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Sample records for crystalline benzoyl peroxides

  1. Investigation of the decomposition reaction and dust explosion characteristics of crystalline benzoyl peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, K.-T.; Chen, T.-C.; Hu, K.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The benzoyl peroxide (BPO) is widely used in the chemical industry. Many catastrophes have been caused by its thermal instability or reactive incompatibility in storage or thermal decomposition reaction. Thus, its hazard characteristics have to be clearly identified. First of all, the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is used to measure the heat of decomposition reaction, which can contribute to understanding the reaction characteristics of benzoyl peroxide. The accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) is used to measure the rates of temperature and pressure rises of decomposition reaction, and then the kinetics parameters are estimated. Furthermore, the MIKE 3 apparatus and the 20-l-Apparatus are used to measure and analyze the dust explosion characteristics of benzoyl peroxide under room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Finally, Semenov's thermal explosion theory is applied to investigate the critical runaway condition and the stability criterion of decomposition reaction, and to build the relationship of critical temperature, convective heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer surface area and ambient temperature. These results contribute to improving the safety in the reaction, transportation and storage processes of benzoyl peroxide

  2. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Benzoyl Peroxide Resembling Impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhyun; Craiglow, Brittany G; Watsky, Kalman L; Antaya, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented with recurring severe dermatitis of the face of 5-months duration that resembled impetigo. He had been treated with several courses of antibiotics without improvement. Biopsy showed changes consistent with allergic contact dermatitis and patch testing later revealed sensitization to benzoyl peroxide, which the patient had been using for the treatment of acne vulgaris. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Formulation and Characterization of Benzoyl Peroxide Gellified Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Naresh Kumar; Bharti, Pratibha; Mahant, Sheefali; Rao, Rekha

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out with the objective of formulating a gellified emulsion of benzoyl peroxide, an anti-acne agent. The formulations were prepared using four different vegetable oils, viz. almond oil, jojoba oil, sesame oil, and wheat germ oil, owing to their emollient properties. The idea was to overcome the skin irritation and dryness caused by benzoyl peroxide, making the formulation more tolerable. The gellified emulsions were characterized for their homogeneity, rheology, spreadability, drug content, and stability. In vitro permeation studies were performed to check the drug permeation through rat skin. The formulations were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their acute skin irritation potential. The results were compared with those obtained for the marketed formulation. Later, the histopathological examination of the skin treated with various formulations was carried out. Formulation F3 was found to have caused a very mild dysplastic change to the epidermis. On the other hand, the marketed formulation led to the greatest dysplastic change. Hence, it was concluded that formulation F3, containing sesame oil (6%w/w), was the optimized formulation. It exhibited the maximum drug release and anti-microbial activity, in addition to the least skin irritation potential. PMID:23264949

  4. Rapid detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by using Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Dhakal, Sagar; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Benzoyl peroxide is a common flour additive that improves the whiteness of flour and the storage properties of flour products. However, benzoyl peroxide adversely affects the nutritional content of flour, and excess consumption causes nausea, dizziness, other poisoning, and serious liver damage. This study was focus on detection of the benzoyl peroxide added in wheat flour. A Raman scattering spectroscopy system was used to acquire spectral signal from sample data and identify benzoyl peroxide based on Raman spectral peak position. The optical devices consisted of Raman spectrometer and CCD camera, 785 nm laser module, optical fiber, prober, and a translation stage to develop a real-time, nondestructive detection system. Pure flour, pure benzoyl peroxide and different concentrations of benzoyl peroxide mixed with flour were prepared as three sets samples to measure the Raman spectrum. These samples were placed in the same type of petri dish to maintain a fixed distance between the Raman CCD and petri dish during spectral collection. The mixed samples were worked by pretreatment of homogenization and collected multiple sets of data of each mixture. The exposure time of this experiment was set at 0.5s. The Savitzky Golay (S-G) algorithm and polynomial curve-fitting method was applied to remove the fluorescence background from the Raman spectrum. The Raman spectral peaks at 619 cm-1, 848 cm-1, 890 cm-1, 1001 cm-1, 1234 cm-1, 1603cm-1, 1777cm-1 were identified as the Raman fingerprint of benzoyl peroxide. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 1001 cm-1 and log values of benzoyl peroxide concentrations, the chemical concentration prediction model was developed. This research demonstrated that Raman detection system could effectively and rapidly identify benzoyl peroxide adulteration in wheat flour. The experimental result is promising and the system with further modification can be applicable for more products in near

  5. Remediation of Contaminated Soils by Thermal Desorption; Effect of Benzoyl Peroxide Addition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštánek, František; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Maléterová, Ywetta; Demnerová, K.; Kaštánek, Petr; Šolcová, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, JUL 1 (2016), s. 309-313 ISSN 0959-6526 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04020700 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : soil * hydrocarbons * benzoyl peroxide Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 5.715, year: 2016

  6. Sensory and Functionality Differences of Whey Protein Isolate Bleached by Hydrogen or Benzoyl Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tucker J; Foegeding, E Allen; Drake, MaryAnne

    2015-10-01

    Whey protein is a highly functional food ingredient used in a wide variety of applications. A large portion of fluid whey produced in the United States is derived from Cheddar cheese manufacture and contains annatto (norbixin), and therefore must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare sensory and functionality differences between whey protein isolate (WPI) bleached by benzoyl peroxide (BP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP). HP and BP bleached WPI and unbleached controls were manufactured in triplicate. Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were conducted to determine flavor differences between treatments. Functionality differences were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, protein solubility, SDS-PAGE, and effect of NaCl concentration on gelation relative to an unbleached control. HP bleached WPI had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation and sulfur containing volatile compounds than both BP and unbleached WPI (P protein loss at pH 4.6 of WPI decreased by bleaching with either hydrogen peroxide or benzoyl peroxide (P whey with either BP or HP resulted in protein degradation, which likely contributed to functionality differences. These results demonstrate that bleaching has flavor effects as well as effects on many of the functionality characteristics of whey proteins. Whey protein isolate (WPI) is often used for its functional properties, but the effect of oxidative bleaching chemicals on the functional properties of WPI is not known. This study identifies the effects of hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl peroxide on functional and flavor characteristics of WPI bleached by hydrogen and benzoyl peroxide and provides insights for the product applications which may benefit from bleaching. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Profile of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% aqueous gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common and chronic skin disease, and is a frequent source of morbidity for affected patients. Treatment of acne vulgaris is often difficult due to the multifactorial nature of this disease. Combination therapy, such as that containing clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide, has become the standard of care. Several fixed formulations of clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide of varying concentrations are available and have been used with considerable success. The major limitation is irritation and dryness from higher concentrations of benzoyl peroxide, and a combination providing optimal efficacy and tolerability has yet to be determined. Recently, a clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide 3.75% fixed combination formulation was developed. Studies have suggested that this formulation may be a safe and effective treatment regimen for patients with acne vulgaris. Here, we provide a brief review of acne pathogenesis, benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin, and profile a new Clindamycin-BP 3.75% fixed combination gel for the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne vulgaris. PMID:26604811

  8. Comparative evaluation of retinoic acid, benzoyl peroxide and erythromycin lotion in acne vulgarils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety three patients suffering from acne vulgaris were treated with 0.05% retinoic acid (23 patients, 10% benzyoyl peroxide (24 patients, 2% erythromycin lotin (25 patients and 50% glycerine in methylated spirit (21 patients used as a control, for a period of 6 weeks. The patients were evaluated at 2 weeks and 6 weeks by spot counting of the lesions and diagrammatic representations. Good to excellent results were obtained in 69.6% of patients of erythromycin lotion. Retinoic acid was more effective in reducing noninflammatory lesions (75.2% whereas inflammatory lesions showed better response (73.6% with erythromycin lotion and benzoyl peroxide was almost equally effective in both types of lesions.

  9. Comparison of a chlorhexidine and a benzoyl peroxide shampoo as sole treatment in canine superficial pyoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, A; Cobb, M A; Bond, R

    2011-09-03

    The clinical and antibacterial efficacy of two shampoos used as a sole antibacterial treatment in dogs with superficial pyoderma were investigated and compared. In a randomised, partially blinded study, a 3 per cent chlorhexidine gluconate shampoo (Chlorhex 3; Leo Animal Health) was compared against a 2.5 per cent benzoyl peroxide shampoo (Paxcutol; Virbac) in 22 dogs with superficial pyoderma. Dogs were washed two to three times weekly with a 10-minute contact time over 21 days. Clinical scores and bacterial counts were assessed on days 1, 8 and 22 and compared within and between treatment groups; overall response was assessed at the end of the study. Twenty dogs completed the study; 15 (68.2 per cent) showed an overall clinical improvement and the clinical signs resolved in three chlorhexidine-treated dogs. In the chlorhexidine-treated group, scores for papules/pustules (P<0.001), investigator-assessed pruritus (P=0.003), total bacterial counts (P=0.003) and counts for coagulase-positive staphylococci (P=0.003) were reduced after three weeks. Scores and bacterial counts did not vary significantly in the benzoyl peroxide-treated group.

  10. Efficacy of Intense-pulsed Light Therapy with Topical Benzoyl Peroxide 5% versus Benzoyl Peroxide 5% Alone in Mild-to-moderate Acne Vulgaris: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Gholami, Maryam; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Faghihi, Gita; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a disease of pilosebaceous unit with multifactorial pathogenesis and threats patients' social functioning. There is a growing research to find faster, more effective, and easy to use treatments. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of benzoyl peroxide 5% (BP) with and without concomitant intense-pulsed light (IPL) therapy in mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris. In this controlled trial, 58 eligible patients with mild-to-moderate acne and Fitzpatrick skin phototype III and IV were randomly allocated to two groups. All patients were asked to use a thin layer of BP every night. The IPL therapy was administered at the end of first, 2 nd , and 3 rd months. Acne Global Severity Scale (AGSS), Acne Severity Index (ASI), and total lesion counting (TLC) along with patient satisfaction were recorded. Patients were also examined 1 month after the final therapeutic visit. The IPL group showed greater reduction in AGSS ( P < 0.001) and TLC ( P = 0.005) than the control group. However, the difference in ASI was not significant ( P = 0.12). Patients in IPL groups were more satisfied than control group ( P < 0.001). Adding IPL to BP can result better response to BP alone. In acne treatment, combination therapy such as IPL and other topical agents should be kept in mind.

  11. Mechanisms of DNA damage by the tumor promoter and progressor benzoyl peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swauger, J.E.; Dolan, P.M.; Zweier, J.L.; Kensler, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BzPO), a tumor promoter and progressor in mouse skin, produces strand breaks in DNA of exposed cells. Previously we have reported that the metabolism of BzPO in keratinocytes proceeds via the initial cleavage of the peroxide bond, yielding benzoyloxyl radicals which, in turn, can fragment to form phenyl radicals and carbon dioxide. Benzoic acid, the product of hydrogen abstraction by the benzoyloxyl radical, is the major stable metabolite of BzPO produced by keratinocytes. In the present study we have examined the capacity of BzPO to generate strand scissions in φX-174 plasmid DNA. DNA damage was dose-dependent over a concentration range of 10-1000 μM BzPO and was dependent on the presence of copper but not other transition state metals. By contrast, benzoic acid did not produce DNA damage in this system. The inclusion of spin trapping agents (PBN, DBNBS), radical scavenging agents (Nal, GSH), or the copper chelator o-phenanthroline in incubations was found to significantly reduce the extent of DNA damage. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that the primary radical trapped was the benzoyloxyl radical, implying a role for this radical in the generation of the observed DNA damage. Collectively these observations suggest BzPO may be activated to DNA damaging intermediates in keratinocytes via metal-catalyzed cleavage of the peroxide bond resulting in the formation of the benzoyloxyl radical. Covalent modification of DNA was not observed when [ 14 C]BzPO was incubated with calf thymus DNA in the presence of copper. Overall, these results suggest that BzPO induces DNA damage via benzoyloxyl radical mediated proton abstraction from the DNA strand and the adduct formation with DNA is unlikely to occur

  12. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of topical clindamycin and 5% benzoyl peroxide with nadifloxacin cream and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel in the treatment of acne vulgaris and assessment of the effects of these treatments on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslıhan Kırkağaç

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disase of the pilosebaceous unit. Topical antibiotics and anti-inflammatory treatment are used for mild and moderate acne. Clindamycin is frequently used for acne treatment, altough nadifloxacin is a relatively new agent. There are few studies evaluating nadifloxacin efficacy. It's impact on quality of life has not been determined previously. In this study, it is aimed to compare the effect of these two agents, and to evaluate the effect of these treatments on quality of life. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with mild-moderate acne vulgaris were divided in two groups of 40 people that had no difference in terms of age, gender and acne severity. The combination of topical clindamycin and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel twice a day was given to group 1 for 12 weeks. The combination of nadifloxacin cream and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel twice a day was given to group 2 for 12 weeks. The number of the inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions were recorded at baseline and on weeks 2, 4, 8, 12 and side effects were recorded and evaluated. Global improvement was evaluated separately by patients and doctor after the treatment. Before and after the treatment, the quality of life of the patients were evaluated with Skindex-29. Results: Both treatment group regimens were significantly effective on inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions and were well tolerated by patients in terms of side effects. It was also observed that there was statistically significant recovery after treatment in terms of clinical severity and quality of life. There was not any statistically significant difference between two treatment methods in terms of effectiveness, side effect and quality of life. Conclusion: Nadifloxacin and 5% benzoyl peroxide combination is effective in the treatment and improvement of quality of life in acne patients.

  13. Simple and fast fluorescence detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam based on consecutive chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Shi Wen; Li Zhao; Ma Huimin; Liu Yang; Zhang Jinghua; Liu Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple and fast method for fluorescence detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam (1) is proposed based on consecutive chemical reactions. Highlights: ► Benzoyl peroxide can oxidize Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ . ► Fe 3+ selectively induces the opening of rhodamine spirolactam ring. ► The two reactions led to the development of a new fluorescent method for benzoyl peroxide. ► The method is simple and fast, and is used to detect benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour. - Abstract: Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a brightener is often added to wheat flour, and excessive use of this food additive is receiving increasing concern. Herein, a simple and fast method for fluorescence detection of BPO is proposed based on consecutive chemical reactions. In this approach, BPO first oxidizes Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ and the resulting Fe 3+ then induces the opening of the spirolactam ring of a new rhodamine derivative, N-methoxy rhodamine-6G spirolactam, switching on fluorescence of the detection system. More importantly, the fluorescence response of the reaction system to BPO is rather rapid and sensitive, with a detection limit of 6 mg kg −1 (k = 3), which makes it to be of great potential use in food safety analysis. The applicability of the proposed method has been successfully demonstrated on the determination of BPO in wheat flour samples.

  14. Randomized, Observer-blind, Split-face Compatibility Study with Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2%/Benzoyl Peroxide 3.75% gel and Facial Foundation Makeup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Neal; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    Cosmetic compatibility in the treatment of acne is an important issue significantly impacting quality of life, but often overlooked, as dermatologists commonly recommended avoidance of cosmetic foundations when treating adult female patients. Fixed combinations of clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide are widely used in the treatment of acne, but little is known about the impact of their concomitant use with facial foundation. To assess the compatibility of clindamycin phosphate 1. 2%/benzoyl peroxide 3. 75% gel with foundation makeup for up to six hours after application. Twenty-nine female subjects applied makeup to their face after randomly applying clindamycin phosphate 1. 2%/benzoyl peroxide 3. 75% gel to one side of the face. Investigator and subject self- assessment included facial skin attributes, facial tolerability, and cosmetic compatibility post-application and at Hour 6; as well as cutaneous tolerability. No statistical difference was noted between the treated and untreated side of the face in terms of coverage, blotchiness, appearance, skin tone, or visual smoothness. Tolerability was excellent, with no erythema, edema, dryness, and peeling post-makeup application. For both the treated and untreated side, there was a slight lack of improvement in cosmetic appearance six hours post-makeup application. Clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide 3. 75% gel was shown to have excellent cosmetic compatibility with facial foundation.

  15. Formulation and evaluation of a topical niosomal gel containing a combination of benzoyl peroxide and tretinoin for antiacne activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A skin disease, like acne, is very common and normally happens to everyone at least once in their lifetime. The structure of the stratum corneum is often compared with a brick wall, with corneocytes surrounded by the mortar of the intercellular lipid lamellae. One of the best options for successful drug delivery to the affected area of skin is the use of elastic vesicles (niosomes) which can be transported through the skin through channel-like structures. In this study, a combination of tretinoin (keratolytic agent) and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) (a potent antibacterial) was given by using niosomes as promising carriers for the effective treatment of acne by acting on a pathogenic site. In this section, niosomal gel formulation encapsulated drugs have been evaluated for in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, for their predetermined characteristics; and finally the stability of the niosome gel was tested at different temperature conditions for understanding of the storage conditions required for maintaining the quality of formulation attributes. The prepared niosome was found to be in the range of 531 nm with a zeta potential of −43 mV; the entrapment efficiencies of tretinoin (TRA) and BPO niosomes were found to be 96.25%±0.56% and 98.75%±1.25%, respectively. The permeated amount of TRA and BPO from the niosomal gel after 24 hours was calculated as 6.25±0.14 μg/cm2 and 5.04±0.014 μg/cm2, respectively. A comparative drug retention study in Wistar rat skin using cream, an alcoholic solution, and a niosomal gel showed 11.54 μg, 2.68 μg, and 15.54 μg amounts of TRA and 68.85 μg, 59.98 μg, and 143.78 μg amounts of BPO were retained in the layers of skin, respectively. In vivo studies of the niosomal gel and antiacne cream of TRA and BPO showed that the niosomal gel was more efficacious than the antiacne cream because niosomal gels with a 4.16-fold lower dose of BPO provided the same therapeutic index at targeted sites in comparison to the antiacne cream. PMID

  16. Formulation and evaluation of a topical niosomal gel containing a combination of benzoyl peroxide and tretinoin for antiacne activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ankush Gupta,1,* Sima Singh,1,* Niranjan G Kotla,1 Thomas J Webster2,3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A skin disease, like acne, is very common and normally happens to everyone at least once in their lifetime. The structure of the stratum corneum is often compared with a brick wall, with corneocytes surrounded by the mortar of the intercellular lipid lamellae. One of the best options for successful drug delivery to the affected area of skin is the use of elastic vesicles (niosomes which can be transported through the skin through channel-like structures. In this study, a combination of tretinoin (keratolytic agent and benzoyl peroxide (BPO (a potent antibacterial was given by using niosomes as promising carriers for the effective treatment of acne by acting on a pathogenic site. In this section, niosomal gel formulation encapsulated drugs have been evaluated for in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, for their predetermined characteristics; and finally the stability of the niosome gel was tested at different temperature conditions for understanding of the storage conditions required for maintaining the quality of formulation attributes. The prepared niosome was found to be in the range of 531 nm with a zeta potential of -43 mV; the entrapment efficiencies of tretinoin (TRA and BPO niosomes were found to be 96.25%±0.56% and 98.75%±1.25%, respectively. The permeated amount of TRA and BPO from the niosomal gel after 24 hours was calculated as 6.25±0.14 µg/cm2 and 5.04±0.014 µg/cm2, respectively. A comparative drug retention study in Wistar rat skin using cream, an alcoholic solution, and a niosomal gel showed 11.54 µg, 2.68 µg, and 15.54 µg

  17. Formulation and evaluation of a topical niosomal gel containing a combination of benzoyl peroxide and tretinoin for antiacne activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A skin disease, like acne, is very common and normally happens to everyone at least once in their lifetime. The structure of the stratum corneum is often compared with a brick wall, with corneocytes surrounded by the mortar of the intercellular lipid lamellae. One of the best options for successful drug delivery to the affected area of skin is the use of elastic vesicles (niosomes) which can be transported through the skin through channel-like structures. In this study, a combination of tretinoin (keratolytic agent) and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) (a potent antibacterial) was given by using niosomes as promising carriers for the effective treatment of acne by acting on a pathogenic site. In this section, niosomal gel formulation encapsulated drugs have been evaluated for in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, for their predetermined characteristics; and finally the stability of the niosome gel was tested at different temperature conditions for understanding of the storage conditions required for maintaining the quality of formulation attributes. The prepared niosome was found to be in the range of 531 nm with a zeta potential of -43 mV; the entrapment efficiencies of tretinoin (TRA) and BPO niosomes were found to be 96.25%±0.56% and 98.75%±1.25%, respectively. The permeated amount of TRA and BPO from the niosomal gel after 24 hours was calculated as 6.25±0.14 μg/cm(2) and 5.04±0.014 μg/cm(2), respectively. A comparative drug retention study in Wistar rat skin using cream, an alcoholic solution, and a niosomal gel showed 11.54 μg, 2.68 μg, and 15.54 μg amounts of TRA and 68.85 μg, 59.98 μg, and 143.78 μg amounts of BPO were retained in the layers of skin, respectively. In vivo studies of the niosomal gel and antiacne cream of TRA and BPO showed that the niosomal gel was more efficacious than the antiacne cream because niosomal gels with a 4.16-fold lower dose of BPO provided the same therapeutic index at targeted sites in comparison to the antiacne cream.

  18. Sub-group Analyses from a Trial of a Fixed Combination of Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2% and Benzoyl Peroxide 3.75% Gel for the Treatment of Moderate-to-severe Acne Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is commonplace and can be difficult to manage. Providing an effective and well-tolerated treatment may lead to improved adherence, increased patient satisfaction, and improved clinical outcomes. Methods: A review of efficacy, safety, and cutaneous tolerability of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel in 498 patients with moderate-to-severe acne vulgaris enrolled in a multicenter Phase III study randomized to receive active or vehicle once daily for 12 weeks, including the most recent post-hoc analyses. Results: Significantly superior reductions in lesion counts were observed with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel from Week 4, with median percent reductions in inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions from baseline of 68.4 and 57.9 percent, respectively (bothpacne vulgaris patients treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel achieved ≥2-grade improvement from baseline in their Evaluator’s Global Severity Score, and almost a third of the adolescent acne vulgaris patients (32.4%) achieved at least a marked improvement in their acne vulgaris as early as Week 2. In adult female acne overall treatments success was achieved in 52.7 percent of patients treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel. Overall, and in the specific subpopulations, clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel was well-tolerated with a similar adverse event profile to vehicle. Limitations: Post-hoc analyses from a single clinical trial with demographic imbalances that could potentially confound the results. Conclusion: Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel appears to be effective in treating acne across various clinically relevant sub-groups. PMID:26705445

  19. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel group study to compare relative efficacies of the topical gels 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide and 0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4% in the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Lynde, Charles W; Kunynetz, Rod A W; Amin, Smita; Choi, Ken; Goldstein, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Combination treatments for acne vulgaris, such as Benzamycin (3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide) and Stievamycin (0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4%), reduce bacterial growth, which contributes to the inflammatory lesions typical of adolescent acne, and also decrease the epidermal cell compaction which may form the characteristic noninflammatory comedone. Both agents contain erythromycin to reduce the growth of Propionibacterium acnes in skin. Benzoyl peroxide has antibiotic activity as well as anticomedogenic properties. Tretinoin may increase the turnover of epidermal cells and loosen the cells compacted to form comedones. A combination preparation containing the two antibiotics may reduce the development of resistance; the combination preparation containing tretinoin and erythromycin will have an antibiotic effect as well as acting on differentiation. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study compared the effectiveness of 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide and 0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4%, each applied twice daily in patients with moderate acne vulgaris. Overall physician and patient ratings of severity of acne symptoms were performed at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12. At baseline the two treatment groups had similar disease severity. The number of papules, pustules, and comedones was reduced in both treatment groups at week 12, and the reductions were not significantly different between the two comparators. Global physician rating of improvement was significantly higher in the 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide group compared with the 0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4% group; however, there was no significant difference in global patient ratings between the two treatment groups. An aggregate score was produced, for both physician rating and patient rating, by adding up individual symptom severity ratings. Compared with 0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4%, 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide provided significantly greater reduction

  20. Dapsone gel 5% in combination with adapalene gel 0.1%, benzoyl peroxide gel 4% or moisturizer for the treatment of acne vulgaris: a 12-week, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Alan B; Shalita, Alan; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Abramovits, William; Lucky, Anne; Garrett, Steven

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of dapsone gel 5% in the treatment of acne when used in combination with adapalene gel 0.1%, benzoyl peroxide gel 4% or moisturizer. This was a twelve-week, randomized, double-blind study. Patients aged 12 years and older (n=301) applied dapsone gel twice daily and were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to one of three additional treatments, applied once daily. By week 12, dapsone gel combined with any of the three additional treatments reduced the mean number of inflammatory lesions. However, the authors did not detect a significant difference in the reduction of inflammatory lesions when dapsone was used in combination with adapalene gel or with benzoyl peroxide gel compared to the dapsone plus moisturizer combination group (P=0.052 for both versus moisturizer combination). Patients treated with dapsone gel combined with adapalene showed a significantly better response in reduction in non-inflammatory and total acne lesion count than those who received the moisturizer combination. Local adverse reactions in all three treatment groups were minimal and generally mild in severity. Dapsone gel in combination with adapalene gel or benzoyl peroxide gel is safe and well tolerated for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  1. Systemic exposure to benzoic acid and hippuric acid following topical application of clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 3% fixed-dose combination gel in Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Hiroko; Takahashi, Naoki; Saenz, Alessandra Alio; Wakamatsu, Akira; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nakahara, Norie; Hasegawa, Setsuo

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 3% fixed-dose combination gel (CLDM/BPO3%) is a topical product for the treatment of acne vulgaris. In this study, plasma and urine concentrations of benzoic acid (BA) and hippuric acid (HA) were analyzed to estimate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of BPO after application of CLDM/BPO3% twice-daily for 7 days in Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Seven-day repeated application of CLDM/BPO3% appears to be safe in this patient population. Concentrations of plasma and urine BA were below the limit of quantification before and after repeated application in most of the 12 adult male patients. Mean difference in Cmax and AUC0-last for plasma HA indicated increased exposures after repeated application, but with wide 90% confidence intervals. Mean Ae0-12 for urine HA was similar before and after repeated application. Repeated application of CLDM/BPO3% is thus unlikely to result in accumulation of BA and HA. The study suggests negligible systemic exposure to BPO metabolites from CLDM/BPO3% after 7-day repeated application in male patients with acne vulgaris. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Fixed-Dose Combination Gel of Adapalene and Benzoyl Peroxide plus Doxycycline 100 mg versus Oral Isotretinoin for the Treatment of Severe Acne: Efficacy and Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Pete; Meckfessel, Matthew H; Preston, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin disease with a high prevalence. Left untreated or inadequately treated, acne vulgaris can lead to psychological and physical scarring, as well as to unnecessary medical expenses. Oral isotretinoin is an effective treatment for severe resistant nodular and conglobate acne vulgaris. A regimen consisting of a fixed-dose combination of adapalene and benzoyl peroxide gel, 0.1%/2.5% (A-BPO) with oral doxycycline 100 mg (A-BPO/D) has been demonstrated to be efficacious and well tolerated in patients with severe acne and may be an alternative to oral isotretinoin for some patients with severe acne. The objective of this analysis was to compare the relative efficacy and associated costs of A-BPO/D versus oral isotretinoin. In this analysis, comparisons of relative efficacy were made using previously published studies involving similar patient populations with severe acne that warrant the use of oral isotretinoin. The pricing for oral doxycycline and oral isotretinoin was estimated based on the maximum allowable cost from 9 states, and the pricing for A-BPO was calculated as the range between the average wholesale price and the wholesale acquisition cost. For this analysis, 2 treatment models were generated to compare costs: (1) a basic treatment model that examined the costs of an initial regimen of either A-BPO/D or oral isotretinoin without considering probable outcomes, and (2) a long-term model that factored in likely treatment outcomes and subsequent treatments into associated costs. The basic treatment model assumed that patients would be prescribed a single regimen of A-BPO/D for 12 weeks or oral isotretinoin for 20 weeks. The long-term model considered the probability of each treatment successfully managing patients' acne, as well as likely additional regimens of A-BPO monotherapy or an additional regimen of oral isotretinoin. As a result of different treatment durations, the costs for each treatment were normalized to weekly cost of

  3. The clinical impact of vehicle technology using a patented formulation of benzoyl peroxide 5%/clindamycin 1% gel: comparative assessments of skin tolerability and evaluation of combination use with a topical retinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Tanghetti, Emil

    2006-02-01

    A major challenge encountered in clinical practice in patients with acne vulgaris is irritation related to topical medications used for treatment. Advances in vehicle technology have improved formulations containing active ingredients known to produce irritation in some patients, such as benzoyl peroxide (BP) and topical retinoids. Clinical studies, including combination therapy studies have demonstrated that certain additives, such as silicates and specific humectants, reduce irritation by maintaining barrier integrity. A patented gel formulation of BP 5%/clindamycin phosphate 1% (clindamycin) containing dimethicone and glycerin has been studied both as a monotherapy and in combination with topical retinoid use. This article evaluates specific vehicle additives included in this gel formulation and explains their role in reducing irritation. Data from clinical trials utilizing this technology in acne management are also reviewed.

  4. An aqueous gel fixed combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 3.75% for the once-daily treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David M; Rich, Phoebe; Cook-Bolden, Fran E; Korotzer, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a fixed combination clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 3.75% (clindamycin-BP 3.75%) aqueous gel in moderate to severe acne vulgaris. A total of 498 patients, 12-40 years of age, were randomized to receive clindamycin-BP 3.75% or vehicle in a double-blind, controlled 12-week, 2-arm study evaluating safety and efficacy using inflammatory and noninflammatory lesion counts, Evaluator Global Severity Scores (EGSS) and subject self-assessment (SSA). In addition, patients completed a patient satisfaction survey (PSS), acne-specific QoL questionnaire, and assessed their facial skin for shininess/oiliness. Clindamycin-BP 3.75% demonstrated statistical superiority to vehicle in reducing both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions and acne severity. Clindamycin-BP 3.75% showed greater efficacy relative to vehicle in assessments of skin oiliness, SSA and PSS. No substantive differences were seen in cutaneous tolerability among treatment groups and no patients discontinued treatment with Clindamycin-BP 3.75% because of adverse events. Data from controlled studies may differ from clinical practice. It is not possible to determine the contributions from the individual active ingredients. Clindamycin-BP 3.75% provides statistically significant greater efficacy than vehicle with a favorable safety and tolerability profile.

  5. Twelve-week, multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative phase II/III study of benzoyl peroxide gel in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Igarashi, Atsuyuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-07-01

    A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel, administrated once daily for 12 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Efficacy was evaluated by counting all inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. All 609 subjects were randomly assigned to receive the study products (2.5% and 5% BPO and placebo), and 607 subjects were included in the full analysis set, 544 in the per protocol set and 609 in the safety analyses. The median rates of reduction from baseline to the last evaluation of the inflammatory lesion counts, the primary end-point, in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 72.7% and 75.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that in the placebo group (41.7%). No deaths or other serious adverse events were observed. The incidences of adverse events in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 56.4% and 58.8%, respectively; a higher incidence than in the placebo group, but there was no obvious difference between the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Most adverse events did not lead to study product discontinuation. The results suggested that both 2.5% and 5% BPO are useful for the treatment of acne vulgaris. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Open-label, randomized, multicenter, phase III study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of benzoyl peroxide gel in long-term use in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Makoto; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-06-01

    An open-label, randomized, multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of long-term use of 2.5% and 5% benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gels administrated once daily for 52 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. The efficacy of the study drugs was evaluated by counting inflammatory lesions and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. In total, 458 subjects were included in the efficacy and safety analyses. The total lesion count, the efficacy end-point, was similarly changed both in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups over the course of the study. The median rates of reduction from baseline to week 12 were approximately 65%. Thereafter, the counts were maintained at a reduced level without increasing until week 52. The median rates at week 52 were approximately 80%. Similar trends were observed for inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts. Bacteriological evaluation indicated similar distribution of the minimum inhibitory concentration of each of the antibacterial drugs against Propionibacterium acnes between the values at baseline and at week 52, suggesting that long-term use did not result in changes in the drug sensitivity. The incidence of adverse events was 84.0% in the 2.5% BPO group and 87.2% in the 5% BPO group. Many of the adverse events occurred within the first month and were mild or moderate in severity and transient. The results suggest that both 2.5% and 5% BPO gels are effective and safe for long-term treatment of patients with acne vulgaris. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. Prevention and Reduction of Atrophic Acne Scars with Adapalene 0.3%/Benzoyl Peroxide 2.5% Gel in Subjects with Moderate or Severe Facial Acne: Results of a 6-Month Randomized, Vehicle-Controlled Trial Using Intra-Individual Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréno, Brigitte; Bissonnette, Robert; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Barankin, Benjamin; Lynde, Charles; Kerrouche, Nabil; Tan, Jerry

    2018-04-01

    Very few clinical trials have investigated the effect of topical acne treatment on scarring. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of adapalene 0.3%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel (A0.3/BPO2.5) in atrophic acne scar formation in patients with acne. In this multicenter, randomized, investigator-blinded, vehicle-controlled study, subjects with moderate or severe facial acne (Investigator's Global Assessment [IGA] score 3 or 4; ≥ 25 inflammatory lesions; ten or more atrophic acne scars) applied A0.3/BPO2.5 or vehicle daily per half face for 24 weeks. Subjects with acne requiring systemic treatment were excluded. Assessments included investigator atrophic acne scar count, Scar Global Assessment (SGA), acne lesion count, IGA, skin roughness and skin texture, subject self-assessment of clinical acne-related scars and satisfaction questionnaire, tolerability, and safety. Included subjects (n = 67) had mainly moderate acne (92.5% IGA 3); mean scores at baseline were approximately 40 acne lesions and 12 scars per half face. By week 24, the change from baseline in total scar count was - 15.5% for A0.3/BPO2.5 versus  + 14.4% for vehicle (approximately 30% difference), with a mean of 9.5 scars versus 13.3 per half face, respectively (p vehicle (p vehicle (p vehicle side, most commonly skin irritation (14.9 vs. 6%, respectively). Topical A0.3/BPO2.5 prevented and reduced atrophic scar formation. Scar count increased with vehicle (+ 14.4%) but decreased with A0.3/BPO2.5 (- 15.5%) over 24 weeks. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02735421.

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION CHEMOSELECTIVE C-BENZOYLATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BCSE

    Department of Chemistry, Savitribaiphule Pune University, Pune 411007, India ... Crafts acylation or benzoylation reactions employ acid chlorides and Lewis acids ... cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor [14] and cysteine protease modulator.

  9. Benzoyl peroxide-induced damage to DNA and its components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazlewood, C; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    of base adducts, though the exact identity of the species detected in these cases could not be determined due to the complexity of the spectra. Hydrogen abstraction at the sugar-phosphate backbone is also believed to occur with these substrates as strand breakage is observed; the extent of the latter...

  10. N-Benzoyl-2-nitrobenzenesulfonamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Suchetan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C13H10N2O5S, the N—C bond in the C—SO2—NH—C segment has gauche torsion angles with respect to the S=O bonds. The conformation between the N—H bond and the ortho-nitro group in the sulfonyl benzene ring is syn. The molecule is twisted at the S—N bond with a torsion angle of −63.4 (2°. The sulfonyl benzene ring is tilted by 77.1 (1° relative to the —SO2—NH—C—O segment. The dihedral angle between the sulfonyl and the benzoyl benzene rings is 88.6 (1°. In the crystal, pairs of N—H...O(S hydrogen bonds link the molecules into inversion dimers, which are linked by weak C—H...O and C—H...π interactions along the b axis.

  11. Microwave-assisted facile and rapid Friedel-Crafts benzoylation of arenes catalysed by bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phoung Hoang; Hansen, Poul Erik; Pham, Thuy Than

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activity of metal triflates was investigated in Friedel–Crafts benzoylation under microwave irradiation. Friedel–Crafts benzoylation with benzoyl chloride of a variety of arenes containing electron-rich and electron-poor rings using bismuth triflate under microwave irradiation is de...

  12. Photocarcinogenesis and toxicity of benzoyl peroxide in hairless mice after simulated solar radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina M; Philipsen, Peter A; Poulsen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    with UV radiation. BPO can promote skin tumorigenesis in a mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis model. As acne vulgaris is frequently localized on sun-exposed areas, we investigated whether BPO or BPO-clin accelerates photocarcinogenesis in combination with simulated solar radiation (SSR) in 12 groups of 25...

  13. Photocarcinogenesis and toxicity of benzoyl peroxide in hairless mice after simulated solar radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina M; Philipsen, Peter A; Poulsen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    hairless female C3.Cg/TifBomTac-immunocompetent mice. BPO or BPO-clin was applied topically to the back five times each week, followed by SSR three times each week (2, 3, or 4 standard erythema doses) 3-4 h later, for 365 days or until death. Generally BPO and BPO-clin did not accelerate the time to first...

  14. Polymerization of aniline in an organic peroxide system by the inverted emulsion process

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Palle Swapna; Sathyanarayana, DN; Palaniappan, S

    2002-01-01

    An inverted emulsion process for the synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline using a novel oxidizing agent, namely benzoyl peroxide, is described. The polymerization is carried out in a nonpolar solvent in the presence of a functionalized protonic acid (sulfosalicylic acid) as the dopant and an emulsifier (sodium lauryl sulfate). The influence of synthesis conditions such as the duration of the reaction, temperature, concentration of the reactants, etc., on the properties of polyanili...

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of myosin subfragment-one-with 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, R.

    1985-01-01

    The photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz 2 ATP) contains the photoreactive benzophenone group esterified at the 2' or 3' hydroxyl groups of ribose. MgBz 2 ADP has a single binding site on skeletal myosin chymotryptic subfragment-one (SF 1 ) with a binding constant of 3.2 x 10 5 M -1 . Bz 2 ATP is also a substrate for the ATPase activity of SF 1 in the presence of different cations. The irradiation of SF 1 with [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP photoinactivates the ATPase activity with concomitant incorporation of the analogue into the enzyme. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photolabeled SF 1 after milk trypsin digestion shows that all three tryptic peptides, 25 K, 50K, and 20 K, and both light chains are labeled. The presence of ATP during irradiation reduces labeling of the 50 K peptide only indicating that the other peptides are non-specifically labeled. To reduce the non-specific labeling [ 3 H]Bz 2 ATP is trapped on SF 1 by cross-linking the two reactive thiols, SH 1 and SH 2 , by N,N'-p-phenylene dimaleimide or Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline complexes. The Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline modified [ 14 C]Bz 2 ATP-SF 1 , after proteolytic digestion, yields five labeled peptides which were purified by gel filtration and high performance liquid chromatography

  16. STUDIES ON RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF METHYL METHACRYLATE INITIATED WITH ORGANIC PEROXIDE-AMINE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Kunyuan; SHUI Li; FENG Xinde

    1984-01-01

    Radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) initiated with various diacyl peroxideamine systems was studied. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and lauroyl peroxide (LPO) were used as diacyl peroxide component, N,N-dimethyl aniline (DMA) and its para substituted derivatives, i.e., N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMT), p-hydroxymethyl-N,N-dimethyl aniline (HDMA), p-nitro-N,N-dimethyl aniline (NDMA) and p-dimethylamino benzaldehyde (DMAB) were used as amine components. It was found that the peroxide-DMT systems give higher rates of bulk polymerization Rp of MMA than the organic hydroperoxide-DMT systems with the following descending order BPO-DMT>LPO-DMT>CHP (cumene hydroperoxide)-DMT>TBH (tert-butyl hydroperoxide)-DMT.The aromatic tertiary amines possess obvious structural effect on the Rp values in the diacyl peroxideamine system. The overall activation energy of MMA polymerization was determined and the kinetics of polymerization of MMA initiated with BPO-DMT system was investigated.

  17. Regioselective Benzoylation of Diols and Carbohydrates by Catalytic Amounts of Organobase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuchao; Hou, Chenxi; Ren, Jingli; Xin, Xiaoting; Xu, Hengfu; Pei, Yuxin; Dong, Hai; Pei, Zhichao

    2016-05-17

    A novel metal-free organobase-catalyzed regioselective benzoylation of diols and carbohydrates has been developed. Treatment of diol and carbohydrate substrates with 1.1 equiv. of 1-benzoylimidazole and 0.2 equiv. of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) in MeCN under mild conditions resulted in highly regioselective benzoylation for the primary hydroxyl group. Importantly, compared to most commonly used protecting bulky groups for primary hydroxyl groups, the benzoyl protective group offers a new protection strategy.

  18. Benzoylated Uronic Acid Building Blocks and Synthesis of N-Uronate Conjugates of Lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bård Helge Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemoenzymatic approach towards benzoylated uronic acid building blocks has been investigated starting with benzoylated hexapyranosides using regioselective C-6 enzymatic hydrolysis as the key step. Two of the building blocks were reacted with the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine. Glucuronidation of lamotrigine using methyl (2,3,4-tri-O-benzoyl-α-D-glycopyranosyl bromideuronate proceeded to give the N2-conjugate. However, lamotrigine-N2-glucuronide was most efficiently synthesised from methyl (2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl bromideuronate. Employing nitromethane as solvent with CdCO3 as a base lamotrigine-N2 glucuronide was prepared in a high yield (41%. Also methyl (2,3-di-O-benzoyl-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-α-D-glucosyl bromideuronate underwent N-glucuronidation, but the product was unstable, eliminating hydrogen fluoride to give the corresponding enoate conjugate.

  19. X-ray investigations of sulfur-containing fungicides. IV. 4'-[[Benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, W M

    2001-09-01

    The conformations of the two approximately isomorphous structures 4'-[[benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(22)H(18)ClN(3)O(4)S, and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(23)H(21)N(3)O(5)S, are stabilized by resonance-assisted intramolecular hydrogen bonds linking the hydrazone moieties and sulfonyl groups. The stronger bond is observed in the former compound. The difference in electronic properties between the Cl atom and the methoxy group is too small to significantly alter the non-bonding interactions of the sulfonyl and beta-carbonyl groups.

  20. Crystalline lens radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Pasquier, D.; Castelain, B.; Lartigau, E.; Warnet, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cyto-protection reported in. vitro and in. vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cyto-protective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathione pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Arnifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radio-protectants, could be further test?r for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. (author)

  1. Determination of organic peroxides by liquid chromatography with on-line post-column ultraviolet irradiation and peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Keiyu; Thara, Ayuko; Kishikawa, Naoya; Nakashima, Kenichiro; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2003-02-14

    A HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide with peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (PO-CL) detection following on-line UV irradiation. Organic peroxides [i.e., benzoyl peroxide (BP), tert.-butyl hydroperoxide (BHP), tert.-butyl perbenzoate (BPB), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP)] were UV irradiated (254 nm, 15 W) to generate hydrogen peroxide, which was determined by PO-CL detection. The conditions for UV irradiation and PO-CL detection were optimized by a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from peroxides with on-line UV irradiation also was confirmed by the FIA system by incorporating an enzyme column reactor immobilized with catalase. The separation of four organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide by HPLC was accomplished isocratically on an ODS column within 30 min. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio=3) were 1.1 microM for hydrogen peroxide, 6.8 microM for BP, 31.3 microM for BHP, 7.5 microM for BPB and 1.3 microM for CHP. The proposed method was applied to the determination of BP in wheat flour.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  3. AuBr3-catalyzed azidation of per-O-acetylated and per-O-benzoylated sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Jayashree; Hotha, Srinivas; Vangala, Madhuri

    2018-01-01

    Herein we report, for the first time, the successful anomeric azidation of per- O -acetylated and per- O -benzoylated sugars by catalytic amounts of oxophilic AuBr 3 in good to excellent yields. The method is applicable to a wide range of easily accessible per- O -acetylated and per- O -benzoylated sugars. While reaction with per- O -acetylated and per- O -benzoylated monosaccharides was complete within 1-3 h at room temperature, the per- O -benzoylated disaccharides needed 2-3 h of heating at 55 °C.

  4. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  5. Structure of 1,5-Anhydro-D-Fructose: X-ray Analysis of Crystalline Acetylated Dimeric Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundt, Inge; Andersen, Søren Møller; Marcussen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Acetylation of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose under acidic conditions gave two crystalline acetylated dimeric forms, which by X-ray analysis were shown to be diastereomeric spiroketals formed between C-2 and C-2´/C-3´. The structures of the compounds differed only at the configuration at C-2. Acetylation...... or benzoylation of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose in pyridine yielded 3,6-di-O-acetyl-1,5-anhydro-4-deoxy-D-glycero-hex-3-enos-2-ulopyra -nose or crystalline 1,5-anhydro-3,6-di-O-benzoyl-4-deoxy-D-glycero-hex-3-enos-2-ulo-py ranose....

  6. Copper-Catalyzed Electrophilic Amination of Organoaluminum Nucleophiles with O-Benzoyl Hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Yang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xu; Li, Yimei; Zhang, Lijun; Fang, Hong; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiancui; Wang, Shaowu

    2015-06-19

    A copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of aryl and heteroaryl aluminums with N,N-dialkyl-O-benzoyl hydroxylamines that affords the corresponding anilines in good yields has been developed. The catalytic reaction proceeds very smoothly under mild conditions and exhibits good substrate scope. Moreover, the developed catalytic system is also well suited for heteroaryl aluminum nucleophiles, providing facile access to heteroaryl amines.

  7. Copper(II)-catalyzed electrophilic amination of quinoline N-oxides with O-benzoyl hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jia, Chunqi; Sun, Kai; Lv, Yunhe; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Kexiao; Wu, Hankui

    2015-03-21

    Copper acetate-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization amination of quinoline N-oxides was achieved using O-benzoyl hydroxylamine as an electrophilic amination reagent, thereby affording the desired products in moderate to excellent yields. Electrophilic amination can also be performed in good yield on a gram scale.

  8. Synthesis, screening and QSAR studies of 3-benzoyl-2-oxo/thioxo-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5-Acyl-6-methyl-4-substituted-2-oxo/thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidines (A) were synthesized by cyclocondensation reaction between appropriate aldehyde, acetoacetate and urea/thiourea in presence of aluminium chloride and hydrochloric acid which upon treatment with benzoyl chloride in presence of pyridine in ...

  9. LC determination of propylene glycol in human plasma after pre-column derivatization with benzoyl chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinjewel, A.; Swart, E.L.; Lingeman, H.; Wilhelm, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method, using photodiode array detection was developed for the determination of propylene glycol in human plasma and in the fluid retreived after continuous veno-venous hemofiltration. The method entailed alkaline derivatization with benzoyl chloride

  10. Chemoselective C-benzoylation of phenols by using AlCl3 under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Substituted phenols were chemo-selectively reacted with benzoylchloride in presence of aluminum chloride under solvent-free condition to afford the corresponding 2'-hydroxy aryl benzophenones in excellent yields (72-96%). Naphthol benzoylation resulted in lower yields as compared to phenols. Both reactions ...

  11. Formulation and evaluation of a topical niosomal gel containing a combination of benzoyl peroxide and tretinoin for antiacne activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ankush; Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Ankush Gupta,1,* Sima Singh,1,* Niranjan G Kotla,1 Thomas J Webster2,3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A skin disease, like acne, is very common and normally happ...

  12. 75 FR 9767 - Classification of Benzoyl Peroxide as Safe and Effective and Revision of Labeling to Drug Facts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... develop carcinogenicity study protocols (Refs. 11 through 14). In 2001, CHPA submitted a mouse and a rat... rule proposed that this labeling appear in the patient package insert. In the 1995 proposed rule, we... redness, burning, itching, peeling, or possibly swelling. Irritation may be reduced by using the product...

  13. Rapid determination and chemical change tracking of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Su-Qin; Gu, Dong-Chen; He, Helen; Xu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Xi-Chang

    2016-02-01

    BPO is often added to wheat flour as flour improver, but its excessive use and edibility are receiving increasing concern. A multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting was employed to identify BPO in wheat flour and unveil its changes during storage. BPO contained in wheat flour (treatment of BPO in wheat flour based on 2DCOS-IR and spectral subtraction analysis, it was found that BPO in wheat flour not only decomposed into benzoic acid and benzoate, but also produced other deleterious substances, e.g., benzene. This study offers a promising method with minimum pretreatment and time-saving to identify BPO in wheat flour and its chemical products during storage in a holistic manner.

  14. Benzoyl peroxide/clindamycin/UVA is more effective than fluticasone/UVA in progressive macular hypomelanosis: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Relyveld, Germaine N.; Kingswijk, Melanie M.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Menke, Henk E.; Bos, Jan D.; Westerhof, Wiete

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no effective treatment for progressive macular hypomelanosis. Recent findings indicate that Propionibacterium acnes may play a role in the pathogenesis. OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapy with anti-inflammatory therapy in patients with

  15. A cold active (2R,3R)-(-)-di-O-benzoyl-tartrate hydrolyzing esterase from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christian; Platz, Tanja; Cadez, Neza; Giffhorn, Friedrich; Kohring, Gert-Wieland

    2006-11-01

    In a screening procedure a pink-colored yeast was isolated from enrichment cultures with (2R,3R)-(-)-di-O-benzoyl-tartrate (benzoyl-tartrate) as the sole carbon source. The organism saar1 was identified by morphological, physiological, and 18S ribosomal DNA/internal transcribed spacer analysis as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a basidiomycetous yeast. During growth the yeast hydrolyzed the dibenzoyl ester stoichiometrically to the monoester using the separated benzoate as the growth substrate, before the monoester was further cleaved into benzoate and tartrate, which were both metabolized. The corresponding benzoyl esterase was purified from the culture supernatant and characterized as a monomeric glycosylated 86-kDa protein with an optimum pH of 7.5 and an optimum temperature of 45 degrees C. At 0 degrees C the esterase still exhibited 20% of the corresponding activity at 30 degrees C, which correlates it to psychrophilic enzymes. The esterase could hydrolyze short chain p-nitrophenyl-alkyl esters and several benzoyl esters like benzoyl-methyl ester, ethylene-glycol-dibenzoyl ester, phenyl-benzoyl ester, cocaine, and 1,5-anhydro-D: -fructose-tribenzoyl ester. However feruloyl-ethyl ester was not hydrolyzed. The activity characteristics let the enzyme appear as a promising tool for synthesis of benzoylated compounds for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, or fine chemical applications, even at low temperatures.

  16. Characterization of Benzoyl Coenzyme A Biosynthesis Genes in the Enterocin-Producing Bacterium “Streptomyces maritimus”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longkuan; Moore, Bradley S.

    2003-01-01

    The novel benzoyl coenzyme A (benzoyl-CoA) biosynthesis pathway in “Streptomyces maritimus” was investigated through a series of target-directed mutations. Genes involved in benzoyl-CoA formation were disrupted through single-crossover homologous recombination, and the resulting mutants were analyzed for their ability to biosynthesize the benzoyl-CoA-primed polyketide antibiotic enterocin. Inactivation of the unique phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-encoding gene encP was previously shown to be absolutely required for benzoyl-CoA formation in “S. maritimus”. The fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes encH, -I, and -J, on the other hand, are necessary but not required. In each case, the yield of benzoyl-CoA-primed enterocin dropped below wild-type levels. We attribute the reduced benzoyl-CoA formation in these specific mutants to functional substitution and cross-talk between the products of genes encH, -I, and -J and the enzyme homologues of primary metabolism. Disruption of the benzoate-CoA ligase encN gene did not perturb enterocin production, however, demonstrating that encN is extraneous and that benzoic acid is not a pathway intermediate. EncN rather serves as a substitute pathway for utilizing exogenous benzoic acid. These experiments provide further support that benzoyl-CoA is formed in a novel bacterial pathway that resembles the eukaryotic assembly of benzoyl-CoA from phenylalanine via a β-oxidative path. PMID:12511484

  17. Correlations between retention indices and molecular structure of their benzoyl derivatives on phenyl substituted polysiloxane stationary phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pias, J.B.; Gasco, L.

    1976-01-01

    The retention indices of aliphaticalcohols of carbon number up to Csub(g), and of their benzoyl derivatives up to C 7 , were determined in columns packed with Chromosorb G (AW-DMCS-HP) coated previously with 5% methyl, and methyl phenyl polysiloxanes with increasing polarity (SE-30, OV-3, OV-7; OV-11, OV-17 and OV-25). Correlations between retention indices and chain length for 1-alcohols, 2-alcohols, 3-alcohols, 1, on -3-alcohols, 2-methyl-1-alcohols and for their corresponding benzoyl derivatives were calculated at 100, 120 and 140 0 C. In alcohols, a -CH 2 - group increases I approximately 100 units, and in their benzoyl derivatives from 80 to 100 units. Dispersion indices ΔI, and positional and structural increments of I were evaluated for -OH and benzoyl groups in terms for phase polarity and chain length. Effects of chain length, chain branching and double bond location on retention parameters were also studied. (author)

  18. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  19. Recovery of plutonium from oxalate supernatant using 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Extraction of Pu(IV) from oxalate supernatant was carried out employing varying concentrations of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP). Near quantitative extraction of Pu(IV) from an aqueous solution of 0.2M oxalic acid and 3M HNO 3 was possible employing 0.05M PMBP solution in xylene. Extraction studies at different uranium loading conditions were carried out and conditions for quantitative stripping were arrived at. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  1. Peroxide organometallic compounds and their transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Brilkina, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given experimental works on synthesis and reactions of peroxide organometallic compounds. Reactions have been considered of organometallic compounds with oxygen and organic peroxides which result in formation of both peroxide and non-peroxide products. Possible routes and mechanisms of chemical transformations of peroxide organometallic compounds have been discussed. Reactions of organometallic compounds with oxygen and peroxides have been considered

  2. Lanthanum benzoyl acetonates: an IR and mass spectrometric study of the composition and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, N.N.; Dik, T.A.; Tereshko, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used to study the structure of lanthanum chelates of benzoyl acetone (1-phenyl-1,3-butadione, HBA) of the following compositions: La(BA) 3 · EtOH, La(BA) 2 , La(BA) 2 · CH 3 CN, and La(BA) 2 · HDA, where EtOH = ethanol, HDA = nonadecanoic acid. It is demonstrated that a quasi-aromatic metalloring is formed in lanthanum chelates studied. Stable metal-containing fragments of the molecular ions of lanthanum bis- and tris-benzoylacetonate were identified [ru

  3. Gadolinium (III) 2-benzoyl-1,1,3,3-tetracyanopropenide diacetate. Synthesis and crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, Sergey V.; Kayukov, Yakov S.; Grigor' ev, Arthur A. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmaceutics, I.N. Ul' yanov Chuvash State University, Cheboksary (Russian Federation); Tafeenko, Victor A. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2018-02-15

    2-Acyl-1,1,3,3-tetracyanopropenides (ATCN) is a stable organic salts, containing the carbonyl group in addition to the tetracyanoallyl (TCA) fragment in the anion. TCA anions are known as bridging ligands with variable denticity with potential application in organic electronics and as a ionic liquids components. In this communication we reporting the synthesis and crystal structure of gadolinium(III) 2-benzoyl-1,1,3,3-tetracyanopropenide diacetate - the first lanthanide ATCN. (copyright 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. The 2-(acetoxymethyl)benzoyl (AMB) group as a new base-protecting group, designed for the protection of (phosphate) modified oligonucleotides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, W.H.A.; Huskens, J.; Boeckel, van C.A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 2-(acetoxymethyl)benzoyl (AMB) group is a new base-protecting group that facilitates the synthesis of labile, modified nucleotides, since it can be rapidly cleaved under mild basic conditions. The 2-(acetoxymethyl)benzoyl (AMB) group is a new base-protecting group that facilitates the synthesis

  5. Greener Friedel-Crafts Acylation using Microwave-enhanced reactivity of Bismuth Triflate in the Friedel-Crafts Benzoylation of Aromatic Compounds with Benzoic Anhydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phuong Hoang; Nguyen, Hai Truong; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    An efficient and facile bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate-catalyzed benzoylation of aromatic compounds using benzoic anhydride under solvent-free microwave irradiation has been developed. The microwave-assisted Friedel-Crafts benzoylation results in good yields within short reaction times. Bismuth...

  6. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  7. Structural, antimicrobial and computational characterization of 1-benzoyl-3-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiş, Murat; Karipcin, Fatma; Sarıboğa, Bahtiyar; Taş, Murat; Çelik, Hasan

    2012-12-01

    A new thiourea derivative, 1-benzoyl-3-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)thiourea (bcht) has been synthesized from the reaction of 2-amino-4-chlorophenol with benzoyl isothiocyanate. The title compound has been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, (13)C, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The structure of bcht derived from X-ray diffraction of a single crystal has been presented. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by using density functional method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The complete assignments of all vibrational modes were performed on the basis of the total energy distributions (TED). Isotropic chemical shifts ((13)C NMR and (1)H NMR) were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Theoretical calculations of bond parameters, harmonic vibration frequencies and nuclear magnetic resonance are in good agreement with experimental results. The UV absorption spectra of the compound that dissolved in ACN and MeOH were recorded. Bcht was also screened for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis and luminescence properties of novel 4-(N-carbazole methyl) benzoyl hydrazone Schiff bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dongcai; Wu Panliang; Tan Hui; Xia Long; Zhou Wenhui

    2011-01-01

    4-(N-carbazole methyl) benzoyl hydrazine was synthesized on the basis of carbazole, and then nine novel carbazolyl acylhydrazone Schiff bases were synthesized by the condensation reaction between 4-(N-carbazole methyl) benzoyl hydrazine and the substituted benzaldehydes. The relationships between the substituted group types and the UV fluorescence spectral properties, as well as the fluorescence quantum yields of the title Schiff bases were also investigated. The results show that the introduction of both the donating and accepting electron groups causes various grade redshifts of the fluorescence characteristic emission peak of the title Schiff bases to occur.The fluorescence quantum yields of the title Schiff bases with the donating group are increased, and the highest fluorescence quantum yield is up to 0.703. - Highlights: → Nine novel Schiff bases have been designed and synthesized. → Introduction of the donating electron groups causes various grade red shifts of the fluorescence characteristic emission peak and the UV characteristic absorption peak of the synthesized Schiff bases. → Introduction of the donating electron groups causes the fluorescence quantum yields to be increased considerably. →Introduction of the accepting electron groups causes the fluorescence intensity and quantum yield of the synthesized Schiff bases to be reduced. → Fluorescence quantum yield of o-hydroxyl-substituted Schiff base is up to 0.703; this Schiff base is expected to be used as hole transport optical material.

  9. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  10. What Is Crystalline Silica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ceramic manufacturing and the tool and die, steel and foundry industries. Crystalline silica is used in manufacturing, household abrasives, adhesives, paints, soaps, and glass. Additionally, ...

  11. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone peroxides. 172.802 Section 172.802 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.802 Acetone peroxides. The food additive acetone peroxides may be safely used in... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide...

  12. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, Anand; Duruvasalu, Rajesh; Iyyanar, Saranraj; Velumayil, Ramesh, E-mail: p.anand@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering, Vel Tech Dr RR. & Dr. SR University, Avadi, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Veerabathiran, Anbumalar [Mechanical Engineering, Velammal College of Engineering & Technology, Madurai, TN (India)

    2017-07-01

    The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E') recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg) decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E”) and damping peaks (Tan δ) values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity. (author)

  13. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Palanivel

    Full Text Available Abstract The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E’ recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E” and damping peaks (Tan δ values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity.

  14. Peroxide coordination of tellurium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A.; Medvedev, Alexander G. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Churakov, Andrei V.; Grishanov, Dmitry A.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lev, Ovadia [The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    Tellurium-peroxo complexes in aqueous solutions have never been reported. In this work, ammonium peroxotellurates (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH).1.28 H{sub 2}O.0.72 H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (2) were isolated from 5 % hydrogen peroxide aqueous solutions of ammonium tellurate and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of 1 comprises ammonium cations and a symmetric binuclear peroxotellurate anion [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}]{sup 4-}. The structure of 2 consists of an unsymmetrical [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH)]{sup 5-} anion, ammonium cations, hydrogen peroxide, and water. Peroxotellurate anions in both 1 and 2 contain a binuclear Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O) fragment with one μ-oxo- and two μ-peroxo bridging groups. {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that the peroxo bridged bitellurate anions are the dominant species in solution, with 3-40 %wt H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and for pH values above 9. DFT calculations of the peroxotellurate anion confirm its higher thermodynamic stability compared with those of the oxotellurate analogues. This is the first direct evidence for tellurium-peroxide coordination in any aqueous system and the first report of inorganic tellurium-peroxo complexes. General features common to all reported p-block element peroxides could be discerned by the characterization of aqueous and crystalline peroxotellurates. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Identification of Minor Benzoylated 4-Phenylcoumarins from a Mammea neurophylla Bark Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach Tai Dang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Through dereplication analysis, seven known Mammea coumarins were identified in a fraction obtained from Mammea neurophylla dichloromethane bark extract selected for its ability to prevent advanced glycation end-product (AGE formation. Among them, a careful examination of the NMR dataset of pedilanthocoumarin B led to a structural revision. Inspection of LC-DAD-MSn chromatograms allowed us to predict the presence of four new compounds, which were further isolated. Using spectroscopic methods (1H-, 13C- and 2D-NMR, HRMS, UV, these compounds were identified as new benzoyl substituted 4-phenylcoumarins (iso-pedilanthocoumarin B and neurophyllol C and 4-(1-acetoxypropylcoumarins cyclo F (ochrocarpins H and I.

  16. Synergistic extraction of trivalent lanthanoids with 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone and various sulphoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Chakravortty, V.; Reddy, M.L.P.; Ramamohan, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of trivalent lanthanoids Nd, Tb and Tm with mixtures of 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (HPBI) and dioctyl sulphoxide (DOSO), bis-2-ethylhexyl sulphoxide (B2EHSO) or diphenyl sulphoxide (DPhSO) in xylene from perchlorate solution was investigated. Lanthanoids were found to be extracted as Ln(PBI) 3 with HPBI alone. In the presence of sulphoxides, Nd(III) was found to be extracted as Nd(PBI) 3 . S and Nd(PBI) 3 . 2 S (where S = sulphoxide). On the other hand, Tb(III) and Tm(III) were extracted as Tb(PBI) 3 . S and Tm(PBI) 3 . S respectively. The equilibrium constants of the synergistic species were found to increase monotonically with decreasing ionic radii of these metal ions. The addition of a sulphoxide to the metal chelate system not only enhances the extraction efficiency but also improves the selectivities among these trivalent lanthanoids. (orig.)

  17. Cross-linking of LDPE/wax blends by using dicumyl peroxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Igor Krupa

    They are not soluble in many solvents due to their high crystallinity, but they ... macroradical formation via thermal decomposition of organic peroxides.6,7,8 A ... as potential applications of LDPE/wax blends are concerned, lower viscosity of ...

  18. A novel surfactant S-benzoyl-N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate synthesis and its flotation performance to galena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xin; Hu, Yuan; Zhong, Hong, E-mail: zhongh@csu.edu.cn; Wang, Shuai, E-mail: wangshuai@csu.edu.cn; Liu, Guangyi; Zhao, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel surfactant BEDTC was first introduced as galena flotation collector. • BEDTC exhibited superior collecting power to galena against sphalerite. • BEDTC has two active centers to mineral surfaces. • BEDTC molecules formed two distinct adsorption geometries on galena surfaces. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel dithiocarbamate compound, S-benzoyl-N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (BEDTC), was synthesized via one-pot reaction of diethylamine, carbon disulfide, sodium hydroxide and benzoyl chloride using abundant carbon disulfide as a solvent. Its flotation performance and adsorption mechanism on the galena was first investigated by flotation tests, adsorption quantity measurements, FTIR spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The flotation results illustrated that BEDTC exhibited stronger collecting power than the conventional sulphide collectors such as sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (SEDTC) and sodium isobutyl xanthate (SIBX) and superior selectivity for galena against sphalerite. The adsorption data demonstrated that the adsorption affinity of BEDTC to galena was stronger than that of SEDTC and SIBX, and the preferable pH range for BEDTC adsorption on galena surfaces was 6–10. The results of FTIR spectra and XPS indicated that the interaction of BEDTC with galena may be dominated by the chemical adsorption, which was further confirmed by DFT calculation. BEDTC probably acted as a bidentate ligand, bonding with lead through the thiol sulfur and carbonyl oxygen atoms to form two distinct adsorption geometries, one with the same Pb atom to form a six-membered ring complex, and the other with two different Pb atoms to form a ''bullet'' shape complex.

  19. Crystalline color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2001-01-01

    In any context in which color superconductivity arises in nature, it is likely to involve pairing between species of quarks with differing chemical potentials. For suitable values of the differences between chemical potentials, Cooper pairs with nonzero total momentum are favored, as was first realized by Larkin, Ovchinnikov, Fulde, and Ferrell (LOFF). Condensates of this sort spontaneously break translational and rotational invariance, leading to gaps which vary periodically in a crystalline pattern. Unlike the original LOFF state, these crystalline quark matter condensates include both spin-zero and spin-one Cooper pairs. We explore the range of parameters for which crystalline color superconductivity arises in the QCD phase diagram. If in some shell within the quark matter core of a neutron star (or within a strange quark star) the quark number densities are such that crystalline color superconductivity arises, rotational vortices may be pinned in this shell, making it a locus for glitch phenomena

  20. Supra-molecular hydrogen-bonding patterns in the N(9)-H protonated and N(7)-H tautomeric form of an N(6) -benzoyl-adenine salt: N (6)-benzoyl-adeninium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Ammasai; Jeeva Jasmine, Nithianantham; Thomas Muthiah, Packianathan; Perdih, Franc

    2016-02-01

    In the title molecular salt, C12H10N5O(+)·NO3 (-), the adenine unit has an N (9)-protonated N(7)-H tautomeric form with non-protonated N(1) and N(3) atoms. The dihedral angle between the adenine ring system and the phenyl ring is 51.10 (10)°. The typical intra-molecular N(7)-H⋯O hydrogen bond with an S(7) graph-set motif is also present. The benzoyl-adeninium cations also form base pairs through N-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen bonds involving the Watson-Crick face of the adenine ring and the C and O atoms of the benzoyl ring of an adjacent cation, forming a supra-molecular ribbon with R 2 (2)(9) rings. Benzoyl-adeninum cations are also bridged by one of the oxygen atoms of the nitrate anion, which acts as a double acceptor, forming a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to generate a second ribbon motif. These ribbons together with π-π stacking inter-actions between the phenyl ring and the five- and six-membered adenine rings of adjacent mol-ecules generate a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  1. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  2. FORMULA ESTABLISHMENT OF COLORLESS Pb(II COMPLEX WITH N-BENZOYL-N-PHENYL HYDROXYLAMINE (BPA USING ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay B Sarode

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method for determination of stoichiometry of colorless complexes by using atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique in continuous variation method and slope ratio method was described here. This method can be used in same manner as that of mole ratio method and slope ratio method. In this method atomic absorption spectroscopy was used instead of UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique is superior to UV-Vis spectrophotometry as it can be applied to colorless soluble complexes. Pb(II and n-benzoyl-n-phenyl hydroxylamine react to form colorless complex at pH 6.5, which can be easily determined by this method. It was found that Pb(II forms 1:2 complex with n-benzoyl-n-phenyl hydroxylamine and is quantitatively extracted back to aqueous solution for AAS analysis.

  3. Sucrose derivatives and the selective benzoylation of the secondary hydroxyl groups of 6,1',6'-tri-O-tritylsucrose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, C.W.; Koekemoer, J.M.; Marais, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The preparation and 500 MHz 1 H-n.m.r. spectra of a number of sucrose derivatives are described. The assignment of the individual proton resonances in these compounds contributed to the identification of the mono- and dibenzoates obtained by benzoylation of 6,1',6'-tri-O-tritylsucrose following regioselective activation of the secondary hydroxyl groups by reaction with dibutyltin oxide or bis(tributyltin) oxide

  4. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  5. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...... phase behavior and it was possible to convert one such compound partly into its vinylheptafulvene (VHF) isomer upon irradiation with light when in the liquid crystalline phase. This conversion resulted in an increase in the molecular alignment of the phase. In time, the meta-stable VHF returns...... to the DHA where the alignment is maintained. The systematic structural variation has revealed that a biaryl spacer between the DHA and the alkyl chain is needed for liquid crystallinity and that the one aromatic ring in the spacer cannot be substituted by a triazole. This work presents an important step...

  6. Synthesis characterization and toxicity of lanthanide complexes with schiff bases derived from S-benzoyl dithiocarbazate and aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqi, K S; Tabassum, S; Zaidi, S A.A.; Kureshy, R I; Khan, N H [Aligarh Muslim Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1989-12-01

    New O:N:S and N:S donor ligands namely, S-benzoyl-N-(o-hydroxybenzaldehyde) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N-(N,N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N(N-thiophene-2-aldehyde) dithiocarbazate and their complexes with La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), Er(III), Yb(III), and Lu(III) have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, NMR and electronic spectroscopy. The nephelauxetic effect(1-{beta}overlined), bonding parameter, {beta}overlined, bsup(1/2) and Sinha covalency parameter {delta}, have been calculated. Their positive values indicate covalent nature of metal-ligand bond which is also supported by their molar conductances measured in nitrobenzene. Magnetic moment values exhibit paramagnetic nature of the complexes. Log K,{Delta}G, {Delta}H and {Delta}S values have also been ca lculated. Toxicity of the compounds has been evaluated against cockroaches and fungi(Aspergillus flavus and A. niger). The LD{sub 50} and % inhibition values demonstrate greater efficacy of the complexes than that of the free bases. (author). 4 tabs., 12 refs.

  7. Synthesis characterization and toxicity of lanthanide complexes with schiff bases derived from S-benzoyl dithiocarbazate and aldehydes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, K.S.; Tabassum, S.; Zaidi, S.A.A.; Kureshy, R.I.; Khan, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    New O:N:S and N:S donor ligands namely, S-benzoyl-N-(o-hydroxybenzaldehyde) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N-(N,N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N(N-thiophene-2-aldehyde) dithiocarbazate and their complexes with La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), Er(III), Yb(III), and Lu(III) have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, NMR and electronic spectroscopy. The nephelauxetic effect(1-βoverlined), bonding parameter, βoverlined, bsup(1/2) and Sinha covalency parameter δ, have been calculated. Their positive values indicate covalent nature of metal-ligand bond which is also supported by their molar conductances measured in nitrobenzene. Magnetic moment values exhibit paramagnetic nature of the complexes. Log K,ΔG, ΔH and ΔS values have also been ca lculated. Toxicity of the compounds has been evaluated against cockroaches and fungi(Aspergillus flavus and A. niger). The LD 50 and % inhibition values demonstrate greater efficacy of the complexes than that of the free bases. (author). 4 tabs., 12 refs

  8. Purification of benzoyl-mercapto-acetyl-tri-glycine and ethyl cysteinate dimer complemented with biological evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, A.; Ramos, B.; Herrera, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of benzoyl-mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG3) and ethyl cysteinate dimer (L,L-ECD) has been conducted through fractionated recrystallization of its impurities and isomers; biological behavior of the main isomers has been evaluated through biological distribution in mice. Chemical purity of synthesized MAG3 is 69,9%; after purification, 98, 12% is obtained from the compound with adequate biological distribution; fusion points range between 194 and 196 o C before and after purification; recrystallization yields is 12%. Radiochemical purity of testing lot is 98%. In biological evaluations conducted in mice, injection dose percentages for the purest one, after 5 minutes, is 31,20% in kidneys and 1,14% in the liver. Chemical purity of synthesized ECD is 80,29%; after purification, 98,76% is obtained from the isomer with adequate biological activity; fusion points range between 195 and 197 o C; yield percentage in recrystallization is 29%. radiochemical purity of testing lot is 97%; in biological evaluations conducted in mice, injection dose percentages for the purest one, after 5 minutes, is 1,37% in the brain, 25,70% in the liver and 13,40% in kidneys

  9. Uranium precipitation with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although hydrogen peroxide precipitation of uranium continues to be used primarily as means of producing a high purity yellowcake, it has also become an important process due to its superior physical properties. Processing costs such as filtering, drying and/or calcining and drumming, can be reduced. 5 refs

  10. Hydrogen peroxide: importance and determination

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos, Ivanildo Luiz de; Shiraishi, Karina Antonelli; Braz, Alexandre Delphini; Fernandes, João Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A brief discussion about the hydrogen peroxide importance and its determination is presented. It was emphasized some consideration of the H2O2 as reagent (separated or combined), uses and methods of analysis (techniques, detection limits, linear response intervals, sensor specifications). Moreover, it was presented several applications, such as in environmental, pharmaceutical, medicine and food samples.

  11. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  12. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  13. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ molecular dynamics (MD) methods, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations using MD methods has been performed to obtain the equilibrium crystalline beam structure. The effect of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Schiffer et al. depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  14. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen peroxide...

  15. Determination of molybdenum in various materials by normal-phase liquid chromatography using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagur, Gracia; Sanchez-Vinas, Mercedes; Gazquez, Domingo

    1995-01-01

    A normal-phase liquid chromatographic method for the selective determination of molybdenum with N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine is described. The molybdenum(VI) complex was preconcentrated by extraction into chloroform and injected onto a nitrile column for chromatography. The mobile phase was a 0.075 M solution of reagent in chloroform (stabilized with amylene). The detection limit for molybdenum by the proposed method was 0.88 ng for a phase volume ratio of 20:1 (aqueous to organic). Molybdenum has been determined in several samples with satisfactory accuracy and precision

  16. Palladium(II)-catalyzed ortho-C-H arylation/alkylation of N-benzoyl α-amino ester derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misal Castro, Luis C; Chatani, Naoto

    2014-04-14

    The palladium-catalyzed arylation/alkylation of ortho-C-H bonds in N-benzoyl α-amino ester derivatives is described. In such a system both the NH-amido and the CO2R groups in the α-amino ester moieties play a role in successful C-H activation/C-C bond formation using iodoaryl coupling partners. A wide variety of functional groups and electron-rich/deficient iodoarenes are tolerated. The yields obtained range from 20 to 95%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Extractive properties of benzohydroxamic and N-benzoyl-benzohydroxamic acids as analytical reagents towards six transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Rafie Hamid

    1999-06-01

    Two hydroxamic acids were prepared: benzohydroxamic and N-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acids. The former was prepared by coupling the free hydrox amine with benzoyl chloride with the ratio 1:1 in alkaline medium, where as the latter by the same procedure with the ratio 1:2 respectively, they were identified by their melting points, elemental analysis of their nitrogen contents. infra-red spectrophotometry, as well as their nitrogen using elevation of boiling point and the titration method to determine their molecular weights. The two hydroxamic acids were used as analytical reagents for the extraction of the metals Cr(vi), Fe(III), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi). Benzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction 99.55% for Cr.(vi) 3M H 2 SO 4 , of 90.16% for Ti(iv) at pH 2.0,of 80.56% for Co(II) at pH 8.0 and 98.01% for U(vi) at pH 6.0. N-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction of 96.45% for Cr(vi) at 3M H 2 So 4 , of 90.82% for Fe(III) at pH 4.0, of 97.02% for V(v) at 3M H 2 So 4 , of 83.56% for Ti(iv) at pH 2.0, of 89.82% for Co(II) at pH 8.0 and of 97.16% for U(vi) at pH 6.0. at the same pH of maximum extraction using heavy matrix, synthetic sea-water, benzohydroxamic acid has maximum values of 91.08%, of 77.99%, of 91.39%, of 87.50 and of 93.17% for Cr(vi), Fe(III), V(v), Ti(iv), Co9II) and U(vi) respectively whereas n-benzoyl benzohydroxamic acid has maximum values of 86.17%, of 77.78%, of 89.61%, of 75.66%, of 79.63% and of 91.18% for Cr(vi), Fe(III), V(v), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi) respectively. The ratio of metal to ligand was determined utilizing the continuous variation method. It was 1 :2, 1: 1, 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 1: 2 and 1 : 2 with respect to Cr(vi), fe(III), Ti(iv), Co(II) and U(vi) respectively.(Author)

  18. Sugar microanalysis by HPLC with benzoylation: improvement via introduction of a C-8 cartridge and a high efficiency ODS column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Michiko; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2007-07-01

    An HPLC protocol for sugar microanalysis based on the formation of ultraviolet-absorbing benzoyl chloride derivatives was improved. Here, samples were prepared with a C-8 cartridge and analyzed with a high efficiency ODS column, in which porous spherical silica particles 3 microm in diameter were packed. These devices allowed us to simultaneously quantify multiple sugars and sugar alcohols up to 10 ng/ml and to provide satisfactory separations of some sugars, such as fructose and myo-inositol and sorbitol and mannitol. This protocol, which does not require special apparatuses, should become a powerful tool in sugar research.

  19. Thermochemistry of cyclic acetone peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolesov, V.I.; Egorshev, V.Yu.; Patrikeev, D.I. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, O.V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Old data on DADP and TATP enthalpies of formation have been revised. • Combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme allowed calculated enthalpies of formation of TATP and DADP. • Oxygen bomb calorimetry measurements allowed experimental enthalpies of formation of the peroxides. • Both experimental and calculated values show a satisfactory agreement between each other. • The newly obtained enthalpies reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and explosion. - Abstract: Two potentially initiating explosive peroxides, diacetonediperoxide (DADP) and triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), were studied in respect to their thermochemical properties. To get the internally self-consistent estimations of gas-phase enthalpy of formation of DADP and TATP, their values were calculated by combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme. The energies of combustion (Δ{sub c}U) were measured and the standard enthalpies of formation (Δ{sub f}H{sub 298}{sup °}) of DADP and TATP were derived using the standard enthalpies of formation of the combustion products. The heat of explosion was measured for small low-pressed charges of the peroxides. The obtained enthalpies of formation of DADP and TATP were found to agree well with quantum chemical calculations and reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and detonation.

  20. Synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and biological activity of copper(ii and nickel(ii complexes with l-benzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podunavac-Kuzmanović Sanja O.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorides of copper(II and nickel(ll react with 1-benzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole or 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole to give complexes of the type [M(LnCln(H20∙Cln (M = Cu or Ni; L = (1-benzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole or 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole; n=O, 1 or 2. The complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity magnetic susceptibility measurements and IR spectra. These studies suggest that all the complexes possess an octahedral stereochemistry. The antibacterial activity of (1-benzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole or 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl-2-methylbenzimidazole and their complexes was evaluated against Escherichia coli and Bacillus sp.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  2. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  3. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  4. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Li, X.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ the Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, the authors have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. They include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  5. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Novel Amino Acid-(N'-Benzoyl Hydrazide and Amino Acid-(N'-Nicotinoyl Hydrazide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine N. Khattab

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling reaction of benzoic acid and nicotinic acid hydrazides with N- protected L-amino acids including valine, leucine, phenylalanine, glutamic acid and tyrosine is reported. The target compounds, N-Boc-amino acid-(N`-benzoyl- and N- Boc-amino acid-(N`-nicotinoyl hydrazides 5a-5e and 6a-6e were prepared in very high yields and purity using N-[(dimethylamino-1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl- methylene]-N-methyl-methanaminium hexafluorophosphate N-oxide (HATU as coupling reagent. The antimicrobial activity of the Cu and Cd complexes of the designed compounds was tested. The products were deprotected affording the corresponding amino acid-(N`-benzoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (7a-7e and amino acid-(N`- nicotinoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (8a-8e. These compounds and their Cu and Cd complexes were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Several compounds showed comparable activity to that of ampicillin against S. aureus and E. coli.

  6. Substitution Effects and Linear Free Energy Relationships During Reduction of 4- Benzoyl-n-(4-substituted Benzyl)pyridinium Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Zhang, Guo-Hui; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In analogy to 4-(para-substituted benzoyl)-N-methylpyridinium cations (1-X's), the title species (2-X's, -X = -OCH3, -CH3, -H, -Br, -COCH3, -NO2) undergo two reversible, well-separated (E(sub 1/2) greater than or equal to 650 mV) one-electron reductions. The effect of substitution on the reduction potentials of 2-X's is much weaker than the effect of the same substituents on 1-X's: the Hammett rho-values are 0.80 and 0.93 for the 1st- and 2nd-e reduction of 2-X's vs. 2.3 and 3.3 for the same reductions of 1-X's, respectively. Importantly, the nitro group of 2-NO2 undergoes reduction before the 2nd-e reduction of the 4-benzoylpyridinium system. These results suggest that the redox potentials of the 4-benzoylpyridinium system can be course-tuned via p-benzoyl substitution and fine-tuned via para-benzyl substitution. Introducing the recently derived substituent constant of the -NO2(sup)- group (sigma para-NO2(sup)- = -0.97) yields an excellent correlation for the 3rd-e reduction of 2- NO2 (corresponding to the reduction of the carbonyl group) with the 2nd-e reduction of the other 2-X's, and confirms the electron donating properties of -NO2(sup)-.

  7. A New Benzoyl Compound Isolated from the Endophytic Fungi of Kandis Gajah (Garcinia griffithii and Asam Kandis (Garcinia cowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia griffithii and Garcinia cowa belong to the genus Garcinia. The genus Garcinia has been known to be a rich source of secondary metabolites, such as xanthones, benzophenones, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, and other phenolic derivatives. Previous investigations of endophytic fungi from G. griffithii revealed the presence of three compounds not found in the host. In order to the continue the phytochemical work on endophytic fungi of G. griffithii, the constituent of the endophytic fungi of G. griffithii was re-examined. In this study, a benzoyl compound similar to that found in the endophytic fungus of G. cowa was observed. The same benzoyl compound was also isolated from the endophytic fungus Acremonium sp of G. griffithii and Aspergillus sp of G. cowa with cultivation of eight weeks in static conditions at room temperature. The culture medium was partitioned using ethyl acetate and evaporated to obtain the concentrated extract. Isolation of compounds was performed using the chromatography method. The chemical structure was proposed on the basis of spectroscopic data, including ultraviolet (UV, infrared (IR, mass spectrometry (MS, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR, heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectroscopy (HSQC, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation spectroscopy (HMBC, and correlation spectroscopy (COSY.

  8. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  9. Detection of hydrogen peroxide with graphyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electronic properties of graphyne has been investigated to explore the possibility of using graphyne based biosensor. We have used density functional theory to study the electronic properties of γ-graphyne in the presence of different number of hydrogen peroxide. The optimal adsorption position, orientation, and distance of hydrogen peroxide adsorbed on the graphyne sheet have been determined by calculating adsorption energy. It is found that γ-graphyne which is an intrinsic semiconductor becomes an n-type semiconductor due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The energy band gap of γ-graphyne is decreased by increasing the number of hydrogen peroxide. The results demonstrate that γ-graphyne is a promising candidate for biosensor application because of its electrical sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, K.

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this project was to make detailed descriptions of the geological conditions and the different kinds of leakage in some tunnels in Sweden, to be able to describe the presence of ground water in crystalline bedrock. The studies were carried out in TBM tunnels as well as in conventionally drilled and blasted tunnels. Thanks to this, it has been possible to compare the pattern and appearance of ground water leakage in TBM tunnels and in blasted tunnels. On the basis of some experiments in a TBM tunnel, it has been confirmed that a detailed mapping of leakage gives a good picture of the flow paths and their aquiferous qualities in the bedrock. The same picture is found to apply even in cautious blasted tunnels. It is shown that the ground water flow paths in crystalline bedrock are usually restricted to small channels along only small parts of the fractures. This is also true for fracture zones. It has also been found that the number of flow paths generally increases with the degree of tectonisation, up to a given point. With further tectonisation the bedrock is more or less crushed which, along with mineral alteration, leaves only a little space left for the formation of water channels. The largest individual flow paths are usually found in fracture zones. The total amount of ground water leakage per m tunnel is also greater in fracture zones than in the bedrock between the fracture zones. In mapping visible leakage, five classes have been distinguished according to size. Where possible, the individual leak inflow has been measured during the mapping process. The quantification of the leakage classes made in different tunnels are compared, and some quantification standards suggested. A comparison of leakage in different rock types, tectonic zones, fractures etc is also presented. (author)

  11. PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1958-09-16

    reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

  12. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  13. Correlations Between retention indices and molecular structure of aliphatic alcohols and of their benzoyl derivatives on phenyl substituted polysiloxane stationary phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pias, J. B.; Gasco, L.

    1976-01-01

    The retention indices of aliphatic alcohols of carbon number up to C g , and of their benzoyl derivatives up to C 7 , were determined in columns packed with Chromo sorb G (AW-DMCS-HP) coated previously with 5% methyl, and methyl phenyl polysiloxanes with increasing polarity (SE-30, 0V-3, 0V-7, 0V-11, 0V-17 and OV-25). Correlations between retention indices and chain length for 1-alcohols, 2-alcohols, 3-alcohols, 1 , on -3-alcohols, 2-methyl-1-alcohols and for their corresponding benzoyl derivatives were calculated at 100, 120 and 140 degree centigree. In alcohols, a -CH 2 - group increases I approximately 100 units, and in their benzoyl derivatives from 80 to 100 units. Dispersion indices Δl , and positional and structural increments δI, were evaluated for -OH and benzoyl groups in terms of phase polarity and chain length. Effects of chain length, chain branching and double bond location on retention parameters were also studied. (Author) 23 refs

  14. Synthesis of benzoyl-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine C6H5COSCH2CO(NHCH2CO)3OH (Bz-MAG3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ktaifani, M.; Nakawa, M. A.; Nahmo, A.; Allaf, W.

    2006-11-01

    Benzo-mercaptoacetylglycylglcylglycine (Bz-MAG3) was prepared by three subsequent steps starting from benzoyl chloride. The obtained product was fully characterized by its multi-nuclear NMR and IR spectroscopy. The purity of the product was confirmed by HPLC. (author)

  15. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  16. Contribution to the study of the chemical effects of the (n, γ) reaction on copper N-benzoyl N-phenyl hydroxylaminate and copper N-benzoyl N-(o) Tolyl hydroxylaminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, C.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of some factors such as pre-heating and pre-irradiation with gamma rays on the retention and thermal annealing of copper N-benzoyl N-phenyl hydroxylaminate and of copper N-benzolyl N-(o) tolyl hydroxylaminate is studied. The complexes were synthesized and characterized by determination of the melting-point, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, infra-red and visible range absoption spectrometry-thermogravimetric analysis were examined and the stability of the compounds was checked against heating and gamma irradiation from a 60 Co source. Some experiments using the Szilard-Chalmers effect were carried out by irradiating the compound in the IEA-R 1 nuclear reactor and calculating its specific activities. (M.J.C.) [pt

  17. Phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramiez Cortina, R.C.; Hernadez Perez, I. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico); Ortiz Lozoya, C.E. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico)]|[Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexico); Alonso Gutierrez, M.S. [Inst. National Polytechnique, ENSCT, Lab. of Chimie Agro-Industrielle, Toulouse (France)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the process application of advanced oxidation is investigated with hydrogen peroxide, for the phenol destruction. The experiments were carried out in a glass reactor of 750 mL. Three phenol concentrations were studied (2000, 1000 and 500 ppm) being oxidized with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (1, 2 and 3 M). The tests of oxidation had a reaction time of 48 h at ambient temperature and pressure. The phenol degradation was determined as COD at different reaction times and intermediate oxidation products were analyzed by chromatography. The results of this study show that it is possible to degrade phenol (1000 ppm) until 90% with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} 2M. Being achieved the best efficiency with a good molar relationship of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/phenol. Intends a reaction outline in the degradation of the phenol. (orig.)

  18. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the U.S...

  19. Problem of the lithium peroxide thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, R A; Ferapontov, Yu A; Kozlova, N P

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate samples under heating in atmospheric air was studied by the method of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It was found that in the temperature range of 32°C to 82°C the interaction of lithium peroxides and steam with the formation of lithium peroxide monohydrate occurs, which was confirmed chemically and by X-ray Single-qualitative analysis. It was experimentally found that lithium peroxide starts to decompose into the lithium oxide and oxygen in the temperature range of 340 ÷ 348°C. It was established that the resulting thermal decomposition of lithium oxide, lithium peroxide at the temperature of 422°C melts with lithium carbonate eutecticly. The manifestation of polymorphism was not marked(seen or noticed) under the heating of studied samples of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate in the temperature range of 25°C ÷ 34°C. (paper)

  20. Synthesis of new derivatives of 1-(3-aminophenyl-4-benzoyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAHMI KASIMOGULLAR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available 1-(3-Aminophenyl-4-benzoyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (1 was synthesized according to the literature. 2-(3-Aminophenyl-2,6-dihydro-3,4-diphenyl-7H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyridazin-7-one (5 was obtained by the cyclocondensation reaction of 1 with hydrazine hydrate. New pyrazole derivatives of compounds 1 and 5 were synthesized by their reaction with β-diketones, β-ketoesters, β-naphthol, phenol and various other reagents. The structures of the synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, IR and mass spectroscopy, as well as elemental analysis.

  1. Extraction of hafnium by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyralozone from aqueous-alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Prihoda, J.

    1975-01-01

    Extraction of hafnium by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (HL) in benzene, toluene, chloroform and tetrachloromethane from aqueous-alcoholic solutions of the formal acidity of 2M-HClO 4 was studied. Methyl, ethyl, n- and isopropyl, tert-butyl and allyl alcohol as well as ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and propylene glycol were used as organic components of the mixed aqueous-organic phase. Their presence in some cases resulted in a synergic increase in the distribution ratio of hafnium. The increase is interpreted using the results of a slope analysis and measurements of the alcohol distribution and the relative permittivity of the organic phase. It is suggested that HfL 4 molecules were solvated by alcohol molecules in the organic phase. At high alcohol concentration synergism changed into antagonism. This was caused by changes in the distribution of HL and its interaction with the alcohol in the organic phase. (author)

  2. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of TCE contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, D.H.; Robinson, K.G.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Solvent contaminated soils are ubiquitous in the industrial world and represent a significant environmental hazard due to their persistence and potentially negative impacts on human health and the environment. Environmental regulations favor treatment of soils with options which reduce the volume and toxicity of contaminants in place. One such treatment option is the in-situ application of hydrogen peroxide to soils contaminated with chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). This study investigated hydrogen peroxide mass loading rates on removal of TCE from soils of varying organic matter content. Batch experiments conducted on contaminated loam samples using GC headspace analysis showed up to 80% TCE removal upon peroxide treatment. Column experiments conducted on sandy loam soils with high organic matter content showed only 25% TCE removal, even at hydrogen peroxide additions of 25 g peroxide per kg soil

  3. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Yaremenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately.

  4. Neutron transmission through crystalline Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Kilany, M.; El-Mesiry, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The neutron transmission through crystalline Fe has been calculated for neutron energies in the range 10 4 < E<10 eV using an additive formula. The formula permits calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-section as a function of temperature and crystalline form. The obtained agreement between the calculated values and available experimental ones justifies the applicability of the used formula. A feasibility study on using poly-crystalline Fe as a cold neutron filter and a large Fe single crystal as a thermal one is given

  5. Anaerobic degradation of 2-aminobenzoic acid (anthranilic acid) via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and cyclohex-1-enecarboxyl-CoA in a denitrifying bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmeyer, C; Koch, J; Fuchs, G

    1992-06-01

    The enzymes catalyzing the initial reactions in the anaerobic degradation of 2-aminobenzoic acid (anthranilic acid) were studied with a denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. anaerobically grown with 2-aminobenzoate and nitrate as the sole carbon and energy sources. Cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate are simultaneously adapted to growth with benzoate, whereas cells grown on benzoate degrade 2-aminobenzoate several times less efficiently than benzoate. Evidence for a new reductive pathway of aromatic metabolism and for four enzymes catalyzing the initial steps is presented. The organism contains 2-aminobenzoate-coenzyme A ligase (2-aminobenzoate-CoA ligase), which forms 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA. 2-Aminobenzoyl-CoA is then reductively deaminated to benzoyl-CoA by an oxygen-sensitive enzyme, 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA reductase (deaminating), which requires a low potential reductant [Ti(III)]. The specific activity is 15 nmol of 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA reduced min-1 mg-1 of protein at an optimal pH of 7. The two enzymes are induced by the substrate under anaerobic conditions only. Benzoyl-CoA is further converted in vitro by reduction with Ti(III) to six products; the same products are formed when benzoyl-CoA or 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA is incubated under reducing conditions. Two of them were identified preliminarily. One product is cyclohex-1-enecarboxyl-CoA, the other is trans-2-hydroxycyclohexane-carboxyl-CoA. The complex transformation of benzoyl-CoA is ascribed to at least two enzymes, benzoyl-CoA reductase (aromatic ring reducing) and cyclohex-1-enecarboxyl-CoA hydratase. The reduction of benzoyl-CoA to alicyclic compounds is catalyzed by extracts from cells grown anaerobically on either 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate at almost the same rate (10 to 15 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein). In contrast, extracts from cells grown anaerobically on acetate or grown aerobically on benzoate or 2-aminobenzoate are inactive. This suggests a sequential induction of the enzymes.

  6. The problem of peroxidation in radiolis logy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraboj, V.A.; Chebotarev, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis is validated concerning the products of freeradical oxidation of lipids and the phenol compounds as a mediator of the stress-syndrome. The data are reviewed on activation of peroxidation under the effect of radiation, cytochemical agents, etc., secondarily stimulating the neurohumoral system function of homeostasis regulation. With the emotional-algesic and cold-stresses, the regulatory system stimulation is of primary, reflex, nature, but it secondarily promotes the peroxidation activation. The radiotoxins (of the quinoid and lipid nature) appearing in tissues under the effect of ionizing radiation, are smilar in structure and mechanism of action to peroxidation activation products formed under the effect of other stress-agents

  7. Inorganic precursor peroxides for antifouling coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, L.T.; Hermann, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Modern antifouling coatings are generally based on cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and organic biocides as active ingredients. Cu2O is prone to bioaccumulation, and should therefore be replaced by more environmentally benign compounds when technically possible. However, cuprous oxide does not only provide...... antifouling properties, it is also a vital ingredient for the antifouling coating to obtain its polishing and leaching mechanism. In this paper, peroxides of strontium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc are tested as pigments in antifouling coatings. The peroxides react with seawater to create hydrogen peroxide...... matrix provides antifouling properties exceeding those of a similar coating based entirely on zinc oxide....

  8. Peroxides and radiation impairment of oxidative phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgii, I E; Akoev, I G

    1975-09-01

    An increase in the peroxidase activity of the mitochondria and a simultaneous rise in the amount of peroxide compounds, which are half lipid-like substances, are detected within the first 10 minutes after irradiation (1000 r). A mechanism of radiation impairment of oxidative phosphorylation is connected with the penetration of its inhibitors to the mitochondria due to the disturbed permeability of membranes affected by peroxides.

  9. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  10. Hydrogen peroxide as a sustainable energy carrier: Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide and the fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal–oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  12. The make up of crystalline bedrock - crystalline body and blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M.; Huber, A.

    1986-01-01

    Statements of a geological nature can be made on the basis of investigations of the bedrock exposed in southern Black Forest and these can, in the form of prognoses, be applied to the crystalline Basement of northern Switzerland. Such statements relate to the average proportions of the main lithological groups at the bedrock surface and the surface area of the granite body. Some of the prognoses can be compared and checked with the results from the deep drilling programme in northern Switzerland. Further, analogical interferences from the situation in the southern Black Forest allow predictions to be made on the anticipated block structure of the crystalline Basement. (author)

  13. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALGREN DL

    2008-01-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation

  14. neutron transmission through crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mesiry, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the neutron transmission through crystalline materials. Therefore a study of pyrolytic graphite (PG) as a highly efficient selective thermal neutron filter and Iron single crystal as a whole one, as well as the applicability of using their polycrystalline powders as a selective cold neutron filters is given. Moreover, the use of PG and iron single crystal as an efficient neutron monochromator is also investigated. An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neutron cross-section including the Bragg scattering from different )(hkl planes to the neutron transmission through crystalline iron and graphite. The formula takes into account their crystalline form. A computer CFe program was developed in order to provide the required calculations for both poly- and single-crystalline iron. The validity of the CFe program was approved from the comparison of the calculated iron cross-section data with the available experimental ones. The CFe program was also adapted to calculate the reflectivity from iron single crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator The computer package GRAPHITE, developed in Neutron Physics laboratory, Nuclear Research Center, has been used in order to provide the required calculations for crystalline graphite in the neutron energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV. A Mono-PG code was added to the computer package GRAPHITE in order to calculate the reflectivity from PG crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator.

  15. Diverse topics in crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Draeseke, A.; Sessler, A.M.; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1995-01-01

    Equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and radio-frequency (rf) electric fields in storage rings. These equations are employed in the molecular dynamics simulations to study the properties of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. The transition from ID to 2D, and from 2D to 3D is explored, and the scaling behavior of the heating rates is discussed especially in the high temperature limit. The effectiveness of various cooling techniques in achieving crystalline states has been investigated. Crystalline beams made of two different species of ions via sympathetic cooling are presented, as well as circulating ''crystal balls'' bunched in all directions by magnetic focusing and rf field. By numerically reconstructing the original experimental conditions of the NAP-M ring, it is found that only at extremely low beam intensities, outside of the range of the original measurement, proton particles can form occasionally-passing disks. The proposed New ASTRID ring is shown to be suitable for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams of all dimensions

  16. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  17. Ambient pressure hydrometallurgical conversion of arsenic trioxide to crystalline scorodite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debekaussen, R. [Corus Consulting and Technical Services, Delft (Netherlands); Droppert, D. [Solumet Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada); Demopoulos, G. P. [McGill Univ., Dept. of Metallurgical Enginering, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Development of a novel process for the ambient pressure conversion of arsenic trioxide, a common, but extremely toxic by-product of the non-ferrous smelting industry, is described. The process consists of three main stages; (1) dissolution of arsenic trioxide, (2) oxidation of trivalent arsenic with the addition of hydrogen peroxide at 95 degree C, to pentavalent arsenic, and (3) step-wise precipitation of crystalline scorodite from highly concentrated arsenic containing solutions, by operating below a characteristics induction pH in the presence of seed material. The technical feasibility of the process has been confirmed by bench-scale testing of industrial flue dust material or acid plant effluents. 30 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. Synthesis and Bioactivity of N-Benzoyl-N'-[5-(2'-substituted phenyl-2-furoyl] Semicarbazide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zining Cui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs with good activity, benzoylphenylurea, a typical kind of CSIs, was chosen as the lead compound and 15 novel derivatives containing furan moieties were designed by converting the urea linkage of benzoylphenylureas into a semicarbazide and changing the aniline part into furoyl groups. The title compounds were synthesized by the reaction of substituted benzoyl isocyanates with 5-(substituted phenyl-2-furoyl hydrazine, and the structures were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses (compound E2. The bioassay results indicated that the title compounds exhibit good insecticidal activity, especially towards Plutella xylostella L., but had lower fungicidal activity. Inspiringly, the title compounds possessed obvious anticancer activity against human promyelocytic leukemic cell line (HL-60, and some of the title compounds also had activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Bel-7402, human gastric carcinoma cell line (BGC-823, and human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line (KB. The results indicated that the linkage in the lead compounds was important to the bioactivity and spectra. The modification on the urea linkage is an effective strategy to discover new pesticide and drug candidates.

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine (FSO 2 BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25 0 C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO 2 BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with 3 H-labeled FSO 2 BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO 2 BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg 2+ . The results are consistent with modification by FSO 2 BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit

  20. Structural evolution of a uranyl peroxide nano-cage fullerene: U60, at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, F.; McGrail, B.; Burns, P. C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    U60 is a uranyl peroxide nano-cage that adopts a highly symmetric fullerene topology; it is topologically identical to C60. Several studies on the aqueous-phase of U60 clusters, [UO2(O2)(OH)]6060-, have shown its persistence in complex solutions and over lengthy time scales. Peroxide enhances corrosion of nuclear fuel in a reactor accident-uranyl peroxides often form near contaminated sites. U60 (Fm-3) crystallizes with approximate formula: Li68K12(OH)20[UO2(O2)(OH)]60(H2O)310. Here, we have used the diamond anvil cell (DAC) to examine U60 to understand the stability of this cluster at high pressures. We used a symmetric DAC with 300 μm culet diamonds and two different pressure-transmitting media: a mixture of methanol+ethanol and silicone oil. Using a combination of in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron XRD, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) ex situ, we have determined the pressure-induced evolution of U60. Crystalline U60 undergoes an irreversible phase transition to a tetragonal structure at 4.1 GPa, and irreversibly amorphizes at 13 GPa. The amorphous phase likely consists of clusters of U60. Above 15 GPa, the U60 cluster is irreversibly destroyed. ESI-MS shows that this phase consists of species that likely have between 10-20 uranium atoms. Raman spectroscopy complements the diffraction measurements. U60 shows two dominant vibrational modes: a symmetric stretch of the uranyl U-O triple bond (810 cm-1), and a symmetric stretch of the U-O2-U peroxide bond (820 cm-1). As pressure is increased, these modes shift to higher wavenumbers, and overlap at 4 GPa. At 15 GPa, their intensity decreases below detection. These experiments reveal several novel behaviors including a new phase of U60. Notably, the amorphization of U60 occurs before the collapse of its cluster topology. This is different from the behavior of solvated C60 at high pressure, which maintains a hcp structure up to 30 GPa, while the clusters disorder. These results suggest

  1. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  2. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both [ 3 H]NaBH 4 reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated

  3. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  4. Grafting of bacterial polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) onto cellulose via in situ reactive extrusion with dicumyl peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liqing; McDonald, Armando G; Stark, Nicole M

    2015-03-09

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was grafted onto cellulose fiber by dicumyl peroxide (DCP) radical initiation via in situ reactive extrusion. The yield of the grafted (cellulose-g-PHB) copolymer was recorded and grafting efficiency was found to be dependent on the reaction time and DCP concentration. The grafting mechanism was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis and showed the presence of radicals produced by DCP radical initiation. The grafted copolymer structure was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) showed that the cellulose-g-PHB copolymer formed a continuous phase between the surfaces of cellulose and PHB as compared to cellulose-PHB blends. The relative crystallinity of cellulose and PHB were quantified from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while the absolute degree of crystallinity was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The reduction of crystallinity indicated the grafting reaction occurred not just in the amorphous region but also slightly in crystalline regions of both cellulose and PHB. The smaller crystal sizes suggested the brittleness of PHB was decreased. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the grafted copolymer was stabilized relative to PHB. By varying the reaction parameters the compositions (%PHB and %cellulose) of resultant cellulose-g-PHB copolymer are expected to be manipulated to obtain tunable properties.

  5. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  6. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Filho, O.; Teixeira, L.A.C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study on the precipitation of uranyl peroxide (UO 4 x H 2 O) has been carried out in a laboratory scale. The objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the initial pH, precipitation pH and H 2 O 2 /UO 2 2+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of: efficiency of U precipitation, content of U in the precipitates, and distribution of impurities in the precipitates. (Author) [pt

  7. Uranium peroxide precipitate drying temperature relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, C.; Dyck, B., E-mail: chick_rodgers@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Cameco Corporation is in the process of revitalizing the mill at its Key Lake operation in northern Saskatchewan. The current Key Lake process employs ammonia stripping and ammonia precipitation. As part of the revitalization, the company is considering installing strong acid stripping in solvent extraction as used at its Rabbit Lake operation. This change would lead to using hydrogen peroxide for uranium precipitation. As part of the process evaluation, tests were carried out to study how changes in the temperature of an indirect fired dryer affected the properties of uranium peroxide [yellowcake] precipitate. This paper discusses the results of the test work, including the relationships between drying temperature and the following: (author)

  8. Ferrofluids in liquid crystalline systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Liebert, L.

    1989-08-01

    It is a well-known fact that intermediate or mesomorphic phase may exist between the crystalline and the isotropic liquid phases. The symmetry properties of these mesophases are intermediate between those of a crystal and a liquid. In this paper, some aspects of the use of ferrofluids in thermotropic and lyotropic systems are studied both the experimental difficulties as well as the fundamental phypical phenomena involved. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  9. EELS from organic crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydson, R; Seabourne, C R; Hondow, N; Eddleston, M D; Jones, W

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for providing light element chemical composition information from organic, crystalline pharmaceutical materials including theophylline and paracetamol and discuss how this type of data can complement transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron diffraction when investigating polymorphism. We also discuss the potential for the extraction of bonding information using electron loss near-edge structure (ELNES)

  10. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons

  11. Graphene on insulating crystalline substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcoeltekin, S; El Kharrazi, M; Koehler, B; Lorke, A; Schleberger, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that it is possible to prepare and identify ultra-thin sheets of graphene on crystalline substrates such as SrTiO 3 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaF 2 by standard techniques (mechanical exfoliation, optical and atomic force microscopy). On the substrates under consideration we find a similar distribution of single layer, bilayer and few-layer graphene and graphite flakes as with conventional SiO 2 substrates. The optical contrast C of a single graphene layer on any of those substrates is determined by calculating the optical properties of a two-dimensional metallic sheet on the surface of a dielectric, which yields values between C = -1.5% (G/TiO 2 ) and C = -8.8% (G/CaF 2 ). This contrast is in reasonable agreement with experimental data and is sufficient to make identification by an optical microscope possible. The graphene layers cover the crystalline substrate in a carpet-like mode and the height of single layer graphene on any of the crystalline substrates as determined by atomic force microscopy is d SLG = 0.34 nm and thus much smaller than on SiO 2 .

  12. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Marlen; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Hernández-Padrón, Genoveva; Mendieta, Alicia I; Bernal, Rodolfo; Cruz-Vázquez, Catalina; Castaño, Victor M

    2012-10-22

    Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  13. Synthesis, PASS-Predication and in Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Benzyl 4-O-benzoyl-α-l-rhamnopyranoside Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Matin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl α-l-rhamnopyranoside 4, obtained by both conventional and microwave assisted glycosidation techniques, was subjected to 2,3-O-isopropylidene protection to yield compound 5 which on benzoylation and subsequent deprotection of isopropylidene group gave the desired 4-O-benzoylrhamnopyranoside 7 in reasonable yield. Di-O-acetyl derivative of benzoate 7 was prepared to get newer rhamnopyranoside. The structure activity relationship (SAR of the designed compounds was performed along with the prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS training set. Experimental studies based on antimicrobial activities verified the predictions obtained by the PASS software. Protected rhamnopyranosides 5 and 6 exhibited slight distortion from regular 1C4 conformation, probably due to the fusion of pyranose and isopropylidene ring. Synthesized rhamnopyranosides 4–8 were employed as test chemicals for in vitro antimicrobial evaluation against eight human pathogenic bacteria and two fungi. Antimicrobial and SAR study showed that the rhamnopyranosides were prone against fungal organisms as compared to that of the bacterial pathogens. Interestingly, PASS prediction of the rhamnopyranoside derivatives 4–8 were 0.49 < Pa < 0.60 (where Pa is probability ‘to be active’ as antibacterial and 0.65 < Pa < 0.73 as antifungal activities, which showed significant agreement with experimental data, suggesting rhamnopyranoside derivatives 4–8 were more active against pathogenic fungi as compared to human pathogenic bacteria thus, there is a more than 50% chance that the rhamnopyranoside derivative structures 4–8 have not been reported with antimicrobial activity, making it a possible valuable lead compound.

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl))adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-03-24

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSO/sub 2/BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25/sup 0/C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO/sub 2/BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with /sup 3/H-labeled FSO/sub 2/BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO/sub 2/BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg/sup 2 +/. The results are consistent with modification by FSO/sub 2/BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit.

  15. Vitamin C Supplementation Reduces Peroxidative Damage without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the effects of vitamin C supplementation on the lung function tests and peroxidative damage in asthmatic children. Methodology: Fifteen asthmatics aged between 8 - 14 years, all in the stable state were used in this study. Three millilitres of blood were drawn from the antecubital ...

  16. Relationship Between Calorie Restriction, Lipid Peroxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the brain of the caloric restricted rats, there was little or no change in the tGSH and GSH, although the GSSG and GSSG/GSH% ratio were increased significantly. These results suggest that aging of rats had been decelerated by caloric restriction due to the decrease in the peroxidative damage in the lungs and brain.

  17. Microsomal lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of cellular damage. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornbrust, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The NADPH/iron-dependent peroxidation of lipids in rat liver microsomes was found to be dependent on the presence of free ferrous ion and maintains iron in the reduced Fe/sup 2 +/ state. Chelation of iron by EDTA inhibited peroxidation. Addition of iron, after preincubation of microsomes in the absence of iron, did not enhance the rate of peroxidation suggesting that iron acts by initiating peroxidative decomposition of membrane lipids rather than by catalyzing the breakdown of pre-formed hydroperoxides. Liposomes also underwent peroxidation in the presence of ferrous iron at a rate comparable to intact microsomes and was stimulated by ascorbate. Carbon tetrachloride initiated lipid peroxidation in the absence of free metal ions. Rates of in vitro lipid peroxidation of microsomes and homogenates were found to vary widely between different tissues and species. The effects of paraquat on lipid peroxidation was also studied. (DC)

  18. Quantum-chemical evaluation of the lability of π-electronic systems in N-benzoyl derivatives of phosphorus and sulfur imines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.P.; Pen'kovskii, V.V.; Boldeskul, I.E.

    1986-01-01

    The charges on atoms, the bond indices, their components, and the energies of the highest occupied π orbitals of four N-benzoyl derivatives of phosphorus and sulfur imines have been calculated by the CNDO/2 method in an spd basis. According to the results obtained, the π system of a bridging sulfur-nitrogen group is more labile than a phosphorus-nitrogen group, in agreement with the experimental evaluations of the transmission of the electronic effects of substituents in these systems. An interpretation of this lability has been given

  19. Ionizing radiation and lipid peroxidation in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    1997-07-01

    Lipids are organic compounds constituting the living cells. Lipid molecules can be disassembled through peroxidative pathways and hydrocarbons can be bred as end-product of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Lipid peroxidation can be started by an indirect effect of ionizing radiation. So a radioinduced cellular damage in human body can be detected by monitoring the production of specific hydrocarbons

  20. Saline groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampen, P.

    1992-11-01

    The State-of-art report describes research made on deep saline groundwaters and brines found in crystalline bedrock, mainly in site studies for nuclear waste disposal. The occurrence, definitions and classifications of saline groundwaters are reviewed with a special emphasis on the different theories concerning the origins of saline groundwaters. Studies of the saline groundwaters in Finland and Sweden have been reviewed more thoroughly. Also the mixing of different bodies of groundwaters, observations of the contact of saline groundwaters and permafrost, and the geochemical modelling of saline groundwaters as well as the future trends of research have been discussed. (orig.)

  1. Crystalline beams: The vertical zigzag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This note is the continuation of our comprehensive investigation of Crystalline Beams. After having determined the equations of motion and the conditions for the formation of the simplest configuration, i.e. the string, we study the possibility of storing an intense beam of charged particles in a storage ring where they form a vertical zigzag. We define the equilibrium configuration, and examine the confinement conditions. Subsequently, we derive the transfer matrix for motion through various elements of the storage ring. Finally we investigate the stability conditions for such a beam

  2. Crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.G.; Clearfield, A.

    1976-01-01

    The ion exchange behaviour of seven crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates towards some of the alkali metal cations is described. Only two of the compounds (A and C) possess ion exchange properties in acidic solutions. Four others show some ion exchange characteristics in basic media with some of the alkali cations. Compound G does not behave as an ion exchanger in solutions of pH + , but show very little Na + uptake. Compound E undergoes ion exchange with Na + and Cs + , but not with Li+. Both Li + and Na + are sorbed by compounds A and C. The results are indicative of structures which show steric exclusion phenomena. (author)

  3. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grassl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995, C51, 1038–1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11 Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992, 610, 64–66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom.

  4. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  5. Lateral topological crystalline insulator heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Niu, Chengwang; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of lateral heterostructures fabricated by two-dimensional building blocks brings many exciting realms in material science and device physics. Enriching available nanomaterials for creating such heterostructures and enabling the underlying new physics is highly coveted for the integration of next-generation devices. Here, we report a breakthrough in lateral heterostructure based on the monolayer square transition-metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M  =  W, X  =  S/Se) modules. Our results reveal that the MX2 lateral heterostructure (1S-MX2 LHS) can possess excellent thermal and dynamical stability. Remarkably, the highly desired two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase is confirmed by the calculated mirror Chern number {{n}\\text{M}}=-1 . A nontrivial band gap of 65 meV is obtained with SOC, indicating the potential for room-temperature observation and applications. The topologically protected edge states emerge at the edges of two different nanoribbons between the bulk band gap, which is consistent with the mirror Chern number. In addition, a strain-induced topological phase transition in 1S-MX2 LHS is also revealed, endowing the potential utilities in electronics and spintronics. Our predictions not only introduce new member and vitality into the studies of lateral heterostructures, but also highlight the promise of lateral heterostructure as appealing topological crystalline insulator platforms with excellent stability for future devices.

  6. Reaction of 11 C-benzoyl chlorides with metalloid reagents: 11 C-labeling of benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, and phenyl ketones from [11 C]CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslin, Sara; Dahl, Kenneth; Nordeman, Patrik

    2018-01-26

    In this article, we describe the carbon-11 ( 11 C, t 1/2  = 20.4 minutes) labeling of benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, and ketones using an efficient 2-step synthesis in which 11 C-carbon monoxide is used in an initial palladium-mediated reaction to produce 11 C-benzoyl chloride as a key intermediate. In the second step, the obtained 11 C-benzoyl chloride is further treated with a metalloid reagent to furnish the final 11 C-labeled product. Benzyl alcohols were obtained in moderated to high non-isolated radiochemical yields (RCY, 35%-90%) with lithium aluminum hydride or lithium aluminum deuteride as metalloid reagent. Changing the metalloid reagent to either tributyltin hydride or sodium borohydride, allowed for the reliable syntheses of 11 C-benzaldehydes in RCYs ranging from 58% to 95%. Finally, sodium tetraphenylborate were utilized to obtain 11 C-phenyl ketones in high RCYs (77%-95%). The developed method provides a new and efficient route to 3 different classes of compounds starting from aryl iodides or aryl bromides. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Synthesis, screening and QSAR studies of 3-benzoyl-2-oxo/thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine analogues as antibacterial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh L. Sawant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to synthesize several 3-benzoyl-5-acyl-6-methyl-4-substituted-2-oxo/thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidines, evaluate them for their antibacterial activity and to establish correlation between the activity and physicochemical properties. 5-Acyl-6-methyl-4-substituted-2-oxo/thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidines (A were synthesized by cyclocondensation reaction between appropriate aldehyde, acetoacetate and urea/thiourea in presence of aluminium chloride and hydrochloric acid which upon treatment with benzoyl chloride in presence of pyridine in benzene furnish the title compounds (1-28. The structures of all title compounds have been confirmed on the basis of their analytical, IR and NMR spectral data. The title compounds have been tested for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The compounds were divided into training and test sets. A quantitative structure activity relationship study was made using various descriptors. Several statistical expressions were developed using stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. The best quantitative structure activity relationship model was further cross validated. The study revealed that total positive partial charge (PC+ and total polar negative Van der Waals surface area (Q_VSA_PNEG contributes negatively where as contribution of Van der Waals surface area to molar refractivity (SMR_VSA7 contributes positively to the antibacterial activity. The compounds with improved antibacterial potential can be successfully designed with selected quantitative structure activity relationship model.

  8. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Begum

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is the most common and major medical complication of pregnancy with a high incidence of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy abnormally increased lipid peroxidation and free radical formation as well as significantly decreased antioxidants production in maternal blood may lead to pathogenesis of preeclampsia. So, we designed this study as little information is known about lipid peroxidation and antioxidant level in preeclampsia. Objectives: To assess the serum malondialdehyde (MDA level as a lipid peroxidation product and vitamin E (antioxidant level in women with preeclampsia as well as in normal pregnancy and to compare the values. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 60 women aged from 25 to 35 years in the department of Biochemistry, Budi Kemuliaan Maternity Hospital (BKMH in Jakarta during the period April to July 2004. Twenty were normal pregnant women and 20 were preeclamptic patients. For comparison age matched 20 apparently healthy nonpregnant women were included in the study. The study subjects were selected from outpatient department (OPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of BKMH in Jakarta. Serum MDA (lipid peroxidation product level was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBRAS method and vitamin E was estimated spectroflurometrically. Data were analyzed by unpaired Student’s t test between the groups by using SPSS version 12. Results: The mean serum MDA levels were significantly higher in normal pregnancy and also in preeclampsia than that of nonpregnant control group women (p<0.001. Again the serum MDA levels were significantly higher in preeclampsia than that of normal pregnant women (p<0.001. The serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia and also in normal pregnancy than that of nonpregnant control women (p<0.001. Moreover, the serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia compared to that of normal

  9. Schottky spectra and crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestrikov, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we revise the current dependence of the Schottky noise power of a cooled proton beam previously measured at NAP-M. More careful study of experimental data indicates a linear decrease in the inverse Schottky noise power with an increase in the beam intensity (N). The root of this function determines a threshold current which occurs at N = N th ≅1.2 x 10 8 particles. The inspection of measured Schottky spectra shows that this threshold does not correspond to some collective instability of the measured harmonic of the linear beam density. The found value of N th does not depend on the longitudinal beam temperature. For the case of NAP-M lattice, the study of the spectral properties of the Schottky noise in the crystalline string predicts the current dependence of the equilibrium momentum spread of the beam, which qualitatively agrees with that, recalculated from the NAP-M data. (orig.)

  10. Correlations Between retention indices and molecular structure of aliphatic alcohols and of their benzoyl derivatives on phenyl substituted polysiloxane stationary phases; Cromatografia en fase gaseosa sobre metilfenilpolisiloxanos. Estructura molecular y parametros de retencion para alcoholes y sus derivados benzoilados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pias, J B; Gasco, L

    1976-07-01

    The retention indices of aliphatic alcohols of carbon number up to C{sub g}, and of their benzoyl derivatives up to C{sub 7}, were determined in columns packed with Chromo sorb G (AW-DMCS-HP) coated previously with 5% methyl, and methyl phenyl polysiloxanes with increasing polarity (SE-30, 0V-3, 0V-7, 0V-11, 0V-17 and OV-25). Correlations between retention indices and chain length for 1-alcohols, 2-alcohols, 3-alcohols, 1 , on -3-alcohols, 2-methyl-1-alcohols and for their corresponding benzoyl derivatives were calculated at 100, 120 and 140 degree centigree. In alcohols, a -CH{sub 2}- group increases I approximately 100 units, and in their benzoyl derivatives from 80 to 100 units. Dispersion indices {delta}l , and positional and structural increments {delta}I, were evaluated for -OH and benzoyl groups in terms of phase polarity and chain length. Effects of chain length, chain branching and double bond location on retention parameters were also studied. (Author) 23 refs.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide stabilization in one-dimensional flow columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    Rapid hydrogen peroxide decomposition is the primary limitation of catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations in situ chemical oxidation (CHP ISCO) remediation of the subsurface. Two stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide, citrate and phytate, were investigated for their effectiveness in one-dimensional columns of iron oxide-coated and manganese oxide-coated sand. Hydrogen peroxide (5%) with and without 25 mM citrate or phytate was applied to the columns and samples were collected at 8 ports spaced 13 cm apart. Citrate was not an effective stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide in iron-coated sand; however, phytate was highly effective, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals two orders of magnitude over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Both citrate and phytate were effective stabilizers for manganese-coated sand, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals by four-fold over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Phytate and citrate did not degrade and were not retarded in the sand columns; furthermore, the addition of the stabilizers increased column flow rates relative to unstabilized columns. These results demonstrate that citrate and phytate are effective stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide under the dynamic conditions of one-dimensional columns, and suggest that citrate and phytate can be added to hydrogen peroxide before injection to the subsurface as an effective means for increasing the radius of influence of CHP ISCO.

  12. Alkaline Peroxide Delignification of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh [Biosciences; Katahira, Rui [National; Donohoe, Bryon S. [Biosciences; Black, Brenna A. [National; Pattathil, Sivakumar [Complex; Stringer, Jack M. [National; Beckham, Gregg T. [National

    2017-05-30

    Selective biomass fractionation into carbohydrates and lignin is a key challenge in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. In the present study, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment was investigated to fractionate lignin from polysaccharides in corn stover (CS), with a particular emphasis on the fate of the lignin for subsequent valorization. The influence of peroxide loading on delignification during AHP pretreatment was examined over the range of 30-500 mg H2O2/g dry CS at 50 degrees C for 3 h. Mass balances were conducted on the solid and liquid fractions generated after pretreatment for each of the three primary components, lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. AHP pretreatment at 250 mg H2O2/g dry CS resulted in the pretreated solids with more than 80% delignification consequently enriching the carbohydrate fraction to >90%. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy of the AHP pretreated residue shows that, under high peroxide loadings (>250 mg H2O2/g dry CS), most of the side chain structures were oxidized and the aryl-ether bonds in lignin were partially cleaved, resulting in significant delignification of the pretreated residues. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis shows that AHP pretreatment effectively depolymerizes CS lignin into low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fragments in the aqueous fraction. Imaging of AHP pretreated residues shows a more granular texture and a clear lamellar pattern in secondary walls, indicative of layers of varying lignin removal or relocalization. Enzymatic hydrolysis of this pretreated residue at 20 mg/g of glucan resulted in 90% and 80% yields of glucose and xylose, respectively, after 120 h. Overall, AHP pretreatment is able to selectively remove more than 80% of the lignin from biomass in a form that has potential for downstream valorization processes and enriches the solid pulp into a highly digestible material.

  13. Engineering bacterial motility towards hydrogen-peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgile, Chelsea; Hauk, Pricila; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Shang, Wu; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biologists construct innovative genetic/biological systems to treat environmental, energy, and health problems. Many systems employ rewired cells for non-native product synthesis, while a few have employed the rewired cells as 'smart' devices with programmable function. Building on the latter, we developed a genetic construct to control and direct bacterial motility towards hydrogen peroxide, one of the body's immune response signaling molecules. A motivation for this work is the creation of cells that can target and autonomously treat disease, the latter signaled by hydrogen peroxide release. Bacteria naturally move towards a variety of molecular cues (e.g., nutrients) in the process of chemotaxis. In this work, we engineered bacteria to recognize and move towards hydrogen peroxide, a non-native chemoattractant and potential toxin. Our system exploits oxyRS, the native oxidative stress regulon of E. coli. We first demonstrated H2O2-mediated upregulation motility regulator, CheZ. Using transwell assays, we showed a two-fold increase in net motility towards H2O2. Then, using a 2D cell tracking system, we quantified bacterial motility descriptors including velocity, % running (of tumble/run motions), and a dynamic net directionality towards the molecular cue. In CheZ mutants, we found that increased H2O2 concentration (0-200 μM) and induction time resulted in increased running speeds, ultimately reaching the native E. coli wild-type speed of ~22 μm/s with a ~45-65% ratio of running to tumbling. Finally, using a microfluidic device with stable H2O2 gradients, we characterized responses and the potential for "programmed" directionality towards H2O2 in quiescent fluids. Overall, the synthetic biology framework and tracking analysis in this work will provide a framework for investigating controlled motility of E. coli and other 'smart' probiotics for signal-directed treatment.

  14. Effect of cadmium chloride on hepatic lipid peroxidation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride to 8-12 weeks old CBA-mice enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation. A positive correlation between cadmium chloride dose and level of peroxidation was observed in both male and female mice. A sex-related difference in mortality was not observed...... but at a dose of 25 mumol CdCl2/kg the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation was higher in male mice than in female mice. The hepatic lipid peroxidation was not increased above the control level in 3 weeks old mice, while 6 weeks old mice responded with increased peroxidation as did 8-12 weeks old mice....... The mortality after an acute toxic dose of cadmium chloride was the same in the three age groups. Pretreatment of mice with several low intraperitoneal doses of cadmium chloride alleviated cadmium induced mortality and lipid peroxidation. The results demonstrate both age dependency and a protective effect...

  15. Hydrogen peroxide probes directed to different cellular compartments.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalai Malinouski; You Zhou; Vsevolod V Belousov; Dolph L Hatfield; Vadim N Gladyshev

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular ...

  16. Radiation-induced peroxidation of egg lecithin liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Tomaszewski, K.E.; Coleman, M.H.; Gould, G.

    1983-01-01

    Peroxidation of multilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin was measured following γ-irradiation of oxygen saturated suspensions. The addition of hydroxyl radical scavengers and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was used to show that hydroxyl radicals were the major species initiating peroxidation. Superoxide radicals were found to be much less effective initiators of peroxidation. Trolox C, a water soluble analogue of vitamin E, was found to act as an efficient antioxidant in this system. (author)

  17. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vineet K; Yadav, Raghvendra S; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C

    2012-04-30

    Present "green" synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25±1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates pretreated by alkali hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueping; Jiang, Yan; Rong, Xianjian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuangfei; Nie, Shuangxi

    2016-09-01

    The surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates by alkali hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHPP) were investigated in this study. The results tended to manifest that AHPP prior to enzymatic and chemical treatment was potential for improving accessibility and reactivity of bamboo substrates. The inorganic components, organic solvent extractives and acid-soluble lignin were effectively removed by AHPP. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the surface of bamboo chips had less lignin but more carbohydrate after pre-treatment. Fiber surfaces became etched and collapsed, and more pores and debris on the substrate surface were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Brenauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results showed that both of pore volume and surface area were increased after AHPP. Although XRD analysis showed that AHPP led to relatively higher crystallinity, pre-extraction could overall enhance the accessibility of enzymes and chemicals into the bamboo structure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Filho, O.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental study on the (UO 4 .xH 2 ) uranyl peroxide precipitation from a uranium process strip solution is presented. The runs were performed in a batch reactor, in laboratory scale. The main objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. The chemical composition of process solution was obtained. The experiments were conducted according to a factorial design, aiming to evaluate the effects of initial pH, precipitation pH and H 2 O 2 /UO 2 2+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of the efficiency of U precipitation, the content of U in the precipitates and the distribution of impurities in the precipitates. The results indicated that the process works is satisfactory on the studied conditions and depending on conditions, it is possible to achieve levels of U precipitation efficiency greater than 99.9% in reaction times of 2 hours. The precipitates reach grades around 99% U 3 O 8 after calcination (900 0 C) and impurities fall below the limit for penalties established by the ASTM and the Allied Chemical Standards. The precipitates are composed of large aggregates of crystals of 1-4 μm, are fast settling and filtering, and are free-flowing when dry. (Author) [pt

  20. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J.; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY 581/591 was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe 2+ /EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe 2+ /EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H 2 O 2 , BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. A survey of chemicals inducing lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H

    1987-01-01

    A great number of drugs and chemicals are reviewed which have been shown to stimulate lipid peroxidation in any biological system. The underlying mechanisms, as far as known, are also dealt with. Lipid peroxidation induced by iron ions, organic hydroperoxides, halogenated hydrocarbons, redox cycling drugs, glutathione depleting chemicals, ethanol, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and a number of miscellaneous compounds, e.g. hydrazines, pesticides, antibiotics, are mentioned. It is shown that lipid peroxidation is stimulated by many of these compounds. However, quantitative estimates cannot be given yet and it is still impossible to judge the biological relevance of chemical-induced lipid peroxidation.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Probes Directed to Different Cellular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Zhou, You; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events. Conclusions We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells. PMID:21283738

  3. Hydrogen peroxide probes directed to different cellular compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikalai Malinouski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells.Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events.We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells.

  4. Synthesis and thermal properties of strontium and calcium peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Kraft, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    A practical synthesis and a discussion of some chemical properties of pure strontium peroxide and calcium peroxide are presented. The general synthesis of these peroxides involves precipitation of their octahydrates by addition of H2O2 to aqueous ammoniacal Sr(NO3)2 or CaCl2. The octahydrates are converted to the anhydrous peroxides by various dehydration techniques. A new x-ray diffraction powder pattern for CaO2 x 8H2O is given from which lattice parameters a=6.212830 and c=11.0090 were calculated on the basis of the tetragonal crystal system.

  5. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Crystalline silicotitanate gate review analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Carreon, R.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is an ion-exchange method for removing radioactive cesium from tank waste to allow the separation of the waste into high- and low-level fractions. The CST, originally developed Sandia National Laboratories personnel in association with Union Oil Products Corporation, has both a high affinity and selectivity for sorbing cesium-137 from highly alkaline or acidic solutions. For several years now, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded work to investigate applying CST to large-scale removal of cesium-137 from radioactive tank wastes. In January 1997, an expert panel sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area met to review the current state of the technology and to determine whether it was ready for routine use. The review also sought to identify any technical issues that must be resolved or additional CST development that must occur before full implementation by end-users. The CST Gate Review Group concluded that sufficient work has been done to close developmental work on CST and turn the remaining site-specific tasks over to the users. This report documents the review group''s findings, issues, concerns, and recommendations as well as responses from the Tanks Focus Area expert staff to specific pretreatment and immobilization issues

  7. Characterization of the residues modified when F1 - ATPases are inactivated by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazan and 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]-1,N6-ethenoadenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Inactivation of the F 1 -ATPases isolated from spinach chloroplasts (CF 1 ) and from the plasma membrane of the thermophilic bacterium, PS3 (TF 1 ) with 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazan (Nbf-Cl) results in modification of Tyr-β-328 and Tyr-β-307, respectively. These residues are homologous to Tyr-β-311 of the F 1 -ATPase isolated from beef heart mitochondria, previously identified as the residue derivatized during inactivation of that enzyme with Nbf-Cl. Interestingly, an intramolecular migration of the Nbf- moiety from the tyrosine residue to a nearby lysine residue, observed when MF 1 and TF 1 which had been inactivated with Nbf-Cl are incubated at alkaline pH, was not observed when CF 1 was treated in the same manner. CF 1 differs from other ATPases in that it contains ADP, tightly bound at a single catalytic site. It is possible that this tightly bound ADP prevents migration of the Nbf moiety. The characteristics of inactivation of MF 1 with the fluorosulfonyl benzoyl derivatives of adenosine (FSBA) and inosine (FSBI) have been described in the literature. Inactivation of MF 1 with FSBA results in the mutually exclusive modification of Tyr-368 or His-427 in all three copies of the β subunit. These residues comprise part of the noncatalytic nucleotide binding site. Inactivation of MF 1 with FSBI results in modification of Tyr-β-345 in a single catalytic site. The fluorosulfonyl benzoyl derivative of 1,N 6 -ethenoadenosine (FSBεA) has been prepared, and the characteristics and selectivity of modification of MF 1 with this reagent are presented. FSBεA binds reversibly to MF 1 with an apparent dissociation constant of 250 μM before covalent modification. The residue in MF 1 that reacts with FSBεA exhibits an apparent pK a of 8.9

  8. Studies on Synthesis of Some Novel Heterocyclic Chalcone, Pyrazoline, Pyrimidine - 2 - One, Pyrimidine - 2 - Thione, para-Acetanilide Sulphonyl and Benzoyl Derivatives and their Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh N. Mistry

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available 1, 2 - Dichloro benzene on chlorosulphonation by chlorosulphonic acid gives 1, 2 - [dichloro] - benzene sulphonyl chloride which on condensation with p –amino acetophenone gives 1-[acetyl] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative. This derivative undergo condensation with 2,4- dichloro benzaldehyde gives 1- [3” - (sub. phenyl - 2” - propene - 1” - one] - 1’ , 2’ - [dichloro] - dibenz sulphonamide derivative which on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate and glacial acetic acid gives 1-[acetyl]-3- [1’ , 2’ - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] -5 - [2” , 4” - dichloro phenyl] - 2 - pyrazoline derivative. This derivative reacts with various substituted aldehydes to give corresponding substituted chalcone derivatives [1(a-j]. Now, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on condensation with urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine - 2 - one derivatives [2(a-j] and on condensation with thio-urea gives corresponding substituted pyrimidine- 2 -thione derivatives [3(a-j]. Further, these chalcone derivatives [1(a-j] on reaction with 99% hydrazine hydrate gives 1 - [1’ - (H - 5’ - (sub. phenyl - 2’ - pyrazoline]- 3 - [1” , 2” - (dichloro - dibenz sulphonamide] - 5 - [2’’’ , 4’’’ - dichloro phenyl]-2- pyrazoline derivatives [4(a-j] as an intermediate compounds, which on condensation with p-acetanilide sulphonyl chloride gives corresponding substituted p - acetanilide sulphonyl derivatives [5(a-j] and on condensation with benzoyl chloride gives corresponding substituted benzoyl derivatives [6(a-j]. Structure elucidation of synthesised compounds has been made on the basis of elemental analysis, I.R. spectral studies and 1H N.M.R. spectral studies. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesised compounds has been studied against the cultures “Staphylococcus aureus”, “Escherichia coli” and “Candela albicans”.

  9. Introduction to chemistry of crystalline zeolites and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Cabezas, Raul Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Establishes the zeolites as the most important group of solid acids and its relation to the contemporaneous chemical industry. It describes that zeolites are used in the following applications: refineries, chemicals/petrochemicals, environmental chemistry, separation of gas, adsorbent ia and ionic exchange in water purification in mineral processes, medicine and agricultural industry. Zeolites are defined as crystalline aluminium silicates with a compound structure of interconnected tetrahedrons. It mentions the key components in zeolites structure. It focuses that structural basic unity of the zeolite is the tetrahedron and compound structural unities are: cells and columns. Besides, it describes that pore system defines a lot of all its properties; but chemical composition affects them. Composition and properties of zeolites are established: adsorption, molecular sieves, acidity, selectivity, transition state in the hydrocarbon's chemistry. It concludes that the newer application of zeolite is in oxidations: Titanium-Silicate-1; production of propylene's oxide using peroxide of hydrogen as oxidizing. The catalysis is an active area of research, and the most popular areas are related to chemicals and the environment [es

  10. Hydraulic testing in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.E.; Andersson, J.E.; Carlsson, L.; Hansson, K.; Larsson, N.A.

    1986-12-01

    Swedish Geolocical Company (SGAB) conducted and carried out single-hole hydraulic testing in borehole Fi 6 in the Finnsjoen area of central Sweden. The purpose was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different methods applicable in crystalline rocks and to recommend methods for use in current and scheduled investigations in a range of low hydraulic conductivity rocks. A total of eight different methods of testing were compared using the same equipment. This equipment was thoroughly tested as regards the elasticity of the packers and change in volume of the test section. The use of a hydraulically operated down-hole valve enabled all the tests to be conducted. Twelve different 3-m long sections were tested. The hydraulic conductivity calculated ranged from about 5x10 -14 m/s to 1x10 -6 m/s. The methods used were water injection under constant head and then at a constant rate-of-flow, each of which was followed by a pressure fall-off period. Water loss, pressure pulse, slug and drill stem tests were also performed. Interpretation was carried out using standard transient evaluation methods for flow in porous media. The methods used showed themselves to be best suited to specific conductivity ranges. Among the less time-consuming methods, water loss, slug and drill stem tests usually gave somewhat higher hydraulic conductivity values but still comparable to those obtained using the more time-consuming tests. These latter tests, however, provided supplementary information on hydraulic and physical properties and flow conditions, together with hydraulic conductivity values representing a larger volume of rock. (orig./HP)

  11. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  12. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-01-01

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results

  14. Lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid levels in Nigeria children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to establish data on the roles of lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid in the pathology of malaria in Nigeria children. We measured the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid in the plasma of 406 parasitaemic and 212 non-parasitaemic Nigerian children.

  15. effect of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy breaking of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (Claassens and. Vreugdenhil, 2000; Suttle, 2004). Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy and sprouting of potato microtubers and field grown tubers is described. MATERIELS AND METHODS. Production of microtubers.

  16. Plasma lipid peroxidation and progression of disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M.; Mostert, J.; Arutjunyan, A. V.; Stepanov, M.; Teelken, A.; Heersema, D.; De Keyser, J.

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), but its relation to disease progression is uncertain. To evaluate the relationship of plasma lipid peroxidation with progression of disability in MS, we measured blood plasma fluorescent lipid peroxidation

  17. Propylene epoxydation with hydrogen peroxide in acidic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kertalli, E.; Rijnsoever, L.S.; Paunovic, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Neira d'Angelo, M.F.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the epoxidation of propylene with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of acids and halides is studied. The presence of acids and halides is indispensable for increasing the selectivity of the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, the first step of the direct propylene oxide

  18. Chromium-induced accumulation of peroxide content, stimulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative damage and changes in contents of chlorophyll, protein, peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of enzymatic antioxidants were investigated in 4-day-old green gram (Vigna radiata L. cv. Wilczek) seedlings. Cr increased the contents of peroxide and MDA but decreased the ...

  19. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  20. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  1. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paunovic, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor is a safe and efficient process. Conventionally, hydrogen peroxide is produced using the anthraquinone autooxidation process, which is rather complex and can only be performed cost-effectively on a large scale. As a result, hydrogen

  2. The evaluation of hydrogen peroxide bleaching of Gonometa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide bleaching on Gonometa postica silk and the influence that temperature, pH and time duration had on hydrogen peroxide release , colour change, breaking load and stiffness were determined. The best bleaching (81 delta E) of the Gonometa postica silk fabric was obtained with 60 minutes ...

  3. The quest for crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2002-01-01

    The phase transition of an ion beam into its crystalline state has long been expected to dramatically influence beam dynamics beyond the limitations of standard accelerator physics. Yet, although considerable improvement in beam cooling techniques has been made, strong heating mechanisms inherent to existing high-energy storage rings have prohibited the formation of the crystalline state in these machines up to now. Only recently, laser cooling of low-energy beams in the table-top rf quadrupole storage ring PAaul Laser cooLing Acceleration System (PALLAS) has lead to the experimental realization of crystalline beams. In this article, the quest for crystalline beams as well as their unique properties as experienced in PALLAS will be reviewed.

  4. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  5. Excimer fluorescence of liquid crystalline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, Tamara V.; Khakhel, Oleg A.; Barashkov, Nikolay N.; Korotkova, Irina V.

    1996-04-01

    The method of synchronous scanning fluorescence spectroscopy shows a presence of dimers of pyrene in a polymeric matrix. The results suggest that excimer formation takes place with dimers in liquid crystalline systems.

  6. Syntheses, molecular and crystalline architectures, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syntheses, molecular and crystalline architectures, and luminescence behaviour of terephthalate bridged heptacoordinated dinuclear lead(II) complexes containing a pentadentate N-donor Schiff base. SUBHASIS ROYa, SOMNATH CHOUBEYa, SUMITAVA KHANa, KISHALAY BHARa,. PARTHA MITRAb and BARINDRA ...

  7. Radiation effect on lipid peroxide content of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Nobutada; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the radiation-induced deterioration of lipid in spices, peroxide value, iodine value and acid value were measured after extraction by chloroform. Peroxide values of black pepper and white pepper were not increased by gamma-irradiation with doses below 30 kGy and gradually increased at higher dose up to 80 kGy in this study. On contrary, peroxide values of clove and rosemary increased rather quickly below 20 kGy of gamma-irradiation, and they became stationary at higher dose. Iodine values and acid values had relationship with peroxide values on each kind of spices. On the storage study of irradiated spices, peroxide values decreased quickly during 20 days storage as same as nonirradiated spices, and it became stationary after 20 to 50 days storage at 30degC. Enhancement of oxidized deterioration were not observed even higher irradiation doses up to 80 kGy in this study. (author)

  8. Determination of active oxygen content in rare earth peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carlos A.S.; Abrao, Alcidio

    1993-01-01

    The content of active oxygen in rare earth peroxides have been determined after the dissolution of the samples with hydrocloridic acid in the presence of potassium iodide. The free generated iodine is titrated with sodium thiosulfate using starch as indicator. The oxidation of iodide to the free iodine indicates the presence of a higher valence state rare earth oxide, until now specifically recognized for the oxides of cerium (Ce O 2 ), praseodymium (Pr 6 O 1 1) and terbium (TB 4 O 7 ). recently the authors synthesized a new series of rare earth compounds, the peroxides. These new compounds were prepared by precipitating the rare earth elements complexed with carbonate ion by addition of hydrogen peroxide. the authors demonstrated that all rare earth elements, once solubilized by complexing with carbonate ion, are quantitatively precipitated as peroxide by addition of hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  9. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits

  10. Irradiation sterilization of semi-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Dunn, T.; Stannett, V.

    1978-01-01

    A semi-crystalline polymer such as polypropylene, is sterilized by high energy irradiation, with the polymer containing a non-crystalline mobilizing additive which increases the free volume of the polymer, to prevent embrittlement of the polymer during and subsequent to the irradiation. The additive has a density of from 0.6 to 1.9 g/cm 3 and a molecular weight from 100 to 10,000 g/mole

  11. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halgren, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft 2 ) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  12. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition......, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J(1H–13C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl......-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl...

  13. Acid- and base-catalysis in the mononuclear rearrangement of some (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole in toluene: effect of substituents on the course of reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Francesca; Frenna, Vincenzo; Ghelfi, Franco; Marullo, Salvatore; Spinelli, Domenico

    2011-04-15

    The reaction rates for the rearrangement of eleven (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 3a-k into the relevant (2-aryl-5-phenyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)ureas 4a-k in the presence of trichloroacetic acid or of piperidine have been determined in toluene at 313.1 K. The results have been related to the effect of the aryl substituent by using Hammett and/or Ingold-Yukawa-Tsuno correlations and have been compared with those previously collected in a protic polar solvent (dioxane/water) as well as with those on the analogous rearrangement of the corresponding (Z)-arylhydrazones of 3-benzoyl-5-phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 1a-k in benzene. Some light can thus be shed on the general differences of chemical reactivity between protic polar (or dipolar aprotic) and apolar solvents.

  14. OxymaPure/DIC: An Efficient Reagent for the Synthesis of a Novel Series of 4-[2-(2-Acetylaminophenyl-2-oxo-acetylamino] Benzoyl Amino Acid Ester Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Faham

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OxymaPure (ethyl 2-cyano-2-(hydroxyiminoacetate was tested as an additive for use in the carbodiimide (DIC approach for the synthesis of a novel series of α-ketoamide derivatives (4-[2-(2-acetylaminophenyl-2-oxo-acetylamino]benzoyl amino acid ester derivatives. OxymaPure showed clear superiority to HOBt/DIC or carbodiimide alone in terms of purity and yield. The title compounds were synthesized via the ring opening of N-acylisatin. First, N-acetylisatin was reacted with 4-aminobenzoic acid under conventional heating as well as microwave irradiation to afford 4-(2-(2-acetamidophenyl-2-oxoacetamidobenzoic acid. This α-ketoamide was coupled to different amino acid esters using OxymaPure/DIC as a coupling reagent to afford 4-[2-(2-acetylaminophenyl-2-oxo-acetylamino]benzoyl amino acid ester derivatives in excellent yield and purity. The synthesized compounds were characterized using FT-IR, NMR, and elemental analysis.

  15. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  16. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  17. Diverse Cd(II) compounds based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands: Structures and photoluminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ning; Guo, Wei-Ying; Song, Hui-Hua; Yu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Five new Cd(II) coordination polymers with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid (H_2bzgluO) and different N-donor ligands, [Cd(bzgluO)(2,2′-bipy)(H_2O)]_n (1), [Cd(bzgluO)(2,4′-bipy)_2(H_2O)·3H_2O]_n (2), [Cd(bzgluO)(phen)·H_2O]_n (3), [Cd(bzgluO)(4,4′-bipy)(H_2O)]_n (4), [Cd(bzgluO)(bpp)(H_2O)·2H_2O]_n (5) were synthesized (2,2′-bipy=2,2′-bipyridine, 2,4′-bipy=2,4′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4′-bipy=4,4′-bipyridine, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane). Compounds 1–2 exhibit a 1D single-chain structure. Compound 1 generates a 2D supramolecular structure via π–π stacking and hydrogen bonding, 3D architecture of compound 2 is formed by hydrogen bonding. Compound 3 features a 1D double-chain structure, which are linked by π–π interactions into a 2D supramolecular layer. Compounds 4-5 display a 2D network structure. Neighboring layers of 4 are extended into a 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding. The structural diversity of these compounds is attributed to the effect of ancillary N-donor ligands and coordination modes of H_2bzgluO. Luminescent properties of 1–5 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism of compounds 1, 2 and 5 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Five new Cd(II) metal coordination compounds with H_2bzgluO and different N-donor ligands were synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 present 1D structures, compounds 4 and 5 display 2D networks. Results indicate that auxiliary ligands and coordination modes of H_2bzgluO play an important role in governing the formation of final frameworks, and the hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking interactions contribute the formation of the diverse supramolecular architectures. Furthermore, the different crystal structures influence the emission spectra significantly. - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that complexes prepared with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid. • Each complex displays diverse structures and different supramolecular

  18. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher R; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-02-07

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances.

  19. Electron irradiation effects on lithium peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Jun; Shiotsuki, Taishi; Shimo, Yusuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Nito, Takehiro; Kimoto, Koji

    2018-03-01

    In this study, electron irradiation effects on lithium peroxide (Li2O2), which is an important discharge product of Li-air (or Li-O2) batteries, were investigated using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results obtained show that Li2O2 to Li2O transformation occurs with 80 and 300 keV incident electrons under high electron dose rates at 20 and -183 °C. The Li2O2 to Li2O transformation rate for 300 keV was 1/5 of that for 80 keV with the irradiation taking place at -183 °C. We also present a series of the EELS spectra that can be used as a criterion to judge the molar ratio of Li2O to Li2O2 in the general systems where Li2O2 and Li2O coexist.

  20. Analysis of lipid peroxidation kinetics. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden

    2008-01-01

    concentrations of reactants or different ways of initiating the re-  action. Nor has it been possible to predict the time dependence of the  products. The reason for these problems is the complicated structure  of the kinetic scheme, which includes a chain reaction. In this work  we perform an in depth analysis......  The kinetics of the lipid peroxidation reaction is only partly under-  stood. Although the set of reactions constituting the overall reaction  is believed to be known, it has not been possible to predict how the  reaction will respond to a change of one or more of the parameters, e.g.  initial...... of the importance of the individual  reaction steps and we introduce a new quasi-stationary concentration  method based on the assumption that one or more concentrations vary  much slower than the others. We show that it is justified to use a  quasi-stationary concentration approximation for the alkyl radical L...

  1. Plutonium peroxide precipitation: review and current research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Increasing the HNO 3 concentration decreases the filtration time but increases the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. A compromise was therefore necessary. If a minimum plutonium concentration is required in the filtrate, the acidity could be lowered to 1.9M with an approximate doubling in the filtration time. The H 2 O 2 concentration has little effect on filtration time. However, the higher the H 2 O 2 concentration, the less plutonium lost to the filtrate. Concentrations higher than the 22 moles/mole Pu recommended (at least up to 30 molar which was the highest investigated) would be beneficial if reagent costs are not excessive and production capacity exists for destroying the excess H 2 O 2 in the filtrate. Although the effect is not large, filtration time is shorter and the plutonium concentration in the filtrate is lower if metallic impurities are present. The slowest rate of H 2 O 2 addition investigated gives a plutonium peroxide precipitate with the fastest filtration time. The rate of addition has very little effect on the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. The temperature has little effect on the filtration time. 14 0 C is recommended since decomposition of H 2 O 2 would be slower at 14 0 C than at 22 0 C (min. Pu content in the filtrate). The effect of digestion time on both the filtration time and the plutonium content in the filtrate is minor, so the shortest digestion time investigated is recommended

  2. Bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsens, Carolus; Rastogi, Sanjay; Dutch Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The reported thin-film polymerization has been used as a screening method in order to find bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters with convenient melting temperatures for melt-processing purposes. An in depth study of the structural, morphological and chemical changes occurring during the ongoing polycondensation reactions of these polymers have been performed. Structural and conformational changes during polymerization for different compositions have been followed by time resolved X-ray and Infrared spectroscopy. In this study, bio-based monomers such as vanillic acid and 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid are successfully incorporated in liquid crystalline polyesters and it is shown that bio-based liquid crystalline polymers with high aromatic content and convenient processing temperatures can be synthesized. Special thanks to the Dutch Polymer Institute for financial support

  3. Irreducible tensor operators and crystalline potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutron, F.; Saint-James, D.

    1961-01-01

    It is often accepted that the effects of its neighbourhood on the quantum state of an ion A may be obtained by the model of the crystalline effective field approximation. Within this assumption Stevens has developed a method which provides equivalent operators that facilitate the calculation of the matrix elements of the crystalline field in a given multiplicity. This method has been extended here. We demonstrate that in the expansion of the crystalline field in powers of the electrons coordinates of the ion A - for electrons of the same sub-shell of A - only even terms can contribute. Equivalent operators and matrix elements, in a given multiplicity, are given for these development terms - up to order 6 - and for potential invariant by the operations of one of the thirty-two point-groups. (author) [fr

  4. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  5. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of VX, GD, and HD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, George W; Sorrick, David C; Procell, Lawrence R; Hess, Zoe A; Brickhouse, Mark D; McVey, Iain F; Schwartz, Lewis I

    2003-01-01

    Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) has been utilized for more than a decade to sterilize clean rooms and pharmaceutical processing equipment and, quite recently, to decontaminate anthrax-ridden buildings...

  6. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan; Caps, Valerie; Tuel, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional

  7. Free standing graphene oxide film for hydrogen peroxide sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Pranay; Balakrishnan, Jayakumar; Thakur, Ajay D.

    2018-05-01

    We report hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)sensing using free standing graphene oxide thin films prepared using a cost effective scalable approach. Such sensors may find application in pharmaceutical and food processing industries.

  8. the effects of vitamin e supplementation on serum lipid peroxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. C.O.NWAIGWE

    The effects of dietary supplementation of vitamin E on feed intake and serum lipid peroxidation formation were ... belongs to the family Birnaviridae and of the genus Birnavirus ... diseases, Alzheimer's disease and increased resistance to ...

  9. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  10. Potentiometric Titration Method for Quantitative Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bessette, Russell R

    2005-01-01

    An electrochemical potentiometric titration method that entails titration of a known volume of a catholyte containing an unknown amount of hydrogen peroxide in a titration cell having two electrodes...

  11. Influence of Alkaline-Peroxide Treatment of Fiber on the Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber/Poly(butylene succinate Biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Yee Then

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the surface of oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF was modified via alkaline-peroxide treatment with hydrogen peroxide under alkaline conditions. The effect of the treatment on the chemical composition and microstructure of the fiber was examined using chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The treatment resulted in the removal of lignin, hemicellulose, and waxy substances from the fiber and increased its surface roughness and crystallinity. The eco-friendly biocomposite was made from poly(butylene succinate (PBS and chemically treated fiber at a weight ratio of 30:70, and was fabricated via a melt-blending technique followed by hot-pressed moulding. The results indicated that alkaline-peroxide treatment of the fiber improved the tensile strength, tensile modulus, and elongation at break of the OPMF/PBS biocomposite by 54, 830, and 43%, respectively. The SEM analysis revealed improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the chemically treated fiber and the PBS. This work demonstrates that alkaline-peroxide treatment of fiber is beneficial prior to its use in fabricating biocomposites.

  12. Used fuel disposition in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) in fiscal year 2010 (FY10) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level nuclear waste. The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  13. Irradiation induced crystalline to amorphous transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a crystalline solid with energetic heavy particles results in cascades of defects which, with increasing dose, overlap and form a continuous disordered layer. In semiconductors the physical properties of such disordered layers are found to be similar to those of amorphous layers produced by evaporation. It is shown in the case of silicon, that the transition from a disordered crystalline (X) layer to an amorphous (α) layer occurs when the Gibbs energy of the X phase and of the defects it contains becomes larger than the Gibbs energy of the α phase. (author)

  14. Electronic processes in non-crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mott, Nevill Francis

    2012-01-01

    Since the first edition of this highly successful book the field saw many great developments both in experimental and theoretical studies of electrical properties of non-crystalline solids. It became necessary to rewrite nearly the whole book, while the aims of the second edition remained the same: to set out the theoretical concepts, to test them by comparison with experiment for a wide variety of phenomena, and to apply them to non-crystalline materials. Sir Nevill Mott shared the1977 Nobel Prize for Physics, awarded for his research work in this field. The reissue of this book as part of th

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of 5-benzoyl-4-phenyl-2-methylthio-1H-pyrimidine with theoretical calculations using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnkaya, Ersin; Dinçer, Muharrem; Şahan, Emine; Yıldırım, İsmail

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the molecular structure and spectroscopic parameters (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR) of 5-benzoyl-4-phenyl-2-methylthio-1H-pyrimidine. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with Z = 2. The molecular geometry was also optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets in ground state and compared with the experimental data. All the assignments of the theoretical frequencies were performed by potential energy distributions using VEDA 4 program. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential (ESP). Also, non-linear optical properties of the title compound were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. The theoretical results showed an excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  16. Determination of rhenium content in molybdenite by ICP-MS after separation of the major matrix by solvent extraction with N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxalamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhong, Li-feng; Tu, Xiang-lin; Liang, Xi-rong; Xu, Ji-feng

    2010-05-15

    A simple and rapid analytical method for determining the concentration of rhenium in molybdenite for Re-Os dating was developed. The method used isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) after the removal of major matrix elements (e.g., Mo, Fe, and W) from Re by solvent extraction with N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) in chloroform solution. The effect on extraction efficiency of parameters such as pH (HCl concentration), BPHA concentration, and extraction time were also assessed. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the validity of the separation method was accessed by measuring (187)Re/(185)Re values for a molybdenite reference material (JDC). The obtained values were in good agreement with previously measured values of the Re standard. The proposed method was applied to replicate Re-Os dating of JDC and seven samples of molybdenite from the Yuanzhuding large Cu-Mo porphyry deposit. The results demonstrate good precision and accuracy for the proposed method. The advantages of the method (i.e., simplicity, efficiency, short analysis time, and low cost) make it suitable for routine analysis.

  17. Insight into the theoretical and experimental studies of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone N(4)-methyl-N(4)- phenylthiosemicarbazone - A potential NLO material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, K. G.; Aravindakshan, K. K.; Safna Hussan, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The synthesis, geometrical parameters, spectroscopic studies, optimised molecular structure, vibrational analysis, Mullikan population analysis, MEP, NBO, frontier molecular orbitals and NLO effects of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone N-(4)-methyl-N-(4)-phenylthiosemicarbazone, C25H23N5OS (L1) have been communicated in this paper. A combined experimental and theoretical approach was used to explore the structure and properties of the compound. For computational studies, Gaussian 09 program was used. Starting geometry of molecule was taken from X-ray refinement data and has been optimized by using DFT (B3LYP) method with the 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. NBO analysis gave insight into the strongly delocalized structure, responsible for the nonlinearity and hence the stability of the molecule. Frontier molecular orbitals have been defined to forecast the global reactivity descriptors of L1. The computed first-order hyperpolarizability (β) of the compound is 2 times higher than that of urea and this account for its nonlinear optical property. Simultaneously, a molecular docking study of the compound was performed using GLIDE Program. For this, three biological enzymes, histone deacetylase, ribonucleotide reductase and DNA methyl transferase, were selected as receptor molecules.

  18. The Melting Behavior and Thermal Stability of Green Poly(L-lactic acid) with N, N, N, N'-Tetra(benzoyl) Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid Dihydrazide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Qiang Xu, Q.; Ren, L.; Zhao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal properties of green poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) with N, N, N, N'-tetra(benzoyl) ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid dihydrazide (NA) at different conditions were investigated. The melting behavior of PLLA/NA sample after isothermal crystallization at 100 degree C showed that the low-temperature melting peak shifted to high temperature with increasing of crystallization time. However, the high-temperature melting peak did not show any change. Meantime, the melting enthalpy of cold crystallization was higher than that of hot crystallization, and the difference between cold crystallization and hot crystallization increased from 0.31 J/g to 0.89 J/g with increasing of crystallization time. Heating or cooling rate affected the melting behavior of PLLA, the low-temperature and high-temperature melting peak shifted to low temperature with increasing of rate, and the ratio of melting peak area between low-temperature melting peak and high-temperature melting peak decreased. Thermal stability of PLLA/NA indicated that PLLA/NA only exhibited one decomposition stage as decomposition of PLLA. (author)

  19. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    OpenAIRE

    Karadas, Muhammet; Hatipoglu, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n = 10): AS: no whitening (negative control), with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwas...

  20. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  1. Physico Chemical Characteristic of Kappa Carrageenan Degraded Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Febriansyah Siregar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractKappa carrageenan is polysaccharide that widely used in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile and printing industries as coagulate agent, stabilizer and gelling agent. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is strong oxidator to degrade polysaccharide. Hydrogen peroxide has some advantades such as cheap, easy to get and savety environment. Degradation method using hydrogen peroxide is a technology based on establishment radical hydoxile reactive that attack the glycosidic of polysaccharides as a result reducing in molecular weight of polysaccharide. The aims of this study were to analyze the effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature and degradation time to molecular weight of refined kappa carrageenan. Structural changes on kappa carrageenan degradation were characterized by viscometer, SEM and FTIR. Hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature and degradation time were significantly reducing molecular weight and changes in the structural function of refined kappa carrageenan. The lowest molecular weight of refined kappa carrageenan degraded was obtained from the treatment 3% of hydrogen peroxide at temperature 80°C and degradation time for 4 hours.

  2. Determination of crystallinity of ceramic materials from the Ruland Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Gomes Junior, J.C.; Lima, J.C. de; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some methods found in literature approach the different characteristics between crystalline and amorphous phases by X ray diffraction technique. These methods use the relation between the intensities of the crystalline peaks and background amorphous or the absolute intensity of one of these to determine the relative amount of crystalline and amorphous material. However, a crystalline substance presents shows coherent diffuse scattering and a loss in the intensity of the peaks of diffraction in function of thermal vibrations of atoms and imperfections in the crystalline structure. A correct method for the determination of the crystallinity must take in account these effects. This work has as objective to determine the crystallinity of ceramic materials obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ashes, using the X ray diffraction technique and the Ruland Method, that considers the diminution of the intensity of the crystalline peak because of the disorder affects. The Ruland Method shows adequate for the determination of the crystallinity of the ceramic materials. (author)

  3. Metamict state radiation damage in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Metamict minerals provide an excellent basis for the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly such changes in physical and chemical properties as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. This paper summarizes pertinent literature on metamictization and proposes experiments that are critical to the elucidation of structural controls on radiation damage in crystalline phases

  4. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  5. Attenuation of Thermal Neutrons by Crystalline Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Ashry, A.; Fathalla, M.

    2002-01-01

    A simple formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total neutron cross - section including the Bragg scattering from different (hkt) planes to the neutron * transmission through a solid crystalline silicon. The formula takes into account the silicon form of poly or mono crystals and its parameters. A computer program DSIC was developed to provide the required calculations. The calculated values of the total neutron cross-section of perfect silicon crystal at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures were compared with the experimental ones. The obtained agreement shows that the simple formula fits the experimental data with sufficient accuracy .A good agreement was also obtained between the calculated and measured values of polycrystalline silicon in the energy range from 5 eV to 500μ eV. The feasibility study on using a poly-crystalline silicon as a cold neutron filter and mono-crystalline as a thermal neutron one is given. The optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread, temperature and cutting plane for efficiently transmitting the thermal reactor neutrons, while rejecting both fast neutrons and gamma rays accompanying the thermal ones for the mono crystalline silicon are also given

  6. Gamma crystallins of the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendra, Venkata Pulla Rao; Khan, Ismail; Chandani, Sushil; Muniyandi, Anbukkarasi; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2016-01-01

    Protein crystallins co me in three types (α, β and γ) and are found predominantly in the eye, and particularly in the lens, where they are packed into a compact, plastic, elastic, and transparent globule of proper refractive power range that aids in focusing incoming light on to the retina. Of these, the γ-crystallins are found largely in the nuclear region of the lens at very high concentrations (>400 mg/ml). The connection between their structure and inter-molecular interactions and lens transparency is an issue of particular interest. We review the origin and phylogeny of the gamma crystallins, their special structure involving the use of Greek key supersecondary structural motif, and how they aid in offering the appropriate refractive index gradient, intermolecular short range attractive interactions (aiding in packing them into a transparent ball), the role that several of the constituent amino acid residues play in this process, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability and how even single point mutations can upset this delicate balance and lead to intermolecular aggregation, forming light-scattering particles which compromise transparency. We cite several examples of this, and illustrate this by cloning, expressing, isolating and comparing the properties of the mutant protein S39C of human γS-crystallin (associated with congenital cataract-microcornea), with those of the wild type molecule. In addition, we note that human γ-crystallins are also present in other parts of the eye (e.g., retina), where their functions are yet to be understood. There are several 'crucial' residues in and around the Greek key motifs which are essential to maintain the compact architecture of the crystallin molecules. We find that a mutation that replaces even one of these residues can lead to reduction in solubility, formation of light-scattering particles and loss of transparency in the molecular assembly. Such a molecular understanding of the process helps us construct the

  7. Spectroscopic studies of europium-tetracyclines complexes and their applications in detection of hydrogen peroxide and urea peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Andrea Nastri

    2010-01-01

    In this work were studied the spectroscopic properties of trivalent europium ion complexed with components of tetracycline family, chlorotetracycline, oxytetracycline and metacycline, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and urea peroxide. Optical parameters were obtained such as absorption, emission, lifetime and calibration curves were constructed for luminescence spectra. Experiments were carried out with both inorganic compounds and europium-tetracyclines complexes in order to verify possible interferences. Studies for glucose determination were also described using europium-tetracyclines complexes as biosensors. Results show that europium tetracyclines complexes emit a narrow band in the visible region and, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or urea peroxide there is a greater enhancement in their luminescence and lifetime. Thus, europium-tetracyclines complexes studied can be used as biosensors for hydrogen and urea peroxides determination as a low cost and room temperature method. An indirect method for glucose determination was studied by adding glucose oxidase enzyme in europium-tetracyclines complex in the presence of glucose promoting as product hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  8. Characterization of TPS/PHBV blends prepared in the presence of maleated PHBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Natalia F.; Andrade, Cristina T.

    2011-01-01

    Maleated derivatives of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) were obtained in an internal mixer in the presence of maleic anhydride and benzoyl peroxide, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. Extruded blends of cornstarch and PHBV were prepared with and without the addition of maleated PHBV. Although the X-ray diffractograms had revealed decreased crystallinity, the micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy indicated that the addition of the maleated derivatives led to a partial compatibilization. (author)

  9. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vineet K.; Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Present “green” synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach. ► TEM shows average particle size of 8.25 ± 1.37 nm of synthesized nanosilver, giving UV–vis absorption at 410 nm. ► FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation (stability up to three months). ► The nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). ► The recovery percentage of H 2 O 2 in water is 92–105%, which is applicable for sensors and water/waste water plants. - Abstract: Present “green” synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25 ± 1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV–vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  10. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vineet K., E-mail: vineet2shukla@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Poonam [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM shows average particle size of 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm of synthesized nanosilver, giving UV-vis absorption at 410 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation (stability up to three months). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recovery percentage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in water is 92-105%, which is applicable for sensors and water/waste water plants. - Abstract: Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  11. The Amoebicidal Effect of Ergosterol Peroxide Isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Suárez-Medellín, Jorge; Del Ángel-Piña, Christian; Trigos, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and is a recurrent health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of the magnitude of this disease, finding novel strategies for treatment that does not affect human cells is necessary. Ergosterol peroxide is a sterol particularly known as a major cytotoxic agent with a wide spectrum of biological activities produced by edible and medicinal mushrooms. The aim of this report is to evaluate the amoebicidal activity of ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol isolated from 5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol) (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Our results show that ergosterol peroxide produced a strong cytotoxic effect against amoebic growth. The inhibitory concentration IC50 of ergosterol peroxide was evaluated. The interaction between E. histolytica and ergosterol peroxide in vitro resulted in strong amoebicidal activity (IC50  = 4.23 nM) that may be due to the oxidatory effect on the parasitic membrane. We also tested selective toxicity of ergosterol peroxide using a cell line CCL-241, a human epithelial cell line isolated from normal human fetal intestinal tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the cytotoxicity of ergosterol peroxide against E. histolytica, which uncovers a new biological property of the lipidic compound isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Different modes of hydrogen peroxide action during seed germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz eWojtyla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide was initially recognized as a toxic molecule that causes damage at different levels of cell organization and thus losses in cell viability. From the 1990s, the role of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule in plants has also been discussed. The beneficial role of H2O2 as a central hub integrating signaling network in response to biotic and abiotic stress and during developmental processes is now well established. Seed germination is the most pivotal phase of the plant life cycle, affecting plant growth and productivity. The function of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and seed aging has been illustrated in numerous studies; however, the exact role of this molecule remains unknown. This review evaluates evidence that shows that H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule in seed physiology in accordance with the known biology and biochemistry of H2O2. The importance of crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and a number of signaling molecules, including plant phytohormones such as abscisic acid, gibberellins and ethylene and reactive molecules such as nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide acting on cell communication and signaling during seed germination, is highlighted. The current study also focuses on the detrimental effects of H2O2 on seed biology, i.e., seed aging that leads to a loss of germination efficiency. The dual nature of hydrogen peroxide as a toxic molecule on one hand and as a signal molecule on the other is made possible through the precise spatial and temporal control of its production and degradation. Levels of hydrogen peroxide in germinating seeds and young seedlings can be modulated via pre-sowing seed priming/conditioning. This rather simple method is shown to be a valuable tool for improving seed quality and for enhancing seed stress tolerance during post-priming germination. In this review, we outline how seed priming/conditioning affects the integrative role of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and

  13. Lipid Peroxidation: Pathophysiology and Pharmacological Implications in the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Fatou eNjie-Mbye

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen-derived free radicals such as hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl species have been shown to oxidize phospholipids and other membrane lipid components leading to lipid peroxidation. In the eye, lipid peroxidation has been reported to play an important role in degenerative ocular diseases (age-related macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, ocular tissues are prone to damage from reactive oxygen species due to stress from constant exposure of the eye to sunlight, atmospheric oxygen and environmental chemicals. Furthermore, free radical catalyzed peroxidation of long chain polyunsaturated acids (LCPUFAs such as arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid leads to generation of LCPUFA metabolites including isoprostanes and neuroprostanes that may further exert pharmacological/toxicological actions in ocular tissues. Evidence from literature supports the presence of endogenous defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species in the eye, thereby presenting new avenues for the prevention and treatment of ocular degeneration. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and synthetic peroxides can exert pharmacological and toxicological effects on tissues of the anterior uvea of several mammalian species. There is evidence suggesting that the retina, especially retinal ganglion cells can exhibit unique characteristics of antioxidant defense mechanisms. In the posterior segment of the eye, H2O2 and synthetic peroxides produce an inhibitory action on glutamate release (using [3H]-D-aspartate as a marker, in vitro and on the endogenous glutamate and glycine concentrations in vivo. In addition to peroxides, isoprostanes can elicit both excitatory and inhibitory effects on norepinephrine (NE release from sympathetic nerves in isolated mammalian iris ciliary bodies. Whereas isoprostanes attenuate dopamine release from mammalian neural retina, in vitro, these novel arachidonic acid metabolites exhibit a biphasic regulatory effect on glutamate release

  14. Pengaruh Kecepatan Pendinginan Terhadap Perubahan Volume Leburan Polymer Crystalline dan Non-Crystalline

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrurrozi, Mohammad; Moristanto, Bagus Senowulung dan

    2003-01-01

    AbstractThe study was directed to develop a method to predict the influence of the rate of cooling to the degree of crystallittitv (DOC) and volume change of crystalline polymers. Crystalline polymer melts exhibit volume shrinkage on cooling below melting point due to crystallization. Crystallization and volunrc shrinkage will proceed with varies rate as long as the temperature is above the glass tansition temperatrre. DOC achieved by polymer is not only determined by the inherent crystallini...

  15. Singlet oxygen-mediated formation of protein peroxides within cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.; Policarpio, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Singlet oxygen is generated by a number of cellular, enzymatic and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV, or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer; as a consequence this oxidant has been proposed as a damaging agent in a number of pathologies including photo-aging and skin cancer. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study it is shown that illumination of viable, sensitizer-loaded, THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intra-cellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires the presence of the sensitizer, is enhanced in D 2 O, and decreased by azide; these data are consistent with the mediation of singlet oxygen. The concentration of peroxides detected, which is not affected by glucose or ascorbate loading of the cells, corresponds to ca. 1.5 nmoles peroxide per 10 6 cells using rose bengal as sensitizer, or 10 nmoles per mg cell protein and account for up to ca. 15% of the O 2 consumed by the cells. Similar peroxides have been detected on isolated cellular proteins exposed to light in the presence of rose bengal and oxygen. After cessation of illumination, the cellular protein peroxide levels decreases with t 1/2 ca. 4 hrs at 37 deg C, and this is associated with increased cell lysis. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions, gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These protein peroxides, and radicals derived from them, can inactivate key cellular enzymes (including caspases, GAPDH and glutathione reductase) and induce DNA base oxidation, strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer gives rise to novel long-lived, but reactive, intra-cellular protein peroxides via singlet oxygen

  16. Diverse Cd(II) compounds based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands: Structures and photoluminescent properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ning; Guo, Wei-Ying; Song, Hui-Hua, E-mail: songhuihua@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Yu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: haitaoyu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn

    2016-01-15

    Five new Cd(II) coordination polymers with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid (H{sub 2}bzgluO) and different N-donor ligands, [Cd(bzgluO)(2,2′-bipy)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(bzgluO)(2,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)·3H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (2), [Cd(bzgluO)(phen)·H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (3), [Cd(bzgluO)(4,4′-bipy)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (4), [Cd(bzgluO)(bpp)(H{sub 2}O)·2H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (5) were synthesized (2,2′-bipy=2,2′-bipyridine, 2,4′-bipy=2,4′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4′-bipy=4,4′-bipyridine, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane). Compounds 1–2 exhibit a 1D single-chain structure. Compound 1 generates a 2D supramolecular structure via π–π stacking and hydrogen bonding, 3D architecture of compound 2 is formed by hydrogen bonding. Compound 3 features a 1D double-chain structure, which are linked by π–π interactions into a 2D supramolecular layer. Compounds 4-5 display a 2D network structure. Neighboring layers of 4 are extended into a 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding. The structural diversity of these compounds is attributed to the effect of ancillary N-donor ligands and coordination modes of H{sub 2}bzgluO. Luminescent properties of 1–5 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism of compounds 1, 2 and 5 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Five new Cd(II) metal coordination compounds with H{sub 2}bzgluO and different N-donor ligands were synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 present 1D structures, compounds 4 and 5 display 2D networks. Results indicate that auxiliary ligands and coordination modes of H{sub 2}bzgluO play an important role in governing the formation of final frameworks, and the hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking interactions contribute the formation of the diverse supramolecular architectures. Furthermore, the different crystal structures influence the emission spectra significantly. - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that complexes prepared with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid

  17. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  18. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H 2 O 2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo

  19. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  20. Destruction of oxalate by reaction with hydrogen peroxide. [Hydrazine oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.; Arwood, P.C.

    1981-09-01

    The destruction of oxalate by oxidation to carbon dioxide using hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative method for the disposal of oxalate in connection with the possible use of an aqueous hydrazine oxalate solution as a scrubbing agent for solvent cleanup in processes for the recovery of uranium, plutonium, and thorium by solvent extraction. The rate of oxidation of oxalate by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution at the reflux temperature was adequate for process application; reaction half-times at 100/sup 0/C were less than one hour when the hydrogen peroxide concentration was greater than 0.5 M. The reaction was first order with respect to both the oxalate and hydrogen peroxide concentrations and had an activation energy of 58.7 kJ/g-mol. The rate increased with the hydrogen ion concentration as (H/sup +/)/sup 0/ /sup 3/ but was not significantly affected by the presence of 100 ppM of uranium or copper in solution. In the near-neutral hydrazine oxalate solutions, the reaction of either component with hydrogen peroxide was too slow for process application.

  1. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.J.C. Neiva

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  2. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  3. A chemiluminescent method for determination of lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xiaofeng; Hu Tianxi; Fan Xiaobing

    2003-01-01

    We established a chemiluminescent system for determination of lipid peroxidation and screening anti-oxidants. The lipid containing unsaturated fatly acids was injected into a galls tube. Luminol solution and the deionized water were added into it too. The glass tube was put into a preincubation box to incubate it for 0.5 h at 37 degree C. AAPH solution was injected into the tube for immediate measurement in a biochemiluminometer at 38-39 degree C. The pulses /6s(CP6s) were determined with T-2 program. Chemiluminescent dynamic and lipid peroxidation changes were observed continuously. Once the CL intensity of lipid peroxidation got peak, the antioxidant which has different concentration was added immediately in situ. A certain CL intensity (CP6s) was chosen as evaluation index to compare the activity of antioxidants. A luminol chemiluminescent system for determination of lipid peroxidation has been made. It was found that Vit. C, teapolyphenol, and glutathione have effects on scavenging lipid free radicals. The new method is quick, sensitive, and simple for determination of lipid peroxidation and screening antioxidants

  4. Liquid Crystalline Perylene diimides : Architecture and Charge Carrier Mobilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, C.W.; Sieval, A.B.; Dakhorst, J.E.J.; Dijk, van M.; Kimkes, P.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Donker, H.

    2000-01-01

    The phase behavior of three N-alkyl-substituted perylene diimide derivatives is examined by differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. The occurrence of multiple phase transitions indicates several crystalline and several liquid crystalline phases. X-ray diffraction

  5. Diverse Cd(II) compounds based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands: Structures and photoluminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Guo, Wei-Ying; Song, Hui-Hua; Yu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Five new Cd(II) coordination polymers with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid (H2bzgluO) and different N-donor ligands, [Cd(bzgluO)(2,2‧-bipy)(H2O)]n (1), [Cd(bzgluO)(2,4‧-bipy)2(H2O)·3H2O]n (2), [Cd(bzgluO)(phen)·H2O]n (3), [Cd(bzgluO)(4,4‧-bipy)(H2O)]n (4), [Cd(bzgluO)(bpp)(H2O)·2H2O]n (5) were synthesized (2,2‧-bipy=2,2‧-bipyridine, 2,4‧-bipy=2,4‧-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4‧-bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane). Compounds 1-2 exhibit a 1D single-chain structure. Compound 1 generates a 2D supramolecular structure via π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding, 3D architecture of compound 2 is formed by hydrogen bonding. Compound 3 features a 1D double-chain structure, which are linked by π-π interactions into a 2D supramolecular layer. Compounds 4-5 display a 2D network structure. Neighboring layers of 4 are extended into a 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding. The structural diversity of these compounds is attributed to the effect of ancillary N-donor ligands and coordination modes of H2bzgluO. Luminescent properties of 1-5 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism of compounds 1, 2 and 5 were investigated.

  6. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of silver(I) complexes based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands with different flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming-Jie; Feng, Qi; Song, Hui-Hua

    2016-05-01

    By changing the N-donor ancillary ligand, three novel silver (I) complexes {[Ag(HbzgluO) (4,4‧-bipy)]·H2O}n (1), {[Ag2(HbzgluO)2 (bpe)2]·2H2O}n (2) and {[Ag(HbzgluO)(bpp)]·2H2O}n (3) (H2bzgluO = N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid, 4,4‧-bipy = 4,4ˊ-bipyridine, bpe = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane, bpp = 1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane) were synthesized. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). In this study, the N-donor ligands are changed from rigidity (4,4‧-bipy), quasi-flexibility (bpe) to flexibility (bpp), the structures of complexes also change. Complex 1 features a 1D chain structure which is further linked together to construct a 2D supramolecular structure through hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 is a 1D double-chains configuration which eventually forms a 3D supramolecular network via hydrogen bonding interactions. Whereas, complex 3 exhibits a 2D pleated grid structure which is linked by hydrogen bonding interactions into a 3D supramolecular network. The present observations demonstrate that the modulation of coordination polymers with different structures can accomplish by changing the spacer length of N-donor ligands. In addition, the solid-state circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that compound 2 exhibited negative cotton effect which originated from the chiral ligands H2bzgluO and the solid-state fluorescence spectra of the three complexes demonstrated the auxiliary ligands have influence on the photoluminescence properties of the complexes.

  7. Electromagnetic processes in strong crystalline fields

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  8. Liquid Crystalline Semiconductors Materials, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Stephen; O'Neill, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This is an exciting stage in the development of organic electronics. It is no longer an area of purely academic interest as increasingly real applications are being developed, some of which are beginning to come on-stream. Areas that have already been commercially developed or which are under intensive development include organic light emitting diodes (for flat panel displays and solid state lighting), organic photovoltaic cells, organic thin film transistors (for smart tags and flat panel displays) and sensors. Within the family of organic electronic materials, liquid crystals are relative newcomers. The first electronically conducting liquid crystals were reported in 1988 but already a substantial literature has developed. The advantage of liquid crystalline semiconductors is that they have the easy processability of amorphous and polymeric semiconductors but they usually have higher charge carrier mobilities. Their mobilities do not reach the levels seen in crystalline organics but they circumvent all of t...

  9. Application of thermodynamics to silicate crystalline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic relations is presented, describing Guggenheim's regular solution models, the simple mixture, the zeroth approximation, and the quasi-chemical model. The possibilities of retrieving useful thermodynamic quantities from phase equilibrium studies are discussed. Such quantities include the activity-composition relations and the free energy of mixing in crystalline solutions. Theory and results of the study of partitioning of elements in coexisting minerals are briefly reviewed. A thermodynamic study of the intercrystalline and intracrystalline ion exchange relations gives useful information on the thermodynamic behavior of the crystalline solutions involved. Such information is necessary for the solution of most petrogenic problems and for geothermometry. Thermodynamic quantities for tungstates (CaWO4-SrWO4) are calculated.

  10. Determination of chloride content in crystalline silicotitanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) is one of three options under evaluation to replace the In-Tank Precipitation process. This Salt Disposition Alternatives team identified three options for pretreatment of High Level Waste supernate: non-elutable ion exchange, precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate or direct disposal in grout. The ion exchange option would use crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Researchers at Texas A and M and Sandia National Laboratory developed CST. The engineered form of CST was procured from UOP LLC under the trade name IONSIVreg s ign IE-911. Review of vendor literature and discussions with UOP personnel led to speculation concerning the fate of chloride ion during the manufacture process of IE-911. Walker proposed tests to examine the chloride content of CST and removal methods. This report describes the results of tests to determine the chloride levels in as received CST and washed CST

  11. Total scattering of disordered crystalline functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoto, Shin-Ichi; Kodama, Katsuaki; Iikubo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2009-01-01

    There are disorders in some modern functional materials. As an example, the crystalline phase of an optical recording material has low thermal conductivity but high electrical conductivity, simultaneously. This contradiction is a challenge to material scientists in designing good functional materials, which should have at least two types of crystallographic sites. One site limits thermal conductivity while the other site carries electrons or holes with high mobility. This problem exists with not only optical recording materials but also thermoelectric materials. The periodic boundary condition gets lost in the disordered parts. This therefore, makes atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis with a wide range of real space suitable for investigating the form and size of crystalline parts as well as disordered parts in the material. Pulsed neutron powder diffraction is one of the best tools for use in this new type of emerging research, together with synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and electron diffraction.

  12. Plasmonic Physics of 2D Crystalline Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Torbatian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Collective modes of doped two-dimensional crystalline materials, namely graphene, MoS 2 and phosphorene, both monolayer and bilayer structures, are explored using the density functional theory simulations together with the random phase approximation. The many-body dielectric functions of the materials are calculated using an ab initio based model involving material-realistic physical properties. Having calculated the electron energy-loss, we calculate the collective modes of each material considering the in-phase and out-of-phase modes for bilayer structures. Furthermore, owing to many band structures and intreband transitions, we also find high-energy excitations in the systems. We explain that the material-specific dielectric function considering the polarizability of the crystalline material such as MoS 2 are needed to obtain realistic plasmon dispersions. For each material studied here, we find different collective modes and describe their physical origins.

  13. Crystallinity evaluation of polyhydroxybutyrate and polycaprolactone blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Maxwell P.; Rodrigues, Elton Jorge R.; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate, PHB, is a polymer obtained through bacterial or synthetic pathways. It has been used in the biomedical field as a matrix for drug delivery, medical implants and as scaffold material for tissue engineering. PHB has high structural organization, which makes it highly crystalline and brittle, making biodegradation difficult, reducing its employability. In order to enhance the mechanical and biological properties of PHB, blends with other polymers, biocompatible or not, are researched and produced. In this regard, blends of PHB and polycaprolactone, PCL, another biopolymer widely used in the biomedical industry, were obtained via solution casting and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR). Results have shown a dependence between PHB's crystallinity index and PCL quantity employed to obtain the blends.(author)

  14. University Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajeet Rohatgi; Vijay Yelundur; Abasifreke Ebong; Dong Seop Kim

    2008-08-18

    The overall goal of the program is to advance the current state of crystalline silicon solar cell technology to make photovoltaics more competitive with conventional energy sources. This program emphasizes fundamental and applied research that results in low-cost, high-efficiency cells on commercial silicon substrates with strong involvement of the PV industry, and support a very strong photovoltaics education program in the US based on classroom education and hands-on training in the laboratory.

  15. Reactions and Interactions in Liquid Crystalline Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-30

    nematic lyophases of potassium laurate, myristyl tri methylammonium bromide or sodium decylsulfate with 1-decanol and 23 water. A strong retardation of the...crystalline polyacrylate crosslinked elastomers were synthesized. 198c 0 0 96 0 0 0O-(CH12 ) 2 -0O(k 97 Crosslinking, up to 10% of structural units produced...in their isotropic state and they work as the transporting phase for the azo-crown ether molecules. The permeation of K+ from a potassium p

  16. The phase diagram of crystalline surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, K.N.; Bowick, M.J.; Catterall, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    We report the status of a high-statistics Monte Carlo simulation of non-self-avoiding crystalline surfaces with extrinsic curvature on lattices of size up to 128 2 nodes. We impose free boundary conditions. The free energy is a gaussian spring tethering potential together with a normal-normal bending energy. Particular emphasis is given to the behavior of the model in the cold phase where we measure the decay of the normal-normal correlation function

  17. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  18. Controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xueshen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene on the back side of copper foil using CH4 as the precursor. The influence of growth time and the pressure ratio of CH4/H2 on the structure of graphene are examined. An optimized polymer-assisted method is used to transfer the synthesized graphene onto a SiO2/Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the graphene.

  19. Crystallinity in starch plastics: consequences for material properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1997-01-01

    The processing of starches with biodegradable additives has made biodegradable plastics suitable for a number of applications. Starch plastics are partially crystalline as a result of residual crystallinity and the recrystallization of amylose and amylopectin. Such crystallinity is a key determinant

  20. Crystalline lens power and refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Rafael; Morgan, Ian G; Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B

    2012-02-01

    To study the relationships between the refractive power of the crystalline lens, overall refractive error of the eye, and degree of nuclear cataract. All phakic participants of the population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study with an age of 50+ years were included. Calculation of the refractive lens power was based on distance noncycloplegic refractive error, corneal refractive power, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length according to Bennett's formula. The study included 1885 subjects. Mean refractive lens power was 25.5 ± 3.0 D (range, 13.9-36.6). After adjustment for age and sex, the standardized correlation coefficients (β) of the association with the ocular refractive error were highest for crystalline lens power (β = -0.41; P lens opacity grade (β = -0.42; P lens power (β = -0.95), lower corneal refractive power (β = -0.76), higher lens thickness (β = 0.30), deeper anterior chamber (β = 0.28), and less marked nuclear lens opacity (β = -0.05). Lens thickness was significantly lower in eyes with greater nuclear opacity. Variations in refractive error in adults aged 50+ years were mostly influenced by variations in axial length and in crystalline lens refractive power, followed by variations in corneal refractive power, and, to a minor degree, by variations in lens thickness and anterior chamber depth.

  1. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects

  2. The strength of crystalline color superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Rajagopal, Krishna; Sharma, Rishi

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the shear modulus of the crystalline color superconducting phase of quark matter, showing that this phase of dense, but not asymptotically dense, quark matter responds to shear stress as a very rigid solid. This phase is characterized by a gap parameter Δ that is periodically modulated in space and therefore spontaneously breaks translational invariance. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space- and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by Δ, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase of matter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superfluid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores

  3. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications

  4. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  5. Synthesis of unstable cyclic peroxides for chemiluminescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoloni, Fernando H.; Oliveira, Marcelo A. de; Augusto, Felipe A.; Ciscato, Luiz Francisco M.L.; Bastos, Erick L.; Baader, Wilhelm J., E-mail: wjbaader@iq.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2012-11-15

    Cyclic four-membered ring peroxides are important high-energy intermediates in a variety of chemi and bioluminescence transformations. Specifically, a-peroxy lactones (1,2-dioxetanones) have been considered as model systems for efficient firefly bioluminescence. However, the preparation of such highly unstable compounds is extremely difficult and, therefore, only few research groups have been able to study the properties of these substances. In this study, the synthesis, purification and characterization of three 1,2-dioxetanones are reported and a detailed procedure for the known synthesis of diphenoyl peroxide, another important model compound for the chemical generation of electronically excited states, is provided. For most of these peroxides, the complete spectroscopic characterization is reported here for the first time. (author)

  6. Electrochemical behaviour of platinum in hydrogen peroxide solution (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prost, G.H.

    1963-06-01

    The relative stability of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution at 25 deg. C, allows its amperometric determination from the theory, using either its cathodic reduction or its anodic oxidation. The cathodic reduction yields a wave on a platinum electrode only when some oxygen is present in the solution. It cannot, therefore, be used for electrochemical determination. On the other hand, the anodic oxidation on platinum produces a wave which might be used. However, a passivation of platinum occurs at the same time. This passivation process is studied by means of potentio-kinetic, potentio-static, intensio-static curves and of pH measurements in the vicinity of the anode. A mechanism for passivation is presented, which takes into account the role of hydrogen peroxide as a reducing agent. This passivation rules out any analytical application of the oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide. (author) [fr

  7. Determination of hydrogen peroxide in water by chemiluminescence detection, (1). Flow injection type hydrogen peroxide detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashiro, Naoya; Uchida, Shunsuke; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Morishima, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Satoh, Tomonori; Sugama, Junichi; Yamada, Rie

    2004-01-01

    A flow injection type hydrogen peroxide detection system with a sub-ppb detection limit has been developed to determine hydrogen peroxide concentration in water sampled from a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen peroxide water loop. The hydrogen peroxide detector is based on luminol chemiluminescence spectroscopy. A small amount of sample water (20 μl) is mixed with a reagent mixture, an aqueous solution of luminol and Co 2+ catalyst, in a mixing cell which is installed just upstream from the detection cell. The optimum values for pH and the concentrations of luminol and Co 2+ ion have been determined to ensure a lower detectable limit and a higher reproducibility. The photocurrent detected by the detection system is expressed by a linear function of the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the region of lower concentration ([H 2 O 2 ] 2 O 2 ] in the region of higher concentration ([H 2 O 2 ] > 10 ppb). The luminous intensity of luminol chemiluminescence is the highest when pH of the reagent mixture is 11.0. Optimization of the major parameters gives the lowest detectable limit of 0.3 ppb. (author)

  8. Constructing MnO{sub 2}/single crystalline ZnO nanorod hybrids with enhanced photocatalytic and antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Weiwei [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410114 (China); Liu, Tiangui, E-mail: tianguiliu@gmail.com [College of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Chen [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410114 (China); Chen, Chuansheng, E-mail: 1666423158@qq.com [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410114 (China)

    2016-07-15

    In order to improve the photocatalytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods, ZnO nanorods decorated with MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles (MnO{sub 2}/ZnO nanorod hybrids) were prepared by using microwave assisted coprecipitation method under the influence of hydrogen peroxide, and the structure, photocatalytic activity and antibacterial property of the products were studied. Experimental results indicated that MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles are decorated on the surface of single crystalline ZnO nanorods. Moreover, the resultant MnO{sub 2}/ZnO nanorod hybrids have been proven to possess good photocatalytic and antibacterial activity, which their degradated efficiency for Rhodamin B (RhB) is twice as the pure ZnO nanorods. Enhancement for photocatalytic and antibacterial activity is mainly attributed to the low band gap energy and excellent electrochemical properties of MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: The MnO{sub 2}/single crystalline ZnO nanorods hybrids, which MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles are loaded on the surface of ZnO nanorods, were prepared by the step-by-step precipitation method under the assistance of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. Display Omitted - Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}/ZnO nanorod hybrids were prepared by the step-by-step assembly method. • Single crystalline ZnO nanorods can be decorated by MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • MnO{sub 2}/ZnO nanorod hybrids possess good photocatalytic and antibacterial activity. • MnO{sub 2} can improve the photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods under visible light.

  9. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  10. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  11. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  12. Intercommunication of factors the energy products and peroxidation at training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokimov E.I.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of the training loading on the state of some parameters, characterizing the basic ways of power providing and lipid peroxidation is studied. In research took part 34 footballers in the age 19 - 25 years. Trainings were conducted in aerobic-anaerobic mode. It is set that as a result of training duration 90 minutes the endogenous antioxidant systems of man adequately get along at the processes of peroxidase. Meaningful correlative connections are exposed statistically between the intermediate products of carbohydrate, lipidic, albuminous exchange and lipid peroxidation.

  13. Applications of hydrogen peroxide in electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto Armando

    1998-12-01

    It is demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide can be produced with a current efficiency of 40-70% by the cathodic reduction of oxygen at a reticulated vitreous carbon electrode in a divided flow-cell using catholytes consisting of aqueous chloride or sulphate media, pH >>{sub 2}. The supporting electrolyte does not influence either the current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or its rate of production. The current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a strong function of the potential and this suggests that 2e- and 4e- reduction of oxygen occurs in parallel at different sites on the carbon surface. Voltammetry experiments showed that (a) the I-E response for oxygen reduction at pH >>{sub 2} is a function of the electrode surface and/or the supporting electrolyte; (b) both H{sub 2} evolution and oxygen reduction are retarded on carbon with increasing ionic strength; (c) the presence of ferrous ions lead to the homogeneous decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} away from the cathode surface but their effectiveness as a catalyst for this decomposition depends on their speciation in solution which changes during an electrolysis. The use of a three-dimensional electrode fabricated from reticulated vitreous carbon allows Fenton`s reagent to be electroproduced at a practical rate which makes possible the removal of organics in slightly acidic aqueous media. A wide range of highly toxic organic molecules (phenol, catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, oxalic acid, aniline, cresol and amaranth) have been oxidised in mild conditions and a significant fraction of the organic carbon is evolved as CO{sub 2}. In all cases studied the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) was depleted to levels higher than 85%, indicating a complete mineralisation of the organic pollutants. The life-time of the reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was demonstrated to be over 1000 hours during two and a half years of experiments. During this time the cathode performance was very good, leading to

  14. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    -sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had TTs averaging 190 ± 190 years in surface horizons. Summed over the bulk soil profile, we found that smectite content correlated with the mean TT of bulk soil C across varied lithologies. The SRO mineral content in KNP soils was generally very low, except for the soils developed on gabbros under more humid climate that also had very high Fe and C contents with a surprisingly short, mean C TTs. In younger landscapes, SRO minerals are metastable and sequester C for long timescales. We hypothesize that in the KNP, SRO minerals represent a transient stage of mineral evolution and therefore lock up C for a shorter time. Overall, we found crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides (determined as the difference between Fe in dithionate citrate and oxalate extractions) to be the strongest predictor for soil C content, while the mean TT of soil C was best predicted from the amount of smectite, which was also related to more easily measured bulk properties such as cation exchange capacity or pH. Combined with previous research on C turnover times in 2 : 1 vs. 1 : 1 clays, our results hold promise for predicting C inventory and persistence based on intrinsic timescales of specific carbon–mineral interactions.

  15. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  16. Synthesis of N-benzoyl-[α-14C]-N'-phenyl-2,6-diaminobenzoic acid and N-benzoyl-N'-phenyl-[3'-3H]-2,6-diaminobenzoic acid, and their absorption, excretion, and distribution in rats and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Shigeo; Kuroki, Michitake; Kasuya, Yasuji; Suzuki, Kenji.

    1975-01-01

    N-benzoyl-N'-phenyl-2, 6-diaminobenzoic acid (F-1) is a new anti-inflammatory agent. Two isotopically labeled compounds of F-1 ( 3 H-F-1 and 14 C-F-1) were synthesized and their absorption and distribution were investigated in rats and guinea pigs. When 3 H-F-1 was orally administered to rats and guinea pigs, about 20% of the administered radioactivity was excreted in the urine and approximately 70% of it was excreted in the feces during 7 days after 3 H-F-1 administration. A higher concentration of 3 H-F-1 in the blood was observed in rats than in guinea pigs. The maximum blood concentration of 3 H-activity appeared one hour after the oral administration of 3 H-F-1 to rats, while in guinea pigs in appeared three hours later. These facts are in good agreement with the difference in the anti-inflammatory effect between rats and guinea pigs. The highest concentration of 3 H-activity in various organs, such as liver, adrenal, kidney, and lung, was found three hours after the oral administration of 3 H-F-1. (auth.)

  17. Effect of Terminalia chebula fruit extract on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... products mainly edible vegetables and spices, have a key role in chemopreventers ... protein; dunit/minute/mg protein ; eµg/mg protein; fn moles of H2O2 ... induce peroxidation of cell membrane lipids (Bhattacharya et al., 1999). .... catalase – like activities in seminal plasma and spermatozoa. Int. J. Androl.

  18. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured and reported. Chickens fed LPO had greater serum triacylglycerol and very low ... favour lipid peroxidation, inhibit synthesis of higher homologous of ... The ambient temperature was gradually decreased from 33 °C at first.

  19. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  20. Peroxidative damage of mitochondrial respiration is substrate-dependent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endlicher, R.; Křiváková, P.; Rauchová, Hana; Nůsková, Hana; Červinková, Z.; Drahota, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2009), s. 685-692 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/06/1261 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : mitochondrial enzymes * peroxidative damage * tert-butyl hydroperoxide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  1. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... The reaction was monitored by ATR FTIR by following the disappearance of the O-H ..... of hydrogen peroxide than other iron ions such as FeCl2, FeCl3, ..... HWANG D-S, LEE E-H, KIM K-W, LEE K-I and PARK S-J (1999).

  2. Combined effect of vanadium and nickel on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exposure to nickel led to a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in SOD, GST activities in liver and GSH content in kidney and a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the hepatic MDA content and renal SOD activity. When the metals were administered in combination, the elevation of lipid peroxidation did not potentiate. However ...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, V.K.; Rach, J.J.; Schreier, Theresa M.

    1994-01-01

    Antifungal agents are needed to maintain healthy stocks of fish in the intensive culture systems currently employed in fish hatcheries. Malachite green has been the most widely used antifungal agent; however, its potential for producing teratology in animals and fish precludes further use in fish culture. Preliminary studies at the National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI, USA (La Crosse Center) indicate that hydrogen peroxide is effective for control of Saprolegnia sp. fungus on incubating eggs of rainbow trout. It is also effective against a wide variety of other organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, viruses, and spores, and has been proposed as a treatment for sea lice on salmon. Hydrogen peroxide and its primary decomposition products, oxygen and water, are not systemic poisons and are considered environmentally compatible. In response to a petition from the La Crosse Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently classified hydrogen peroxide as a 'low regulatory priority' when used for control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Preliminary tests conducted at the La Crosse Center suggest that prophylactic treatments of 250 to 500 ppm (based on 100% active ingredient) for 15 minutes every other day will inhibit fungal infections on healthy rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs. This treatment regime also seems to inhibit fungal development and increase hatching success among infected eggs. Efficacy and safety of hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish are currently being evaluated.

  4. Sperm DNA damage in relation to lipid peroxidation following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationships between lipid peroxidation (LPO) and sperm DNA damage following freezing-thawing of boar semen in different extenders. The comet assay was used to measure the extent of sperm DNA damage in a cryoprotectant-free extender or in cryoprotectant-based extenders after single ...

  5. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 2. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a xyloglucan oligosaccharide on capsiate content and gene expression associatedwith capsinoids synthesis in Capsicum annuum L. AY ZUNUN-PÉREZ T GUEVARA-FIGUEROA SN ...

  6. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, L.; Chopin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40 o C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H + ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I 2 ], [IO 3 - ], [H 2 O 2 ] and [H + ]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs

  7. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from broilers to evaluate serum biochemical metabolites on day 41. Thigh meat samples were provided and analysed after 1, 5 and 10 days' storage to evaluate lipid peroxidation at the end of the experiment. Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured ...

  8. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled air of healthy children: reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); S.L. Schellekens; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAn increased content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a marker of inflammation, has been described in the condensate of exhaled air from adults and children with inflammatory lung disorders, including asthma. However, the normal range of [H2O2] in the exhaled

  9. Plasma Lipid Peroxidation and Total Antioxidant Status among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis predicts that low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) oxidation is an early event in atherosclerosis and that oxidized LDL-C contributes to atherogenesis. OBJECTIVE: To determine a link, if any, between the plasma lipid peroxidation and total ...

  10. Sol – Gel synthesis and characterization of magnesium peroxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaison, J; Chan, Y S; Ashok raja, C; Balakumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium peroxide is an excellent source of oxygen in agriculture applications, for instance it is used in waste management as a material for soil bioremediation to remove contaminants from polluted underground water, biological wastes treatment to break down hydrocarbon, etc. In the present study, sol-gel synthesis of magnesium peroxide (MgO 2 ) nanoparticles is reported. Magnesium peroxide is odourless; fine peroxide which releases oxygen when reacts with water. During the sol-gel synthesis, the magnesium malonate intermediate is formed which was then calcinated to obtain MgO 2 nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using Thermo gravimetric -Differential Thermal Analysis (TG- DTA), X-Ray Diffraction studies (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM). Our study provides a clear insight that the formation of magnesium malonate during the synthesis was due to the reaction between magnesium acetate, oxalic acid and ethanol. In our study, we can conclude that the calcination temperature has a strong influence on particle size, morphology, monodispersity and the chemistry of the particles. (paper)

  11. Can hydrogen peroxide and quercetin improve production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present work was to determine if hydrogen peroxide in combination with quercetin or indole butyric acid, can modify some characteristics related to rooting and development in cuttings of Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla. Cuttings were periodically evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days according to the ...

  12. Hydrogen peroxide and radiation water chemistry of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, E.; Watanabe, A.; Endo, M.; Takahashi, M.; Karasawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    G-values and rate constants at elevated temperature are reviewed and updated for computer simulation of water radiolysis in BWRs. Quantitative relationship between g-values of H 2 and OH was found out to govern numerically the radiolytic environment in the BWR primary system. Thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured in stagnant water in a quartz cell and the rate constant was determined at 2.4 x 10 -7 s -1 with the activation energy of 53.3 kJ/mol. Behaviors of hydrogen peroxide under HWC simulated with updated variables were consistent with plant observation at Forsmark 1 and 2. The most likely decomposition scheme of hydrogen peroxide at surface was identified as H 2 O 2 → H + HO 2 . Based on the surface decomposition process, actual level of hydrogen peroxide was estimated at 200-400 ppb under NWC condition from measured at BWR sampling stations. The estimation was consistent with the numerical simulation of BWR water radiolysis with updated variables. (author)

  13. Desiccation-induced changes in viability, lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... Key words: Intermediate seeds, desiccation, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation,. Mimusops ... between ROS production and cell defenses determines ... needed for reduction of dehydroascorbate, which is .... was calculated using the extinction coefficient (6.2 mM-1cm-1) for.

  14. Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    wide range of industrial processes such as food processing (e.g. in the ... tron transfer effect of mitochondria.4 These radicals. (reactive .... of H2O2 without undergoing fouling or poisoning due to any inter- .... adsorbed OHads species was shown operative at po- tentials of .... Douglass W C 2003 Hydrogen peroxide medical.

  15. The basic chemistry and photochemistry behind hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, N.D.; Fairley, P.D.; Mohan, V.; Jumeaux, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide gel formulation is a complexprocess which involves both chemistry and physics, and there is still some controversy about the efficiency of whitening processes, particularly with respect to the roles of temperature and irradiation with light. In this work we

  16. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  17. Thin-walled nanoscrolls by multi-step intercalation from tubular halloysite-10 Å and its rearrangement upon peroxide treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsirka, Balázs; Horváth, Erzsébet; Szabó, Péter; Juzsakova, Tatjána; Szilágyi, Róbert K.; Fertig, Dávid; Makó, Éva; Varga, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kristóf, János

    2017-03-01

    Surface modification of the halloysite-10 Å mineral with tubular morphology can be achieved by slightly modified procedures developed for the delamination of kaolinite minerals. The resulting delaminated halloysite nanoparticles have unexpected surface/morphological properties that display, new potentials in catalyst development. In this work, a four-step intercalation/delamination procedure is described for the preparation of thin-walled nanoscrolls from the multi-layered hydrated halloysite mineral that consists of (1) intercalation of halloysite with potassium acetate, (2) replacement intercalation with ethylene glycol, (3) replacement intercalation with hexylamine, and (4) delamination with toluene. The intercalation steps were followed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Delamination eliminated the crystalline order and the crystallite size along the 'c'-axis, increased the specific surface area, greatly decreased the thickness of the mineral tubes to a monolayer, and shifted the pore diameter toward the micropore region. Unexpectedly, the removal of residual organics from intercalation steps adsorbed at the nanoscroll surface with a peroxide treatment resulted in partial recovery of crystallinity and increase of crystallite size along the 'c'-crystal direction. The d(001) value showed a diffuse pattern at 7.4-7.7 Å due to the rearrangement of the thin-walled nanoscrolls toward the initial tubular morphology of the dehydrated halloysite-7 Å mineral.

  18. Influence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pre-hydrolysis on the isolation of microcrystalline cellulose from oil palm fronds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Abdulwahab F; Haafiz, M K Mohamad; Hossain, Md Sohrab; Hussin, M Hazwan; Fazita, M R Nurul

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was isolated from oil palm fronds (OPF) using chemo-mechanical process. Wherein, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) was utilized to extract OPF fibre at different AHP concentrations. The OPF pulp fibre was then bleached with acidified sodium chlorite solution followed by the acid hydrolysis using hydrochloric acid. Several analytical methods were conducted to determine the influence of AHP concentration on thermal properties, morphological properties, microscopic and crystalline behaviour of isolated MCC. Results showed that the MCC extracted from OPF fibres had fibre diameters of 7.55-9.11nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the obtained microcrystalline fibre had both celluloses I and cellulose II polymorphs structure, depending on the AHP concentrations. The Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) analyses showed that the AHP pre-hydrolysis was successfully removed hemicelluloses and lignin from the OPF fibre. The crystallinity of the MCC was increased with the AHP concentrations. The degradation temperature of MCC was about 300°C. The finding of the present study showed that pre-treatment process potentially influenced the quality of the isolation of MCC from oil palm fronds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature influence in crystallinity of polymer microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Cristiane de P.; Novack, Katia M.

    2011-01-01

    Drug delivery technology is evolving through the creation of new techniques of drug delivery effectively. The new methods used in drugs administration are based in microencapsulation process. Microsphere encapsulation modifies drug delivery bringing benefits and efficiency. In this work has been evaluated the influence of temperature in microspheres preparation. Microspheres were obtained by PMMA-co-PEG (COP) copolymer with indomethacin inserted in polymer matrix. Samples were characterized by SEM, DSC and XRD. SEM micrographs confirmed the formation of different sizes of microspheres and it was verified that higher temperatures make more crystalline microspheres. (author)

  20. He implantation induced nanovoids in crystalline Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpelaeinen, S.; Kuitunen, K.; Slotte, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Priolo, F.

    2009-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) in Doppler broadening mode was used to study the vacancy profile of crystalline Si after He and B implantation and subsequent annealing. In the He-implanted samples two different void layers were observed, one consisting of large voids at the projected range of He and another containing 'nanovoids' slightly larger than divacancies at roughly halfway between R p of He and the surface. The nanovoid layer was shown to be absent from samples co-implanted with B, implying that interstitials created during B implantation get trapped in the nanovoids and fill them, thus hindering interstitial-mediated B diffusion.

  1. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  2. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Ture; Weinzieri, Barbara

    The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with fivefold symmetry in 3D space....... The quasi-crystal geometry can be constructed from two different cubic cells with identical rhombic facets, where the relation between the diagonals is the golden section. All cells have identical rhombic faces, identical edges and identical icosahedral/dodecahedral nodes....

  3. Singlet exciton interactions in crystalline naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisel, F.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of prompt fluorescence in crystalline naphthalene at 300 K, excited by picosecond 266 nm pulse, has been studied as a function of excitation intensity. Experimental decay curves can be fitted only when the exponential distribution in depth of excitation and the radial (gaussian) intensity profile of the excitation are both taken into account. From analysis of decay at early time ( -10 cm 3 s -1 . If the reaction is diffusion-limited, this rate implies an average singlet diffusivity Dsub(S)=(2+-1)10 -4 cm 2 s -1

  4. New thermophilic anaerobes that decompose crystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taya, M; Hinoki, H; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, T; Yap, M G.S.; Kobayashi, T

    1985-01-01

    Two strains (designated as 25A and 3B) of cellulolytic, thermophilic, anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria were newly isolated from an alkaline hot spring through enrichment cultures at 60/sup 0/C. Though strain 25A was nearly identical to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 as a reference strain, strain 3B had some characteristics different from the reference; no flagellation, alkalophilic growth property (optimum pH of 7.5-8) and orange-colored pigmentation of the cell mass. Strain 3B effectively decomposed micro-crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and raw cellulosics (rice straw, newspaper, and bagasse) without physical or chemical pretreatments. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND JOB STRESS IN DENTAL HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Melnikova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study devoted to the lipid peroxidation indices in dentists target group as a marker of psycho-emotional state. We revealed increase in the level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists during job stress. There was strong decrease in level of TBA-active products in control group of dentist that study during the lectures. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dentist examination can be considered as non-specific component of reactions towards the stressors of professional activities. We also revealed that the initial level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists before the outpatient dental reception was higher than that of dentists that study before lectures. This is indicates the mobilization of sympathetic nervous system before beginning of the working day. The contents of the level of TBA-active products in the oral fluid of female and male dentists after dental examination significantly increased, whereas these indices decreased in the group of dentists that study after the lectures. The increasing of TBA-active products in dentists after outpatient dental reception was by 42.5 % and 77 % higher compared with a group of dentists that study in the lecture classes. The results of correlation analysis suggest the influence of lipid peroxidation processes on the cardiovascular and blood system of dentists during job stress. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dental examination can be considered as non-specific component of the body's response to stressors influence in professional activities. Key words: dentists, activation of lipid peroxidation, psychoemotional stress, job stress.

  6. Supra-molecular architecture in a co-crystal of the N(7)-H tautomeric form of N (6)-benzoyl-adenine with adipic acid (1/0.5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinton Darious, Robert; Thomas Muthiah, Packianathan; Perdih, Franc

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title co-crystal, C12H9N5O·0.5C6H10O4, consists of one mol-ecule of N (6)-benzoyl-adenine (BA) and one half-mol-ecule of adipic acid (AA), the other half being generated by inversion symmetry. The dihedral angle between the adenine and phenyl ring planes is 26.71 (7)°. The N (6)-benzoyl-adenine mol-ecule crystallizes in the N(7)-H tautomeric form with three non-protonated N atoms. This tautomeric form is stabilized by intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl (C=O) group and the N(7)-H hydrogen atom on the Hoogsteen face of the purine ring, forming an S(7) ring motif. The two carboxyl groups of adipic acid inter-act with the Watson-Crick face of the BA mol-ecules through O-H⋯N and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. The latter units are linked by N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming layers parallel to (10-5). A weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond is also present, linking adipic acid mol-ecules in neighbouring layers, enclosing R (2) 2(10) ring motifs and forming a three-dimensional structure. C=O⋯π and C-H⋯π inter-actions are also present in the structure.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  8. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  9. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alan M.; Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L.; Grover, Liam M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity

  10. Crystallinity and mechanical effects from annealing Parylene thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jackson@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Stam, Frank; O' Brien, Joe [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Kailas, Lekshmi [University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Mathewson, Alan; O' Murchu, Cian [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2016-03-31

    Parylene is commonly used as thin film polymer for MEMS devices and smart materials. This paper investigates the impact on bulk properties due to annealing various types of Parylene films. A thin film of Parylene N, C and a hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C were deposited using a standard Gorham process. The thin film samples were annealed at varying temperatures from room temperature up to 300 °C. The films were analyzed to determine the mechanical and crystallinity effects due to different annealing temperatures. The results demonstrate that the percentage of crystallinity and the full-width-half-maximum value on the 2θ X-ray diffraction scan increases as the annealing temperature increases until the melting temperature of the Parylene films was achieved. Highly crystalline films of 85% and 92% crystallinity were achieved for Parylene C and N respectively. Investigation of the hybrid film showed that the individual Parylene films behave independently to each other, and the crystallinity of one film had no significant impact to the other film. Mechanical testing showed that the elastic modulus and yield strength increase as a function of annealing, whereas the elongation-to-break parameter decreases. The change in elastic modulus was more significant for Parylene C than Parylene N and this is attributed to the larger change in crystallinity that was observed. Parylene C had a 112% increase in crystallinity compared to a 61% increase for Parylene N, because the original Parylene N material was more crystalline than Parylene C so the change of crystallinity was greater for Parylene C. - Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C was developed. • Parylene N has greater crystallinity than Parylene C. • Phase transition of Parylene N due to annealing results in increased crystallinity. • Annealing caused increased crystallinity and elastic modulus in Parylene films. • Annealed hybrid Parylene films crystallinity behave

  11. The effects of bacteria on crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Many reactions involving inorganic minerals at water-rock interfaces have now been recognized to be bacterially mediated; these reactions could have a significant effect in the excavation of vaults for toxic and radioactive waste disposal. To investigate the role that bacteria play in the natural aqueous environment of crystalline rock the microbial growth factors of nutrition, energy and environment are described. Microbial activity has been investigated in Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), situated in the Archean granitic Lac du Bonnet Batholith, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Faults, initiated in the Early Proterozoic, and later-formed fractures, provide ground-water pathways. Planktonic bacteria, free-swimming in the groundwater, have been observed in over 100 underground borehole samples. The number of bacteria varied from 10 3 to 10 5 mL -1 and appeared to decrease with depth and with increased salinity of the water. However, in the natural environment of deep (100-500 m) crystalline rocks, where nutrition is limited, formation of biofilms by sessile bacteria is a successful survival strategy. Natural biofilms at the URL and biofilms grown in bioreactors have been studied. The biofilms can accumulate different elements, depending upon the local environment. Precipitates of iron have been found in all the biofilms studied, where they are either passively accumulated or utilized as an energy source. Within the biofilm active and extensive biogeochemical immobilization of dissolved elements is controlled by distinct bacterial activities which are sufficiently discrete for hematite and siderite to be precipitated in close proximity

  12. Optical properties of crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forouhi, A.R.; Bloomer, I.

    1988-01-01

    A new formulation for the complex index of refraction, N(E) = n(E)-ik(E), as a function of photon energy E, for crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics is developed based on our previous derivation of N(E) for amorphous materials. The extinction coefficient k(E) is deduced from a one-electron model with finite lifetime for the excited electron state. The refractive index n(E) is then derived from the Kramers-Kronig relation as the Hilbert transform of k(E). It is shown that n(∞)>1. Excellent agreement is found between our equations for n(E) and k(E) and published measured values for crystalline Si, Ge, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, SiC, cubic C, and α-SiO 2 , over a wide range of energies (∼0--20 eV). Far fewer parameters, all of which have physical significance, are required and they can be determined for a particular material from the position and strength of the peaks in the k spectrum

  13. Active colloidal propulsion over a crystalline surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Udit; Straube, Arthur V.; Fischer, Peer; Gibbs, John G.; Höfling, Felix

    2017-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of chemically self-propelled Janus colloids moving atop a two-dimensional crystalline surface. The surface is a hexagonally close-packed monolayer of colloidal particles of the same size as the mobile one. The dynamics of the self-propelled colloid reflects the competition between hindered diffusion due to the periodic surface and enhanced diffusion due to active motion. Which contribution dominates depends on the propulsion strength, which can be systematically tuned by changing the concentration of a chemical fuel. The mean-square displacements (MSDs) obtained from the experiment exhibit enhanced diffusion at long lag times. Our experimental data are consistent with a Langevin model for the effectively two-dimensional translational motion of an active Brownian particle in a periodic potential, combining the confining effects of gravity and the crystalline surface with the free rotational diffusion of the colloid. Approximate analytical predictions are made for the MSD describing the crossover from free Brownian motion at short times to active diffusion at long times. The results are in semi-quantitative agreement with numerical results of a refined Langevin model that treats translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the same footing.

  14. Molecular reorientations in a substance with liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Phuc.

    1986-05-01

    Results of dielectric relaxation (DR), quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS), far infrared absorption (FIR), proton magnetic resonance (PMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and preliminary X-ray diffraction measurements on the di-n-pentyloxyazoxybenzene (5.OAOB) are presented. The measurements carried out by all these methods showed that 5.OAOB exhibits a nontypical for liquid-crystalline materials phase diagram. It has two mesophases: a nematic (N) and an ''intermediate'' crystalline phase just below it. A complex interpretation of results obtained is given. All suggestions concerning the character of reorientational motions of the molecule as a whole as well as of its segments in mesomorphic phases are analyzed. From comparison of the DR and QNS studies one can conclude that in the N phase the molecule as a whole performs rotational diffusion around the long axis (τ DR ∼ 100 ps) and at the same time the two moieties perform faster independent reorientations around N - benzene rings bonds withτ QNS ∼ 5 ps. On the basis of various experimental data it is shown that the CrI phase is a plastic-crystalline phase for which the molecule and its segments perform fast stochastic unaxial reorientations. This is the first case where the existence of such a phase in liquid-crystalline materials has been experimentally confirmed. (author)

  15. Protective mechanisms against peptide and protein peroxides generated by singlet oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    or detoxify such peroxides. It is shown that catalase, horseradish peroxidase, and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase do not react rapidly with these peroxides. Oxymyoglobin and oxyhemoglobin, but not the met (Fe3+) forms of these proteins, react with peptide but not protein, peroxides with oxidation of the heme iron...

  16. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorshev, V. Yu.; Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru; Smirnov, S.P.

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  17. Characterization of crystalline structures in Opuntia ficus-indica

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; del López, Alicia Real; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the crystalline compounds present in nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes. The identification of the crystalline structures was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystalline structures identified were calcium carbonate (calcite) [CaCO3], calcium-magnesium bicarbonate [CaMg(CO3)2], magnesium oxide [MgO], calcium oxalate monohydrate [Ca(C2O4)•(H2O)], potassium peroxydiphosph...

  18. Dangling bonds and crystalline inclusions in amorphous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, L [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica; Russo, G [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1981-02-07

    It is suggested that on the surface of crystalline inclusions dangling bond formation is favoured due to unbalanced local stresses. The energy for bond tearings is probably originated from the exothermic process leading to the crystalline inclusion configuration which is more stable than the original amorphous one. A thermodynamical calculation is performed giving the ratio nsub(k) of crystalline inclusions having k dangling bonds on their surface.

  19. Used Fuel Disposition in Crystalline Rocks: FY16 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. FY16 continued to be a successful year in both experimental and modeling arenas in evaluation of used fuel disposal in crystalline rocks. The work covers a wide range of research topics identified in the R&D plan.

  20. United States Crystalline Repository Project - key research areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patera, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Crystalline Repository Project is responsible for siting the second high-level nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock for the US Department of Energy. A methodology is being developed to define data and information needs and a way to evaluate that information. The areas of research the Crystalline Repository Project is involved in include fluid flow in a fractured network, coupled thermal, chemical and flow processes and cooperation in other nations and OECD research programs

  1. Influence of the peroxide group on the surface of titanium dioxide synthesized by the OPM route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Estela Melare Ribeiro dos; Kubo, Andressa Mayumi; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; Francatto, Patricia; Souza Neto, Francisco Nunes de; Leite, Edson Roberto; Longo, Elson; Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In the context of nanotechnology, there is a growing demand for environmentally sustainable solutions and technological innovations that are linked to reducing energy consumption and minimizing waste generation during the synthesis process. The Oxidant Peroxide Method for titanium dioxide synthesis (TiO 2 -OPM) is based on the oxidation of titanium ions to obtain nanometric powders that are highly reactive particles with controlled morphology. This method is easy and advantageous because it uses reagents of low toxicity, without the necessity to operate in inert atmosphere and at high temperatures. In this work, we obtained nanometric powders of TiO 2 -OPM from metallic titanium (TiO 2 -Met), and titanium isopropoxide (TiO 2 -Iso). Separately, the precursors reacts with hydrogen peroxide in ammoniacal medium in order to compare their reactivity by quantifying the peroxo groups on the surface. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images showed nanoparticles of 10nm of both materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed typical structures of crystalline materials with mixture of anatase and rutile phase of titanium dioxide. Raman spectroscopy also cooperated with the XRD patterns showing vibrational modes of the mixture of phases (anatase and rutile) in both materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the two materials lost mass, in which in the first stage (80 - 125 deg C) occurred 24% of loss and in the second stage (235-265 deg C) is between 10% - 13%, and is related to the elimination of peroxo groups at the surface due to thermal treatment. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed peaks related to exothermic decomposition of the peroxo groups (200 - 250 deg C) that coincided with peak rates of mass loss in the TGA. And the redox titration showed that the surface of the TiO 2 -Met had peroxo groups in 8.6 % w/w and 10.1 % w/w for TiO 2 -Iso, resulting in an increase of peroxo groups on the surface, making the TiO 2 -Iso route

  2. Influence of the peroxide group on the surface of titanium dioxide synthesized by the OPM route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Estela Melare Ribeiro dos; Kubo, Andressa Mayumi; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; Francatto, Patricia; Souza Neto, Francisco Nunes de; Leite, Edson Roberto; Longo, Elson; Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues, E-mail: estelamelare@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: In the context of nanotechnology, there is a growing demand for environmentally sustainable solutions and technological innovations that are linked to reducing energy consumption and minimizing waste generation during the synthesis process. The Oxidant Peroxide Method for titanium dioxide synthesis (TiO{sub 2}-OPM) is based on the oxidation of titanium ions to obtain nanometric powders that are highly reactive particles with controlled morphology. This method is easy and advantageous because it uses reagents of low toxicity, without the necessity to operate in inert atmosphere and at high temperatures. In this work, we obtained nanometric powders of TiO{sub 2}-OPM from metallic titanium (TiO{sub 2}-Met), and titanium isopropoxide (TiO{sub 2}-Iso). Separately, the precursors reacts with hydrogen peroxide in ammoniacal medium in order to compare their reactivity by quantifying the peroxo groups on the surface. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images showed nanoparticles of 10nm of both materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed typical structures of crystalline materials with mixture of anatase and rutile phase of titanium dioxide. Raman spectroscopy also cooperated with the XRD patterns showing vibrational modes of the mixture of phases (anatase and rutile) in both materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the two materials lost mass, in which in the first stage (80 - 125 deg C) occurred 24% of loss and in the second stage (235-265 deg C) is between 10% - 13%, and is related to the elimination of peroxo groups at the surface due to thermal treatment. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed peaks related to exothermic decomposition of the peroxo groups (200 - 250 deg C) that coincided with peak rates of mass loss in the TGA. And the redox titration showed that the surface of the TiO{sub 2}-Met had peroxo groups in 8.6 % w/w and 10.1 % w/w for TiO{sub 2}-Iso, resulting in an increase of peroxo groups on the surface, making

  3. Preparation of inorganic crystalline compounds induced by ionizing, UV and laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuba, V.; Pavelkova, T.; Barta, J.; Indrei, J.; Gbur, T.; Pospisil, M.; Mucka, V.; Docekalova, Z.; Zavadilova, A.; Vlk, M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation methods represent powerful tool for synthesis of various inorganic materials. Study of solid particles formation from solutions in the field of UV or ionizing radiation is one of the very promising and long term pursued trends in photochemistry and radiation chemistry. The motivation may be various, either preparation of new materials or removal of hazardous contaminants (e.g. heavy metals) from wastewater. This work deals with preparation of some metal oxides, synthetic garnets and spinel structures via irradiation of aqueous solutions containing precursors, i.e. soluble metal salts, radical scavengers and/or macromolecular stabilizers. Namely, results on radiation induced preparation of nickel, zinc, yttrium and aluminium oxides are summarized, as well as zinc peroxide, yttrium / lutetium - aluminium garnets and cobalt(II) aluminate. 60 Co irradiator, linear electron accelerator, medium pressure UV lamp and solid state laser were used as the sources of radiation. Aside from preparation, various physico-chemical and structural properties of compounds prepared were also studied. All used modifications of radiation method are rather convenient and simple, and yield (nano)powder materials with interesting characteristics. Prepared materials generally have high chemical purity, high specific surface area and narrow distribution of particles size (ranging in tens of nm). Generally, all types of irradiation result in materials with comparable properties and structural characteristics; but in the case of synthetic garnets and spinels, preparation using UV-radiation seems to be the most convenient for their preparation. Among compounds discussed, only zinc oxide and zinc peroxide were prepared directly via irradiation. For preparation of other crystalline compounds, additional heat treatment (at low temperature) of amorphous solid phase formed under irradiation was necessary.

  4. Differential sensitivity of cellular membranes to peroxidative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijbers, W.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a morphological and cytochemical investigation into the effects of both vitamin E deficiency and X-irradiation on the ultrastructure and enzyme activities of several cellular membranes, particularly the plasma membrane and the membranes of lysosomes, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. In the vitamin E deficient situation, the radicals and peroxides only originate near mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, so that these membrane systems suffer from changes. After irradiation of the liver of both the control duckling and the deficient duckling, radicals originate in all parts of the cell. Due to their high content of lipids and cholesterols, peroxides will occur mainly in plasma membranes and lysosomal membranes. Moreover, in these membranes there is hardly any protection by vitamin E

  5. Ultraviolet- and sunlight-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, T.K.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation and sunlight caused lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane (as detected by measurement of the oxidation index, A 233 /A 215 , and the amount of malondialdehyde formed) and made the membrane leaky (as revealed by the release of the trapped chromate anions). The oxidation index and the formation of malondialdehyde increased linearly with increasing dose of radiation and depended significantly on the dose rate. The effects were smaller in liposomes derived from Vibrio cholerae phospholipid than in those derived from egg lecithin. The effects of the radiation dose and dose rate on hemolysis and peroxidation (MDA formation) of the erythrocyte membrane followed a similar pattern. A direct correlation between the percentage leakage of chromate (Y) and the oxidation index (X) of the liposomal system was obtained as Y = 236.5 x X

  6. Assay to detect lipid peroxidation upon exposure to nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Timothy M; Neun, Barry W; Stern, Stephan T

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for the analysis of human hepatocarcinoma cells (HEP G2) for lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), following treatment with nanoparticle formulations. Oxidative stress has been identified as a likely mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity, and cell-based in vitro systems for evaluation of nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress are widely considered to be an important component of biocompatibility screens. The products of lipid peroxidation, lipid hydroperoxides, and aldehydes, such as MDA, can be measured via a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. In this assay, which can be performed in cell culture or in cell lysate, MDA combines with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) to form a fluorescent adduct that can be detected at an excitation wavelength of 530 nm and an emission wavelength of 550 nm. The results are then expressed as MDA equivalents, normalized to total cellular protein (determined by Bradford assay).

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide: A Key Chemical for Today's Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Albanese, Lorenzo; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Mario

    2016-12-20

    The global utilization of hydrogen peroxide, a green oxidant that decomposes in water and oxygen, has gone from 0.5 million tonnes per year three decades ago to 4.5 million tonnes per year in 2014, and is still climbing. With the aim of expanding the utilization of this eminent green chemical across different industrial and civil sectors, the production and use of hydrogen peroxide as a green industrial oxidant is reviewed herein to provide an overview of the explosive growth of its industrial use over the last three decades and of the state of the art in its industrial manufacture, with important details of what determines the viability of the direct production from oxygen and hydrogen compared with the traditional auto-oxidation process. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Process Department, 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze 30207 (France); Muhr, H.; Plasari, E. [Reaction and Process Engineering Laboratory, CNRS, University of Lorraine. 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, Nancy 54001 (France); Auger, F. [Areva Mines/SEPA. 2 route de Lavaugrasse, Bessines-sur-Gartempe 87250 (France)

    2016-07-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  9. Carbon catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen peroxide production in acidic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čolić, Viktor; Yang, Sungeun; Révay, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commodity chemical, as it is an environmentally friendly oxidant. The electrochemical production of H2O2 from oxygen and water by the reduction of oxygen is of great interest, as it would allow the decentralized, on-site, production of pure H2O2. The ability to run...... the reaction in an acidic electrolyte with high performance is particularly important, as it would allow the use of polymer solid electrolytes and the production of pH-neutral hydrogen peroxide. Carbon catalysts, which are cheap, abundant, durable and can be highly selective show promise as potential catalysts...... for such systems. In this work, we examine the electrocatalytic performance and properties of seven commercially available carbon materials for H2O2 production by oxygen electroreduction. We show that the faradaic efficiencies for the reaction lie in a wide range of 18-82% for different carbon catalysts. In order...

  10. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A.; Muhr, H.; Plasari, E.; Auger, F.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  11. Lycopene control of benzophenone-sensitized lipid peroxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Dragan; Marković, Dejan

    2012-05-01

    Lycopene antioxidant activity in the presence of two different mixtures of phospholipids in hexane solution, under continuous regime of UV-irradiation from three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) has been evaluated in this work. Lycopene expected role was to control lipid peroxidation, by scavenging free radicals generated by UV-irradiation, in the presence and in the absence of selected photosensitizer, benzophenone. This work shows that lycopene undergoes to UV-induced destruction (bleaching), highly dependent on the incident photons energy input, more expressed in the presence than in the absence of benzophenone. The further increase ("excess") of its bleaching is undoubtedly related to the further increase of its antioxidant activity in the presence of benzophenone, having the same cause: increase of (phospholipids peroxidation) chain-breaking activities.

  12. Preparation of water soluble chitosan by hydrolysis using hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenqiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan is not soluble in water, which limits its wide application particularly in the medicine and food industry. In the present study, water soluble chitosan (WSC) was prepared by hydrolyzing chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid in homogeneous phase. Factors affecting hydrolysis were investigated and the optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined. The WSC structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting products were composed of chitooligosaccharides of DP 2-9. The WSC content of the product and the yield were 94.7% and 92.3% (w/w), respectively. The results indicate that WSC can be effectively prepared by hydrolysis of chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on mechanism of decreased lipid peroxide by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Okazoe, Yoko; Akimaru, Kunihiro; Sato, E.F.; Utsumi, Kozo.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the effect of SOD on lipid peroxidation in biomembrane from V.E-deficient rats, in order to study the mechanism of increased SOD activities and decreased lipid peroxide by low dose irradiation. The following results were obtained. i. Active oxygen (O 2 - ) strongly enhances lipid peroxidations in biomembrane with the Fe 3+ as catalyst. ii. SOD evidently inhibits lipid peroxidations under above conditions. iii. We suggested that the effect of SOD enhanced by low dose irradiation results in inhibition of lipid peroxidation. (author)

  14. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weizierl, Barbara; Wester, Ture

    2001-01-01

    Artikel på CD-Rom 8 sider. The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells...... with fivefold symmetry in 3D space. The quasi-crystal geometry can be constructed from two different cubic cells with identical rhombic facets, where the relation between the diagonals is the golden section. All cells have identical rhombic faces, identical edges and identical icosahedral/dedecahedral nodes....... The purpose of the paper is to investigate some possibilities for the application of Quasi-Crystal geometry for structures in architecture. The basis for the investigations is A: to use the Golden Cubes (the two different hexahedra consisting of rhombic facets where the length of the diagonals has the Golden...

  15. (Preoxidation cleaning optimization for crystalline silicon)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments has been performed in Sandia's Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory to evaluate the effect of various chemical surface treatments on the recombination lifetime of crystalline silicon wafers subjected to a high-temperature dry oxidation. From this series of experiments we have deduced a relatively simple yet effective cleaning sequence. We have also evaluated the effect of different chemical damage-removal etches for improving the recombination lifetime and surface smoothness of mechanically lapped wafers. This paper presents the methodology used, the experimental results obtained, and our experience with using this process on a continuing basis over a period of many months. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Ground Water movement in crystalline rock aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serejo, A.N.C.; Freire, C.; Siqueira, H.B. de; Frischkorn, H.; Torquato, J.R.F.; Santiago, M.M.F.; Barbosa, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Ground water movement studies were performed in crystalline rock aquifers from the upper Acarau River hydrographic basin, state of Ceara, Brazil. The studies included carbon-14, 18 O/ 16 O and tritium measurements as well as chemical analysis. A total of 35 wells were surveyed during drought seasons. Carbon-14 values displayed little variation which implied that the water use was adequate despite of the slower recharge conditions. Fairly constant isotopic 18 O/ 16 O ratio values in the wells and their similarity with rainwater values indicated that the recharge is done exclusively by pluvial waters. A decreasing tendency within the tritium concentration values were interpreted as a periodic rainwater renewal for these aquifers. The chemical analysis demonstrated that there is in fact no correlation between salinity and the time the water remains in the aquifer itself. (D.J.M.) [pt

  17. Mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys we have developed indirect studies of diffusion based on electron irradiation and hydrostatic pressure effects upon crystallization. In a first part we present the models of crystallization which are used, then we give the experimental results. The main point is the first experimental measurement of the activation volume for diffusion in a metallic glass: the value of which is roughly one atomic volume. We show also recent quantitative results concerning radiation enhanced diffusion in metallic glasses (FeNi) 8 (PB) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 . In a last part we discuss the atomic model needed to explain our results

  18. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A

    2006-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations

  19. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  20. Radionuclide migration in crystalline rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.

    2002-01-01

    Crystalline rock has been considered as a host medium for the repository of high radioactive spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The geosphere will act as an ultimate barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere if they are released through the technical barriers. Radionuclide transport is assumed to take place along watercarrying fractures, and retardation will occur both in the fracture and within the rock matrix. To be able to predict the transport and retardation of radionuclides in rock fractures and rock matrices, it is essential to understand the different phenomena involved. Matrix diffusion has been indicated to be an important mechanism, which will retard the transport of radionuclides in rock fractures. Both dispersion and matrix diffusion are processes, which can have similar influences on solute breakthrough curves in fractured crystalline rock. In this work, the migration of radionuclides in crystalline rock fractures was studied by means of laboratory scale column methods. The purpose of the research was to gain a better understanding of various phenomena - particularly matrix diffusion - affecting the transport and retardation behaviour of radionuclides in fracture flow. Interaction between radionuclides and the rock matrix was measured in order to test the compatibility of experimental retardation parameters and transport models used in assessing the safety of underground repositories for spent nuclear fuel. Rock samples of mica gneiss and of unaltered, moderately altered and strongly altered tonalite represented different rock features and porosities offering the possibility to determine experimental boundary limit values for parameters describing both the transport and retardation of radionuclides and rock matrix properties. The dominant matrix diffusion behaviour was demonstrated in porous ceramic column and gas diffusion experiments. Demonstration of the effects of matrix diffusion in crystalline rock fracture succeeded for the

  1. Semiclassical and quantum polarons in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, P.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-08-01

    Crystalline acetanilide is a an organic solid with peptide bond structure similar to that of proteins. Two states appear in the amide I spectral region having drastically different properties: one is strongly temperature dependent and disappears at high temperatures while the other is stable at all temperatures. Experimental and theoretical work over the past twenty five years has assigned the former to a selftrapped state while the latter to an extended free exciton state. In this article we review the experimental and theoretical developments on acetanilide paying particular attention to issues that are still pending. Although the interpretation of the states is experimentally sound, we find that specific theoretical comprehension is still lacking. Among the issues that that appear not well understood is the effective dimensionality of the selftrapped polaron and free exciton states.

  2. Structural Analysis of Aromatic Liquid Crystalline Polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpad Somogyi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory preparations of liquid crystalline prepolymers, distillates accompanying prepolymers, final polymers, and sublimates accompanying final polymers were examined. NaOD/D2O depolymerization of prepolymers and polymers back to monomers with integration of the 1H NMR spectra showed up to 6% excess of carboxyls over phenol groups, caused partly by loss of the low-boiling comonomer hydroquinone through distillation during prepolymerization and leaving anhydride units in the polymer chain. ESI− MS and MS/MS of hexafluoroisopropanol extracts of the prepolymer detected small molecules including some containing anhydride groups; ESI+ MS showed the presence of small cyclic oligomers. 1H NMR (including TOCSY spectra provided more quantitative analyses of these oligomers. The final polymerization increases the length of the polymer chains and sublimes out the small oligomers. Anhydride linkages remaining in the polymer must make LCP’s more susceptible to degradation by nucleophilic reagents such as water, alkalis, and amines.

  3. Nanodefects in ultrahard crystalline cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, S. V.; Stefan, M.; Goovaerts, E.; Schoemaker, D.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN), the second hardest known material after diamond, exhibits high thermal conductivity and an excellent ability to be n or p doped, which makes it a strong candidate for the next generation of high-temperature micro optical and micro electronic devices. According to recent studies, cBN exhibits a better resistance to radiation damage than diamond, which suggests potential applications in extreme radiation environments. Crystalline cBN powders of up to 0.5 mm linear size is obtained in a similar way as diamond, by catalytic conversion of hexagonal BN (hBN) to cBN at even higher pressures (> 5GPa) and temperatures (∼ 1900 K). Considering the essential role played by the nanodefects (point defects and impurities) in determining its physical properties, it is surprising how limited is the amount of published data concerning the properties of nanodefects in this material, especially by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the most powerful method for identification and characterization of nanodefects in both insulators and semiconductors. This seems to be due mainly to the absence of natural cBN gems and the extreme difficulties in producing even mm 3 sized synthetic crystals. We shall present our recent EPR studies on cBN crystalline powders, performed in a broad temperature range from room temperature (RT) down to 1.2 K on several sorts of large size cBN powder grits of yellow and amber color for industrial applications. Previous multifrequency (9.3 GHz and 95 GHz) EPR studies of brown to black cBN crystallites prepared with excess of boron, resulted in the discovery of two new types of paramagnetic point defects with different spectral properties, called the D1 and D2 centers. Our X(9.3 GHz)-band EPR investigations resulted in the observation in amber cBN crystalline powders of a spectrum with a strong temperature dependence of the lineshape. It was found that for high and low temperatures, respectively, the numerical

  4. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A ampersand 038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports

  5. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  6. Nonlinear optics of liquid crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, Iam Choon

    2009-01-01

    Liquid crystals occupy an important niche in nonlinear optics as a result of their unique physical and optical properties. Besides their broadband birefringence and transparency, abilities to self-assemble into various crystalline phases and to conform to various flexible forms and shapes, liquid crystals are compatible with almost all other optoelectronic materials and technology platforms. In both isotropic and ordered phases, liquid crystals possess extraordinarily large optical nonlinearities that stretch over multiple time scales. To date, almost all conceivable nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed in a very broad spectrum spanning the entire visible to infrared and beyond. In this review, we present a self-contained complete discussion of the optical nonlinearities of liquid crystals, and a thorough review of a wide range of nonlinear optical processes and phenomena enabled by these unique properties. Starting with a brief historical account of the development of nonlinear optical studies of the mesophases of liquid crystals, we then review various liquid crystalline materials and structures, and their nonlinear optical properties. Emphasis is placed on the nematic phase, which best exemplifies the dual nature of liquid crystals, although frequent references to other phases are also made. We also delve into recent work on novel structures such as photonic crystals, metamaterials and nanostructures and their special characteristics and emergent properties. The mechanisms and complex nonlocal dynamics of optical nonlinearities associated with laser induced director axis reorientation, thermal, density, and order parameter fluctuations, space charge field formation and photorefractivity are critically reviewed as a foundation for the discussions of various nonlinear optical processes detailed in this paper

  7. Quantum vibrational polarons: Crystalline acetanilide revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Peter; Edler, Julian

    2006-03-01

    We discuss a refined theoretical description of the peculiar spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide (ACN). Acetanilide is a molecular crystal with quasi-one-dimensional chains of hydrogen-bonded units, which is often regarded as a model system for the vibrational spectroscopy of proteins. In linear spectroscopy, the CO stretching (amide I) band of ACN features a double-peak structure, the lower of which shows a pronounced temperature dependence which has been discussed in the context of polaron theory. In nonlinear spectroscopy, both of these peaks respond distinctly differently. The lower-frequency band exhibits the anharmonicity expected from polaron theory, while the higher-frequency band responds as if it were quasiharmonic. We have recently related the response of the higher-frequency band to that of a free exciton [J. Edler and P. Hamm, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2415 (2002)]. However, as discussed in the present paper, the free exciton is not an eigenstate of the full quantum version of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian, which is commonly used to describe these phenomena. In order to resolve this issue, we present a numerically exact solution of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian in one dimension (1D) and 3D. In 1D, we find that the commonly used displaced oscillator picture remains qualitatively correct, even for relatively large exciton coupling. However, the result is not in agreement with the experiment, as it fails to explain the free-exciton band. In contrast, when taking into account the 3D nature of crystalline acetanilide, certain parameter regimes exist where the displaced oscillator picture breaks down and states appear in the spectrum that indeed exhibit the characteristics of a free exciton. The appearance of these states is a speciality of vibrational polarons, whose source of exciton coupling is transition dipole coupling which is expected to have opposite signs of interchain and intrachain coupling.

  8. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by rat liver mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ješina, Pavel; Kholová, D.; Bolehovská, R.; Červinková, Z.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2004), s. 305-310 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0799; GA MŠk OC 918.50 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenace * triiodothyronine * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  9. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2008), s. 7925-7928 ISSN 0021-8561 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094; GA MŠk OC 157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : magnetic alginate beads * catalase * magnetic separation * Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2008

  10. Role of lipid peroxidation in pathogenesis of senile cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisić Bojana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background /Aim. Cataract is a structural, biochemical and optical change in the eye lens, which changes transmission and refraction of light rays reducing keenness and clarity of a figure on the retina. Its occurrence is highest in older people, over the age of 65 (45.9%, thus a certain degree of opacification exists practically in all people over the 70. Our research was directed to measuring of lipid peroxidation products in cataract lenses involved in early stages of cataractogenesis through oxidative stress and in the development of mature cataract. Methods. Clinical and biochemical research was carried out in 101 patients with cataract, 46 women and 55 men. The average age of the group was 72.47 (ґ = 7.98. According to the cataract maturity degree the patients were classified into two groups as follows: cataracta senilis incipiens (n = 41 and cataracta senilis matura (n = 60. Measuring of diene conjugates was carried out by spectrophotometer. Fluorescent lipid peroxidation products were measured by a spectrofluorophotometer, and malondialdehyde (MDA concentration was measured by colorimeter as a product of a reaction with thiobarbituric acid (TBA. Result. Significantly higher diene conjugated concentration in lenses was measured in the patients with the diagnosis cataracta senilis incipiens (p < 0.001 as well as the intensity of fluorescent iminopropens (p < 0.001. Significantly higher MDA concentration in lens (p < 0.001 was measured in the patients with cataracta senilis matura. Conclusion. The lens structure changes caused by lipid peroxidation can, with other risk factors present, influence the occurrence and development of mature cataract. Some cataract types show different lipid peroxidation intensity with the most distinct changes in cataract which started as corticonuclear.

  11. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  12. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bodiroga Milanka; Ognjanović Jasminka

    2002-01-01

    Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A). Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction...

  13. The basic chemistry and photochemistry behind hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening

    OpenAIRE

    Young, N.D.; Fairley, P.D.; Mohan, V.; Jumeaux, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide gel formulation is a complexprocess which involves both chemistry and physics, and there is still some controversy about the efficiency of whitening processes, particularly with respect to the roles of temperature and irradiation with light. In this work we avoid the complications of the physics bystudying the basic interactions between whitening agents and stainmolecules in simple solutions. We demonstrate that blue light irradiation has a clear and la...

  14. Oxidation of hydrogen peroxide by [Ni (cyclam)] in aqueous acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oxidation of hydrogen peroxide by tris(2,2 -bipyridine) and tris(4,4 -dimethyl-2,2 - bipyridine) complexes of osmium(III), iron(III), ruthenium(III), and nickel(III) studied in acidic and neutral aqueous media, show an inverse acid depen- dence over the pH the range 6.0–8.5.12 Kinetic mea- surements with an excess of H2O2 ...

  15. Effect of exercise on lipid peroxidation in student soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Puspaningtyas, Desty Ervira; Afriani, Yuni; Mahfida, Silvi Lailatul; Kushartanti, Wara; Farmawati, Arta

    2018-01-01

    Training is conducted to improve physiological functions that can support improvementof cardio-respiratory function (O2max). However, intensive training can lead to oxidativestress, which can contribute to health problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluatethe effect of training on serum lipid peroxidation levels in student soccer players. Thestudy was pre-experimental study with a one-shot case design conducted in April 2014.Twelve student soccer players from UGM who chosen by purposi...

  16. Continuous precipitation of uranium peroxide in process pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinelato, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study on uranium peroxide precipitation has been carried out with the objective to evaluate the influence of the main process parameters with a technological approach. The uraniferous solution used was obtained from the hydrometallurgical processing of an ore from Itataia - CE. Studies were developed in two distinct experimental stages. In the first stage, the precipitation was investigated by means of laboratory batch tests and, in the second stage, by means of continuous operation in a process pilot plant. (author)

  17. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, B.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of [ 14 C]glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D 2 O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D 2 O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation

  18. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos S. Rabelo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp and may originate from various sources, including (NH46Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyptus pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/adt Mo and 5 kg/adt H2O2. The PMo stage was more efficient to remove pulp hexenuronic acids than lignin. Its efficiency decreased with increasing pH in the range of 1.5-5.5, while it increased with increasing temperature and peroxide and molybdenum doses. The application of the PMo stage as replacement for the A-stage of the AZDP sequence significantly decreased chlorine dioxide demand. The PMo stage caused a decrease of 20-30% in the generation of organically bound chlorine. The quality parameters of the pulp produced during the PMo stage mill trial were comparable to those obtained with the reference A-stage.

  19. Levels of oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation in thyroid neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, Orla

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the presence of oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation in thyroid neoplasia. METHODS: Using tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry, we assessed levels of DNA damage (8-oxo-dG) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) in 71 follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA), 45 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), and 17 follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and matched normal thyroid tissue. RESULTS: Cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG and 4-HNE expression was significantly higher in FTA, FTC, and PTC tissue compared to matched normal tissue (all p values < .001). Similarly, elevated nuclear levels of 8-oxo-dG were seen in all in FTA, FTC, and PTC tissue compared to matched normal (p values < .07, < .001, < .001, respectively). In contrast, a higher level of 4-HNE expression was detected in normal thyroid tissue compared with matched tumor tissue (p < .001 for all groups). Comparing all 3 groups, 4-HNE levels were higher than 8-oxo-dG levels (p < .001 for all groups) except that cytoplasmic levels of 8-oxo-dG were higher than 4-HNE in all (p < .001). These results were independent of proliferation status. CONCLUSION: High levels of DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in benign and malignant thyroid neoplasia indicates this damage is an early event that may influence disease progression.

  20. Effect of irradiation of lipid peroxidation in serum, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisa, Yoshio

    1976-01-01

    With blood obtained from patients irradiated for cervical uterine cancer (consisting of 4 cases of Stage I, 5 cases of Stage II and 4 cases of Stage III), changes of blood picture, serum lipid weight and serum lipid peroxide accompanying irradiation were studied on 3 occasions, before, during and after the irradiation. The following results were obtained. Serum lipid and serum lipid peroxide were found to increase along with the advance of uterine cancer from Stage I to II and III. At the termination of irradiation the serum lipid and serum lipid peroxide in the cases of cervical uterine cancer at Stage III were found to have recovered to close to the levels before irradiation, but in the other cases these values tended to increase with irradiation. Except the termination of irradiation treatment of cervical uterine cancer of Stage III, the decrease of leucocyte count has a mutual relationship with the increase of serum thiobarbituric acid (TBA), so that change in the serum TBA level can be assumed to be a criterion for irradiation injury. (auth.)

  1. Nitrophenylboronic acids as highly chemoselective probes to detect hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Chieh-Ti; Chang, Ching-Ming; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2011-11-09

    Hydrogen peroxide is commonly used in the food processing industry as a chlorine-free bleaching and sterilizing agent, but excessive amounts of residual hydrogen peroxide have led to cases of food poisoning. Here we describe the development of a novel nonenzymatic colorimetric method for the determination of residual hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products. Nitrophenylboronic acids chemoselectively react with hydrogen peroxide under alkaline conditions to produce yellow nitrophenolates. Of the three nitrophenylboronic acid isomers tested, the p-isomer displayed the highest sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide and the fastest reaction kinetics. The reaction product, p-nitrophenolate, has an absorption maximum at 405 nm and a good linear correlation between the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the A(405) values was obtained. We successfully applied this convenient and rapid method for hydrogen peroxide determination to samples of dried bean curds and disposable chopsticks, thereby demonstrating its potential in foods and agricultural industries.

  2. Kinetics of 25-hydroperoxycholesterol formation during photo-oxidation of crystalline cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; Barnaba, Carlo; García, Hugo Sergio

    2014-06-01

    25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OH), a side-chain product of cholesterol oxidation, has emerged as one of the important issues in food chemistry and biochemistry, because of its involvement in several human pathologies. This oxysterol is derived from both enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. However, the latter mechanism has been scarcely studied in either food or model systems. In this work, a kinetic model was developed to evaluate the formation of 25-OH and its precursor 25-hydroperoxycholesterol (25-OOH) during photo-oxidation of cholesterol for 28 days under fluorescent light. 25-OOH was estimated by an indirect method, using thin-layer chromatography coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peroxide value (POV) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were determined. POV showed a hyperbolic behavior, typical of a crystalline system in which the availability of cholesterol is the limiting factor. Further reactions of hydroperoxides were followed; in particular, after photo-oxidation, 25-OOH (0.55 mg g(-1) ) and 25-OH (0.08 mg g(-1) ) were found in cholesterol, as well as seven other oxysterols, including 7-hydroxy and 5,6-epoxy derivatives. The application of kinetic models to the data showed good correlation with theoretical values, allowing derivation of the kinetic parameters for each oxidation route. The results of this work confirm that cholesterol in the crystalline state involves different oxidation patterns as compared to cholesterol in solution. Moreover, the numerical fit proved that hydroperoxidation is the rate-limiting step in 25-OH formation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Occurrence of Metastudtite (Uranium Peroxide Dihydrate) at a FUSRAP Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.M.; Nelson, K.A.; Stevens, G.T.; Grassi, V.J.

    2006-01-01

    Uranium concentrations in groundwater in a localized area of a site exceed the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) by a factor of one thousand. Although the groundwater seepage velocity ranges up to 0.7 meters per day (m/day), data indicate that the uranium is not migrating in groundwater. We believe that the uranium is not mobile because of local geochemical conditions and the unstable nature of the uranium compound present at the site; uranium peroxide dihydrate (metastudtite). Metastudtite [UO 4 .2(H 2 O) or (U(O 2 )|O|(OH) 2 ).3H 2 O] has been identified at other sites as an alteration product in casks of spent nuclear fuel, but neither enriched nor depleted uranium were present at this site. Metastudtite was first identified as a natural mineral in 1983, although documented occurrences in the environment are uncommon. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a remedial investigation at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deep water New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to evaluate radioactive contamination resulting from historical activities conducted in support of Manhattan Engineering District operations. From 1942 to 1947, Chambers Works converted uranium oxides to uranium tetrafluoride and uranium metal. More than half of the production at this facility resulted from the recovery process, where uranium-bearing dross and scrap were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to produce uranium peroxide dihydrate. The 280-hectare Chambers Works has produced some 600 products, including petrochemicals, aromatics, fluoro-chemicals, polymers, and elastomers. Contaminants resulting from these processes, including separate-phase petrochemicals, have also been detected within the boundaries of the FUSRAP investigation. USACE initiated remedial investigation field activities in 2002. The radionuclides of concern are natural uranium (U nat ) and its short-lived progeny. Areas of impacted soil generally correspond to the

  4. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, C.; Adnet, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H 2 O 2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO 3 ]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO 3 ] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  5. Definitions of terms relating to crystalline polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meille, S. V.; Allegra, G.; Geil, P. H.; He, J.; Hess, M.; Jin, J.-I.; Kratochvíl, Pavel; Mormann, W.; Stepto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 10 (2011), s. 1831-1871 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : IUPAC Polymer Division * crystalline polymers * crystalline polymer conformation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2011

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic estimation of crystallinity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    The crystallinity parameter is calculated by using a standard procedure which can be used to estimate the distribution of quartz in various rocks for mining purpose. The infrared ... The X-ray diffraction full ... crystallinity and trace mineral components of rocks (Partha- ... infrared techniques (Rice et al 1995). ... The absorption.

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on crystalline ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Hofmann, I.; Liesen, D.

    1989-04-01

    The workshop consisted of mainly invited and some contributed papers. More informal discussions took place in three working groups on the following topics: beam cooling techniques; diagnostics of crystalline beams; storage rings for crystalline beams. The present volume collects all papers as well as the summaries of the working groups. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  8. Determination of cellulose I crystallinity by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Sally A. Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Two new methods based on FT-Raman spectroscopy, one simple, based on band intensity ratio, and the other, using a partial least-squares (PLS) regression model, are proposed to determine cellulose I crystallinity. In the simple method, crystallinity in semicrystalline cellulose I samples was determined based on univariate regression that was first developed using the...

  9. Quantitative aspects of crystalline lactose in milk products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetman, K.

    1982-01-01

    The occurrence of crystalline lactose in milk products and its influence on their physical properties are briefly reviewed. The importance of the quantitive determination of crystalline lactose for scientific and industrial purposes is indicated, and a summary is given of our earlier work. This

  10. Diffractometric method for determining the degree of crystallinity of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukhchin, D. G., E-mail: dimatsch@mail.ru; Malkov, A. V.; Tyshkunova, I. V.; Mayer, L. V.; Novozhilov, E. V. [Lomonosov Northen (Arctic) Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    A new method for determining the degree of crystallinity of a material from X-ray diffraction data has been developed. The method is based on estimating the rate of change in function I = f(2θ) in the entire range of scattering angles. A calculation is performed using the ratio of the integral modulus of the first derivative of intensity with respect to angle 2θ to the integral area under the diffraction pattern curve. The method was tested on two substances with known amorphous and crystalline components. A linear relationship is revealed between the specified ratio of crystalline and amorphous parts and the calculated crystallinity index. The proposed method allows one to estimate impartially and compare the degree of crystallinity for samples of different nature.

  11. Solvent extraction of lanthanide ions with 1-Phenyl-3-Methyl-4-Benzoyl-Pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP), 2. Extraction of Erbium(III), Ytterbium(III) and Lutetium(III) by HPMBP from aqueous-methanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czakis-Sulikowska, D.M.; Kuznik, B.; Malinowska, A.

    1990-01-01

    The solvent extraction of lanthanides(III)(Ln = Er, Yb, Lu) by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazolone-5 (HL) in carbon tetrachloride from aqueous-methanol phase was investigated. The equilibrium constants for the extraction from aqueous-50 % (ν/ν) methanol phase (K ex ), two-phase stability constants of the complexes LnL 3 (β 3 * ) and stability constants of complexes LnL 2+ , LnL 2 + , LnL 3 (β n )(Ln = Yb, Lu) were calculated. It was confirmed that the addition of methanol to the aqueous phase causes a synergistic effect. The influence of methanol on the dissociation constant of HPMBP (K a ) and the distribution constant of HPMBP (p HL ) between carbon tetrachloride and water-methanol solutions was investigated. (Authors)

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy investigation using ab initio and density functional theory analysis on the structure of 3-(6-benzoyl-2-oxobenzo[ d]oxazol-3(2 H)-yl)propanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hakan; Algül, Öztekin; Önkol, Tijen

    2008-08-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the 3-(6-benzoyl-2-oxobenzo[ d]oxazol-3(2 H)-yl)propanoic acid were calculated by the HF and DFT methods using 6-31G(d) basis set. The FT-infrared spectra have been measured for the title compound in the solid state. We obtained 11 stable conformers for the title compound, however the Conformer 1 is approximately 3.88 kcal/mol more stable than the Conformer 11. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental geometry of the title compound shows that the X-ray parameters fairly well reproduce the geometry of the Conformer 1. The harmonic vibrations computed of this compound by the B3LYP/6-31G(d) method are in a good agreement with the observed IR spectral data. Theoretical vibrational spectra of the title compound were interpreted by means of PEDs using VEDA 4 program.

  13. Solvent extraction of Zr(IV) and Nb(V) with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4benzoyl-pyrazole-5-one and tri-iso-octylamine from different mineral acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.Y.; Nwabue, F.I.; Ahmed, S.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of Zr(IV) and Nb(V) from aqueous solutions of mineral acids with 1% 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazole-5-one and 5% tri-iso-octylamine solutions in chloroform has been investigated respectively. The mechanism of extraction and the composition of the extracted species have been suggested and the effect of complexing and salting-out agents also determined. Separation factors of various metals with respect to niobium have been estimated and separation from zirconium and many other elements has been achieved. Procedures are recommended for the separation of 95 Nb from 95 Zr- 95 Nb mixture as well as from the fission products. (orig.) [de

  14. (3-Benzoyl-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-olato-κ2O,Obis[2-(2-pyridylphenyl-κ2C1,N]iridium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijun Luo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ir(C11H8N2(C17H19O2], has an octahedral coordination geometry around the IrIII atom, retaining the cis-C,C,trans–N,N chelate disposition of the two 2-phenylpyridine ligands. The chelate rings are nearly mutually perpendicular [the interplanar angles range from 85.48 (17 to 89.17 (19°]. The two 2-(2-pyridylphenyl ligands are approximately planar, with the plane of the phenyl ring being inclined to that of the pyridine ring by 2.3 (3 and 5.1 (3° in the two ligands. The interplanar angle between the phenyl ring in 3-benzoyl-camphor and the IrO2C3 chelate ring is 35.5 (2°.

  15. Development of highly porous crystalline titania photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszewski, Michal

    The objectives of this dissertation are the design, synthesis, and characterization of titania materials with surface area, porosity, crystallinity and doping tailored toward photocatalytic applications. Ultimately, the research should result in a strategy allowing the synthesis of titania with all these important features. The synthetic methods investigated in this research will include: i) soft-templating, ii) hard-templating, and iii) modified precursor strategy. Soft-templating strategy uses organic templates--either block copolymers or surfactants--that under specific conditions assemble into micelles, and later, these micelles are used to template the desired material around them. The resulting organic-inorganic composite is then calcined in air to remove the organic template and recover the final material with high surface area and large pore volume. This work explores 1) synthesis of titania materials in the presence of polymer templates, and the effects of different synthetic conditions on the structure of the resulting materials. Hard-templating, in contrast to soft-templating, uses inorganic templates. The hard template is introduced during the synthesis to cast its shape onto the fabricated material and removed afterwards, when the material has formed. The final material is an inverse replica of the hard template used, typically with a well-developed mesostructure. This work explores 1) hard templating synthesis of titania materials using silica and alumina, and 2) the effects of the template amount and type. The modified precursor strategy is a novel synthetic method, developed in this research, and designed specifically to achieve titania material with high surface area, large pore volume, high crystallinity, and possibly doping. The modified precursors are prepared by reacting generic titania precursors, such as titanium isopropoxide (TIPO), with organic acids, which results in substitution of some or all alkoxide groups in TIPO structure. The goal

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of the furan peroxide formation in the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of sodium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunskaya, E.P.; Badovskaya, L.A.; Kaklyugina, T.Ya.; Poskonin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetics of the initial stage of the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide are studied in the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 in water and without catalytic additions in n-butanol. Organic peroxide having in its disposal Mo(6), which is the only product on the initial stage of the reaction, is formed since the first minutes of oxidation of furfural by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 . The mechanisms of conversion of furfural in the Na 2 MoO 4 - H 2 O system and its oxidation by peroxide without sodium molybdate are discussed. Schemes of formation of furfural complexes based on the results of kinetic studies are suggested. Comparison of obtained data demonstrates that presence of the sodium molybdates in the reaction medium trends to change of reaction procedure in the hydrogen peroxide [ru

  17. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of diesel utilizing hydrogen peroxide and functionalized-activated carbon in a biphasic diesel-acetonitrile system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haw, Kok-Giap; Bakar, Wan Azelee Wan Abu; Ali, Rusmidah; Chong, Jiunn-Fat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kadir, Abdul Aziz Abdul [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the development of granular functionalized-activated carbon as catalysts in the catalytic oxidative desulfurization (Cat-ODS) of commercial Malaysian diesel using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Granular functionalized-activated carbon was prepared from oil palm shell using phosphoric acid activation method and carbonized at 500 C and 700 C for 1 h. The activated carbons were characterized using various analytical techniques to study the chemistry underlying the preparation and calcination treatment. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms exhibited the characteristic of microporous structure with some contribution of mesopore property. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results showed that higher activation temperature leads to fewer surface functional groups due to thermal decomposition. Micrograph from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that activation at 700 C creates orderly and well developed pores. Furthermore, X-ray Diffraction patterns revealed that pyrolysis has converted crystalline cellulose structure of oil palm shell to amorphous carbon structure. The influence of the reaction temperature, the oxidation duration, the solvent, and the oxidant/sulfur molar ratio were examined. The rates of the catalytic oxidative desulfurization reaction were found to increase with the temperature, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/S molar ratio. Under the best operating condition for the catalytic oxidative desulfurization: temperature 50 C, atmospheric pressure, 0.5 g activated carbon, 3 mol ratio of hydrogen peroxide to sulfur, 2 mol ratio of acetic acid to sulfur, 3 oxidation cycles with 1 h for each cycle using acetonitrile as extraction solvent, the sulfur content in diesel was reduced from 2189 ppm to 190 ppm with 91.3% of total sulfur removed. (author)

  18. Goldstone bosons in a crystalline chiral phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Marco

    2017-07-24

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is expected to exhibit a rich structure. Different models have shown, that crystalline phases with a spatially varying chiral condensate can occur in the regime of low temperatures and moderate densities, where they replace the first-order phase transition found for spatially constant order parameters. We investigate this inhomogeneous phase, where in addition to the chiral symmetry, translational and rotational symmetry are broken as well, in a two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The main goal of this work is to describe the Goldstone bosons in this phase, massless excitations that occur for spontaneously broken symmetries. We take one of the simplest possible modulations, the chiral density wave, and show how to derive the quark propagator of the theory analytically, by means of transformations in chiral and momentum space. We apply this to a test case for the gap equation. We show the derivation of Nambu-Goldstone modes in the inhomogeneous phase and find, that for our case only three different modes have to be taken into account. We proceed to calculate the Goldstone boson related to the breaking of spatial symmetry, which can be related to the neutral pion. By evaluating a Bethe-Salpeter equation, we can show, that we have indeed found a Goldstone boson and give its dispersion relation in terms of momenta perpendicular, as well as parallel to the mass modulation.

  19. Goldstone bosons in a crystalline chiral phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is expected to exhibit a rich structure. Different models have shown, that crystalline phases with a spatially varying chiral condensate can occur in the regime of low temperatures and moderate densities, where they replace the first-order phase transition found for spatially constant order parameters. We investigate this inhomogeneous phase, where in addition to the chiral symmetry, translational and rotational symmetry are broken as well, in a two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The main goal of this work is to describe the Goldstone bosons in this phase, massless excitations that occur for spontaneously broken symmetries. We take one of the simplest possible modulations, the chiral density wave, and show how to derive the quark propagator of the theory analytically, by means of transformations in chiral and momentum space. We apply this to a test case for the gap equation. We show the derivation of Nambu-Goldstone modes in the inhomogeneous phase and find, that for our case only three different modes have to be taken into account. We proceed to calculate the Goldstone boson related to the breaking of spatial symmetry, which can be related to the neutral pion. By evaluating a Bethe-Salpeter equation, we can show, that we have indeed found a Goldstone boson and give its dispersion relation in terms of momenta perpendicular, as well as parallel to the mass modulation.

  20. Ion damage calculations in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oen, O.S.

    1985-07-01

    Damage profiles in crystalline silicon produced by light (B) and heavy (Bi) ions with energies from 10 to 100 keV were studied using the computer program MARLOWE (version 12). The program follows not only the incident ion collision by collision, but also any Si target atom that is set into motion through an energetic collision. Thus, the transport effect of the complete cascade of recoiled target atoms is included in the damage profile. The influence of channeling was studied for Si(100) using beam tilt angles from the surface normal of 0 0 , 3 0 and 7 0 about the [001] or [011] axes. The effects of channeling on the damage profile are twofold: first, there is a large reduction of the central damage peak; second, there is a component of the damage profile that extends considerably deeper into the target than that found in conventional studies using a random target assemblage. The influence of amorphous overlayers of SiO 2 on the damage and implantation profiles in the Si(100) substrate has also been investigated

  1. Chaotic Fluid Mixing in Crystalline Sphere Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, Regis; Lester, Daniel; Meheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-11-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of steady 3D Stokes flow over simple cubic (SC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices of close-packed spheres, and uncover the mechanisms governing chaotic mixing. Due to the cusp-shaped sphere contacts, the topology of the skin friction field is fundamentally different to that of continuous (non-granular) media (e.g. open pore networks), with significant implications for fluid mixing. Weak symmetry breaking of the flow orientation with respect to the lattice symmetries imparts a transition from regular to strong chaotic mixing in the BCC lattice, whereas the SC lattice only exhibits weak mixing. Whilst the SC and BCC lattices share the same symmetry point group, these differences are explained in terms of their space groups, and we find that a glide symmetry of the BCC lattice generates chaotic mixing. These insights are used to develop accurate predictions of the Lyapunov exponent distribution over the parameter space of mean flow orientation, and point to a general theory of mixing and dispersion based upon the inherent symmetries of arbitrary crystalline structures. The authors acknowledge the support of ERC project ReactiveFronts (648377).

  2. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  4. Charge-density study of crystalline beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R F [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray structure factors for crystalline beryllium measured by Brown (Phil. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377) have been analyzed with multipole deformation functions for charge-density information. Single exponential radial functions were used for the valence charge density. A valence monopole plus the three harmonics, P/sup 3//sub 5/(cos theta) sin 3phi, P/sub 6/(cos theta) and P/sup 3//sub 7/(cos theta) sin 3phi, provide a least-squares fit to the data with Rsub(w)=0.0081. The superposition of these density functions describes a bonding charge density between Be atoms along the c axis through the tetrahedral vacancy. The results reported here are in qualitative agreement with a recent pseudo-potential calculation of metallic beryllium. The final residuals in the analysis are largest at high sin theta/lambda values. This suggests that core charge deformation is present and/or anharmonic motion of the nuclei is appreciable.

  5. Crystalline insoluble acid salts of tetravalent metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, G.; Bernasconi, M.G.; Casciola, M.; Costantino, U.

    1980-01-01

    Several titration curves of crystalline acid salts of tetravalent metals show an evident decrease in the pH of the supernatant solution with an increasing addition of metal hydroxide. This phenomenon, very unusual for common organic ion-exchangers, seems to be quite general for inorganic ion-exchangers with layered structure of α-type. In order to throw light on this phenomenon, a detailed investigation was carried out on the titration curves of α-Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O with various metal hydroxides, particularly KOH. To obtain the presence of a distinct minimum in the titration curve, three conditions seem to be necessary: (1) high activation energy for H + /Msup(Z+) exchange (which, in turn, depends on the relative size of Msup(Z+) and size of the windows connecting the cavities), (2) formation of solid solution having high M-content and (3) formation of a phase, with a large inter-layer distance, in the external parts of the crystals. This last point is particularly important since the enlargement of the external part of the crystals lowers the activation energy for the exchange of large cations. Thus, once started, the exchange can take place at lower pH' values. (author)

  6. Effects of grinding on certain crystalline structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekiz, Y.

    1965-06-01

    The effects of grinding on certain crystalline substances (ZnO, ZnS, Sb), have been studied using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The treatments were carried out using a vibrating mill which involves a higher energy than more conventional equipment such as ball-mills. Various methods have been proposed for determining the width of the intrinsic profile (β). In the case of zinc oxide it has been shown possible to differentiate the respective contributions of the fragmentation effects and of lattice deformation effects to the overall effects of the grinding. For the two types of zinc sulfide (blend and Wurtzite) it has been shown that the blend-wurtzite) transition point is very much decreased, and that the rate of transformation of wurtzite into the stable form (blend) at room temperature is considerably increased by the grinding. In the case of antimony, the method of fragmentation shows the existence of an anisotropy which appears to be connected with easily cleavable planes. These observations show that in the case of grinding carried out with sufficient energy, the accumulation of this energy in the matter through the creation of lattice defects can accelerate the reaction rate or bring about physical transformations. (author) [fr

  7. Chaotic Fluid Mixing in Crystalline Sphere Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, R.; Lester, D. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Méheust, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of steady 3D Stokes flow over simple cubic (SC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices of close-packed spheres, and uncover the mechanisms governing chaotic mixing. Due to the cusp-shaped sphere contacts, the topology of the skin friction field is fundamentally different to that of continuous (non-granular) media (e.g. open pore networks), with significant implications for fluid mixing. Weak symmetry breaking of the flow orientation with respect to the lattice symmetries imparts a transition from regular to strong chaotic mixing in the BCC lattice, whereas the SC lattice only exhibits weak mixing. Whilst the SC and BCC lattices share the same symmetry point group, these differences are explained in terms of their space groups, and we find that a glide symmetry of the BCC lattice generates chaotic mixing. These insight are used to develop accurate predictions of the Lyapunov exponent distribution over the parameter space of mean flow orientation, and point to a general theory of mixing and dispersion based upon the inherent symmetries of arbitrary crystalline structures.

  8. Crystalline silicotitanates -- novel commercial cesium ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Dangieri, T.J.; Fennelly, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A ampersand M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na + . The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. These CST properties made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia and UOP, under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), developed CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by Sandia and Texas A ampersand M consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications such as batch waste processing. Data are also presented confirming the excellent stability of the commercial CSTs over a broad pH range and the high radiation stability of the exchangers. In addition, data are provided that demonstrate the high physical strength and attrition resistance of IONSIV reg-sign IE-911, critical properties for column ion exchange applications

  9. Blending crystalline/liquid crystalline small molecule semiconductors: A strategy towards high performance organic thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; He, Yaowu; Li, Aiyuan; Zhang, Dongwei; Meng, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Solution processed small molecule polycrystalline thin films often suffer from the problems of inhomogeneity and discontinuity. Here, we describe a strategy to solve these problems through deposition of the active layer from a blended solution of crystalline (2-phenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene, Ph-BTBT) and liquid crystalline (2-(4-dodecylphenyl) [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, C12-Ph-BTBT) small molecule semiconductors with the hot spin-coating method. Organic thin film transistors with average hole mobility approaching 1 cm2/V s, much higher than that of single component devices, have been demonstrated, mainly due to the improved uniformity, continuity, crystallinity, and stronger intermolecular π-π stacking in blend thin films. Our results indicate that the crystalline/liquid crystalline semiconductor blend method is an effective way to enhance the performance of organic transistors.

  10. Effect of light energy on peroxide tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Karen; Tam, Laura; Hubert, Manfred

    2004-02-01

    Light-activated bleaching is a method of tooth whitening. The authors conducted a study to compare the whitening effects and tooth temperature changes induced by various combinations of peroxide bleaches and light sources. The authors randomly assigned 250 extracted human teeth halves into experimental groups (n = 10). A placebo gel (control), a 35 percent hydrogen peroxide or a 10 percent carbamide peroxide bleach was placed on the tooth surface and was irradiated with no light (control); a halogen curing light; an infrared, or IR, light; an argon laser; or a carbon dioxide, or CO2, laser. Color changes were evaluated immediately, one day and one week after treatment using a value-oriented shade guide and an electronic dental color analyzer. The outer enamel and inner dentin surface temperatures were monitored before and immediately after each 30-second application of light using a thermocouple thermometer. Color and temperature changes were significantly affected by an interaction of the bleach and light variables. The application of lights significantly improved the whitening efficacy of some bleach materials, but it caused significant temperature increases in the outer and inner tooth surfaces. The IR and CO2 laser lights caused the highest tooth temperature increases. Dentists performing an in-office bleaching technique with the use of an additional light source to accelerate tooth whitening should consider the specific bleaching agent being used, as well as the potential risks of heating teeth. A specific combination of bleach and light that demonstrates good color change and little temperature rise should be selected for in-office tooth bleaching.

  11. Studies on lipid peroxidation and anti-LPO chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizhong; Lao Qinhua

    1995-02-01

    The contents of lipid peroxides (LPO) in sera and tissues were determined by the modified spectrophotometry of TBA, and the effects of three chemicals on lipid peroxidation induced by radiation were observed. The items studied included: (1) the normal values of LPO of sera in rats and adults: (2) the normal values in some tissues of rats; (3) the changes of LPO levels of sera in patients with some mental diseases and patients with malignant tumours before and after local gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in rats after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (5) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in mice after internal exposure by Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution; (6) the effects of chinonin, tannic acid and squalene on lipid peroxidation induced by irradiation. The results were as follows: (1) the LPO contents in patients with some mental diseases dramatically increased; (2) there was marked difference between the LPO levels before and after local gamma irradiation exposure in patients with malignant tumours; (3) the LPO contents in some tissues of rats remarkably increased after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the LPO contents in some tissues of mice dramatically increased and their protein contents markedly reduced after internal exposure, showing a negative correlation between them; (5) a gradual increase in LPO contents in some tissues of mice appeared with increasing dosage of whole-body gamma irradiation exposure at dose range from 0 to 4 Gy. A linear relationship between the dose and the LPO contents was observed; (6) all three chemicals could reduce the LPO levels in liver, spleen and kidney of the irradiated mice. The efficacy of chinonin was better than that of tannic acid and squalene. (5 tabs., 1 fig.)

  12. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  13. Peroxide formation and kinetics of sodium dissolution in alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidaran, P.; Chandran, K.; Ganesan, V.; Periaswami, G.

    1997-01-01

    Suitable techniques for sodium removal and decontamination of sodium wetted components of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFRs) are necessary both for repair, reuse and decommissioning of such components. Among the methods followed for sodium removal, alcohol dissolution is usually employed for small components like bellow sealed valves, gripping tools to handle core components and sodium sampling devices (primary and secondary). One of the concerns in the alcohol dissolution method is the possible role of peroxide formation in the ethoxy group during storage and handling leading to explosion. This paper describes the study of peroxide formation in ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve as well as some of the results of dissolution kinetic studies carried out in our laboratory using different alcohols. The peroxide formation of ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve were studied by iodometric technique. It has been found that the peroxide formation is less in sodium containing alcohol than in pure one. Ethyl carbitol, butyl cellosolve and Jaysol-SS (mixture of ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and methyl isobutyl ketone) were used in dissolution kinetics studies. The effects due to area and orientation of the fresh sodium surface have also been investigated. The reaction rates were studied in the temperature range of 303-343 K. The rate of dissolution was estimated by measuring the sodium content of alcohol at periodic intervals. It is found that the reaction rate varies in the order of ethyl alcohol-water mixture > Jaysol-SS > butyl cellosolve > ethyl carbitol. While cleaning sodium using alcohol, the concentration of alcohol is held essentially constant throughout the process. The rate of reaction depends only on the amount of sodium and follows pseudo-first order kinetics. Increase in surface area has a marked impact on the dissolution rate at lower temperatures while at higher temperatures, the temperature factor overrides the effect due to surface area

  14. Petroleum Contaminated Soil Treatment Using Surfactant and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Lobo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of washing soil with surfactants, sodium lauryl ether sulphate (LESS and sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS was combined with chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide, with a view to in situ remediation of clay soil contaminated with hydrocarbons oil. The evaluation of the efficiency of the procedure was the removal of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and the comparison of physical and chemical characteristics of contaminated soil and uncontaminated from the same region. The combination of these two techniques, soil washing and application of an oxidizing agent, presented as a process of effective remediation for soils contaminated with petroleum products in subtropical regions.

  15. Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation by Enzymatic Hydrolysates from Wheat Bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat bran, an important by-product of the cereal industry, is rich in potentially health-promoting phenolic compounds. The phenolics are mainly esterified to the cell wall polysaccharides. In our previous paper, wheat bran was destarched and deproteinated by α-amylase, protease and amyloglucosidase successively and further hydrolyzed using Bacillus subtilis xylanases, and the enzymatic hydrolysates from wheat bran (EHWB showed good scavenging activity in vitro. The aim of this study is to further characterize the antioxidant potential of EHWB against various systems, both ex vivo and in vivo, namely, rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation systems induced by Fe2+/H2O2 and Fe3+-adenosine diphosphate (ADP/dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, copper- and 2,2’-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH-induced human low-density lipoprotein (LDL oxidation systems, and alloxan-induced in vivo lipid peroxidation in mice. EHWB inhibited lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes induced by Fe2+/H2O2 and Fe3+-ADP/NADPH in a concentration-dependent manner with 90.3 and 87 % inhibition of lipid peroxidation at 50 mg/L, respectively, which were similar to that of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT at 20 mg/L. The antioxidant potential of EHWB at a concentration ranging from 10 to 20 mg/L in the nonenzymatic system was more effective than in the enzymatic system. EHWB strongly inhibited in vitro copper- and AAPH-mediated oxidation of LDL in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with 52.41 and 63.03 % inhibition at 20 mg/L, respectively, which were similar to that of ascorbate at 10 mg/L. EHWB significantly decreased the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and increased the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD in serum and liver of alloxan-treated mice compared with the control. These results demonstrated that EHWB might be efficient in the protection of

  16. Historical Survey: German Research on Hydrogen Peroxide/Alcohol Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, John E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Discussion of HP/fuel explosives in the scientific literature dates back to at least 1927. A paper was published that year in a German journal entitled On Hydrogen Peroxide Explosives [Bamberger and Nussbaum 1927]. The paper dealt with HP/cotton/Vaseline formulations, specifically HP89/cotton/Vaseline (76/15/9) and (70/8.5/12.5). The authors performed experiments with charge masses of 250-750 g and charge diameters of 35-45 mm. This short paper provides brief discussion on the observed qualitative effects of detonations but does not report detonation velocities.

  17. Removal of Reactive Red 198 by Nanoparticle Zero Valent Iron in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Shojaei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dyes are widely used in textile industries, they are carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic. Industries discharge their wastewater containing a variety of colors into water resources and make harmful effect on the environment. The present study aims to Evaluate removal of reactive red 198 by nanoparticle zero valent iron (NZVI in the presence of hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution. The effective parameters on the removal of dye such as the hydrogen peroxide concentration of NZVI, contact time, pH and dye concentration were investigated and optimized. According to the results, the combination of NZVI with hydrogen peroxide is more effective than single hydrogen peroxide. At pH = 4, contact time= 40 min, 200 M of hydrogen peroxide, dye concentration= 75 mg/L and concentration of NZVI 2g/L, color removal was achieved 91% approximately. Based on the results of experiments, using hydrogen peroxide- NZVI has high efficiency in removal of azo dye type.

  18. A biosensor for hydrogen peroxide detection based on electronic properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Density functional theory has been used to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes have been considered in the presence of different number of hydrogen peroxide. The results indicate that hydrogen peroxide has no significant effect on the metallic nanotube and these nanotubes remain to be metallic. In contrast, the electronic properties of the semiconducting nanotubes are so sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. The energy band gap of these nanotubes is decreased by increasing the number of hydrogen peroxide. The electronic sensivity of the carbon nanotubes to hydrogen peroxide opens new insights into developing biosensors based on the single walled carbon nanotubes.

  19. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  20. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.; Hoennicke, M.G.; Safatle, A.M.V.; Cusatis, C.; Moraes Barros, P.S.; Morelhao, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed

  1. [Representation and mathematical analysis of human crystalline lens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tălu, Stefan; Giovanzana, Stefano; Tălu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    The surface of human crystalline lens can be described and analyzed using mathematical models based on parametric representations, used in biomechanical studies and 3D solid modeling of the lens. The mathematical models used in lens biomechanics allow the study and the behavior of crystalline lens on variables and complex dynamic loads. Also, the lens biomechanics has the potential to improve the results in the development of intraocular lenses and cataract surgery. The paper presents the most representative mathematical models currently used for the modeling of human crystalline lens, both optically and biomechanically.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has distinct adaptive responses to both hydrogen peroxide and menadione.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, D J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with low concentrations of either hydrogen peroxide or menadione (a superoxide-generating agent) induces adaptive responses which protect cells from the lethal effects of subsequent challenge with higher concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment with menadione is protective against cell killing by hydrogen peroxide; however, pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide is unable to protect cells from subsequent challenge with menadione. This suggests th...

  3. Thin-walled nanoscrolls by multi-step intercalation from tubular halloysite-10 Å and its rearrangement upon peroxide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsirka, Balázs; Horváth, Erzsébet; Szabó, Péter; Juzsakova, Tatjána; Szilágyi, Róbert K.; Fertig, Dávid; Makó, Éva; Varga, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Halloysite intercalation/delamination. • Thin-walled nanoscroll preparation. • Oxidative surface cleaning with H_2O_2 and heating. • X-ray diffraction, TEM, N_2 adsorption, TG/DTG and FT-IR/ATR measurements. • Nanoscroll rearrangement, periodicity along the crystallographic ‘c’-axis. - Abstract: Surface modification of the halloysite-10 Å mineral with tubular morphology can be achieved by slightly modified procedures developed for the delamination of kaolinite minerals. The resulting delaminated halloysite nanoparticles have unexpected surface/morphological properties that display, new potentials in catalyst development. In this work, a four-step intercalation/delamination procedure is described for the preparation of thin-walled nanoscrolls from the multi-layered hydrated halloysite mineral that consists of (1) intercalation of halloysite with potassium acetate, (2) replacement intercalation with ethylene glycol, (3) replacement intercalation with hexylamine, and (4) delamination with toluene. The intercalation steps were followed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N_2 adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Delamination eliminated the crystalline order and the crystallite size along the ‘c’-axis, increased the specific surface area, greatly decreased the thickness of the mineral tubes to a monolayer, and shifted the pore diameter toward the micropore region. Unexpectedly, the removal of residual organics from intercalation steps adsorbed at the nanoscroll surface with a peroxide treatment resulted in partial recovery of crystallinity and increase of crystallite size along the ‘c’-crystal direction. The d(001) value showed a diffuse pattern at 7.4–7.7 Å due to the rearrangement of the thin-walled nanoscrolls toward the initial tubular morphology of the dehydrated halloysite-7 Å mineral.

  4. Thin-walled nanoscrolls by multi-step intercalation from tubular halloysite-10 Å and its rearrangement upon peroxide treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsirka, Balázs, E-mail: zsirkab@almos.vein.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Horváth, Erzsébet, E-mail: erzsebet.horvath@gmail.com [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Szabó, Péter, E-mail: xysma@msn.com [University of Pannonia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Juzsakova, Tatjána, E-mail: yuzhakova@almos.uni-pannon.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Szilágyi, Róbert K., E-mail: szilagyi@montana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Fertig, Dávid, E-mail: fertig.david92@gmail.com [University of Pannonia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Makó, Éva, E-mail: makoe@almos.vein.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Varga, Tamás, E-mail: vtamas@chem.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, Rerrich B. tér 1., Szeged H-6720 Hungary (Hungary); and others

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Halloysite intercalation/delamination. • Thin-walled nanoscroll preparation. • Oxidative surface cleaning with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and heating. • X-ray diffraction, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption, TG/DTG and FT-IR/ATR measurements. • Nanoscroll rearrangement, periodicity along the crystallographic ‘c’-axis. - Abstract: Surface modification of the halloysite-10 Å mineral with tubular morphology can be achieved by slightly modified procedures developed for the delamination of kaolinite minerals. The resulting delaminated halloysite nanoparticles have unexpected surface/morphological properties that display, new potentials in catalyst development. In this work, a four-step intercalation/delamination procedure is described for the preparation of thin-walled nanoscrolls from the multi-layered hydrated halloysite mineral that consists of (1) intercalation of halloysite with potassium acetate, (2) replacement intercalation with ethylene glycol, (3) replacement intercalation with hexylamine, and (4) delamination with toluene. The intercalation steps were followed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Delamination eliminated the crystalline order and the crystallite size along the ‘c’-axis, increased the specific surface area, greatly decreased the thickness of the mineral tubes to a monolayer, and shifted the pore diameter toward the micropore region. Unexpectedly, the removal of residual organics from intercalation steps adsorbed at the nanoscroll surface with a peroxide treatment resulted in partial recovery of crystallinity and increase of crystallite size along the ‘c’-crystal direction. The d(001) value showed a diffuse pattern at 7.4–7.7 Å due to the rearrangement of the thin-walled nanoscrolls toward the initial tubular morphology of the dehydrated halloysite-7 Å mineral.

  5. RNA aptamers targeted for human αA-crystallin do not bind αB-crystallin, and spare the α-crystallin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Prabhat K; Shi, Hua; Pande, Jayanti

    2017-09-16

    The molecular chaperones, α-crystallins, belong to the small heat shock protein (sHSP) family and prevent the aggregation and insolubilization of client proteins. Studies in vivo have shown that the chaperone activity of the α-crystallins is raised or lowered in various disease states. Therefore, the development of tools to control chaperone activity may provide avenues for therapeutic intervention, as well as enable a molecular understanding of chaperone function. The major human lens α-crystallins, αA- (HAA) and αB- (HAB), share 57% sequence identity and show similar activity towards some clients, but differing activities towards others. Notably, both crystallins contain the "α-crystallin domain" (ACD, the primary client binding site), like all other members of the sHSP family. Here we show that RNA aptamers selected for HAA, in vitro, exhibit specific affinity to HAA but do not bind HAB. Significantly, these aptamers also exclude the ACD. This study thus demonstrates that RNA aptamers against sHSPs can be designed that show high affinity and specificity - yet exclude the primary client binding region - thereby facilitating the development of RNA aptamer-based therapeutic intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC). In the......Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC......). In the MREC, electrical potential generated by the exoelectrogens and the salinity-gradient between salt and fresh water were utilized to drive the high-rate H2O2 production. Operational parameters such as air flow rate, pH, cathodic potential, flow rate of salt and fresh water were investigated. The optimal...... H2O2 production was observed at salt and fresh water flow rate of 0.5 mL min−1, air flow rate of 12–20 mL min−1, cathode potential of −0.485 ± 0.025 V (vs Ag/AgCl). The maximum H2O2 accumulated concentration of 778 ± 11 mg L−1 was obtained at corresponding production rate of 11.5 ± 0.5 mg L−1 h−1...

  7. Antifungal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide in dental unit waterline disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Jolanta

    2006-01-01

    The concentration and composition of fungal flora in dental unit waterlines (DUWL) were evaluated. For this purpose, water samples from unit reservoirs and high-speed handpieces, and biofilm samples from the waterline walls from units were collected. Subsequently, analogous samples from DUWL were taken before and after disinfection using agent containing hydrogen peroxide. In the examined samples, the yeast-like fungi Candida albicans and Candida curvata were found. The following species of mould were also identified: Aspergillus amstelodami, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus glaucus group, Aspergillus (=Eurotium herbariorum) repens, Citromyces spp., Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium (glabrum) frequentans, Penicillium pusillum, Penicillium turolense and Sclerotium sclerotiorum (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum). Before disinfection, Candida curvata and Candida albicans constituted the greatest proportion of the total fungi in the reservoirs water; in the water of handpieces--Candida albicans and Aspergillus glaucus group; and in the biofilm samples--Aspergillus glaucus group and Candida albicans. After disinfection, in all 3 kinds of samples, Candida albicans prevailed, constituting from 31.2-85.7 % of the total fungi. The application of agent containing hydrogen peroxide caused a significant decrease both in the number of total fungi and individual fungal species, which confirms the product effectiveness in fungal decontamination of DUWL.

  8. INTERACTION OF ALDEHYDES DERIVED FROM LIPID PEROXIDATION AND MEMBRANE PROTEINS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania ePizzimenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Lipid peroxidation is increased in tears from the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch-Navarro, Soledad; Franco, Ilenia; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Silvestre, Dolores; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2013-10-01

    We describe a procedure in which tears, obtained from Schirmer strips, are used to measure a marker of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA). We also compared the levels of proteins and MDA in tears from two groups of people: young adults (18-30 years old) and elderly adults (65-85 years old), because the data related to total protein concentration of human tears vary widely and because the majority of people over the age of 65 experience some symptoms of dry eyes and this condition has been recognized as an oxidative stress-induced disease. Our results show a significant difference in the protein concentration of the tears taken from the two age categories, younger adults (18-30 years old) and older adults (65-85 years old). Herein, we report for the first time an increase in MDA concentrations determined by HPLC in human tears based on age. It is possible that alterations in the tear lipid layer may lead to an increase in lipid peroxidation. Further studies are needed to understand the nature and function of tear film and stability in order to obtain new methods to analyze tears in patients with different diseases. In this sense, it would be interesting to compare MDA concentration in tears from control subjects and from people with meibomian gland dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid peroxidation in workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Chen, C Y; Sheu, J Y; Chuang, I C; Pan, J H; Lin, T H

    1999-02-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to hexavalent chromium induces lipid peroxidation in human. This study involved 25 chrome-plating factory workers and a reference group of 28 control subjects. The whole-blood and urinary chromium concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the activities of protective enzymes were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. In the chrome-plating workers, the mean concentrations of chromium in blood and urine were 5.98 microg/L and 5.25 microg/g creatinine, respectively; the mean concentrations of MDA in blood and urine were 1.7 micromol/L and 2.24 micromol/g creatinine. The concentrations of both chromium and MDA in blood and urine were significantly higher in the chromium-exposed workers. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) were not markedly different between control and exposed workers. Data suggest that MDA may be used as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure. Antioxidant enzymic activities are not a suitable marker for chromium exposure.

  11. Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe 2+ , or Fe 3+ , and 3 vol % H 2 O 2 in 0.1M HNO 3 is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99 0 C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90 0 C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH 4 OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly

  12. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodiroga Milanka

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A. Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction was used for the quantitative iodometric determination of total peroxide in procedure B. H2O2 reacted with potassium permanganate in acid medium, but peracetic acid did not react under the same conditions. That made possible the selective permanganometric determination of H2O2 in the presence of peracetic acid. The procedure B was performed in two titration vessels (KV=3.4% for peracetic acid, 0.6% for H2O2. The procedure A for iodometric determination of peracetic acid in one titration vessel after permanganometric titration of H2O2 was recommended (KV=2,5% for peracetic acid, 0,45% for H2O2.

  13. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Karadas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n=10: AS: no whitening (negative control, with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwash; SC: Scope White mouthwash; and OP group: 10% CP Opalescence PF (positive control. Color measurements were carried out with a spectrophotometer before staining, after staining, and on the 7th, 28th, and 56th day of the whitening period. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance followed by a Tukey post hoc test. The color change (ΔE was significantly greater in all the groups compared to that of the AS group. After 56 days, no significant differences were found among the mouthwash products with respect to color change (P>0.05. The whiteness of the teeth treated with the mouthwashes increased significantly over time. Nevertheless, the color change achieved with the mouthwashes was significantly lower than that achieved with the 10% CP at-home bleaching gel.

  14. Inhibition of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation by means of gallic polydisulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losev, Yu.P.; Amadyan, M.G.; Oganesyan, N.M.; Fedulov, A.S.; Abramyan, A.K.; Shagoyan, A.G.; Khachkavanktsyan, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Inhibition of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation by means of gallic polydisulphade has been studied. Rats were exposed to X-rays in doses 4,8 and 5,25 Gy. Lipid peroxidation was analysed in blood plasma, membranes of erythrocytes and homogenates of liver and spleen tissues of rats. Polydisulphide of gallic acid was used as inhibitor of lipid peroxidation because of its effective antioxidant properties as have been reported previously. It has been demonstrated that gallic disulphide exhibited high inhibition efficiency in conditions of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation due to the effect of intra-molecular synergism

  15. Changes in mitochondrial function by lipid peroxidation and their inhibition by biscoclaurin alkaloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aono, K.; Shiraishi, N.; Arita, T.; Inouye, B.; Nakazawa, T.; Utsumi, K.

    1981-01-01

    During in vitro investigation of changes in mitochondrial function accompanying lipid peroxidation, it was found that cepharanthine, a biscoclaurin alkaloid, protects against such change. Results obtained were as follows: (1) Fe2+ induces lipid peroxidation of isolated mitochondria, resulting in diminished oxidative phosphorylation. (2) This diminishment largely depends on deterioration of ion compartmentation of the membrane and an increase in latent ATPase activity. (3) The Fe2+-induced deterioration in ion compartmentation is inhibited by cepharanthine. (4) Cepharanthine inhibits the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation induced by Fe2+. (5) Cepharanthine inhibits the lipid peroxidation of soybean lecithin liposomes by 60Co-irradiation

  16. Ultraviolet radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane: modification by capsaicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, A. K.; Ghosh, J. J.; Mandal, T. K. [University College of Science, Department of Biochemistry, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700-019 (India)

    1993-07-01

    Ultraviolet-radiation has been reported to cause lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. In the present study, treatment with capsaicin, (8-methyl-n-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the pungent principle of red hot pepper, was shown to modify UV-induced lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. Treatment with low doses of capsaicin (less than 0.1 μg/mL of phosphatidyl choline liposome) produced a significant increase in UV-induced lipid peroxidation, while high doses (0.1-0.5 μg/mL of PC liposome) caused a significant decrease of UV-induced peroxidation.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane: modification by capsaicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Ghosh, J.J.; Mandal, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet-radiation has been reported to cause lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. In the present study, treatment with capsaicin, (8-methyl-n-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the pungent principle of red hot pepper, was shown to modify UV-induced lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. Treatment with low doses of capsaicin (less than 0.1 μg/mL of phosphatidyl choline liposome) produced a significant increase in UV-induced lipid peroxidation, while high doses (0.1-0.5 μg/mL of PC liposome) caused a significant decrease of UV-induced peroxidation

  18. The effect of hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation on non-sporing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, C.E.; Waites, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    A kill of 99.99% was obtained in cell suspensions of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis by incubation with hydrogen peroxide 1.0%(w/v) for 75 and 180 min respectively. The same kill was produced by 30s irradiation with ultraviolet (u.v.) light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide 1.0% (w/v). This simultaneous treatment with u.v. and hydrogen peroxide produced a synergistic kill at least 30-fold greater than that produced by irradiation of cell suspensions of Esch. coli with or without subsequent incubation with hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  19. Facile method to align crystalline needles composed of organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-23

    Sep 23, 2017 ... (using self-assembly) used for the purpose, its disadvantage is that a larger amount of the material dissolves in the solution than what ... Working hypothesis for aligning crystalline needles .... using a home-made equipment.

  20. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahhal, V.; Talero, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively

  1. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their

  2. Bicontinuous cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles for oral delivery of Doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swarnakar, Nitin K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study explores the potential of bicontinous cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) for improving therapeutic potential of doxorubicin. METHODS: Phytantriol based Dox-LCNPs were prepared using hydrotrope method, optimized for various formulation components, process...

  3. Conformational polymorphism and aromaticity in crystalline dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwiński, Jan; Eilmes, Julita; Oleksyn, Barbara J.; Stadnicka, Katarzyna

    2004-06-01

    The structures of two single crystal modifications, orange and yellow, of 7,16-dibenzoyl-6,8,15,17-tetramethyl-5,14-dihydrodibenzo [b,i][1,4,8,11]tetraazacyclotetradecine were determined in room and low temperatures. The aromaticity of the 14-membered macrocyclic ring system was studied with the use of HOMA index and compared to the values calculated for the structures found in the Cambridge Structural Database System. The nature of the polymorphism of the investigated molecules was elucidated. The molecules of the orange and yellow modifications differ in the mutual orientation of the benzoyl groups. The molecular conformation in the yellow crystals is stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds, C-H⋯OC, which do not occur in the orange modification. Weak, but numerous, intermolecular bonds of this type occur in both modifications, but in the orange polymorph a π-π interaction is also observed, while in the yellow modification a C-H⋯N intermolecular bond is formed.

  4. Novel polypyrrole films with excellent crystallinity and good thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeeju, Pullarkat P.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Francis Xavier, Puthampadath A.; Sajimol, Augustine M.; Jayalekshmi, Sankaran

    2012-01-01

    Polypyrrole has drawn a lot of interest due to its high thermal and environmental stability in addition to high electrical conductivity. The present work highlights the enhanced crystallinity of polypyrrole films prepared from the redoped sample solution. Initially hydrochloric acid doped polypyrrole was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ammonium peroxidisulphate as oxidant. The doped polypyrrole was dedoped using ammonia solution and then redoped with camphor sulphonic acid. Films were coated on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates from the redoped sample solution in meta-cresol. The enhanced crystallinity of the polypyrrole films has been established from X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the redoped polypyrrole film is about 30 times higher than that of the hydrochloric acid doped pellet sample. The results of Raman spectroscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the samples support the enhancement in crystallinity. Percentage crystallinity of the samples is estimated from XRD and DSC data. The present work is significant, since crystallinity of films is an important parameter for selecting polymers for specific applications. - Highlights: ► Polypyrrole films redoped with CSA have been prepared from meta-cresol solution. ► The solution casted films exhibit semi-crystallinity and good thermal stability. ► Percentage crystallinity estimated using XRD and DSC analysis is about 65%. ► Raman studies support the enhancement in crystallinity based on XRD and DSC data. ► The conductivity of the film is 30 times higher than that of HCl doped sample.

  5. Nanomembrane structures having mixed crystalline orientations and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Scott, Shelley A.; Savage, Donald E.

    2014-08-12

    The present nanomembrane structures include a multilayer film comprising a single-crystalline layer of semiconductor material disposed between two other single-crystalline layers of semiconductor material. A plurality of holes extending through the nanomembrane are at least partially, and preferably entirely, filled with a filler material which is also a semiconductor, but which differs from the nanomembrane semiconductor materials in composition, crystal orientation, or both.

  6. Crystalline Repository Project. Technical progress report, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made periodically on the development of a geologic repository in crystalline rock for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Crystalline Respository Development (OCRD), a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other prime contractors and by subcontractors to OCRD

  7. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    OpenAIRE

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their unique combination of mechanical properties and chemical resistance. Their use, however, has been limited mainly due to poor adhesion properties. Thermotropic liquid crystalline thermosets displayed ...

  8. Novel polypyrrole films with excellent crystallinity and good thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeju, Pullarkat P., E-mail: jeejupp@gmail.com [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India); Varma, Sreekanth J.; Francis Xavier, Puthampadath A.; Sajimol, Augustine M. [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, Sankaran, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Polypyrrole has drawn a lot of interest due to its high thermal and environmental stability in addition to high electrical conductivity. The present work highlights the enhanced crystallinity of polypyrrole films prepared from the redoped sample solution. Initially hydrochloric acid doped polypyrrole was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ammonium peroxidisulphate as oxidant. The doped polypyrrole was dedoped using ammonia solution and then redoped with camphor sulphonic acid. Films were coated on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates from the redoped sample solution in meta-cresol. The enhanced crystallinity of the polypyrrole films has been established from X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the redoped polypyrrole film is about 30 times higher than that of the hydrochloric acid doped pellet sample. The results of Raman spectroscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the samples support the enhancement in crystallinity. Percentage crystallinity of the samples is estimated from XRD and DSC data. The present work is significant, since crystallinity of films is an important parameter for selecting polymers for specific applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polypyrrole films redoped with CSA have been prepared from meta-cresol solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solution casted films exhibit semi-crystallinity and good thermal stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Percentage crystallinity estimated using XRD and DSC analysis is about 65%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman studies support the enhancement in crystallinity based on XRD and DSC data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductivity of the film is 30 times higher than that of HCl doped sample.

  9. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  10. Solution processed nanogap organic diodes based on liquid crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Fei; Iino, Hiroaki; Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2017-09-01

    Co-planar nanogap organic diodes were fabricated with smectic liquid crystalline materials of the benzothienobenzothiophene (BTBT) derivative by a spin-coating technique. A high rectification ratio of the order of 106 at ±3 V was achieved when a liquid crystalline material of 2,7-didecyl benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (10-BTBT-10) was used in a device configuration of Al/10-BTBT-10/pentafluorobenzenethiol-treated Au on a glass substrate, which was 4 orders higher than that of the device based on non-liquid crystalline materials of 2,7-dibutyl benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (4-BTBT-4) and BTBT. Similar results were also observed when another liquid crystalline material of ω, ω'-dioctylterthiophene (8-TTP-8) and a non-liquid crystalline material of terthiophene (TTP) were used. These improved rectifications can be ascribed to the self-assembly properties and controllable molecular orientation of liquid crystalline materials, which made uniform perpendicular oriented polycrystalline films favorable for superior charge transport in nano-channels.

  11. High levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas: effects on enamel and pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, George; Zaidel, Lynette; Lin, Nora; Stranick, Michael; Bagley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the safety of high levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness, pulp penetration, and enamel morphology. Colgate Platinum Professional Overnight Whitening System (Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Canton, MA, USA) (10% carbamide peroxide, equivalent to 3.5% hydrogen peroxide) was compared with two prototype formulations containing either 7.0% or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide. In the pulp chamber studies, human extracted teeth were exposed to 3.5%, 7.0%, or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours. Microhardness, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atomic force microscopy evaluations were made from enamel blocks cut from human extracted molars. The enamel blocks were evaluated following 14 7-hour treatments (98 h total). At 7 hours' post-treatment, hydrogen peroxide penetrated the pulp chamber at 23.12 +/- 10.09, 24.58 +/- 6.90, and 26.39 +/- 5.43 microg for 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% hydrogen peroxide, respectively. With regard to enamel morphology, pulp penetration, microhardness, and elemental composition, no statistically significant differences were observed between treatment groups following 98 hours of treatment. Hydrogen peroxide does not adversely affect enamel morphology or microhardness. The levels recovered in pulp indicate that hydrogen peroxide is not expected to inhibit pulpal enzymes. Overnight tray products containing levels of hydrogen peroxide of 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% are not expected to adversely affect the enamel or pulpal enzymes. Additional safety studies are needed to assess the potential for tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

  12. Catalyst-free activation of peroxides under visible LED light irradiation through photoexcitation pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yaowen [Department of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430079 (China); Shenzhen Research Institute of Wuhan University, Shenzhen, 518057 (China); Li, Yixi; Yao, Linyu; Li, Simiao; Liu, Jin [Department of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430079 (China); Zhang, Hui, E-mail: eeng@whu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430079 (China); Shenzhen Research Institute of Wuhan University, Shenzhen, 518057 (China)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Persulfate could decolorize Rhodamine B (RhB) directly via non-radical reactions. • LED lamps emitting white light were utilized as the visible light source. • Dyes could activate peroxides through photoexcitation pathway. • Decolorization of dyes and production of radicals were achieved simultaneously. • The catalyst-free peroxide/dye/Vis process was effective in a broad pH range. - Abstract: Catalysts are known to activate peroxides to generate active radicals (i.e., hydroxyl radical (·OH) and sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −})) under certain conditions, but the activation of peroxides in the absence of catalysts under visible light irradiation has been rarely reported. This work demonstrates a catalyst-free activation of peroxides for the generation of ·OH and/or SO{sub 4}·{sup −} through photoexcited electron transfer from organic dyes to peroxides under visible LED light irradiation, where Rhodamine B (RhB) and Eosin Y (EY) were selected as model dyes. The formation of ·OH and/or SO{sub 4}·{sup −} in the reactions and the electron transfer from the excited dyes to peroxides were validated via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The performance of the peroxide/dye/Vis process was demonstrated to be altered depending on the target substrate. Meanwhile, the peroxide/dye/Vis process was effective for simultaneous decolorization of dyes and production of active radicals under neutral even or basic conditions. The findings of this study clarified a novel photoexcitation pathway for catalyst-free activation of peroxides under visible light irradiation, which could avoid the secondary metal ion (dissolved or leached) pollution from the metal-based catalysts and expand the application range of the peroxide-based catalytic process.

  13. Confined crystallization, crystalline phase deformation and their effects on the properties of crystalline polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haopeng

    With the recent advances in processing and catalyst technology, novel morphologies have been created in crystalline polymers and they are expected to substantially impact the properties. To reveal the structure-property relationships of some of these novel polymeric systems becomes the primary focus of this work. In the first part, using an innovative layer-multiplying coextrusion process to obtain assemblies with thousands of polymer nanolayers, dominating "in-plane" lamellar crystals were created when the confined poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layers were made progressively thinner. When the thickness was confined to 25 nanometers, the PEO crystallized as single, high-aspect-ratio lamellae that resembled single crystals. This crystallization habit imparted more than two orders of magnitude reduction in the gas permeability. The dramatic decrease in gas permeability was attributed to the reduced diffusion coefficient, because of the increase in gas diffusion path length through the in-plane lamellae. The temperature dependence of lamellar orientation and the crystallization kinetics in the confined nanolayers were also investigated. The novel olefinic block copolymer (OBC) studied in the second part consisted of long crystallizable sequences with low comonomer content alternating with rubbery amorphous blocks with high comonomer content. The crystallizable blocks formed lamellae that organized into space-filling spherulites even when the fraction of crystallizable block was so low that the crystallinity was only 7%. These unusual spherulites were highly elastic and recovered from strains as high as 300%. These "elastic spherulites" imparted higher strain recovery and temperature resistance than the conventional random copolymers that depend on isolated, fringed micellar-like crystals to provide the junctions for the elastomeric network. In the third part, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to obtain the temperature dependence of the free

  14. Fibrous Catalyst-Enhanced Acanthamoeba Disinfection by Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilvington, Simon; Winterton, Lynn

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) disinfection systems are contact-lens-patient problem solvers. The current one-step, criterion-standard version has been widely used since the mid-1980s, without any significant improvement. This work identifies a potential next-generation, one-step H2O2, not based on the solution formulation but rather on a case-based peroxide catalyst. One-step H2O2 systems are widely used for contact lens disinfection. However, antimicrobial efficacy can be limited because of the rapid neutralization of the peroxide from the catalytic component of the systems. We studied whether the addition of an iron-containing catalyst bound to a nonfunctional propylene:polyacryonitrile fabric matrix could enhance the antimicrobial efficacy of these one-step H2O2 systems. Bausch + Lomb PeroxiClear and AOSept Plus (both based on 3% H2O2 with a platinum-neutralizing disc) were the test systems. These were tested with and without the presence of the catalyst fabric using Acanthamoeba cysts as the challenge organism. After 6 hours' disinfection, the number of viable cysts was determined. In other studies, the experiments were also conducted with biofilm formed by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Elizabethkingia meningoseptica bacteria. Both control systems gave approximately 1-log10 kill of Acanthamoeba cysts compared with 3.0-log10 kill in the presence of the catalyst (P catalyst compared with ≥3.0-log10 kill when it was omitted. In 30 rounds' recurrent usage, the experiments, in which the AOSept Plus system was subjected to 30 rounds of H2O2 neutralization with or without the presence of catalytic fabric, showed no loss in enhanced biocidal efficacy of the material. The catalytic fabric was also shown to not retard or increase the rate of H2O2 neutralization. We have demonstrated the catalyst significantly increases the efficacy of one-step H2O2 disinfection systems using highly resistant Acanthamoeba cysts and bacterial biofilm. Incorporating the catalyst into the

  15. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  16. Dynamical structure analysis of crystalline-state reaction and elucidation of chemical reactivity in crystalline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It was found that a chiral alkyl group bonded to the cobalt atom in a cobalt complex crystal was racemized with retention of the single crystal form on exposure to visible light. Such reactions, which are called crystalline-state reactions, have been found in a variety of cobalt complex crystals. The concept of reaction cavity was introduced to explain the reaction rate quantitatively and the chirality of the photo-product. The new diffractometers and detectors were made for rapid data collection. The reaction mechanism was also elucidated using neutron diffraction analysis. The unstable reaction intermediates were analyzed using cryo-trapping method. The excited-state structures were obtained at the equilibrium state between ground and excited states. (author)

  17. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Mechanical Properties of 3D Printing Non-Crystalline and Semi-Crystalline Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiwei; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Wenzheng; Jiang, Jili; Wang, Bofan; Jiang, Hao; Fuh, Jerry Ying Hsi

    2018-05-17

    Fused deposition modeling 3D printing has become the most widely used additive manufacturing technology because of its low manufacturing cost and simple manufacturing process. However, the mechanical properties of the 3D printing parts are not satisfactory. Certain pressure and ultrasonic vibration were applied to 3D printed samples to study the effect on the mechanical properties of 3D printed non-crystalline and semi-crystalline polymers. The tensile strength of the semi-crystalline polymer polylactic acid was increased by 22.83% and the bending strength was increased by 49.05%, which were almost twice the percentage increase in the tensile strength and five times the percentage increase in the bending strength of the non-crystalline polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene with ultrasonic strengthening. The dynamic mechanical properties of the non-crystalline and semi-crystalline polymers were both improved after ultrasonic enhancement. Employing ultrasonic energy can significantly improve the mechanical properties of samples without modifying the 3D printed material or adjusting the forming process parameters.

  18. Polyester Sulphonic Acid Interstitial Nanocomposite Platform for Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I. Iwuoha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel enzyme immobilization platform was prepared on a platinum disk working electrode by polymerizing aniline inside the interstitial pores of polyester sulphonic acid sodium salt (PESA. Scanning electron microscopy study showed the formation of homogeneous sulphonated polyaniline (PANI nanotubes (~90 nm and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA confirmed that the nanotubes were stable up to 230 °C. The PANI:PESA nanocomposite showed a quasi-reversible redox behaviour in phosphate buffer saline. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was immobilized on to this modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection. The biosensor gave a sensitivity of 1.33 μA (μM-1 and a detection limit of 0.185 μM for H2O2. Stability experiments showed that the biosensor retained more than 64% of its initial sensitivity over four days of storage at 4 °C.

  19. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (PMo stage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P Mo stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H 2 O 2 . The P Mo stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P Mo stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  20. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan

    2010-10-20

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional catalysts such as Ti-containing mesoporous silicas, which convert phenols to the corresponding benzoquinones, gold nanoparticles are very selective to biaryl compounds (3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl diphenoquinone and 2,2′,3,3′,5,5′-hexamethyl-4,4′- biphenol, respectively). Products yields and selectivities depend on the solvent used, the best results being obtained in methanol with yields >98%. Au offers the possibility to completely change the selectivity in the oxidation of substituted phenols and opens interesting perspectives in the clean synthesis of biaryl compounds for pharmaceutical applications. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  2. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  3. Thermal History and Crystallinity of Sheet Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, A. G.; Nabelek, P. I.; Hofmeister, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magma emplaced in a sheet intrusion has two potential fates: to crystallize, or quench to glass. Rapidly chilled sheet margins are typically glassy or microcrystalline, while interiors are coarser-grained. The actual textures result from a combination of thermal history and crystallization kinetics, which are related by various feedback mechanisms. The thermal history of cooling sheet intrusions is often approximated using the analytical solution for a semi-infinite half-space, which uses constant thermal properties such as heat capacity (CP), thermal diffusivity (D) and thermal conductivity (k = DρCP), where ρ is density. In reality, both CP and D are strongly T-dependent for glasses and crystals, and melts have higher CP and lower D than crystals or glasses. Another first-order feature ignored in the analytical solution is latent heat of crystallization (ΔHxt), which can be implemented numerically as extra heat capacity over the crystallization interval. For rhyolite melts, D is ~0.5 mm2s-1 and k is ~1.5 Wm-1K-1, which are similar to those of major crustal rock types and granitic protoliths at magmatic temperatures, suggesting that changes in thermal properties accompanying partial melting of the crust should be relatively minor. Numerical models of hot (~920°C liquidus for 0.5 wt.% H2O) shallow rhyolite intrusions indicate that the key difference in thermal history between bodies that quench to obsidian, and those that crystallize, results from the release of latent heat of crystallization, which enables bodies that crystallize to remain at high temperatures for much longer times. The time to solidification is similar in both cases, however, because solidification requires cooling through the glass transition (Tg ~620°C) in the first case, and cooling only to the solidus (~770°C) in the second. For basaltic melts, D is ~0.3 mm2s-1 and k is ~1.0 Wm-1K-1, compared to ~0.6 mm2s-1 and 2.5 Wm-1K-1 for crystalline basalt or peridotite at magmatic temperatures

  4. Oxidation resistant peroxide cross-linked UHMWPE produced by blending and surface diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, Rizwan M; Oral, Ebru; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used as acetabular cup in total hip replacement (THR) and tibial component in total knee replacement (TKR). Crosslinking of UHMWPE has been successful used to improve its wear performance leading to longer life of orthopedic implants. Crosslinking can be performed by radiation or organic peroxides. Peroxide crosslinking is a convenient process as it does not require specialized equipment and the level of crosslinking can be manipulated by changing the amount of peroxide added. However, there is concern about the long-term stability of these materials due to possible presence of by-products. Vitamin E has been successfully used to promote long-term oxidative stability of UHMWPE. In this study, UHMWPE has been crosslinked using organic peroxide in the presence of Vitamin E to produce an oxidation resistant peroxide crosslinked material. Crosslinking was performed both in bulk by mixing peroxide and resin, and only on the surface using diffusion of peroxides.The results show that UHMWPE can be crosslinked using organic peroxides in the presence of vitamin E by both methods. However, the level of crosslinking decreases with the increase in vitamin E content. The wear resistance increases with the increase in crosslink density, and oxidation resistance significantly increases due to the presence of vitamin E

  5. Oxidation resistant peroxide cross-linked UHMWPE produced by blending and surface diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R. M.; Oral, E.; Muratoglu, O. K.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used as acetabular cup in total hip replacement (THR) and tibial component in total knee replacement (TKR). Crosslinking of UHMWPE has been successful used to improve its wear performance leading to longer life of orthopedic implants. Crosslinking can be performed by radiation or organic peroxides. Peroxide crosslinking is a convenient process as it does not require specialized equipment and the level of crosslinking can be manipulated by changing the amount of peroxide added. However, there is concern about the long-term stability of these materials due to possible presence of by-products. Vitamin E has been successfully used to promote long-term oxidative stability of UHMWPE. In this study, UHMWPE has been crosslinked using organic peroxide in the presence of Vitamin E to produce an oxidation resistant peroxide crosslinked material. Crosslinking was performed both in bulk by mixing peroxide and resin, and only on the surface using diffusion of peroxides.The results show that UHMWPE can be crosslinked using organic peroxides in the presence of vitamin E by both methods. However, the level of crosslinking decreases with the increase in vitamin E content. The wear resistance increases with the increase in crosslink density, and oxidation resistance significantly increases due to the presence of vitamin E. (author)

  6. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  7. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of the Pulpal Peroxide Levels in Intact and Restored Teeth - An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patri, Gaurav; Acharya, Gourismita; Agrawal, Pratik; Panda, Vijeta

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (30%) is a commonly used "in office" bleaching agent. Deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide on the pulp have been observed. The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the penetration of 30% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber through intact teeth and through the surface of teeth, restored with either hybrid composite or Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC). Sixty extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into six groups. Two groups were restored with hybrid composite resin and two with RMGIC, while two groups were left intact. The teeth with acetate buffer solution in their pulp cavity were then immersed in either 30% hydrogen peroxide or distilled water depending upon the group, for 60 minutes at 37°C. Then horseradish peroxidase and leucocrystal violet were added to the acetate buffer solution present in the pulp chamber after it was transferred to a test tube and the optical density of the resultant blue solution obtained was measured spectrophotometrically. The data obtained were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Student's t-test. The data obtained established that hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp from the bleaching agent used. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) showed the highest pulpal peroxide level in teeth restored with RMGIC followed by teeth restored with hybrid composite resin and the least amount of penetration was observed in intact teeth. The amount of peroxide penetration into the tooth is more through restored tooth than intact tooth and is also dependant on the type of restorative materials used.

  8. Determination of amino acid and protein peroxides by the xylenol orange-Fe(III) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.; Craig, G.; Gebicki, J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress imposed on living organisms is believed to lead to the depletion of their antioxidant defences, followed by chemical changes in the cell constituents. These may ultimately develop into pathological conditions such as cancer or cardiovascular disease. An assay of peroxides which could be applied to tissues or simple tissue extracts would prove extremely useful in the studies of the phenomenon of oxidative stress. With this purpose, the authors have tested the ability of two peroxide assay techniques to measure the formation of amino acid and protein peroxides in aqueous solutions irradiated with gamma rays, using a modification of the method based on the oxidation of Fe(II)) by peroxides and complexing of the Fe(III) produced by xylenol orange. The molar extinction coefficients of the peroxides tested were determined by comparison with the well-tested iodometric assay. This work was extended to the detection of all organic peroxides in human blood plasma or serum subjected to oxidative stress, where the iodometric assay proved difficult to apply and unreliable because of the binding of iodine to the blood components. Preliminary results suggest that exposure of serum to gamma radiation leads to immediate peroxidation of the proteins, with a delay before generation of lipid peroxides

  9. Involvement of the Mannose Phosphotransferase System of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Peroxide Stress Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Marc J. A.; Molenaar, Douwe; de Jong, Anne; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    A Lactobacillus plantarum strain with a deletion in the gene rpoN, encoding the alternative sigma factor 54 (sigma(54)), displayed a 100-fold-higher sensitivity to peroxide than its parental strain. This feature could be due to sigma(54)-dependent regulation of genes involved in the peroxide stress

  10. Hydrogen peroxide and caustic soda: Dancing with a dragon while bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Carl Houtman; Kolby Hirth

    2013-01-01

    When hydrogen peroxide is mixed with caustic soda, an auto-accelerating reaction can lead to generation of significant amounts of heat and oxygen. On the basis of experiments using typical pulp mill process concentration and temperatures, a relatively simple kinetic model has been developed. Evaluation of these model results reveals that hydrogen peroxide-caustic soda...

  11. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Inactivation of cellular caspases by peptide-derived tryptophan and tyrosine peroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampton, Mark B; Morgan, Philip E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Peroxides generated on peptides and proteins within cells, as a result of radical attack or reaction with singlet oxygen, are longer-lived than H(2)O(2) due to their poor removal by protective enzymes. These peroxides readily oxidize cysteine residues and can inactivate thiol-dependent enzymes. W...

  13. Lipid peroxidation: A phytotoxic consequence of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunert, K J; Mehlhorn, H; Schmidt, A; Horsch, F; Filby, G; Fund, N; Gross, S; Hanisch, B; Kilz, E; Seidel, A [comps.

    1986-04-01

    Spruce and fir, both 10 years of age, were exposed to purified air, ozone (0.14 mg/m/sup 3/ air), SO/sub 2/ (0.03 mg/m/sup 3/ air), or a combination of both gases in open top chambers. With age, a combination of both gases significantly increased the content of the antioxidants vitamin E and C and glutathione in needles of fir and spruce when compared to the control treated with purified air. The increase was stronger in needles of fir than in needles of spruce. Further, the increase was already found in the youngest needles of fir. Compared to the control, no significant higher amount of antioxidants was observed when trees were exposed to ozone alone. Moreover, ozone exposure was less effective than SO/sub 2/ exposure. Combination of both air pollutants induced synergistic effects. In field studies (location: Schwarzwald, Kaelbelescheuer/Haldenhof), needles of spruce also showed an increase in the vitamin E content dependent on the extent of damage. This increase was partly accompanied by a higher amount of vitamin C and an increased degree of lipid peroxidation, measured as ethane production. Our results from open top experiments are consistent with our previous data investigating natural aging in higher plants. Therefore we suggest that by the phytotoxic action of air pollutants, such as SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ + ozone, age-related peroxidative processes are accelerated. Further, both vitamin E and glutathione are specific indicators of these processes. By now, no direct and significant correlation between field studies and studies with open tops has been found.

  14. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials

  15. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation: influence of oxygen concentration and membrane lipid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.; Tilburg, C.A.M. van; Konings, A.W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation -induced lipid peroxidation phospholipid liposomes was investigated in terms of its dependence on lipid composition and oxygen concentration. Non-peroxidizable lipid incorporated in the liposomes reduced the rate of peroxidation of the peroxidizable phospholipid acyl chains, possibly by restricting the length of chain reactions. The latter effect is believed to be caused by interference of the non-peroxidizable lipids in the bilayer. At low oxygen concentration lipid peroxidation was reduced. The cause of this limited peroxidation may be a reduced number of radical initiation reactions possibly involving oxygen-derived superoxide radicals. Killing of proliferating mammalian cells, irradiated at oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 100%, appeared to be independent of the concentration of peroxidizable phospholipids in the cell membranes. This indicates that lipid peroxidation is not the determining process in radiation-induced reproductive cell death. (author)

  16. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čeřovský, M., E-mail: scholtz@aldebaran.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic); Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Rusová, K. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic); Scholtz, V. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-15

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  17. Photo-oxidation of histidine peptides yields high concentrations of unstable peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policarpio, V.V.; Hawkins, C.L.; Davies, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins by UV, and visible light in the presence of sensitizers, results in side chain modification as well as aggregation and fragmentation. In particular, singlet oxygen has been reported to oxidize Met, Trp, Tyr, Cys and His side chains in a selective manner. In this study the oxidation of histidine and its derivatives, and His-containing peptides is examined using a range of sensitizers, to determine whether peroxides are major intermediates, and the mechanism of formation of these species. Visible light-sensitised oxidation of Gly-His-Gly in the presence of oxygen and rose bengal gives unstable substrate-derived peroxides with the peroxide yield increasing with increasing photolysis time. Similar behaviour was detected with other photosensitizers, though the peroxide yields varied with the sensitizer at identical concentrations with rose bengal > aluminium phthalocyanine > hematoporphyrin IX > zinc phthalocyanine > tetrakisporphine. The peroxide yield was decreased in the presence of azide and enhanced when deuterium oxide was employed as the solvent, consistent with peroxide formation being singlet oxygen mediated. Experiments using anoxic conditions gave low yields of peroxides confirming the oxygen-dependence of these reactions. HPLC analysis showed rapid loss of the parent peptide, with subsequent formation of both stable and unstable products; these are currently being characterized by MS and NMR. Similar behavior has been observed with other His derivatives. The yield of singlet oxygen formed in these reactions has been estimated using a bleaching assay (N, N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline). Quantification of singlet oxygen formation and Gly-His-Gly derived peroxide during rose bengal-mediated photooxidation indicated a conversion efficiency of the initial singlet oxygen into substrate-derived peroxides of ca. 75% indicating that peroxide formation is a highly efficient and major reaction pathway

  18. Dietary fiber and lipid peroxidation: effect of dietary fiber on levels of lipids and lipid peroxides in high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, B S; Manoj, G; Leelamma, S; Menon, V P

    1991-06-01

    Effect of feeding coconut and blackgram fiber isolated as neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on the levels of lipids and lipid peroxides was studied in rats given a high fat diet. Concentration of cholesterol, free falty acid and phospholipids showed significant decrease in the serum, liver aorta and intestine of coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes was significantly decreased in liver and intestine of both fiber groups, while hydroperoxides showed significant increase in liver and heart of both the fiber groups. SOD and catalase activity was found to be increased in liver, intestine, heart proximal colon and distal colon of both the fiber groups. Serum ceruloplasmin levels showed a slight increase in animals fed coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Glutathione levels in liver, intestine proximal colon, distal colon and heart also showed a significant decrease in the animals of both the fiber groups.

  19. Effects of 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide on the microhardness and color change of composite resins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Sadat Hashemi Kamangar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 40% hydrogen peroxide and 15% carbamide peroxide on microhardness and color change of a silorane-based composite resin in comparison with two methacrylate-based composites.Fifty-four disc-shaped specimens (A3 shade were fabricated of Filtek P90 (P90, Filtek Z350XT Enamel (Z350 and Filtek Z250 (Z250 (3MESPE (n=18. The samples of each composite were randomly divided into three subgroups of 6. The control subgroups were immersed in distilled water; the test groups were exposed to Opalescence Boost (OB once; and Opalescence PF (OP (Ultradent for two weeks. Vickers microhardness testing and a spectrophotometric analysis of the color of samples were performed before and after each intervention.The baseline microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of the other two composites (P=0.001, but no difference was found between Z250 and Z350 in this respect (P=0.293. Bleaching treatments significantly decreased the microhardness of Z250 and Z350 (P 0.05. No significant difference was detected between the two types of bleaching (P>0.05. After bleaching with OB, ΔE value was measured to be 3.12(1.97, 3.31(1.84 and 3.7(2.11 for P90, Z250 and Z350, respectively. These values were 5.98(2.42, 4.66(2.85 and 4.90(2.78 after bleaching with OP with no significant difference.Bleaching decreased the microhardness of methacrylate-based but not silorane-based composites. Although no significant differences were found in ΔE of composites, ΔE of all groups did not remain in the clinically acceptable range after bleaching except for P90 after bleaching with 40% H2O2 (ΔE < 3.3.

  20. Catalase-Aminotriazole Assay, an Invalid Method for Measurement of Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Wood Decay Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Highley, Terry L.

    1981-01-01

    The catalase-aminotriazole assay for determination of hydrogen peroxide apparently cannot be used for measuring hydrogen peroxide production in crude preparations from wood decay fungi because of materials in the crude preparations that interfere with the test.

  1. Reaction Front Evolution during Electrochemical Lithiation of Crystalline Silicon Nanopillars

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2012-12-01

    The high theoretical specific capacity of Si as an anode material is attractive in lithium-ion batteries, although the issues caused by large volume changes during cycling have been a major challenge. Efforts have been devoted to understanding how diffusion-induced stresses cause fracture, but recent observations of anisotropic volume expansion in single-crystalline Si nanostructures require new theoretical considerations of expansion behavior during lithiation. Further experimental investigation is also necessary to better understand the anisotropy of the lithiation process. Here, we present a method to reveal the crystalline core of partially lithiated Si nanopillars with three different crystallographic orientations by using methanol to dissolve the Li atoms from the amorphous Li-Si alloy. The exposed crystalline cores have flat {110} surfaces at the pillar sidewalls; these surfaces represent the position of the reaction front between the crystalline core and the amorphous Li-Si alloy. It was also found that an amorphous Si structure remained on the flat surfaces of the crystalline core after dissolution of the Li, which was presumed to be caused by the accumulation of Si atoms left over from the removal of Li from the Li-Si alloy. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Mesomorphous versus traces of crystallinity: The itraconazole example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atassi, Faraj, E-mail: fatassi@yahoo.com; Behme, Robert J.; Patel, Phenil J.

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • Characterizing partially disordered pharmaceuticals is very challenging due to the fact that more than one discrete disordered phase can be present. • Dynamic mechanical analysis and dielectric analysis are extremely helpful in characterizing pharmaceutical mesophases (liquid crystals). • Thermotropic pharmaceutical mesophases, often mistaken as amorphous or partially crystalline, can show different phases of liquid crystallinity at different temperature. • Liquid crystalline pharmaceutical materials often show amorphous behavior along with other characteristics specific to mesomorphous materials. • The thermal and mechanical history of pharmaceutical disordered samples has a significant effect on their phase composition. - Abstract: Characterizing disordered pharmaceutical materials can be challenging, especially materials with partially disordered structures that lose one or two directional order (mesophases) and do not fit the traditional characterization categories of amorphous, crystalline or a combination of the two. Itraconazole, an antifungal agent, was chosen as a model compound that, when quench cooled, exhibits atypical disordered structure. Five different analytical tools were used to map out the molecular structure of this material and how it changes with changing temperature. X-ray diffraction showed some remnant crystallinity while dielectric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis, DSC and hot stage microscopy gave more detailed molecular structure of the disordered material and explained all temperature related structural changes. The characterization of mesomorphous Itraconazole described here will help characterize a wide range of pharmaceuticals that exhibit thermotropic (temperature induced) mesomorphism at the molecular level.

  3. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Ouk, E-mail: sangouk.kim@kaist.ac.kr [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp{sup 2} hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystalline LGO aqueous dispersions are spontaneous parallel aligned between geometric confinement for highly aligned LGO/polymer composite fabrication. - Highlights: • A simple fabrication method for highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites is proposed. • LGO aqueous dispersion shows nematic liquid crystalline phase at 0.8 mg/ml. • In nematic phase, LGO flakes are highly aligned by geometric confinement. • Infiltration of PDMS into freeze-dried LGO allows highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites.

  4. Reaction Front Evolution during Electrochemical Lithiation of Crystalline Silicon Nanopillars

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo; Berla, Lucas A.; McDowell, Matthew T.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The high theoretical specific capacity of Si as an anode material is attractive in lithium-ion batteries, although the issues caused by large volume changes during cycling have been a major challenge. Efforts have been devoted to understanding how diffusion-induced stresses cause fracture, but recent observations of anisotropic volume expansion in single-crystalline Si nanostructures require new theoretical considerations of expansion behavior during lithiation. Further experimental investigation is also necessary to better understand the anisotropy of the lithiation process. Here, we present a method to reveal the crystalline core of partially lithiated Si nanopillars with three different crystallographic orientations by using methanol to dissolve the Li atoms from the amorphous Li-Si alloy. The exposed crystalline cores have flat {110} surfaces at the pillar sidewalls; these surfaces represent the position of the reaction front between the crystalline core and the amorphous Li-Si alloy. It was also found that an amorphous Si structure remained on the flat surfaces of the crystalline core after dissolution of the Li, which was presumed to be caused by the accumulation of Si atoms left over from the removal of Li from the Li-Si alloy. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Design of multi materials combining crystalline and amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volland, A.; Ragani, J.; Liu, Y.; Gravier, S.; Suéry, M.; Blandin, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Elaboration of multi materials associating metallic glasses and conventional crystalline alloys by co-deformation performed at temperatures close to the glass transition temperature of the metallic glasses. ► Elaboration of filamentary metal matrix composites with a core in metallic glass by co extrusion. ► Sandwich structures produced by co-pressing. ► Detection of atomic diffusion from the glass to the crystalline alloys during the processes. ► Good interfaces between the metallic glasses and the crystalline alloys, as confirmed by mechanical characterisation. - Abstract: Multi materials, associating zirconium based bulk metallic glasses and crystalline metallic alloys like magnesium alloys or copper are elaborated by co-deformation processing performed in the supercooled liquid regions (SLR) of the bulk metallic glasses. Two processes are investigated: co-extrusion and co-pressing. In the first case, filamentary composites with various designs can be produced whereas in the second case sandwich structures are obtained. The experimental window (temperature, time) in which processing can be carried out is directly related to the crystallisation resistance of the glass which requires getting information about the crystallisation conditions in the selected metallic glasses. Thermoforming windows are identified for the studied BMGs by thermal analysis and compression tests in their SLR. The mechanical properties of the produced multi materials are investigated thanks to specifically developed mechanical devices and the interfaces between the amorphous and the crystalline alloys are characterised.

  6. Morphology and crystallinity of sisal nanocellulose after sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosiati, H.; Wijayanti, D. A.; Triyana, K.; Kamiel, B.

    2017-09-01

    Different preparation methods on the natural fibers resulted in different morphology. However, the relationships between type of natural fibers, preparation methods and the morphology of produced nanocellulose could not be exactly defined. The sisal nanocellulose was presently prepared by alkalization and bleaching followed by sonication to verify changes in the morphology and crystallinity of nanocellulose related to the formation mechanism. The extracted microcellulose was subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The isolated cellulose nanospheres were examined with respect to morphology by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, to crystallinity by electron diffraction analysis. Bleaching after alkalization made the microfibrils clearly separated from each other to the individual fiber whose width of the single fiber was ranging from 6 to 13 µm. The XRD crystallinity index (CI) of microcellulose gradually increased after the chemical treatments; 83.12% for raw sisal fiber, 88.57% for alkali treated fiber and 94.03% for bleached fibers. The ultrasonic agitation after bleaching that was carried out at 750 Watt, 20 kHz and amplitude of 39% for 2 h produces homogeneous cellulose nanospheres less than 50 nm in diameter with relatively low crystallinity. The electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the low crystallinity of produced nnocellulose is related to the effect of chemical treatment done before sonication.

  7. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yun-Yuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Su, Wei-Fang; Chen, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Novel liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced polymerization shrinkage and effectively bond to tooth structures, can be applied in esthetic dentistry, including core and post systems, direct and indirect restorations, and dental brackets. The purposes of this study were to investigate the properties of liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites including biocompatibility, microhardness, and frictional forces of bracket-like blocks with different filler contents for further clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials that exhibited various filler contents, by assessing their cell activity performance using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and their microhardness with or without thermocycling. We also evaluated the frictional force between bracket-like duplicates and commercially available esthetic bracket systems using Instron 5566. The liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials showed good biocompatibility. The materials having high filler content demonstrated greater microhardness compared with commercially available bracket materials, before and after the thermocycling treatment. Thus, manufacturing processes are important to reduce frictional force experienced by orthodontic brackets. The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  9. Mesomorphous versus traces of crystallinity: The itraconazole example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atassi, Faraj; Behme, Robert J.; Patel, Phenil J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Characterizing partially disordered pharmaceuticals is very challenging due to the fact that more than one discrete disordered phase can be present. • Dynamic mechanical analysis and dielectric analysis are extremely helpful in characterizing pharmaceutical mesophases (liquid crystals). • Thermotropic pharmaceutical mesophases, often mistaken as amorphous or partially crystalline, can show different phases of liquid crystallinity at different temperature. • Liquid crystalline pharmaceutical materials often show amorphous behavior along with other characteristics specific to mesomorphous materials. • The thermal and mechanical history of pharmaceutical disordered samples has a significant effect on their phase composition. - Abstract: Characterizing disordered pharmaceutical materials can be challenging, especially materials with partially disordered structures that lose one or two directional order (mesophases) and do not fit the traditional characterization categories of amorphous, crystalline or a combination of the two. Itraconazole, an antifungal agent, was chosen as a model compound that, when quench cooled, exhibits atypical disordered structure. Five different analytical tools were used to map out the molecular structure of this material and how it changes with changing temperature. X-ray diffraction showed some remnant crystallinity while dielectric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis, DSC and hot stage microscopy gave more detailed molecular structure of the disordered material and explained all temperature related structural changes. The characterization of mesomorphous Itraconazole described here will help characterize a wide range of pharmaceuticals that exhibit thermotropic (temperature induced) mesomorphism at the molecular level

  10. Nonlinear optical properties of TeO$_2$ crystalline phases from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Berkaine, Nabil; Orhan, Emmanuelle; Masson, Olivier; Thomas, Philippe; Junquera, Javier

    2010-01-01

    We have computed second and third nonlinear optical susceptibilities of two crystalline bulk tellurium oxide polymorphs: $\\alpha$-TeO$_{2}$ (the most stable crystalline bulk phase) and $\\gamma$-TeO$_{2}$ (the crystalline phase that ressembles the more to the glass phase. Third order nonlinear susceptibilities of the crystalline phases are two orders of magnitude larger than $\\alpha$-SiO$_{2}$ cristoballite, thus extending the experimental observations on glasses to the case of crystalline com...

  11. Synthetic protease substrate n-benzoyl-L-argininyl-p-nitroanilide activates specific binding of [3H]estradiol to a protein in rat pancreas: relationship of structure to activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, A.

    1984-01-01

    N-benzoyl-L-argininyl-p-nitroanilide (BAN), a synthetic substrate for trypsin-like proteolytic enzymes, is a potent activator of [ 3 H]estradiol-binding to a protein present in rat pancreas. When partially purified, this protein is almost devoid of [ 3 H]estradiol-binding activity in the absence of an endogenous accessory factor. BAN can mimic the natural coligand in this steroid binding reaction. The effect of BAN is specific since a number of derivatives of this substance are inactive or may even inhibit steroid binding. It is unlikely that BAN exerts this stimulatory action indirectly, possibly by preventing proteolytic inactivation of the [ 3 H]estradiol-binding protein, since preincubation of the protein in the absence of BAN resulted neither in reduced rate, nor extent, of steroid binding following BAN addition. Also, a number of protease inhibitors had no effect on the binding reaction. Of those inhibitors tested, only antipain significantly enhanced binding of [ 3 H]estradiol, but only about 20 percent as effectively as BAN. 13 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  12. (2-Benzoyl-1-phenylethenolato-κ2O,O′bis[2-(1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylphenyl-κC1]iridium(III dichloromethane disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav I. Bezzubov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here synthesis and crystal structure of a neutral IrIII complex, [Ir(C19H13N22(C15H11O2]·2CH2Cl2 or [Ir(C^N2O^O]·2CH2Cl2, where C^N is 1,2-diphenyl-1H-benzimidazole and O^O is 2-benzoyl-1-phenylethenolate. The coordination sphere of the IrIII atom, located on a twofold rotation axis, is that of a slighlty distorted C2N2O2 octahedron, with the N atoms in a trans configuration. In the crystal, complex molecules assemble through weak C—H...π interactions in the range 2.699 (3–2.892 (3 Å. The solvent CH2Cl2 molecules reside in channels aligned along the a axis and are connected to the complex molecules by C—H...O interactions.

  13. Identification of poorly crystalline scorodite in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, R.; Rowson, J.; Hughes, K.; Rinas, C.; Warner, J.

    2010-01-01

    The McClean Lake mill, located in northern Saskatchewan, processes a variety of uranium ore bodies to produce yellowcake. A by-product of this process is an acidic waste solution enriched in arsenic, referred to as raffinate. The raffinate waste stream is treated in the tailings preparation circuit, where arsenic is precipitated as a poorly crystalline scorodite phase. Raffinate neutralization studies have successfully identified poorly crystalline scorodite using XRD, SEM, EM, XANES and EXAFS methods, but to date, scorodite has not been successfully identified within the whole tailing solids. During the summer of 2008, a drilling program sampled the in situ tailings within the McClean Lake tailings management facility. Samples from this drilling campaign were sent to the Canadian Light Source Inc. for EXAFS analysis. The sample spectra positively identify a poorly crystalline scorodite phase within the McClean tailings management facility. (author)

  14. Atomically flat single-crystalline gold nanostructures for plasmonic nanocircuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J S; Geisler, P; Bruening, C; Kern, J; Prangsma, J C; Wu, X; Feichtner, Thorsten; Ziegler, J; Weinmann, P; Kamp, M; Forchel, A; Hecht, B [Wilhelm-Conrad-Roentgen-Center for Complex Material Systems, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Biagioni, P [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Deep subwavelength integration of high-definition plasmonic nano-structures is of key importance for the development of future optical nanocircuitry. So far the experimental realization of proposed extended plasmonic networks remains challenging, mainly due to the multi-crystallinity of commonly used thermally evaporated gold layers. Resulting structural imperfections in individual circuit elements drastically reduce the yield of functional integrated nanocircuits. Here we demonstrate the use of very large but thin chemically grown single-crystalline gold flakes. After immobilization on any arbitrary surface, they serve as an ideal basis for focused-ion beam milling. We present high-definition ultra-smooth gold nanostructures with reproducible nanosized features over micrometer lengthscales. By comparing multi- and single-crystalline optical antennas we prove that the latter have superior optical properties which are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  15. Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks. FY15 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. Chapter headings are as follows: Fuel matrix degradation model and its integration with performance assessments, Investigation of thermal effects on the chemical behavior of clays, Investigation of uranium diffusion and retardation in bentonite, Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: dependence on density, Sorption and desorption of plutonium by bentonite, Dissolution of plutonium intrinsic colloids in the presence of clay and as a function of temperature, Laboratory investigation of colloid-facilitated transport of cesium by bentonite colloids in a crystalline rock system, Development and demonstration of discrete fracture network model, Fracture continuum model and its comparison with discrete fracture network model.

  16. Development of shear bands in amorphous-crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdnyakov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical study is made into conditions of shear band evolution in amorphous-crystalline alloys with various morphological types of structural constituents. The condition of shear band evolution in thin amorphous alloys in the interior of the crystalline matrix is obtained. It is shown that a scale effect exists which manifests itself in suppression of the process of localized plastic flow with amorphous alloy thickness decreasing down to the limit. The analysis of the condition for shear band evolution in an amorphous alloy with nanocrystalline inclusions is accomplished. The relationship of a critical stress of shear band evolution to a volume fraction of disperse crystal inclusions is obtained. A consideration is also given to the evolution of shear bands in the material containing amorphous and crystalline areas of micro meter size. For the alloy with the structure of this type conditions for propagation of localized flows by a relay race type mechanism are determined [ru

  17. Mixing induced reactive transport in fractured crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesus; Dentz, Marco; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Nardí, Albert; Saaltink, Maarten W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the solute retention properties of crystalline fractured rocks due to mixing-induced geochemical reactions are studied. While fractured media exhibit paths of fast flow and transport and thus short residence times for conservative solutes, at the same time they promote mixing and dilution due to strong heterogeneity, which leads to sharp concentration contrasts. Enhanced mixing and dilution have a double effect that favors crystalline fractured media as a possible host medium for nuclear waste disposal. Firstly, peak radionuclide concentrations are attenuated and, secondly, mixing-induced precipitation reactions are enhanced significantly, which leads to radionuclide immobilization. An integrated framework is presented for the effective modeling of these flow, transport and reaction phenomena, and the interaction between them. In a simple case study, the enhanced dilution and precipitation potential of fractured crystalline rocks are systematically studied and quantified and contrasted it to retention and attenuation in an equivalent homogeneous formation.

  18. Nonlinear laser pulse response in a crystalline lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R P; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D

    2016-04-01

    The propagation characteristics of a spatial Gaussian laser pulse have been studied inside a gradient-index structured crystalline lens with constant-density plasma generated by the laser-tissue interaction. The propagation of the laser pulse is affected by the nonlinearities introduced by the generated plasma inside the crystalline lens. Owing to the movement of plasma species from a higher- to a lower-temperature region, an increase in the refractive index occurs that causes the focusing of the laser pulse. In this study, extended paraxial approximation has been applied to take into account the evolution of the radial profile of the Gaussian laser pulse. To examine the propagation characteristics, variation of the beam width parameter has been observed as a function of the laser power and initial beam radius. The cavitation bubble formation, which plays an important role in the restoration of the elasticity of the crystalline lens, has been investigated.

  19. The physics of large deformation of crystalline solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, James F

    1968-01-01

    Historically, a major problem for the study of the large deformation of crystalline solids has been the apparent lack of unity in experimentally determined stress-strain functions. The writer's discovery in 1949 of the unexpectedly high velocity of incremental loading waves in pre-stressed large deformation fields emphasized to him the pressing need for the independent, systematic experimental study of the subject, to provide a firm foundation upon which physically plausible theories for the finite deformation of crystalline solids could be constructed. Such a study undertaken by the writer at that time and continued uninterruptedly to the present, led in 1956 to the development of the diffraction grating experiment which permitted, for the first time, the optically accurate determination of the strain-time detail of non-linear finite amplitude wave fronts propagating into crystalline solids whose prior history was precisely known. These experimental diffraction grating studies during the past decade have led...

  20. Effects of alkaline or liquid-ammonia treatment on crystalline cellulose: changes in crystalline structure and effects on enzymatic digestibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmel Michael E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In converting biomass to bioethanol, pretreatment is a key step intended to render cellulose more amenable and accessible to cellulase enzymes and thus increase glucose yields. In this study, four cellulose samples with different degrees of polymerization and crystallinity indexes were subjected to aqueous sodium hydroxide and anhydrous liquid ammonia treatments. The effects of the treatments on cellulose crystalline structure were studied, in addition to the effects on the digestibility of the celluloses by a cellulase complex. Results From X-ray diffractograms and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, it was revealed that treatment with liquid ammonia produced the cellulose IIII allomorph; however, crystallinity depended on treatment conditions. Treatment at a low temperature (25°C resulted in a less crystalline product, whereas treatment at elevated temperatures (130°C or 140°C gave a more crystalline product. Treatment of cellulose I with aqueous sodium hydroxide (16.5 percent by weight resulted in formation of cellulose II, but also produced a much less crystalline cellulose. The relative digestibilities of the different cellulose allomorphs were tested by exposing the treated and untreated cellulose samples to a commercial enzyme mixture (Genencor-Danisco; GC 220. The digestibility results showed that the starting cellulose I samples were the least digestible (except for corn stover cellulose, which had a high amorphous content. Treatment with sodium hydroxide produced the most digestible cellulose, followed by treatment with liquid ammonia at a low temperature. Factor analysis indicated that initial rates of digestion (up to 24 hours were most strongly correlated with amorphous content. Correlation of allomorph type with digestibility was weak, but was strongest with cellulose conversion at later times. The cellulose IIII samples produced at higher temperatures had comparable crystallinities to the initial cellulose I