and Total Fill BC Sealers. There is a little information about the influence of antibiotic medicaments on the bond strength of root canal sealer. These findings suggest that the use of DAP does not affect the adhesion strength of AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, and Total Fill BC Sealers.

  10. Measurement on Hydrate Products Crystallinity Degrees of Autoclaved Silicate Products%蒸压硅酸盐制品水化产物的结晶度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯昌君; 王淑英; 王浩; 袁兵

    2012-01-01

    利用烧失量和酸溶法测定不同固体废物蒸压样品的结合水量和溶出差,研究固体废物蒸压样品中水化产物量、结晶度与其强度的关系.结果表明,粉煤灰、废玻璃、废混凝土蒸压样品的结晶度较低,钢渣蒸压样品的结晶度较高.蒸压样品的溶出差、结合水量和结晶度与水化产物种类有关.蒸压样品的结晶度可间接表达结晶良好的水化产物占总水化产物量的多少,并可用来确定不同蒸压制品的合理养护制度,指导蒸压制品的工艺优化.蒸压样品的结晶度存在合理范围.%The relationships of solid waste autoclaved samples compressive strength and their crystal-Unity degrees, hydrate amounts were studied with dissolved amount difference and bound water a-mount measured with loss on ignition and acid digestion method. The results showed that the crystal-linity degrees of autoclaved samples, such as fly ash, waste glass and waste concrete are in a low level except that the crystallinity degree of autoclaved steel slag sample is higher. The dissolved amount difference, bound water amount and crystallinity degree of the autoclaved samples were related to their hydrate types. The crystallinity degrees of autoclaved samples could be indirectly represented as the ratios of well-crystallized hydrate amounts to total hydrate amounts in the autoclaved samples, and used to determine the autoclaved schedule and guide the technology optimization for autoclaved products. There is a reasonable crystallinity degree range for the compressive strength of autoclaved samples.

  11. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays; Interaction des silicates de calcium hydrates, principaux constituants du ciment, avec les chlorures d'alcalins. Analogie avec les argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallis-Terrisse, H

    2000-10-06

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  12. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ching-Chuan [Antai Medical Care Cooperation Antai Tian-Sheng Memorial Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien, E-mail: thh@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  13. The effect of powder properties on sintering, microstructure, mechanical strength and degradability of beta-tricalcium phosphate/calcium silicate composite bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Kaili; Chang Jiang; Shen Ruxiang, E-mail: jchang@mail.sic.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The effect of powder properties on sintering, microstructure, mechanical strength and degradability of beta-tricalcium phosphate/Calcium silicate (beta-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}/CaSiO{sub 3}, beta-TCP/CS) composite bioceramics was investigated. beta-TCP/CS composite powders with a weight ratio of 50:50 were prepared by three different methods: mechanical milling method (TW-A), two-step chemical precipitation method (TW-B) and in situ chemical co-precipitation method (TW-C), and then the three composite powders were uniaxially compacted at 30 MPa, followed by cold isostatic pressing into rectangular-prism-shaped specimens under a pressure of 200 MPa for 15 min, and then sintered at 1150 deg. C for 5 h. The TW-B powders with less agglomerative morphologies and uniform nano-size particles attained 96.14% relative density (RD). A uniform microstructure with about 120 nm grains was observed. Whereas, the samples obtained from TW-A and TW-C powders only reached a RD of 63.08% and 78.86%, respectively. The bending strength of the samples fabricated from TW-B reached 125 MPa, which was more than 3.7 and 1.5 times higher as compared with that of samples obtained from TW-A and TW-C powders, respectively. Furthermore, the degradability of the samples fabricated from TW-B powders was obviously lower than that of the samples fabricated from TW-A and TW-C powders.

  14. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan W

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Wei Fan,1,* Daming Wu,1,* Franklin R Tay,2 Tengjiao Ma,1 Yujie Wu,1 Bing Fan1 1The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Endodontics, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05. The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05. Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05. The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials. Keywords: antibacterial effect, mesoporosity

  15. Mechanical and physical behavior of newly developed functionally graded materials and composites of stainless steel 316L with calcium silicate and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataollahi Oshkour, Azim; Pramanik, Sumit; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat Huang; Tarlochan, Faris; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the structural, physical and mechanical behavior of composites and functionally graded materials (FGMs) made of stainless steel (SS-316L)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and SS-316L/calcium silicate (CS) employing powder metallurgical solid state sintering. The structural analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the sintering at high temperature led to the reaction between compounds of the SS-316L and HA, while SS-316L and CS remained intact during the sintering process in composites of SS-316L/CS. A dimensional expansion was found in the composites made of 40 and 50 wt% HA. The minimum shrinkage was emerged in 50 wt% CS composite, while the maximum shrinkage was revealed in samples with pure SS-316L, HA and CS. Compressive mechanical properties of SS-316L/HA decreased sharply with increasing of HA content up to 20 wt% and gradually with CS content up to 50 wt% for SS-316L/CS composites. The mechanical properties of the FGM of SS-316L/HA dropped with increase in temperature, while it was improved for the FGM of SS-316L/CS with temperature enhancement. It has been found that the FGMs emerged a better compressive mechanical properties compared to both the composite systems. Therefore, the SS-316L/CS composites and their FGMs have superior compressive mechanical properties to the SS-316L/HA composites and their FGMs and also the newly developed FGMs of SS-316L/CS with improved mechanical and enhanced gradation in physical and structural properties can potentially be utilized in the components with load-bearing application.

  16. Interfacial Kinetics of High-Al-Containing Ultra-Lightweight Steels with Calcium Silicate-Based Molten Oxides at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi Hyun; Sohn, Il

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the high-temperature reaction between high-Al- and -Mn-containing steels and synthesized molten calcium silicate-based fluxes from 1623 K to 1643 K (1350 °C to 1370 °C) was studied. Cylindrical steel rods were rotated in the molten fluxes for 300 to 1200 seconds at various temperatures below the melting point of the steels. The rods were connected to a rheometer, and the initial reaction rates were estimated from the torque variations. The dissolution of the steel into the molten slag was correlated to the variation in torque. The kinetics of the reaction between the rods and the slag estimated from the torque and subsequently from the viscosity were confirmed from the mass balance and from the variation in the chemical compositions of the rods and the molten slags, respectively. The liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient of Al2O3 was calculated to be 1.14 × 10-2 cm/s at 1623 K (1350 °C) and 1.52 × 10-2 cm/s at 1633 K (1360 °C). The kinetics calculated assuming liquid-phase mass transfer control was observed to be similar to the aforementioned kinetics determined from the dynamic viscosity variations. On the basis of dimensionless analysis of the Sherwood number (Sh = 0.05·Re0.65Sc0.31), liquid-phase mass transfer from the metal/flux interface was observed to be the rate-controlling step.

  17. The effect of powder properties on sintering, microstructure, mechanical strength and degradability of beta-tricalcium phosphate/calcium silicate composite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Shen, Ruxiang

    2009-12-01

    The effect of powder properties on sintering, microstructure, mechanical strength and degradability of beta-tricalcium phosphate/calcium silicate (beta-Ca3(PO4)2/CaSiO3, beta-TCP/CS) composite bioceramics was investigated. beta-TCP/CS composite powders with a weight ratio of 50:50 were prepared by three different methods: mechanical milling method (TW-A), two-step chemical precipitation method (TW-B) and in situ chemical co-precipitation method (TW-C), and then the three composite powders were uniaxially compacted at 30 MPa, followed by cold isostatic pressing into rectangular-prism-shaped specimens under a pressure of 200 MPa for 15 min, and then sintered at 1150 degrees C for 5 h. The TW-B powders with less agglomerative morphologies and uniform nano-size particles attained 96.14% relative density (RD). A uniform microstructure with about 120 nm grains was observed. Whereas, the samples obtained from TW-A and TW-C powders only reached a RD of 63.08% and 78.86%, respectively. The bending strength of the samples fabricated from TW-B reached 125 MPa, which was more than 3.7 and 1.5 times higher as compared with that of samples obtained from TW-A and TW-C powders, respectively. Furthermore, the degradability of the samples fabricated from TW-B powders was obviously lower than that of the samples fabricated from TW-A and TW-C powders.

  18. Effect of polymers on the nanostructure and on the carbonation of calcium silicate hydrates: a scanning transmission X-ray microscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, J.

    2011-09-07

    This study investigated the effects of organic polymers (polyethylene glycol and hexadecyltrimethylammonium) on structures of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which is the major product of Portland cement hydration. Increased surface areas and expansion of layers were observed for all organic polymer modified C-S-H. The results from attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic measurements also suggest lowered water contents in the layered structures for the C-S-H samples that are modified by organic polymers. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results further supports this observation. We also observed difference in the extent of C-S-H carbonation due to the presence of organic polymers. No calcite formed in the presence of HDTMA whereas formation of calcite was observed with C-S-H sample modified with PEG. We suggest that the difference in the carbonation reaction is possibly due to the ease of penetration and diffusion of the CO 2. This observation suggests that CO 2 reaction strongly depends on the presence of organic polymers and the types of organic polymers incorporated within the C-S-H structure. This is the first comprehensive study using STXM to quantitatively characterize the level of heterogeneity in cementitious materials at high spatial and spectral resolutions. The results from BET, XRD, ATR-FTIR, and STXM measurements are consistent and suggest that C-S-H layer structures are significantly modified due to the presence of organic polymers, and that the chemical composition and structural differences among the organic polymers determine the extent of the changes in the C-S-H nanostructures as well as the extent of carbonation reaction. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Obtaining calcium silicates by using solid residues as precursors. Influence of water in the process of mixing reagents; Obtencin de silicatos de calcio empleando como precursores residuos solidos. Influencia del mezclado de reactivos en fase seca o fase humeda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe-Sese, M.; Eliche-Quesada, D.; Corpas-Iglesias, F. A.

    2011-07-01

    The suitability of re-using residues marble, remaining from cutting marble, as a source of calcium-oxide, as well as the resultant ashes from the combustion of the wastes generated in the process of manufacturing boards from derivates of wood, as a source of silica, as raw material for the production of calcium silicate products has been determined. First of all, the influence of water has been studied in the initial phase of mixing residues. Marble and ashes have been mixed in molar relation CaO:SiO{sub 2} of 1:1 using two different ways: using a planetary ball mill (while in solid state) or agitating at 90 degree centigrade (2 h) using a 60 wt% of water (while in humid state). Later, both mixtures were sintered at 1100 degree centigrade (24 h). In order to use the obtained calcium-silicates as ceramic insulating thermal materials, the samples were compressed at 15 Tm obtaining bricks from which the technological properties have been studied. The ceramic materials obtained from mixing the residues in dry phase, as well as those obtained in the wet phase, can be used as thermal insulators, showing values of conductivity of 0.18 and 0.12 w/m{sup 2}K, with an elevated resistance to compressive strength. (Author) 14 refs.

  1. 硅肥对蔗地土壤性状、甘蔗叶片营养及产量的影响%Effect of calcium silicate fertilizer on soil characteristics,sugarcane nutrients and its yield parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海荣; 徐林; BOKHTIAR S M; MANOJ Kumar Srivastav; 李杨瑞; 杨丽涛

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]A green house experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of calcium silicate fertilizer onsoil characteristics,growth and nutrition and yield parameters of sugarcane.[Method]A soil pot experiment was conducted using sugarcane variety ROC22.The treatments included:normal fertilization(26 g N + 1.76 g P +20 g K/pot:T0)and normal fertilization + different concentration of calcium silicate(20,40,60,80,120 and 150 g/pot in T1-T6,respectively).[Result]The results showed that application of calcium silicate affected the content of N,P,Ca,Mg and Si in TVD leaf tissues.Use of 120 g/pot calcium silicate resulted in 92% increase in Si content compared to control.It significantly influenced the physico-chemical properties of soil.Soil organic matter and available P content decreased significantly,the available S increased by 137% in soils treated with 120 g/pot calcium silicate fertilizer.The exchangeable Ca and Mg increased by 117.9 and 86.0%,respectively at 150 g/pot Si.The pH of soil was found to be higher than control.Si significantly affected the sugarcane plant height and cane yield,and showed almost increasing trend of dry matter and sugar yield with increasing of its concentration.[Conclusion]The positive effects of calcium silicate fertilizer have been observed on general sugarcane growth and development and soil' s physico-chemical properties.Its supplementation in normal fertilizer may be recommended for sustaining the sugarcane productivity.%[目的]在大棚条件下进行甘蔗硅肥施用量研究,阐明硅肥对甘蔗生长、营养以及土壤特性等的影响.[方法]以新台糖22号为试验材料,以每桶26 g N+1.76 g P+20 g K为对照,设置T1~T6(20、40、60、80、120and 150g/桶)6个不同硅肥用量,研究不同施硅水平对甘蔗的影响.[结果]硅肥处理的甘蔗+1叶N、P、Ca、Mg、Si含量较对照有一定提高,其中120g/桶处理的甘蔗+1叶含硅量比对照增加92%.不同施硅水平对甘蔗土壤理化性

  2. Study on properties of nature rubber filled by active calcium silicate%活性硅酸钙填充天然橡胶复合材料性能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张士龙; 刘钦甫; 丁述理; 梁鹏; 李晓光

    2013-01-01

    以无定形活性水合硅酸钙、炭黑、白炭黑为填料,使用硅烷偶联剂对其改性,采用熔融共混法制备了天然橡胶复合材料,并考察了改性剂种类、改性剂添加量、硅酸钙添加量、硅酸钙与炭黑、白炭黑的配合比例对天然橡胶复合材料硫化性能、力学性能的影响.结果表明:与炭黑、白炭黑传统填料相比,硅酸钙粉体具有降低胶料扭矩、缩短硫化时间的作用;填充硅酸钙后,天然橡胶的拉伸及撕裂强度有不同程度降低,但在填充50份4%S基改性的硅酸钙后,复合材料的100%、300%定伸强度与50份炭黑填充时相当;硅酸钙与白炭黑配合填充时,复合材料的拉伸强度和撕裂强度在比例为1∶3、1∶1时各自达到最大值11.31 MPa、23.93 N/mm,优于白炭黑单独填充.%A series of nature rubber ( NR ) composites based on carbon black, silica, and active calcium silicate modified by silane agents were prepared by melt blending. The effect of modification agent types and quantity, powder supply rate, filler combination on the mechanical properties of the rubber composites were researched. The vulcanizing torque and curing time were obviously reduced compared with rubbers with silica or carbon black. The tensile strength and tear strength of rubber with active calcium silicate decreased compared with the pure rubber. But the tensile strength at 100% and 300% of NR composites filled by 50 portion active calcium silicate equivalent to composites filled by 50 portion carbon black. The tensile strength and tear strength of composites respectively reached the maximum value 11. 31 MPa and 23. 93 N/mm when the combination proportion of active calcium silicate and silica are 1:3 and 1:1, which were superior to composites filled by silica alone.

  3. The effect of fluoride and silicate ions on the coprecipitation of gadolinium with calcium in phosphoric and sulpho-phosphoric media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlassa, S.; Salhamen, F. [Univ. Mohammed V - Agdal, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Radiochimie

    2013-05-01

    This work was carried out with the aim to establish the effect of some impurities on the coprecipitation of gadolinium with calcium phosphate and gypsum. The tests were performed using the radioactive tracer technique to monitor the fate of gadolinium in various phosphoric and sulpho-phosphoric media containing fluoride and silicate ions as impurities. In 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} M NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution, the Gd(III) at a concentration of 10{sup -4} M is almost entirely precipitated as amorphous phosphate. However, the presence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at C{sub H{sub 3SO{sub 4}}} {>=} 0.1 M, reduces the coprecipitation to less than 8 at. %, on average. The fluoride ions in solution, even at C{sub HF} {<=} 0.1 M, induce a reduction of coprecipitation of 10 to 30% according to HF concentration. In the media containing 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} M NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and 10{sup -1} M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the effect of HF is almost negligible in the absence of Si(IV); nevertheless, the presence of fluorosilicate in solution may contribute to the enhancement of the coprecipitation of the REE. The sulphuric acid (0.1 M) in phosphoric media (0.74 {<=} C{sub H{sub 3PO{sub 4}}} {<=} 4.44 M), leads to a significant coprecipitation of the REE (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {<=}D{sub Gd}{<=} 3.1 {+-} 0.5), whilst the addition of HF (0.1 M) to these media enhances the solubility of the REE (left angle D{sub Gd} right angle = 0.06 {+-} 0.01). XRD, IR spectroscopy and elemental analyses of the solid phases in conjunction with the variation of the distribution coefficient D indicate that the coprecipitation of the REE is likely controlled by heterovalent substitution of REE in gypsum and its precipitation as phosphate or fluorosilicate. (orig.)

  4. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tits, Jan; Laube, Andreas; Wieland, Erich [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Gaona, Xavier [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2014-07-01

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO{sub 2} was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO{sub 2}R{sub d} values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, R{sub d} values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the R{sub d} values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the R{sub d} values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO{sub 2} whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar R{sub d} values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic

  5. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  6. Surface properties, crystallinity and optical properties of anodised titanium in mixture of β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) and calcium acetate (CA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuan, Lee Te, E-mail: gd130079@siswa.uthm.edu.my; Abdullah, Hasan Zuhudi, E-mail: hasan@uthm.edu.my; Idris, Maizlinda Izwana, E-mail: izwana@uthm.edu.my [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Anodic oxidation is an electrochemical method for the production of ceramic films on a metallic substrate. It had been widely used to deposit the ceramic coatings on the metals surface. This method has been widely used in surface modification of biomaterials especially for dental implants. In this study, the surface morphology, crystallinity and optical properties of titanium foil was modified by anodising in mixture of β-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP) and calcium acetate monohydrate (CA). The experiments were carried out at high voltage (350 V), different anodising time (5 and 10 minutes) and current density (10-70 mA.cm{sup −2}) at room temperature. Anodised titanium was characterised by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and UV-Vis spectrometry. The result of the experiment showed that surface morphology, crystallinity and optical properties depended strongly on the current density and anodising time. More porous surface and large amount of anatase and rutile was produced at higher current density and longer anodising time. Apart from that, it is also revealed that the energy band gap of anodised titanium increases as the increase in current density due to the presence of anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2}.

  7. Surface properties, crystallinity and optical properties of anodised titanium in mixture of β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) and calcium acetate (CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Lee Te; Abdullah, Hasan Zuhudi; Idris, Maizlinda Izwana

    2015-07-01

    Anodic oxidation is an electrochemical method for the production of ceramic films on a metallic substrate. It had been widely used to deposit the ceramic coatings on the metals surface. This method has been widely used in surface modification of biomaterials especially for dental implants. In this study, the surface morphology, crystallinity and optical properties of titanium foil was modified by anodising in mixture of β-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP) and calcium acetate monohydrate (CA). The experiments were carried out at high voltage (350 V), different anodising time (5 and 10 minutes) and current density (10-70 mA.cm-2) at room temperature. Anodised titanium was characterised by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and UV-Vis spectrometry. The result of the experiment showed that surface morphology, crystallinity and optical properties depended strongly on the current density and anodising time. More porous surface and large amount of anatase and rutile was produced at higher current density and longer anodising time. Apart from that, it is also revealed that the energy band gap of anodised titanium increases as the increase in current density due to the presence of anatase and rutile TiO2.

  8. Zinc-modified calcium silicate bioceramics coating and osteointegration%锌修饰硅酸钙陶瓷涂层与骨整合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐立璋; 余将明; 叶晓健; 李恺; 郑学斌; 唐峰; 许鹏; 席焱海; 许国华; 侯春林

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Zinc-modified calcium silicate (CaSiO3) bioceramics coating on the titanium surface prepared in preliminary experiments has good chemical stability and antibacterial property. OBJECTIVE:To observe the effects of zinc-modified CaSiO3 bioceramics coating on osteointegration. METHODS:MC3T3-E1 cels were respectively cultured on the titanium with zinc-modified CaSiO3 bioceramics coating (experiment group), titanium with CaSiO3 bioceramics coating (control group) and pure titanium (blank control group). Then, cel adhesion, proliferation, calcification rate and the expression of type I colagen and osteocalcin were detected. The implant materials mentioned above were respectively inserted into the femurs of New Zealand white rabbits, and after 1.5 months, the osteoproliferation and osteointegration between the implants and the host were tested. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:In vitro experiment: The number of adhesive cels at 12 hours after co-culture was significantly increased in the experimental group compared with the control group and blank control group (P < 0.05). At 14 days after co-culture, cel proliferation ability and ability of calcium nodule formation in the experiment group were significantly better than those in the other groups (P < 0.05). At 21 days after co-culture, there was no significant difference in the expression of type I colagen, but the expression of osteocalcin in the experiment group was higher than that in the control group and blank control group (P < 0.05).In vivo experiment: In the experiment group, a large amount of bone substances were detected, the coating materials directly contacted with the bone interface, new bone tissues and little fibrous tissues were observed at the interface. In contrast, there was a small amount of bone hyperplasia in the control group and almost no bone hyperplase in the blank control group. Moreover, a small part of the implant directly contacted with the bone interface and the most part was separated from

  9. Calcification in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystalline deposits in the knee: anatomic, radiographic, MR imaging, and histologic study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.; Chung, C.B.; Lima, J.E. de; Trudell, D. [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, University of California, San Diego, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, CA 92162, San Diego (United States); Johnson, K.; Terkeltaub, R.; Resnick, D. [Department of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, CA 92162, San Diego (United States); Pe, S. [University of California, San Diego, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, CA 92162, San Diego (United States)

    2004-07-01

    To demonstrate and determine the frequency and location of calcification within cadaveric knees with or without calcification typical of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), utilizing histologic, radiographic and MR imaging techniques. Ten cadaveric knees of elderly individuals that demonstrated no radiographic evidence of prior surgery or trauma were studied with MR imaging and subsequently sectioned in planes corresponding to those obtained with MR imaging. The slices were imaged with high-resolution radiography. Two musculoskeletal radiologists correlated the anatomic, MR and radiographic findings. Three of the knees, which did not demonstrate calcifications, were utilized as controls. Histologic sections were obtained from four knees that contained calcifications and from the three controls, and analyzed with special histologic stains that demonstrate phosphorus and calcium. Radiographic imaging and histologic analysis demonstrated widespread CPPD crystal deposition in four of the 10 knee specimens (40%). MR imaging demonstrated some calcifications only within the articular cartilage of the femoral condyles in three of the four (75%) specimens that had CPPD deposits. In all four specimens radiographs and histologic analysis were more sensitive than MR imaging. Histologic analysis demonstrated no evidence of CPPD crystals in the control specimens. MR imaging is insensitive to the presence of CPPD deposits in the knee, even when such deposits are widespread. Our study suggests that the sensitivity of MR imaging was significantly better in detecting CPPD deposits in the hyaline cartilage of the femoral condyles when compared with other internal structures, even when such structures contained a higher amount of calcification. (orig.)

  10. Calcium and potassium silicates and the growth of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings Aplicação de silicatos de cálcio e de potássio e o crescimento de mudas de Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Antonio Bognola

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of silicate is a practice that has been frequently adopted in annual crops, although few studies have been conducted in order to verify its efficiency in forest tree species. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of calcium and potassium silicates in the growth of seedlings of Eucalyptus grandis. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, in Alambari county, State of São Paulo. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with eight treatments, three replications and 25 plants per plot, maintained at the field capacity moisture level. Seedlings were planted in plastic tubes using local substrate, basic fertilization and silicates. Diameter, height and fresh and dry biomass of the seedlings were determined 150 days after silicates treatments were applied. The use of silicates either in the substrate or through foliar application, in the production of eucalypt seedlings has proven to be inadequate when the substrate presents a balanced basic composition in terms of nutrients and pH.

    doi: 10.4336/2011.pfb.31.66.83

    O uso de silicato é uma prática que vem sendo adotada com frequência em culturas anuais, muito embora poucos trabalhos tenham sido realizados com intuito de verificar sua eficiência em espécies florestais arbóreas. O objetivo principal desta pesquisa foi avaliar o efeito da aplicação de silicatos de cálcio e de potássio no crescimento de mudas de Eucalyptus grandis. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, no Município de Alambari, SP. O delineamento usado foi inteiramente ao acaso, com oito tratamentos, três repetições e 25 plantas por parcela, sendo mantidas na umidade de capacidade de campo. As mudas foram plantadas em tubetes de plástico, utilizando substrato local, com adubação básica e silicatos. Diâmetro de colo, altura e biomassa verde e seca das mudas foram determinados 150 dias após a

  11. Dealkalization of calcium silicate slag and study of using it as cement admixture%硅钙渣脱碱处理及作水泥混合材的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘江; 张建波; 孙俊民; 王宏霞; 叶家元; 史迪

    2012-01-01

    Orthogonal experiment method is applied to research on dealkalization of calcium silicate slag, and properties of non-dealkalizated and dealkalizated calcium slag cement have been analyzed. Effects of temperature, holding time, content of lime milk and washing times were discussed, the results show that the optimum dealkalization combination of the four factors is as follows:content of lime milk is 10%,temperature 85 X. and holding time 3 hours,washing twice,then an alkali content of 0.83% will be acquired; compressive strength of non梔ealkalizated calcium slag cement is higher than dealkalizated calcium slag cement during the early hydration, the advantages of dealkalizated calcium slag cement will gradually appear as time goes and will be more significantly as calcium slag content increase; Microscopic analysis shows that non-dealkalizated calcium slag cement generates large amount of C-S-H gel during early hydration and its hydration products are more compact than dealkalizated calcium slag cement, little difference of the compactness has been found between them when the hydration time is 28 days.%采用正交试验法对硅钙渣进行脱碱处理,对脱碱前后的硅钙渣水泥性能进行了研究.通过调整温度、保温时间、石灰乳掺量和水洗次数,得出最佳脱碱组合为:石灰乳掺量10%,温度85℃,保温时间3h,水洗2次,处理后碱含量为0.83%:强度试验结果表明,水化早期未脱碱硅钙渣水泥抗压强度要高于脱碱硅钙渣水泥,但随着龄期逐渐增长,脱碱硅钙渣水泥优势逐渐显现,掺量越大优势越明显;微观形貌分析表明,未脱碱硅钙渣水泥水化早期生成大量C-S-H凝胶,水化产物较脱碱硅钙渣水泥更致密,水化28d时两者水化产物的致密性相当.

  12. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  13. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Sakon, Itsuki [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  14. Avaliação de cultivares de alface adubadas com silicato de cálcio em casa-de-vegetação Evaluation of lettuce cultivars fertilized with calcium silicate in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lúcia Félix Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido no Departamento de Ciência do Solo da Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, no período de junho a agosto de 2002. Objetivou-se avaliar a produtividade, o estado nutricional e a qualidade (classe de tamanho de cultivares de alface cultivadas com doses de silicato de cálcio em vasos sob casa-de-vegetação. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições, com 1 planta/vaso, em esquema fatorial 3 x 4 + 3, sendo três cultivares de alface (Raider, Regina e Vera e quatro doses de silicato de cálcio (0, 410, 1,000 e 2,000 mg dm-3; os tratamentos adicionais foram compostos pela aplicação de 820 mg dm-3 de carbonato de cálcio, para as três cultivares. O estado nutricional das plantas de alface foi avaliado pelo Sistema Integrado de Diagnose e Recomendação (DRIS. A aplicação da fonte silicato de cálcio não aumentou o crescimento das plantas e não aumentou o teor dos nutrientes nas plantas de alface, mas melhorou a nutrição das plantas para Si e aumentou a porcentagem de plantas sadias. A aplicação também aumentou a concentração de Mn, devido ao alto conteúdo de Mn no fertilizante aplicado (Silifértil®. As três variedades de alface comportaram-se como plantas não acumuladoras de Si.The experiment was carried out at the Department of Soil Sciences of the Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, from June to August 2002, with the objective to evaluate the productivity, the nutritional state and the quality (size class of lettuce cultivars grown with calcium silicate in greenhouse. The experimental design was disposed in blocks with four replicates, in factorial arrangement with additional treatments: 3 x 4 +3, composed by three lettuce cultivars: Raider (group crisphead lettuce; Regina (group butterhead lettuce and Vera (group looseleaf lettuce and four calcium silicate rates (0, 410, 1.000 and 2.000 mg dm-3, additional treatments were composed of the application of

  15. Characterization of silicates and calcium carbonates applied to high-dose dosimetry; Caracterizacao de silicatos e carbonatos de calcio aplicados a dosimetria de doses altas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Gustavo Barreto

    2012-07-01

    The predominant isomorphous form in the biominerals studied in this work (oyster shell, coral, mother of pearl and shell) was aragonite. The appearance of the calcite phase occurred at 500 deg C at a heating rate of 10 deg {sup C}/s for all samples except for the coral sample, which was 400 deg C, independent of the heating rate. The most abundant element in the biominerals samples was Ca in the CaO form, and in the silicates (tremolite, diopside and rhodonite) Si in the SiO form. The most common trace element observed in the biominerals samples was Fe. The analyses of electron paramagnetic resonance showed lines of Mn{sup 2+} in the coral and mother-of-pearl samples before irradiation. In the case of the irradiated samples, the defects found were CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, CO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 2}{sup -}, in the g range between 2.0010 and 2.0062. In the analyses by optical absorption of biominerals, transitions due to the presence of Mn in the samples were found. A thermoluminescent (TL) peak at approximately 140 deg C was found for the biominerals and at 180 deg C for silicates, which intensity depends directly on the dose. For samples exposed to different types of radiation, the TL peak occurred at lower temperatures. From the dose-response curves obtained for these materials, it was possible to determine a linear range for which their application in high dose dosimetry becomes possible. Taking into account the radiation type, among biominerals and silicates, the lowest detectable dose (40mGy) to gamma radiation was achieved for oyster shell samples using the measuring technique of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Using beta radiation, for diopside and tremolite samples the lowest detectable dose of 60mGy was obtained. For all samples, using the TL, OSL and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques in alpha, beta and gamma radiation beans a good response reproducibility was obtained. Therefore, the samples characterized

  16. Computational Material Modeling of Hydrated Cement Paste Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Chemistry Structure - Influence of Magnesium Exchange on Mechanical Stiffness: C-S-H Jennite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    material chemistry structure are studied following a molecular dynamics (MD) computational modeling methodology. Calcium ions are replaced with... chemistry structure. Conference Name: 1st Pan-American Conference on Computational Mechanics Conference Date: April 27, 2015 1st Pan-American Congress on...MODELING OF C-S-H Material chemistry level modeling following the principles and techniques commonly grouped under Computational Material Science is

  17. Alleviating negative effects of irrigation-water salinity on growth and vase life of gerbera by foliar spray of calcium chloride and potassium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mohammadi Torkashvand

    2015-01-01

    The required water for greenhouses in Kishestan, Soume-e-Sara town, Guilan province, Iran, is mainly provided by underground resources that have inappropriate quality. One way to reduce the impact of salinity an plant growth is proper nutrition. This greenhouse research was conducted to evaluate the effect of water salinity and foliar spray of calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) on growth and vase life of gerbera in a factorial experiment based on compeletly randomized design with two factors. The ...

  18. Non-aqueous formation of the calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite: astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Sarah J; Parker, Julia E; Evans, Aneurin

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of calcium carbonate, through the solid-gas interaction of amorphous Ca-silicate with gaseous CO2, at elevated pressures, and link this to the possible presence of calcium carbonate in a number of circumstellar and planetary environments. We use in-situ synchrotron X-Ray powder diffraction to obtain detailed structural data pertaining to the formation of the crystalline calcium carbonate phase vaterite and its evolution with temperature. We found that the metastable calcium carbonate phase vaterite was formed alongside calcite, at elevated CO2 pressure, at room temperature and subsequently remained stable over a large range of temperature and pressure. We report the formation of the calcium carbonate mineral vaterite whilst attempting to simulate carbonate dust grain formation in astrophysical environments. This suggests that vaterite could be a mineral component of carbonate dust and also presents a possible method of formation for vaterite and its polymorphs on planetary surfaces.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  20. Crystalline silicate dust around evolved stars II. The crystalline silicate complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Molster, F J; Tielens, A G G M

    2002-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series of three in which we present an exhaustive inventory of the 49 solid state emission bands observed in a sample of 17 oxygen-rich dust shells surrounding evolved stars. Most of these emission bands are concentrated in well defined spectral regions (called complexes). We define 7 of these complexes; the 10, 18, 23, 28, 33, 40 and 60 micron complex. We derive average properties of the individual bands. Comparison with laboratory data suggests that both olivines (Mg(2x)Fe(2-2x)SiO(4)) and pyroxenes (Mg(x)Fe(1-x)SiO(3)) are present, with x close to 1, i.e. the minerals are very Mg-rich and Fe-poor. This composition is similar to that seen in disks surrounding young stars and in the solar system comet Hale-Bopp. A significant fraction of the emission bands cannot be identified with either olivines or pyroxenes. Possible other materials that may be the carriers of these unidentified bands are briefly discussed. There is a natural division into objects that show a disk-like geomet...

  1. Crystalline silicate dust around evolved stars - II. The crystalline silicate complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molster, F. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    This is the second paper in a series of three in which we present an exhaustive inventory of the solid state emission bands observed in a sample of 17 oxygen-rich dust shells surrounding evolved stars. The data were taken with the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrographs on board of the Infrared

  2. Alleviating negative effects of irrigation-water salinity on growth and vase life of gerbera by foliar spray of calcium chloride and potassium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi Torkashvand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The required water for greenhouses in Kishestan, Soume-e-Sara town, Guilan province, Iran, is mainly provided by underground resources that have inappropriate quality. One way to reduce the impact of salinity an plant growth is proper nutrition. This greenhouse research was conducted to evaluate the effect of water salinity and foliar spray of calcium (Ca and silicon (Si on growth and vase life of gerbera in a factorial experiment based on compeletly randomized design with two factors. The first factor was salinity of irrigation water at two levels (0 and 1.5 dS/m and the second factor was foliar spray at seven levels (without spray, twice Ca spray, four times Ca spray, two times Ca spray + once Si spray, twice Ca spray + twice Si spray, four times Ca spray + once Si spray, and four times Ca spray + twice Si spray, each with three replications. Results showed that four times Ca foliar spray led to an increase in stem hight, stem and neck diameter, postharvest life and Ca concentration of shoots. In all spray treatments, number of flowers in zero salinity was more than 1.5 dS/m treatments. In general, in case of using low-quality water (electrical conductivity of 1.5 dS/m, the effects of salinity on dry and fresh weights of gerbera plant and vase life of its flowers can be reduced by foliar application of Ca and Si. Since inappropriate water quality in Rasht Greenhouse Complex, Soume-e-Sara town, is one of the main problems of the farmers, especially in growing the ornamental plants, effects of salinity on plant growth could be alleviated with foliar spray of nutrients, especially Ca and Si. In this respect, four times spray of Ca and also twice spray of Ca + twice spray of Si are recommended.

  3. Residual stresses and phase transformations in Ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Fabian

    Due to their high melting temperature, low density, and good thermomechanical stability, silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are some of the most promising materials systems for high temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, their silica surface layer reacts with water vapor contained in combustion environments. The resulting hydroxide layer volatilizes, leading to component recession. Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the substrate from degradation. Next generation coatings for silicon-based ceramics based on ytterbium silicates have shown a promising combination of very low and good thermomechanical properties. The focus of this thesis is threefold: In the first part, phase transformations in plasma sprayed ytterbium silicates were investigated. Plasma sprayed materials are known to contain large amounts of amorphous material. Phase changes during the conversion from amorphous to crystalline materials were investigated as they have been known to lead to failure in many coatings. The second part of this work focused on measuring residual stresses in multilayer EBCs using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Strains were resolved spatially, with probe sizes as small as 20 um. Stresses were calculated using mechanical properties of ytterbium silicates, determined with in-situ loading and heating experiments. In-situ and ex-situ heating experiments allowed for the study of changes in stress states that occur in these EBC materials during heating and cooling cycles. Lastly, the interaction of ytterbium silicates with low-melting environmental calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glasses was studied. Synchrotron XRD was used to study the influence of CMAS on the stress state in the coating, X-ray computed tomography was used to provide 3D images of coatings, and EDS and TEM analysis were used to study the interactions at the CMAS/ytterbium silicate interface in detail.

  4. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  5. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  6. The origin of crystalline residues in Stardust Al foils: Surviving cometary dust or crystallized impact melts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, Penelope J.; Kearsley, Anton T.; Ishii, Hope A.; Burchell, Mark J.; Bradley, John P.; Teslich, Nick; Cole, Mike J.; Price, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Samples returned by the Stardust mission from comet 81P/Wild 2 provide an unequaled opportunity to investigate cometary formation and evolution. Crystalline silicates have been identified in impact craters in Stardust Al foil, yet their origin is ambiguous. They may be original cometary components, or they may have grown from melt generated by impact. We have now studied experimental impacts of the calcium silicate mineral wollastonite, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy to document the relationship between impact feature shape and crystal lattice orientation in impact residue. Wollastonite can have a characteristic acicular habit, forming crater shapes that indicate crystal orientation upon impact. From extracted impact residue, we determined the lattice orientation of crystalline material for comparison with the whole particle orientation. We assume that crystallization from melt, without surviving seed nuclei, should result in randomly oriented crystallite growth, with no preferred direction for individual crystals. However, we find that the majority of crystalline material in the residue retains b-axis orientation parallel to the long axis of the crater form. This, together with impact parameter calculations and lack of Al incorporation by the residue (suggesting melting did not occur), indicates that these crystals and, by analogy, the majority of Al-free crystalline silicates in Stardust foil, are surviving remnants of the impactor. Furthermore, amorphous wollastonite residue probably did not form via melting and subsequent quenching, but instead by high-pressure amorphization or degradation of unquenchable phases. Finally, one crystal studied appears to be a new high-pressure/temperature polymorph of CaSiO3, indicating that such polymorphs may be observed in Stardust residues in craters.

  7. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  8. Characterization of crystalline structures in Opuntia ficus-indica

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; del López, Alicia Real; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the crystalline compounds present in nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes. The identification of the crystalline structures was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystalline structures identified were calcium carbonate (calcite) [CaCO3], calcium-magnesium bicarbonate [CaMg(CO3)2], magnesium oxide [MgO], calcium oxalate monohydrate [Ca(C2O4)•(H2O)], potassium peroxydiphosph...

  9. Behavior of calcium silicate in leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic calculation, the mole ratio of CaO to SiO2, temperature and A/S of bauxitehave a profound influence on the mole ratio of 2CaO @ SiO2 to CaO @ SiO2 in sinter. CaO @ SiO2 and β-2CaO @ SiO2appear stable in caustic solution but unstable in soda solution, and CaO @ SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO @ SiO2 un-der the same leaching condition. Compared with the conventional sinter, the rate of alumina extraction of the newsinter is large and the secondary reaction is restricted in the leaching, which might be mainly due to the more contentof CaO @ SiO2 in sinter and better stability of CaO @ SiO2 in leaching.

  10. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  11. The Cosmic Crystallinity Conundrum: Clues from IRAS 17495-2534

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Angela K; Tartar, Josh B

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, cosmic crystalline silicates have presented several challenges to understanding dust formation and evolution. The mid-infrared spectrum of IRAS 17495$-$2534, a highly obscured oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, is the only source observed to date which exhibits a clear crystalline silicate absorption feature. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to test competing hypotheses for dust formation. Observed spectral features suggest that both amorphous and crystalline dust is dominated by forsterite (Mg\\_2 SiO\\_4) rather than enstatite (MgSiO\\_3) or other silicate compositions. We confirm that high mass-loss rates should produce more crystalline material, and show why this should be dominated by forsterite. The presence of Mg\\_2 SiO\\_4 glass suggests that another factor (possibly C/O) is critical in determining astromineralogy. Correlation between crystallinity, mass-loss rate and initial stellar mass suggests that only the most massive AGB stars contribute significant qua...

  12. Nanoscale zinc silicate from phytoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, C. R.; Amarasinghe, R.; Freitas, J. A.; Culbertson, J. C.; Wollmershauser, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report a faster, less expensive method of producing zinc silicate nanoparticles. Such particles are used in high volume to make phosphors and anti-corrosion coatings. The approach makes use of phytoliths (plant rocks), which are microscopic, amorphous, and largely silicate particles embedded in plants, that lend themselves to being easily broken down into nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of Zn2SiO4 were produced in a two stage process. In the refinement stage, plant residue, mixed with an appropriate amount of ZnO, was heated in an argon atmosphere to a temperature exceeding 1400 °C for four to six hours and then heated in air at 650 °C to remove excess carbon. TEM shows 50-100 nm nanoparticles. Raman scattering indicates that only the -Zn2SiO4 crystalline phase was present. X-ray analysis indicated pure rhombohedral R 3 bar phase results from using rice/wheat husks. Both samples luminesced predominantly at 523 nm when illuminated with X-rays or UV laser light.

  13. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  14. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus; Leonardo Theodoro Büll; Juliano Corulli Corrêa; Roberto Lyra Villas Boas

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR) and neutralization power (NP), indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC). Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER) for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicat...

  15. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J.; Banwart, Steve A.; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to ‘trenching’ of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO2 and climate history. PMID:22859556

  16. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  17. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  18. Low-temperature fabrication of macroporous scaffolds through foaming and hydration of tricalcium silicate paste and their bioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huan, Z.; Chang, J.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    A low-temperature fabrication method for highly porous bioactive scaffolds was developed. The two-step method involved the foaming of tricalcium silicate cement paste and hydration to form calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. Scaffolds with a combination of interconnected macro- and micro

  19. Suprimento do silicato de cálcio e a eficiência nutricional de variedades de cafeeiro Effect of calcium silicate suplly and the nutritional efficiency of coffee cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia Aziz Alexandre Pozza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Embora não seja considerado nutriente essencial às plantas, o Si é classificado como elemento benéfico ou útil, mas pode alterar a dinâmica nutricional das plantas. Objetivando comparar a eficiência nutricional de variedades de cafeeiro (Catuaí, Mundo Novo e Icatu em resposta à adubação silicatada, realizou-se um experimento em blocos casualizados, com as três variedades de mudas em tubetes combinadas com seis doses de CaSiO3 (T0 = 0, T1 = 0,063, T2 = 0,125, T3 = 0,25, T4 = 0,5 e T5 = 1,0 g dm-3 de substrato. A variedade Icatu teve a maior eficiência de absorção (EA de Cu, Zn, Fe e Si, maior eficiência de uso (EU de N, K, Ca, B e Mn, não diferindo da Mundo Novo com relação aos nutrientes N, Ca e Mn, e maior eficiência de translocação (ET de N, S, Zn e de Fe. A Catuaí teve maior EA de P, K, B e Mn, não diferindo da Mundo Novo com relação aos nutrientes P, K e Mn, maior EU para Mg, S, Cu, Zn, Fe e Si, provavelmente devido à melhor ET desses nutrientes, exceto para Fe e Si. A Mundo Novo foi mais eficiente na absorção de N, K, Ca, Mg, Mn e Si, teve maior EU de P e Mn e maior ET de K, Ca, B, Mn e Si.Silicon is classified as a beneficial nutrient and can improve the nutritional dynamics of plants, although it is not considered an essential nutrient for plants. In an experiment in a randomized block design, three coffee cultivars (Catuaí, Mundo Novo and Icatu were planted in plastic tubes, combined with six doses of calcium silicate (T0=0, T1=0.063, T2=0.125, T3=0.25, T4=0.5 and T5=1.0 g dm-3 substrate, to compare the nutritional efficiency of the cultivars in response to silicon fertilization. Cultivar Icatu showed the higher uptake efficiency (UE of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Si, and efficiency of use (EU of N, K, Ca, B, and Mn, but the later did not differ from Mundo Novo cultivar (N, Ca, and Mn. The efficiency of translocation (ET was higher for N, S, Zn, and Fe. For Catuaí the uptake efficiency of P, K, B, and Mn was higher

  20. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Heo, Jong

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca2Nd8-xCex(SiO4)6O2] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca-silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca-silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10-6 g m-2 for Ce ion and 2.19·10-6 g m-2 for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing.

  1. Bonding Preferences of Non-Bridging Oxygens in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass: Evidence from O-17 MAS and 3QMAS NMR on Calcium Aluminate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwardt, J. R.; Lee, S.; Stebbins, J.

    2001-12-01

    Non-bridging oxygens (NBO's) play a significant role in the thermodynamic and transport properties in glasses and silicate melts. Previous oxygen-17 (O-17) triple quantum magic angle spinning (3QMAS NMR) data have shown the presence of NBO's in several calcium aluminosilicate (CAS) glasses on the CaAl2O4-SiO2 join (Stebbins and Xu 1997). The observed chemical shifts of these glasses are similar to those for the NBO in calcium silicate glasses (Stebbins et al. 1997 and Stebbins et al 1999); however, a recent O-17 MAS NMR study of crystalline CaAl2O4 showed that the NBO peak in an associated impurity phase is shifted to a higher frequency by 30 to 40 ppm from that of CAS and Ca-silicate glasses (Stebbins et al. in press). This finding suggests that Si is the preferred network cation for NBO's in aluminosilicate glasses and melts at the glass transition temperature. The preference for Si over that of Al as the network cation host for NBO's has also been suggested by Raman and other spectroscopic techniques (Mysen 1988). To investigate this apparent preference for Si-NBO, O-17 3QMAS and MAS experiments were conducted to examine the location of the NBO peak in the spectra of a calcium aluminate glass. Since the CaAl2O4 glass is difficult to make by conventional cooling methods, the binary eutectic composition (63CaO-37Al2O3) was chosen. The resulting O-17 MAS spectrum shows an intense, relatively narrow peak centered at 72 ppm, which nearly coincides with the peak location and width of the Al-O-Al peak in the crystalline Ca-aluminates (Stebbins et al. in press.) (70 ppm). There is a broader, less intense peak centered at 155 ppm that is assigned to the Al-NBO peak. This peak is in approximately the same location as that for a Ca-aluminate phase reported by Stebbins et al. (in press) (137 ppm). In addition, our 3QMAS data show that the peak maximum of the NBO in the Ca-aluminate (-85 and 150 ppm in isotropic and MAS dimensions, respectively) differs significantly from

  2. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... silicate nanocomposites and their structure-properties relationship. In the first part of the thesis, thermoplastic layered silicates were obtained by extrusion. Different modification methods were tested to observe the intercalation treatment effect on the silicate-modifier interactions. The silicate...

  3. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    CERN Document Server

    Min, M; De Koter, A; Hovenier, J W; Keller, L P; Markwick-Kemper, F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effect of the amount of magnesium in the silicate lattice is studied. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non-coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to model shape effects. For the dust materials we use amorphous and crystalline silicates with various composition and SiC. The results of our analysis of the 10 mu feature are used to compute the shape of the 20 mu silicate feature and to compare this with observations. By using realistic particle shapes we are, for the first time, able to derive the magnesium fraction in interstellar silicates. We find that the interstellar silicates are highly magnesium rich (Mg/(Fe+Mg)>0.9) and that the stoichiometry lies between pyroxene and olivine type silicates. This composition is not consistent with that o...

  4. The utilization of waste by-products for removing silicate from mineral processing wastewater via chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jianhua; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Zhang, Qingpeng; Liu, Hang; Meng, Xiangsong

    2017-08-22

    This study investigates an environmentally friendly technology that utilizes waste by-products (waste acid and waste alkali liquids) to treat mineral processing wastewater. Chemical precipitation is used to remove silicate from scheelite (CaWO4) cleaning flotation wastewater and the waste by-products are used as a substitute for calcium chloride (CaCl2). A series of laboratory experiments is conducted to explain the removal of silicate and the characterization and formation mechanism of calcium silicate. The results show that silicate removal reaches 90% when the Ca:Si molar ratio exceeds 1.0. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the characterization and formation of calcium silicate. The pH is the key factor for silicate removal, and the formation of polysilicic acid with a reduction of pH can effectively improve the silicate removal and reduce the usage of calcium. The economic analysis shows that the treatment costs with waste acid (0.63 $/m(3)) and waste alkali (1.54 $/m(3)) are lower than that of calcium chloride (2.38 $/m(3)). The efficient removal of silicate is confirmed by industrial testing at a plant. The results show that silicate removal reaches 85% in the recycled water from tailings dam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  6. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  7. Silicic Large Igneous Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott Bryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are the end-product of huge additions of magma to the continental crust both at the surface and at depth. Since the first categorisation of LIPs by Coffin & Eldholm (1994), it has been recognised that LIPs are more varied inform, age and character, and this includes the recognition of Silicic LIPs. Silicic LIPs are the largest accumulations of primary volcaniclastic rocks at the Earth's surface with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 and extrusive and subvolcanic intrusive volumes >0.25 Mkm3. The Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Silicic LIP events are the best recognised and are similar in terms of their dimension, crustal setting, volcanic architecture and geochemistry.

  8. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  9. Effect of calcium and magnesium silicate on the growth of the castor oil plant subjected to salinity levels Efeito de silicato de cálcio e magnésio sobre o crescimento de plantas de mamoneira submetidas a níveis de salinidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Brito Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress decreases the osmotic potential of soil solution causing water stress, causing toxic effects in the plants resulting in injuries on the metabolism and nutritional disorders, thus compromising the plant growth, resulting in lower production. The calcium silicate and magnesium can perform the same function as limestone, besides providing silicon to plants, may also contribute to the resistance of plants to salt stress. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium and magnesium silicate on the growth of the castor oil plant BRS Energia cultivated under saline conditions. This study evaluated plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves, leaf area, dry weight of shoot and root, and soil chemical characteristics. There was no interaction between factors of salinity level and of silicate level regarding the evaluated variables. There was a direct relationship between salinity levels and plant growth in height and stem diameter. The K concentration in soil were affected by salinity levels. O estresse salino diminui o potencial osmótico da solução do solo causando estresse hídrico, provocando efeitos tóxicos nas plantas que resultam em injúrias no metabolismo e desordens nutricionais, comprometendo assim o crescimento das plantas, resultando em menor produção. O silicato de cálcio e magnésio pode desempenhar a mesma função do calcário, além de fornecer silício para as plantas, podendo ainda, contribuir para a resistência de plantas ao estresse salino. Nesse sentido, objetivou-se com esse trabalho avaliar o efeito do silicato de cálcio e magnésio no crescimento da mamoneira BRS Energia cultivada sob condições salinas. Avaliou-se a altura da planta, diâmetro do caule, número de folhas, área foliar, massa seca da parte aérea e da raiz e as características químicas do solo. Não houve interação entre os fatores níveis de salinidade e silicato sobre as variáveis analisadas. Houve rela

  10. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  11. Mineralogical Characterization of Fe-Bearing AGB and Supernova Silicate Grains From the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the circumstellar envelopes of evolved O-rich stars indicate the dust is mostly amorphous silicate with olivine-like compositions. Spectral modeling suggests these grains are Fe-rich [Mg/(Mg+Fe) 0.5], but it is not known whether the Fe is distributed within the silicate matrix or exists as metal inclusions. In contrast, the crystalline silicates are inferred to be extremely Mg-rich [Mg/(Mg+Fe) > 0.95]. The mineralogies and chemical compositions of dust in supernova (SN) remnants are not as well constrained, but abundant silicates of olivine-like and enstatite-like compositions have been fit to the infrared emission features. Silicates in the interstellar medium (ISM) are >99% amor-phous and Fe-bearing. The dearth of crystalline silicates in the ISM requires that some amorphization or destruction mechanisms process these grains.

  12. Artrodese na coluna cervical utilizando SICAP como substituto de enxerto ósseo Artrodesis en la columna cervical utilizando SICAP como sustituto de injerto óseo Cervical spine fusion utilizing silicated calcium phosphate bone graft substitute (SICAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fratezi

    2011-01-01

    Tech EE.UU, Reino Unido es un injerto óseo compuesto de calcio-fosfato con una sustitución de silicato en la estructura química, con una estructura tridimensional que parece hueso natural. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes fueron sometidos a fusión ósea cervical y analizados retrospectivamente. La evaluación radiográfica y la evaluación clínica fueron realizadas utilizandose el cuestionario Neck Disability Index y la escala análoga del dolor (VAS pre y postoperación. RESULTADOS: El período promedio de seguimiento postoperatorio fue de 14 meses ± 5 meses (7-30 meses. Once pacientes fueron sometidos a fusión vía anterior; 5 pacientes vía posterior y 3 pacientes vía anterior y posterior. La revisión radiográfica mostró 19/19 (100% de fusión ósea, ningún caso presentó subsidencia, rotura o soltura de material de implante o movimiento en los niveles fusionados. Ningún ejemplo de osificación heterotópica o de crecimiento óseo intracanal fue observado. Clínicamente, el promedio de las puntuaciones del Neck Disability disminuyeron 13,3 puntos (promedio preop. de 34,5, postop. de 21,2, mejora de 39%, el promedio de VAS para dolor cervical disminuyó 2 puntos (2,7 preop. para 0,7 postop.; mejora de 74,1%. No fueron observadas complicaciones como infección, osteólisis o edema excesivo de las partes blandas. CONCLUSIÓN: Los resultados preliminares obtenidos en esta serie feuron estimulantes con el uso de SICaP como injerto óseo, con sólida fusión ósea obtenida en todos los casos y sin formación de osificación heterotópica o crecimiento de hueso intracanal. SIcaP demuestra ser un sustituto confiable para el injerto óseo autólogo en la columna cervical.OBJECTIVE: Bone graft substitutes have been developed to obviate the need for autograft from the iliac crest and its resultant complications. SiCaP (Actifuse, ApaTech US, UK is a calcium phosphate bone graft substitute with selective controlled silicate substitution in a patented 3-dimensional structure

  13. Crystalline silicates in planetary nebulae with [WC] central stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, LBFM; Beintema, DA; Zijlstra, AA; de Koter, A; Molster, FJ; Bouwman, J; de Jong, T; Pottasch, [No Value; de Graauw, T

    We present ISO-SWS spectroscopy of the cool dusty envelopes surrounding two Planetary Nebulae with [WC] central stars, BD+30 3639 and He 2-113. The lambda <15 mu m region is dominated by a rising continuum with prominent emission from C-rich dust (PAHs), while the long wavelength part shows narrow

  14. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  15. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  16. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques (OPASI-T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Astronomical dust is observed in a variety of astrophysical environments and plays an important role in radiative processes and chemical evolution in the galaxy. Depending upon the environment, dust can be either carbon-rich or oxygen-rich (silicate grains). Both astronomical observations and ground-based data show that the optical properties of silicates can change dramatically with the crystallinity of the material, and recent laboratory research provides evidence that the optical properties of silicate dust vary as a function of temperature as well. Therefore, correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies on the understanding of the properties of silicate dust as functions of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. The OPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project addresses the need for high quality optical characterization of metal-enriched silicate condensates using a variety of techniques. A combination of both new and established experiments are used to measure the extinction, reflection, and emission properties of amorphous silicates across the infrared (near infrared to millimeter wavelengths), providing a comprehensive data set characterizing the optical parameters of dust samples. We present room temperature measurements and the experimental apparatus to be used to investigate and characterize additional metal-silicate materials.

  17. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  18. Structural chemistry of anhydrous sodium silicates - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Sodium silicates are of considerable importance for many fields of inorganic chemistry and applied mineralogy, being either raw materials for synthesis or already finished products. In addition to their industrial relevance they have also been studied intensively because of their interesting physico-chemical properties including high ion-exchange capacity and selectivity or two-dimensional sodium diffusion and conductivity. Furthermore, the structural chemistry of crystalline sodium silicates offers the crystallographer challenging tasks such as polytypism, polymorphism, temperature and/or pressure-dependent phase transitions, pseudo-symmetry, complex twinning phenomena as well as incommensurately modulated structures. Many of these structural problems have been solved only recently, although in some cases they have been known for several decades. This article will provide an overview on the structurally characterized sodium silicates and their fascinating crystallochemical characteristics.

  19. Biocalcite, a multifunctional inorganic polymer: Building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of calcium phosphate-based bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA. Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of calcium phosphate mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications.

  20. Efeito do silicato de cálcio e da autoclavagem na supressividade e na conducividade de dois solos à Rhizoctonia solani Influence of calcium silicate and sterilization on the natural suppressiveness and on the conduciveness of two soils to Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício de Ávila Rodrigues

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se verificar o efeito da aplicação de silicato de cálcio e da esterilização na supressividade natural de um Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro (LEa álico textura muito argilosa e na conducividade natural de uma Terra Roxa Estruturada eutrófica (TRe ao fungo Rhizoctonia solani, em condições de casa de vegetação. Utilizou-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial 2 x 3 x 2. Os fatores foram: duas classes de solo (LEa e TRe - 0-20 cm; três tratamentos (esterilização ou não por autoclavagem, aplicação de silicato e testemunha e infestação ou não com R. solani, com três repetições e 16 plântulas de feijoeiro por parcela. A aplicação de silicato foi feita incorporando 0,63 g do produto em 1 kg de cada material de solo, seguido de incubação por 30 dias. Para promover a infestação artificial, foram colocados 800 mg de inóculo em 1 kg de cada material de solo. O silicato de cálcio aumentou os teores de Ca trocável e a soma de bases nos dois solos. Um decréscimo na saturação por Al de 70 para 19% e um aumento na saturação por bases de 9 para 21% alteraram significativamente a supressividade natural do LEa à R. solani. Com relação à TRe, a aplicação de silicato não teve nenhum efeito na sua conducividade, dado ao seu natural caráter eutrófico, o qual já é favorável ao desenvolvimento deste fungo. A esterilização não influiu no desenvolvimento de R. solani, o que sugere que os fatores abióticos foram os responsáveis pela supressividade ou conducividade desses solos.The effect of calcium silicate slag and soil sterilization on the natural suppressiveness of a Typic Acrustox (clay Dark Red Latosol -- LEa and the natural conduciveness of an Oxic Haplustoll (TRe to Rhizoctonia solani were studied under greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was a three-replicate completely randomized one, with 2 x 3 x 2 factorial combination of the following treatments: two soil kinds (LEa and

  1. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  2. 水化硅酸钙与沸石滤柱去除水中低浓度氮磷%Removal of Low Concentration of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Water Processes of Filter Columns Adsorption Filled with Hydrated Calcium Silicate and Natural Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董阳; 雷月华; 李春杰; 刘红美; 孟莎; 张伟; 吉宏坤

    2012-01-01

    Condition of inflowing river, Roshi River with the low concentration of nutrient was simulated. Study took the hydrate calcium silicate and natural zeolite as the adsorbing medium. The experiment designed the different kind of filter columns operated at the same time, filling with hydrated calcium silicate, natural zeolite and mixtures of calcium hydrate and zeolite with ratio 1:3, 1:1 respectively. Through researching the removal effect of the nutrient by 4 different kinds of fdter columns by controlling the material proportion and HRT, it was affirmed that the filter columns with only silicate hydrate had best effect on the removal of phosphate, with average removal efficiency of 90.75 %, but the absorbing ability to ammonia nitrogen was unstable. The filter columns filled with only natural zeolite possess the weaker ability to absorb the phosphate, with average removal rate at 77.30 %, and was also affected by the filter velocity easily. It is concluded when the proportion of material is 1:1 and the filter velocity is 0.696 m/d, the removal effect of the nutrient is promoted definitely. The nutrient concentration of effluent could reach the Level Ⅲ standard of surface water in China. It could be used as the theory base in the project which removing the nutrient in the constructed wetland.%模拟洱海的入湖河流——罗时江低浓度氮磷营养盐条件,采用水化硅酸钙与天然沸石作为吸附介质进行滤柱试验.试验设计4个滤柱并列运行,分别装填单一水化硅酸钙滤料、单一沸石滤料、水化硅酸钙与沸石双层滤料(1:3)和水化硅酸钙与沸石双层滤料(1:1),对比不同滤柱在不同滤速条件下的效果.单一水化硅酸钙填充滤柱对磷酸盐的去除效果最高,平均可保持在90.75%左右,但对氨氮去除不稳定;单一的沸石填充滤柱对磷酸盐吸附能力较弱,平均在77.30%,且受滤速影响较大.在水化硅酸钙与天然沸石配比为1:1,滤速为0.696 m/d时,对

  3. Crystalline Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D; Jiang, F -J; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We show that exotic phases arise in generalized lattice gauge theories known as quantum link models in which classical gauge fields are replaced by quantum operators. While these quantum models with discrete variables have a finite-dimensional Hilbert space per link, the continuous gauge symmetry is still exact. An efficient cluster algorithm is used to study these exotic phases. The $(2+1)$-d system is confining at zero temperature with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. A crystalline phase exhibits confinement via multi-stranded strings between charge-anti-charge pairs. A phase transition between two distinct confined phases is weakly first order and has an emergent spontaneously broken approximate $SO(2)$ global symmetry. The low-energy physics is described by a $(2+1)$-d $\\mathbb{R}P(1)$ effective field theory, perturbed by a dangerously irrelevant $SO(2)$ breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. This model is an ideal candidat...

  4. Silicate Dust in Evolved Protoplanetary Disks: Growth, Sedimentation, and Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Watson, Dan; Bohac, Chris; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; 10.1086/512121

    2009-01-01

    We present the Spitzer IRS spectra for 33 young stars in Tr 37 and NGC 7160. The sample includes the high- and intermediate-mass stars with MIPS 24 microns excess, the only known active accretor in the 12 Myr-old cluster NGC 7160, and 19 low-mass stars with disks in the 4 Myr-old cluster Tr 37. We examine the 10 microns silicate feature, present in the whole sample of low-mass star and in 3 of the high- and intermediate-mass targets, and we find that PAH emission is detectable only in the Herbig Be star. We analyze the composition and size of the warm photospheric silicate grains by fitting the 10 microns silicate feature, and study the possible correlations between the silicate characteristics and the stellar and disk properties (age, SED slope, accretion rate, spectral type). We find indications of dust settling with age and of the effect of turbulent enrichment of the disk atmosphere with large grains. Crystalline grains are only small contributors to the total silicate mass in all disks, and do not seem t...

  5. Carbonate-silicate ratio for soil correction and influence on nutrition, biomass production and quality of palisade grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ferreira de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicates can be used as soil correctives, with the advantage of being a source of silicon, a beneficial element to the grasses. However, high concentrations of silicon in the plant would affect the digestibility of the forage. To evaluate the influence of the substitution of the calcium carbonate by calcium silicate on the nutrition, biomass production and the feed quality of the palisade grass [Urochloa brizantha (C. Hochstetter ex A. Rich. R. Webster], three greenhouse experiments were conducted in completely randomized designs with four replications. Experimental units (pots contained a clayey dystrophic Rhodic Haplustox, a sandy clay loam dystrophic Typic Haplustox and a sandy loam dystrophic Typic Haplustox. Each soil received substitution proportions (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 % of the carbonate by calcium silicate. The increase in the proportion of calcium silicate elevated the concentrations and accumulations of Si, Ca, Mg, and B, reduced Zn and did not alter P in the shoot of plants. The effects of the treatments on the other nutrients were influenced by the soil type. Inclusion of calcium silicate also increased the relative nutritional value and the digestibility and ingestion of the forage, while the concentration and accumulation of crude protein and the neutral detergent and acid detergent fibers decreased. Biomass production and feed quality of the palisade grass were generally higher with the 50 % calcium silicate treatment.

  6. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  7. On the Relation of Silicates and SiO Maser in Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, Biwei

    2017-04-01

    The SiO molecule is one of the candidates for the seed of silicate dust in the circumstellar envelope of evolved stars, but this opinion is challenged. In this work we investigate the relation of the SiO maser emission power and the silicate dust emission power. With both our own observation by using the PMO/Delingha 13.7 m telescope and archive data, a sample is assembled of 21 SiO v = 1, J = 2 - 1 sources and 28 SiO v = 1, J = 1 - 0 sources that exhibit silicate emission features in the ISO/SWS spectrum as well. The analysis of their SiO maser and silicate emission power indicates a clear correlation, which is not against the hypothesis that the SiO molecules are the seed nuclei of silicate dust. On the other hand, no correlation is found between SiO maser and silicate crystallinity, which may imply that silicate crystallinity does not correlate with mass-loss rate.

  8. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  9. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  10. Analyses of Cometary Silicate Crystals: DDA Spectral Modeling of Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Comets are the Solar System's deep freezers of gases, ices, and particulates that were present in the outer protoplanetary disk. Where comet nuclei accreted was so cold that CO ice (approximately 50K) and other supervolatile ices like ethane (C2H2) were preserved. However, comets also accreted high temperature minerals: silicate crystals that either condensed (greater than or equal to 1400 K) or that were annealed from amorphous (glassy) silicates (greater than 850-1000 K). By their rarity in the interstellar medium, cometary crystalline silicates are thought to be grains that formed in the inner disk and were then radially transported out to the cold and ice-rich regimes near Neptune. The questions that comets can potentially address are: How fast, how far, and over what duration were crystals that formed in the inner disk transported out to the comet-forming region(s)? In comets, the mass fractions of silicates that are crystalline, f_cryst, translate to benchmarks for protoplanetary disk radial transport models. The infamous comet Hale-Bopp has crystalline fractions of over 55%. The values for cometary crystalline mass fractions, however, are derived assuming that the mineralogy assessed for the submicron to micron-sized portion of the size distribution represents the compositional makeup of all larger grains in the coma. Models for fitting cometary SEDs make this assumption because models can only fit the observed features with submicron to micron-sized discrete crystals. On the other hand, larger (0.1-100 micrometer radii) porous grains composed of amorphous silicates and amorphous carbon can be easily computed with mixed medium theory wherein vacuum mixed into a spherical particle mimics a porous aggregate. If crystalline silicates are mixed in, the models completely fail to match the observations. Moreover, models for a size distribution of discrete crystalline forsterite grains commonly employs the CDE computational method for ellipsoidal platelets (c:a:b=8

  11. A MODEL FOR THE DUST ENVELOPE OF THE SILICATE CARBON STAR IRAS 09425-6040

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung-Won, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City, 28644 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 09425-6040 (I09425) is a silicate carbon star with conspicuous crystalline silicate and water-ice features and emission excesses in the far-infrared and millimeter (mm) wavelength ranges. To understand properties of the dust envelope of I09425, we propose a physical model based on the observations and known properties of asymptotic giant branch stars and dust. We perform radiative transfer model calculations using multiple dust shells and disks with various dust species. We compare the model results with the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) acquired with different telescopes. We find that the physical model for I09425 using multiple shells of carbon and silicate dust and multiple disks of amorphous and crystalline silicates reproduces the observed SED fairly well. This object looks to have detached cold O-rich (silicate and water-ice) dust shells, which could be remnants of the recent chemical transition from O to C and an inner C-rich dust shell. A long-lived thin disk of very large silicate grains can reproduce the emission excess in the mm wavelength band and a recently formed thick disk of crystalline silicates can reproduce the prominent emission features in the spectral range 8–45 μm. The highly crystallized silicates could be recently formed by high temperature annealing due to the last O-rich superwind just before the chemical transition of the central star. I09425 could be a rare object that has the remnants of past O-rich stellar winds in the outer shells as well as in the circumbinary disks.

  12. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  13. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  14. Trends in the adsorption and reactivity of hydrogen on magnesium silicate nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Ichraf; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-04-14

    We study nanoclusters of Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene (having (MgO)6(SiO2)3 and (MgO)4(SiO2)4 compositions) with respect to their reactivity towards hydrogen atoms, using density functional calculations. Ultrasmall silicate particles are fundamental intermediates in cosmic dust grain formation and processing, and are thought to make up a significant mass fraction of the grain population. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and high surface area to bulk ratios, they are likely to also have a disproportionately large influence on surface chemistry in the interstellar medium. This work investigates the potential role of silicate nanoclusters in vital interstellar hydrogen-based chemistry by studying atomic H adsorption and H2 formation. Our extensive set of calculations confirm the generality of a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the H2 reaction barrier and the 2Hchem binding energy, suggesting it to be independent of silicate dust grain shape, size, crystallinity and composition. Our results also suggest that amorphous/porous grains with forsteritic composition would tend to dissociate H2, but relatively Mg-poor silicate grains (e.g. enstatite composition) and/or more crystalline/compact silicate grains would tend to catalyse H2 formation. The high structural thermostability of silicate nanoclusters with respect to the heat released during exothermic H2 formation reactions is also verified.

  15. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  16. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  17. Investigation of the hydration and bioactivity of radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sorrentino, François; Damidot, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Novel root-end filling materials are composed of tricalcium silicate (TCS) and radiopacifier as opposed to the traditional mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) which is made up of clinker derived from Portland cement and bismuth oxide. The aim of this research was to characterize and investigate the hydration of a tricalcium silicate-based proprietary brand cement (Biodentine™) and a laboratory manufactured cement made with a mixture of tricalcium silicate and zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z) and compare their properties to MTA Angelus™. The materials investigated included a cement containing 80% of TCS and 20% zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z), Biodentine™ and MTA Angelus™. The specific surface area and the particle size distribution of the un-hydrated cements and zirconium oxide were investigated using a gas adsorption method and scanning electron microscopy. Un-hydrated cements and set materials were tested for mineralogy and microstructure, assessment of bioactivity and hydration. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction and calorimetry were employed. The radiopacity of the materials was investigated using ISO 6876 methods. The un-hydrated cements were composed of tricalcium silicate and a radiopacifier phase; zirconium oxide for both Biodentine™ and TCS-20-Z whereas bismuth oxide for MTA Angelus™. In addition Biodentine™ contained calcium carbonate particles and MTA Angelus™ exhibited the presence of dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, calcium, aluminum and silicon oxides. TCS and MTA Angelus™ exhibited similar specific surface area while Biodentine™ had a greater specific surface area. The cements hydrated and produced some hydrates located either as reaction rim around the tricalcium silicate grain or in between the grains at the expense of volume containing the water initially present in the mixture. The rate of reaction of tricalcium

  18. Evidence of yttrium silicate inclusions in YSZ-porcelain veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Brian R; Griggs, Jason A; Neidigh, John; Piascik, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    This report introduces the discovery of crystalline defects that can form in the porcelain veneering layer when in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The focus was on dental prostheses and understanding the defects that form in the YSZ/porcelain system; however the data reported herein may have broader implications toward the use and stability of YSZ-based ceramics in general. Specimens were cut from fully sintered YSZ plates and veneering porcelain was applied (porcelain veneer. Local EDAX (SEM) was performed in the regions of visible inclusions and showed significant increases in yttrium concentration. TEM specimens also showed apparent inclusions in the porcelain and selected area electron diffraction was performed on these regions and found the inclusions to be crystalline and identified as either yttrium-silicate (Y2 SiO5 ) or yttrium-disilicate (Y2 Si2 O7 ). Micro-CT data showed that yttrium-silicate precipitates were distributed throughout the thickness of the porcelain veneer. Future studies are needed to determine whether many of the premature failures associated with this materials system may be the result of crystalline flaws that form as a result of high temperature yttrium diffusion near the surfaces of YSZ.

  19. Mbosi: An anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

    1996-09-01

    The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimeter size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron meteorite with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, which is an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions. Chips from three Mbosi inclusions were studied, but most of the work concentrated on a whole 3.1 mm circular inclusion. This inclusion consists of a mantle and a central core of different mineralogies. The mantle is partially devitrified quartz-normative glass, consisting of microscopic crystallites of two pyroxenes and plagioclase, which are crystalline enough to give an x-ray powder diffraction pattern but not coarse enough to permit analyses of individual minerals. The core consists of silica. The bulk composition does not match any known meteorite type, although there is a similarity in mode of occurrence to quartz-normative silicate inclusions in some HE irons. Mbosi silicate appears to be unique. The bulk rare earth element (REE) pattern of the mantle is flat at ≅ 7×C1; the core is depleted in REE but shows a small positive Eu anomaly. The O-isotope composition of bulk silicate lies on a unit slope mixing line (parallel and close to the C3 mixing line) that includes the Eagle Station pallasites and the iron Bocaiuva (related to the IIF irons); all of these share the property of having Ge/Ga ratios >10. It is concluded that Mbosi silicate represents a silica-bearing source rock that was melted and injected into metal. Melting occurred early in the history of the parent body because the metal now shows a normal Widmanstätten structure with only minor distortion that was caused when the parent body broke up and released meteorites into interplanetary space. The cause of Ge/Ga ratios being >10 in these irons is unknown. The fact that silicates in Mbosi, Bocaiuva (related to IIF irons) and the Eagle

  20. Characterization of crystalline structures in Opuntia ficus-indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; del López, Alicia Real; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2015-01-01

    This research studies the crystalline compounds present in nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes. The identification of the crystalline structures was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystalline structures identified were calcium carbonate (calcite) [CaCO3], calcium-magnesium bicarbonate [CaMg(CO3)2], magnesium oxide [MgO], calcium oxalate monohydrate [Ca(C2O4)•(H2O)], potassium peroxydiphosphate [K4P2O8] and potassium chloride [KCl]. The SEM images indicate that calcite crystals grow to dipyramidal, octahedral-like, prismatic, and flower-like structures; meanwhile, calcium-magnesium bicarbonate structures show rhombohedral exfoliation and calcium oxalate monohydrate is present in a drusenoid morphology. These calcium carbonate compounds have a great importance for humans because their bioavailability. This is the first report about the identification and structural analysis of calcium carbonate and calcium-magnesium bicarbonate in nopal cladodes, as well as the presence of magnesium oxide, potassium peroxydiphosphate and potassium chloride in these plants. The significance of the study of the inorganic components of these cactus plants is related with the increasing interest in the potential use of Opuntia as a raw material of products for the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries.

  1. Use of propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate intercalated complexes as drug reservoirs in polymeric matrix tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Pongjanyakul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the use of propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate intercalated complexes as drug reservoirs in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose tablets. The matrix tablets containing the complexes were prepared and characterised with respect to propranolol release and were subsequently compared with those loading propranolol or a propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate physical mixture. Additionally, the effects of varying viscosity grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, compression pressures and calcium acetate incorporation on the drug release characteristics of the complex-loaded tablets were also examined. The results showed that the complex-loaded tablets have higher tablet hardness than those containing propranolol or a physical mixture. The drug release from the complex-loaded tablets followed a zero-order release kinetic, whereas an anomalous transport was found in the propranolol or physical mixture tablets. The drug release rate of the complex tablet significantly decreased with increasing hydroxypropylmethylcellulose viscosity grade. Increase in the compression pressure caused a decrease in the drug release rate of the tablets. Furthermore, the incorporation of calcium ions could accelerate propranolol release, particularly in acidic medium, because calcium ions could be exchanged with propranolol molecules intercalated in the silicate layers of magnesium aluminium silicate. These findings suggest that propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate intercalated complexes show strong potential for use as drug reservoirs in matrix tablets intended for modifying drug release.

  2. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  3. Lack of marked cyto- and genotoxicity of cristobalite in devitrified (heated) alkaline earth silicate wools in short-term assays with cultured primary rat alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Christina; Harrison, Paul T C; Bellmann, Bernd; Brown, Robert C; Zoitos, Bruce K; Class, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are low-biopersistence high-temperature insulation wools. Following prolonged periods at high temperatures they may devitrify, producing crystalline silica (CS) polymorphs, including cristobalite, classified as carcinogenic to humans. Here we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic significance of cristobalite present in heated AES wools. Primary rat alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro for 2 h with 200 µg/cm² unheated/heated calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS1, CMS2, CMS3; heat-treated for 1 week at, or 4 weeks 150 °C below, their respective classification temperatures) or magnesium silicate wool (MS; heated for 24 h at 1260 °C). Types and quantities of CS formed, and fiber size distribution and shape were determined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Lactate dehydrogenase release and alkaline and hOGG1-modified comet assays were used, ± aluminum lactate (known to quench CS effects), for cytotoxicity/genotoxicity screening. Cristobalite content of wools increased with heating temperature and duration, paralleled by decreases in fiber length and changes in fiber shape. No marked cytotoxicity, and nearly no (CMS) or only slight (MS) DNA-strand break induction was observed, compared to the CS-negative control Al₂O₃, whereas DQ12 as CS-positive control was highly active. Some samples induced slight oxidative DNA damage, but no biological endpoint significantly correlated with free CS, quartz, or cristobalite. In conclusion, heating of AES wools mediates changes in CS content and fiber length/shape. While changes in fiber morphology can impact biological activity, cristobalite content appears minor or of no relevance to the intrinsic toxicity of heated AES wools in short-term assays with rat alveolar macrophages.

  4. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  5. Low-voltage bendable pentacene thin-film transistor with stainless steel substrate and polystyrene-coated hafnium silicate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seunghyup; Yong, Kijung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-04-01

    The hafnium silicate and aluminum oxide high-k dielectrics were deposited on stainless steel substrate using atomic layer deposition process and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and polystyrene (PS) were treated improve crystallinity of pentacene grown on them. Besides, the effects of the pentacene deposition condition on the morphologies, crystallinities and electrical properties of pentacene were characterized. Therefore, the surface treatment condition on dielectric and pentacene deposition conditions were optimized. The pentacene grown on polystyrene coated high-k dielectric at low deposition rate and temperature (0.2-0.3 Å/s and R.T.) showed the largest grain size (0.8-1.0 μm) and highest crystallinity among pentacenes deposited various deposition conditions, and the pentacene TFT with polystyrene coated high-k dielectric showed excellent device-performance. To decrease threshold voltage of pentacene TFT, the polystyrene-thickness on high-k dielectric was controlled using different concentration of polystyrene solution. As the polystyrene-thickness on hafnium silicate decreases, the dielectric constant of polystyrene/hafnium silicate increases, while the crystallinity of pentacene grown on polystyrene/hafnium silicate did not change. Using low-thickness polystyrene coated hafnium silicate dielectric, the high-performance and low voltage operating (1 × 10(4)) and complementary inverter (DC gains, ~20) could be fabricated.

  6. Overbased Calcium sulfonate Detergent Technology Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qing-gao; MUIR Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Overbased calcium sulfonate is used widely as detergent in automotive and marine lubricants, as well as various industrial oil applications. In this paper, the process to produce overbased calcium sulfonate is overviewed. The sulfonate structure and molecular weight and its molecular weight distribution, the enclosed calcium carbonate nanoparticle size and crystalline structure, properties of the carrier oil, all influence its properties, such as stability, viscosity, and detergency of the system.

  7. Synergic effect of chitosan and dicalcium phosphate on tricalcium silicate-based nanocomposite for root-end dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Fatemeh; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Shidpour, Reza

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, cement composites based on calcium silicate have been more generally considered for medical applications. Calcium silicate Cement are among the categories that are used in dental root canal treatment. The aim of this study is to make new calcium silicate cement with dicalcium phosphate and chitosan additives to preserve and strengthen desirable properties of this type of cements. In this study, composite dental cement based on calcium silicate was prepared. Then effect of adding biodegradable and biocompatible polymer such as chitosan on setting properties and its structure were studied. In this study, a combination of calcium silicate, dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) as powder phase and 2% solution of the chitosan dissolved in 1% acetic acid solution as liquid phase, was used. As well as control sample was obtained by mixing the powder with distilled water as the liquid phase. Based on the obtained results, setting time of composite cement was changed from 51 to 67 minutes by adding chitosan polymer. Presence of chitosan also reduced the compressive strength a little. The bioactivity of the cement were studied in a solution of simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. The samples were analyzed by SEM to identify the microstructure and by XRD to determine crystal structure. The composition of cement before incubation in SBF was included early phases (phase calcium silicate and calcium phosphate) that after 14 days of immersion in SBF, they were converted to layer-shaped hydroxy apatite and the presence of chitosan had not any influence on the final phase of hydroxy apatite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, Jaffe et al. (2004) by the first time spatially resolved the parsec-sized dust torus around NGC 1068 and found that the 10 micrometer silicate absorption feature of the innermost hot component exhibits an anomalous profile differing from that of the interstellar medium and that of common olivine-type silicate dust. While they ascribed the anomalous absorption profile to gehlenite (Ca_2Al_2SiO_7, a calcium aluminum silicate species), we propose a physical dust model and argue that, although the presence of gehl...

  9. Effect of silicate incorporation on in vivo responses of α-tricalcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Tatsukawa, Eri; Shibata, Yasuaki; Umemoto, Shota; Yokoi, Taishi; Ioku, Koji; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    In addition to calcium phosphate-based ceramics, glass-based materials have been utilized as bone substitutes, and silicate in these materials has been suggested to contribute to their ability to stimulate bone repair. In this study, a silicate-containing α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) ceramic was prepared using a wet chemical process. Porous granules composed of silicate-containing α-TCP, for which the starting composition had a molar ratio of 0.05 for Si/(P + Si), and silicate-free α-TCP were prepared and evaluated in vivo. When implanted into bone defects that were created in rat femurs, α-TCP ceramics either with or without silicate were biodegraded, generating a hybrid tissue composed of residual ceramic granules and newly formed bone, which had a tissue architecture similar to physiological trabecular structures, and aided regeneration of the bone defects. Supplementation with silicate significantly promoted osteogenesis and delayed biodegradation of α-TCP. These results suggest that silicate-containing α-TCP is advantageous for initial skeletal fixation and wound regeneration in bone repair.

  10. Formation of Cosmic Crystals in Highly-Supersaturated Silicate Vapor Produced by Planetesimal Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, H; Yamamoto, T; Nakamoto, T; Yamada, J; Tsukamoto, K; Nozawa, J

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that fine silicate crystals observed in primitive meteorite and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) nucleated in a supersaturated silicate vapor followed by crystalline growth. We investigated evaporation of $\\mu$m-sized silicate particles heated by a bow shock produced by a planetesimal orbiting in the gas in the early solar nebula and condensation of crystalline silicate from the vapor thus produced. Our numerical simulation of shock-wave heating showed that these {\\mu}m-sized particles evaporated almost completely when the bow shock is strong enough to cause melting of chondrule precursor dust particles. We found that the silicate vapor cools very rapidly with expansion into the ambient unshocked nebular region; the cooling rate is estimated, for instance, to be as high as 2000 K s$^{-1}$ for a vapor heated by a bow shock associated with a planetesimal of radius 1 km. The rapid cooling of the vapor leads to nonequilibrium gas-phase condensation of dust at temperatures muc...

  11. Improved mechanical and corrosion properties of nickel composite coatings by incorporation of layered silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tientong, J. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ahmad, Y.H. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Nar, M.; D' Souza, N. [University of North Texas, Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, Denton, TX 76207 (United States); Mohamed, A.M.A. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Golden, T.D., E-mail: tgolden@unt.edu [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Layered silicates as exfoliated montmorillonite are incorporated into nickel films by electrodeposition, enhancing both corrosion resistance and hardness. Films were deposited onto stainless steel from a plating solution adjusted to pH 9 containing nickel sulfate, sodium citrate, and various concentrations of exfoliated montmorillonite. The presence of the incorporated layered silicate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The composite films were also compact and smooth like the pure nickel films deposited under the same conditions as shown by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results showed that incorporation of layered silicates into the film do not affect the nickel crystalline fcc structure. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved stability and adhesion. Pure nickel films cracked and peeled from the substrate when immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution within 5 days, while the nanocomposite films remained attached even after 25 days. The corrosion resistance of the nickel nanocomposites was also improved compared to nickel films. Nickel-layered silicate composites showed a 25% increase in Young's modulus and a 20% increase in hardness over pure nickel films. - Highlights: • 0.05–2% of layered silicates are incorporated into crystalline nickel films. • Resulting composite films had improved stability and adhesion. • Corrosion resistance improved for the composite films. • Hardness improved 20% and young's modulus improved 25% for the composite films.

  12. Mid-IR water and silicate relation in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, S.; Bremer, J.; Kamp, I.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Lahuis, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanations for the current detection rate. Aims: In this study, we aim to break degeneracies through constraints obtained from observations. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. Methods: We analyze observed water line fluxes from three blends at 15.17, 17.22 and 29.85 μm published earlier and compute the 10 μm silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra to search for possible trends. We use a series of published ProDiMo thermo-chemical models, to explore disk dust and gas properties, and also the effects of different central stars. In addition, we produced two standard models with different dust opacity functions, and one with a parametric prescription for the dust settling. Results: Our series of models that vary properties of the grain size distribution suggest that mid-IR water emission anticorrelates with the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. The models also show that the increasing stellar bolometric luminosity simultaneously enhance the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10 μm silicate strength. Two-thirds of the targets in our sample show crystalline dust features, and the disks are mainly flaring. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline silicates that was noted in earlier studies, but our models do not support this intrinsic difference in silicate peak strength. Individual properties of our models are not able to reproduce the most extreme observations, suggesting that more complex dust properties (e.g., vertically changing) are

  13. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  14. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  15. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  16. Utilization of industrial solid wastes able to generate calcium trisulphoaluminate and silicate hydrates in stabilization processes and for the manufacture of building materials; Utilizzazione di residui solidi industriali in grado di generare trisolfoalluminato e silicato di calcio idrati nei processi di stabilizzazione e nella produzione di materiali da costruzione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, L. [Naples, Univ. `Federico II` (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica; Cioffi, R. [Naples, Univ. `Federico II` (Italy). Ditp. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione

    1998-01-01

    In this work the stabilization of hazardous solid wastes containing heavy metals has been studied by means of novel matrices able to generate calcium trisulphoaluminate and silicate hydrates. The process is based on the hydration of two different mixtures containing blast furnace slag, coal ashes, chemical gypsum and Portland cement. The stabilization capacity of the two mixtures has been checked with regard to both a residue from an incinerator of municipal solid wastes and model systems obtained by adding 5 and 10% of soluble nitrates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The stabilized products have been validated from the point of view of mechanical properties by determining the unconfined compressive strength, and from the environmental point of view by means of static and dynamic leaching tests. Both matrices have proved to have great potentiality for the stabilization of hazardous solid wastes, the one based on blast furnace slag being better. Finally, evidence is given that different leaching tests are necessary to fully understand the immobilization mechanism responsible for stabilization. [Italiano] In questo lavoro e` stata studiata la atbilizzazione di residui tossici e nocivi contenenti metalli pesanti per mezzo di matrici leganti innovative capaci di generare trisolfoalluminato e silicato di calcio idrati. Il processo e` basato sull`idratazione di due diverse miscele contenenti scoria d`alto forno, ceneri di carbone, gessi chimici e cemento Portland. Le capacita` stabilizzanti delle due miscele sono state verificate sia nei confronti di un residuo solido generato a seguito dell`incenerimento di RSU, che nei confronti di sistemi modello ottenuti aggiungendo singolarmente il 5 e 10% dei nitrati solubili di Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb e Zn. I prodotti solidi stabilizzati sono stati validati dal punto di vista delle prestazioni meccaniche mediante prove di resistenza a compressione, e dal punto di vista ambientale mediante test di rilascio sia statici che dinamici

  17. Processing and Properties of Chemically Derived Calcium Silicate Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-27

    crack techniques are applicable for the SympL). edited by S. Mindess and S. P. Shah (Materials Research measurement of crack growth resistance in...610 (1981) S. K.S.Mazdiyasni. Ceram. Inter. 8. 45-56 (1982) 6. O.M.Roy and S.C.Oyfesobi. J. Amer. Ceram. Sac.. 60. 178-180 ( 1977 ) - 7. R.Kondo and

  18. Redox Equilibrium of Niobium in Calcium Silicate Base Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayousef-Jadid, A.-M.; Schwerdtfeger, Klaus

    2010-10-01

    The oxidation state of niobium has been determined at 1873 K (1600 °C) in CaO-SiO2-NbO x melts with CaO/SiO2 ratios (mass pct) of 0.66, 0.93 and 1.10, and 5.72 to 11.44 pct Nb2O5 (initial). The slag samples were equilibrated with gas phases of controlled oxygen pressure, then quenched to room temperature and analyzed chemically. The niobium is mainly pentavalent with small amounts in the tetravalent state. It was found that the Nb5+/Nb4+ ratio increases with oxygen pressure at a constant CaO/SiO2 ratio and constant content of total niobium, closely according to the ideal law of mass action, which is proportional to {text{p}}_{{{text{O}}2 }}^{1/4} . The ratio also increases with total niobium content, and it seems to have a maximum at a basicity of about 0.93. The color of the solidified slag samples is described and is explained with the help of transmission spectra.

  19. Redox Equilibria of Chromium in Calcium Silicate Base Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayousef-Jadid, A.-M.; Schwerdtfeger, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation state of chromium has been determined at 1600 °C in CaO-SiO2-CrO x melts with CaO/SiO2 ratios (mass pct) of 0.66, 0.93, and 1.10, and 0.15 to 3.00 pct Cr2O3 (initial). A few experiments were also carried out with CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CrO x melts at 1430 °C. The slag samples were equilibrated with gas phases of controlled oxygen pressure. Two techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state: thermogravimetry and quenching of the samples with subsequent wet chemical analysis. In the low-oxygen pressure range, the chromium is mainly divalent. In the high-oxygen pressure range, it is trivalent and hexavalent. It was found that the Cr3+/Cr2+ and Cr6+/Cr3+ ratios depend on oxygen pressure at a constant CaO/SiO2 ratio and a constant content of total chromium, according to the ideal law of mass action. According to the respective chemical reactions, these ratios change proportional to p_{{{text{O}}2 }}{}^{1/4} or p_{{{text{O}}_{ 2} }}{}^{3/4}, respectively. They also increase with increasing basicity. The data are used to compute the fractions of the different ions in the melt. There is a certain range of oxygen pressure in which all three valence states, Cr2+, Cr3+, and Cr6+, coexist. The color of the solidified slag samples is described and is explained with the help of transmission spectra.

  20. Bioactive composites consisting of PEEK and calcium silicate powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ill Yong; Sugino, Atsushi; Kikuta, Koichi; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Cho, Sung Baek

    2009-08-01

    Bioactive bone-repairing materials with mechanical properties analogous to those of natural bone can be obtained through the combination of bioactive ceramic fillers with organic polymers. Previously, we developed novel bioactive microspheres in a binary CaO-SiO2 system produced through a sol-gel process as filler for the fabrication of composites. In this study, we fabricate bioactive composites in which polyetheretherketone is reinforced with 0-50 vol% 30CaO x 70SiO2 (CS) microspheres. The prepared composites reinforced with CS particles form hydroxyapatite on their surfaces in simulated body fluid. The induction periods of hydroxyapatite formation on the composites decrease with increasing amount of CS particles. The mechanical properties of the composites are evaluated by three-point bending test. The composites reinforced with 20 vol% CS particles show 123.5 MPa and 6.43 GPa in bending strength and Young's modulus, respectively.

  1. Bioactivity evaluation of three calcium silicate-based endodontic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, L; Okiji, T

    2013-09-01

    To compare white ProRoot MTA (WMTA), EndoSequence BC sealer (BC sealer) and Biodentine with regard to their ability to produce apatites and cause Ca and Si incorporation in adjacent human root canal dentine after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Root sections of human single-rooted teeth were filled with one of the materials and immersed in PBS for 1, 7, 30 or 90 days (n = 5 each). Morphology and elemental composition of surface precipitates and interfacial dentine were analysed using a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyser with image observation function. Ca- and Si-incorporation depths in the interfacial dentine were measured. In addition, the amount of Ca ions released from the test materials was measured by EDTA titration. All materials produced surface precipitates of acicular or lath-like morphology with Ca/P ratio of 1.6 : 2.0. Within dentinal tubules, the three materials formed tag-like structures that were frequently composed of Ca- and P-rich and Si-poor materials, suggesting intratubular precipitation. Ca- and Si-incorporation depths were in the order of Biodentine > WMTA > BC sealer, with a significant difference between BC sealer and the others at several time-points (P  WMTA > BC sealer with significant differences between the materials (P < 0.05). Compared with Biodentine and WMTA, BC sealer showed less Ca ion release and did not show Ca and Si incorporation as deeply in human root canal dentine when immersed in PBS for up to 90 days. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Preparation and characterization of multifunctional magnetic mesoporous calcium silicate materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang, Yufang Zhu, Jie Li, Min Zhu, Cuilian Tao and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared multifunctional magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials using triblock copolymer (P123 as a structure-directing agent. The effects of Fe substitution on the mesoporous structure, in vitro bioactivity, magnetic heating ability and drug delivery property of mesoporous CaSiO3 materials were investigated. Mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials had similar mesoporous channels (5–6 nm with different Fe substitution. When 5 and 10% Fe were substituted for Ca in mesoporous CaSiO3 materials, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials still showed good apatite-formation ability and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells evaluated by the elution cell culture assay. On the other hand, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials could generate heat to raise the temperature of the surrounding environment in an alternating magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic property. When we use gentamicin (GS as a model drug, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials release GS in a sustained manner. Therefore, magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials would be a promising multifunctional platform with bone regeneration, local drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia.

  3. Preparation and characterization of multifunctional magnetic mesoporous calcium silicate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhu, Yufang; Li, Jie; Zhu, Min; Tao, Cuilian; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-10-01

    We have prepared multifunctional magnetic mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials using triblock copolymer (P123) as a structure-directing agent. The effects of Fe substitution on the mesoporous structure, in vitro bioactivity, magnetic heating ability and drug delivery property of mesoporous CaSiO3 materials were investigated. Mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials had similar mesoporous channels (5-6 nm) with different Fe substitution. When 5 and 10% Fe were substituted for Ca in mesoporous CaSiO3 materials, mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials still showed good apatite-formation ability and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells evaluated by the elution cell culture assay. On the other hand, mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials could generate heat to raise the temperature of the surrounding environment in an alternating magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic property. When we use gentamicin (GS) as a model drug, mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials release GS in a sustained manner. Therefore, magnetic mesoporous Fe-CaSiO3 materials would be a promising multifunctional platform with bone regeneration, local drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia.

  4. Developments in TEM Nanotomography of Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Taylor, Rae

    2015-04-01

    This investigation was designed to explore the possibility of using transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography on cement-based systems gain a greater understanding of their nanostructure and pore network. The preliminary results show a clearly a well-defined pore network at the nanoscale, with pore size approximately 1.7-2.4 nm in diameter and spaced around 5-8 nm apart. A comparison of small angle X-ray scattering data with 2-D TEM images analyzed with the Fourier slice theorem documents an excellent structural correlation. © 2015 The American Ceramic Society.

  5. O-17 NMR studies of some silicate crystals and glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Yildirim, E K

    2000-01-01

    structure. Therefore some of the Sn has to be in three coordinated to oxygen for charge balancing. The sup 1 sup 7 O MAS NMR spectra of a partially crystallised sample showed three distinct sites which are assigned as Sn-O-Sn, Si-O-Sn, and Si-O-Si on the basis of their chemical shift. The C sub Q values obtained from the simulations of these peaks supports this assignment. The sup 2 sup 9 Si MAS NMR of the same sample showed two crystalline and a glassy peaks which are fitted to two crystalline and two glassy sites. The possible composition of this sample was calculated and found to be SiSn sub 8 O sub 1 sub 0. Crystalline and glassy silicates were investigated by means of sup 1 sup 7 O NMR. The dependence of the measured efg on the Si-O-AI bond angle was investigated in some crystalline aluminosilicate sodalites and kalsilite. The results show that C sub Q increases with increasing bond angle while eta decreases with increasing bond angle and they both follow a similar function to that found for the Si-O-Si ...

  6. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  7. In vitro degradation, bioactivity, and cytocompatibility of calcium silicate, dimagnesium silicate, and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Siyu; Chang, Jiang

    2009-08-01

    CaSiO3 (CS) ceramics have been regarded as a potential bioactive material for bone regeneration. Mg2SiO4 (M2S) ceramic has been reported as a novel bioceramic with higher mechanical properties and good biocompatibility recently. beta-Ca2(PO4)2 (beta-TCP) ceramic is a well-known bioactive and degradable material for bone repair. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the effect of three bioceramics with different chemical composition on the in vitro degradation, apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid (SBF) and cytocompatibility. The degradation was evaluated through the activation energy of Si or P ion released from ceramics and the weight loss of the ceramics in Tris-HCl buffer solution. Formation of bone-like apatite on different bioceramic surfaces was investigated in SBF. The presence of bone-like apatite layer on the material surface after soaking in SBF was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The effect of ionic products from the three kinds of material dissolution on osteoblast-like cell proliferation was investigated. The results showed that the degradation rate of CS was much faster than that of beta-TCP and M2S ceramics. Apatite formation occurred on the CS ceramics quickly. However, it was less likely to occur on the surfaces of beta-TCP and M2S ceramics. The ionic products from extracts of CS and M2S could stimulate osteoblast-like cell proliferation at certain concentration range throughout the 6-day culture period.

  8. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF Al-RICH SILICATE STARDUST FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christian [Institute for Mineralogy, University of Muenster, Correnssstr. 24, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Hoppe, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Brenker, Frank E., E-mail: christian.vollmer@wwu.de [Institute of Geoscience/Mineralogy, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-05-20

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content < 0.5 at%), structurally undisturbed orthopyroxene (MgSiO{sub 3}) with an unusually high Al content (1.8 {+-} 0.5 at%). This is the first TEM documentation of a single crystal pyroxene within the complete stardust silicate data set. We interpret the microstructure and chemistry of this grain as being a direct condensate from a gas of locally non-solar composition (i.e., with a higher-than-solar Al content and most likely also a lower-than-solar Mg/Si ratio) at (near)-equilibrium conditions. From the overabundance of crystalline olivine (six reported grains to date) compared to crystalline pyroxene (only documented as a single crystal in this work) we infer that formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  9. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  10. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  11. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  12. Vitrification of incinerated tannery sludge in silicate matrices for chromium stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varitis, S; Kavouras, P; Pavlidou, E; Pantazopoulou, E; Vourlias, G; Chrissafis, K; Zouboulis, A I; Karakostas, Th; Komninou, Ph

    2017-01-01

    The vitrification process was applied for the stabilization and solidification of a rich in chromium ash that was the by-product of incineration of tannery sludge. Six different batch compositions were produced, based on silica as the glass former and sodium and calcium oxides as flux agents. As-vitrified products (monoliths) were either composed of silicate matrices with separated from the melt Eskolaite (Cr2O3) crystallites or were homogeneous glasses (in one case). All as-vitrified products were thermally treated in order to transform them to partially crystallized, i.e. devitrified products. Devitrification is an important part of the work since studying the transformation of the initial as-vitrified products into glass-ceramics with better properties could result to stabilized products with potential added value. The devitrified products were diversified by the effective crystallization mode and separated crystal phase composition. These variations originated from differences in: (a) batch composition of the initial as-vitrified products and (b) thermal treatment conditions. In devitrified products crystallization led to the separation of Devitrite (Na2Ca3Si6O16), Combeite (Na4Ca4Si6O18) and Wollastonite (CaSiO3) crystalline phases, while Eskolaite crystallites were not affected by thermal treatment. Leaching test results revealed that chromium was successfully stabilized inside the as-vitrified monoliths. Devitrification impairs chromium stabilization, only in the case where the initial as-vitrified product was a homogeneous glass. In all other cases, devitrification did not affect successful chromium stabilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  14. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate environmental/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  15. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  16. Hydrothermal Formation of Calcium Copper Tetrasilicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Comer, Sara; Kolis, Joseph W; Salguero, Tina T

    2015-12-01

    We describe the first hydrothermal synthesis of CaCuSi4 O10 as micron-scale clusters of thin platelets, distinct from morphologies generated under salt-flux or solid-state conditions. The hydrothermal reaction conditions are surprisingly specific: too cold, and instead of CaCuSi4 O10 , a porous calcium copper silicate forms; too hot, and calcium silicate (CaSiO3 ) forms. The precursors also strongly impact the course of the reaction, with the most common side product being sodium copper silicate (Na2 CuSi4 O10 ). Optimized conditions for hydrothermal CaCuSi4 O10 formation from calcium chloride, copper(II) nitrate, sodium silicate, and ammonium hydroxide are 350 °C at 3000 psi for 72 h; at longer reaction times, competitive delamination and exfoliation causes crystal fragmentation. These results illustrate that CaCuSi4 O10 is an even more unique material than previously appreciated.

  17. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  19. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  20. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  1. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Al-rich Silicate Stardust from Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Christian; Hoppe, Peter; Brenker, Frank E.

    2013-05-01

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  3. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, M.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.; Vladilo, G.; Som, D.

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines serendipitously pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to simultaneously probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. In particular, the damped and sub-damped Lyman- α (DLA/sub-DLA) absorbers trace gas-rich galaxies, independent of the intrinsic luminosities or star-formation rates of the associated galaxy stellar populations. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system was provided through our detection of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the z=0.52 DLA absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 quasar absorption systems at 0.1 < z < 1.4. We find clear detections of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the quasar absorption systems studied. In addition, we also detect the 18 µ m silicate feature in the sources with adequate spectral coverage. We find variations in the breadth, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 µ m interstellar silicate absorption features among the absorbers. This suggests that the silicate dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relative to one another, and relative to those in the Milky Way. We also find suggestions in several sources, based on comparisons with laboratory-derived profiles from the literature, that the silicate dust grains may be significantly more crystalline than those in the amorphous Milky Way ISM. This is particularly evident in the z=0.89 absorber toward the quasar PKS 1830-211, where substructure near 10 µ m is consistent with a crystalline olivine composition. If confirmed, these grain property variations may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution over the past 9 Gyrs, and for the commonly-made assumption that highredshift dust is similar to local dust. We also discuss

  4. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Mohajer, M. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yaghoubi, A., E-mail: yaghoubi@siswa.um.edu.my [Center for High Impact Research, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Ramesh, S., E-mail: ramesh79@um.edu.my [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Bushroa, A.R.; Chin, K.M.C.; Tin, C.C. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chiu, W.S. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium silicates (Mg{sub x}SiO{sub y}) and in particular forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  6. Calcium carbonate interaction analysis in polypropylene compounds and their impact on the formation of beta crystalline phase of this polymer; Analise da interacao de diferentes tipos de carbonato de calcio em compositos de polipropileno e suas consequencias na formacao da fase cristalina beta do PP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The insertion of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in polypropylene compound is a thoroughly known technique widely studied in the academic area and in the industry. Its wide application is due, mainly, to increase mechanical properties with low manufacturing cost. These improvements in this polymer make it more versatile and competitive compared to other expensive polymers. In this study, the incorporation of four types of CaCO3 from the same manufacturer were compared and the focus was on the size of this mineral filler. Furthermore, it was analyzed the interaction of graphitized polypropylene with maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) in the same samples. All these samples were analyzed by WAXS and SEM. The physical properties of tensile strength and impact were also analyzed. It was observed from this study that the smallest CaCO3 produced with PP-g-MA resulted in better physical properties with the formation of a crystalline phase beta, as originally studied by other authors using other raw materials. (author)

  7. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  8. Comparison of hafnium silicate thin films on silicon (1 0 0) deposited using thermal and plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan, Vishwanathan; Bhandari, Harish; Klein, Tonya M

    2002-11-01

    Hafnium silicate thin films were deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si at 400 deg. C using hafnium (IV) t-butoxide. Films annealed in O{sub 2} were compared to as-deposited films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hafnium silicate films were deposited by both thermal and plasma enhanced MOCVD using 2% SiH{sub 4} in He as the Si precursor. An O{sub 2} plasma increased Si content to as much as {approx}26 at.% Si. Both thermal and plasma deposited Hf silicates are amorphous as deposited, however, thermal films exhibit crystallinity after anneal. Surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy was found to be 1.1 and 5.1 nm for MOCVD hafnium silicate and plasma enhanced MOCVD hafnium silicate, respectively.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Irradiation-driven Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Analogs of Protoplanetary Hydrous Silicate Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues; Remusat, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  11. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-01-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated. PMID:26979401

  12. Electrical conductivity studies of nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate synthesized by sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nallamuthu, N.; Prakash, I. [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Satyanarayana, N., E-mail: nallanis2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Venkateswarlu, M. [R and D, Amara Raja Batteries Ltd., Tirupati 517520, AP (India)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Nanocrystalline La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} material was synthesized by sol-gel method. > TG/DTA curves predicted the thermal behavior of the material. > FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of SiO{sub 4} and La-O network in the La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27}. > XRD patterns confirmed the formation of pure crystalline La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} phase. > The grain interior and the grain boundary conductivities are evaluated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline apatite type structured lanthanum silicate (La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27}) sample was synthesized by sol-gel process. Thermal behavior of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate sample was studied using TG/DTA. The structural coordination of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate, calcined at various temperatures, was identified from the observed FTIR spectral results. The observed XRD patterns of the calcined dried gel were compared with the ICDD data and confirmed the formation of crystalline lanthanum silicate phase. The average crystalline size of La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} was calculated using the Scherrer formula and it is found to be {approx}80 nm. The observed SEM images of the lanthanum silicate indicate the formation of the spherical particles and the existence of O, Si and La in the lanthanum silicate are confirmed from the SEM-EDX spectrum. The grain and grain boundary conductivities are evaluated by analyzing the measured impedance data, using winfit software, obtained at different temperatures, of La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} sample. Also, the observed grain and grain boundary conductivity behaviors of the La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} sample are analysed using brick layer model. The electrical permittivity and electrical modulus were calculated from the measured impedance data and were analyzed by fitting through the Havriliak and Negami function to describe the dielectric relaxation behavior of the nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate.

  13. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  14. Ion release, porosity, solubility, and bioactivity of MTA Plus tricalcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Siboni, Francesco; Primus, Carolyn M; Prati, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate MTA Plus (Prevest Denpro Limited, Jammu, India, for Avalon Biomed Inc) material's properties, namely calcium release, the pH change, solubility, water sorption, porosity, surface morphology, and apatite-forming ability after immersion in simulated body fluid. Two tricalcium silicate powders (MTA Plus and ProRoot MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and Dycal (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE) were tested. After incubation at 37°C and 99% relative humidity, calcium and hydroxyl ion release were tested up to 28 days in deionized water at 37°C. Water absorption, interconnected pores, apparent porosity, and solubility were measured after 24 hours of immersion in deionized water at 37°C. The morphologic and elemental analysis of the materials' surfaces were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x-ray analysis after storage at 37°C for 1-28 days in simulated body fluid using the ISO 23317 method. All 3 materials created an alkaline pH within 3 hours, which continued for 28 days. MTA Plus had a higher ion release than ProRoot MTA and Dycal; the use of the MTA Plus gel enhanced the initial calcium release and the increase of the pH. Both MTA materials were more porous, water soluble, and water sorptive than Dycal and more bioactive. After aging in simulated body fluid, MTA Plus material caused precipitation of an apparent calcium phosphate layer. MTA Plus showed improved reactivity and prolonged capability to release calcium and increase the local pH to alkaline values in comparison with ProRoot MTA. These pronounced ion-releasing properties are interlinked with its noticeable porosity, water sorption, and solubility and with the formation of calcium phosphorus minerals. The finer calcium silicate powder may explain the higher ion release, water sorption, porosity, and solubility of MTA Plus compared with ProRoot MTA. For clinicians, MTA Plus represents a lower-cost bioactive tricalcium

  15. Influence of complex chemical additives on the water resistant silicate materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hryhorenko Olena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it has been established that the use of silica fume, low-base slag and calcium hydroxide to modify clays in constrained contact conditions leads to an increase in the number of contacts between the particle components and provides the conditions for the formation of strong contacts and the formation of dense microstructures, and therefore reduces its water absorption and increases water resistance of unburned building materials based on local aluminum silicate raw materials.

  16. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  17. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enriched mixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate on human gingival fibroblasts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eshagh A Saberi; Narges Farhadmollashahi; Faroogh Ghotbi; Hamed Karkeabadi; Roholla Havaei

    2016-01-01

    ....11 However, in contrast to MTA, CEM does not induce cell necrosis after one week.11 Biodentine is another calcium silicate cement with dentin-like characteristics, which has been suggested as an alternative to MTA...

  18. A silicate disk in the heart of the Ant

    CERN Document Server

    Chesneau, Olivier; Balick, Bruce; Lagadec, Eric; Matsuura, Mikako; Smith, Nathan; Spang, Alain; Wolf, Sebastian; Zijlstra, Albert A

    2007-01-01

    We aim at getting high spatial resolution information on the dusty core of bipolar planetary nebulae to directly constrain the shaping process. Methods: We present observations of the dusty core of the extreme bipolar planetary nebula Menzel 3 (Mz 3, Hen 2-154, the Ant) taken with the mid-infrared interferometer MIDI/VLTI and the adaptive optics NACO/VLT. The core of Mz 3 is clearly resolved with MIDI in the interferometric mode, whereas it is unresolved from the Ks to the N bands with single dish 8.2 m observations on a scale ranging from 60 to 250 mas. A striking dependence of the dust core size with the PA angle of the baselines is observed, that is highly suggestive of an edge-on disk whose major axis is perpendicular to the axis of the bipolar lobes. The MIDI spectrum and the visibilities of Mz 3 exhibit a clear signature of amorphous silicate, in contrast to the signatures of crystalline silicates detected in binary post-AGB systems, suggesting that the disk might be relatively young. We used radiative-...

  19. In Vitro Screening of the Apatite-Forming Ability, Biointeractivity and Physical Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate Material for Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Giovanna Gandolfi; Francesco Siboni; Antonella Polimeni; Maurizio Bossù; Francesco Riccitiello; Sandro Rengo; Carlo Prati

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Calcium silicate-based materials are hydraulic self-setting materials with physico-chemical properties suitable for endodontic surgery and good biological/clinical outcomes. The study aim was to evaluate the bio-properties (biointeractivity and apatite-forming ability) and selected physical properties (porosity, water sorption, solubility, and setting time) of Biodentine, a tricalcium silicate material for endodontics and restorative dentistry, compared to that of ProRoot MTA (Mineral ...

  20. A kinetic study of precipitation from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, M.J.J.M. van; Bruyn, P.L. de

    The formation of three different crystalline calcium phosphates (DCPD, OCP, HAP) and an amorphous calcium phosphate was studied as a function of pH and supersaturation. Under the experimental conditions the formation of HAP is always found to be preceded by one or more precursors in a sequence that

  1. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  2. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...

  3. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  4. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D is needed to help your body use calcium. Milk is fortified with vitamin D for this reason. ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ...

  5. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center. Calcium and vitamin D: Important at every age. NIAMS.NIH.gov website. www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Bone_Health/Nutrition . Updated May 2015. Accessed March ...

  6. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  7. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  8. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, C; Van Winckel, H; Evans, T Lloyd; Woods, P M; Kemper, F; Marengo, M; Meixner, M; Sloan, G C; Tielens, A G G M

    2011-01-01

    Aims. In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods. Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results. We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central...

  9. Quantitative Phase Development of crystalline, nano-crystalline and amorphous phases during hydration of OPC blended with siliceous fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Ambitious efforts driven by political and environmental considerations to reduce carbon dioxide emission are currently present, amongst other branches in the construction material industry as well. One possible solution concentrates on the replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials like fly ash or granulated blast furnace slag. Due to its high amorphous phase content and the related reactivity potential fly ash seems well suited for being used in cement or concrete. Unfortu...

  10. Crystalline systems. [Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    The use of two double resonance methods, electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) in the study of free radicals in solids is reviewed. Included are descriptions of how crystalline-phase ENDOR is used to determine small hyperfine splittings, quadrupoly couplings, and reaction mechanisms or radical formation and how crystalline phase ELDOR is used to determine large hyperfine splittings, to identify radicals with large quadrupole moments and to study spin exchange processes. The complementary role played by the ENDOR and ELDOR spectroscopy in the separation of overlapping EPR spectra, in the study of proton-deuterium exchange, in the study of methyl groups undergoing tunneling rotation, and in the determination of the rates of intermolecular motion are dealt with. 13 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  11. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  12. CaCl2-Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29Si MAS NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinfei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2 on tricalcium silicate (C3S hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS spectra and 29Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system. The Ca L3,2-edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C3S hydration in the presence of CaCl2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H, which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C3S. Based on the Ca L3,2-edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C3S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl2 in hydrated C3S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups (Q2 and branch sites (Q3 in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.

  13. Characterization and nutrient release from silicate rocks and influence on chemical changes in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Guelfi Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of Brazilian agriculture has led to a heavy dependence on imported fertilizers to ensure the supply of the growing food demand. This fact has contributed to a growing interest in alternative nutrient sources, such as ground silicate rocks. It is necessary, however, to know the potential of nutrient release and changes these materials can cause in soils. The purpose of this study was to characterize six silicate rocks and evaluate their effects on the chemical properties of treated soil, assessed by chemical extractants after greenhouse incubation. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized plots, in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with four replications. The factors were potassium levels (0-control: without silicate rock application; 200; 400; 600 kg ha-1 of K2O, supplied as six silicate rock types (breccia, biotite schist, ultramafic rock, phlogopite schist and two types of mining waste. The chemical, physical and mineralogical properties of the alternative rock fertilizers were characterized. Treatments were applied to a dystrophic Red-Yellow Oxisol (Ferralsol, which was incubated for 100 days, at 70 % (w/w moisture in 3.7 kg/pots. The soil was evaluated for pH; calcium and magnesium were extracted with KCl 1 mol L-1; potassium, phosphorus and sodium by Mehlich 1; nickel, copper and zinc with DTPA; and the saturation of the cation exchange capacity was calculated for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and overall base saturation. The alternative fertilizers affected soil chemical properties. Ultramafic rock and Chapada mining byproduct (CMB were the silicate rocks that most influenced soil pH, while the mining byproduct (MB led to high K levels. Zinc availability was highest in the treatments with mining byproduct and Cu in soil fertilized with Chapada and mining byproduct.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  16. Characterization of silicate/Si(001) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, M.; Cartier, E.; Narayanan, V.; Reuter, M. C.; Guha, S.; Bojarczuk, N.

    2002-11-01

    Many of the proposed high permittivity gate dielectrics for silicon-based microelectronics rely on a stack configuration, with an SiO2 buffer layer to provide an interface. We describe a means for creating gate dielectrics with a direct yttrium silicate-silicon interface through the solid-state reaction of yttria and silicon oxynitride, avoiding the preparation of an oxide-free silicon surface. Characterization by medium-energy ion scattering indicates complete consumption of the underlying oxide through silicate formation during high-temperature annealing. Furthermore, the silicate dielectric exhibits small flat-band voltage shifts, indicating low quantities of charge, without passivation steps. Creation of a silicate-silicon interfaces by a simple route may enable the study of an alternate class of dielectrics.

  17. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  18. Insights into Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Bowden, Mark E.; Hoyt, David W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Arey, Bruce W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2013-07-01

    Long-term geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered an integral part to moderating CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and subsequently minimizing effects of global climate change. Although subsurface injection of CO2 is common place in certain industries, deployment at the scale required for emission reduction is unprecedented and therefore requires a high degree of predictability. Accurately modeling geochemical processes in the subsurface requires experimental derived data for mineral reactions occurring between the CO2, water, and rocks. Most work in this area has focused on aqueous-dominated systems in which dissolved CO2 reacts to form crystalline carbonate minerals. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet supercritical fluid phase. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) that simulate conditions in geologic repositories. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by three novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the supercritical CO2 resulted in increased silicate carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared spectroscopy and determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes. Even in extreme low water conditions, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance detected formation of Q3 [Si(OSi)3OH] and Q4 [Si(OSi)4] amorphous silica species. Unlike the thick (<10 μm) passivating silica layers observed in the fully water saturated scCO2 experiments, images obtained from a focused ion beam sectioned sample indicted these coatings were chemically wollastonite

  19. Sol-Gel Synthesis and Luminescent Characteristic of Doped Eu3+ Silicate-Silica Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liangzhun; Yu Xibin; Yang Shiping; Zhou Pingle; Tang Jinfeng; Peng Xiudong

    2005-01-01

    Eu-doped silicate complex gel nano-particles was obtained by sol-gel process and characterized with TEM, XRD, PL, etc. The well dispersed particles have particle size about 60~70 nm with specific surface area 98.3 m2·g-1. The complex gel phosphor gives a broad and strong luminescent emission originating from Eu2+ ions centered at 425 nm. The emission band shifts to shorter wavelengths with the increase of the ion radius of the alkali earth metals, but the band becomes red-shifted gradually with the increase of the ion radius of the alkali metals(except Li+). These divalent Eu2+ ions originate in inequivalent substitution of the alkaline earth ions. The presence of alkaline ions is favorable for the increasing emission intensity of the Eu2+ and lowering crystalline temperature of the silicate complex gel.

  20. The influence of high pressure on the properties of natural alumino-silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šušić N.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the application of high-pressure (up to 12 GPa on natural alumino-silicates has been studied. Chemical and mineral compositions and thermal behaviour have been analyzed of two samples of alumino-silicates. Results obtained indicate that the application of high pressure causes notable changes. A particularly significant one is the formation of amorphous phases on account of crystalline phases. An amorphous layer formed on particle surfaces with its diverse physical, mechanical, chemical, and other properties, especially over a long period of time, can influence the processes provoking or activating land slides or soil settlements. This enables derivation of many new materials with entirely new properties important for use in the ceramic and brick industries.

  1. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  2. Structure and Viscosity of Carbonate-Silicate Melts Using in situ Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. R.; Manning, C. E.; Kavner, A.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical properties of carbon-rich magmas at high pressures and temperatures are a major factor controlling the deep-Earth carbon cycle, and may play a crucial role in global magmatism at depth. We have measured the structure of carbonate-silicate liquids as a function of carbon content along the calcite-wollastonite (CaCO3-CaSiO3) and calcite-forsterite (CaCO3-Mg2SiO3) compositional joins at ~1800 oC, and 3 or 6 GPa in a Paris-Edinburgh press using X-ray diffuse scattering. Pair distribution functions calculated from the scattering data confirm that CaCO3 behaves as an ionic liquid, while compositions with 40-100 wt% wollastonite contain polymerized silicate with an average connectivity (Qn) of at least two bridging O per Si (Q2). Even liquid compositions with as little as 35 wt% forsterite component contain silicate polymers, despite the absence of bridging O in the crystalline orthosilicate. As the carbonate content of the melt is increased, the average connectivity of SiO4 units linearly increases from ~Q2 for pure wollastonite liquid to >Q3 for 40 wt% wollastonite, even though less silicate is present. Analysis of Ca-Ca and Ca-Si pair correlations, as well as Ca-O bond distances, indicate that Ca2+ bonds more strongly to the silicate framework as carbonate content increases. Increasing pressure from 3 to 6 GPa at constant composition causes Qn to fall near Q0. The trends in local atomic structure with composition and pressure explain falling sphere viscometry measurements in carbonate-silicate liquids at upper mantle conditions. These viscosities are as low as 6x10-3 Pa-s for pure CaCO3, only half a log unit higher than that of water, and span ~1.6 log units between the carbonate and silicate end-members. Structural and viscosity trends taken together indicate carbonate-rich, depolymerized and highly mobile liquid at depth which transitions into silicate-rich, polymerized and much less mobile liquid as the melt ascends into the crust.

  3. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  4. In Situ Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy of Early Tricalcium Silicate Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchul Bae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The understanding and control of early hydration of tricalcium silicate (C3S is of great importance to cement science and concrete technology. However, traditional characterization methods are incapable of providing morphological and spectroscopic information about in situ hydration at the nanoscale. Using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy, we report the changes in morphology and molecular structure of C3S at an early stage of hydration. In situ C3S hydration in a wet cell, beginning with induction (~1 h and acceleration (~4 h periods of up to ~8 h, was studied and compared with ex situ measurements in the deceleration period after 15 h of curing. Analysis of the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure showed that the Ca binding energy and energy splitting of C3S changed rapidly in the early age of hydration and exhibited values similar to calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H. The formation of C–S–H nanoseeds in the C3S solution and the development of a fibrillar C–S–H morphology on the C3S surface were visualized. Following this, silicate polymerization accompanied by C–S–H precipitation produced chemical shifts in the peaks of the main Si K edge and in multiple scattering. However, the silicate polymerization process did not significantly affect the Ca binding energy of C–S–H.

  5. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  6. Calcium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a person has symptoms of a parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , or an overactive thyroid. A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. It is included in the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the basic metabolic panel (BMP) , ...

  7. Three-dimensional culture of dental pulp stem cells in direct contact to tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Lindner, S R; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G; Galler, K M

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate cements are biocompatible dental materials applicable in contact with vital tissue. The novel tricalcium silicate cement Biodentine™ offers properties superior to commonly used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Objective of this study was to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to induce differentiation and mineralization in three-dimensional cultures of dental pulp stem cells after direct contact with the material. Test materials included a new tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™, Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), MTA (ProRoot® MTA, DENSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialities, Johnson City, TN, USA), glass ionomer (Ketac™ Molar Aplicap™, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), human dentin disks and polystyrene. Magnetic activated cell sorting for to the surface antigen STRO-1 was performed to gain a fraction enriched with mesenchymal stem cells. Samples were allowed to set and dental pulp stem cells in collagen carriers were placed on top. Scanning electron microscopy of tricalcium silicate cement surfaces with and without cells was conducted. Cell viability was measured for 14 days by MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evaluated (days 3, 7, and 14) and expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, DSPP, and RUNX2) was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase data was performed to compare different materials as well as time points (Mann-Whitney U test, α = 0.05). Cell viability was highest on tricalcium silicate cement, followed by MTA. Viability on glass ionomer cement and dentin disks was significantly lower. Alkaline phosphatase activity was lower in cells on new tricalcium silicate cement compared to MTA, whereas expression patterns of marker genes were alike. Increased cell viability and similar levels of mineralization-associated gene expression in three-dimensional cell cultures on the novel tricalcium silicate cement and mineral

  8. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  9. Synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Minh, Doan, E-mail: doan.phamminh@mines-albi.fr [Universite de Toulouse, Mines Albi, CNRS, Centre RAPSODEE, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Lyczko, Nathalie; Sebei, Haroun; Nzihou, Ange [Universite de Toulouse, Mines Albi, CNRS, Centre RAPSODEE, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Sharrock, Patrick [Universite de Toulouse, SIMAD, IUT Paul Sabatier, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81104 Castres (France)

    2012-08-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium hydroxyapatite was synthesized from CaCO{sub 3} and four orthophosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} led to the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was also the most efficient for calcium dissolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction pathway was dissolution-precipitation accompanied by agglomeration step. - Abstract: The synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca-HA) starting from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources, including orthophosphoric acid, potassium, sodium and ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphates, was investigated under ambient conditions. The reaction started with calcium carbonate dissolution in an acid medium, followed by rapid precipitation of calcium cations with orthophosphate species to form calcium phosphate based particles which were in the size range of 0.4-1 {mu}m. These particles then agglomerated into much larger ones, up to 350 {mu}m in diameter (aggregates). These aggregates possessed an unstable porous structure which was responsible for the porosity of the final products. The highest specific surface area and pore volume were obtained with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. On the other hand, orthophosphoric acid led to the highest dissolution of calcium carbonate and the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Under ambient conditions, calcium phosphate based solid products of low crystallinity were formed. Different intermediates were identified and a reaction pathway proposed.

  10. Modified tricalcium silicate cement formulations with added zirconium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yoshihara, Kumiko; De Munck, Jan; Cokic, Stevan; Pongprueksa, Pong; Putzeys, Eveline; Pedano, Mariano; Chen, Zhi; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of modifying tricalcium silicate (TCS) cements on three key properties by adding ZrO2. TCS powders were prepared by adding ZrO2 at six different concentrations. The powders were mixed with 1 M CaCl2 solution at a 3:1 weight ratio. Biodentine (contains 5 wt.% ZrO2) served as control. To evaluate the potential effect on mechanical properties, the mini-fracture toughness (mini-FT) was measured. Regarding bioactivity, Ca release was assessed using ICP-AES. The component distribution within the cement matrix was evaluated by Feg-SEM/EPMA. Cytotoxicity was assessed using an XTT assay. Adding ZrO2 to TCS did not alter the mini-FT (p = 0.52), which remained in range of that of Biodentine (p = 0.31). Ca release from TSC cements was slightly lower than that from Biodentine at 1 day (p > 0.05). After 1 week, Ca release from TCS 30 and TCS 50 increased to a level that was significantly higher than that from Biodentine (p  0.05). EPMA revealed a more even distribution of ZrO2 within the TCS cements. Particles with an un-reacted core were surrounded by a hydration zone. The 24-, 48-, and 72-h extracts of TCS 50 were the least cytotoxic. ZrO2 can be added to TCS without affecting the mini-FT; Ca release was reduced initially, to reach a prolonged release thereafter; adding ZrO2 made TCS cements more biocompatible. TCS 50 is a promising cement formulation to serve as a biocompatible hydraulic calcium silicate cement.

  11. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  12. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  13. FORMAS DE APLICAÇÃO DE SILICATO DE CÁLCIO E MAGNÉSIO NA CULTURA DO SORGO EM NEOSSOLO QUARTZARÊNICO DE CERRADO FORMS OF APPLICATION OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM SILICATE IN SORGHUM CROP IN A SAVANNAH QUARTZIPSAMMENT SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Carbone Carneiro

    2008-11-01

    savannah soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients, demanding chemical correction to  become productive. For this purpose, limestone is usually applied, but silicate sources are also used because, besides correcting soil reaction, it supplies silicon to plants. This research had as objective to evaluate the effect of  silicon levels and forms in soil and sorghum plants. Two forms of silicate application were evaluated: in the planting furrow and in the whole area. For the applications in the planting furrow, the levels of 100 kg ha-1, 200 kg ha-1, and 300 kg ha-1 of silicate were used, while for the applications in the whole area 1000 kg ha-1, 2000 kg ha-1, and 3000 kg ha-1 were used. Both application forms increased sorghum grain yield and Si concentration in soil and plants, differing, statistically, from control, but with no differences among them. The Si levels also promoted yield and Si concentration in soil and plants. The silicate addition promoted pH increase in the soil, confirming its acidity neutralization effect.

    KEY-WORDS: Silicon; silicate; sorghum.

  14. In Vitro Screening of the Apatite-Forming Ability, Biointeractivity and Physical Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate Material for Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Gandolfi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Calcium silicate-based materials are hydraulic self-setting materials with physico-chemical properties suitable for endodontic surgery and good biological/clinical outcomes. The study aim was to evaluate the bio-properties (biointeractivity and apatite-forming ability and selected physical properties (porosity, water sorption, solubility, and setting time of Biodentine, a tricalcium silicate material for endodontics and restorative dentistry, compared to that of ProRoot MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as gold standard material. Methods: Biodentine and ProRoot MTA pastes were prepared and analyzed for calcium release and alkalinizing activity (3 h–28 days, setting time, water sorption, porosity, solubility, surface microstructure and composition, and apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid. Results: Biodentine showed higher calcium release, alkalinizing activity, and solubility but higher open and apparent porosity, water sorption, and a markedly shorter setting time. Calcium phosphate (CaP deposits were noted on material surfaces after short ageing times. A CaP coating composed of spherulites was detected after 28 days. The thickness, continuity, and Ca/P ratio of the coating differed markedly between the materials. Biodentine showed a coating composed by denser but smaller spherulites, while ProRoot MTA showed large but less dense aggregates of spherulitic deposits. Conclusions: Biodentine showed a pronounced ability to release calcium and extended alkalinizing activity interlinked with its noticeable porosity, water sorption, and solubility: open porosities provide a broad wet biointeractive surface for the release of the calcium and hydroxyl ions involved in the formation of a CaP mineral. Biodentine is a biointeractive tricalcium silicate material with interesting chemical-physical properties and represents a fast-setting alternative to the conventional calcium silicate MTA-like cements.

  15. COLD DRAWING IN CRYSTALLINE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    alcohols, phenol) in Nylon 6 produced changes in the crystalline structure as well as plasticizer action; these two effects must therefore be carefully...distinguished. Changes in the crystalline structure were followed by changes in the infrared spectrum. Dynamic mechanical and thermogravimetric analysis

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  17. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  18. A Silicate Inclusion in Puente del Zacate, a IIIA Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Moore, Carleton B.; Steele, Ian M.

    1996-09-01

    The IIIA and IIIB iron meteorites are considered to have formed in the cores of asteroids. A silicate inclusion within the IIIA meteorite Puente del Zacate consisting of olivine (Fa_4), low-calcium pyroxene (Fs_6Wo_1), chromium diopside (Fs_3Wo47), plagioclase (An14Or_4), graphite, troilite, chromite, daubreelite, and iron metal resembles inclusions in IAB iron meteorites. The oxygen isotopic composition of the Puente del Zacate inclusion is like chromite and phosphate inclusions in other IIIA and IIIB irons. The Puente del Zacate inclusion may have been derived from the lower mantle of the IIIAB parent asteroid.

  19. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li 2O-(72- x)SiO 2- xZnO-5.1Na 2O-1.3P 2O 5-4.1B 2O 3, 5.5⩽ x⩽17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-( Q0) and pyro-phosphate ( Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li 3Zn 0.5SiO 4), tridymite (SiO 2) and cristobalite (SiO 2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li 3PO 4 and (Na,Li) 3PO 4 in the glass-ceramics.

  20. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  1. The fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic (NOTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSANKA KITIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The content and composition of fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic were analized by GC. It was found that unsaturated acids prevailed and that the major components were palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The hydrocarbon fractions of pentane extracts were shown to consist of the alkane homologues (C17 to C34 with nonacosane and hentriacontane being prevailing compounds.

  2. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. The mid-IR water and silicate relation in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Antonellini, S; Kamp, I; Riviere-Marichalar, P; Lahuis, F; Thi, W -F; Woitke, P; Meijerink, R; Aresu, G; Spaans, M

    2016-01-01

    Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50\\%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanation for the current detection rate. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10~$\\mu$m silicate feature. We analyse observed water line fluxes from three blends and compute the 10~$\\mu$m silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra. We use a series of published models, exploring disk dust and gas properties, and the effects of different stars. The models also show that the increasing stellar luminosity enhance simultaneously the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10~$\\mu$m silicate. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline sil...

  4. MINERALOGY OF PRESOLAR SILICATE AND OXIDE GRAINS OF DIVERSE STELLAR ORIGINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott, E-mail: lan-anh.n.nguyen@nasa.gov [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, EISD Directorate, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We report the chemical and structural analysis of nine presolar silicate grains and one presolar oxide grain from the ungrouped chondrite Acfer 094 and the CR chondrite Queen Alexandra Range 99177. Oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that five of these grains condensed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, four have supernova (SN) origins, and one grain likely has a nova origin. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that most of the grains are amorphous with widely varying non-stoichiometric chemical compositions. Three crystalline AGB grains were identified: a clinoenstatite-containing grain assemblage, a Fe-rich olivine grain, and a nanocrystalline enstatite grain encased in an amorphous silicate shell. An amorphous stoichiometric enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) SN grain likely condensed as a crystal and was later rendered amorphous. We do not observe a systematic difference in the chemistries and mineralogies of presolar silicates from different stellar sources, suggesting that the grains formed under a similar range of conditions.

  5. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust in Quasar Absorption Systems at z<1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Vladilo, G.; Welty, D. E.; Som, D.

    2013-01-01

    Interstellar dust plays a significant role in the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, such as star-formation, and the heating, cooling, and ionization of interstellar material. While interstellar dust has been studied extensively in local galaxies, much less is known about the properties of dust grains in distant galaxies. One technique to study extragalactic interstellar dust is to look for absorption features produced by the dust in the spectra of background luminous objects, such as quasars. We will present results from an ongoing study of the interstellar silicate dust in several quasar absorption systems using infrared absorption spectra obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and complementary ground-based data on associated gas-phase metal absorption lines. Based on the shape of the 10 micron silicate absorption feature, we find suggestions that the interstellar silicate dust grains in the distant universe may be significantly more crystalline in structure than those in our own Galaxy. If confirmed, this may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution, and for assumptions about the similarity of dust properties at all epochs. Support for this work is provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Additional support comes from National Science Foundation grants AST-0908890 and AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  6. Optical and crystallization studies of titanium dioxide doped sodium and potassium silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatal, F. H.; Marzouk, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.

    2016-10-01

    Combined optical and FTIR spectral analysis were used to investigate prepared invert two alkali silicate glasses (Na2O·SiO2sbnd K2O·SiO2) containing high titanium oxide content. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared through thermal two step regime of the parent glasses and they were characterized by FTIR and X-ray diffraction measurements. Experimental optical spectra indicate the appearance of an additional UV band due to absorption of tetravalent titanium ions beside the UV bands due to trace ferric ions impurities. FT infrared absorption spectra reveal composite vibrational bands due to vibrational modes of both silicate groups and TiO4 or Sisbnd Osbnd Ti units. Such tetravalent groupings of titanium ions confirm the stability of such invert glasses containing as such two main glass forming oxides. FTIR spectra of the glass - ceramic derivatives show nearly the same IR vibrational modes as their parent glasses. X-ray diffraction analysis show the separation of crystalline sodium or potassium titanate phases beside a minor form of silica and the results confirm that TiO2 acts mainly as network forming units leading to the formation of crystalline titanate phases.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  8. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Crystalline and Non-Crystalline Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parrott, Edward P. J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy of crystalline and non-crystalline solids is probably one of the most active research fields within the terahertz community. Many potential applications, amongst which spectral recognition is probably one of the most prominent, have significantly stimulated the development...... selected examples, the potential the technique holds for various different applications. A particular focus will be given to data analysis and, in particular, how we may account for effects resulting from non-ideal sample preparation....

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the elastic moduli of silicate glasses and crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, Katharina; Stoffel, Ralf Peter; Dronskowski, Richard; Conradt, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    A combined quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic approach to the mechanical properties of multicomponent silicate glasses is presented. Quantum chemical calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT) on various silicate systems were performed to explore the crystalline polymorphs existing for a given chemical composition. These calculations reproduced the properties of known polymorphs even in systems with extensive polymorphism, like MgSiO3. Properties resting on the atomic and electronic structure, i.e., molar volumes (densities) and bulk moduli were predicted correctly. The theoretical data (molar equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli) were then used to complement the available experimental data. In a phenomenological evaluation, experimental data of bulk moduli, a macroscopic property resting on phononic structure, were found to linearly scale with the ratios of atomic space demand to actual molar volume in a universal way. Silicates ranging from high-pressure polymorphs to glasses were represented by a single master line. This suggests that above the Debye limit (in practice: above room temperature), the elastic waves probe the short range order coordination polyhedra and their next-neighbor linkage only, while the presence or absence of an extended translational symmetry is irrelevant. As a result, glasses can be treated - with respect to the properties investigated - as commensurable members of polymorphic series. Binary glasses fit the very same line as their one-component end-members, again both in the crystalline and glassy state. Finally, it is shown that the macroscopic properties of multicomponent glasses also are linear superpositions of the properties of their constitutional phases (as determined from phase diagrams or by thermochemical calculations) taken in their respective glassy states. This is verified experimentally for heat capacities and Young’s moduli of industrial glass compositions. It can be concluded, that the combined quantum

  10. Growth of brushite crystals in sodium silicate gel and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.R.; Wang, M. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Brushite (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, DCPD) single crystals were grown in sodium silicate gel at room temperature. The single diffusion technique was employed in growing crystals. Suitable reactants such as ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate and calcium nitrate tetra hydrate were used as inner and outer reactants. Growth parameters, such as concentration of reactants, gel density and period of growth, were investigated. With 1M ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate and 2M calcium nitrate tetra hydrate, Brushite needles of the size up to 40 mm in length were obtained in a period of 45 days. The crystals grown were confirmed to be Brushite by XRD and FTIR analyses. As determined by nano-indentation tests, these crystals had average modulus and hardness values of 22.5 GPa and 1.75 GPa, respectively. (orig.)

  11. Effect of calcium source on structure and properties of sol-gel derived bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bobo; Turdean-Ionescu, Claudia A; Martin, Richard A; Newport, Robert J; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E; Jones, Julian R

    2012-12-18

    The aim was to determine the most effective calcium precursor for synthesis of sol-gel hybrids and for improving homogeneity of sol-gel bioactive glasses. Sol-gel derived bioactive calcium silicate glasses are one of the most promising materials for bone regeneration. Inorganic/organic hybrid materials, which are synthesized by incorporating a polymer into the sol-gel process, have also recently been produced to improve toughness. Calcium nitrate is conventionally used as the calcium source, but it has several disadvantages. Calcium nitrate causes inhomogeneity by forming calcium-rich regions, and it requires high temperature treatment (>400 °C) for calcium to be incorporated into the silicate network. Nitrates are also toxic and need to be burnt off. Calcium nitrate therefore cannot be used in the synthesis of hybrids as the highest temperature used in the process is typically 40-60 °C. Therefore, a different precursor is needed that can incorporate calcium into the silica network and enhance the homogeneity of the glasses at low (room) temperature. In this work, calcium methoxyethoxide (CME) was used to synthesize sol-gel bioactive glasses with a range of final processing temperatures from 60 to 800 °C. Comparison is made between the use of CME and calcium chloride and calcium nitrate. Using advanced probe techniques, the temperature at which Ca is incorporated into the network was identified for 70S30C (70 mol % SiO(2), 30 mol % CaO) for each of the calcium precursors. When CaCl(2) was used, the Ca did not seem to enter the network at any of the temperatures used. In contrast, Ca from CME entered the silica network at room temperature, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction, (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and dissolution studies. CME should be used in preference to calcium salts for hybrid synthesis and may improve homogeneity of sol-gel glasses.

  12. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  13. Liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the recent developments in the field of liquid-crystalline lanthanide complexes. The role of trivalent lanthanide ions as the central metal ion in metallomesogens is considered. An outlook for the future is given.

  14. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2012-01-01

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso-

  15. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination.

  16. Hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype tricalcium silicate-based dentin replacement material after pulp capping in entire tooth cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Laurent, Patrick; About, Imad

    2014-11-01

    The calcium-releasing ability of pulp-capping materials induces pulp tissue regeneration. Tricalcium silicate-based materials produce calcium hydroxide as a by-product of hydration. Assessment of hydration and calcium ion leaching is usually performed on samples that have been aged in physiological solution for a predetermined period of time. The hydration and activity of the materials in vivo may not be similar to those displayed in vitro because of insufficient fluid available in contact with dentin. The aim of this research was the assessment of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material after pulp capping and to compare it with direct hydration in an aqueous solution. The extent of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material with a similar composition to Biodentine but not incorporating the additives was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of polished specimens after being allowed to hydrate in Hank's balanced salt solution for 14 days. The extent of hydration was compared with material hydration when used as direct pulp capping materials by using a tooth culture model. Material activity was also assessed by x-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the deposition of calcium hydroxide by the materials, and calcium ion leaching in Hank's balanced salt solution was assessed by ion chromatography. Biodentine and the prototype tricalcium silicate cement hydrated and reaction by-products were deposited in the cement matrix both after pulp capping and when incubated in an aqueous solution. Calcium hydroxide was formed, and calcium ions were leached in solution. Theracal LC hydration was incomplete because of the limited moisture diffusion within the material. Thus, no calcium hydroxide was produced, and a lower calcium ion leaching was recorded. Theracal LC had a heterogeneous structure with large unhydrated

  17. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d......-saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation...

  18. Dispersion of Silicate in Tricalcium Phosphate Elucidated by Solid-State NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rewal, A.; Wei, X.; Akinc, M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2008-03-12

    The dispersion of silicate in tricalcium phosphate, a resorbable bioceramics for bone replacement, has been investigated by various solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In samples prepared with 5 and 10 mol% of both {sup 29}SiO{sub 2} and ZnO, three types of silicate have been detected: (i) SiO{sub 4}{sup 4-} (Q{sub 0} sites) with long longitudinal (T{sub 1,Si}) relaxation times ({approx} 10,000 s), which substitute for {approx}1% of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}; (ii) silicate nanoinclusions containing Q{sub 2}, Q{sub 1}, and Q{sub 0} sites with T{sub 1,Si} 100 s, which account for most of the silicon; and (iii) crystalline Q{sub 4} (SiO{sub 2}) with long T{sub 1,Si}. Sensitivity was enhanced >100-fold by {sup 29}Si enrichment and refocused detection. The inclusions in both samples have a diameter of {approx}8 nm, as proved by {sup 29}Si{l_brace}{sup 31}P{r_brace} REDOR dephasing on a 30-ms time scale, which was simulated using a multispin approach specifically suited for nanoparticles. {sup 29}Si CODEX NMR with 30-s {sup 29}Si spin diffusion confirms that an inclusion contains >10 Si (consistent with the REDOR result of >100 Si per inclusion). Overlapping signals of silicate Q{sub 2}, Q{sub 1}, and Q{sub 0} sites were spectrally edited based on their J-couplings, using double-quantum filtering. The large inhomogeneous broadening of the Q{sub 2}, Q{sub 1}, and Q{sub 0} {sup 29}Si subspectra indicates that the nanoinclusions are amorphous.

  19. UTILIZATION OF RICE HUSK AS RAW MATERIAL IN SYNTHESIS OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research about synthesis and characterization of MCM-41 from rice husk has been done. Silica (SiO2 was extracted from rice husk by refluxing with 3M hydrochloric solution at 80 °C for 3 h. The acid-leached rice husk was filtered, washed, dried and calcined at 650 °C for 6 h lead the rough powder of rice husk silica with light brown in color. Characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD and FTIR spectroscopy method. Rice husk silica was dissolved into the sodium hydroxide solution leading to the solution of sodium silicate, and used as silica source for the synthesis of MCM-41. MCM-41 was synthesized by hydrothermal process to the mixture prepared from 29 g of distilled water, 8.67 g of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB, 9.31 g of sodium silicate solution, and amount mL of 1 M H2SO4. Hydrothermal process was carried out at 100 °C in a teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave heated in the oven for 36 h. The solid phase was filtered, then washed with deionised water, and dried in the oven at 100 °C for 2 h. The surfactant CTMAB was removed by calcination at 550 °C for 10 h with heating rate 2 °C/min. The as-synthesized and calcined crystals were characterized by using FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 physisorption methods. In order to investigate the effect of silica source, the same procedure was carried out by using pure sodium silicate as silica source. It was concluded that silica extracted from rice husk can be used as raw materials in the synthesis of MCM-41, there is no significant difference in crystallinity and pore properties when was compared to material produced from commercial sodium silicate.

  20. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  1. Human Dental Pulp Cells Responses to Apatite Precipitation from Dicalcium Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yun Lai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the mechanisms behind the processes of cell attachment and the enhanced proliferation that occurs as a response to the presence of calcium silicate-based materials needs to be better understood so as to expand the applications of silicate-based materials. Ions in the environment may influence apatite precipitation and affect silicate ion release from silicate-based materials. Thus, the involvement of apatite precipitate in the regulation of cell behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs is also investigated in the present study, along with an investigation of the specific role of cell morphology and osteocalcin protein expression cultured on calcium silicate (CS with different Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM. The microstructure and component of CS cement immersion in DMEM and P-free DMEM are analyzed. In addition, when hDPCs are cultured on CS with two DMEMs, we evaluate fibronectin (FN and collagen type I (COL secretion during the cell attachment stage. The facilitation of cell adhesion on CS has been confirmed and observed both by scanning with an electron microscope and using immunofluorescence imaging. The results indicate that CS is completely covered by an apatite layer with tiny spherical shapes on the surface in the DMEM, but not in the P-free DMEM. Compared to the P-free DMEM, the lower Ca ion in the DMEM may be attributed to the formation of the apatite on the surfaces of specimens as a result of consumption of the Ca ion from the DMEM. Similarly, the lower Si ion in the CS-soaked DMEM is attributed to the shielding effect of the apatite layer. The P-free DMEM group releases more Si ion increased COL and FN secretion, which promotes cell attachment more effectively than DMEM. This study provides new and important clues regarding the major effects of Si-induced cell behavior as well as the precipitated apatite-inhibited hDPC behavior on these materials.

  2. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  3. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  4. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  5. Six White Dwarfs with Circumstellar Silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Jura, M; Zuckerman, B

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope spectra reveal 10 micron silicate emission from circumstellar dust orbiting six externally-polluted white dwarfs. Micron-size glasses with an olivine stoichiometry can account for the distinctively broad wings that extend to 12 microns; these particles likely are produced by tidal-disruption of asteroids. The absence of infrared PAH features is consistent with a scenario where extrasolar rocky planets are assembled from carbon-poor solids.

  6. Microscopic characterization of crystalline phases in waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Millar, A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to determine the microstructure of crystalline phases present in zirconium- and titanium-bearing glass crystalline composite (GCC) waste forms. The GCC materials were found to contain spinels (maghemite), zirconolites, perovskites (CaTiO{sub 3}) and plagiociase feldspar (anorthite) mineral phases. The structure of the uranium and cerium-bearing monoclinic zirconolite was characterized by medium resolution TEM imaging and electron and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The phase was found to contain high levels of iron in comparison to Synroc-type zirconolites. Excess zirconium in zirconolite has resulted in martensitic baddeleyite (ZrO{sub 2}) formation. Anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}) was present as elongated crystallites within a calcium-rich aluminosilicate glass. Lead and iron-bearing anorthite lying along distinct precipitates were occasionally observed within the an crystallographic planes.

  7. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses. Progress report, June 1, 1996--May 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

    1998-06-01

    This DOE-funded project (DE-FG03-ER13445, 6/1/96-5/31/99) emphasizes study of the behavior of volatiles in magmatic systems. The project is explicitly focused on the combined application of IR spectroscopy, experimental petrology, and stable isotope geochemistry to understanding the behavior and properties of the volatile components dissolved in silicate melts and glasses, although in recent years, our emphasis has broadened to include non-volatile aspects of stable isotope geochemistry. Results obtained during the current grant and previous grant periods confirm that when applied to study of well-chosen synthetic and natural systems, the combination of these approaches and techniques can yield insights of general petrological and volcanological value and of practical value to DOE. In particular, the results of our DOE-funded work has led to a deeper understanding of the physical chemistry of silicate melts as well as specific constraints on the thermal and chemical evolution of high-level magmatic systems of the sort being evaluated as potential geothermal and magmathermal energy sources. Moreover, our work has also contributed to understanding the behavior of H-, C-, and O-bearing species in amorphous and crystalline silicates, including the kinetics of their interactions; we believe these results will contribute to efforts to use silicates in the development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

  9. Identification of the man-made barium copper silicate pigments among some ancient Chinese artifacts through spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q H; Yang, J C; Li, L; Dong, J Q; Zhao, H X; Liu, S

    2015-03-05

    This article describes the complementary application of non-invasive micro-Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to the characterization of some ancient Chinese silicate artifacts. A total of 28 samples dated from fourth century BC to third century AD were analyzed. The results of chemical analysis showed that the vitreous PbO-BaO-SiO2 material was used to sinter these silicate artifacts. The barium copper silicate pigments including BaCuSi4O10, BaCuSi2O6 and BaCu2Si2O7 were widely identified from colorful areas of the samples by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, other crystalline phases such as Fe2O3, BaSi2O5, BaSO4, PbCO3 and quartz were also identified. The present study provides very valuable information to trace the technical evolution of man-made barium copper silicate pigments and their close relationship with the making of ancient PbO-BaO-SiO2 glaze and glass.

  10. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  11. Potential etiologic role of brushite in the formation of calcium (renal) stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1981-05-01

    Brushite may play an important regulatory role in the formation of calcium -containing renal stones. The urinary environment from patients with hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis is typically supersaturated and shows an increased propensity for the spontaneous nucleation of brushite. Brushite has been identified in "stone-forming" urine and in stones. This crystalline phase may undergo phase transformation to hydroxyapatite or cause heterogeneous nucleation or epitaxial growth of calcium oxalate. Thus, brushite may also participate in the formation of stones of hydroxypatite or calcium oxalate.

  12. Optical combs with a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Solomatine, Iouri; Seidel, David; Maleki, Lute

    2008-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a tunable monolithic optical frequency comb generator. The device is based on the four-wave mixing in a crystalline calcium fluoride whispering gallery mode resonator. The frequency spacing of the comb is given by an integer number of the free spectral range of the resonator. We select the desired number by tuning the pumping laser frequency with respect to the corresponding resonator mode. We also observe interacting optical combs and high-frequency hyperparametric oscillation, depending on the experimental conditions. A potential application of the comb for generating narrowband frequency microwave signals is demonstrated.

  13. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  14. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  15. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  16. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  17. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  18. Influence of composition on setting kinetics of new injectable and/or fast setting tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setbon, H M; Devaux, J; Iserentant, A; Leloup, G; Leprince, J G

    2014-12-01

    New commercial tricalcium silicate based cements were elaborated to improve handling properties and setting time. The goals of the present work were: (i) to determine the composition of the new injectable and/or fast setting calcium silicate based cements, and (ii) to investigate the impact of the differences in composition on their setting kinetics. The materials considered were Angelus MTA™, Biodentine™, MM-MTA™, MTA-Caps™, and ProRoot MTA™ as control. Elemental composition of materials was studied by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Energy Dispersive analysis, whereas phases in presence were analyzed by Micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis and cement surface by Scanning Electron Microscope. Setting kinetics was evaluated using rheometry. Elemental analysis revealed, for all cements, the presence of three major components: calcium, silicon and oxygen. Chlorine was detected in MM-MTA, MTA-Caps and Biodentine. Different radio-opacifiers were identified: bismuth oxide in ProRoot MTA, Angelus MTA and MM-MTA, zirconium oxide in Biodentine and calcium tungstate (CaWO4) in MTA-Caps. All cements were composed of di- and tri-calcium silicate, except Biodentine for which only the latter was detected. Major differences in setting kinetics were observed: a modulus of 8×10(8)Pa is reached after 12min for Biodentine, 150min for MM-MTA, 230min for Angelus MTA and 320min for ProRoot MTA. The maximum modulus reached by MTA-Caps was 7×10(8)Pa after 150min. Even if these cements possess some common compounds, major differences in their composition were observed between them, which directly influence their setting kinetics. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Níveis de silicato de cálcio e magnésio na produção das gramídeas Marandu e Tanzânia cultivadas em um Neossolo Quartzarênico Level of calcium and magnesium silicate in the yield of Marandu grass and Tanzania grass cultivated in one Quartzsandy Neosoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Augustus Fortes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O estudo foi conduzido em casa-de-vegetação do Departamento de Ciência do Solo da Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras-MG, com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da correção da acidez do solo, por meio da aplicação de níveis de silicato de Ca e Mg, na produção das gramíneas Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu e Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia-1 cultivadas em solo Neossolo Quartzarênico ortic. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi blocos ao acaso, em esquema fatorial 2 x 5 com quatro repetições, sendo duas forrageiras e cinco níveis de saturação por bases (V% original, 40, 60, 80 e 100%. Cada unidade experimental correspondeu a um vaso sem furos, com capacidade para 4,0 dm³ de solo, totalizando 40 vasos. Foram avaliadas as produções de MS por corte (PMS e total (PTMS, a altura e o número de perfilhos. Não houve variação entre as gramíneas em altura de perfilhos. O Tanzânia foi superior ao Marandu em PMS e número de perfilhos. Houve aumento linear na PMS, PTMS e altura de perfilhos. Conclui-se que ambas as gramíneas responderam de forma positiva à elevação dos níveis de V%, em PMS, até 54,8%. O Tanzânia produziu mais MS em relação ao Marandu.This study was conducted in a greenhouse of the Soil Science Department at Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras-MG, with the purpose of evaluating the effect of the soil correction acidity, by the application of Ca and Mg silicate levels, in the production of grasses Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu and Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia-1 cultivated in Quartzsandy Neosoil ortic. The experimental design was a randomized complete block, in 2 x 5 factorial scheme with four replicates, being two forages and five levels of base saturation (BS%; (original BS, 40, 60, 80 and 100%. Each experimental unit corresponded to a pot with a capacity of 4.0 dm³ of soil, totalizing 40 pots. The dry matter yield (DMY for cut and total (TDMY, height and number of tillers were evaluated. There were

  20. Crystalline 'Genes' in Metallic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, M J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The underlying structural order that transcends the liquid, glass and crystalline states is identified using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). GA identifies the most common energetically favorable packing motif in crystalline structures close to the alloy's Al-10 at.% Sm composition. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid structures using a cluster-alignment method which reveals the average topology. Conventional descriptions of the short-range order, such as Voronoi tessellation, are too rigid in their analysis of the configurational poly-types when describing the chemical and topological ordering during transition from undercooled metallic liquids to crystalline phases or glass. Our approach here brings new insight into describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter physics.

  1. Influence of alkali, silicate, and sulfate content of carbonated concrete pore solution on mild steel corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, B. [Schlumberger Carbon Services, Schlumberger Riboud Product Center, Clamart (France); L' Hostis, V. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Tricheux, L. [CEBTP-SOLEN, Elancourt, (France); Idrissi, H. [Laboratoire MATEIS UMR CNRS, Equipe RI2S, Department Science et Genie des Materiaux, Villeurbanne, (France)

    2010-02-15

    The increase in the rebar corrosion rate due to the concrete carbonation is the major cause of reinforced concrete degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of mild steel rebars in simulated carbonated concrete solution. For this purpose, thermodynamic calculations, electrochemical techniques, gravimetric measurements, and surface analyses were used. Thermodynamic investigations of the nature of the interstitial solution provides an estimation of the influence of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2} {sup -}) and alkali (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) content on carbonate alkalinity of the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O open system (pCO{sub 2} = 0.3 mbar). In this system, calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) remain thermodynamically unstable and amorphous silica controls silicate aqueous content at 100 ppm. Electrochemical results highlight a decrease in the corrosion rate with increasing carbonate alkalinity and the introduction of silicate. The introduction of sulfate at fixed carbonate alkalinity shows a dual effect: at high carbonate alkalinity, the corrosion rate is increased whereas at low carbonate alkalinity, corrosion rate is decreased. Those results are supported by surface analysis. Authors conclude that silicate and sulfate release from cement hydrates and fixation of alkali on carbonated hydrates are key parameters to estimate mild steel corrosion in carbonated concrete. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Influence of alkali, silicate, and sulfate content of carbonated concrete pore solution on mild steel corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hostis, V. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Lab Etud Comportement Betons and Argiles, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Huet, B. [Schlumberger Riboud Prod Ctr, Schlumberger Carbon Serv, F-92142 Clamart (France); Tricheux, L. [CEBTP SOLEN, F-78990 Elancourt (France); Idrissi, H. [CNRS, Lab MATEIS UMR 5510, Equipe RI2S, Dept Sci and Genie Mat, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-07-01

    The increase in the rebar corrosion rate due to the concrete carbonation is the major cause of reinforced concrete degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of mild steel rebars in simulated carbonated concrete solution. For this purpose, thermodynamic calculations, electrochemical techniques, gravimetric measurements, and surface analyses were used. Thermodynamic investigations of the nature of the interstitial solution provides an estimation of the influence of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and alkali (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) content on carbonate alkalinity of the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O open system (pCO{sub 2}=0. 3 mbar). in this system, calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) remain thermodynamically unstable and amorphous silica controls silicate aqueous content at 100 ppm. Electrochemical results highlight a decrease in the corrosion rate with increasing carbonate alkalinity and the introduction of silicate. The introduction of sulfate at fixed carbonate alkalinity shows a dual effect: at high carbonate alkalinity, the corrosion rate is increased whereas at low carbonate alkalinity, corrosion rate is decreased. Those results are supported by surface analysis. Authors conclude that silicate and sulfate release from cement hydrates and fixation of alkali on carbonated hydrates are key parameters to estimate mild steel corrosion in carbonated concrete. (authors)

  3. Positronium diffusion in crystalline polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-12-16

    The analysis in four components of the positron lifetime spectra of nine different and structurally well characterised lamellar polyethylene samples has allowed to associate the two longest-lived components to positronium annihilation in the crystalline and amorphous phases. Further assumption on positronium tunneling through the interface between both phases, and a simple geometrical model, led to a value for the positronium diffusion coefficient in the crystalline phase of the order of 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/s. Interfaces have thicknesses around 1.5 nm and are shallow traps for positronium. (orig.).

  4. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  5. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  6. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyen, Nina; Benzerara, Karim; Li, Jinhua; Groleau, Alexis; Balan, Etienne; Robert, Jean-Louis; Esteve, Imene; Tavera, Rosaluz; Moreira, David; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion

    2015-10-01

    Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2·nH2O). Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential for fossilization of

  7. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eZeyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH2·nH2O. Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential

  8. Formation and Characterization of Ceramic Nanocomposite Crystalline Coatings on Aluminium by Anodization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Mubarak Ali; V.Raj

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic nanocomposite coatings have been synthesized on aluminium by using lithium sulphate electrolyte with zirconium silicate additive by anodization.The effects of current density (CD) on microhardness,structure,composition and surface topography of the oxide layer formed at various CDs (0.1-0.25 A/cm2) have been studied.Crystalline coatings formed at 0.25 A/cm2 have been (width 95 nm) observed with a relatively uniform distribution confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.Additionally,the average microhardness value of ceramic nanocomposite coatings fabricated from lithium sulphate-zirconium silicate bath is approximately 8.5 times higher than that of the as-received aluminium.The surface statistics of the coatings is discussed in detail to explain the roughness and related parameters for better understanding.These observations demonstrate the importance of surface statistics in controlling the morphology of the coatings and its properties.From the X-ray diffraction investigations,it can be concluded that the formed nanocomposite coatings are crystalline in nature and that the crystallinity of the coatings decreases with increasing applied current density.

  9. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  10. Nitridosilicates - a significant extension of silicate chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnick, W.; Huppertz, H. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Lab. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1997-05-01

    A new dimension in silicate chemistry becomes accessible through substitution of oxygen by nitrogen. Multinary nitridosilicates, such as Ln{sub 3}Si{sub 6}N{sub 11} (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) shown on the right, are built up from SiN{sub 4} tetrahedra into network structures. Owing to the stability of the covalent Si-N bonds and the high degree of condensation, the nitridosilicates show remarkable chemical and thermal stabilities, similar to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. (orig.) 22 refs.

  11. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartzman, D. [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  12. Characterization of the Aqueous Uranyl-Silicate Complex Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, M.; Massey, M.; Huang, P.

    2015-12-01

    The speciation of aqueous uranium ions is an important factor in predicting its mobility and fate in the environment. Two major controls on speciation are pH and the presence of complexing ligands. For the case of aqueous uranyl, UO22+(aq), some common complexes include uranyl-hydroxy, uranyl-carbonato, and uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, all of which differ in chemical reactivity and mobility. Uranyl-silicate complexes are also known but remain poorly characterized. In this work, we studied uranyl speciation in a series of aqueous solutions of 0.1 mM uranyl and 2 mM silicate with pH ranging from 4 to 7. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of these samples were recorded at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). Of particular note are the uranyl and silicate concentrations employed in our experiments, which are lower than conditions in previously reported EXAFS studies and approach conditions in natural groundwater systems. Preliminary analyses of EXAFS data indicate that uranyl speciation changes across the pH range, consistent with published thermodynamic data that suggest uranyl-silicate complexes may be important for pH ~ 5 and below, while uranyl-carbonato complexes become dominant at circumneutral pH. To guide the interpretation of the EXAFS data, molecular-scale simulations were carried out using density functional theory. We considered two classes of models: (i) hydrated clusters, and (ii) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of 3D-periodic models involving uranyl and silicate in water. These calculations reveal that at pH ~ 5, the uranyl speciation is the [UO2(H2O)4H3SiO4]+ complex formed by the substitution of an equatorial uranyl water with a monodentate silicate ligand. The evidence from experiments and simulations provide a consistent picture for the uranyl-silicate complex, which may be important in the transport of uranyl in acidic, silicate-rich waters.

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic estimation of crystallinity in SiO2 based rocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhaskar J Saikia; G Parthasarathy; N C Sarmah

    2008-10-01

    We present here optical properties and crystallinity index of quartz (SiO2) in natural rocks samples from the Mikir and Khasi hills, Assam, India. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of quartz in rock samples and estimate the mining quality of quartz mineral, which is substantiated by calculating the crystallinity index. Systematic investigations of structure have been carried out in between 10 m (1000 cm–1) and 20 m (500 cm–1) bands of silicates. Investigation is based on the assignment of infrared bands to certain structural groups of SiO4 tetrahedra. The crystallinity of samples has been ascertained by comparing the ratio of intensity of the characteristic peak at 778 and 695 cm–1 with the corresponding ratio for a standard sample. The crystallinity parameter is calculated by using a standard procedure which can be used to estimate the distribution of quartz in various rocks for mining purpose. The infrared spectroscopic investigation is found to be an ideal tool for structure elucidation and for estimating quartz crystallinity of the natural samples.

  14. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  15. Sulphur dioxide removal using South African limestone/siliceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Ogenga; M.M. Mbarawa; K.T. Lee; A.R. Mohamed; I. Dahlan [Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2010-09-15

    This study presents an investigation into the desulfurization effect of sorbent derived from South African calcined limestone conditioned with fly ash. The main aim was to examine the effect of chemical composition and structural properties of the sorbent with regard to SO{sub 2} removal in dry-type flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. South African fly ash and CaO obtained from calcination of limestone in a laboratory kiln at a temperature of 900{sup o}C were used to synthesize CaO/ash sorbent by atmospheric hydration process. The sorbent was prepared under different hydration conditions: CaO/fly ash weight ratio, hydration temperature (55-75{sup o}C) and hydration period (4-10 h). Desulfurization experiments were done in the fixed bed reactor at 87{sup o}C and relative humidity of 50%. The chemical composition of both the fly ash and calcined limestone had relatively high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and oxides of other transitional elements which provided catalytic ability during the sorbent sorption process. Generally the sorbents had higher SO{sub 2} absorption capacity in terms of mol of SO{sub 2} per mol of sorbent (0.1403-0.3336) compared to hydrated lime alone (maximum 0.1823). The sorbents were also found to consist of mesoporous structure with larger pore volume and BET specific surface area than both CaO and fly ash. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed the presence of complex compounds containing calcium silicate hydrate in the sorbents. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  17. Stability of f