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Sample records for crystal membrane dust

  1. Liquid Crystal Membrane Dust Mitigation System for Lunar or Martian Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar dust creates a number of hazards to lunar operations including, effect on human health, degradation of life support systems, wear to mechanical systems and...

  2. DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CRYSTALLIZATION OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G. Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallography is more like an art than science. Crystallizing membrane proteins are a big challenge; membrane proteins are present in the cell membrane and serve as cell support. The most important feature of membrane protein is that it contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions on its surface. They are generally much more difficult to study than soluble proteins. The problem becomes more difficult when trying to obtain crystals to determine the high resolution structures of membrane proteins. We want to utilize this opportunity to briefly examine various approaches for crystallization of membrane proteins. The important factors for determining the success of crystallization experiments for membrane proteins lies in the purification, preparation of membrane samples, the environment in which the crystals are grown and the technique used to grow the crystals. All the X-ray structures of membrane protein are grown from preparations of detergents by different methods developed to crystallize. In this review different techniques for the crystallization of membrane proteins are being described. The cubic phase method also known as in meso method is discussed along with other methods to understand about the crystallization of membrane proteins, its general applicability, salt, detergent and screening effects on crystallization. Low volumes as nano-liter of samples can be used for crystallization. The effects of different detergents on the crystallization of membrane protein, as well as the use of surfactants like polyoxyethylene. Approach based on the detergent complexation to prove the ability of cyclodextrins to remove detergent from ternary mixtures in order to get 2D crystals. Crystallization of membrane proteins using non-ionic surfactants as well as Lipidic sponge phase and with swollen lipidic mesophases is discussed to better understand the crystallization of membrane proteins.

  3. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Dynamics of a Dust Crystal with Two Different Size Dust Species

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, L S; Hyde, T W

    2005-01-01

    A self-consistent three-dimensional model for a complex (dusty) plasma is used to study the effects of multiple-sized dust grains in a dust crystal. In addition to the interparticle forces, which interact through a Yukawa potential, the model includes the effects of gravity, the variation of the sheath potential above the powered electrode, and a radial confining potential. Simulations studied various ratios of a mix of 6.5- and 8.9-micron monodisperse particles and compared their correlation functions, electric potential energy of the crystal formations, and the dispersion relations for in-plane and out-of-plane dust lattice wave (DLW) modes for two different sheath thicknesses. In the 7 mm sheath, the particles formed two layers in the vertical direction by size, and acted as a two-layer crystal with weak correlation between the layers. In the 3 mm sheath, the particles formed an essentially monolayer crystal; however the crystal dynamics showed some characteristics of a bilayer crystal.

  5. Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Vapor Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmar, Jared A.; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most robust method to determine protein structure at the atomic level. However, the bottlenecks of protein expression and purification often discourage further study. In this chapter, we address the most common problems encountered at these stages. Based on our experiences in expressing and purifying antimicrobial efflux proteins, we explain how a pure and homogenous protein sample can be successfully crystallized by the vapor diffusion method. We present our current protocols and methodologies for this technique. Case studies show step-by-step how we have overcome problems related to expression and diffraction, eventually producing high quality membrane protein crystals for structural determinations. It is our hope that a rational approach can be made of the often anecdotal process of membrane protein crystallization. PMID:25950974

  6. Chemically Stable Lipids for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Peng, Lingling; Zinovev, Egor; Vlasov, Alexey; Lee, Sung Chang; Kuklin, Alexander; Mishin, Alexey; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Zhang, Qinghai; Cherezov, Vadim (MIPT); (USC); (Scripps)

    2017-05-01

    The lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has been widely recognized as a promising membrane-mimicking matrix for biophysical studies of membrane proteins and their crystallization in a lipidic environment. Application of this material to a wide variety of membrane proteins, however, is hindered due to a limited number of available host lipids, mostly monoacylglycerols (MAGs). Here, we designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of chemically stable lipids resistant to hydrolysis, with properties complementary to the widely used MAGs. In order to assess their potential to serve as host lipids for crystallization, we characterized the phase properties and lattice parameters of mesophases made of two most promising lipids at a variety of different conditions by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Both lipids showed remarkable chemical stability and an extended LCP region in the phase diagram covering a wide range of temperatures down to 4 °C. One of these lipids has been used for crystallization and structure determination of a prototypical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin at 4 and 20 °C.

  7. Methods for synthesizing microporous crystals and microporous crystal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir; Severance, Michael; Sun, Chenhu

    2017-02-07

    A method of making a microporous crystal material, comprising: a. forming a mixture comprising NaOH, water, and one or more of an aluminum source, a silicon source, and a phosphate source, whereupon the mixture forms a gel; b. heating the gel for a first time period, whereupon a first volume of water is removed from the gel and micoroporous crystal nuclei form, the nuclei having a framework; and c.(if a membrane is to be formed) applying the gel to a solid support seeded with microporous crystals having a framework that is the same as the framework of the nuclei; d. heating the gel for a second time period. during which a second volume of water is added to the gel; wherein the rate of addition of the second volume of water is between about 0.5 and about 2.0 fold the rate of removal of the first volume of water.

  8. Methods for synthesizing microporous crystals and microporous crystal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir; Severance, Michael; Sun, Chenhu

    2017-02-07

    A method of making a microporous crystal material, comprising: a. forming a mixture comprising NaOH, water, and one or more of an aluminum source, a silicon source, and a phosphate source, whereupon the mixture forms a gel; b. heating the gel for a first time period, whereupon a first volume of water is removed from the gel and micoroporous crystal nuclei form, the nuclei having a framework; and c.(if a membrane is to be formed) applying the gel to a solid support seeded with microporous crystals having a framework that is the same as the framework of the nuclei; d. heating the gel for a second time period. during which a second volume of water is added to the gel; wherein the rate of addition of the second volume of water is between about 0.5 and about 2.0 fold the rate of removal of the first volume of water.

  9. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  10. An automated pipeline to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changki; Vink, Martin; Hu, Minghui; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-06-01

    Electron crystallography relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and is particularly well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. To obtain 2D crystals from purified membrane proteins, the detergent in a protein-lipid-detergent ternary mixture must be removed, generally by dialysis, under conditions favoring reconstitution into proteoliposomes and formation of well-ordered lattices. To identify these conditions a wide range of parameters such as pH, lipid composition, lipid-to-protein ratio, ionic strength and ligands must be screened in a procedure involving four steps: crystallization, specimen preparation for electron microscopy, image acquisition, and evaluation. Traditionally, these steps have been carried out manually and, as a result, the scope of 2D crystallization trials has been limited. We have therefore developed an automated pipeline to screen the formation of 2D crystals. We employed a 96-well dialysis block for reconstitution of the target protein over a wide range of conditions designed to promote crystallization. A 96-position magnetic platform and a liquid handling robot were used to prepare negatively stained specimens in parallel. Robotic grid insertion into the electron microscope and computerized image acquisition ensures rapid evaluation of the crystallization screen. To date, 38 2D crystallization screens have been conducted for 15 different membrane proteins, totaling over 3000 individual crystallization experiments. Three of these proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals. Our automated pipeline outperforms traditional 2D crystallization methods in terms of throughput and reproducibility.

  11. Membrane protein crystallization in lipidic mesophases: detergent effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, X.; Caffrey, M.

    2000-01-01

    The "cubic phase method" for growing crystals of membrane proteins uses a complex mixture of water, lipid, protein, and other components. The current view is that the cubic phase is integral to the process. Thus additives from whatever source introduce the possibility of destabilizing the phase, thereby compromising the crystallization process. Detergents are used to solubilize membrane proteins and are likely to be ported into the cubic medium with the target protein. Depending on the identi...

  12. Attempt to detect diamagnetic anisotropy of dust-sized crystal orientated to investigate the origin of interstellar dust alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Hisayoshi, K.; Uyeda, C.

    2013-03-01

    Diamagnetic anisotropy Δ χ dia was detected on a submillimeter-sized calcite crystal by observing the rotational oscillation of its magnetically stable axis with respect to the magnetic field direction. The crystal was released in an area of microgravity generated by a 1.5-m-long drop shaft. When the oscillations are observable, the present method can measure Δ χ dia of crystal grains irrespective of how small they are without measuring the sample mass. In conventional Δ χ measurements, the background signal from the sample holder and the difficulty in measuring the sample mass prevent measurement of Δ χ dia for small samples. The present technique of observing Δ χ dia of a submillimeter-sized single crystal is a step toward realizing Δ χ dia measurements of micron-sized grains. The Δ χ dia values of single micron-sized grains can be used to assess the validity of a dust alignment model based on magnetic torque that originates from the Δ χ dia of individual dust particles.

  13. Secondary and lyotropic liquid crystal membranes for improved aqueous separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemade, Parag Ramesh

    An effective membrane separation process should have high flux (i.e., volume filtered per unit membrane surface area per unit time) and selectivity (i.e., passage of the desired species and rejection of undesired species). This dissertation examined two approaches, secondary membranes and lyotropic liquid crystal membranes, for improving flux and selectivity in aqueous liquid separations. The first part of my work emphasizes the use of pre-deposited secondary membranes and backflushing for controlling membrane fouling in microfiltration and ultrafiltration of biological mixtures. Use of secondary membranes increased the permeate flux in microfiltration by several fold. Protein transmission is also enhanced due to the presence of the secondary membrane, and the amount of protein recovered is more than twice that obtained during filtration of protein-only solutions under otherwise identical conditions. In ultrafiltration, the flux enhancement due to secondary membranes is 50%, or less. For the second part of my research, I developed and evaluated polymerized lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) thin-film composite membranes. LLC assemblies provide an opportunity to make nanoporous polymer membranes with precise control over chemical and structural features on the nanometer scale, which is currently lacking in commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes available today. These LLC composite membranes are prepared by photopolymerization of solution-cast films of LLC monomer on an ultrafiltration support membrane. These LLC membranes appeared to exhibit almost linearly increasing ionic rejection based on ionic diameter. LLC monomer was modified to achieve a 15% reduction in channel diameter, through the use of a larger multivalent Eu3+ cation as the carboxylate counterion. However, the monomers synthesized required use of solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, which resulted in the dissolution and damage of the support membranes used. Therefore, this direction

  14. Impacts of crystal metal on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation during dust storm episodes in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Bei, Yiling

    2016-03-01

    Trimethylamine (TMA) enters the atmosphere from a variety of sources and is a ubiquitous atmospheric organic base. The atmospheric reaction mechanism of TMA with key atmospheric oxidants is important to predict its distribution and environmental behavior in the particle phase. While previous studies have extensively focused on the production of particle amine salts (i.e. trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)) using chamber experiments, the atmospheric behavior of TMAO in the environment is still poorly understood. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at two sampling sites in Beijing from March 10 to May 10, 2012. We analyzed the samples for water-soluble ions, crystal metals, TMA, and TMAO. Water-soluble ions (e.g. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+), TMA, and TMAO were measured using ion chromatography, while crystal metal (e.g. Al, Fe, Mn) in PM2.5 was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two dust storms (DS) occurred during the sampling period on March 28 and April 28. Mineral dust impacted PM2.5 mass and composition greatly during dust storm days, as it contributed approximately 1.2-4.0 times greater on dust storm days versus non-dust storm days. We found TMAO concentrations were highly associated with aluminum in PM2.5. Further, we applied the density functional theory (DFT) method to confirm that aluminum plays a catalytic effect in the reaction of TMA with ozone (O3). Our work improves understanding of the effect of crystal metals on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation in the atmosphere.

  15. Application of Membrane Crystallization for Minerals’ Recovery from Produced Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamer Ali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Produced water represents the largest wastewater stream from oil and gas production. Generally, its high salinity level restricts the treatment options. Membrane crystallization (MCr is an emerging membrane process with the capability to extract simultaneously fresh water and valuable components from various streams. In the current study, the potential of MCr for produced water treatment and salt recovery was demonstrated. The experiments were carried out in lab scale and semi-pilot scale. The effect of thermal and hydrodynamic conditions on process performance and crystal characteristics were explored. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses confirmed that the recovered crystals are sodium chloride with very high purity (>99.9%, also indicated by the cubic structure observed by microscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy analysis. It was demonstrated experimentally that at recovery factor of 37%, 16.4 kg NaCl per cubic meter of produced water can be recovered. Anti-scaling surface morphological features of membranes were also identified. In general, the study provides a new perspective of isolation of valuable constituents from produced water that, otherwise, is considered as a nuisance.

  16. Crystal nuclei templated nanostructured membranes prepared by solvent crystallization and polymer migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Ji, Jing; Li, Kang

    2016-09-01

    Currently, production of porous polymeric membranes for filtration is predominated by the phase-separation process. However, this method has reached its technological limit, and there have been no significant breakthrough over the last decade. Here we show, using polyvinylidene fluoride as a sample polymer, a new concept of membrane manufacturing by combining oriented green solvent crystallization and polymer migration is able to obtain high performance membranes with pure water permeation flux substantially higher than those with similar pore size prepared by conventional phase-separation processes. The new manufacturing procedure is governed by fewer operating parameters and is, thus, easier to control with reproducible results. Apart from the high water permeation flux, the prepared membranes also show excellent stable flux after fouling and superior mechanical properties of high pressure load and better abrasion resistance. These findings demonstrate the promise of a new concept for green manufacturing nanostructured polymeric membranes with high performances.

  17. Activating photonic crystal membrane nanocavities by infiltrating with liquid crystals or luminescent colloidal nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dündar, M.A.; Christova, C.; Silov, A.Y.; Karouta, F.; Nötzel, R.; Wienk, M.; Salemink, H.; Van der Heijden, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC, Merk 5 CB) is infiltrated into active, InAs quantum dots embedded, InGaAsP membrane type nanocavities to investigate the possible effect of the LC orientation on active cavity tuning. The tuning is demonstrated thermally and thermo-optically. The thermal tuning showed that the ca

  18. Activating photonic crystal membrane nanocavities by infiltrating with liquid crystals or luminescent colloidal nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dündar, M.A.; Christova, C.; Silov, A.Y.; Karouta, F.; Nötzel, R.; Wienk, M.; Salemink, H.; Van der Heijden, R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC, Merk 5 CB) is infiltrated into active, InAs quantum dots embedded, InGaAsP membrane type nanocavities to investigate the possible effect of the LC orientation on active cavity tuning. The tuning is demonstrated thermally and thermo-optically. The thermal tuning showed that the c

  19. Flexible photonic crystal membranes with nanoparticle high refractive index layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Karrock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible photonic crystal slabs with an area of 2 cm2 are fabricated by nanoimprint replication of a 400 nm period linear grating nanostructure into a ≈60 µm thick polydimethylsiloxane membrane and subsequent spin coating of a high refractive index titanium dioxide nanoparticle layer. Samples are prepared with different nanoparticle concentrations. Guided-mode resonances with a quality factor of Q ≈ 40 are observed. The highly flexible nature of the membranes allows for stretching of up to 20% elongation. Resonance peak positions for unstretched samples vary from 555 to 630 nm depending on the particle concentration. Stretching results in a resonance shift for these peaks of up to ≈80 nm, i.e., 3.9 nm per % strain. The color impression of the samples observed with crossed-polarization filters changes from the green to the red regime. The high tunability renders these membranes promising for both tunable optical devices as well as visualization devices.

  20. MICROFILTRATION AND ULTRAFILTRATION OF Bacillus thuringiensis FERMENTATION BROTH: MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE AND SPORE-CRYSTAL RECOVERY APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    R. Marzban; F. Saberi; M.M.A. Shirazi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recovery of spores and crystals from the fermentation broth of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was studied using the membrane separation technology. Four types of polymeric membranes, with different characteristics, in the range of microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) were used for evaluating their permeate flux and spore-crystal recovery capacity. Results indicated that both MF and UF membranes are effective for spore-crystal recovery. The hydrophobic MF membrane made of polyvi...

  1. Pressure sensor based on flexible photonic crystal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrock, Torben; Gerken, Martina

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a pressure sensor based on deformation of a periodically nanostructured Bragg grating waveguide on a flexible 50 µm polydimethylsiloxane membrane and remote optical read out. A pressure change causes deformation of this 2 mm diameter photonic crystal membrane sealing a reference volume. The resulting shift of the guided mode resonances is observed by a remote camera as localized color change. Crossed polarization filters are employed for enhancing the visibility of the guided mode resonances. Pressure values are calculated from the intensity change in the green color channel using a calibration curve in the range of 2000 Pa to 4000 Pa. A limit of detection (LOD) of 160 Pa is estimated. This LOD combined with the small size of the sensor and its biocompatibility render it promising for application as an implantable intraocular pressure sensor.

  2. Equation of state calculations for two-dimensional dust coulomb crystal at near zero temperature by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M., E-mail: djouder-madjid@ummto.dz; Kermoun, F.; Mitiche, M. D.; Lamrous, O. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri Tizi-Ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2016-01-15

    Dust particles observed in universe as well as in laboratory and technological plasma devices are still under investigation. At low temperature, these particles are strongly negatively charged and are able to form a 2D or 3D coulomb crystal. In this work, our aim was to check the ideal gas law validity for a 2D single-layer dust crystal recently reported in the literature. For this purpose, we have simulated, using the molecular dynamics method, its thermodynamic properties for different values of dust particles number and confinement parameters. The obtained results have allowed us to invalidate the ideal gas behaviour and to propose an effective equation of state which assumes a near zero dust temperature. Furthermore, the value of the calculated sound velocity was found to be in a good agreement with experimental data published elsewhere.

  3. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  4. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  5. Evaluation of secondary crystallization effect in poly hydroxybutyrate and silanized coir dust composites; Avaliacao do efeito da cristalizacao secundaria em compositos de polihidroxibutirato e po de coco silanizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Carolina C. de; Costa, Marysilvia F. da; Thire, Rossana M.S.M., E-mail: ccmello@metalmat.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Centro de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate is a natural and biodegradable polyester, susceptible to secondary crystallization when it is stored at environment temperature. Coir dust is an agroindustrial waste which has good prospects for use as filler in composites. In this context, PHB-coir dust composites were produced. The compatibilization was made by coir dust silanization. The secondary crystallization evolution on materials was evaluated by x-ray diffraction. Its effect was verified by tension tests which presented that elastic modulus increases when crystallinity increases. (author)

  6. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization.

  7. Optomechanical and Photothermal Interactions in Suspended Photonic Crystal Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Woolf, David N; Iwase, Eiji; Khan, Mughees; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Deotare, Parag; Bulu, Irfan; Johnson, Steven G; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2012-01-01

    We present here an optomechanical system fabricated with novel stress management techniques that allow us to suspend an ultrathin defect-free silicon photonic-crystal membrane above a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrate with a gap that is tunable to below 200 nm. Our devices are able to generate strong attractive and repulsive optical forces over a large surface area with simple in- and outcoupling and feature the strongest repulsive optomechanical coupling in any geometry to date (gOM/2{\\pi} ~ -65 GHz/nm). The interplay between the optomechanical and photo-thermal-mechanical dynamics is explored, and the latter is used to achieve cooling and amplification of the mechanical mode, demonstrating that our platform is well-suited for applications in low-power mass, force, and refractive index sensing as well as and optomechanical accelerometry.

  8. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Yue [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  9. A GaN photonic crystal membrane laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Hung; Wang, Jyh-Yang; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Shen, Kun-Ching; Yeh, Dong-Ming; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, C C

    2011-01-14

    The implementation of a series of optically pumped GaN photonic crystal (PhC) membrane lasers is demonstrated at room temperature. The photonic crystal is composed of a scalene-triangular arrangement of circular holes in GaN. Three defect structures are fabricated for comparing their lasing characteristics with those of perfect PhC. It is observed that all the lasing defect modes have lasing wavelengths very close to the band-edge modes in the perfect PhC structure. Although those lasing modes, including band-edge and defect modes, have different optical pump thresholds, different lasing spectral widths, different quality factors (Q factors), and different polarization ratios, all their polarization distributions show maxima in the directions around one of the hole arrangement axes. The similar lasing characteristics between the band-edge and defect modes are attributed to the existence of extremely narrow partial band gaps for forming the defect modes. Also, the oriented polarization properties are due to the scalene-triangle PhC structure. In one of the defect lasing modes, the lasing threshold is as low as 0.82 mJ cm(-2), the cavity Q factor is as large as 1743, and the polarization ratio is as large as 25.4. Such output parameters represent generally superior lasing behaviors when compared with previously reported implementations of similar laser structures.

  10. Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfaure, C.; Pomorski, M.; de Sanoit, J.; Bergonzo, P.; Saada, S.

    2016-06-01

    A single crystal diamond large area thin membrane was assembled as a p-doped/Intrinsic/Metal (PIM) structure and used in a betavoltaic configuration. When tested with a 20 keV electron beam from a high resolution scanning electron microscope, we measured an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.85 V, a charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 98%, a fill-factor of 80%, and a total conversion efficiency of 9.4%. These parameters are inherently linked to the diamond membrane PIM structure that allows full device depletion even at 0 V and are among the highest reported up to now for any other material tested for betavoltaic devices. It enables to drive a high short-circuit current Isc up to 7.12 μA, to reach a maximum power Pmax of 10.48 μW, a remarkable value demonstrating the high-benefit of diamond for the realization of long-life radioisotope based micro-batteries.

  11. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Membrane Proteins: Specimen Preparation for Two-Dimensional Crystals and Single Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg; Rubinstein, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein structure and function can be studied by two powerful and highly complementary electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) methods: electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and single particle analysis of detergent-solubilized protein complexes. To obtain the highest-possible resolution data from membrane proteins, whether prepared as 2D crystals or single particles, cryo-EM samples must be vitrified with great care. Grid preparation for cryo-EM of 2D crystals is possi...

  12. Plasmonic Light Trapping in Ultrathin Single Crystal Silicon Membrane for Solar Cells Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-14

    for solar cell applications. Sub-ten micrometer free standing silicon membranes were produced by the chemical etching of silicon wafers. The produced...membranes were observed to be mechanically flexible, yet sufficiently sturdy to tolerate the different processing steps during solar cell fabrication...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Plasmonic Light Trapping in Ultrathin Single Crystal Silicon Membrane for Solar Cells

  13. The nanoscience behind the art of in-meso crystallization of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabara, Alexandru; Meikle, Thomas G; Newman, Janet; Peat, Thomas S; Conn, Charlotte E; Drummond, Calum J

    2017-01-05

    The structural changes occurring at the nanoscale level within the lipid bilayer and driving the in-meso formation of large well-diffracting membrane protein crystals have been uniquely characterized for a model membrane protein, intimin. Importantly, the order to order transitions taking place within the bilayer and the lipidic nanostructures required for crystal growth have been shown to be general, occurring for both the cubic and the sponge mesophase crystallization pathways. For the first time, a transient fluid lamellar phase has been observed and unambiguously assigned for both crystallization pathways, present at the earliest stages of protein crystallogenesis but no longer observed once the crystals surpass the size of the average lyotropic liquid crystalline domain. The reported time-resolved structural investigation provides a significantly improved and general understanding of the nanostructural changes taking place within the mesophase during in-meso crystallization which is a fundamental advance in the enabling area of membrane protein structural biology.

  14. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  15. A novel microseeding method for the crystallization of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Stefan Andrew; Bräuning, Bastian; Stewart, Patrick Douglas Shaw

    2016-04-01

    Random microseed matrix screening (rMMS), in which seed crystals are added to random crystallization screens, is an important breakthrough in soluble protein crystallization that increases the number of crystallization hits that are available for optimization. This greatly increases the number of soluble protein structures generated every year by typical structural biology laboratories. Inspired by this success, rMMS has been adapted to the crystallization of membrane proteins, making LCP seed stock by scaling up LCP crystallization conditions without changing the physical and chemical parameters that are critical for crystallization. Seed crystals are grown directly in LCP and, as with conventional rMMS, a seeding experiment is combined with an additive experiment. The new method was used with the bacterial integral membrane protein OmpF, and it was found that it increased the number of crystallization hits by almost an order of magnitude: without microseeding one new hit was found, whereas with LCP-rMMS eight new hits were found. It is anticipated that this new method will lead to better diffracting crystals of membrane proteins. A method of generating seed gradients, which allows the LCP seed stock to be diluted and the number of crystals in each LCP bolus to be reduced, if required for optimization, is also demonstrated.

  16. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystall

  17. MICROFILTRATION AND ULTRAFILTRATION OF Bacillus thuringiensis FERMENTATION BROTH: MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE AND SPORE-CRYSTAL RECOVERY APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Marzban

    Full Text Available Abstract Recovery of spores and crystals from the fermentation broth of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt was studied using the membrane separation technology. Four types of polymeric membranes, with different characteristics, in the range of microfiltration (MF and ultrafiltration (UF were used for evaluating their permeate flux and spore-crystal recovery capacity. Results indicated that both MF and UF membranes are effective for spore-crystal recovery. The hydrophobic MF membrane made of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF achieved a better performance compared to the one made with hydrophilic cellulose acetate (CA. Both had a 0.22 µm pore size, under the condition of an upper range of feed pressure. Also, with the increase of the feed flow rate, a higher flux was achieved for the PVDF membrane. A UF membrane made of polyethersulfone (PES polymer was also used effectively for spore/crystal recovery from the broth, but under a higher operating pressure. In the entire experiment, a 99.9% rejection factor was measured with the applied membranes for the spore/crystal in the fermentation broth.

  18. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  19. Membrane proteins: functional and structural studies using reconstituted proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigaud J.-L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers is a powerful tool to analyze functional as well as structural areas of membrane protein research. First, the proper incorporation of a purified membrane protein into closed lipid vesicles, to produce proteoliposomes, allows the investigation of transport and/or catalytic properties of any membrane protein without interference by other membrane components. Second, the incorporation of a large amount of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers to grow crystals confined to two dimensions has recently opened a new way to solve their structure at high resolution using electron crystallography. However, reconstitution of membrane proteins into functional proteoliposomes or 2-D crystallization has been an empirical domain, which has been viewed for a long time more like "black magic" than science. Nevertheless, in the last ten years, important progress has been made in acquiring knowledge of lipid-protein-detergent interactions and has permitted to build upon a set of basic principles that has limited the empirical approach of reconstitution experiments. Reconstitution strategies have been improved and new strategies have been developed, facilitating the success rate of proteoliposome formation and 2-D crystallization. This review deals with the various strategies available to obtain proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals from detergent-solubilized proteins. It gives an overview of the methods that have been applied, which may be of help for reconstituting more proteins into lipid bilayers in a form suitable for functional studies at the molecular level and for high-resolution structural analysis.

  20. Self-interaction chromatography as a tool for optimizing conditions for membrane protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Nagy, Lisa A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Cogdell, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The second virial coefficient, or B value, is a measurement of how well a protein interacts with itself in solution. These interactions can lead to protein crystallization or precipitation, depending on their strength, with a narrow range of B values (the 'crystallization slot') being known to promote crystallization. A convenient method of determining the B value is by self-interaction chromatography. This paper describes how the light-harvesting complex 1-reaction centre core complex from Allochromatium vinosum yielded single straight-edged crystals after iterative cycles of self-interaction chromatography and crystallization. This process allowed the rapid screening of small molecules and detergents as crystallization additives. Here, a description is given of how self-interaction chromatography has been utilized to improve the crystallization conditions of a membrane protein.

  1. Overview of electron crystallography of membrane proteins: crystallization and screening strategies using negative stain electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannenga, Brent L; Iadanza, Matthew G; Vollmar, Breanna S; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy, or cryoEM, is an emerging technique for studying the three-dimensional structures of proteins and large macromolecular machines. Electron crystallography is a branch of cryoEM in which structures of proteins can be studied at resolutions that rival those achieved by X-ray crystallography. Electron crystallography employs two-dimensional crystals of a membrane protein embedded within a lipid bilayer. The key to a successful electron crystallographic experiment is the crystallization, or reconstitution, of the protein of interest. This unit describes ways in which protein can be expressed, purified, and reconstituted into well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A protocol is also provided for negative stain electron microscopy as a tool for screening crystallization trials. When large and well-ordered crystals are obtained, the structures of both protein and its surrounding membrane can be determined to atomic resolution.

  2. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V. A., E-mail: vishal.shah@warwick.ac.uk; Gammon, P. M. [Department of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chávez-Ángel, E. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Department of Physics, UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); and others

    2014-04-14

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm{sup 2}. We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials.

  3. Preparation and Gas Permeability of ZIF-7 Membranes Prepared via Two-step Crystallization Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Li, Qiming; Bao, Xinxia; Gui, Jianzhou; Yu, Xiaofei [Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun (China)

    2014-06-15

    Continuous and dense ZIF-7 membranes were successfully synthesized on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} porous substrate via two-step crystallization technique. ZIF-7 seeding layer was first deposited on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate by in-situ low temperature crystallization, and then ZIF-7 membrane layer can be grown through the secondary high-temperature crystallization. Two synthesis solutions with different concentration were used to prepare ZIF-7 seeding layer and membrane layer on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, respectively. As a result, a continuous and defect-free ZIF-7 membrane layer can be prepared on porous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, as confirmed by scanning electron microscope. XRD characterization shows that the resulting membrane layer is composed of pure ZIF-7 phase without any impurity. A single gas permeation test of H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} or CO{sub 2} was conducted based on our prepared ZIF-7 membrane. The ZIF-7 membrane exhibited excellent H{sub 2} molecular sieving properties due to its suitable pore aperture and defect-free membrane layer.

  4. Enhanced performance of a biomimetic membrane for Na2CO3 crystallization in the scenario of CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Wenyuan; Lin, Jiuyang; Tækker Madsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Membrane assisted crystallization (MACr) offers an innovative platform for crystallizing Na2CO3, allowing its reuse after CO2 capture from flue gases by an alkaline solution (i.e., NaOH). In this study, the biomimetic aquaporin Inside™ membrane AIM60 was employed to enhance water removal, facilit......Membrane assisted crystallization (MACr) offers an innovative platform for crystallizing Na2CO3, allowing its reuse after CO2 capture from flue gases by an alkaline solution (i.e., NaOH). In this study, the biomimetic aquaporin Inside™ membrane AIM60 was employed to enhance water removal......, a proper control of the supersaturation level induces crystallization of Na2CO3·10H2O crystals with a purity of 99.94%. Hence, the aquaporin Inside™ FO membrane may be a promising alternative to existing methods for Na2CO3 crystallization for its application in a CO2 capture scenario....

  5. Dust exposure, eye redness, eye cytology and mucous membrane irritation in a tobacco industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Pedersen, O.F.

    1989-01-01

    In a study of 75 workers employed in a tobacco factory producing cheroots we measured cellular contents of tear fluid, redness of eyes, discomfort, total (0–5.7 mg/m3) and respirable dust in the breathing zone and total ambient dust by stationary sampling (0.08–1.0 mg/m3). A matched group of 50 o...

  6. Crystallizing membrane proteins for structure-function studies using lipidic mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The lipidic cubic phase method for crystallizing membrane proteins has posted some high-profile successes recently. This is especially true in the area of G-protein-coupled receptors, with six new crystallographic structures emerging in the last 3½ years. Slowly, it is becoming an accepted method with a proven record and convincing generality. However, it is not a method that is used in every membrane structural biology laboratory and that is unfortunate. The reluctance in adopting it is attributable, in part, to the anticipated difficulties associated with handling the sticky viscous cubic mesophase in which crystals grow. Harvesting and collecting diffraction data with the mesophase-grown crystals is also viewed with some trepidation. It is acknowledged that there are challenges associated with the method. However, over the years, we have worked to make the method user-friendly. To this end, tools for handling the mesophase in the pico- to nano-litre volume range have been developed for efficient crystallization screening in manual and robotic modes. Glass crystallization plates have been built that provide unparalleled optical quality and sensitivity to nascent crystals. Lipid and precipitant screens have been implemented for a more rational approach to crystallogenesis, such that the method can now be applied to a wide variety of membrane protein types and sizes. In the present article, these assorted advances are outlined, along with a summary of the membrane proteins that have yielded to the method. The challenges that must be overcome to develop the method further are described.

  7. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  8. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Morth, Jens Preben

    2007-01-01

    define the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle......A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H+-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi 1, 2......, 3 , and Na+,K+-ATPase (the sodium–potassium pump) in animals 4 . The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis 5 . The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na...

  9. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Morth, Jens Preben;

    2007-01-01

    A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H+-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi 1, 2......, 3 , and Na+,K+-ATPase (the sodium–potassium pump) in animals 4 . The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis 5 . The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na...... define the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle...

  10. Large-scale identification of membrane proteins with properties favorable for crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jared; Kagawa, Allison; Kurasaki, Kellie; Ataie, Niloufar; Cho, Il Kyu; Li, Qing X; Ng, Ho Leung

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein crystallography is notoriously difficult due to challenges in protein expression and issues of degradation and structural stability. We have developed a novel method for large-scale screening of native sources for integral membrane proteins that have intrinsic biochemical properties favorable for crystallization. Highly expressed membrane proteins that are thermally stable and nonaggregating in detergent solutions were identified by mass spectrometry from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Sus scrofa cerebrum. Many of the membrane proteins identified had been crystallized previously, supporting the promise of the approach. Most identified proteins have known functions and include high-value targets such as transporters and ATPases. To validate the method, we recombinantly expressed and purified the yeast protein, Yop1, which is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum curvature. We demonstrate that Yop1 can be purified with the detergent dodecylmaltoside without aggregating.

  11. Flexible photodetectors on plastic substrates by use of printing transferred single-crystal germanium membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Shin, Jonghyun; Qin, Guoxuan; Sun, Lei; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Lagally, Max G.; Celler, George K.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2009-01-01

    This letter presents studies of multiwavelength flexible photodetectors on a plastic substrate by use of printing transferred single-crystal germanium (Ge) membranes. Ge membranes of 250nm thickness with selectively ion-implantation doped regions were released from a germanium-on-insulator substrate and integrated with a 175-μm-thick polyethylene terephthalate substrate via a dry printing technique. Photodiodes configured in lateral p-i-n configuration using the flexible Ge membranes with an intrinsic region width of 10μm exhibit an external quantum efficiency that varies from 5% at 411nm to 42% at 633nm under -1V bias condition. These results demonstrate the potential of utilizing single-crystal Ge-membrane photodiodes for imaging applications and as solar cells on objects with arbitrary curvatures and shapes.

  12. Geometric methods in the elastic theory of membranes in liquid crystal phases

    CERN Document Server

    Ji Xing Liu; Yu Zhang Xie

    1999-01-01

    This book contains a comprehensive description of the mechanical equilibrium and deformation of membranes as a surface problem in differential geometry. Following the pioneering work by W Helfrich, the fluid membrane is seen as a nematic or smectic - A liquid crystal film and its elastic energy form is deduced exactly from the curvature elastic theory of the liquid crystals. With surface variation the minimization of the energy at fixed osmotical pressure and surface tension gives a completely new surface equation in geometry that involves potential interest in mathematics. The investigations

  13. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  14. Dust exposure, eye redness, eye cytology and mucous membrane irritation in a tobacco industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Pedersen, O.F.

    1989-01-01

    In a study of 75 workers employed in a tobacco factory producing cheroots we measured cellular contents of tear fluid, redness of eyes, discomfort, total (0–5.7 mg/m3) and respirable dust in the breathing zone and total ambient dust by stationary sampling (0.08–1.0 mg/m3). A matched group of 50...... office workers in a telephone company (total ambient dust concentration between 0.08–0.13 mg/m3) was similarly examined as referents. We found a difference between the two companies with regard to cell counts, with tobacco workers having the largest numbers except for lymphocytes. Among tobacco workers...... we furthermore found that the number of cuboidal and columnar epithelial cells increased during the day. The increase of cuboidal cells, however, occurred mainly in a small group of tobacco workers exposed to the highest concentrations of tobacco dust (mean =1.26 mg/m3). No difference...

  15. A high-throughput strategy to screen 2D crystallization trials of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Martin; Derr, Kd; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2007-12-01

    Electron microscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has demonstrated potential for structure determination of membrane proteins. Technical limitations in large-scale crystallization screens have, however, prevented a major breakthrough in the routine application of this technology. Dialysis is generally used for detergent removal and reconstitution of the protein into a lipid bilayer, and devices for testing numerous conditions in parallel are not readily available. Furthermore, the small size of resulting 2D crystals requires electron microscopy to evaluate the results and automation of the necessary steps is essential to achieve a reasonable throughput. We have designed a crystallization block, using standard microplate dimensions, by which 96 unique samples can be dialyzed simultaneously against 96 different buffers and have demonstrated that the rate of detergent dialysis is comparable to those obtained with conventional dialysis devices. A liquid-handling robot was employed to set up 2D crystallization trials with the membrane proteins CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and light-harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. For CopA, 1 week of dialysis yielded tubular crystals and, for LH2, large and well-ordered vesicular 2D crystals were obtained after 24 h, illustrating the feasibility of this approach. Combined with a high-throughput procedure for preparation of EM-grids and automation of the subsequent negative staining step, the crystallization block offers a novel pipeline that promises to speed up large-scale screening of 2D crystallization and to increase the likelihood of producing well-ordered crystals for analysis by electron crystallography.

  16. Comparison of Five Computational Methods for Computing Q Factors in Photonic Crystal Membrane Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2017-01-01

    Five state-of-the-art computational methods are benchmarked by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities. The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number of modes is investigated. Specia...

  17. Two-dimensional crystallization of integral membrane proteins for electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, David L; Rice, William J; Hu, Minghui; Kim, Changki; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-01-01

    Although membrane proteins make up 30% of the proteome and are a common target for therapeutic drugs, determination of their atomic structure remains a technical challenge. Electron crystallography represents an alternative to the conventional methods of X-ray diffraction and NMR and relies on the formation of two-dimensional crystals. These crystals are produced by reconstituting purified, detergent-solubilized membrane proteins back into the native environment of a lipid bilayer. This chapter reviews methods for producing two-dimensional crystals and for screening them by negative stain electron microscopy. In addition, we show examples of the different morphologies that are commonly obtained and describe basic image analysis procedures that can be used to evaluate their promise for structure determination by cryoelectron microscopy.

  18. Continuous preparation of polymer coated drug crystals by solid hollow fiber membrane-based cooling crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyue; Singh, Dhananjay; Sirkar, Kamalesh K; Pfeffer, Robert

    2016-02-29

    A facile way to continuously coat drug crystals with a polymer is needed in controlled drug release. Conventional polymer coating methods have disadvantages: high energy consumption, low productivity, batch processing. A novel method for continuous polymer coating of drug crystals based on solid hollow fiber cooling crystallization (SHFCC) is introduced here. The drug acting as the host particle and the polymer for coating are Griseofulvin (GF) and Eudragit RL100, respectively. The polymer's cloud point temperature in its acetone solution was determined by UV spectrophotometry. An acetone solution of the polymer containing the drug in solution as well as undissolved drug crystals in suspension were pumped through the tube side of the SHFCC device; a cold liquid was circulated in the shell side to rapidly cool down the feed solution-suspension in the hollow-fiber lumen. The polymer precipitated from the solution and coated the suspended crystals due to rapid temperature reduction and heterogeneous nucleation; crystals formed from the solution were also coated by the polymer. Characterizations by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and dissolution tests show that a uniformly coated, free-flowing drug/product can be obtained under appropriate operating conditions without losing the drug's pharmaceutical properties and controlled release characteristics.

  19. Synthesis of single-crystal-like nanoporous carbon membranes and their application in overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-01-04

    Nanoporous graphitic carbon membranes with defined chemical composition and pore architecture are novel nanomaterials that are actively pursued. Compared with easy-to-make porous carbon powders that dominate the porous carbon research and applications in energy generation/conversion and environmental remediation, porous carbon membranes are synthetically more challenging though rather appealing from an application perspective due to their structural integrity, interconnectivity and purity. Here we report a simple bottom–up approach to fabricate large-size, freestanding and porous carbon membranes that feature an unusual single-crystal-like graphitic order and hierarchical pore architecture plus favourable nitrogen doping. When loaded with cobalt nanoparticles, such carbon membranes serve as high-performance carbon-based non-noble metal electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  20. A highly sensitive humidity sensor based on a nanofibrous membrane coated quartz crystal microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xianfeng; Ding Bin [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Yu Jianyong [Nanomaterials Research Center, Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pan Fukui, E-mail: binding@dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Fashion, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2010-02-05

    A novel humidity sensor was fabricated by electrospinning deposition of nanofibrous polyelectrolyte membranes as sensitive coatings on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The results of sensing experiments indicated that the response of the sensors increased by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) from 6 to 95% at room temperature, exhibiting high sensitivity, and that, in the range of 20-95% RH, the Log({Delta}f) showed good linearity. The sensitivity of fibrous composite polyacrylic acid (PAA)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes was two times higher than that of the corresponding flat films at 95% RH. Compared with fibrous PAA/PVA membranes, the nanofibrous PAA membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced humidity sensitivity due to their high PAA content and large specific surface area caused by the formation of ultrathin nanowebs among electrospun fibers. Additionally, the resultant sensors exhibited a good reversible behavior and good long term stability.

  1. A highly sensitive humidity sensor based on a nanofibrous membrane coated quartz crystal microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Wang, Moran; Pan, Fukui

    2010-02-01

    A novel humidity sensor was fabricated by electrospinning deposition of nanofibrous polyelectrolyte membranes as sensitive coatings on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The results of sensing experiments indicated that the response of the sensors increased by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) from 6 to 95% at room temperature, exhibiting high sensitivity, and that, in the range of 20-95% RH, the Log(Δf) showed good linearity. The sensitivity of fibrous composite polyacrylic acid (PAA)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes was two times higher than that of the corresponding flat films at 95% RH. Compared with fibrous PAA/PVA membranes, the nanofibrous PAA membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced humidity sensitivity due to their high PAA content and large specific surface area caused by the formation of ultrathin nanowebs among electrospun fibers. Additionally, the resultant sensors exhibited a good reversible behavior and good long term stability.

  2. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    , platinum(II) and trimethyllead compounds as being particularly useful. On the other hand, lanthanide and uranyl compounds are poorly represented, which may be a consequence of these compounds having aggressive effects in crystal-soaking procedures. Furthermore, the database highlights the variety...

  3. Conformational Exchange in a Membrane Transport Protein Is Altered in Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Freed; P Horanyi; M Wiener; D Cafiso

    2011-12-31

    Successful macromolecular crystallography requires solution conditions that may alter the conformational sampling of a macromolecule. Here, site-directed spin labeling is used to examine a conformational equilibrium within BtuB, the Escherichia coli outer membrane transporter for vitamin B{sub 12}. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from a spin label placed within the N-terminal energy coupling motif (Ton box) of BtuB indicate that this segment is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded forms. In bilayers, substrate binding shifts this equilibrium toward the unfolded form; however, EPR spectra from this same spin-labeled mutant indicate that this unfolding transition is blocked in protein crystals. Moreover, crystal structures of this spin-labeled mutant are consistent with the EPR result. When the free energy difference between substates is estimated from the EPR spectra, the crystal environment is found to alter this energy by 3 kcal/mol when compared to the bilayer state. Approximately half of this energy change is due to solutes or osmolytes in the crystallization buffer, and the remainder is contributed by the crystal lattice. These data provide a quantitative measure of how a conformational equilibrium in BtuB is modified in the crystal environment, and suggest that more-compact, less-hydrated substates will be favored in protein crystals.

  4. Bio-inspired synthesis of ZnO polyhedral single crystals under eggshell membrane direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Huilan; Song, Fang; Dong, Qun; Li, Tuoqi; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Di [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai (China)

    2011-07-15

    A simple and versatile technique was developed to prepare hierarchical ZnO single crystals by introducing eggshell membrane (ESM) to a bio-inspired approach. Based on the control of nucleation and gestation, ZnO nanocrystallites could grow at three dimensions into polyhedral single crystals through a surface sol-gel process followed by a calcination treatment. Different from traditional wet chemical techniques, our synthetic process depends more on the restrictive or directing functions of the ESM biomacromolecules. The hierarchical ZnO nanostructures doped with polyhedral single crystallites could be desirable for catalysts, photoelectrochemical devices, especially solar cells. (orig.)

  5. Crystal structure of HIV-1 gp41 including both fusion peptide and membrane proximal external regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Buzon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env composed of the receptor binding domain gp120 and the fusion protein subunit gp41 catalyzes virus entry and is a major target for therapeutic intervention and for neutralizing antibodies. Env interactions with cellular receptors trigger refolding of gp41, which induces close apposition of viral and cellular membranes leading to membrane fusion. The energy released during refolding is used to overcome the kinetic barrier and drives the fusion reaction. Here, we report the crystal structure at 2 A resolution of the complete extracellular domain of gp41 lacking the fusion peptide and the cystein-linked loop. Both the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR and the membrane proximal external region (MPER form helical extensions from the gp41 six-helical bundle core structure. The lack of regular coiled-coil interactions within FPPR and MPER splay this end of the structure apart while positioning the fusion peptide towards the outside of the six-helical bundle and exposing conserved hydrophobic MPER residues. Unexpectedly, the section of the MPER, which is juxtaposed to the transmembrane region (TMR, bends in a 90 degrees-angle sideward positioning three aromatic side chains per monomer for membrane insertion. We calculate that this structural motif might facilitate the generation of membrane curvature on the viral membrane. The presence of FPPR and MPER increases the melting temperature of gp41 significantly in comparison to the core structure of gp41. Thus, our data indicate that the ordered assembly of FPPR and MPER beyond the core contributes energy to the membrane fusion reaction. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence that part of MPER will be membrane inserted within trimeric gp41. We propose that this framework has important implications for membrane bending on the viral membrane, which is required for fusion and could provide a platform for epitope and lipid bilayer recognition for broadly

  6. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  7. Calculating the permeability coefficients of mixed matrix membranes of polydimethylsiloxane and silicalite crystals to various ethanol-water solutions using molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability coefficients of mixed matrix membranes of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and silicalite crystal are taken as the sum of the permeability coefficients of membrane components each weighted by their associated mass fraction. The permeability coefficient of a membrane c...

  8. Superior thermal conductivity of transparent polymer nanocomposites with a crystallized alumina membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Poostforush

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The properties of novel thermoconductive and optically transparent nanocomposites have been reported. The composites were prepared by the impregnation of thermoset resin into crystallized anodic aluminum oxide (AAO. Crystallized AAO synthesized by annealing amorphous AAO membrane at 1200°C. Although through-plane thermal conductivity of nanocomposites improved up to 1.13 W•m–1•K–1 (39 vol% alumina but their transparency was preserved (Tλ550 nm ~ 72%. Integrated annealed alumina phase, low refractive index mismatch between resin and alumina and formation of nano-optical fibers through the membrane resulted in such marvel combination. This report shows a great potential of these types of nanocomposites in ‘heat management’ of lightening devices.

  9. Decay dynamics of quantum dots influenced by the local density of optical states of two-dimensional photonic crystal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Johansen, Jeppe; Stobbe, Søren

    2008-01-01

    We have performed time-resolved spectroscopy on InAs quantum dot ensembles in photonic crystal membranes. The influence of the photonic crystal is investigated by varying the lattice constant systematically. We observe a strong slow down of the quantum dots’ spontaneous emission rates as the two-...... the bandgap in good agreement with local density of states calculations.......We have performed time-resolved spectroscopy on InAs quantum dot ensembles in photonic crystal membranes. The influence of the photonic crystal is investigated by varying the lattice constant systematically. We observe a strong slow down of the quantum dots’ spontaneous emission rates as the two...

  10. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-04-06

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  11. High-throughput crystallization of membrane proteins using the lipidic bicelle method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujwal, Rachna; Abramson, Jeff

    2012-01-09

    Membrane proteins (MPs) play a critical role in many physiological processes such as pumping specific molecules across the otherwise impermeable membrane bilayer that surrounds all cells and organelles. Alterations in the function of MPs result in many human diseases and disorders; thus, an intricate understanding of their structures remains a critical objective for biological research. However, structure determination of MPs remains a significant challenge often stemming from their hydrophobicity. MPs have substantial hydrophobic regions embedded within the bilayer. Detergents are frequently used to solubilize these proteins from the bilayer generating a protein-detergent micelle that can then be manipulated in a similar manner as soluble proteins. Traditionally, crystallization trials proceed using a protein-detergent mixture, but they often resist crystallization or produce crystals of poor quality. These problems arise due to the detergent's inability to adequately mimic the bilayer resulting in poor stability and heterogeneity. In addition, the detergent shields the hydrophobic surface of the MP reducing the surface area available for crystal contacts. To circumvent these drawbacks MPs can be crystallized in lipidic media, which more closely simulates their endogenous environment, and has recently become a de novo technique for MP crystallization. Lipidic cubic phase (LCP) is a three-dimensional lipid bilayer penetrated by an interconnected system of aqueous channels. Although monoolein is the lipid of choice, related lipids such as monopalmitolein and monovaccenin have also been used to make LCP. MPs are incorporated into the LCP where they diffuse in three dimensions and feed crystal nuclei. A great advantage of the LCP is that the protein remains in a more native environment, but the method has a number of technical disadvantages including high viscosity (requiring specialized apparatuses) and difficulties in crystal visualization and manipulation. Because

  12. The origin of crystalline residues in Stardust Al foils: Surviving cometary dust or crystallized impact melts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, Penelope J.; Kearsley, Anton T.; Ishii, Hope A.; Burchell, Mark J.; Bradley, John P.; Teslich, Nick; Cole, Mike J.; Price, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Samples returned by the Stardust mission from comet 81P/Wild 2 provide an unequaled opportunity to investigate cometary formation and evolution. Crystalline silicates have been identified in impact craters in Stardust Al foil, yet their origin is ambiguous. They may be original cometary components, or they may have grown from melt generated by impact. We have now studied experimental impacts of the calcium silicate mineral wollastonite, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy to document the relationship between impact feature shape and crystal lattice orientation in impact residue. Wollastonite can have a characteristic acicular habit, forming crater shapes that indicate crystal orientation upon impact. From extracted impact residue, we determined the lattice orientation of crystalline material for comparison with the whole particle orientation. We assume that crystallization from melt, without surviving seed nuclei, should result in randomly oriented crystallite growth, with no preferred direction for individual crystals. However, we find that the majority of crystalline material in the residue retains b-axis orientation parallel to the long axis of the crater form. This, together with impact parameter calculations and lack of Al incorporation by the residue (suggesting melting did not occur), indicates that these crystals and, by analogy, the majority of Al-free crystalline silicates in Stardust foil, are surviving remnants of the impactor. Furthermore, amorphous wollastonite residue probably did not form via melting and subsequent quenching, but instead by high-pressure amorphization or degradation of unquenchable phases. Finally, one crystal studied appears to be a new high-pressure/temperature polymorph of CaSiO3, indicating that such polymorphs may be observed in Stardust residues in craters.

  13. Estimation of diffusion anisotropy in microporous crystalline materials and optimization of crystal orientation in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounaris, Chrysanthos E; First, Eric L; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2013-09-28

    The complex nature of the porous networks in microporous materials is primarily responsible for a high degree of intracrystalline diffusion anisotropy. Although this is a well-understood phenomenon, little attention has been paid in the literature with regards to classifying such anisotropy and elucidating its effect on the performance of membrane-based separation systems. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology to estimate full diffusion tensors based on the detailed description of the porous network geometry through our recent advances for the characterization of such networks. The proposed approach explicitly accounts for the tortuosity and complex connectivity of the porous framework, as well as for the variety of diffusion regimes that may be experienced by a guest molecule while it travels through the different localities of the crystal. Results on the diffusion of light gases in silicalite demonstrate good agreement with results from experiments and other computational techniques that have been reported in the literature. A comprehensive computational study involving 183 zeolite frameworks classifies these structures in terms of a number of anisotropy metrics. Finally, we utilize the computed diffusion tensors in a membrane optimization model that determines optimal crystal orientations. Application of the model in the context of separating carbon dioxide from nitrogen demonstrates that optimizing crystal orientation can offer significant benefit to membrane-based separation processes.

  14. Characterization of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane with Variation of Crystallizing Temperature for pH Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jin-Ho; Lee, Sung-Gap; Jo, Ye-Won; Jung, Hye-Rin

    2015-11-01

    We fabricated electrolyte-dielectric-metal (EDM) device incorporating a high-k Al2O3 sensing membrane from a porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) using a two step anodizing process for pH sensors. In order to change the properties of the AAO template, the crystallizing temperature was varied from 400 degrees C to 700 degrees C over 2 hours. The structural properties were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The pH sensitivity increased with an increase in the crystallizing temperature from 400 degrees C to 600 degrees C. However at 700 degrees C, deformation occurred. The porous AAO sensor with a crystallizing temperature of 600 degrees C displayed the good sensitivity and long-term stability and the values were 55.7 mV/pH and 0.16 mV/h, respectively.

  15. The 2DX robot: a membrane protein 2D crystallization Swiss Army knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovache, Ioan; Biasini, Marco; Kowal, Julia; Kukulski, Wanda; Chami, Mohamed; van der Goot, F Gisou; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2010-03-01

    Among the state-of-the-art techniques that provide experimental information at atomic scale for membrane proteins, electron crystallography, atomic force microscopy and solid state NMR make use of two-dimensional crystals. We present a cyclodextrin-driven method for detergent removal implemented in a fully automated robot. The kinetics of the reconstitution processes is precisely controlled, because the detergent complexation by cyclodextrin is of stoichiometric nature. The method requires smaller volumes and lower protein concentrations than established 2D crystallization methods, making it possible to explore more conditions with the same amount of protein. The method yielded highly ordered 2D crystals diffracting to high resolution from the pore-forming toxin Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin (2.9A), the plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 (3.1A) and the human aquaporin-8 (hAQP8; 3.3A). This new method outperforms traditional 2D crystallization approaches in terms of accuracy, flexibility, throughput, and allows the usage of detergents having low critical micelle concentration (CMC), which stabilize the structure of membrane proteins in solution.

  16. Modal approach for tailoring the absorption in a photonic crystal membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Peretti, Romain; Seassal, Christian; Letartre, Xavier; Drouard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for tailoring the absorption in a photonic crystal membrane. For that purpose, we first applied Time Domain Coupled Mode Theory to such a subwavelength membrane and demonstrated that 100% resonant absorption can be reached even for a symmetric membrane, if degenerate modes are involved. Design rules were then derived from this model in order to tune the absorption. Subsequently, Finite Difference Time Domain simulations were used as a proof of concept and carried out on a low absorbing material (extinction coefficient=10-2) with a high refractive index corresponding to the optical indices of amorphous silicon at around 720 nm. In doing so, 85% resonant absorption was obtained, which is significantly higher than the commonly reported 50% maximum value. Those results were finally analyzed and confronted to theory so as to extend our method to other materials, configurations and applications.

  17. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  18. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Oxford e-Research Centre, 7 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Horrell, Sam [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from Allochromatium vinosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellers, Petra; Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang, E-mail: lubitz@mpi-muelheim.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Stiftstrasse 34-36, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the first successful crystallization of a membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase isolated from a photosynthetic organism (A. vinosum). The crystals obtained produced diffraction patterns up to 2.5 Å resolution. The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase is a unique metalloprotein that is able to catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen to protons and electrons during a complex reaction cycle. The [NiFe] hydrogenase was isolated from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum and its crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis are reported. It was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium citrate and imidazole as crystallization agents. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 205.00, b = 217.42, c = 120.44 Å. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å resolution.

  20. Membrane-Based Technologies in the Pharmaceutical Industry and Continuous Production of Polymer-Coated Crystals/Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyue; Sirkar, Kamalesh K; Jin, Chi; Singh, Dhananjay; Pfeffer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Membrane technologies are of increasing importance in a variety of separation and purification applications involving liquid phases and gaseous mixtures. Although the most widely used applications at this time are in water treatment including desalination, there are many applications in chemical, food, healthcare, paper and petrochemical industries. This brief review is concerned with existing and emerging applications of various membrane technologies in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industry. The goal of this review article is to identify important membrane processes and techniques which are being used or proposed to be used in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical operations. How novel membrane processes can be useful for delivery of crystalline/particulate drugs is also of interest. Membrane separation technologies are extensively used in downstream processes for bio-pharmaceutical separation and purification operations via microfiltration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration. Also the new technique of membrane chromatography allows efficient purification of monoclonal antibodies. Membrane filtration techniques of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration are being combined with bioreactors and advanced oxidation processes to treat wastewaters from pharmaceutical plants. Nanofiltration with organic solvent-stable membranes can implement solvent exchange and catalyst recovery during organic solvent-based drug synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds/intermediates. Membranes in the form of hollow fibers can be conveniently used to implement crystallization of pharmaceutical compounds. The novel crystallization methods of solid hollow fiber cooling crystallizer (SHFCC) and porous hollow fiber anti-solvent crystallization (PHFAC) are being developed to provide efficient methods for continuous production of polymer-coated drug crystals in the area of drug delivery. This brief review provides a general introduction to various applications of membrane technologies in

  1. Crystal structure and biochemical analyses reveal Beclin 1 as a novel membrane binding protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijiao Huang; Feng-Liang Wang; Haiteng Deng; Lei Liu; Ning Gao; Li Yu; Yigong Shi; Wooyoung Choi; Wanqiu Hu; Na Mi; Qiang Guo; Meisheng Ma; Mei Liu; Yuan Tian; Peilong Lu

    2012-01-01

    The Beclin 1 gene is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor and plays an essential role in autophagy.However,the molecular mechanism by which Beclin 1 functions remains largely unknown.Here we report the crystal structure of the evolutionarily conserved domain(ECD)of Beclin 1 at 1.6(A)resolution.Beclin 1 ECD exhibits a previously unreported fold,with three structural repeats arranged symmetrically around a central axis.Beclin 1 ECD defines a novel class of membrane-binding domain,with a strong preference for lipid membrane enriched with cardiolipin.The tip of a surface loop in Beclin 1 ECD,comprising three aromatic amino acids,acts as a hydrophobic finger to associate with lipid membrane,consequently resulting in the deformation of membrane and liposomes.Mutation of these aromatic residues rendered Beclin 1 unable to stably associate with lipid membrane in vitro and unable to fully rescue autophagy in Beclin 1-knockdown cells in vivo.These observations form an important framework for deciphering the biological functions of Beclin 1.

  2. Integrated membrane distillation-crystallization: process design and cost estimations for seawater treatment and fluxes of single salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusen, R.J.M.; Medevoort, J. van; Roelands, C.P.M.; Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Leerdam, R.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this research is to design an integrated membrane distillation-crystallization (MDC) process for desalination of seawater with pure water and dry salts as the only products. The process is based on a combination of membrane distillation (MD) and osmotic distillation (OD) steps with

  3. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  4. Plasmonic and Photonic Modes Excitation in Graphene on Silicon Photonic Crystal Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Gu, Tingyi; Hao, Yufeng

    Graphene is a perspective material platform for the infrared (from far-IR to near-IR) optoelectronics due to possibility of extremely confined surface plasmons polaritons excitation at long wavelengths, and large (for atomically thin layer) optical absorbance of 2.3% in the short wavelengths rang...... characterization. Measured data are well correlated with the numerical analysis. Combined graphene – silicon photonic crystal membranes can find applications for infrared absorbers, modulators, filters, sensors and photodetectors.......Graphene is a perspective material platform for the infrared (from far-IR to near-IR) optoelectronics due to possibility of extremely confined surface plasmons polaritons excitation at long wavelengths, and large (for atomically thin layer) optical absorbance of 2.3% in the short wavelengths ranges....... Being deposited on a silicon photonic crystal membrane graphene serves as a highly promising system for modern optoelectronics with rich variety of possible regimes. Depending on the relation between the photonic crystal lattice constant and wavelengths (plasmonic, photonic and free-space) we identify...

  5. Production, crystallization and neutron diffraction of fully deuterated human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Blakeley, Matthew P; Raasakka, Arne; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Kursula, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The molecular details of the formation of the myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, are to a large extent unknown. P2 is a peripheral membrane protein from peripheral nervous system myelin, which is believed to play a role in this process. X-ray crystallographic studies and complementary experiments have provided information on the structure-function relationships in P2. In this study, a fully deuterated sample of human P2 was produced. Crystals that were large enough for neutron diffraction were grown by a ten-month procedure of feeding, and neutron diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å from a crystal of 0.09 mm(3) in volume. The neutron crystal structure will allow the positions of H atoms in P2 and its fatty-acid ligand to be visualized, as well as shedding light on the fine details of the hydrogen-bonding networks within the P2 ligand-binding cavity.

  6. Osteoarthritis-associated basic calcium phosphate crystals activate membrane proximal kinases in human innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Emma M; Cunningham, Clare C; Helbert, Laura; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Dunne, Aisling

    2017-02-07

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic debilitating joint disorder of particularly high prevalence in the elderly population. Intra-articular basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are present in the majority of OA joints and are associated with severe degeneration. They are known to activate macrophages, synovial fibroblasts, and articular chondrocytes, resulting in increased cell proliferation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). This suggests a pathogenic role in OA by causing extracellular matrix degradation and subchondral bone remodelling. There are currently no disease-modifying drugs available for crystal-associated OA; hence, the aim of this study was to explore the inflammatory pathways activated by BCP crystals in order to identify potential therapeutic targets to limit crystal-induced inflammation. Primary human macrophages and dendritic cells were stimulated with BCP crystals, and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was detected by immunoblotting. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed macrophages were pre-treated with inhibitors of Syk, PI3K, and MAPKs prior to BCP stimulation, and cytokine production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Aa an alternative, cells were treated with synovial fluid derived from osteoarthritic knees in the presence or absence of BCP crystals, and gene induction was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We demonstrate that exposure of primary human macrophages and dendritic cells to BCP crystals leads to activation of the membrane-proximal tyrosine kinases Syk and PI3K. Furthermore, we show that production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-1β and phosphorylation of downstream MEK and ERK MAPKs is suppressed following treatment with inhibitors of Syk or PI3K. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of macrophages with BCP crystals

  7. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  8. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  9. High-reflectivity $Si\\_3N\\_4$ photonic-crystal membranes for optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X; Makles, K; Caër, C; Chua, S; Braive, R; Robert-Philip, I; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Jacqmin, T; Deléglise, S

    2016-01-01

    Nanomechanical resonators strongly coupled to the electromagnetic field are a promising resource for quantum-limited mass and force sensors, and as transducers for coupling otherwise incompatible quantum systems such as microwave and optical photons. In particular, suspended nanomem-branes obtained by chemical release of a high-tensile stress layer are an advantageous platform for such transducers, combining an extremely high mechanical quality factor and a low mass. We demonstrate the successful implementation of a photonic-crystal reflector on a high-tensile stress $Si\\_3N\\_4$ nanomembrane, enabling its direct coupling to a high-finesse optical cavity. This approach is particularly well suited for hybrid opto-electro-mechanical transducers, where the membrane motion is simultaneously coupled to an optical and a microwave cavity. We provide an illustration of the physical process underlying the high reflectivity by measuring the photonic crystal band diagram. Moreover, we introduce a clear theoretical descri...

  10. Crystal structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrD inner membrane multidrug efflux pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Reddy Bolla

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. The MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here report the crystal structure of the inner membrane MtrD multidrug efflux pump, which reveals a novel structural feature that is not found in other RND efflux pumps.

  11. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that catalyses the biological oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, R.L.; Rosenzweig, A.C. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that catalyses the conversion of methane to methanol. Knowledge of how pMMO performs this extremely challenging chemistry may have an impact on the use of methane as an alternative energy source by facilitating the development of new synthetic catalysts. We have determined the structure of pMMO from the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) to a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. The enzyme is a trimer with an {alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3}{gamma}{sub 3} polypeptide arrangement. Two metal centres, modelled as mononuclear copper and dinuclear copper, are located in soluble regions of each pmoB subunit, which resembles cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. A third metal centre, occupied by zinc in the crystal, is located within the membrane. The structure provides new insight into the molecular details of biological methane oxidation.

  12. Realization of a 33 GHz phononic crystal fabricated in a freestanding membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew F. Goettler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals (PnCs are man-made structures with periodically varying material properties such as density, ρ, and elastic modulus, E. Periodic variations of the material properties with nanoscale characteristic dimensions yield PnCs that operate at frequencies above 10 GHz, allowing for the manipulation of thermal properties. In this article, a 2D simple cubic lattice PnC operating at 33 GHz is reported. The PnC is created by nanofabrication with a focused ion beam. A freestanding membrane of silicon is ion milled to create a simple cubic array of 32 nm diameter holes that are subsequently backfilled with tungsten to create inclusions at a spacing of 100 nm. Simulations are used to predict the operating frequency of the PnC. Additional modeling shows that milling a freestanding membrane has a unique characteristic; the exit via has a conical shape, or trumpet-like appearance.

  13. Choroideremia Is a Systemic Disease With Lymphocyte Crystals and Plasma Lipid and RBC Membrane Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alice Yang; Mysore, Naveen; Vali, Hojatollah; Koenekoop, Jamie; Cao, Sang Ni; Li, Shen; Ren, Huanan; Keser, Vafa; Lopez-Solache, Irma; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Khan, Ayesha; Mui, Jeannie; Sears, Kelly; Dixon, Jim; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Braverman, Nancy; Koenekoop, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor neuronal degenerations are common, incurable causes of human blindness affecting 1 in 2000 patients worldwide. Only half of all patients are associated with known mutations in over 250 disease genes, prompting our research program to identify the remaining new genes. Most retinal degenerations are restricted to the retina, but photoreceptor degenerations can also be found in a wide variety of systemic diseases. We identified an X-linked family from Sri Lanka with a severe choroidal degeneration and postulated a new disease entity. Because of phenotypic overlaps with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy, which was recently found to have systemic features, we hypothesized that a systemic disease may be present in this new disease as well. Methods For phenotyping, we performed detailed eye exams with in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence tomography. For genotyping, we performed whole exome sequencing, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmations and cosegregation. Systemic investigations included electron microscopy studies of peripheral blood cells in patients and in normal controls and detailed fatty acid profiles (both plasma and red blood cell [RBC] membranes). Fatty acid levels were compared to normal controls, and only values two standard deviations above or below normal controls were further evaluated. Results The family segregated a REP1 mutation, suggesting choroideremia (CHM). We then found crystals in peripheral blood lymphocytes and discovered significant plasma fatty acid abnormalities and RBC membrane abnormalities (i.e., elevated plasmalogens). To replicate our discoveries, we expanded the cohort to nine CHM patients, genotyped them for REP1 mutations, and found the same abnormalities (crystals and fatty acid abnormalities) in all patients. Conclusions Previously, CHM was thought to be restricted to the retina. We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that CHM is a systemic condition with prominent crystals in lymphocytes and

  14. Crystal Structure of the Membrane Fusion Protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.; (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2010-03-29

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP) that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB MFP from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any MFPs associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner-membrane efflux pump CusA and outer-membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly {beta}-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of MFPs, the {alpha}-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N- and C-termini of CusB form the first {beta}-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of an MFP in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system and provide direct evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates.

  15. Structure determination using poorly diffracting membrane-protein crystals: the H+-ATPase and Na+,K+-ATPase case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P; Morth, J Preben; Nissen, Poul

    2010-03-01

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of membrane proteins on the basis of poorly diffracting crystals which exploits molecular replacement for heavy-atom site identification at 6-9 A maximum resolution and improvement of the heavy-atom-derived phases by multi-crystal averaging using quasi-isomorphous data sets. The multi-crystal averaging procedure allows real-space density averaging followed by phase combination between non-isomorphous native data sets to exploit crystal-to-crystal nonisomorphism despite the crystals belonging to the same space group. This approach has been used in the structure determination of H(+)-ATPase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase using Ca(2+)-ATPase models and its successful application to the Mhp1 symporter using LeuT as a search model is demonstrated.

  16. NanoFIBrication of a two-dimensional phononic crystal in a free standing membrane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseman, Zayd C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Goettler, Drew F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Su, Mehmet F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional phononic crystal (PnC) that can operate in the GHz range is created in a freestanding silicon substrate using NanoFIBrication (using a focused ion beam (FIB) to fabricate nanostructures). First, a simple cubic 6.75 x 6.75 ?m array of vias with 150 nm spacing is generated. After patterning the vias, they are backfilled with void-free tungsten scatterers. Each via has a diameter of 48 nm. Numerical calculations predict this 2D PnC will generate a band gap near 22 GHz. A protective layer of chromium on top of the thin (100 nm) silicon membrane confines the surface damage to the chromium, which can be removed at a later time. Inspection of the underside of the membrane shows the vias flaring out at the exit, which we are dubbing the 'trumpet effect'. The trumpet effect is explained by modeling the lateral damage in a freestanding membrane.

  17. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools.

  18. High-throughput identification of purification conditions leads to preliminary crystallization conditions for three inner membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Kroner, Frank; Black, Isobel; Isaacs, Neil W; Roe, Andrew J; McLuskey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    An important factor in the crystallization, and subsequent structural determination, of integral membrane proteins is the ability to produce a stable and monodisperse solution of the protein. Obtaining the correct purification detergent to achieve this can be laborious and is often serendipitous. In this study, high-throughput methods are used to analyze the suitability of eight different detergents on the stability of 12 inner transmembrane proteins from Escherichia coli. The best results obtained from the small-scale experiments were scaled up, the aggregation state of the proteins assessed, and all monodisperse protein solutions entered into crystallization trials. This resulted in preliminary crystallization hits for three inner membrane proteins: XylH, PgpB and YjdL and this study reports the methods, purification procedures and crystallization conditions used to achieve this.

  19. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Sergei, E-mail: s.sokolov@utwente.nl; Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P. [Complex Photonic Systems (COPS), MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo [Thales Research and Technology, Route Départementale 128, 91767 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  20. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Sergei; Yüce, Emre; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    We perform a spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: helium and nitrogen. The use of high-conducting gas in combination with low-conducting semiconductor leads to a resonance control with a spatial resolution better than 4 microns.

  1. Assessing two-dimensional crystallization trials of small membrane proteins for structural biology studies by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Rudolph, Frederik; Dreaden, Tina M; Zhao, Gengxiang; Barry, Bridgette A; Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg

    2010-10-29

    Electron crystallography has evolved as a method that can be used either alternatively or in combination with three-dimensional crystallization and X-ray crystallography to study structure-function questions of membrane proteins, as well as soluble proteins. Screening for two-dimensional (2D) crystals by transmission electron microscopy (EM) is the critical step in finding, optimizing, and selecting samples for high-resolution data collection by cryo-EM. Here we describe the fundamental steps in identifying both large and ordered, as well as small 2D arrays, that can potentially supply critical information for optimization of crystallization conditions. By working with different magnifications at the EM, data on a range of critical parameters is obtained. Lower magnification supplies valuable data on the morphology and membrane size. At higher magnifications, possible order and 2D crystal dimensions are determined. In this context, it is described how CCD cameras and online-Fourier Transforms are used at higher magnifications to assess proteoliposomes for order and size. While 2D crystals of membrane proteins are most commonly grown by reconstitution by dialysis, the screening technique is equally applicable for crystals produced with the help of monolayers, native 2D crystals, and ordered arrays of soluble proteins. In addition, the methods described here are applicable to the screening for 2D crystals of even smaller as well as larger membrane proteins, where smaller proteins require the same amount of care in identification as our examples and the lattice of larger proteins might be more easily identifiable at earlier stages of the screening.

  2. Crystal structures of electrospun PVDF membranes and its separator application for rechargeable lithium metal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Kun [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: gaokun@hit.edu.cn; Hu Xinguo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Dai Chongsong [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yi Tingfeng [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2006-07-15

    An electrospinning method was used to prepare electrospun PVDF-based membranes (EPMs) for battery separators applications. The morphology of the EPMs was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The relations between applied voltage and average fiber diameter (AFD) under certain electrospinning conditions were discussed. The thermal properties and crystal structure of the EPMs also were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Due to soften PVDF fibers in high temperature, the thermal treated EPMs can form an interconnected web structure, which greatly improves physical properties. Compared with Celgard{sup TM} 2400 (PP separator), the cell with EPM shows better cycling ability of CV and charge-discharge performance with little capacity loss after 50 cycles at C/2 rate.

  3. Optimization of the hybrid bilayer membrane method for immobilization of avidin on quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Saem; Choi, Suk-Jung

    2009-04-15

    Hybrid bilayer membrane (HBM), comprising a lipid monolayer fused to a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAM), has a potential capability to provide a convenient tool for the preparation of functionalized sensor surfaces. In this work, the HBM approach was optimized for the preparation of avidin-containing quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chip which would be available for immobilization of biotinylated molecules. Lipid layer of HBM was composed of background lipid such as egg phosphatidyl choline and biotinylated lipid to which avidin was attached. Highest performance was obtained at 1:1 ratio of the biotinylated lipid and the background lipid, and sensitivity and stability of the resulting sensor chip was comparable to a sensor chip prepared by the conventional carbodiimide reaction. By utilizing the HBM method, construction of a stable avidin sensor chip was achieved within 40 min without any chemical steps. Thus the HBM method was proven to be a convenient and efficient way to immobilize avidin on sensor surfaces.

  4. Crystal structure of outer membrane protein NMB0315 from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    Full Text Available NMB0315 is an outer membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NMB and a potential candidate for a broad-spectrum vaccine against meningococcal disease. The crystal structure of NMB0315 was solved by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD at a resolution of 2.4 Å and revealed to be a lysostaphin-type peptidase of the M23 metallopeptidase family. The overall structure consists of three well-separated domains and has no similarity to any previously published structure. However, only the topology of the carboxyl-terminal domain is highly conserved among members of this family, and this domain is a zinc-dependent catalytic unit. The amino-terminal domain of the structure blocks the substrate binding pocket in the carboxyl-terminal domain, indicating that the wild-type full-length protein is in an inactive conformational state. Our studies improve the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of M23 metallopeptidases.

  5. High quality factor two dimensional GaN photonic crystal cavity membranes grown on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico Triviño, N.; Rossbach, G.; Dharanipathy, U.; Levrat, J.; Castiglia, A.; Carlin, J.-F.; Atlasov, K. A.; Butté, R.; Houdré, R.; Grandjean, N.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the achievement of freestanding GaN photonic crystal L7 nanocavities with embedded InGaN/GaN quantum wells grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on Si (111). GaN was patterned by e-beam lithography, using a SiO2 layer as a hard mask, and usual dry etching techniques. The membrane was released by underetching the Si (111) substrate. Micro-photoluminescence measurements performed at low temperature exhibit a quality factor as high as 5200 at ˜420 nm, a value suitable to expand cavity quantum electrodynamics to the near UV and the visible range and to develop nanophotonic platforms for biofluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. In-situ Growth of Biocidal AgCl Crystals in the Top Layer of Asymmetric Polytriazole Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2016-05-06

    Scalable fabrication strategies to concentrate biocidal materials in only the surface of membranes are highly desirable. In this letter, tight-UF polytriazole membranes with a high concentration of biocide silver chloride (AgCl) crystals dispersed in only their top layer are presented. They were made following a simple dual-bath process that is compatible with current commercial membrane casting facilities. These membranes can achieve a 150-fold increase in their antimicrobial character compared to their silver-free counterpart. Moreover, fine-tuning of their properties is straightforward. A change in the silver concentration in one of the baths is enough to tune the permeance, molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) and silver loading of the final membrane.

  7. Plasma dust crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John; Thomas, H.; Morfill, G.

    1994-01-01

    In a ground-based definition study, a concept for a new type of microgravity experiment is developed. We formed a new state of matter: a crystalline lattice structure of charged micron-size spheres, suspended in a charge-neutral plasma. The plasma is formed by a low-pressure radio-frequency argon discharge. Solid microspheres are introduced, and they gain a negative electric charge. They are cooled by molecular drag on the ambient neutral gas. They are detected by laser light scattering and video photography. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a two-dimensional nonquantum lattice forms through the Coulomb interaction of these spheres. Microgravity is thought to be required to observe a three-dimensional structure.

  8. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  9. Comparison of four computational methods for computing Q factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We benchmark four state-of-the-art computational methods by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities.The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number ofmodes is investigated. Special att...

  10. A spin label study of the effects of asbestos, quartz, and titanium dioxide dusts on the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Leyko, W; Gendek, E

    1985-01-01

    The effects of five UICC asbestos samples, titanium dioxide, and quartz on the bovine red cell membrane have been studied in erythrocyte ghosts by the spin labelling technique. Analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of two sulphydryl reactive spin labels and one fatty acid spin label in red cell ghosts showed modifications in membrane protein after asbestos treatment but no alterations in membrane lipids. In experiments with quartz no membrane changes were noted but tit...

  11. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  12. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Kunze, Angelika; Carlsson, Nils; Altgärde, Noomi; Svedhem, Sofia; Nordén, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  13. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  14. A spin label study of the effects of asbestos, quartz, and titanium dioxide dusts on the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyko, W; Gendek, E

    1985-04-01

    The effects of five UICC asbestos samples, titanium dioxide, and quartz on the bovine red cell membrane have been studied in erythrocyte ghosts by the spin labelling technique. Analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of two sulphydryl reactive spin labels and one fatty acid spin label in red cell ghosts showed modifications in membrane protein after asbestos treatment but no alterations in membrane lipids. In experiments with quartz no membrane changes were noted but titanium dioxide altered the proteins bound with the protein reactive spin label used in the present study. The possible mechanism for these effects is discussed.

  15. Closure between ice-nucleating particle and ice crystal number concentrations in ice clouds embedded in Saharan dust: Lidar observation during the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Engelmann, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin; Vrekoussis, Michalis; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we compare ice-nucleating particle number concentration (INPC) derived from polarization lidar (Mamouri and Ansmann, 2015) with ice crystal number concentrations (ICNC) in ice cloud layers embedded in the observed Saharan dust layers (at heights above 6 km and corresponding temperatures from -20 to -40°C). ICNC is estimated from the respective cirrus extinction profiles obtained with the same polarization lidar in combination with Doppler lidar measurements of the ice crystal sedimentation speed from which the mean size of the crystals can be estimated. Good agreement between INPC and ICNC was obtained for two case studies of the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 field campaign with focus on INPC profiling. The campaign was organized by the Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, where a lidar was deployed. Additionaly, observations of AERONET and EALINET Lidar stations during the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 field campaign, performed by Cyprus University of Technology in Limassol. Both, INPC and ICNC were found in the range from 10-50 1/L. Lidar-derived INPC values were also compared with in-situ INPC measurements (Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber, HINC, ETH Zurich, deployed at Agia Marina, at 500 m a.s.l., 30 km west of the lidar site). Reasonable and partly good agreement (during dust events) was found between the two retrievals. The findings of these closure studies corroborate the applicability of available INPC parameterization schemes (DeMott et al., 2010, 2015) implemented in the lidar retrieval scheme, and more generally INPC profiling by using active remote sensing (at ground and in space with CALIPSO and EarthCARE lidars).

  16. Preparation of highly permeable BPPO microfiltration membrane with binary porous structures on a colloidal crystal substrate by the breath figure method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Yu, Bing; Cong, Hailin; Peng, Qiaohong; Yang, Zhen; Luo, Yongli; Chi, Ming

    2016-01-01

    A highly permeable brominated poly(phenylene oxide) (BPPO) microfiltration membrane with binary porous structures was fabricated by combination of the breath figure and colloidal crystal template methods. The pore size in the bottom layer of the membrane was adjusted by the diameter of SiO2 microspheres in the colloidal crystal template, while the pore size in the top layer of the membrane was adjusted by varying the BPPO concentration in the casting solution. The permeability of the membrane cast on the colloidal crystal substrate was much higher than that of the membrane cast on a bare silicon wafer. The binary porous BPPO membrane with high permeability and antifouling property was used for microfiltration applications.

  17. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase-cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength.

  18. Probing the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Nariman; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing interest in using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with model surfaces. The high sensitivity, ease of use and the ability to monitor interactions in real-time has made it a popular technique for colloid chemists, biologists, bioengineers and biophysicists. QCM-D has been recently used to probe the interaction of NPs with supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as model cell membranes. The interaction of NPs with SLBs is highly influenced by the quality of the lipid bilayers. Unlike many surface sensitive techniques, using QCM-D, the quality of SLBs can be assessed in real-time, hence QCM-D studies on SLB-NP interactions are less prone to the artefacts arising from bilayers that are not well formed. The ease of use and commercial availability of a wide range of sensor surfaces also have made QCM-D a versatile tool for studying NP interactions with lipid bilayers. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art on QCM-D based techniques for probing the interactions of NPs with lipid bilayers.

  19. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  20. A novel approach for structure analysis of two-dimensional membrane protein crystals using x-ray powder diffraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Dilanian, Ruben A; Varghese, Jose N; Wilkins, Steve W; Oka, Toshihiko; Yagi, Naoto; Quiney, Harry M; Nugent, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    The application of powder diffraction methods in two-dimensional crystallography is regarded as intractable because of the uncertainties associated with overlapping reflections. Here, we report an approach that resolves these ambiguities and provides reliable low-resolution phase information directly from powder diffraction data. We apply our method to the recovery of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) molecule to a resolution of 7 angstroms using only powder diffraction data obtained from two-dimensional purple membrane (PM) crystals.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of novel composite membranes composed of photonic crystals and TiO2 nanotube array films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junjie; Zhu, Huili; Wang, Aijun; Chen, Sheng-Li; Yuan, Yao

    2016-05-01

    Novel composite membranes composed of photonic crystals (PCs) and TiO2 nanotube array (TNA) films have been fabricated by combining the room temperature floating self-assembly (RTFSA) method, recently developed by our research group, and the liquid-phase deposition technique. By applying this combined procedure, polystyrene (PS) opal PC/TNA and TiO2 inverse opal PC/TNA composite membranes were prepared. Scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy analyses showed that the membrane samples possessed very high crystalline quality. Notably, the ordered packing of the PS microspheres from the top to the bottom of the opal PC film was not affected by the surface roughness of the porous TNA substrate. This is attributed to the self-assembly mechanism of the colloidal particles, which produces a three-dimensional ordered structure in the RTFSA method. Herein, the crystallization of the colloidal particles occurred at the surface of the colloidal suspension, and the crystal growth proceeded downward from the surface of the suspension to the substrate.

  2. Contamination from an affinity column: an encounter with a new villain in the world of membrane-protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Pankaj; Deniaud, Aurélien; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva

    2012-10-01

    Attempts to crystallize AtNTT1, a chloroplast ATP/ADP transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana, revealed an unexpected contaminant, Strep-Tactin, a variant of streptavidin that was used during purification of the protein. Although it was present in very small amounts, crystals of Strep-Tactin were reproducibly grown from the AtNTT1 solution. AtNTT1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified from detergent-solubilized membrane fractions using Strep-Tactin affinity chromatography based on an engineered streptavidin. The contamination of protein solutions purified on Strep-Tactin columns has never been described previously and seems to be specific to membrane proteins solubilized in detergents. Trace amounts of Strep-Tactin were observed to be eluted from a Strep-Tactin column using several routinely used detergents, illustrating their possible role in the contamination. This finding raises an alarm and suggests caution in membrane-protein purification using Strep-Tactin affinity columns, where detergents are essential components. The small crystals of contaminant protein led to the structure at 1.9 Å resolution of Strep-Tactin in complex with desthiobiotin.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Decaneto, Elena; Grossman, Moran; Havenith, Martina; Sagi, Irit; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Knipp, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) belongs to the large family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases termed MMPs that are located in the extracellular matrix. MT1-MMP was crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitating agent. Data sets for MT1-MMP were collected to 2.24 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.99, c = 122.60 Å. The crystal contained one molecule per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.90 Å3 Da−1; the solvent content is estimated to be 57.6%. PMID:24637763

  4. Liquid crystals and their interactions with colloidal particles and phospholipid membranes: Molecular simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Evelina B.

    Experimentally, liquid crystals (LC) can be used as the basis for optical biomolecular sensors that rely on LC ordering. Recently, the use of LC as a reporting medium has been extended to investigations of molecular scale processes at lipid laden aqueous-LC interfaces and at biological cell membranes. In this thesis, we present two related studies where liquid crystals are modelled at different length scales. We examine (a) the behavior of nanoscopic colloidal particles in LC systems, using Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulations and a mesoscopic dynamic field theory (DyFT); and (b) specific interactions of two types of mesogens with a model phospholipid bilayer, using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) at the A-nm scale. In (a), we consider colloidal particles suspended in a LC, confined between two walls. We calculate the colloid-substrate and colloid-colloid potentials of mean force (PMF). For the MC simulations, we developed a new technique (ExEDOS or Expanded Ensemble Density Of States) that ensures good sampling of phase space without prior knowledge of the energy landscape of the system. Both results, simulation and DyFT, indicate a repulsive force acting between a colloid and a wall. In contrast, both techniques indicate an overall colloid-colloid attraction and predict a new topology of the disclination lines that arises when the particles approach each other. In (b), we find that mesogens (pentylcyanobiphenyl [5CB] or difluorophenyl-pentylbicyclohexyl [5CF]) preferentially partition from the aqueous phase into a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. We find highly favorable free energy differences for partitioning (-18kBT for 5CB, -26k BT for 5CF). We also simulated fully hydrated bilayers with embedded 5CB or 5CF at concentrations used in recent experiments (6 mol% and 20 mol%). The presence of mesogens in the bilayer enhances the order of lipid acyl tails and changes the spatial and orientational arrangement of lipid headgroup atoms. A stronger

  5. Crystallization of the Membrane-Associated Annexin B1: Roles of Additive Screen, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Bioactivity Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F.; Xu, Y; Azzi, A; Zhu, D; Rehse, D; Chen, C; Sun, S; Lin, S

    2010-01-01

    Annexin B1 (AnxB1) is a calcium-dependent phospholipid binding protein from Taenia solium cysticercus and has been reported to possess anticoagulant activity, to inhibit phospholipase A{sub 2}, and to regulate membrane transport. Native AnxB1 and its selenomethionyl derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. The results of dynamic light scattering analysis showed that Hepes buffer combined with low concentration salts (NaCl or CaCl{sub 2}) was beneficial for preventing aggregation and for AnxB1 stabilization in the storage. After the additive screen, crystals have been yielded in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (Gn-HCl). We determined that a low concentration of Gn-HCl significantly delayed clotting time and increased anticoagulant activity. Analysis of the crystal showed that in the presence of Gn-HCl, AnxB1 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group, which is modified from the cubic space group for crystals grown in the absence of Gn-HCl. A high quality data set (at 1.9 {angstrom}) has been collected successfully for crystals of L-selenomethionine labeled protein in the presence of Gn-HCl, to solve the structure with the single anomalous dispersion method (SAD). The unit cell parameters are a = 102.35 {angstrom}, b = 103.59 {angstrom}, c = 114.60 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90.00{sup o}.

  6. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  7. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  8. Silk fibroin membranes from solvent-crystallized silk fibroin/gelatin blends: Effects of blend and solvent composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Eun S. [Fiber and Polymer Science Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Frankowski, David J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hudson, Samuel M. [Fiber and Polymer Science Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Spontak, Richard J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States) and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)]. E-mail: Rich_Spontak@ncsu.edu

    2007-04-15

    Protein membranes have been prepared by mixing gelatin (G) with Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) and using aqueous methanol (MeOH) to induce SF crystallization. Amorphous blends of these polymers appear quasi-homogeneous, as discerned from visual observation, electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon subsequent exposure to aqueous MeOH, SF undergoes a conformational change from random-coil to {beta}-sheet. This transformation occurs in pure SF, as well as in each of the G/SF blends, as discerned from FTIR spectroscopy and thermal calorimetry. The influence of MeOH-induced SF crystallization on structure and property development has been measured as functions of blend and solvent composition. By preserving a support scaffold above the G helix-to-coil transition temperature, the formation of crystalline SF networks in G/SF blends can be used to stabilize G-based hydrogels or generate SF membranes for biomaterial, pharmaceutical and gas-separation purposes. The present study not only examines the properties of G/SF blends before and after SF crystallization, but also establishes the foundation for future research into thermally-responsive G/SF bioconjugates.

  9. Preliminary X-ray investigations of several crystal forms of the ferripyoverdine FpvA outer membrane receptor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Christophe; Hoegy, Françoise; Pattus, Franc; Cobessi, David, E-mail: cobessi@esbs.u-strasbg.fr [Institut Gilbert-Laustriat UMR 7175 CNRS/Université Strasbourg I, Département Récepteurs et Protéines Membranaires, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, Boulevard Sébastien Brandt, BP 10413, F-67412 Illkirch (France)

    2006-05-01

    The crystallization and X-ray data analysis of three crystal forms of the outer membrane pyoverdine transducer FpvA from P. aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine are described. The resolution of the crystals ranges from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form; all were obtained in the presence of C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent. Ferripyoverdine transport across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the pyoverdine receptor FpvA and the transcriptional regulation of FpvA involve interactions of the FpvA N-terminal TonB box and signalling domain with proteins from the inner membrane. Several crystallization conditions of FpvA–Pvd-Fe solubilized in C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent were obtained and X-ray data were collected from three crystal forms. The resolution limits range from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. From preliminary analysis of the electron-density maps, the first full-length structure of an outer membrane receptor including a signalling domain should be determined.

  10. Sound absorption enhancement of nonwoven felt by using coupled membrane - sonic crystal inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriani, M. C.; Yahya, I.; Harjana; Ubaidillah; Aditya, F.; Siregar, Y.; Moeliono, M.; Sulaksono, S.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental results from laboratory test on the sound absorption performance of nonwoven felt with an array thin tubes and sonic crystal inclusions reported in this paper. The nonwoven felt sample was produced by a local company with 15 mm in its thickness and 900 gsm. The 6.4 mm diameter plastic straw was used to construct the thin tubes array while the sonic crystal is arranged in a 4 × 4 lattice crystal formation. It made from a PVC cylinder with 17 mm and 50 mm in diameter and length respectively. All cylinders have two holes positioned on 10 mm and 25 mm from the base. The results show that both treatments, array of thin tube and sonic crystal inclusions are effectively increased the sound absorption coefficient of the nonwoven felt significantly especially in the low frequency range starting from 200Hz.

  11. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Sonja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3, BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103 and macrosialin (CD68. LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The abundant proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are major constituents of the glycoconjugate coat present on the inside of the lysosomal membrane, the 'lysosomal glycocalyx'. The LAMP family is characterized by a conserved domain of 150 to 200 amino acids with two disulfide bonds. Results The crystal structure of the conserved domain of human DC-LAMP was solved. It is the first high-resolution structure of a heavily glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein. The structure represents a novel β-prism fold formed by two β-sheets bent by β-bulges and connected by a disulfide bond. Flexible loops and a hydrophobic pocket represent possible sites of molecular interaction. Computational models of the glycosylated luminal regions of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 indicate that the proteins adopt a compact conformation in close proximity to the lysosomal membrane. The models correspond to the thickness of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat of only 5 to 12 nm, according to electron microscopy. Conclusion The conserved luminal domain of lysosome-associated membrane proteins forms a previously unknown β-prism fold. Insights into the structure of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat were obtained by computational models of the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 luminal regions.

  12. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: martin.caffrey@tcd.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  13. Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dursch, Thomas J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ciontea, Monica A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Radke, Clayton J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are studied using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. Finally, a validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs.

  14. A Crystal Structure of a Dimer of the Antibiotic Ramoplanin Illustrates Membrane Positioning and a Potential Lipid II Docking Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamburger, J.; Hoertz, A; Lee, A; Senturia, R; McCafferty, D; Loll, P

    2009-01-01

    The glycodepsipeptide antibiotic ramoplanin A2 is in late stage clinical development for the treatment of infections from Gram-positive pathogens, especially those that are resistant to first line antibiotics such as vancomycin. Ramoplanin A2 achieves its antibacterial effects by interfering with production of the bacterial cell wall; it indirectly inhibits the transglycosylases responsible for peptidoglycan biosynthesis by sequestering their Lipid II substrate. Lipid II recognition and sequestration occur at the interface between the extracellular environment and the bacterial membrane. Therefore, we determined the structure of ramoplanin A2 in an amphipathic environment, using detergents as membrane mimetics, to provide the most physiologically relevant structural context for mechanistic and pharmacological studies. We report here the X-ray crystal structure of ramoplanin A2 at a resolution of 1.4 {angstrom}. This structure reveals that ramoplanin A2 forms an intimate and highly amphipathic dimer and illustrates the potential means by which it interacts with bacterial target membranes. The structure also suggests a mechanism by which ramoplanin A2 recognizes its Lipid II ligand.

  15. Crystal Structure of Dengue Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and Its Implications for Membrane Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Vinod; Dessau, Moshe; Kucera, Kaury; Anthony, Karen; Ledizet, Michel; Modis, Yorgo; (Yale); (L2 Diagnostics)

    2009-07-31

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the 'pH sensor' that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  16. Lipid Raft-Mediated Membrane Tethering and Delivery of Hydrophobic Cargos from Liquid Crystal-Based Nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Okhil K; Naciri, Jawad; Oh, Eunkeu; Spillmann, Christopher M; Delehanty, James B

    2016-04-20

    A main goal of bionanotechnology and nanoparticle (NP)-mediated drug delivery (NMDD) continues to be the development of novel biomaterials that can controllably modulate the activity of the NP-associated therapeutic cargo. One of the desired subcellular locations for targeted delivery in NMDD is the plasma membrane. However, the controlled delivery of hydrophobic cargos to the membrane bilayer poses significant challenges including cargo precipitation and lack of specificity. Here, we employ a liquid crystal NP (LCNP)-based delivery system for the controlled partitioning of a model dye cargo from within the NP core into the plasma membrane bilayer. During synthesis of the NPs, the water-insoluble model dye cargo, 3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate (DiO), was efficiently incorporated into the hydrophobic LCNP core as confirmed by multiple spectroscopic analyses. Conjugation of a PEGylated cholesterol derivative to the NP surface (DiO-LCNP-PEG-Chol) facilitated the localization of the dye-loaded NPs to lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane in HEK 293T/17 cell. Analysis of DiO cellular internalization kinetics revealed that when delivered as a LCNP-PEG-Chol NP, the half-life of DiO membrane residence time (30 min) was twice that of free DiO (DiO(free)) (15 min) delivered from bulk solution. Time-resolved laser scanning confocal microscopy was employed to visualize the passive efflux of DiO from the LCNP core and its insertion into the plasma membrane bilayer as confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. Finally, the delivery of DiO as a LCNP-PEG-Chol complex resulted in the attenuation of its cytotoxicity; the NP form of DiO exhibited ∼30-40% less toxicity compared to DiO(free). Our data demonstrate the utility of the LCNP platform as an efficient vehicle for the combined membrane-targeted delivery and physicochemical modulation of molecular cargos using lipid raft-mediated tethering.

  17. There is a baby in the bath water: AcrB contamination is a major problem in membrane-protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesler, David; Blangy, Stéphanie; Cambillau, Christian; Sciara, Giuliano

    2008-10-01

    In the course of a crystallographic study of the Methanosarcina mazei CorA transporter, the membrane protein was obtained with at least 95% purity and was submitted to crystallization trials. Small crystals (contaminating protein, acriflavine resistance protein B (AcrB), that was present at less than 5% in the protein preparations. AcrB contamination is a major problem when expressing membrane proteins in E. coli since it binds naturally to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resins. Here, the structure is compared with previously deposited AcrB structures and strategies are proposed to avoid this contamination.

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Bækgaard, Lone

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca(2+)-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca(2+) from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca(2+) homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca2+ from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca2+ homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca2+ signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  20. Crystallization around solid-like nanosized docks can explain the specificity, diversity, and stability of membrane microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Joly, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    To date, it is widely accepted that microdomains do form in the biological membranes of all eukaryotic cells, and quite possibly also in prokaryotes. Those sub-micrometric domains play crucial roles in signaling, in intracellular transport, and even in inter-cellular communications. Despite their ubiquitous distribution, and the broad and lasting interest invested in those microdomains, their actual nature and composition, and even the physical rules that regiment their assembly still remain elusive and hotly debated. One of the most often considered models is the raft hypothesis, i.e., the partition of lipids between liquid disordered and ordered phases (Ld and Lo, respectively), the latter being enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. Although it is experimentally possible to obtain the formation of microdomains in synthetic membranes through Ld/Lo phase separation, there is an ever increasing amount of evidence, obtained with a wide array of experimental approaches, that a partition between domains in Ld and Lo phases cannot account for many of the observations collected in real cells. In particular, it is now commonly perceived that the plasma membrane of cells is mostly in Lo phase and recent data support the existence of gel or solid ordered domains in a whole variety of live cells under physiological conditions. Here, we present a model whereby seeds comprised of oligomerised proteins and/or lipids would serve as crystal nucleation centers for the formation of diverse gel/crystalline nanodomains. This could confer the selectivity necessary for the formation of multiple types of membrane domains, as well as the stability required to match the time frames of cellular events, such as intra- or inter-cellular transport or assembly of signaling platforms. Testing of this model will, however, require the development of new methods allowing the clear-cut discrimination between Lo and solid nanoscopic phases in live cells. PMID:24634670

  1. Structural and biophysical characterization of an epitope-specific engineered Fab fragment and complexation with membrane proteins: implications for co-crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin C; Hyun, Jeongmin; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Sheppard, Aly; Gumbart, James C; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-04-01

    Crystallization chaperones are attracting increasing interest as a route to crystal growth and structure elucidation of difficult targets such as membrane proteins. While strategies to date have typically employed protein-specific chaperones, a peptide-specific chaperone to crystallize multiple cognate peptide epitope-containing client proteins is envisioned. This would eliminate the target-specific chaperone-production step and streamline the co-crystallization process. Previously, protein engineering and directed evolution were used to generate a single-chain variable (scFv) antibody fragment with affinity for the peptide sequence EYMPME (scFv/EE). This report details the conversion of scFv/EE to an anti-EE Fab format (Fab/EE) followed by its biophysical characterization. The addition of constant chains increased the overall stability and had a negligible impact on the antigen affinity. The 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of Fab/EE reveals contacts with larger surface areas than those of scFv/EE. Surface plasmon resonance, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and size-exclusion chromatography were used to assess Fab/EE binding to EE-tagged soluble and membrane test proteins: namely, the β-barrel outer membrane protein intimin and α-helical A2a G protein-coupled receptor (A2aR). Molecular-dynamics simulation of the intimin constructs with and without Fab/EE provides insight into the energetic complexities of the co-crystallization approach.

  2. Liquid Crystal Sulfonated Aramids as Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two sulfonated aramids, poly(2,2’-disulfonylbenzidine terephthalamide) (PBDT) and poly(2,2’-disulfonylbenzidine isophthalamide) (PBDI) were synthesized with the aim to explore their unique morphology for proton exchange membrane applications. Due to the different polymer structures, PBDT forms a nem

  3. Maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphiles for solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R;

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of integral membrane protein (IMP) structure and function is hampered by the difficulty of handling these proteins. Aqueous solubilization, necessary for many types of biophysical analysis, generally requires a detergent to shield the large lipophilic surfaces of native IMPs. Ma...

  4. Liquid Crystal Sulfonated Aramids as Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two sulfonated aramids, poly(2,2’-disulfonylbenzidine terephthalamide) (PBDT) and poly(2,2’-disulfonylbenzidine isophthalamide) (PBDI) were synthesized with the aim to explore their unique morphology for proton exchange membrane applications. Due to the different polymer structures, PBDT forms a nem

  5. Dust Versus Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A N

    1999-01-01

    Two groups have recently discovered a statistically significant deviation in the fluxes of high-redshift type Ia supernovae from the predictions of a Friedmann model with zero cosmological constant. This letter argues that bright, dusty, starburst galaxies would preferentially eject a dust component with a shallower opacity curve (hence less reddening) and a higher opacity/mass than the observed galactic dust which is left behind. Such dust could cause the falloff in flux at high-z without violating constraints on reddening or metallicity. The specific model presented is of needle-like dust, which is expected from the theory of crystal growth and has been detected in samples of interstellar dust. Carbon needles with conservative properties can supply the necessary opacity, and would very likely be ejected from galaxies as required. The model is not subject to the arguments given in the literature against grey dust, but may be constrained by future data from supernova searches done at higher redshift, in clust...

  6. Production and crystallization of a panel of structure-based mutants of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, Mari; Laulumaa, Saara; Ruskamo, Salla; Kursula, Petri

    2012-11-01

    The myelin sheath is a multilayered membrane that surrounds and insulates axons in the nervous system. One of the proteins specific to the peripheral nerve myelin is P2, a protein that is able to stack lipid bilayers. With the goal of obtaining detailed information on the structure-function relationship of P2, 14 structure-based mutated variants of human P2 were generated and produced. The mutants were designed to potentially affect the binding of lipid bilayers by P2. All mutated variants were also crystallized and preliminary crystallographic data are presented. The structural data from the mutants will be combined with diverse functional assays in order to elucidate the fine details of P2 function at the molecular level.

  7. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of A New Armed-tetraazacrown Ether and Its Liquid Membrane Transport of Alkali Metal Cations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淑兰; 朱文祥; 董淑静; 郭倩玲; 佘远斌

    2003-01-01

    A new tetra-N-substituted tetraazacrown ether derivative, 4,7,13,16-tetra ( 2-cyanobenzyl)-1, 10-dioxa-4, 7, 13, 16-tetraazacy-dooctademne, C44H48N8O2, has been synthesized and struc-turally characterized. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system,Slmeegroup P21/c with a = 1.1176(3) nm, b =2.1906(7) nm,c=0.8430(3)nm, V=2.0132(10)nm3, β = 102.740(5)°,Z=4, Dc= 1.189 g/cm3, final R1=0.0460, wR2=0.0803.The liquid membrane transports of alkali metal cations using the new macrocyde as the ion-carrier were also studied. Com-pared with some macrocyclic ligands, our newly synthesized lig.and showed a good selectivity ratio for Na Na+/Li+.

  8. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-07-01

    The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  9. Study on Extracting Low Concentration Cadmium from Zinc Hydrometallurgy System by Liquid Membrane Crystallizing Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The extraction of low concentration cadmium from a system containing high concentration zinc was studied and got CdS product directly. A new liquid membrane system taking DIPSA, TIBPS as carriers, (NH4)2S as precipitating agent was reported. Precipitating Cd2+ in the internal aq. phase that is used to treat sulfuric acid leaching solution of zinc oxide in zinc hydrometallurgy has gotten satisfied results of extracting cadmium from high concentration zinc. After one-stage of batch process under the optimum liquid membrane conditions, 98.6% transferring rate and 98.1% extracting rate of cadmium was obtained with only less than 1.0% transferring rate of zinc, and the feed solution can be purified very well.

  10. Crystal structure of GAP50, the anchor of the invasion machinery in the inner membrane complex of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Jürgen; Paige, Matthew H; Vaidya, Akhil B; Bergman, Lawrence W; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-04-01

    The glideosome associated protein GAP50 is an essential protein in apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium, several species of which are important human pathogens. The 44.6kDa protein is part of a multi-protein complex known as the invasion machinery or glideosome, which is required for cell invasion and substrate gliding motility empowered by an actin-myosin motor. GAP50 is anchored through its C-terminal transmembrane helix into the inner membrane complex and interacts via a short six residue C-terminal tail with other proteins of the invasion machinery in the pellicle of the parasite. In this paper we describe the 1.7Å resolution crystal structure of the soluble GAP50 domain from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The structure shows an αßßα fold with overall similarity to purple acid phosphatases with, however, little homology regarding the nature of the residues in the active site region of the latter enzyme. While purple acid phosphatases contain a phosphate bridged binuclear Fe-site coordinated by seven side chains with the Fe-ions 3.2Å apart, GAP50 in our crystals contains two cobalt ions each with one protein ligand and a distance between the Co(2+) ions of 18Å. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The dimer interface of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase hemopexin domain: crystal structure and biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-04

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.

  12. Cardiolipin Deficiency in Rhodobacter sphaeroides Alters the Lipid Profile of Membranes and of Crystallized Cytochrome Oxidase, but Structure and Function Are Maintained

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xi; Tamot, Banita; Hiser, Carrie; Reid, Gavin E.; Benning, Christoph; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (MSU)

    2012-05-08

    Many recent studies highlight the importance of lipids in membrane proteins, including in the formation of well-ordered crystals. To examine the effect of changes in one lipid, cardiolipin, on the lipid profile and the production, function, and crystallization of an intrinsic membrane protein, cytochrome c oxidase, we mutated the cardiolipin synthase (cls) gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, causing a >90% reduction in cardiolipin content in vivo and selective changes in the abundances of other lipids. Under these conditions, a fully native cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was produced, as indicated by its activity, spectral properties, and crystal characteristics. Analysis by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) revealed that the cardiolipin level in CcO crystals, as in the membranes, was greatly decreased. Lipid species present in the crystals were directly analyzed for the first time using MS/MS, documenting their identities and fatty acid chain composition. The fatty acid content of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides CcO (predominantly 18:1) differs from that in mammalian CcO (18:2). In contrast to the cardiolipin dependence of mammalian CcO activity, major depletion of cardiolipin in R. sphaeroides did not impact any aspect of CcO structure or behavior, suggesting a greater tolerance of interchange of cardiolipin with other lipids in this bacterial system.

  13. The crystal structure of the outer membrane protein VceC from the bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae at 1.8 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Luca; Du, Dijun; Walas, Fabien; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; Luisi, Ben F; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2005-04-15

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria arises in part from the activities of tripartite drug efflux pumps. In the pathogen Vibrio cholerae, one such pump comprises the inner membrane proton antiporter VceB, the periplasmic adaptor VceA, and the outer membrane channel VceC. Here, we report the crystal structure of VceC at 1.8 A resolution. The trimeric VceC is organized in the crystal lattice within laminar arrays that resemble membranes. A well resolved detergent molecule within this array interacts with the transmembrane beta-barrel domain in a fashion that may mimic protein-lipopolysaccharide contacts. Our analyses of the external surfaces of VceC and other channel proteins suggest that different classes of efflux pumps have distinct architectures. We discuss the implications of these findings for mechanisms of drug and protein export.

  14. Crystal structure of the potassium-importing KdpFABC membrane complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ching-Shin; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Stokes, David L.

    2017-06-21

    Cellular potassium import systems play a fundamental role in osmoregulation, pH homeostasis and membrane potential in all domains of life. In bacteria, the kdp operon encodes a four-subunit potassium pump that maintains intracellular homeostasis, cell shape and turgor under conditions in which potassium is limiting1. This membrane complex, called KdpFABC, has one channel-like subunit (KdpA) belonging to the superfamily of potassium transporters and another pump-like subunit (KdpB) belonging to the superfamily of P-type ATPases. Although there is considerable structural and functional information about members of both superfamilies, the mechanism by which uphill potassium transport through KdpA is coupled with ATP hydrolysis by KdpB remains poorly understood. Here we report the 2.9 Å X-ray structure of the complete Escherichia coli KdpFABC complex with a potassium ion within the selectivity filter of KdpA and a water molecule at a canonical cation site in the transmembrane domain of KdpB. The structure also reveals two structural elements that appear to mediate the coupling between these two subunits. Specifically, a protein-embedded tunnel runs between these potassium and water sites and a helix controlling the cytoplasmic gate of KdpA is linked to the phosphorylation domain of KdpB. On the basis of these observations, we propose a mechanism that repurposes protein channel architecture for active transport across biomembranes.

  15. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  16. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  17. Freestanding GaN-based light-emitting diode membranes on Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ crystal phosphor plate for efficient white light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lungang; Li, Yufeng; Xiong, Han; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jiangteng; Ding, Wen; Zhang, Ye; Yun, Feng

    2016-08-01

    GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) membranes were peeled from the substrate using electrochemical etching of the bottom sacrificial layer. The freestanding membranes were transferred onto a Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce3+) crystal phosphor plate to realize a compact white light source. Verified by the Raman test, the initial strain within the original GaN layers was greatly released after the exfoliation process, which induced alleviation of the quantum confined stark effect. The electroluminescence measurement of a blue LED membranes-on-YAG:Ce3+ plate-structured device was conducted exhibiting color coordinates and a correlated color temperature of (0.3367,0.4525) and 5450 K at 10 mA, respectively.

  18. Crystal structure of a dimeric Ser49- PLA₂-like myotoxic component of the Vipera ammodytes meridionalis venomics reveals determinants of myotoxicity and membrane damaging activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Dessislava; Coronado, Monika; Oberthür, Dominik; Buck, Friedrich; Duhalov, Deyan; Arni, Raghuvir K; Betzel, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Myotoxicity and membrane damage play a central role in the life-threatening effects of the viper envenomation. Myotoxins are an important part of the viper venomics. A Ser49 PLA₂-like myotoxin from the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis, the most venomous snake in Europe, was crystallized and its three-dimensional structure determined. The toxin is devoid of phospholipolytic activity. The structure demonstrates a formation of dimers. In the dimers functionally important peptide segments, located on the protein surface, point in the same direction which can strengthen the pharmacological effect. This supports the hypothesis about the physiological importance of the toxin oligomerization for the myotoxicity and membrane damage. The crystallographic model revealed that the structural determinants of myotoxicity (a positively charged C-terminal region and a hydrophobic knuckle) are fully exposed on the protein surface and accessible for interactions with target membranes. Distortion of the catalytic site region explains the absence of enzymatic activity. The structure reveals anion-binding sites which can be considered as possible sites of interactions of the toxin with a negatively charged membrane surface. The high structural similarity of the Ser49 myotoxin and Asp49 PLA₂ from the same venom suggests an evolutionary relationship: probably, the Ser49 myotoxin is a product of evolution of the catalytically active phospholipase A₂. The first toxin lost the enzymatic activity which is not necessary for the myotoxicity but preserved the cytotoxicity and membrane damaging activity as important components of the venom toxicity.

  19. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust mite allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dust mite allergy is an allergic reaction to tiny bugs that commonly live in house dust. Signs of dust mite allergy include those common to hay fever, such as ...

  20. A Versatile System for High-Throughput In Situ X-ray Screening and Data Collection of Soluble and Membrane-Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broecker, Jana; Klingel, Viviane; Ou, Wei-Lin; Balo, Aidin R.; Kissick, David J.; Ogata, Craig M.; Kuo, Anling; Ernst, Oliver P.

    2016-10-12

    In recent years, in situ data collection has been a major focus of progress in protein crystallography. Here, we introduce the Mylar in situ method using Mylar-based sandwich plates that are inexpensive, easy to make and handle, and show significantly less background scattering than other setups. A variety of cognate holders for patches of Mylar in situ sandwich films corresponding to one or more wells makes the method robust and versatile, allows for storage and shipping of entire wells, and enables automated crystal imaging, screening, and goniometerbased X-ray diffraction data-collection at room temperature and under cryogenic conditions for soluble and membrane-protein crystals grown in or transferred to these plates. We validated the Mylar in situ method using crystals of the water-soluble proteins hen egg-white lysozyme and sperm whale myoglobin as well as the 7-transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin from Haloquadratum walsbyi. In conjunction with current developments at synchrotrons, this approach promises high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins to become faster and more routine.

  1. Crystal Structure of a Soluble Fragment of the Membrane Fusion Protein HlyD in a Type I Secretion System of Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Lee, Minho; Lee, Seunghwa; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-03-01

    The protein toxin HlyA of Escherichia coli is exported without a periplasmic intermediate by the type I secretion system (T1SS). The T1SS is composed of an inner membrane ABC transporter HlyB, an outer-membrane channel protein TolC, and a membrane fusion protein HlyD. However, the assembly of the T1SS remains to be elucidated. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of a part of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of HlyD. The long α-helical domain consisting of three α helices and a lipoyl domain was identified in the crystal structure. Based on the HlyD structure, we modeled the hexameric assembly of HlyD with a long α-helical barrel, which formed a complex with TolC in an intermeshing cogwheel-to-cogwheel manner, as observed in tripartite RND-type drug efflux pumps. These observations provide a structural blueprint for understanding the type I secretion system in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus EssB, an integral membrane component of the Type VII secretion system: atomic resolution crystal structure of the cytoplasmic segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltner, Martin; Fyfe, Paul K; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N

    2013-01-15

    The Type VII protein translocation/secretion system, unique to Gram-positive bacteria, is a key virulence determinant in Staphylococcus aureus. We aim to characterize the architecture of this secretion machinery and now describe the present study of S. aureus EssB, a 52 kDa bitopic membrane protein essential for secretion of the ESAT-6 (early secretory antigenic target of 6 kDa) family of proteins, the prototypic substrate of Type VII secretion. Full-length EssB was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, solubilized from the bacterial membrane, purified to homogeneity and shown to be dimeric. A C-terminal truncation, EssB∆C, and two soluble fragments termed EssB-N and EssB-C, predicted to occur on either side of the cytoplasmic membrane, have been successfully purified in a recombinant form, characterized and, together with the full-length protein, used in crystallization trials. EssB-N, the 25 kDa N-terminal cytoplasmic fragment, gave well-ordered crystals and we report the structure, determined by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) targeting an SeMet (selenomethionine) derivative, refined to atomic (1.05 Å; 1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution. EssB-N is dimeric in solution, but crystallizes as a monomer and displays a fold comprised of two globular domains separated by a cleft. The structure is related to that of serine/threonine protein kinases and the present study identifies that the Type VII secretion system exploits and re-uses a stable modular entity and fold that has evolved to participate in protein-protein interactions in a similar fashion to the catalytically inert pseudokinases.

  3. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  4. Using macromolecular-crystallography beamline and microfluidic platform for small-angle diffraction studies of lipidic matrices for membrane-protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashkina, E.; Khvostichenko, D. S.; Perry, S. L.; Von Osinski, J.; Kenis, P. J. A.; Brister, K.

    2013-03-01

    Macromolecular-crystallography (MX) beamlines routinely provide a possibility to change X-ray beam energy, focus the beam to a size of tens of microns, align a sample on a microdiffractometer using on-axis video microscope, and collect data with an area-detector positioned in three dimensions. These capabilities allow for running complementary measurements of small-angle X-ray scattering and diffraction (SAXS) at the same beamline with such additions to the standard MX setup as a vacuum path between the sample and the detector, a modified beam stop, and a custom sample cell. On the 21-ID-D MX beamline at the Advanced Photon Source we attach a vacuum flight tube to the area detector support and use the support motion for aligning a beam stop built into the rear end of the flight tube. At 8 KeV energy and 1 m sample-to-detector distance we can achieve a small-angle resolution of 0.01A-1 in the reciprocal space. Measuring SAXS with this setup, we have studied phase diagrams of lipidic mesophases used as matrices for membrane-protein crystallization. The outcome of crystallization trials is significantly affected by the structure of the lipidic mesophases, which is determined by the composition of the crystallization mixture. We use a microfluidic chip for the mesophase formulation and in situ SAXS data collection. Using the MX beamline and the microfluidic platform we have demonstrated the viability of the high-throughput SAXS studies facilitating screening of lipidic matrices for membrane-protein crystallization.

  5. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  6. 从含锑烟灰中湿法提取立方晶型三氧化二锑%Extraction of Cubic Crystal Antimony Trioxide from Dusts Containing Antimony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣良; 史宝良; 史爱波; 鞠洪博; 姜大伟; 王伟; 颜平

    2011-01-01

    以含锑烟尘为原料,采用HCI浸出-锑粉还原-Na2CO3中和-氨水添加EDTA水解工艺回收立方晶型Sb2O3产品.对回收工艺过程和条件进行了研究.重点探讨了浸出温度、浸出时间、HCI摩尔浓度、浸出液固比对Sb浸出率的影响,以及不同的SbCl3与EDTA摩尔比对产品Sb2O3晶型的影响.结果表明,采用该工艺Sb的浸出率为98.50%,Sb的回收率为90.35%,产品为纯的立方晶型Sb2O3.%With dusts containing antimony as raw material, the cubic crystal antimony trioxide was recovered by the processes including leaching in hydrochloric acid, antimony powder reduction, sodium carbonate-neutralization, and hydrolysis with EDTA as an additive in ammonia.The influences of leaching temperature, leaching time, hydrochloric acid concentrate, and ratio of liquid to solid on the leaching rate of Sb, and the molar ratio of SbCl3 to EDTA on the crystal of the antimony trioxide product were investigated.The results indicated that the leaching rate of Sb was 98.50%, the recovery of Sb was 90.35%, and the purity of product with cubic crystal antimony trioxide was 99.5%.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the outer membrane complex HasA–HasR from Serratia marcescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huché, Frédéric, E-mail: huche@pasteur.fr [Fachbereich Biologie, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Unité des Membranes Bactériennes, CNRS URA 2172, Département de Microbiologie Fondamentale et Médicale, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile [Unité des Membranes Bactériennes, CNRS URA 2172, Département de Microbiologie Fondamentale et Médicale, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Welte, Wolfram [Fachbereich Biologie, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The expression, purification, and crystallization in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} of the complex HasA-HasR from S. marcescens are reported. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 6.8 Å. Serratia marcescens is able to acquire iron using its haem-acquisition system (‘has’), which contains an outer membrane receptor HasR and a soluble haemophore HasA. After secretion, HasA binds free haem in the extracellular medium or extracts it from haemoproteins and delivers it to the receptor. Here, the crystallization of a HasA–HasR complex is reported. HasA and HasR have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the complex formed and crystallized. Small platelets and bunches of needles of dimensions 0.01 × 0.1 × 1 mm were obtained. A native data set has been collected to 6.8 Å.

  8. Crystal Structure of Dengue Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and its Implication for Receptor Binding, Membrane Fusion and Antibody Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, V.; Dessau, M; Kucera, K; Anthony, K; Ledizet, M; Modis, Y

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the pH sensor that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  9. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Composite Membranes for Inducing Bergenin Crystallization in Supercritical CO{sub 2} and Adsorption Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wencheng; Wang, Ruixia; Cui, Yanfang; Hong, Lile [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Xingyuan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2012-02-15

    The process of molecular imprinting is composed of three steps: covalent conjugate or noncovalent adduct between a functional monomer and a template molecule, which is the preorganization step; polymerization of this monomer-template conjugate (or adduct) and removal of the template from the polymer. In the above procedures, the molecular memory is strongly dependent on the formation and status of the template-monomer preorganization conjugate (or adduct). Therefore, to study these conjugates/adducts in detail is crucially important for understanding the imprinting mechanism and designing efficient molecular imprinting systems. On the other hand, one of the most important and facile ways to realize the molecular imprinting is using the molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs), which were first introduced by Piletsky et al. In MIMs systems, the combination of the imprinting technique can provide membranes with specific selectivity for the separation of targeted organic compounds and thus make the MIMs possess the advantages of both molecular imprinting and membrane technology.

  10. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  11. Fundamental Studies on Confinement Effects in Ionic Conduction and Inversion Layers in 2-D Single Crystal Free Standing Oxide Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-14

    Scientific Progress Please see below Technology Transfer Number of graduating undergraduates who achieved a 3.5 GPA to 4.0 (4.0 max scale): Number of...2-dimensional free standing membrane with correlated oxides may also lead to new insights into mesoscopic electronic phenomena. Vanadium oxide ( VO2 ...well as for potential applications in switching devices. While studies have been conducted on thin films, hybrid layers of VO2 supported on other

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of inner membrane complex (IMC) subcompartment protein 1 (ISP1) from Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Brown, Shannon; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    The protozoan parasites of the Apicomplexa phylum are devastating global pathogens. Their success is largely due to phylum-specific proteins found in specialized organelles and cellular structures. The inner membrane complex (IMC) is a unique apicomplexan structure that is essential for motility, invasion and replication. The IMC subcompartment proteins (ISP) have recently been identified in Toxoplasma gondii and shown to be critical for replication, although their specific mechanisms are unknown. Structural characterization of TgISP1 was pursued in order to identify the fold adopted by the ISPs and to generate detailed insight into how this family of proteins functions during replication. An N-terminally truncated form of TgISP1 was purified from Escherichia coli, crystallized and subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis. Two crystal forms of TgISP1 belonging to space groups P4(1)32 or P4(3)32 and P2(1)2(1)2(1) diffracted to 2.05 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively.

  13. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  14. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  15. Crystal structures of OprN and OprJ, outer membrane factors of multidrug tripartite efflux pumps of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Ryo; Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes tripartite efflux pumps that extrude functionally and structurally dissimilar antibiotics from the bacterial cell. MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY-OprM are the main tripartite efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. The outer membrane factors OprN, OprJ, and OprM are essential components of functional tripartite efflux pumps. To elucidate the structural basis of multidrug resistance, we determined the crystal structures of OprN and OprJ. These structures revealed several features, including tri-acylation of the N-terminal cysteine, a small pore in the β-barrel domain, and a tightly sealed gate in the α-barrel domain. Despite the overall similarity of OprN, OprJ, and OprM, a comparison of their structures and electrostatic distributions revealed subtle differences at the periplasmic end of the α-barrel domain. These results suggested that the overall structures of these outer membrane factors are specifically optimized for particular tripartite efflux pumps. Proteins 2016; 84:759-769. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-11-13

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen.

  17. The Crystal Structure of OprG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a Potential Channel for Transport of Hydrophobic Molecules across the Outer Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Touw; D Patel; b van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The crystal structure, together with recent biochemical data, suggests that OprG and other OmpW family members form channels that mediate the diffusion of small hydrophobic molecules across the OM by a lateral diffusion mechanism similar to that of E. coli FadL.

  18. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  19. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke Sonja; Krausze Joern; Büssow Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3), BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103) and macrosialin (CD68). LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The ...

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultis, David D.; Purdy, Michael D. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Banchs, Christian N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Wiener, Michael C., E-mail: mwiener@virginia.edu [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB{sup 147–239} was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B{sub 12}) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C{sub 8}E{sub 4} (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  1. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor. PMID:27727183

  2. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K

    2016-10-11

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  3. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Rostova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  4. Investigation into Airborne Dust ina Wool Textile Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Haghi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne dust samples were gathered from the vicinity of various commonly performed processes in the wool-preparation industry. Samples of airborne wool dust were collected on membrane filters during the processing of wool lots. The chemical composition of the inorganic particles present in the total inspirable and respirable dust fractions was determined with the use of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The widely differing morphologies of the particles collected raise questions about the validity of trying to correlate minor respiratory symptoms with dust concentrations, as some particle types will penetrate the respiratory system more easily than others. The results are discussed with respect to the sampling methodology used.

  5. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  6. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  7. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  8. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  9. Dust in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  10. PM2.5 Emission Control of Bag Hose Precipitator with Covering Membrane and Filtering Materials in Industrial Dust%覆膜滤料袋除尘器对工业粉尘中PM2.5的排放控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄斌香; 舒家华; 陈璀君; 冷瑞娟

    2013-01-01

      提出以覆膜滤料袋式除尘器来控制工业烟尘中PM2.5的排放,探讨了检测、计算的方法,分析了过滤元件的缺陷对排放效果的影响.%The paper puts forward to use the bag hose precipitator with covering membrane and filtering materials and to control PM2.5 emission in industrial dust; discusses the examination and calculational methods; analyzes the impact of filtering element limitation on emission effect.

  11. Dust ice nuclei effects on cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuebbeler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study aerosol-cloud interactions in cirrus clouds we apply a new multiple-mode ice microphysical scheme to the general circulation model ECHAM5-HAM. The multiple-mode ice microphysical scheme allows to analyse the competition between homogeneous freezing of solution droplets, deposition nucleation of pure dust particles, immersion freezing of coated dust particles and pre-existing ice. We base the freezing efficiencies of coated and pure dust particles on most recent laboratory data. The effect of pre-existing ice, which was neglected in previous ice nucleation parameterizations, is to deplete water vapour by depositional growth and thus prevent homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing from occurring. In a first step, we extensively tested the model and validated the results against in-situ measurements from various aircraft campaigns. The results compare well with observations; properties like ice crystal size and number concentration as well as supersaturation are predicted within the observational spread. We find that heterogeneous nucleation on mineral dust particles and the consideration of pre-existing ice in the nucleation process may lead to significant effects: globally, ice crystal number and mass are reduced by 10% and 5%, whereas the ice crystals size is increased by 3%. The reductions in ice crystal number are most pronounced in the tropics and mid-latitudes on the Northern Hemisphere. While changes in the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds in the tropics are mostly driven by considering pre-existing ice, changes in the northern hemispheric mid-latitudes mainly result from heterogeneous nucleation. The so called negative Twomey-effect in cirrus clouds is represented in ECHAM5-HAM. The net change in the radiation budget is −0.94 W m−2, implying that both, heterogeneous nucleation on dust and pre-existing ice have the potential to modulate cirrus properties in climate simulations and thus should be

  12. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  13. 膜蒸馏-结晶技术及在海水制盐中的应用%Membrane Distillation- Crystallization Technique and Its Application in Sea Salt Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹冬梅; 张雨山; 高春娟; 骆碧君; 武海虹

    2012-01-01

    Membrane distillation - crystallization technique is a new separation and purification technology that develpos rapidly in recent years. The research and application progress of membrane distillation crystallization in trastewater treatment, solvent recovery and salt water separation are reviewed in this paper. Facing with the problems such as the relative scarcity of land resources of Chinas coastal areas, the status of water shortages and the urgent requirement for environment protection of offshore area, it is feasible to utilize the brine and the concentrated seawatei from sea-water desalination process by membrane distillation crystallization technique.%膜蒸馏-结晶技术是近几年来发展迅速的一种新兴分离净化技术.文章综述了该技术在废水处理、溶质回收及盐水分离等方面的应用研究进展.根据我国沿海地区土地资源紧张、水资源短缺的现状和近岸海域环境保护的迫切需求,探讨了利用膜蒸馏-结晶技术对苦卤和海水淡化副产浓海水浓缩利用的可行性.

  14. Parameterization of cloud glaciation by atmospheric dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Madonna, Fabio; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko

    2016-04-01

    The exponential growth of research interest on ice nucleation (IN) is motivated, inter alias, by needs to improve generally unsatisfactory representation of cold cloud formation in atmospheric models, and therefore to increase the accuracy of weather and climate predictions, including better forecasting of precipitation. Research shows that mineral dust significantly contributes to cloud ice nucleation. Samples of residual particles in cloud ice crystals collected by aircraft measurements performed in the upper tropopause of regions distant from desert sources indicate that dust particles dominate over other known ice nuclei such as soot and biological particles. In the nucleation process, dust chemical aging had minor effects. The observational evidence on IN processes has substantially improved over the last decade and clearly shows that there is a significant correlation between IN concentrations and the concentrations of coarser aerosol at a given temperature and moisture. Most recently, due to recognition of the dominant role of dust as ice nuclei, parameterizations for immersion and deposition icing specifically due to dust have been developed. Based on these achievements, we have developed a real-time forecasting coupled atmosphere-dust modelling system capable to operationally predict occurrence of cold clouds generated by dust. We have been thoroughly validated model simulations against available remote sensing observations. We have used the CNR-IMAA Potenza lidar and cloud radar observations to explore the model capability to represent vertical features of the cloud and aerosol vertical profiles. We also utilized the MSG-SEVIRI and MODIS satellite data to examine the accuracy of the simulated horizontal distribution of cold clouds. Based on the obtained encouraging verification scores, operational experimental prediction of ice clouds nucleated by dust has been introduced in the Serbian Hydrometeorological Service as a public available product.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of composite dust on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokic, Stevan M; Hoet, Peter; Godderis, Lode; Wiemann, Martin; Asbach, Christof; Reichl, Franz X; De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L

    2016-12-01

    Previous research revealed that during routine abrasive procedures like polishing, shaping or removing of composites, high amounts of respirable dust particles (composite dust particles on bronchial epithelium cells. Composite dust of five commercial composites (one nano-composite, two nano-hybrid and two hybrid composites) was generated following a clinically relevant protocol. Polymerized composite samples were cut with a rough diamond bur (grain size 100μm, speed 200,000rpm) and all composite dust was collected in a sterile chamber. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to serially diluted suspensions of composite dust in cell culture medium at concentrations between 1.1 and 3.3mg/ml. After 24h-exposure, cell viability and membrane integrity were assessed by the WST-1 and the LDH leakage assay, respectively. The release of IL-1β and IL-6 was evaluated. The composite dust particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering. Neither membrane damage nor release of IL-1β was detected over the complete concentration range. However, metabolic activity gradually declined for concentrations higher than 660μg/ml and the release of IL-6 was reduced when cells were exposed to the highest concentrations of dust. Composite dust prepared by conventional dental abrasion methods only affected human bronchial epithelial cells in very high concentrations. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication contains articles entitled: (1) Crystallization of EGFR-EGF; (2) Crystallization of Apocrustacyanin C1; (3) Crystallization and X-ray Analysis of 5S rRNA and the 5S rRNA Domain A; (4) Growth of Lysozyme Crystals at Low Nucleation Density; (5) Comparative Analysis of Aspartyl tRNA-synthetase and Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and In Microgravity; (6) Lysosome Crystal Growth in the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility Monitored via Mach-Zehnder Interferometry and CCD Video; (7) Analysis of Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and in Microgravity; (8) Crystallization of the Nucleosome Core Particle; (9) Crystallization of Photosystem I; (10) Mechanism of Membrane Protein Crystal Growth: Bacteriorhodopsin-mixed Micelle Packing at the Consolution Boundary, Stabilized in Microgravity; (11) Crystallization in a Microgravity Environment of CcdB, a Protein Involved in the Control of Cell Death; and (12) Crystallization of Sulfolobus Solfataricus

  17. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  18. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  19. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  20. Synthesis of zeolite membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Haiyang; ZHANG Baoquan; Y. S. Lin; LI Yongdan

    2004-01-01

    Zeolite membranes offer great application potentials in membrane separation and/or reaction due to their excellent separation performance and catalytic ability. Up to present, various synthesis methods of zeolite membranes have been developed, including embedded method,in-situ hydrothermal synthesis method, and secondary growth method etc. Compared with the in-situ hydrothermal synthesis method, the secondary growth method possesses a variety of advantages such as easier operation, higher controllability in crystal orientation, microstructure and film thickness, leading to much better reproducibility. This review provides a concise summary and analysis of various synthesis methods reported in the literature. In particular, the secondary growth method was discussed in detail in terms of crystal orientation, defects and crystal grain layers. Some critical issues were also highlighted, which were conducive to the improvement in the synthesis technology of zeolite membranes.

  1. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  2. Dust escape from Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  3. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  4. Four complete turns of a curved 3₁₀-helix at atomic resolution: the crystal structure of the peptaibol trichovirin I-4A in a polar environment suggests a transition to α-helix for membrane function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2012-02-01

    The first crystal structure of a member of peptaibol antibiotic subfamily 4, trichovirin I-4A (14 residues), has been determined by direct methods and refined at atomic resolution. The monoclinic unit cell has two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Both molecules assume a 3₁₀ right-handed helical conformation and are significantly bent. The molecules pack loosely along the crystallographic twofold axis, forming two large tunnels between symmetry-related molecules in which no ordered solvent could be located. Carbonyl O atoms which are not involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding participate in close van der Waals interactions with apolar groups. The necessary amphipathicity for biological activity of peptaibols is not realised in the crystal structure. Hence, a structural change of trichovirin to an α-helical conformation is proposed for membrane integration and efficient water/ion transportation across the lipid bilayer.

  5. Probing the sheath electric field with a crystal lattice by using thermophoresis in dusty plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Victor; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional dust crystal levitated in the sheath of a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell is manipulated by heating or cooling the lower electrode. The dust charge is obtained by measuring global characteristics of the levitated crystal obtained from top-view pictures. From the force balance, the electric field in the sheath is reconstructed. From the Bohm criterion, we conclude that the dust crystal is levitated mainly above and just below the classical Bohm point.

  6. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  7. Testing the sensitivity of past climates to the indirect effects of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoo, Navjit; Storelvmo, Trude

    2017-06-01

    Mineral dust particles are important ice nuclei (IN) and as such indirectly impact Earth's radiative balance via the properties of cold clouds. Using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.6, and Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1, and a new empirical parameterization for ice nucleation on dust particles, we investigate the radiative forcing induced by dust IN for different dust loadings. Dust emissions are representative of global conditions for the Last Glacial Maximum and the mid-Pliocene Warm Period. Increased dust leads to smaller and more numerous ice crystals in mixed phase clouds, impacting cloud opacity, lifetime, and precipitation. This increases the shortwave cloud radiative forcing, resulting in significant surface temperature cooling and polar amplification—which is underestimated in existing studies relative to paleoclimate archives. Large hydrological changes occur and are linked to an enhanced dynamical response. We conclude that dust indirect effects could potentially have a significant impact on the model-data mismatch that exists for paleoclimates.Plain Language SummaryMineral dust and climate are closely linked, with large fluctuations in dust deposition recorded in geological archives. Dusty conditions are generally associated with cold, glacial periods and low dust with warmer climates. The direct effects of dust on the climate (absorbing and reflecting radiation) are well understood; however, the indirect effects of dust on climate have been overlooked. Dust indirectly impacts the climate through its role as ice nuclei; the presence of dust makes it easier for ice to form in a cloud. We explore the indirect effects of dust in climates with different dust loading from the present by conducting a climate modeling study in which dust are able to act as ice nuclei. Including dust indirect effects increases the sensitivity of our model to changes in dust emission. Increasing dust impacts ice crystal numbers (increased) and size

  8. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  9. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  10. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  11. An In Vitro Investigation of Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophage Cytotoxicity Introduced by Fibrous and Grainy Mineral Dusts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Faqin; DENG Jianjun; WU Fengchun; PU Xiaoyong; John HUANG; FENG Qiming; HE Xiaochun

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the damage mechanism of mineral dusts on the pulmonary alveolar macrophage (AM), the changes in their death ratio, malandialdthyde (MDA) content and activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured, and the technique of cell culture in vitro was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of six mineral dusts (twelve crystal habits)from twelve mineral deposits. The results show that wollastonite and clinoptilolite have no AM cytotoxicity, while other fibrous and grainy mineral dusts damage pulmonary AM in various degrees.The cytotoxicity of fibrous mineral dusts was greater than that of the grainy ones, and the cytotoxicity of dusts was positively correlated with the active OH- content in dusts, but not necessarily so with its SiO2 content. The high pH values produced by dust was unfavorable for the survival of cells and the dusts with low bio-resistance were safe for cells. The content of variable valence elements in dusts might influence their cytotoxicity and the surface charge of dusts was not a stable factor for their toxicity. It is demonstrated that the shape of mineral dusts was one of the factors affecting cytotoxicity, and that the cytotoxicity of mineral dusts depends mainly on their properties.

  12. From channel-forming ionic liquid crystals exhibiting humidity-induced phase transitions to nanostructured ion-conducting polymer membranes (adv. Mater. 26/2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Li, Lei; Möller, Martin; Zhu, Xiaomin; Rueda, Jaime J Hernandez; Rosenthal, Martin; Ivanov, Dimitri A

    2013-07-12

    A novel wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecule bearing a sulfonate group at the tip displays humidity-induced phase transitions from a hexagonal columnar structure to a bicontinuous cubic phase. The mesophases can be frozen by photopolymerization of acrylic end-groups resulting in free-standing membranes with different topology of ionic nanochannels. The obtained membranes with a well-ordered ionic channel structure hold promise for applications in separation and catalysis.

  13. Hydrothermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Yuh-Ruey; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2011-06-15

    In this study, ZnO crystals were fabricated from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) after alkaline leaching, purification and hydrothermal treatment. The effects of temperature, duration, pH, and solid/liquid ratio on ZnO crystal morphology and size were investigated. Results show a high reaction temperature capable of accelerating the dissolution of ZnO precursor, expediting the growth of 1D ZnO, and increasing the L/D ratio in the temperature range of 100-200°C. ZnO crystals with high purity can also be obtained, using the one-step hydrothermal treatment with a baffle that depends on the different solubility of zincite and franklinite in the hydrothermal conditions.

  14. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas, E-mail: michael.kopp@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: thomas.haugg@physik.lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, 80333 (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  15. Controlling strongly correlated dust clusters with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Thomsen, Hauke; Bonitz, Michael; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Schella, André; Melzer, André

    2014-01-01

    The most attractive feature of dusty plasmas is the possibility to create strong correlations at room temperatures. At the same time, these plasmas allow for a precise diagnostics with single-particle resolution. From such measurements, the structural properties of finite two-dimensional (2D) clusters and three-dimensional (3D) spherical crystals in nearly harmonic traps-Yukawa balls-have been explored in great detail. Their structural properties-the shell compositions and the order within the shells-have been investigated and good agreement to theoretical predictions was found. Open questions on the agenda are the excitation behavior, the structural changes, and phase transitions that occur at elevated temperature. In order to increase the dust temperature in the experiment various techniques have been used. Among them, laser heating appears to have unique capabilities because it affects only the dust particles, leaving the lighter plasma components unchanged. Here we report on recent experimental results wh...

  16. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  17. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  18. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  19. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  20. Dust Devil Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 6 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Dust devils, small cyclonic wind storms, are common in the American Southwest and on Mars. As the dust devil moves across the surface it picks up the loose dust, leaving behind a dark track to mark its passage. These dust devil tracks are in the Argyre Basin. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -46.6, Longitude 317.5 East (42.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the

  1. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Fenton, Lori; Neakrase, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michael; Statella, Thiago; Whelley, Patrick; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Balme, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Dust devils that leave dark- or light-toned tracks are common on Mars and they can also be found on the Earth's surface. Dust devil tracks (hereinafter DDTs) are ephemeral surface features with mostly sub-annual lifetimes. Regarding their size, DDT widths can range between ˜1 m and ˜1 km, depending on the diameter of dust devil that created the track, and DDT lengths range from a few tens of meters to several kilometers, limited by the duration and horizontal ground speed of dust devils. DDTs can be classified into three main types based on their morphology and albedo in contrast to their surroundings; all are found on both planets: (a) dark continuous DDTs, (b) dark cycloidal DDTs, and (c) bright DDTs. Dark continuous DDTs are the most common type on Mars. They are characterized by their relatively homogenous and continuous low albedo surface tracks. Based on terrestrial and martian in situ studies, these DDTs most likely form when surficial dust layers are removed to expose larger-grained substrate material (coarse sands of ≥500 μm in diameter). The exposure of larger-grained materials changes the photometric properties of the surface; hence leading to lower albedo tracks because grain size is photometrically inversely proportional to the surface reflectance. However, although not observed so far, compositional differences (i.e., color differences) might also lead to albedo contrasts when dust is removed to expose substrate materials with mineralogical differences. For dark continuous DDTs, albedo drop measurements are around 2.5 % in the wavelength range of 550-850 nm on Mars and around 0.5 % in the wavelength range from 300-1100 nm on Earth. The removal of an equivalent layer thickness around 1 μm is sufficient for the formation of visible dark continuous DDTs on Mars and Earth. The next type of DDTs, dark cycloidal DDTs, are characterized by their low albedo pattern of overlapping scallops. Terrestrial in situ studies imply that they are formed when sand

  2. Dust during the Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, E; Elfgren, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that population III stars have reionized the Universe at redshifts greater than 6 has recently gained momentum with WMAP polarization results. Here we analyse the role of early dust produced by these stars and ejected into the intergalactic medium. We show that this dust, heated by the radiation from the same population III stars, produces a submillimetre excess. The electromagnetic spectrum of this excess is compatible with the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) cosmic far infrared background. This spectrum, a Doppler spectrum times the $\

  3. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  4. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  5. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  6. Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Hazard Assessments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Taylor, L. A.; Wallace, W. T.; James, J.; Riofrio, L.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    was developed for this task. The dust separation system includes a fluidized bed, an elutriation flask, and a cyclone. The product dust is collected on a membrane filter with 0.45 micrometer pore size. Collection and separation efficiencies, and particle size distribution measurements of the material retained in the various components are tracked as development and tests proceed. Calculations show that respirable-sized particles, if released in a habitat, would remain suspended in the air for extended periods of time. Without active dust control, most of this fine dust would end up in the crew’s lungs. Dust exposure standards, similar to those established for quartz on Earth, will determine the design, mass, power, and cost of dust control systems incorporated into lunar habitats and pressurized rovers.

  7. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  8. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Senovilla, J M M; Senovilla, Jose M. M.; Vera, Raul

    2000-01-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has new surprising features. The universe is ``closed'' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is ``enclosed'' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable agai...

  9. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  10. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  11. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  12. Thermal treatment for nanofibrous membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinylidene fluoride nanofibrous membranes with high porosity, large electrolyte solution uptake, and adequate mechanical properties were prepared by electrospinning. The physical properties of the electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride membranes can be improved by thermal treatment. Results showed after the thermal treatment, there had appeared ever-increasing tensile strength and elongation of the poly(vinylidene fluoride membranes. The crystal structures of poly(vinylidene fluoride fibers were greatly improved.

  13. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  14. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  15. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus EssB, an integral membrane component of the Type VII secretion system: atomic resolution crystal structure of the cytoplasmic segment

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltner, Martin; Fyfe, Paul K.; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N.

    2012-01-01

    The Type VII protein translocation/secretion system, unique to Gram-positive bacteria, is a key virulence determinant in Staphylococcus aureus. We aim to characterize the architecture of this secretion machinery and now describe the present study of S. aureus EssB, a 52 kDa bitopic membrane protein essential for secretion of the ESAT-6 (early secretory antigenic target of 6 kDa) family of proteins, the prototypic substrate of Type VII secretion. Full-length EssB was heterologously expressed i...

  16. Southern Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 9 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. In our final dust devil image we are again looking at the southern hemisphere of Mars. These tracks occur mainly on the northeast side of the topographic ridges. Of course, there are many exceptions, which makes understanding the dynamics that initiate the actual dust devil cyclone difficult. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -47.6, Longitude 317.3 East (42.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed

  17. Plentiful Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 8 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. These dust devil tracks occur on the northern plains of Mars. The majority of the surface seen in the image has been affected by the passage of dust devils. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.6, Longitude 79.3 East (280.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  18. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  19. Preparation of Zeolite-metal Composite Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A NaA zeolite membrane was synthesized on the surface of the stainless steel slab. The membrane was characterized by XRD and SEM. The membrane was continuous and highly intergrown. The size of NaA zeolite crystals was about 5 ~ 6 mm.

  20. Preparation of Zeolite—metal Composite Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JieLIU; XiaoBoCHEN; 等

    2002-01-01

    A NaA Zeolite membrane was synthesized on the surface of the stainless steel slab. The membrane was characterized by XRD and SEM. The membrane was continuous and highly intergrown. The size of NaA zeolite crystals was about 5-6μm.

  1. Saharan dust event impacts on cloud formation and radiation over Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bangert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of mineral dust particles on clouds, radiation and atmospheric state during a strong Saharan dust event over Europe in May 2008, applying a comprehensive online-coupled regional model framework that explicitly treats particle microphysics and chemical composition. Sophisticated parameterizations for aerosol activation and ice nucleation, together with two-moment cloud microphysics are used to calculate the interaction of the different particles with clouds depending on their physical and chemical properties.

    The impact of dust on cloud droplet number concentration was found to be low, with just a slight increase in cloud droplet number concentration for both uncoated and coated dust. For temperatures lower than the level of homogeneous freezing, no significant impact of dust on the number and mass concentration of ice crystals was found, though the concentration of frozen dust particles reached up to 100 l−1 during the ice nucleation events. Mineral dust particles were found to have the largest impact on clouds in a temperature range between freezing level and the level of homogeneous freezing, where they determined the number concentration of ice crystals due to efficient heterogeneous freezing of the dust particles and modified the glaciation of mixed phase clouds.

    Our simulations show that during the dust events, ice crystals concentrations were increased twofold in this temperature range (compared to if dust interactions are neglected. This had a significant impact on the cloud optical properties which caused a reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation at the surface up to −75 W m−2 in areas with high dust concentrations. Including the direct interaction of dust with radiation caused an additional reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation which was found to be in the order of −40 to −80 W m−2. In contrast to the aerosol-cloud interaction only

  2. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  3. A coal dust burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhrshev, B.M.; Khasnullin, I.G.; Krauze, Ye.G.; Ushakov, Yu.A.; Zinovyev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The burner for combustion of coal dust fuel, primarily, in rotating furnaces, contains coaxially disposed pipes, a branch pipe for feeding in the air mixture and a rotating mechanism. The first two pipes are switched in to an air source. The third pipe on the input end has an oblique section and the pipe may be rotated around an axis by a mechanism. The first pipe has ports and it may be moved in an axial direction. By installing the third pipe in the first and second positions, it is possible to direct the dust coming from the branch pipe along the central (the larger part of the dust) or the central pipe, respectively, which makes it possible to regulate the configuration of the torch and its temperature. Hot air is sucked from the furnace through the ports in the perforated first pipe to the mouth of the burner, which makes it possible to intensify combustion. By moving the fifitpipe to the right it is possible to overlap the ports with the projections and to rule out suction of the air. The possibility of regulating combustion in wide ranges makes it possible to reduce the expenditure of fuel by 2 to 3 percent.

  4. High-efficiency screening of monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Lim

    Full Text Available Determination of crystal structures of membrane proteins is often limited by difficulties obtaining crystals diffracting to high resolution. Co-crystallization with Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies has been reported to improve diffraction of membrane proteins crystals. However, it is not simple to generate useful monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography. In this report, we present an optimized process for efficient screening from immunization to final validation of monoclonal antibody for membrane protein crystallography.

  5. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  6. SEPPCoN: Comet Dust and Activity at Moderate Heliocentric Distances as Observed with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Fernández, Y. R.; Reach, W. T.; Lisse, C. M.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bauer, J. M.; Campins, H.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P. L.; Licandro, J.; Lowry, S. C.; Meech, K. J.; Pittichova, J.; Toth, I.; Weaver, H. A.

    2007-10-01

    A Survey of Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei (SEPPCoN) is underway to characterize the nuclei of 100 Jupiter-family comets (JFC). The survey combines both visible and mid-infrared observations to measure the JFC size and albedo distributions. We inspected Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS and IRS images of the survey targets for dust comae, tails, and trails. Out of 98 observed comets, we found 32 to have some emission from dust outside of the central point source. A few of these sources were also observed to have dust in visible, ground-based data. The heliocentric distances (rh) of the 32 targets range from 3.5 to 6.5 AU, with most between 4 and 5 AU. We derive color-temperatures for the 20 dust detections observed in both the 16 and 22 micron IRS cameras and find the color-temperature approximately varies as 280*rh^(-0.5) [K], as expected for isothermal low-albedo dust in local thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss the evidence for outliers from this trend. We compare our observations to dust syndynes and 3-dimensional dust models to distinguish dust trails from dust tails. Unlike dust tails, dust trails only weakly respond to solar radiation pressure and, therefore, likely represent the largest (> 1 mm) grains ejected from the nucleus. We also compare observations to model images in order to determine the extent of recent coma activity. Water sublimation is expected to be greatly extinguished on comet surfaces by 3.5 AU. Dust structures observed outside of this rh could arise from recent coma activity (timescales up to weeks) caused by the sublimation of highly volatile ices (such as CO2) or the crystallization of amorphous water ice. Alternatively, the observed dust may be slowly dispersing grains ejected at a much earlier epoch (timescales up to years) when water sublimation dominated coma activity.

  7. Clouds and Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote

  8. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.;

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion...... of the zeolite particles, particularly after thermal treatment. When using mesoporous zeolites, the particles were evenly distributed throughout the mesopore system of the zeolitic support, even after calcination, leading to nanocrystals within mesoporous zeolite single crystals....

  9. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  10. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-01-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 microns, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 microns), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 micron-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale- Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11micron and 23 micron crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial transport models of our protoplanetary disk.

  11. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  12. Understanding mineral dusts from the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, J. P.; McDonald, E.; Gillies, J. A.; Jayanty, J.; Casuccio, G.; Gertler, A.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of airborne mineral dust collected during a period of approximately one year, largely in 2006, at Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (Northern, Central, Coastal, and Southern regions). To fully understand mineral dusts, their chemical and physical properties as well as mineralogical interrelationships were accurately established. Three collocated low volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended (TSP), less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) particulate matter were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a "1 in 6 day" sampling schedule. A total of 3,136 filter samples were collected on a 1-in-6 day schedule, along with one-time bulk soil samples, at each of the 15 sites. Sample media included Teflon® membrane and quartz fiber filters for chemical analysis (71 species), and Nuclepore® filters for individual particle analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The provisional study of the data revealed three broad air pollution sources: geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and until now unidentified lead-zinc smelters and battery-processing facilities. SEM results and secondary electron imagery show that quartz and other silicate minerals and, to a lesser extent, dolomite and calcite particles are coated by a thin Si-Al-Mg layer, probably the clay minerals palygorskite and/or montmorillonite/illite. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on aerosol samples collected at six military sites in Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, and Al Asad). PMF results reflect chemical differences amongst sources impacting at individual sites, further complicated by the regional geomorphology and meteorology. Sampling sites are seldom impacted by one source at

  13. Saharan Dust Event Impacts on Cloud Formation and Radiation over Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Nenes, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Barahona, D.; Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Kottmeier, C.; Blahak, U.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of mineral dust particles on clouds, radiation and atmospheric state during a strong Saharan dust event over Europe in May 2008, applying a comprehensive online-coupled regional model framework that explicitly treats particle-microphysics and chemical composition. Sophisticated parameterizations for aerosol activation and ice nucleation, together with two-moment cloud microphysics are used to calculate the interaction of the different particles with clouds depending on their physical and chemical properties. The impact of dust on cloud droplet number concentration was found to be low, with just a slight increase in cloud droplet number concentration for both uncoated and coated dust. For temperatures lower than the level of homogeneous freezing, no significant impact of dust on the number and mass concentration of ice crystals was found, though the concentration of frozen dust particles reached up to 100 l-1 during the ice nucleation events. Mineral dust particles were found to have the largest impact on clouds in a temperature range between freezing level and the level of homogeneous freezing, where they determined the number concentration of ice crystals due to efficient heterogeneous freezing of the dust particles and modified the glaciation of mixed phase clouds. Our simulations show that during the dust events, ice crystals concentrations were increased twofold in this temperature range (compared to if dust interactions are neglected). This had a significant impact on the cloud optical properties, causing a reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation at the surface up to -75Wm-2. Including the direct interaction of dust with radiation caused an additional reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation by 40 to 80Wm-2, and the incoming long-wave radiation at the surface was increased significantly in the order of +10Wm-2. The strong radiative forcings associated with dust caused a reduction in surface temperature in the order of -0

  14. Saharan dust event impacts on cloud formation and radiation over Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bangert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of mineral dust particles on clouds, radiation and atmospheric state during a strong Saharan dust event over Europe in May 2008, applying a comprehensive online-coupled regional model framework that explicitly treats particle microphysics and chemical composition. Sophisticated parameterizations for aerosol activation and ice nucleation, together with two-moment cloud microphysics are used to calculate the interaction of the different particles with clouds depending on their physical and chemical properties.

    The impact of dust on cloud droplet number concentration was found to be low, with just a slight increase in cloud droplet number concentration for both uncoated and coated dust. For temperatures lower than the level of homogeneous freezing, no significant impact of dust on the number and mass concentration of ice crystals was found, though the concentration of frozen dust particles reached up to 100 l−1 during the ice nucleation events. Mineral dust particles were found to have the largest impact on clouds in a temperature range between freezing level and the level of homogeneous freezing, where they determined the number concentration of ice crystals due to efficient heterogeneous freezing of the dust particles and modified the glaciation of mixed phase clouds.

    Our simulations show that during the dust events, ice crystals concentrations were increased twofold in this temperature range (compared to if dust interactions are neglected. This had a significant impact on the cloud optical properties, causing a reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation at the surface up to −75 W m−2. Including the direct interaction of dust with radiation caused an additional reduction in the incoming short-wave radiation by 40 to 80 W m−2, and the incoming long-wave radiation at the surface was increased significantly in the order of +10 W m−2.

    The

  15. Membrane accessibility of glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Alvaro; Eljack, Nasma D; Sani, Marc-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the ion pumping activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is crucial to the survival of animal cells. Recent evidence has suggested that the activity of the enzyme could be controlled by glutathionylation of cysteine residue 45 of the β-subunit. Crystal structures so far available indicate...... that this cysteine is in a transmembrane domain of the protein. Here we have analysed via fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulations whether glutathione is able to penetrate into the interior of a lipid membrane. No evidence for any penetration of glutathione into the membrane...

  16. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various pu

  17. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  18. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  19. Flying Through Dust From Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    How can we tell what an asteroid is made of? Until now, weve relied on remote spectral observations, though NASAs recently launched OSIRIS-REx mission may soon change this by landing on an asteroid and returning with a sample.But what if we could learn more about the asteroids near Earth without needing to land on each one? It turns out that we can by flying through their dust.The aerogel dust collector of the Stardust mission. [NASA/JPL/Caltech]Ejected CluesWhen an airless body is impacted by the meteoroids prevalent throughout our solar system, ejecta from the body are flung into the space around it. In the case of small objects like asteroids, their gravitational pull is so weak that most of the ejected material escapes, forming a surrounding cloud of dust.By flying a spacecraft through this cloud, we could perform chemical analysis of the dust, thereby determining the asteroids composition. We could even capture some of the dust during a flyby (for example, by using an aerogel collector like in the Stardust mission) and bring it back home to analyze.So whats the best place to fly a dust-analyzing or -collecting spacecraft? To answer this, we need to know what the typical distribution of dust is around a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) a problem that scientists Jamey Szalay (Southwest Research Institute) and Mihly Hornyi (University of Colorado Boulder) address in a recent study.The colors show the density distribution for dust grains larger than 0.3 m around a body with a 10-km radius. The distribution is asymmetric, with higher densities on the apex side, shown here in the +y direction. [Szalay Hornyi 2016]Moon as a LaboratoryTo determine typical dust distributions around NEAs, Szalay and Hornyi first look at the distribution of dust around our own Moon, caused by the same barrage of meteorites wed expect to impact NEAs. The Moons dust cloud was measured in situ in 2013 and 2014 by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment

  20. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  1. Crystal science fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, V.; Halfpenny, PJ; Roberts, KJ

    2017-01-01

    The fundamentals of crystal science notably crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal defects, crystal morphology and the surface chemistry of crystals are introduced with particular emphasis on organic crystals.

  2. Some ice nucleation characteristics of Asian and Saharan desert dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Field

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The large (7 m×4 m cylinder, 84 m3 AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber facility at Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany was used to test the ice nucleating ability of two desert dust samples from the Sahara and Asia. Aerosol samples were lognormally distributed with a mode diameter of 0.4(±0.1 μm and geometric standard deviation of ~1.7(±0.2. At temperatures warmer than −40°C droplets were formed before ice crystals formed and there was generally no deposition nucleation observed. At temperatures colder than −40°C both dust samples exhibited dual nucleation events that were observed during the same expansion experiment. The primary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios of 1.1 to 1.3 and is likely to be a deposition nucleation mode. The secondary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios between 1.35 and 1.5. We cannot categorically determine whether this ice nucleation event is via a further deposition mode or a condensation mode, but the presence of some soluble material in the dust samples leads us to favour the latter process. The activated fractions of desert dust ranged from ~5–10% at −20°C to 20–40% at temperatures colder than −40°C. There was no obvious difference between the nucleation behaviour of the two dust samples.

  3. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  4. Ice Nucleating Particle Properties in the Saharan Air Layer Close to the Dust Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, Y.; Garcia, I. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Linke, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Nickovic, S.; Lohmann, U.; Kanji, Z. A.; Sierau, B.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2013 and 2014 measurements of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations, aerosol particle size distributions, chemistry and fluorescence were conducted at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory located at 2373 m asl on Tenerife, west off the African shore. During summer, the observatory is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to dust. Absolute INP concentrations and activated fractions at T=-40 to -15°C and RHi=100-150 % were measured. In this study, we discuss the in-situ measured INP properties with respect to changes in the chemical composition, the biological content, the source regions as well as transport pathways and thus aging processes of the dust aerosol. For the first time, ice crystal residues were also analyzed with regard to biological content by means of their autofluorescence signal close to a major dust source region. Airborne dust samples were collected with a cyclone for additional offline analysis in the laboratory under similar conditions as in the field. Both, in-situ and offline dust samples were chemically characterized using single-particle mass spectrometry. The DREAM8 dust model extended with dust mineral fractions was run to simulate meteorological and dust aerosol conditions for ice nucleation. Results show that the background aerosol at Izaña was dominated by carbonaceous particles, which were hardly ice-active under the investigated conditions. When Saharan dust was present, INP concentrations increased by up to two orders of magnitude even at water subsaturated conditions at T≤-25°C. Differences in the ice-activated fraction were found between different dust periods which seem to be linked to variations in the aerosol chemical composition (dust mixed with changing fractions of sea salt and differences in the dust aerosol itself). Furthermore, two biomass burning events in 2014 were identified which led to very low INP concentrations under the investigated temperature and relative humidity

  5. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  6. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  7. Mining dust filter. Bergbaustaubfilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igelbuescher, H.; Hoelter, H.

    1988-12-28

    A dust filter for application underground, whose casing is designed as a transportable unit combinable with further casings and fitted with removable filter pockets. These filter pockets have a frame which seals towards the casing and with the lattices on which the filter cloth is stretched and with spacers holding the said lattices at a distance. Each casing as such has inspection ports that are operationable optionally on either side, and clean and crude gas channels on its upper side. The ends of these channels have coupleable head pieces, so that connection is made easy when casings are arranged in a line. Each crude gas channel is connected to the inside of the casing by means of perforations in the floor of said channel, whereas the clean gas channel, for its part, is in connection with the inside of the casing by means of a channel on the head side of the casing. It is thus possible to create a dust filter having practically any desired output by arranging individual modules in line, in which connection each individual module is reliably transportable on the facilities available below ground, as pre-fabricated above ground. Stable support of the sides of the filter cloths is ensured by the lattice that consists of reciprocally cranked longitudinal and transverse wires. 10 figs.

  8. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  9. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  10. Modeling impermeable membranes as acoustic filters for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenaga, Miguel A; Juan, Eduardo J

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this research project was to explore a mathematical expression that could be used by medical device designers to appropriately select impermeable membranes to isolate acoustic transducers from water, dust, earwax or other foreign material. The sound transmission properties of various types of impermeable membranes were analytically evaluated and compared to experimental measurements. Computer simulations were also performed to estimate the effects of three key membrane parameters: thickness (h), density (p) and sound speed (c), on the membrane's overall acoustic response. Results indicated that membrane thickness and density affect sound transmission the most. Membrane sound speed had minimal effect on sound transmission.

  11. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  12. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  13. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  14. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  15. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  16. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  17. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  18. Assessing the mineral dust indirect effects and radiation impacts on a simulated idealized nocturnal squall line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Seigel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is arguably the most abundant aerosol species in the world and it plays a large role in aerosol indirect effects (AIEs. This study assesses and isolates the individual responses in a squall line that arise (1 from radiation, (2 from dust altering the microphysics, as well as (3 from the synergistic effects between (1 and (2. To accomplish these tasks, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS set up as a cloud-resolving model (CRM. The CRM contains aerosol and microphysical schemes that allow mineral dust particles to nucleate as cloud drops and ice crystals, replenish upon evaporation and sublimation, be tracked throughout hydrometeor transition, and scavenge by precipitation and dry sedimentation.

    Factor separation is used on four simulations of the squall line in order to isolate the individual roles of radiation (RADIATION, microphysically active dust (DUST MICRO, and the nonlinear interactions of those factors (SYNERGY. Results indicate that RADIATION acts to increase precipitation, intensify the cold pool, and enhance the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to changes in microphysics beginning from cloud top cooling. Conversely, DUST MICRO decreases precipitation, weakens the cold pool, and weakens the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to an enhancement of the warm rain process. SYNERGY shows little impact on the squall line, except near the freezing level, where an increase in mesoscale organization takes place. The combined effect of the mineral dust AIE due to both DUST MICRO and SYNERGY is to weaken the squall line.

  19. Mineral dust indirect effects and cloud radiative feedbacks of a simulated idealized nocturnal squall line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Seigel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is arguably the most abundant aerosol species in the world and as such potentially plays a large role in aerosol indirect effects (AIEs. This study assesses and isolates the individual responses in a squall line that arise (1 from radiation, (2 from dust altering the microphysics, as well as (3 from the synergistic effects between (1 and (2. To accomplish these tasks, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS set up as a cloud-resolving model (CRM. The CRM contains aerosol and microphysical schemes that allow mineral dust particles to nucleate as cloud drops and ice crystals, replenish upon evaporation and sublimation, be tracked throughout hydrometeor transition, and be scavenged by precipitation and dry sedimentation. Factor separation is used on four simulations of the squall line in order to isolate the individual roles of radiation (RADIATION, microphysically active dust (DUST MICRO, and the nonlinear interactions of those factors (SYNERGY. Results indicate that RADIATION acts to increase precipitation, intensify the cold pool, and enhance the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to changes in microphysics originating from cloud top cooling. Conversely, DUST MICRO decreases precipitation, weakens the cold pool, and weakens the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to an enhancement of the warm rain process. SYNERGY shows little impact on the squall line, except near the freezing level, where an increase in mesoscale organization takes place. The combined effect of the mineral dust AIE due to both DUST MICRO and SYNERGY is to weaken the squall line.

  20. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000472.htm Membranous nephropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Membranous nephropathy is a kidney disorder that leads to changes ...

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Deluane, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s plans for implementing the Vision for Space Exploration include returning to the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration of Mars, and beyond. Dust on the lunar surface has a ubiquitous presence which must be explicitly addressed during upcoming human lunar exploration missions. While the operational challenges attributable to dust during the Apollo missions did not prove critical, the comparatively long duration of impending missions presents a different challenge. Near term plans to revisit the moon places a primary emphasis on characterization and mitigation of lunar dust. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems. This paper presents the current perspective and implementation of dust knowledge management and integration, and mitigation technology development activities within NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program. This work is presented within the context of the Constellation Program s Integrated Lunar Dust Management Strategy. The Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development project has been implemented within the ETDP. Project scope and plans will be presented, along with a a perspective on lessons learned from Apollo and forensics engineering studies of Apollo hardware. This paper further outlines the scientific basis for lunar dust behavior, it s characteristics and potential effects, and surveys several potential strategies for its control and mitigation both for lunar surface operations and within the working volumes of a lunar outpost.

  3. Firing membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappert, Emiel Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thermal processing is commonly employed to alter the chemistry and microstructure of membrane layers. It can shape, strengthen, and give functionality to a membrane. A good understanding of the processes taking place during the thermal processing of a membrane material allows for optimization and tu

  4. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Solvents Styrene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Uranium Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) For Educators Introduction Tox Town-Based Curriculum Units / Science Club Careers in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español ...

  5. Dust Acoustic Wave Excitation in a Plasma with Warm Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Thomas, E., Jr.; Marcus, L.; Fisher, R.; Williams, J. D.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the dust acoustic wave dispersion relation in dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges at the University of Iowa [1] and Auburn University [2] have shown the importance of finite dust temperature effects. The effect of dust grains with large thermal speeds was taken into account using kinetic theory of the ion-dust streaming instability [3]. The results of analytic and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation based on the kinetic theory will be presented and compared with the experimental results. [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [3] M. Rosenberg, E. Thomas Jr., and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 15, 073701 (2008).

  6. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  7. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  8. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  9. Quarter-lambda-shifted photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Ek, Sara;

    A new design for photonic crystal lasers is proposed and realised. It allows an intuitive design for ultralow mode volume and high Q cavities which can be realized in a connected membrane structure....

  10. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  11. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  12. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean; Blum, Juergen; Carpenter, John; Dominik, Carsten; Isella, Andrea; Natta, Antonella; Williams, Jonathan; Wilner, David

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In the core accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow from the submicron sizes typical of interstellar dust to micron size particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds and cores, the growth from micron size particles to pebbles and kilometre size bodies must occur in protoplanetary disks. This step in the formation of planetary systems is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in young extrasolar systems. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational...

  13. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  14. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  15. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Andrews, S.; Blum, J.; Carpenter, J.; Dominik, C.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Williams, J. P.; Wilner, D. J.

    In the core-accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow up to micrometer-sized particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds, the growth to pebbles and kilometer-sized bodies must occur at the high densities within protoplanetary disks. This critical step is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in extrasolar systems before the appearance of large planetary-sized bodies. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational signatures of these processes are summarized. We briefly discuss grain growth in molecular cloud cores and in collapsing envelopes of protostars, as these likely provide the initial conditions for the dust in protoplanetary disks. We then review the observational constraints on grain growth in disks from millimeter surveys, as well as the very recent evidence for radial variations of the dust properties in disks. We also include a brief discussion on the small end of the grain size distribution and dust settling as derived from optical, near-, and mid-infrared observations. Results are discussed in the context of global dust-evolution models; in particular, we focus on the emerging evidence for a very efficient early growth of grains and the radial distribution of maximum grain sizes as the result of growth barriers. We also highlight the limits of the current models of dust evolution in disks, including the need to slow the radial drift of grains to overcome the migration/fragmentation barrier.

  16. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  17. Quarter-lambda-shifted photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Ek, Sara

    A new design for photonic crystal lasers is proposed and realised. It allows an intuitive design for ultralow mode volume and high Q cavities which can be realized in a connected membrane structure.......A new design for photonic crystal lasers is proposed and realised. It allows an intuitive design for ultralow mode volume and high Q cavities which can be realized in a connected membrane structure....

  18. Dust in the Interplanetary Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Lamy, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nano dust particles of sizes 1 - 10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nano dust are detected near 1AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Though such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  19. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  20. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  1. Biophysical studies of membrane channel polypeptides

    CERN Document Server

    Galbraith, T P

    2001-01-01

    Membrane channels facilitate the flow of ions across biological membranes, a process which is important in numerous cellular functions. The study of large integral membrane proteins is made difficult by identification, production and purification problems, and detailed knowledge of their three-dimensional structures is relatively scarce. The study of simple 'model' membrane proteins has given valuable insight into the structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in general. The bacterial peptide gramicidin has been the subject of intense study for many years, and has provided important information into the structural basis of channel function. Peptaibols, a class of fungal membrane peptides which includes alamethicin and antiamoebin, have also been useful in relating structural details to molecular ion transport processes. Gramicidin crystals were grown in the presence of phospholipids with various headgroups and acyl chains. The diffraction patterns of the crystals obtained were processed, but found to be in...

  2. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  3. Circumplanetary dust dynamics : application to Martian dust tori and Enceladus dust plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Makuch, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Our Solar system contains a large amount of dust, containing valuable information about our close cosmic environment. If created in a planet's system, the particles stay predominantly in its vicinity and can form extended dust envelopes, tori or rings around them. A fascinating example of these complexes are Saturnian rings containing a wide range of particles sizes from house-size objects in the main rings up to micron-sized grains constituting the E ring. Other example are ring systems in g...

  4. Basic properties of sintering dust from iron and steel plant and potassium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Guang; Guo, Zhancheng

    2013-06-01

    With the production of crude steel, China produces several million tons of sintering dusts which contain a great deal of valuable metals such as, K, Na, Zn, Pb. If discharged directly without adequate treatment, these elements can lead to adverse effects on the environment. Therefore, it is very necessary to determine how to separate these elements from the dust before discharge. Several physical and chemical detection methods were used to study the basic properties of sintering dust. At the same time, preliminary experiments on the recovery of the potassium resources from the sintering dust were carried out. The mean particle size of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) dust determined by a laser granulometer was 41.468 microm. Multi-point BET and single-point BET analysis showed that the surface area of the ESP dust was 2.697 m2/g. XRD measurements detected the following phases in the ESP dust: Fe2O3, Fe3O4, KCl and NaCl, and Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and SiO2 in the water-washed dust. SEM-EDS results proved that in the ESP dust, K mostly existed in the form of KCl particles without being coated. Leaching experiments showed that the KCl in the ESP dust could be separated and recovered by water leaching and fractional crystallization. Through the recovery experiments, the yield of K-Na vaporized crystalline salt was 18.56%, in which the mass fractions of KCl, NaCl, CaSO4 and K2SO4 were about 61.03%, 13.58%, 14.03% and 9.97%, respectively. This process is technically viable and considerable in economic benefit. There was almost no secondary pollution produced in the whole recovery process.

  5. Studies of heterogeneous freezing by three different desert dust samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Connolly

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present results of experiments at the aerosol interactions and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA chamber facility looking at the freezing of water by three different types of mineral particles at temperatures between −12°C and −33°C. The three different dusts are Asia Dust-1 (AD1, Sahara Dust-2 (SD2 and Arizona test Dust (ATD. The dust samples used had particle concentrations of sizes that were log-normally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and standard deviations, σg, of 1.6–1.9. The results from the freezing experiments are consistent with the singular hypothesis of ice nucleation. The dusts showed different nucleation abilities, with ATD showing a rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density at temperatures less than −24°C. AD1 was the next most efficient freezing nuclei and showed a more gradual increase in activity than the ATD sample. SD2 was the least active freezing nuclei.

    We used data taken with particle counting probes to derive the ice-active surface site density forming on the dust as a function of temperature for each of the three samples and polynomial curves are fitted to this data. The curve fits are then used independently within a bin microphysical model to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments in order to test the validity of parameterising the data with smooth curves. Good agreement is found between the measurements and the model for AD1 and SD2; however, the curve for ATD does not yield results that agree well with the observations. The reason for this is that more experiments between −20 and −24°C are needed to quantify the rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density on ATD in this temperature regime. The curves presented can be used as parameterisations in atmospheric cloud models where cooling rates of approximately 1°C min−1 or more are present to predict the concentration of ice crystals forming by the

  6. Studies of heterogeneous freezing by three different desert dust samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Connolly

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of experiments at the aerosol interactions and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA chamber facility looking at the freezing of water by three different types of mineral particles at temperatures between −12°C and −33°C. The three different dusts are Asia Dust-1 (AD1, Sahara Dust-2 (SD2 and Arizona test Dust (ATD. The dust samples used had particle concentrations of sizes that were log-normally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and standard deviations, σg, of 1.6–1.9. The results from the freezing experiments are consistent with the singular hypothesis of ice nucleation. The dusts showed different nucleation abilities, with ATD showing a rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density at temperatures less than −24°C. AD1 was the next most efficient freezing nuclei and showed a more gradual increase in activity than the ATD sample. SD2 was the least active freezing nuclei.

    We used data taken with particle counting probes to derive the ice-active surface site density forming on the dust as a function of temperature for each of the three samples and polynomial curves are fitted to this data. The curve fits are then used independently within a bin microphysical model to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments in order to test the validity of parameterising the data with smooth curves. Good agreement is found between the measurements and the model for AD1 and SD2; however, the curve for ATD does not yield results that agree well with the observations. The reason for this is that more experiments between −20 and −24°C are needed to quantify the rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density on ATD in this temperature regime. The curves presented can be used as parameterisations in atmospheric cloud models where cooling rates of approximately 1°C min−1 or more are present to predict the concentration of ice crystals forming by

  7. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  8. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  9. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  10. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  11. Axion Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Sho

    2016-01-01

    The low-energy effective theories for gapped insulators are classified by three parameters: permittivity $\\epsilon$, permeability $\\mu$, and theta angle $\\theta$. Crystals with periodic $\\epsilon$ are known as photonic crystals. We here study the band structure of photons in a new type of crystals with periodic $\\theta$ (modulo $2\\pi$) in space, which we call the axion crystals. We find that the axion crystals have a number of new properties that the usual photonic crystals do not possess, such as the helicity-dependent photonic band gaps and the nonrelativistic gapless dispersion relation at small momentum. We briefly discuss possible realizations of axion crystals in condensed matter systems as well as high-energy physics.

  12. Dust-infused baroclinic cyclone storm clouds: The evidence, meteorology, and some implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Michael; Kablick, George; Caffrey, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Desert mineral dust is a critical yet still poorly understood component of atmospheric composition, weather, and climate. Long-range transport of dust is well known, yet uncertainty persists regarding the pathway from the desert floor to the free troposphere. Here we will show that a recurrent pathway for dust into the uppermost troposphere involves passage through an extratropical baroclinic cyclonic storm. The evidence derives from a synergistic use of satellite-based, multispectral nadir-image data and lidar. The dust-infused baroclinic storm (DIBS) exhibits peculiar cirrus cloud top reflected and emitted radiance from the UV through thermal IR, involving positive UV absorbing aerosol index, muted visible reflectivity, visible cumuliform texture, and systematically intense visible lidar backscatter on a synoptic scale. Proof that the DIBS is microphysically impacted by storm-scale dust infusion is the occurrence of anomalously large daytime 3.9-11μm brightness temperature difference indicative of small ice crystals. We present multispectral snapshots of two DIBS, over two desert source regions, in comparison with a pristine baroclinic storm cloud. Each storm snapshot is presented in the context of the baroclinic cyclone's lifetime and dust source region (the Gobi desert and the Sahara). These and other cases discussed show that the DIBS is a recurring conduit for long-range transport and a natural experiment in dust-related aerosol indirect effects.

  13. Image processing of 2D crystal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheit, Marcel; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Thierry, Raphaël; Gipson, Bryant R; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Electron crystallography of membrane proteins uses cryo-transmission electron microscopy to image frozen-hydrated 2D crystals. The processing of recorded images exploits the periodic arrangement of the structures in the images to extract the amplitudes and phases of diffraction spots in Fourier space. However, image imperfections require a crystal unbending procedure to be applied to the image before evaluation in Fourier space. We here describe the process of 2D crystal image unbending, using the 2dx software system.

  14. Cytotoxic Effects of Re-Activated Lunar Dust Stimulant on Human Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Lunar dust has been of significant concern due to various problems observed on the Apollo missions. Reports from astronauts have shown that the dust may have caused eye and nasal irritation as well as possible hay fever like symptoms. As NASA hopes to go to the Moon within the next few years, we hope to understand the possible toxic effects the dust might have. In these studies, we are looking at the effect of "re-activated" lunar dust stimulant on human bronchial cells. A simple grinding analog as a method of simulating micrometeorite crushing on the moon is used to "activate" the dust stimulant, i.e. capable of producing hydroxyl radicals. These radicals could then interact with human cells and may lead to a loss in membrane integrity and cell death. (Castranova, 1994) Cells are exposed to the dust for 6 and 24 hour intervals to assess cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity is measured by looking at the production of inflammatory cytokines. Cells are exposed to ground and unground stimulant and compared to cytokine production from cells exposed to quartz which have a known toxicity. Here we look at the cytotoxicity of the lunar dust stimulant relative to quartz by measuring the production of inflammatory cytokines.

  15. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  16. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  17. Synthesis of Silicalite-1 Zeolite Membranes Under Microwave Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Wei; ZHAO; Lina; LIU; Jianguo; YAN; Chuanwei; YANG; Jianhua; WANG; Jinqu

    2015-01-01

    Silicalite-1 membranes supported on macroporous Al2O3 tubes were prepared by in-situ crystallization and secondary growth method under microwave-assisted closed system. The influences of crystallization time and temperature on properties of the as-prepared membranes were investigated. Results show that by in-situ crystallization at different temperatures it’s hardly to obtain uniform membranes on the poor supports, while by secondary growth method dense and well-intergrown silicalite-1 membranes with thickness of 2 μm on seeded supports can be obtained even at 393 K for 60 min. At 423 K, 30 min was enough to synthesize well-intergrown and uniform zeolite membrane under microwave heating. These silicalite-1 membranes also exhibit well hydrogen permeation performance. The effect of temperature was more remarkable than that of time evaluated from the morphology difference of these membranes.

  18. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern.

  19. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  20. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  1. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  2. Coal dust: the real cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S. [Independent Editorial and Technical Services, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    A recent British court case awarded retired coal miners compensation for asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Although the sums involved were small, large numbers of retired coal miners are likely to be eligible for such awards, as British safety in mines was not substantially worse than most other producers at the time, and was better than many. In some parts of the world safety standards are still poor. Dust suppression should be used on coal cutting machines, and dust controlled in transit. This may prove less expensive than it initially appears since the coal dust can be used instead of lost. This particularly important for transport in open trucks. Employers must also ensure that the safety equipment supplied is both comfortable and used. 3 refs., 5 photos.

  3. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  4. Polarized Emission from Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, J E

    2006-01-01

    Observations of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (SMM) polarized emission are used to study magnetic fields and dust grains in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). These observations place constraints on models of molecular clouds, star-formation, grain alignment mechanisms, and grain size, shape, and composition. The FIR/SMM polarization is strongly dependent on wavelength. We have attributed this wavelength dependence to sampling different grain populations at different temperatures. To date, most observations of polarized emission have been in the densest regions of the ISM. Extending these observations to regions of the diffuse ISM, and to microwave frequencies, will provide additional tests of grain and alignment models. An understanding of polarized microwave emission from dust is key to an accurate measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The microwave polarization spectrum will put limits on the contributions to polarized emission from spinning dust and vibrat...

  5. Microwave Emission from Aligned Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    Polarized microwave emission from dust is an important foreground that may contaminate polarized CMB studies unless carefully accounted for. We discuss potential difficulties associated with this foreground, namely, the existence of different grain populations with very different emission/polarization properties and variations of the polarization yield with grain temperature. In particular, we discuss observational evidence in favor of rotational emission from tiny PAH particles with dipole moments, i.e. ``spinning dust'', and also consider magneto-dipole emission from strongly magnetized grains. We argue that in terms of polarization, the magneto-dipole emission may dominate even if its contribution to total emissivity is subdominant. Addressing polarized emission at frequencies larger than approsimately 100 GHz, we discuss the complications arising from the existence of dust components with different temperatures and possibly different alignment properties.

  6. Whirling-type dust catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachev, V.G.; Butylkin, Yu.P.; Denisov, V.I.; Ermin, Yu.S.

    1980-10-07

    A whirling-type dust catcher is proposed, containing a cylindrical body mounted in its upper part, a diaphragm, a tangential nozzle (venturi) for delivery of the secondary gas, located in the lower part of the bunker body and an axial pipe with a vortex generator for introduction of the gas to be cleaned and a coaxial pipe connecting the bunker with the evacuation zone of the vortex generator. For increasing the degree of dust collection by elimination of gas fedthrough from the bunker into the axial zone of the dust catcher, it is equipped with an additional vortex generator set up in the outlet of the coaxial pipe, which is made in the shape of an inverse cone.

  7. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  8. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  9. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  10. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  11. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  12. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  13. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  14. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  15. Efficient radiative transfer in dust grain mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, S

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a dust grain mixture consisting of spherical dust grains with different radii and/or chemical composition on the resulting temperature structure and spectral energy distribution of a circumstellar shell is investigated. The comparison with the results based on an approximation of dust grain parameters representing the mean optical properties of the corresponding dust grain mixture reveal that (1) the temperature dispersion of a real dust grain mixture decreases substantially with increasing optical depth, converging towards the temperature distribution resulting from the approximation of mean dust grain parameters, and (2) the resulting spectral energy distributions do not differ by more than 10% if >= 2^5 grain sizes are considered which justifies the mean parameter approximation and the many results obtained under its assumption so far. Nevertheless, the dust grain temperature dispersion at the inner boundary of a dust shell may amount to >>100K and has therefore to be considered in the cor...

  16. Optimization of Photovoltaic Performance Through the Integration of Electrodynamic Dust Shield Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Steven; Davis, Kris; Hickman, Nicoleta; McFall, Judith; Arens, Ellen; Calle, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The viability of photovoltaics on the Lunar and Martian surfaces may be determined by their ability to withstand significant degradation in the Lunar and Martian environments. One of the greatest threats is posed by fine dust particles which are continually blown about the surfaces. In an effort to determine the extent of the threat, and to investigate some abatement strategies, a series of experiments were conducted outdoors and in the Moon and Mars environmental chamber at the Florida Solar Energy Center. Electrodynamic dust shield prototypes based on the electric curtain concept have been developed by our collaborators at the Kennedy Space Center [1]. These thin film layers can remove dust from surfaces and prevent dust accumulation. Several types of dust shields were designed, built and tested under high vacuum conditions and simulated lunar gravity to validate the technology for lunar exploration applications. Gallium arsenide, single crystal and polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic integrated devices were designed, built and tested under Moon and Mars environmental conditions as well as under ambient conditions. Photovoltaic efficiency measurements were performed on each individual cell with the following configurations; without an encapsulation layer, with a glass covering, and with various thin film dust shields. It was found that the PV efficiency of the hybrid systems was unaffected by these various thin film dust shields, proving that the optical transmission of light through the device is virtually uninhibited by these layers. The future goal of this project is to incorporate a photovoltaic cell as the power source for the electrodynamic dust shield system, and experimentally show the effective removal of dust obstructing any light incident on the cell, thus insuring power production is maximized over time.

  17. 75 FR 64411 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... the CMDPSU or CPDM and the sampled work shift is less than 8 hours, the value of t used for... Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety and...

  18. Early dust evolution in protostellar accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We investigate dust dynamics and evolution during the formation of a protostellar accretion disk around intermediate mass stars via 2D numerical simulations. Using three different detailed dust models, compact spherical particles, fractal BPCA grains, and BCCA grains, we find that even during the early collapse and the first 10,000 yr of dynamical disk evolution, the initial dust size distribution is strongly modified. Close to the disk's midplane coagulation produces dust particles of sizes ...

  19. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  20. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  1. Nonlinear phononics using atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Isacsson, Andreas; Croy, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials are used to tailor phonon and sound propagation properties by utilizing artificial, periodic structures. Analogous to photonic crystals, phononic band gaps can be created, which influence wave propagation and, more generally, allow engineering of the acoustic properties of a system. Beyond that, nonlinear phenomena in periodic structures have been extensively studied in photonic crystals and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices. However, creating nonlinear phononic crystals or nonlinear acoustic metamaterials remains challenging and only few examples have been demonstrated. Here, we show that atomically thin and periodically pinned membranes support coupled localized modes with nonlinear dynamics. The proposed system provides a platform for investigating nonlinear phononics.

  2. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  3. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    compositions of the bulk dust samples. Traces of minerals in the clay fraction of the Harmattan period dust may have their origin in the Bodélé Depression or other saline environments. The Harmattan dust deposited in Ghana shows only little resemblance to dust from the Chad basin and with Harmattan dust...... deposited in Niger. This study therefore suggests that the dust deposited during the Harmattan period in northern Ghana is not under significant influence of sediments from the Bodélé Depression. Similarity in the mineral and elemental composition of the dust from both the Harmattan and Monsoon periods...

  4. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  5. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  6. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate fur...

  7. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  8. GIADA On-Board Rosetta: Early Dust Grain Detections and Dust Coma Characterization of Comet 67P/C-G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Sordini, R.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Fulle, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Grün, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zakharov, V.; Zarnecki, J.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) flying on-board Rosetta is devoted to study the cometary dust environment of 67P/Churiumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: the GDS (Grain Detection System), based on grain detection through light scattering; an IS (Impact Sensor), giving momentum measurement detecting the impact on a sensed plate connected with 5 piezoelectric sensors; the MBS (MicroBalances System), constituted of 5 Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), giving cumulative deposited dust mass by measuring the variations of the sensors' frequency. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the velocity distribution of dust grains emitted from the cometary nucleus.No prior in situ dust dynamical measurements at these close distances from the nucleus and starting from such large heliocentric distances are available up to date. We present here the first results obtained from the beginning of the Rosetta scientific phase. We will report dust grains early detection at about 800 km from the nucleus in August 2014 and the following measurements that allowed us characterizing the 67P/C-G dust environment at distances less than 100 km from the nucleus and single grains dynamical properties. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project

  9. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods: Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (~0.40 arcsec) resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 μm, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio gala

  10. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  11. Dust in the interplanetary medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ingrid; Lamy, Herve [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Czechowski, Andrzej [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud, E-mail: ingrid.mann@aeronomie.b [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    2010-12-15

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nanodust particles of sizes {approx_equal}1-10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nanodust are detected near 1 AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Although such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  12. Crystal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  13. Glass-ceramic materials from electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouras, P; Kehagias, T; Tsilika, I; Kaimakamis, G; Chrissafis, K; Kokkou, S; Papadopoulos, D; Karakostas, Th

    2007-01-31

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) was vitrified with SiO2, Na2CO3 and CaCO3 powders in an electric furnace at ambient atmosphere. Vitreous products were transformed into glass-ceramic materials by two-stage heat treatment, at temperatures determined by differential thermal analysis. Both vitreous and glass-ceramic materials were chemically stable. Wollastonite (CaSiO3) was separated from the parent matrix as the dominant crystalline phase, verified by X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive spectrometry. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that wollastonite crystallizes mainly in its monoclinic form. Knoop microhardness was measured with the static indentation test method in all initial vitreous products and the microhardness values were in the region of 5.0-5.5 GPa. Devitrification resulted in glass-ceramic materials with microhardness values strongly dependent on the morphology and orientation of the separated crystal phase.

  14. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  16. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhuohan

    2014-01-01

    An accurate model of thermal dust emission at the far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths is important for studying the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and for understanding the cycling of matter and energy between stars and the interstellar medium. I will present results of fitting all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100 - 240 μm maps from the COBE-DIRBE, and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. I will also discuss the implications of the analysis on understanding astrophysical processes and the physical properties of dust grains.

  17. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  18. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  19. Global amount of dust in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the total amount of dust in the Universe that is produced in stellar evolution in the entire cosmic time is consistent with the observed amount, if we add to the dust amount inferred for galactic discs the amount recently uncovered in galactic haloes and the surrounding of galaxies in reddening of the quasar light passing through the vicinity of galaxies. The inventory concerning the dust closes. This implies that dust produced from stars should survive effectively for the cosmic time, and that a substantial amount of dust is produced in the burning phase of evolved stars of intermedaite mass.

  20. Efficiency of the deposition mode ice nucleation on mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition mode ice nucleation efficiency of various dust aerosols was investigated at cirrus cloud temperatures between 196 and 223 K using the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere. Arizona test dust (ATD as a reference material and two dust samples from the Takla Makan desert in Asia (AD1 and the Sahara (SD2 were used for the experiments at simulated cloud conditions. The dust particle sizes were almost lognormally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and geometric standard deviations between 1.6 and 1.9. Deposition ice nucleation was most efficient on ATD particles with ice-active particle fractions of about 0.6 and 0.8 at an ice saturation ratio SiSiSi. This indicates that deposition ice nucleation on mineral particles may not be treated in the same stochastic sense as homogeneous freezing. The suggested formulation of ice activation spectra may be used to calculate the formation rate of ice crystals in models, if the number concentration of dust particles is known. More experimental work is needed to quantify the variability of the ice activation spectra as function of the temperature and dust particle properties.

  1. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  2. Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Dust and Crystalline Silica in Foundries

    OpenAIRE

    Ali OMIDIANIDOST; Mehdi GHASEMKHANI; Azari, Mansour R.; Golbabaei,Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The term “crystalline silica” refers to crystallized form of SiO2 and quartz, as the most abundant compound on the earth’s crust; it is capable of causing silicosis and lung cancer upon inhaling large doses in the course of occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to assess occupational exposure to dust and crystalline silica in foundries in Pakdasht, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study, airborne dust samples were collected on PVC filters (37 mm diameter, 0.8 mm por...

  3. Chirality of quartz. Fibrosis and tumour development in dust inoculated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, P

    1991-10-01

    Dextro (d) and laevo (l) forms of quartz dust was inoculated intranasally and subcutaneously into 2-month-old (C57 x BALB/c)F1 mice which were killed 18 months later. Both d and l quartz caused fibrosis, liver nodule formation and an enhanced incidence of lymphoma/leukemia. However, the tumour incidence was significantly higher in l than in d quartz dust-treated animals. It is concluded that in addition to effects clearly independent of chirality there is evidence that the biological response to nonidentical mirror images of solid crystals may differ.

  4. Macromolecular crystallization and crystal perfection

    CERN Document Server

    Chayen, Naomi E; Snell, Edward H

    2010-01-01

    Structural biology is key to our understanding of the mechanisms of biological processes. This text describes current methods and future frontiers in crystal growth and use of X-ray and neutron crystallography, in the context of automation of crystallization and generation of synchrotron X-ray and neutron beams.

  5. Preparation of Mordenite Composite Membranes with Seeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Xiaohui; Li Gang; Lin Ruisen; Kikuchi Eiichi; Matsukata Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    Mordenite composite membranes were prepared by means of coating a porous α-alumina support with nanosized mordenite seeds followed by hydrothermal crystallization.A systematic investigation was performed on the influence of several factors such as ageing of the reaction mixture,alkalinity,salt addition and temperature on the formation of a mordenite membrane on the seeded support.The ageing of the reaction mixture reduces the growth rate of mordenite crystal along a-axis and b-axis but hardly influences the growth rate along c-axis.As a result,the boundaries between the surface crystals become a little larger with prolonging the period of ageing time.The growth rate of the mordenite crystal along individual axes increases first and then decreases with increasing concentration of sodium hydroxide.A higher alkalinity is unfavorable for the formation of a continuous mordenite membrane.The addition of salt in the reaction mixture has different effect on the growth rate of the mordenite crystal along each axis.With increasing the amount of salt,there was hardly influence on the growth rate along c-axis,whereas an obvious decline was observed in the growth rate along either a-axis or b-axis,which enlarges the boundaries between the surface crystals.The growth rate of the mordenite crystal increases more along c-axis than that along a-axis or b-axis with increasing temperature for hydrothermal crystallization.The use of a temperature as high as 473 K produces a membrane composed of bar-like crystals with larger boundaries.

  6. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  7. Cryogenic Piezo Actuators for Lightweight, Large Aperture, Deployable Membrane Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Single crystal piezoelectric actuators are proposed to enable large stroke, high precision, shape control for cryogenic lightweight deployable membrane mirror...

  8. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  9. Dust Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Landgraf, M; Grün, Eberhard; Krüger, Harald; Landgraf, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Dust measurements in the outer solar system are reviewed. Only the plasma wave instrument on board Voyagers 1 and 2 recorded impacts in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Pioneers 10 and 11 measured a constant dust flux of 10-micron-sized particles out to 20 AU. Dust detectors on board Ulysses and Galileo uniquely identified micron-sized interstellar grains passing through the planetary system. Impacts of interstellar dust grains onto big EKB objects generate at least about a ton per second of micron-sized secondaries that are dispersed by Poynting-Robertson effect and Lorentz force. We conclude that impacts of interstellar particles are also responsible for the loss of dust grains at the inner edge of the EKB. While new dust measurements in the EKB are in an early planning stage, several missions (Cassini and STARDUST) are en route to analyze interstellar dust in much more detail.

  10. A lunar dust simulant: CLDS-i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Li, Xiongyao; Zhang, Sensen; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Shijie; Li, Yang; Wu, Yanxue

    2017-02-01

    Lunar dust can make serious damage to the spacecrafts, space suits, and health of astronauts, which is one of the most important problems faced in lunar exploration. In the case of rare lunar dust sample, CLDS-i with high similarity to the real lunar dust is an important objective for studying dust protection and dust toxicity. The CLDS-i developed by the Institute of Geochemistry Chinese Academy Sciences contains ∼75 vol% glass and a little nanophase metal iron (np-Fe0), and with a median particle size about 500 nm. The CLDS-i particles also have complicated shape and sharp edges. These properties are similar to those of lunar dust, and make the CLDS-i can be applied to many fields such as the scientific researches, the treatment technology and toxicological study of lunar dust.

  11. Liquid crystal tunable photonic crystal dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Smith, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    We present a dye-doped liquid crystal laser using a photonic crystal cavity. An applied electric field to the liquid crystal provides wavelength tunability. The photonic crystal enhances resonant interaction with the gain medium....

  12. Influence of mineral dusts on metabolism of arachidonic acid by alveolar macrophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, L.M.; Kuhn, D.C. [Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    1994-12-01

    The alveolar macrophage (AM) responds to stimuli such as coal mine dust by releasing inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and eicosanoids. In this report, the authors examined the effects of an antioxidant, vitamin E, on dust-induced synthesis of PGE(2) and TXB(2) in vitro and in vivo by AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from rats. They also looked at the effects of the surface of silica particles on AM eicosanoid biosynthesis under conditions of calcination, a process that removes exposed hydroxyl groups from the surface of silica particles, thus reducing the likelihood of soluble hydroxyl radical formation. Treatment of AM with vitamin E in vivo and in vitro reduced the augmentation in eicosanoid production usually observed when AM are exposed to mine dusts. These results suggest that vitamin E may effectively reduce the inflammatory and fibrotic response produced by inhalation of mineral dust through an antioxidant mechanism. Silica that has been chemically altered by calcination was unable to activate AM eicosanoid production in vitro when compared to untreated, freshly fractured silica. These findings suggest that the mechanism by which dust particles can activate AM eicosanoid release may involve interaction of surface and/or soluble factors with the cell membrane. Taken together, these studies point to the involvement of Am eicosanoid production as part of the proinflammatory response of this cell to occupational inhalation of mineral dust.

  13. Crystal Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Armstrong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal dislocations were invisible until the mid-20th century although their presence had been inferred; the atomic and molecular scale dimensions had prevented earlier discovery. Now they are normally known to be just about everywhere, for example, in the softest molecularly-bonded crystals as well as within the hardest covalently-bonded diamonds. The advent of advanced techniques of atomic-scale probing has facilitated modern observations of dislocations in every crystal structure-type, particularly by X-ray diffraction topography and transmission electron microscopy. The present Special Issue provides a flavor of their ubiquitous presences, their characterizations and, especially, their influence on mechanical and electrical properties.

  14. Regional characteristics of dust events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShigong; WANGJinyan; ZHOUZijiang; SHANGKezheng; YANGDebao; ZHAO

    2003-01-01

    The regional characteristics of dust events in China has been mainly studied by using the data of dust storm,wind-blown sand and floating dust from 338 observation stations through China from 1954 to 2000.The results of this study are as follows:(1)In China,there are two high frequent areas of dust events,one is located in the area of Minfeng and Hotan in the South xinjiang Basin,the other is situated in the area of Minqin and Jilantai in the Hexi Region.Furthermore,the spatial distributions of the various types of dust events are different.The dust storms mainly occur in the arid and semiarid areas covering the deserts and the areas undergoing desertification in northern China.Wind-blown sand and floating-dust not only occur in the areas where dust storms occur,but also extend to the neighboring areas.The range of wind-blown sand extends northeastward and southeastward,but floating-dust mainly extends southeastward to the low-latitude region such as the East China Plain and the area of the middloe and lower reaches of the Yangtze River.Compared with wind-blown sand,the floating-dust seldom occurs in the high latitude areas such as North xinjiang and Northeast China.(2)The affected areas of dust storms can be divided into seven sub-regions,that is,North Xinjiang Region,South Xinjiang Region,Hexi Region,Qaidam Basin Region,Hetao Region.Northeastem China Region and Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Region.The area of the most frequent occurrence of dust storms and floating-dust is in South Xinjiang Region,and of wind-blown sang in the Hexi Region.In general,the frequency of dust events in all the seven regions shows a decreasing thendency from 1954 to 2000,but there are certain differences between various dust events in different regions.The maximum interannual change and ariance of dust events during this time happened in South Xinjiang Region and Hexi Region.The udst events generally occur most frequently in April in most parts of China.The spring occurred days of dust events

  15. 禽流感病毒H5N1血凝素蛋白的细胞膜上提纯和结晶%Purification and crystallization of hemagglutinin expressed on the cellular membrane originated from avian influenza virus H5N1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌资; 郑煜煌; Yipu Lin; David J Stevens; Steve A Wharton; Patrick J Collins; Junfeng Liu; Alan J Hay

    2009-01-01

    目的 从细胞膜上提纯禽流感病毒H5N1的血凝素蛋白H5 I151F和H5 I151F+A134V+E186D,并使蛋白结晶.方法 细胞内大量增殖重组牛痘病毒,去垢剂提取细胞膜中的HA蛋白,连续蔗糖密度梯度超速离心,Western印迹检测,菠萝蛋白酶等裂解HA,离子交换层析,SDS-PAGE电泳并染色检测蛋白纯度,坐滴气象扩散法结晶.结果 从细胞膜中提取了高纯度的血凝素蛋白H5 I151F和H5 I151F+A134V+E186D,并得到了H5 I151F蛋白晶体.结论 首次获得了禽流感病毒H5N1的H5 I151F蛋白晶体,为进一步研究禽流感病毒人传人的可能性打下基础.%Objective To purify and crystallize two kinds of H5N1 vires hemagglutinin proteins, H5 I151F and H5 I151F + A134V + E186D, from the cellular membrane. Methods Recombinant vaccinia viruses were massive propagated, hemagglutinin (HA) proteins were extracted from cellular membrane with detergent. HA proteins were concentrated with continuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation and detected by Western Blotting. HA proteins were cleavaged with Bromelain, and purified with Ion-exchange chromatography. The protein puri-ty was detected by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and staining. HA proteins were crystallized by sitting-drop vapour diffusion. Results Hemag-glutinin proteins, H5 I151F and H5 I151F + A134V + E186D, were extensively purified. And the crystal of H5 I151F was obtained. Con-clusion For the first time, the highly purified H5 I151F membrane protein crystal was obtained, which provided the basis for further stud-ying the mechanisms of human to human transmission caused by avian influenza viruses.

  16. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  17. Process for Encapsulating Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    A process for growing protein crystals encapsulated within membranes has been invented. This process begins with the encapsulation of a nearly saturated aqueous protein solution inside semipermeable membranes to form microcapsules. The encapsulation is effected by use of special formulations of a dissolved protein and a surfactant in an aqueous first liquid phase, which is placed into contact with a second, immiscible liquid phase that contains one or more polymers that are insoluble in the first phase. The second phase becomes formed into the semipermeable membranes that surround microglobules of the first phase, thereby forming the microcapsules. Once formed, the microcapsules are then dehydrated osmotically by exposure to a concentrated salt or polymer solution. The dehydration forms supersaturated solutions inside the microcapsules, thereby enabling nucleation and growth of protein crystals inside the microcapsules. By suitable formulation of the polymer or salt solution and of other physical and chemical parameters, one can control the rate of transport of water out of the microcapsules through the membranes and thereby create physicochemical conditions that favor the growth, within each microcapsule, of one or a few large crystals suitable for analysis by x-ray diffraction. The membrane polymer can be formulated to consist of low-molecular-weight molecules that do not interfere with the x-ray diffraction analysis of the encapsulated crystals. During dehydration, an electrostatic field can be applied to exert additional control over the rate of dehydration. This protein-crystal-encapsulation process is expected to constitute the basis of protein-growth experiments to be performed on the space shuttle and the International Space Station. As envisioned, the experiments would involve the exposure of immiscible liquids to each other in sequences of steps under microgravitational conditions. The experiments are expected to contribute to knowledge of the precise

  18. Smaller desert dust cooling effect estimated from analysis of dust size and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earth's global energy balance through direct interactions with radiation, and through indirect interactions with clouds and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, or what the effects of potential future changes in dust loading will be. Here we present an analysis of the size and abundance of dust aerosols to constrain the direct radiative effect of dust. Using observational data on dust abundance, in situ measurements of dust optical properties and size distribution, and climate and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations of dust lifetime, we find that the dust found in the atmosphere is substantially coarser than represented in current global climate models. As coarse dust warms the climate, the global dust direct radiative effect is likely to be less cooling than the ~-0.4 W m-2 estimated by models in a current global aerosol model ensemble. Instead, we constrain the dust direct radiative effect to a range between -0.48 and +0.20 W m-2, which includes the possibility that dust causes a net warming of the planet.

  19. Reducing aluminum dust explosion hazards: case study of dust inerting in an aluminum buffing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J

    2008-11-15

    Metal powders or dusts can represent significant dust explosion hazards in industry, due to their relatively low ignition energy and high explosivity. The hazard is well known in industries that produce or use aluminum powders, but is sometimes not recognized by facilities that produce aluminum dust as a byproduct of bulk aluminum processing. As demonstrated by the 2003 dust explosion at aluminum wheel manufacturer Hayes Lemmerz, facilities that process bulk metals are at risk due to dust generated during machining and finishing operations [U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, Investigation Report, Aluminum Dust Explosion Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc., Huntington, Indiana, Report No. 2004-01-I-IN, September 2005]. Previous studies have shown that aluminum dust explosions are more difficult to suppress with flame retardants or inerting agents than dust explosions fueled by other materials such as coal [A.G. Dastidar, P.R. Amyotte, J. Going, K. Chatrathi, Flammability limits of dust-minimum inerting concentrations, Proc. Saf. Progr., 18-1 (1999) 56-63]. In this paper, an inerting method is discussed to reduce the dust explosion hazard of residue created in an aluminum buffing operation as the residue is generated. This technique reduces the dust explosion hazard throughout the buffing process and within the dust collector systems making the process inherently safer. Dust explosion testing results are presented for process dusts produced during trials with varying amounts of flame retardant additives.

  20. [The "crystals" in the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, G A; Romanova, A K

    2011-01-01

    Crystal containing cells widely distributed in plant tissues, though the origin of the crystals and their functions are still opened to question. Membrane vesicles in beet leaves are visible in electronic microscope. They originate in cytoplasm and penetrate into vacuole by pinocytosis with participation of tonoplast. In light microscope, vesicles are luminous likewise crystals in crystal cells. Such vesicles-"crystals" fulfill crystal cells also. The content of vesicles-"crystals" are electronic transparent at every path of leaf development. It was proposed that distinct vesicles-"crystals" in cytoplasm and vacuole and mass of them in crystal cells, vein bundles, and epidermal cells--all of them are lytic compartments. Later, obviously, true crystals are formed.

  1. Structure Prediction of Membrane Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlong Zhou; Yao Zheng; Yan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    There is a large gap between the number of membrane protein (MP) sequences and that of their decoded 3D structures, especially high-resolution structures, due to difficulties in crystal preparation of MPs. However, detailed knowledge of the 3D structure is required for the fundamental understanding of the function of an MP and the interactions between the protein and its inhibitors or activators. In this paper, some computational approaches that have been used to predict MP structures are discussed and compared.

  2. Dunes and Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    22 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of dark sand dunes that formed in winds blowing from east (right) to west (left), along with smaller, lighter-toned ripples and many dark dust devil tracks. The dust devil tracks indicate movement from a variety of directions, while the dunes only indicate winds from the east. In the lower left quarter of the image, dune sand has flowed around a layered rock obstacle. This scene is located near 19.9oN, 280.5oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin

    2016-07-25

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR), and acid yellow 36 (AY) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane–dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye–dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  4. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product.

  5. The plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekberg, Kira

      The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded H+-ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. A recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Together with biochemical and structural data presented in this thesis we are now able...... to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H+-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. Moreover, a completely new paradigm for post-translational activation of these proteins is presented. The talk will focus on the following themes...

  6. The plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekberg, Kira

      The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded H+-ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. A recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Together with biochemical and structural data presented in this thesis we are now able...... to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H+-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. Moreover, a completely new paradigm for post-translational activation of these proteins is presented. The talk will focus on the following themes...

  7. Recombinant house dust mite allergens

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are a globally important source of allergen responsible for the sensitization of more than 50% of allergic patients. Specific immunotherapy with HDM extracts is effective but allergen extracts cannot be fully standardized and severe side-effects can occur during the protracted course of treatment. The introduction of molecular biological techniques into allergy research allowed the indentification of more than 20 groups of HDM allergens. Recombinant HDM allergens can be...

  8. Dust amorphization in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glauser, Adrian M; Watson, Dan M; Henning, Thomas; Schegerer, Alexander A; Wolf, Sebastian; Audard, Marc; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla

    2009-01-01

    High-energy irradiation of the circumstellar material might impact the structure and the composition of a protoplanetary disk and hence the process of planet formation. In this paper, we present a study on the possible influence of the stellar irradiation, indicated by X-ray emission, on the crystalline structure of the circumstellar dust. The dust crystallinity is measured for 42 class II T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region using a decomposition fit of the 10 micron silicate feature, measured with the Spitzer IRS instrument. Since the sample includes objects with disks of various evolutionary stages, we further confine the target selection, using the age of the objects as a selection parameter. We correlate the X-ray luminosity and the X-ray hardness of the central object with the crystalline mass fraction of the circumstellar dust and find a significant anti-correlation for 20 objects within an age range of approx. 1 to 4.5 Myr. We postulate that X-rays represent the stellar activity and consequ...

  9. The Dust & Gas Properties of M83

    CERN Document Server

    Foyle, K; Mentuch, E; Bendo, G; Dariush, A; Parkin, T; Pohlen, M; Sauvage, M; Smith, M W L; Roussel, H; Baes, M; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Davies, J I; Eales, S A; Madden, S; Page, M J; Spinoglio,

    2012-01-01

    We examine the dust and gas properties of the nearby, barred galaxy M83, which is part of the Very Nearby Galaxy Survey. Using images from the PACS and SPIRE instruments of Herschel, we examine the dust temperature and dust mass surface density distribution. We find that the nuclear, bar and spiral arm regions exhibit higher dust temperatures and masses compared to interarm regions. However, the distribution of dust temperature and mass are not spatially coincident. Assuming a trailing spiral structure, the dust temperature peaks in the spiral arms lie ahead of the dust surface density peaks. The dust mass surface density correlates well with the distribution of molecular gas as traced by CO (J=3-2) images (JCMT) and the star formation rate as traced by H?2 with a correction for obscured star formation using 24 micron emission. Using HI images from THINGS to trace the atomic gas component, we make total gas mass surface density maps and calculate the gas-to-dust ratio. We find a mean gas-to-dust ratio of 84 \\...

  10. House dust mites, our intimate associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadchatram, M

    2005-06-01

    House dust mites have lived in human contact from time immemorial. Human dander or dead skin constitutes the major organic component of the house dust ecosystem. Because the mites feed on dander, dust mites and human association will continue to co-exist as part of our environment. Efficient house-keeping practice is the best form of control to reduce infestation. However, special precautions are important when individuals are susceptible or sensitive to dust mites. House dust mites are responsible for causing asthma, rhinitis and contact dermatitis. The respiratory allergies are caused by the inhalation of dead or live mites, their faecal matter or other byproducts. Immune factors are of paramount importance in the development of dust related or mite induced respiratory diseases. House dust mites were found in some 1,000 samples of dust taken from approximately 330 dwellings in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore. Mattresses, carpets, corners of a bedroom, and floor beneath the bed are favourable dust mite habitats. The incriminating species based on studies here and elsewhere, as well as many other species of dust mites of unknown etiological importance are widely distributed in Malaysian homes. Density of dust mites in Malaysia and Singapore is greater than in temperate countries. Prevention and control measures with reference to subjects sensitive to dust mite allergies, including chemical control described in studies conducted in Europe and America are discussed. However, a cost free and most practical way to remove mites, their faecal matter and other products is to resort to sunning the bedding and carpets to kill the living mites, and then beaten and brushed to remove the dust and other components.

  11. Photoelectric Charging of Dust in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickafoose, A. A.; Robertson, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Horanyi, M.

    1999-09-01

    Illumination of surfaces in space by solar ultraviolet light produces photoelectrons which form a plasma sheath near the surface. Dust particles on the surface can acquire a charge and be transported horizontally and vertically by electric fields within the sheath. On the moon, suspended dust grains have been observed on multiple occasions, and there is evidence for horizontal lunar dust transport. Photoelectron production and dust particle charging are also expected to be significant near the surface of Mars. Understanding the photoelectric charging properties of dust can help explain the observed dynamics of lunar dust and help predict the behavior of dust on surfaces of planetary satellites, asteroids, planetary ring particles, and planetesimals. In addition, any human or spacecraft activity on planetary bodies is affected by dust dynamics near the surface. We have examined the photoelectric charging of dust dropped through UV illumination and dust dropped past a UV illuminated surface having a photoelectron sheath. Experiments are performed in vacuum with illumination from a 1 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp. The lamp produces a spectrum down to ~ 200 nm ( ~ 6.2 eV), and the photoemitter is a 12 cm diameter zirconium plate. Dust dropped through UV illumination loses electrons due to photoemission, while dust dropped past an illuminated surface gains electrons from the photoelectron sheath. Initial results are consistent with expected charge calculated from the work function of the materials, the energy of incoming photons, and the capacitance of the grains. Photoelectric charging experiments have been done for several different kinds of dust 90-106 mu m in diameter. We will present the results of these experiments and compare the charging properties of zinc, copper, graphite, Martian regolith simulant (JSC Mars-1), lunar regolith simulant (JSC-1), and lunar soil from an Apollo 17 sample. This research is supported by NASA.

  12. Metal Dusting-Mechanisms and Preventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q.ZHANG; D.J.YOUNG

    2009-01-01

    Metal dusting attacks iron, low and high alloy steels and nickel-or cobalt-base alloys by disintegrating bulk metals and alloys into metal particles in a coke deposit. It occurs in strongly carburising gas atmospheres (carbon activity aC>1) at elevated temperatures (400℃~1000℃). This phenomenon has been studied for decades, but the detailed mechanism is still not well understood. Current methods of protection against metal dusting are either directed to the process conditions-temperature and gas composition-or to the development of a dense adherent oxide layer on the surface of the alloy by selective oxidation. However, metal dusting still occurs by carbon dissolving in the base metal via defects in the oxide scale. The research work at UNSW is aimed at determining the detailed mechanism of metal dusting of both ferritic and austenitic alloys, in particular the microprocesses of graphite deposition, nanoparticle formation and underlying metal destruction. This work was carried out using surface observation, cross-section analysis by focused ion beam and electron microscopic examination of coke deposits at different stages of the reaction. It was found that surface orientation affected carbon deposition and metal dusting at the initial stage of the reaction. Metal dusting occurred only when graphite grew into the metal interior where the volume expansion is responsible for metal disintegration and dusting. It was also found that the metal dusting process could be significantly changed by alterations in alloy chemistry. Germanium was found to affect the iron dusting process by destabilising FeC but increasing the rate of carbon deposition and dusting, which questions the role of cementite in ferritic alloy dusting. Whilst adding copper to iron did not change the carburisation kinetics, cementite formation and coke morphology, copper alloying reduced nickel and nickel-base alloy dusting rates significantly. Application of these fundamental results to the dusting

  13. Combinatorial method for overexpression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-07-30

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters.

  14. Combinatorial Method for Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute 20–30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters. PMID:20525689

  15. Aerosol optical absorption by dust and black carbon in Taklimakan Desert, during no-dust and dust-storm conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Lu; Wenshou Wei; Mingzhe Liu; Weidong Gao; Xi Han

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol absorption coefficient σap involves the additive contribution of both black carbon aerosol (BC) and dust aerosol.The linear statistical regression analysis approach introduced by Fialho et al.(2005) is used to estimate the absorption exponents of BC and dust aerosol absorption coefficients,and further to separate the contributions of these two types of aerosols from the total light absorption coefficient measured in the hinterland of Taklimakan Desert in the spring of 2006.Absorption coefficients are measured by means of a 7-wavelength Aethalometer from 1 March to 31 May and from 1 November to 28 December,2006.The absorption exponent of BC absorption coefficient α is estimated as (-0.95 ±0.002) under background weather (supposing the observed absorption coefficient is due only to BC); the estimated absorption exponent of dust aerosol absorption coefficient β during the 6 dust storm periods (strong dust storm) is (-2.55 ± 0.009).Decoupling analysis of the measured light absorption coefficients demonstrates that,on average,the light absorptions caused by dust aerosol and BC make up about 50.5% and 49.5% respectively of the total light absorption at 520 nm; during dust weather process periods (dust storm,floating dust,blowing dust),the contribution of dust aerosol to absorption extinction is 60.6% on average; in the hinterland of desert in spring,dust aerosol is also the major contributor to the total aerosol light absorption,more than that of black carbon aerosol.

  16. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  17. Do other components of bedding dust affect sensitisation to house dust mites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire; Stanley, Thorsten; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Bedding dust is a mixture of many components, of which the house dust mite (HDM) allergen, Der p 1, is the most allergenic. There has been little work to investigate the effect of other bedding dust components on HDM sensitisation. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of endotoxin in bedding dust on the allergic response in HDM-sensitised individuals. Twenty-nine house dust mite-sensitised adults were skin prick and allergen patch tested against a sterile solution of their own bedding dust and against a solution containing the same concentration of Der p 1 as the bedding solution for comparison. There was no significant difference in wheal size between the diluted house dust mite solution and the bedding dust in spite of their high levels of endotoxin. Symptomatic subjects had larger, but not statistically significant, responses to commercial house dust mite solution than asymptomatic subjects. Allergen patch test responses were negative in 22/29 of subjects using either bedding dust solutions or comparable diluted house dust mite solutions. An individual's own bedding dust does not appear to contain factors that enhance skin prick test or atopy patch test responses to house dust mites.

  18. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during the...

  19. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  20. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathopoulos, V.N., E-mail: vasta@teihal.gr [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece); General Department of Applied Sciences, School of Technological Applications, Technological Educational Institute of Sterea Ellada, GR 34400 Psahna (Greece); Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J. [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in

  1. House dust in seven Danish offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 μg g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is

  2. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  3. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  4. Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2003-01-01

    Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alig...

  5. Simulation of dust statistical characteristics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D.A. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, 92093 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    In this work we analyze the size (radius) distribution function of dust particles in tokamak plasmas during a steady state discharge. A relation between the radius distribution function of dust in the plasma and the radius distribution of dust injected from tokamak walls is obtained using a Green's function formalism. Numerical simulations of the dust radius distribution function in a tokamak plasma with the Dust Transport (DUSTT) code are used to obtain the analytical form of the Green's function semi-empirically. It is demonstrated that the Green's function obtained can be used to predict qualitatively the dust size distributions in the tokamak plasmas. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  7. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  8. Physical properties of suspended dust in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Skrabalova, Lenka; Sigurdardottir, Gudmunda; Branis, Martin; Hladil, Jindrich; Chadimova, Leona; Skala, Roman; Navratil, Tomas; Menar, Sibylle von Lowis of; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric Dust Measurements (ADMI 2013) of one of the most active dust sources in Iceland (Mælifellsandur) were conducted during season with high precipitation on August 8th-18th, 2013. We measured mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10), particle size distributions in size range 0.3-10μm and number concentrations during rather small dust event. Dust samples of the event were analyzed (morpho-textural observations, optical and scanning-electron microscopy). Two TSI 8520 DustTrak Aerosol Monitors (light-scattering laser photometers that measure aerosol mass concentrations in range 0.001 to 100 mg/m3) and one TSI Optical Particle Sizer (OPS) 3330 (optical scattering from single particle up to 16 different channels - 0.3 to 10 μm - measuring particle size distribution) were used. We measured a dust event which occurred during wet and low wind/windless conditions as result of surface heating in August 2013. Maximum particle number concentration (PM~0.3-10 µm) reached 149954 particles cm-3 min-1 while mass concentration (PM1.5-5 µm in diameter. Close-to-ultrafine particle size distributions showed a significant increase in number with the severity of the dust event. Number concentrations were well correlated with mass concentrations. The mineralogy and geochemical compositions showed that glaciogenic dust contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles and 80 % of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals. Wet dust particles were mobilized within < 4 hours. Here we introduced a comprehensive study on physical properties of the Icelandic dust aerosol and the first scientific study of particle size distributions in an Icelandic dust event including findings on initiation of dust suspension.

  9. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Mondal

    2004-11-01

    For an unmagnetized partially ionized dusty plasma containing electrons, singly charged positive ions, micron-sized massive negatively charged dust grains and a fraction of neutral atoms, dispersion relations for both the dust-ion-acoustic and the dust-acoustic waves have been derived, incorporating dust charge fluctuation. The dispersion relations, under various conditions, have been exhaustively analysed. The explicit expressions for the growth rates have also been derived.

  10. Lipidic cubic phase injector facilitates membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Chong; White, Thomas A; Wang, Dingjie; Liu, Wei; Spence, John C H; Bruce Doak, R; Nelson, Garrett; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Liu, Haiguang; Basu, Shibom; Wacker, Daniel; Han, Gye Won; Katritch, Vsevolod; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Marvin Seibert, M; Klinker, Markus; Gati, Cornelius; Shoeman, Robert L; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Kirian, Richard A; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Stevens, Raymond C; Li, Dianfan; Shah, Syed T A; Howe, Nicole; Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization has proven successful for high-resolution structure determination of challenging membrane proteins. Here we present a technique for extruding gel-like LCP with embedded membrane protein microcrystals, providing a continuously renewed source of material for serial femtosecond crystallography. Data collected from sub-10-μm-sized crystals produced with less than 0.5 mg of purified protein yield structural insights regarding cyclopamine binding to the Smoothened receptor.

  11. Halo dust detection around NGC 891

    CERN Document Server

    Bocchio, M; Hunt, L K; Schneider, R

    2015-01-01

    Observations of edge-on galaxies allow us to investigate the vertical extent and properties of dust, gas and stellar distributions. NGC 891 has been studied for decades and represents one of the best studied cases of an edge-on galaxy. We use deep PACS data together with IRAC, MIPS and SPIRE data to study the vertical extent of dust emission around NGC 891. We also test the presence of a more extended, thick dust component. By performing a convolution of an intrinsic vertical profile emission with each instrument PSF and comparing it with observations we derived the scaleheight of a thin and thick dust disc component. For all wavelengths considered the emission is best fit with the sum of a thin and a thick dust component. The scaleheight of both dust components shows a gradient passing from 70 $\\mu$m to 250 $\\mu$m. This could be due to a drop in dust heating (and thus dust temperature) with the distance from the plane, or to a sizable contribution ($\\sim 15 - 80%$) of an unresolved thin disc of hotter dust t...

  12. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; Marassi, Stefania; Schneider, Raffaella; Bianchi, Simone; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. We have developed a new code (GRASH_Rev) which follows the newly-formed dust evolution throughout the supernova explosion until the merging of the forward shock with the circumstellar ISM. We have considered four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN1987A, CasA, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations and estimate that between 1 and 8% of the observed mass will survive, leading to a SN dust production rate of (3.9± 3.7)×10^(-4) MM_{⊙})/yr in the Milky Way. This value is one order of magnitude larger than the dust production rate by AGB stars but insufficient to counterbalance the dust destruction by SNe, therefore requiring dust accretion in the gas phase.

  13. Modern dust aerosol availability in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Cheng, Hong; Che, Huizheng; Sun, Jimin; Lu, Huayu; Qiang, Mingrui; Hua, Ting; Zhu, Bingqi; Li, Hui; Ma, Wenyong; Lang, Lili; Jiao, Linlin; Li, Danfeng

    2017-08-18

    The sources of modern dust aerosols and their emission magnitudes are fundamental for linking dust with climate and environment. Using field sample data, wind tunnel experiments and statistical analysis, we determined the contributions of wadis, gobi (stony desert), lakebeds, riverbeds, and interdunes to modern dust aerosol availability in the three important potential dust sources including the Tarim Basin, Qaidam Basin, and Ala Shan Plateau of China. The results show that riverbeds are the dominant landscape for modern dust aerosol availabilities in the Qaidam Basin, while wadis, gobi, and interdunes are the main landscapes over the Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin. The Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin are potential dust sources in northwestern China, while the Qaidam Basin is not a major source of the modern dust aerosols nowadays, and it is not acting in a significant way to the Loess Plateau presently. Moreover, most of modern dust aerosol emissions from China originated from aeolian processes with low intensities rather than from major dust events.

  14. Dust Devils and Convective Vortices on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-03-01

    Dust devils are low pressure convective vortices able to lift dust from the surface of a planet. They are a common feature on Mars and they can also be found on desertic locations on Earth. On Mars they are considered an important part of the atmospheric dust cycle. Dust in Mars is an essential ingredient of the atmosphere where it affects the radiative balance of the planet. Here we review observations of these dusty vortices from orbit, from in situ measurements on the surface of Mars and some of the models developed to simulate them.

  15. Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Annou; R Annou

    2012-01-01

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial charged dust grains, Boltzmannian electrons and nonthermal ions have been investigated by taking into account finite dust temperature. The pseudopotential has been used to study solitary solution. The existence of solitary waves having negative potential is reported.

  16. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  17. Technical Note: High-resolution mineralogical database of dust-productive soils for atmospheric dust modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nickovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust storms and associated mineral aerosol transport are driven primarily by meso- and synoptic-scale atmospheric processes. It is therefore essential that the dust aerosol process and background atmospheric conditions that drive dust emissions and atmospheric transport are represented with sufficiently well-resolved spatial and temporal features. The effects of airborne dust interactions with the environment determine the mineral composition of dust particles. The fractions of various minerals in aerosol are determined by the mineral composition of arid soils; therefore, a high-resolution specification of the mineral and physical properties of dust sources is needed.

    Several current dust atmospheric models simulate and predict the evolution of dust concentrations; however, in most cases, these models do not consider the fractions of minerals in the dust. The accumulated knowledge about the impacts of the mineral composition in dust on weather and climate processes emphasizes the importance of including minerals in modeling systems. Accordingly, in this study, we developed a global dataset consisting of the mineral composition of the current potentially dust-producing soils. In our study, we (a mapped mineral data to a high-resolution 30 s grid, (b included several mineral-carrying soil types in dust-productive regions that were not considered in previous studies, and (c included phosphorus.

  18. Photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Kurt; Wehrspohn, Ralf B; Föll, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the contributions in this topically edited book stems from the priority program SPP 1113 ""Photonische Kristalle"" run by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), resulting in a survey of the current state of photonic crystal research in Germany. The first part of the book describes methods for the theoretical analysis of their optical properties as well as the results. The main part is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization and modeling of two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, while the final section presents a wide spectrum of applications: gas sensors, micr

  19. Struvite crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Phillip W. (Inventor); Tabanpour, Menachem E. (Inventor); Avila-Segura, Mauricio (Inventor); Meyer, Juliane M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for removing phosphorus from phosphorus containing waste. In one embodiment, the method is preferably carried out by contacting the phosphorus containing waste with a non-cellular membrane and precipitating phosphorus from the waste as struvite. Another aspect of the invention includes a method of removing phosphorus from phosphorus containing sewage comprising filtrates and biosolids. The removal of phosphorus as struvite occurs in two stages as primary and secondary removal. In the primary removal process, the sewage from a dewatering unit is contacted with a first polymeric membrane reactor and the phosphorus is removed as primary struvite. Subsequently Mg is added so as promote struvite formation and the secondary removal process of struvite. In the secondary removal process, the sewage from GBT Filtrate well or Centrifuge Liquor well is contacted with a second monomolecular membrane and the phosphorus is removed as secondary struvite.

  20. Carbon petrology in cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are collected in the Earth's stratosphere. There exists an extensive database on major and minor element chemistry, stable isotopes, noble gas abundances and mineralogy of many CP IDP's, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopic properties. For details on the mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties of IDP's, I refer to the reviews by Mackinnon and Rietmeijer (1987), Bradley et al. (1988) and Sandford (1987). Texture, mineralogy (Mackinnon and Rietmeijer, 1987) and chemistry (Schramm et al., 1989; Flynn and Sutton, 1991) support the notion that CP IDP's are a unique group of ultrafine-grained extraterrestiral materials that are distinct from any known meteorite class. Their fluffy, or porous, morphology suggests that CP IDP's probably endured minimal alteration by protoplanetary processes since their formation. It is generally accepted that CP IDP's are solid debris from short-period comets. The evidence is mostly circumstantial but this notion gained significant support based on the comet Halley dust data (Brownlee, 1990). In this paper, I will accept that CP IDP's are indeed cometary dust. The C/Si ratio in CP IDP's is 3.3 times higher than in CI carbonaceous chondrites (Schramm et al. 1989). The intraparticle carbon distribution is heteorogeneous (Rietmeijer and McKay, 1986). Carbon occurs both in oxidized and reduced forms. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) and Raman spectroscopic analyses have shown the presence of several carbon forms in CP IDP's but the data are scattered in the literature. Carbons in cometary CP IDP's are among the most pristine Solar System carbons available for laboratory study. Similar to a recently developed petrological model for the diversity of layer silicates in CP IDP's (Zolensky, 1991) that is useful to constrain in situ aqueous alteration in comets (Rietmeijer and Mackinnon, 1987a), I here present the first effort to develop a petrological concept of carbons

  1. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (olivine (forsterite 83) grains olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  2. 火星尘埃与探测%Characteristic and detection of Mars dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙丽琳; 秦国泰; 朱光武

    2012-01-01

    Mars dust contributes to the Mars atmosphere dynamic and thermodynamic evolution process and the long-term modification of Mars albedo and surface geology.Mars dust environment is very crucial for the power system and optical sensors onboard Mars landers(or rovers).There is a need for Mars dust in situ measurement.The characteristics and main detecting solutions of Mars dust were discussed.Based upon Quartz Crystal Microbalance technology,the design of Mars dust characteristic integrated detecting system(MDCIDS) was proposed.MDCIDS includes 3 kinds of sensors.The dust accumulation sensor can measure the accumulation rate and mass of Mars dust with sensing crystal surface upward.The charging dust sensors can measure the accumulation rate of positive and negative charging dust through applying different bias voltages to crystals.And the magnetic dust sensors can measure the accumulation rate of magnetic dust with small permanent magnets behind sensing crystals.The accumulation mass range is 10-11~10-4g.MDCIDS is expected to be applied to future Mars landing exploration mission.%火星表面尘埃与太阳辐射、热辐射的相互作用直接影响火星大气的结构、热平衡和动力学过程,并会产生改变火星表面反照率和火星地貌的长期效应.火星尘埃环境还对登陆于火星表面的着陆器能源系统和光学载荷等系统构成影响.为此需开展火星大气尘埃的直接就位探测.在介绍了火星的尘埃特性与主要探测方法基础上,提出了采用微质量计技术开展火星表面尘埃就位探测的综合探测器方案.探测器包含3种传感器.尘埃累积传感器通过设置其敏感晶体表面朝上,可以探测火星表面尘埃的沉积质量与速率;荷电尘埃传感器通过加置不同极性的偏置电压,可以探测荷正电尘埃和荷负电尘埃的累积特性;磁尘传感器通过在敏感晶体后加设小型永久磁铁,可以探测磁性尘埃的累积特性.传

  3. A MODEL FOR THE DUST ENVELOPE OF THE SILICATE CARBON STAR IRAS 09425-6040

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung-Won, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City, 28644 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 09425-6040 (I09425) is a silicate carbon star with conspicuous crystalline silicate and water-ice features and emission excesses in the far-infrared and millimeter (mm) wavelength ranges. To understand properties of the dust envelope of I09425, we propose a physical model based on the observations and known properties of asymptotic giant branch stars and dust. We perform radiative transfer model calculations using multiple dust shells and disks with various dust species. We compare the model results with the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) acquired with different telescopes. We find that the physical model for I09425 using multiple shells of carbon and silicate dust and multiple disks of amorphous and crystalline silicates reproduces the observed SED fairly well. This object looks to have detached cold O-rich (silicate and water-ice) dust shells, which could be remnants of the recent chemical transition from O to C and an inner C-rich dust shell. A long-lived thin disk of very large silicate grains can reproduce the emission excess in the mm wavelength band and a recently formed thick disk of crystalline silicates can reproduce the prominent emission features in the spectral range 8–45 μm. The highly crystallized silicates could be recently formed by high temperature annealing due to the last O-rich superwind just before the chemical transition of the central star. I09425 could be a rare object that has the remnants of past O-rich stellar winds in the outer shells as well as in the circumbinary disks.

  4. Coma dust environment observed by GIADA during the Perihelion of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Fulle, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S. L.; Sordini, R.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Zakharov, V.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Gruen, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zarnecki, J.; Cosi, M.; Giovane, F.; Gustafson, B.; Herranz, M.; Jeronimo, J. M.; Leese, M.; Lopez-Jimenez, A.; Morales, R.

    2015-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument mounted onboard Rosetta monitoring the dust environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: 1) the Grain Detection System, based on particle detection through light scattering; 2) the Impact Sensor, giving momentum measurement; 3) the Micro-Balances System, constituted of 5 quartz crystal microbalances, giving cumulative deposited dust. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the speed distribution of dust particles emitted from the comet nucleus. We will present the coma dust environment as observed by GIADA during the perihelion phase of the Rosetta space mission. Despite the large distance from the nucleus, more than 200 km, GIADA was able to detect temporal and spatial variation of dust density distribution. Specific high dust spatial density sectors of the coma have been identified and their evolution during the perihelion phase was studied. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF- Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project/ESTEC for their outstanding work. Science support provided by NASA through the US Rosetta Project managed by JPL/California Institute of Technology. GIADA calibrated data will be available through the ESA's PSA web site.

  5. Desert dust hazards: A global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    Dust storms originate in many of the world's drylands and frequently present hazards to human society, both within the drylands themselves but also outside drylands due to long-range transport of aeolian sediments. Major sources of desert dust include the Sahara, the Middle East, central and eastern Asia, and parts of Australia, but dust-raising occurs all across the global drylands and, on occasion, beyond. Dust storms occur throughout the year and they vary in frequency and intensity over a number of timescales. Long-range transport of desert dust typically takes place along seasonal transport paths. Desert dust hazards are here reviewed according to the three phases of the wind erosion system: where dust is entrained, during the transport phase, and on deposition. This paper presents a synthesis of these hazards. It draws on empirical examples in physical geography, medical geology and geomorphology to discuss case studies from all over the world and in various fields. These include accelerated soil erosion in agricultural zones - where dust storms represent a severe form of accelerated soil erosion - the health effects of air pollution caused by desert aerosols via their physical, chemical and biological properties, transport accidents caused by poor visibility during desert dust events, and impacts on electricity generation and distribution. Given the importance of desert dust as a hazard to human societies, it is surprising to note that there have been relatively few attempts to assess their impact in economic terms. Existing studies in this regard are also reviewed, but the wide range of impacts discussed in this paper indicates that desert dust storms deserve more attention in this respect.

  6. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment.

  7. Ribbon Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Markvorsen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive crystal-like pattern is spontaneously formed upon the twisting of straight ribbons. The pattern is akin to a tessellation with isosceles triangles, and it can easily be demonstrated with ribbons cut from an overhead transparency. We give a general description of developable ribbons...

  8. Therapeutic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  9. Characterization of anionic-exchange membranes for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abuin, GC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available and Young modulus were evaluated and compared to other membrane materials commonly employed in PEM fuel cells. A quartz crystal microbalance (QMC) was used to measure the water uptake of thin membranes of this material casted over the quartz crystals...

  10. eblur/dust: a modular python approach for dust extinction and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-03-01

    I will present a library of python codes -- github.com/eblur/dust -- which calculate dust scattering and extinction properties from the IR to the X-ray. The modular interface allows for custom defined dust grain size distributions, optical constants, and scattering physics. These codes are currently undergoing a major overhaul to include multiple scattering effects, parallel processing, parameterized grain size distributions beyond power law, and optical constants for different grain compositions. I use eblur/dust primarily to study dust scattering images in the X-ray, but they may be extended to applications at other wavelengths.

  11. Ultrafine-grained mineralogy and matrix chemistry of olivine-rich chondritic interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Olivine-rich chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important subset of fluffy chondritic IDPs collected in the earth's stratosphere. Particles in this subset are characterized by a matrix of nonporous, ultrafine-grained granular units. Euhedral single crystals, crystals fragments, and platey single crystals occur dispersed in the matrix. Analytical electron microscopy of granular units reveals predominant magnesium-rich olivines and FeNi-sulfides embedded in amorphous carbonaceous matrix material. The variable ratio of ultrafine-grained minerals vs. carbonaceous matrix material in granular units support variable C/Si ratios, and some fraction of sulfur is associated with carbonaceous matrix material. The high Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios in granular units is similar to this distribution in P/Comet Halley dust. The chondritic composition of fine-grained, polycrystalline IDPs gradually breaks down into nonchondritic, and ultimately, single mineral compositions as a function of decreased particle mass. The relationship between particle mass and composition in the matrix of olivine-rich chondritic IDPs is comparable with the relationship inferred for P/Comet Halley dust.

  12. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wolk, G; Peletier, R F; Pel, J W

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and determine the presence of dust tori among radio galaxies of various types. Actively accreting supermassive black holes in the centres of radio galaxies may be uncovered through their dust tori reradiating the optical and ultraviolet continuum in mid-infrared bands. Using VISIR on the VLT, we have obtained sub-arcsecond (~0.40") resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 micron, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio galaxies of four types in the redshift range z=0.006-0.156. The sample consists of 8 edge-darkened, low-power Fanaroff-Riley class I (FR-I) radio galaxies, 6 edge-brightened, class II (FR-II) radio galaxies displaying low-excitation optical emission, 7 FR-IIs displaying high-excitation optical emission, and 6 FR-II broad emission line radio galaxies. Out of the sample of 27 objects, 10 nuclei are detected and several have constraining non-detections at 10 sigma sensitivities of 7 mJy. On the basis of the core ...

  13. Dust polarization and ISM turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, Robert R; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing result of Planck's dust-polarization measurements is the observation that the power in the E-mode polarization is twice that in the B mode, as opposed to pre-Planck expectations of roughly equal dust powers in E and B modes. Here we show how the E- and B-mode powers depend on the detailed properties of the fluctuations in the magnetized interstellar medium. These fluctuations are classified into the slow, fast, and Alfv\\'en magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are determined once the ratio of gas to magnetic-field pressures is specified. We also parametrize models in terms of the power amplitudes and power anisotropies for the three types of waves. We find that the observed EE/BB ratio (and its scale invariance) and positive TE correlation cannot be easily explained in terms of favored models for MHD turbulence. The observed power-law index for temperature/polarization fluctuations also disfavors MHD turbulence. We thus speculate that the 0.1--30 pc length scales probed by these ...

  14. Galaxy Zoo: Dust in Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M; Keel, William C; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination-dependence of optical colours for 24,276 well-resolved SDSS galaxies visually classified in Galaxy Zoo. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4 magnitudes for the ugri passbands. We split the sample into "bulgy" (early-type) and "disky" (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or f_DeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of "bulgy" spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of "disky" spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disk ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with "disky" spirals at M_r ~ -21.5 mags having the most reddening. This decrease of reddening for the most luminous spirals has not been observed before ...

  15. Investigation of organic fouling of microfiltration membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; CUI Chong-wei; MA Jun

    2005-01-01

    Because the natural organic matters (NOMs) and proteins are the principal foulants of microfiltration membranes in drinking water, the primary aim of this paper is to obtain a better understanding of the interactions between those foulants and the microfiltration membrane from a novel view of coagulation. Based on reviewed literature and our own analysis, the authors consider that the behaviors of NOMs in the fouling of microfiltration membrane are like a form of crystal growth, and we recognize that the extent of the membrane hydrophobicity plays an essential role in NOMs fouling. However, proteins' fouling is more affected by intermolecular interaction. Additionally, the effect of membrane surface chemistry is not as essential as it is in the situation of NOMs.

  16. TWO-POP-PY: Two-population dust evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnstiel, T.; Klahr, H.; Ercolano, B.

    2017-08-01

    TWO-POP-PY runs a two-population dust evolution model that follows the upper end of the dust size distribution and the evolution of the dust surface density profile and treats dust surface density, maximum particle size, small and large grain velocity, and fragmentation. It derives profiles that describe the dust-to-gas ratios and the dust surface density profiles well in protoplanetary disks, in addition to the radial flux by solid material rain out.

  17. Dust Charging in Electronegative SiH4 Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ping; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; LIU Jin-Yuan; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We theoretically investigate the dust charging in electronegative silane (SiH4) plasmas, taking into account the effects of UV photodetachment. It is found that UV photodetachment could significantly lower the dust negative charge and even makes dust grains be positively charged under some special conditions. In addition, the other parameters, involving the negative ion and dust number densities, electron temperature and dust radius, have great effects upon the dust charging.

  18. Photonic crystals principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary Properties of Photonic CrystalsFabrication of Photonic CrystalsPhotonic Crystal All-Optical SwitchingTunable Photonic Crystal FilterPhotonic Crystal LaserPhotonic Crystal Logic DevicesPhotonic Crystal Sensors

  19. Lipids, membrane proteins and natural membranes studied by neutron scattering and diffraction: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1986-02-01

    Diffraction first observed from myelin 50 years ago was correctly attributed to a fluid crystal of lipids, because similar patterns were observed from extracted lipid preparations. Following on more recent X-ray work which characterized a variety of lipid-water structures, neutron diffraction experiments have provided detailed descriptions of the molecular conformations in lipid bilayers. For a long time, however, the molecular structure of membrane proteins remained elusive and the development of detergents for the extraction of active membrane proteins, and the discovery of naturally crystalline purple membrane were important breakthroughs in this field. Structural parameters of membrane proteins solubilised in detergent have been measured by neutron scattering with contrast variation techniques. Purple membrane has been studied extensively by neutron diffraction. It is an excellent illustration of the use of deuterium labeling by different approaches to address specific questions of molecular structure. These studies are reviewed with a special emphasis on aspects which are applicable to membranes in general.

  20. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probability—a measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty days—was only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  1. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage...

  2. Health risks due to coffee dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula; Baur, Xaver

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed current health risks due to occupational exposure to coffee dust. We performed a cross-sectional study in a coffee haulage company (n = 24), a coffee silo (n = 19), and a decaffeinating company (n = 17). Cross-shift and cross-week case histories of these employees as well as lung function values were recorded. During the handling of green coffee, measurements of airborne dust were conducted. The employees in these workplaces were mainly affected by erythematous and rhinoconjunctival symptoms. They occurred especially in subjects exposed to a high dust load (> 10 mg of inhalable dust per cubic meter of air; n = 28) [Pearson chi(2) test, p = 0.020 and p = 0.023]. IgE antibodies to green coffee and castor beans were detected in 3 workers and 10 workers, respectively. The majority of them (two employees and six employees, respectively) had shown respiratory symptoms during the past 12 months. The preshift lung function values were below average but were not dependent on the level of the inhalable coffee dust exposure. Employees with a coffee dust load > 10 mg/m(3) of air showed higher unspecific bronchial responsiveness more frequently than those with lower exposures. During the transshipment (especially during unloading) of green coffee, a high and clinically relevant exposure to irritative and sensitizing dust occurs. Therefore, efforts to reduce these dust exposures are generally recommended.

  3. 29 CFR 1910.1043 - Cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the instrument must have a means of correcting volumes to body temperature saturated with water... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cotton dust. 1910.1043 Section 1910.1043 Labor Regulations...), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee. Equivalent Instrument means a cotton dust...

  4. Dust Dynamics in Kelvin-Helmholtz Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Tom; Keppens, Rony

    2013-04-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a fluid instability which arises when two contacting flows have different tangential velocities. As shearing flows are very common in all sorts of (astro)physical fluid setups, the KHI is frequently encountered. In many astrophysical fluids the gas fluid in loaded with additional dust particles. Here we study the influence of these dust particles on the initiation of the KHI, as well as the effect the KHI has on the density distribution of dust species in a range of different particle sizes. This redistribution by the instability is of importance in the formation of dust structures in astrophysical fluids. To study the effect of dust on the linear and nonlinear phase of the KHI, we use the multi-fluid dust + gas module of the MPI-AMRVAC [1] code to perform 2D and 3D simulations of KHI in setups with physical quantities relevant to astrophysical fluids. A clear dependency on dust sizes is seen, with larger dust particles displaying significantly more clumping than smaller ones.

  5. Design and Implementation of Space Dust Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左维; 李春来; 徐琳; 刘剑; 刘建军

    2004-01-01

    Space debris is very dangerous to the security of on-the-orbit spacecrafts, and it is increasing in number at high speed with the expansion of human space exploration. Space debris has become a serious space pollutant noticed by many astronomers. The increase of space dust sources and the development of research on space dust urgently need space dust data sharing and exchanging. It is necessary for us to establish the Space Dust Database to realize the sharing and canonical management of the data. The Space Dust Database (SDD) management system, based on the 3-layer B/S computer mode, was designed and implemented in this paper. The system's features include significantly improved runtime efficiency, good scalability and maintainability. The Space Dust Database can provide some scientific bases for the study of the chemical constituents, mineral composition, origin and sources of space dust, but also provide excellent data services and decision-making support for the protection of space and model construction of space dust.

  6. Airborne microorganisms and dust from livestock houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiencies and suitability of samplers for airborne microorganisms and dust, which could be used in practical livestock houses. Two studies were performed: 1) Testing impaction and cyclone pre-separators for dust sampling in livestock houses; 2) Dete

  7. Personal gravimetric dust sampling and risk assessment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available . At all the sampling sites extremely large variation in dust concentrations were measured on a day to day and shift basis. Correlation of dust concentrations between personal and stationary samples was very poor as was the correlation between quartz...

  8. Mechanical properties of dust collected by dust separators in iron ore sinter plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The flow-related mechanical properties of dusts from the de-dusting systems of several sinter plants were investigated. The mass median diameters of the dusts were in the range from approximately 3 to 100 µm. Also, the bulk density of the dusts varied in a wide range (approximately 400 to 2300 kg/m³). A good correlation between the bulk density and the mass median diameter for most of the dusts was found. In contrast, the angles of repose did not vary very much, only for the coarsest dust a significantly lower value was measured. The angles of internal friction as well as the wall friction angles were lower for coarse dust and higher for fine dust. The shear tests showed that both angles depend considerably on the stress level. At low stress, the angles decreased significantly with increasing values of stress, whereas at higher stress, the dependence was small or even disappeared. The only exception to this behaviour was shown by the finest dust. The flowability decreased with the particle size. The flowability categories suggested by the three flowability indicators were passable only for the coarser dusts. For the finer dusts, the flowability was overestimated by all flowability indicators.

  9. Dust-tolerant electrical connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Shazad (Inventor); Herman, Jason (Inventor); Roberts, Dustyn (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A connector assembly includes releasably mateable plug and receptacle units. At least one socket is enclosed within the receptacle unit and is aligned with at least one permeable membrane disposed in the front end of the receptacle unit. The plug unit includes a body slidably mounted within a longitudinal bore therein. At least one pin extends from the front end of the body and is aligned with at least one permeable membrane disposed in the front end of the plug unit. The plug unit is biased toward a first, de-mate position in which the body is extended rearwardly such that the pin is enclosed with the plug unit and is slidable to a second, mate position in which the body is compressed forwardly such that the pin projects through the permeable membranes of the plug and receptacle units to electrically connect with the socket.

  10. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Simonia; Sh. Nabiyev

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  11. Inorganic analysis of dust fall and office dust in an industrial area of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Qasem M; Momani, Kamal A; Jbarah, Abdel-Aziz Q; Massadeh, Adnan

    2004-10-01

    This article deals with the determination and comparison of heavy metals and water-soluble anions and cations in indoor dust and outdoor dust fall in the petroleum refinery area in Jordan. Three sampling sites were considered in the Jordanian petroleum refinery complex for the collection of dust fall and office dust samples. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, C2O4(2-), and SO4(2-)) and cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) using auto-suppressed ion chromatography. Heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, and Al) were determined using flame or graphite-furnace atomic absorption. No correlations were found between heavy metal concentrations in dust fall and office dust samples, indicating different sources. High enrichment factors for heavy metals were found in dust-fall samples, except for Fe and Cr. Zinc showed the highest and cadmium the lowest flux rates.

  12. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  13. Models of dust around Europa and Ganymede

    CERN Document Server

    Miljkovic, K; Mason, N J; Zarnecki, J C

    2012-01-01

    We use numerical models, supported by our laboratory data, to predict the dust densities of ejecta outflux at any altitude within the Hill spheres of Europa and Ganymede. The ejecta are created by micrometeoroid bombardment and five different dust populations are investigated as sources of dust around the moons. The impacting dust flux (influx) causes the ejection of a certain amount of surface material (outflux). The outflux populates the space around the moons, where a part of the ejecta escapes and the rest falls back to the surface. These models were validated against existing Galileo DDS (Dust Detector System) data collected during Europa and Ganymede flybys. Uncertainties of the input parameters and their effects on the model outcome are also included. The results of this model are important for future missions to Europa and Ganymede, such as JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer), recently selected as ESA's next large space mission to be launched in 2022.

  14. Coke dust enhances coke plant wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrz, Piotr; Rozwadowski, Andrzej; Burmistrz, Michał; Karcz, Aleksander

    2014-12-01

    Coke plant wastewater contain many toxic pollutants. Despite physico-chemical and biological treatment this specific type of wastewater has a significant impact on environment and human health. This article presents results of research on industrial adsorptive coke plant wastewater treatment. As a sorbent the coke dust, dozen times less expensive than pulverized activated carbon, was used. Treatment was conducted in three scenarios: adsorptive after full treatment with coke dust at 15 g L(-1), biological treatment enhanced with coke dust at 0.3-0.5 g L(-1) and addition of coke dust at 0.3 g L(-1) prior to the biological treatment. The enhanced biological treatment proved the most effective. It allowed additional removal of 147-178 mg COD kg(-1) of coke dust. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cosmic Dust in the 21st Century

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, J M; Shen, Chuanjian

    2000-01-01

    The past century of interstellar dust has brought us from first ignoring it to finding that it plays an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Current observational results in our galaxy provide a complex physical and chemical evolutionary picture of interstellar dust starting with the formation of small refractory particles in stellar atmospheres to their modification in diffuse and molecular clouds and ultimately to their contribution to star forming regions. Observations of the properties of dust in very young galaxies will be an important probe of the rates of star formation in terms of the production and destruction of dust grains. Future observations of dust at high spectral and spatial resolution will provide detailed information on processes in collapsing clouds up to star formation. Space missions to comets in the next century will first study them in situ but ultimately will bring back pristine nucleus material which will contain the end product of the collapsing protosolar molecular cloud at ...

  16. Recycling of steelmaking dusts: The Radust concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkanen H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of dusts and other wastes of steelmaking is becoming to a necessity of two reasons: due to high contents of iron oxides dusts are valuable raw material for steelmaking and tightening environmental legislation makes the landfill disposal of wastes more expensive. Fine dust fractions from various stages of steelmaking route contain besides iron and carbon heavy metals especially zinc and lead and heavy hydrocarbons that are acceptable neither for landfill disposal nor for recycling back to processes without any spe4cial treatments. Some theoretical and practical aspects concerning high temperature treatments of steelmaking dusts for removal of hazardous components and production of clean high iron raw material for recycling is discussed in this paper. The Radust technology developed at Koverhar steelwork in Finland for treatment of the most problematic fine fractions of blast furnace and oxygen converter dusts is shortly presented and discussed.

  17. Dust in the 55 Cancri planetary system

    CERN Document Server

    Jayawardhana, R; Greaves, J S; Dent, W R F; Marcy, G W; Hartmann, L W; Fazio, G G; Jayawardhana, Ray; Holland, Wayne S.; Greaves, Jane S.; Dent, William R. F.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Hartmann, Lee W.; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of debris disks around $\\sim$ 1-Gyr-old main sequence stars suggests that an appreciable amount of dust may persist even in mature planetary systems. Here we report the detection of dust emission from 55 Cancri, a star with one, or possibly two, planetary companions detected through radial velocity measurements. Our observations at 850$\\mu$m and 450$\\mu$m imply a dust mass of 0.0008-0.005 Earth masses, somewhat higher than that in the the Kuiper Belt of our solar system. The estimated temperature of the dust grains and a simple model fit both indicate a central disk hole of at least 10 AU in radius. Thus, the region where the planets are detected is likely to be significantly depleted of dust. Our results suggest that far-infrared and sub-millimeter observations are powerful tools for probing the outer regions of extrasolar planetary systems.

  18. Ionization and Dust Charging in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Caselli, P

    2016-01-01

    Ionization-recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field and the development of magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks. We present a self-consistent analytical model which allows us to exactly calculate abundances of charged species in dusty gas, in the regime where the dust-phase recombination dominates over the gas-phase recombination. The model is employed to verify applicability of a conventional approximation of low dust charges in protoplanetary disks, and to discuss the implications for the dust coagulation and the development of the "dead zone" in the disk. Furthermore, the importance of mutually consistent models for the ionization and dust evolution is addressed: These processes are coupled via several mechanisms operating in the disk, and therefore their interplay can be crucial for the ultimate ...

  19. [Wood dust as inhalative noxious agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, D; Liebetrau, G; Meister, W

    1985-01-01

    Wood dust is known as a cause of asthma and chronic bronchitis. From 1979 to 1983 we observed 115 patients with chronic lung diseases, who were exposed to wood dust during many years. We found an irritative pathogenesis in 101 patients with asthma or bronchitis. Twenty nine patients had got a positive skin test, especially with makoré, beech, koto, ash, pine. The inhalation test was positive in 7 of them. The occupational etiology was verified in 5 patients. Besides wood dust itself chemicals for wood protection or wood adhesives can have importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Fourteen patients had got alveolitis or lung fibrosis after wood-dust exposition. In each case we found precipitating antibodies against moulds, which could be cultivated from wood dust to which the patients were exposed.

  20. Mesospheric dust observations during the MAXIDUSTY campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Tarjei; Havnes, Ove; Fredriksen, Åshild; Friedrich, Martin; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Plane, John; Hartquist, Tom; Olsen, Sveinung; Eilertsen, Yngve; Trondsen, Espen; Mann, Ingrid; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Moen, Jøran; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Höffner, Josef; Williams, Bifford; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Karlberg, Jan-Ove

    2017-04-01

    The MAXIDUSTY rocket payloads, launched from Andøya June 30 and July 8 2016, were equipped with dust impact detectors aiming to characterize mesospheric dust charge state, mass distribution of impact fragments and NLC/PMSE structure. One of the main scientific objectives for the campaign was to confirm that material of meteoric origin is abundant inside the icy mesospheric dust particles. The rockets were launched simultaneously with PMSE and NLC (MAXIDUSTY-1) and PMSE (MAXIDUSTY-1B) respectively, and radar measurements were made coincident with the rocket flight path. We report here on the initial results from the rocket probes and remote soundings, with emphasis on the dust impact detector results. Results from the Multiple Dust Detector (MUDD) confirm that NLC ice particles probably have a relatively high content of meteoric smoke particles with a filling factor of up to several percent. Comparisons of the DUSTY faraday bucket and PMSE show that there is no simple correlation between the two.

  1. Dust storm events over Delhi: verification of dust AOD forecasts with satellite and surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditi; Iyengar, Gopal R.; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Thar desert located in northwest part of India is considered as one of the major dust source. Dust storms originate in Thar desert during pre-monsoon season, affects large part of Indo-Gangetic plains. High dust loading causes the deterioration of the ambient air quality and degradation in visibility. Present study focuses on the identification of dust events and verification of the forecast of dust events over Delhi and western part of IG Plains, during the pre-monsoon season of 2015. Three dust events have been identified over Delhi during the study period. For all the selected days, Terra-MODIS AOD at 550 nm are found close to 1.0, while AURA-OMI AI shows high values. Dust AOD forecasts from NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) for the three selected dust events are verified against satellite (MODIS) and ground based observations (AERONET). Comparison of observed AODs at 550 nm from MODIS with NCUM predicted AODs reveals that NCUM is able to predict the spatial and temporal distribution of dust AOD, in these cases. Good correlation (~0.67) is obtained between the NCUM predicted dust AODs and location specific observations available from AERONET. Model under-predicted the AODs as compared to the AERONET observations. This may be mainly because the model account for only dust and no anthropogenic activities are considered. The results of the present study emphasize the requirement of more realistic representation of local dust emission in the model both of natural and anthropogenic origin, to improve the forecast of dust from NCUM during the dust events.

  2. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from? Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young. Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds. Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  3. Release of monomers from composite dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokic, S M; Duca, R C; Godderis, L; Hoet, P H; Seo, J W; Van Meerbeek, B; Van Landuyt, K L

    2017-05-01

    Dental personnel are more at risk to develop asthmatic disease, but the exact reason is so far unknown. During abrasive procedures, dental personnel are exposed to nano-sized dust particles released from dental composite. The aim of this study was to investigate whether respirable composite dust may also release monomers. Respirable (composite dust was collected and the release of methacrylate monomers and Bisphenol A (BPA) in water and ethanol was evaluated by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). The dust was ultra-morphologically and chemically analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that, irrespective of the type of composite, the respirable fraction of composite dust may release relatively high concentrations of unpolymerized methacrylate monomers, both in water and ethanol. Higher release was observed in ethanol. The endocrine disruptor BPA also emanated from the composite dust particles. TEM showed that most particles were nano-sized, although particle size ranged between 6nm and 5μm with a mode value between 12 and 39nm. Most particles consisted of several filler particles in resin matrix, although single nano-filler particles could also be observed. Elemental analysis by TEM-EDS proved that the particles collected on the filters originated from the dental composites. Theoretically, composite dust may function as a vehicle to transport monomers deeply into the respiratory system. The results of this study may shed another light on the increasing incidence of respiratory disease among dental personnel, and more care should be taken to prevent inhalation of composite dust. Special care should be taken to prevent inhalation of composite dust, as the dust particles may release methacrylate monomers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyers Valerie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm, reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50. Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  5. Preparation and gas permeabilities of zeolite membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinqu Wang; Yongfeng Wang; Shuanshi Fan [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Zeolites with less than 10 {angstrom} pore are desirable membrane materials, due to their crystallinity, resistance to high temperature, and chemical inertness. A variety of new membranous materials were synthesized composed of a continuous intergrowth of 5-50 micrometer type A, X, Y, or ZSM-5 crystals. The membranes were crystallized under hydrothermal conditions at 90 to 220{degrees}C on the external surface of a porous ceramics. The reagents used were aluminum sulphate, water glass (20.1 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 6.09 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 73.8 wt% water), sodium hydroxide, sulphuric acid, deionized water and templating agents. The molar composition was: 0.1-0.5 Na{sub 2}O:1 SiO{sub 2}:0.04-0.05 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:20-60H{sub 2}O.

  6. The dust mass in Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Looze, Ilse; Barlow, Mike; Marcowith, Alexandre; Tatischef, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical models predict that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) can be efficient dust producers (0.1-1 Msun) and potentially responsible for most of the dust production in the early Universe. Observational evidence for this dust production efficiency has remained limited. Herschel observations from 70-500 microns of the 335-year old Cassiopeia A have indicated the presence of ˜0.1 Msun of cool (T˜35 K) dust interior to the reverse shock (Barlow et al. 2010), while Dunne et al. (2009) have claimed a detection of ˜1 Msun of cold (˜20 K) dust, based on SCUBA 850-micron polarimetric data. At sub-millimeter wavelengths, the supernova dust emission is heavily contaminated by interstellar dust emission and by the synchrotron radiation from the SNR. We present the first spatially resolved analysis of the infrared and submillimeter emission of Cas, A at better than 1 parsec resolution, based on our Herschel PACS and SPIRE 70-500um images. We used our PACS IFU and SPIRE FTS spectra to remove the contaminating emission from bright lines (e.g. [OIII]88, [CII]158). We updated the spectral index of the synchrotron emission based on recent Planck data, and extrapolated this synchrotron spectrum from a 3.7 mm VLA image to infrared/submillimeter wavelengths. We modeled the interstellar dust emission using a Galactic dust emission template from Jones et al. (2013), while the ISM dust mass is scaled to reproduce the continuum emission in the SPIRE FTS spectra at wavelengths > 650 micron (after subtraction of synchrotron emission). The UV radiation field that illuminates the ISM dust was constrained through PDR modelling of the [CI] 1-0, 2-1 and CO 4-3 lines observed in the SPIRE FTS spectra, and was found to range between 0.3 G0 and 1.0 G0 in units of the Draine IS radiation field. Within the uncertainties of the radiation field that illuminates the ISM material and the observational errors, we detect a dust mass of up to 0.8 Msun in Cas, A, with an average temperature of 30 K

  7. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R. B.; Tratt, D. M.; Schichtel, B. A.; Falke, S. R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gassó, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N. S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M. C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B. N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G. C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R. J.; Merrill, J.; Dubois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W. E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W. C.

    2001-08-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 μg/m3 with local peaks >100 μg/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 μm, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  8. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R.B.; Tratt, D.M.; Schichtel, B.A.; Falke, S.R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gasso, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N.S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M.C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B.N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G.C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R.J.; Merrill, J.; DuBois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W.E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 ??g/m3 with local peaks >100 ??g/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 ??m, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  9. DATA CRYSTALLIZATION APPLIED FOR DESIGNING NEW PRODUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenichi HORIE; Yoshiharu MAENO; Yukio OHSAWA

    2007-01-01

    It is only the observable part of the real world that can be stored in data.For such incomplete and ill-structured data,data crystallizing aims at presenting the hidden structure among events including unobservable events.This is realized by data crystallization,where dummy items,corresponding to potential existence ofunobservable events,are inserted to the given data.These dummy items and their relations with observable events are visualized by applying KeyGraph to the data with dummy items,like the crystallization of snow where dusts are involved in the formation of crystallization of water molecules.For tuning the granularity level of structure to be visualized,the tool of data crystallization is integrated with human's process of understanding significant scenarios in the real world.This basic method is expected to be applicable for various real world domains where previous methods of chance-discovery lead human to successful decision making.In this paper,we apply the data crystallization with human-interactive annealing (DCHA) to the design of products in a real company.The results show its effect to industrial decision making.

  10. Thermal analysis of line-defect photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report a systematic study of thermal effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers based on line-defect cavities. Two material platforms, InGaAsP and InP, are investigated experimentally and numerically. Lasers with quantum dot layers embedded in an InP membrane exhibit lasing at room temperatur...

  11. Thermo-induced vesicular dynamics of membranes containing cholesterol derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Tsuyoshi; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C; Hamada, Tsutomu; Le, Phuc Thi Minh; Takagi, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    Membrane structural organization is an intrinsic property of a cell membrane. Any changes in lipid composition, and/or any stimuli that affect molecular packing induce structural re-organization. It membrane dynamics provide a means by which changes in structure organization can be determined, upon a change in the membrane internal or external environment. Here, we report on the effect of thermo-stress on membranes containing cholesterol liquid crystal (LC) compounds cholesterol benzoate (BENZO) and oxidized cholesterols. We have (1) revealed that lipid vesicles containing this artificial cholesterol derivative (BENZO) is thermo-responsive, and that this thermo-sensitivity is significantly similar to naturally oxy-cholesterols (2) elucidated the mechanism behind the membrane perturbation. Using Langmuir monolayer experiments, we have demonstrated that membrane perturbation was due to an increase in the molecular surface area, (3) discussed the similarities between cholesterol benzoate in the cholesterol LC state and in lipid bilayer membranes. Last, (4) drawing from previously reported findings, our new data on membrane dynamics, and the discussion above, we propose that artificial cholesterol derivatives such as BENZO, open new possibilities for controlled and tailored design using model membrane systems. Examples could include the development of membrane technology and provide a trigger for progress in thermo-tropical liquid crystal engineering.

  12. An improved dust emission model with insights into the global dust cycle's climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Fratini, G.; Gillies, J. A.; Ishizuka, M.; Leys, J. F.; Mikami, M.; Park, M.-S.; Park, S.-U.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Ward, D. S.; Zobeck, T. M.

    2014-03-01

    Simulations of the global dust cycle and its interactions with a changing Earth system are hindered by the empirical nature of dust emission parameterizations in climate models. Here we take a step towards improving global dust cycle simulations by presenting a physically-based dust emission model. The resulting dust flux parameterization depends only on the wind friction speed and the soil's threshold friction speed, and can therefore be readily implemented into climate models. We show that our parameterization's functional form is supported by a compilation of quality-controlled vertical dust flux measurements, and that it better reproduces these measurements than existing parameterizations. Both our theory and measurements indicate that many climate models underestimate the dust flux's sensitivity to soil erodibility. This finding can explain why dust cycle simulations in many models are improved by using an empirical preferential sources function that shifts dust emissions towards the most erodible regions. In fact, implementing our parameterization in a climate model produces even better agreement against aerosol optical depth measurements than simulations that use such a source function. These results indicate that the need to use a source function is at least partially eliminated by the additional physics accounted for by our parameterization. Since soil erodibility is affected by climate changes, our results further suggest that many models have underestimated the climate sensitivity of the global dust cycle.

  13. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  14. Parametric and scattering characterization of PDMS membranes for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Vazquez Montiel, S.; Munoz-Lopez, J.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.

    2009-08-01

    Today elastic membranes are being used more frequent as optical surfaces in the science or in the industry. This due to the advantages that they display in their handling and in their cost of production. These characteristics make them ideals to apply them in micro-optical components and Tunable Focus Liquid Filled Length Lens (TFLFLL). In order to know if a membrane of PDMS (PDMS Sylgard 184) is feasible for a specific application within the field of the optics, it is necessary to know its mechanical, optical and chemical properties. In this work the parametric membrane characterization is reported for an optical application. An important factor in the performance of these membranes is related with their scattering factor that is produced due to the roughness and impurities (micro-bubbles or dust particles). These membranes are used as refractive surface in TFLFLL. Experimental results of the characterization process and device performance are presented.

  15. Glacial to Holocene changes in trans-Atlantic Saharan dust transport and dust-climate feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross H; McGee, David; Kinsley, Christopher W; Ridley, David A; Hu, Shineng; Fedorov, Alexey; Tal, Irit; Murray, Richard W; deMenocal, Peter B

    2016-11-01

    Saharan mineral dust exported over the tropical North Atlantic is thought to have significant impacts on regional climate and ecosystems, but limited data exist documenting past changes in long-range dust transport. This data gap limits investigations of the role of Saharan dust in past climate change, in particular during the mid-Holocene, when climate models consistently underestimate the intensification of the West African monsoon documented by paleorecords. We present reconstructions of African dust deposition in sediments from the Bahamas and the tropical North Atlantic spanning the last 23,000 years. Both sites show early and mid-Holocene dust fluxes 40 to 50% lower than recent values and maximum dust fluxes during the deglaciation, demonstrating agreement with records from the northwest African margin. These quantitative estimates of trans-Atlantic dust transport offer important constraints on past changes in dust-related radiative and biogeochemical impacts. Using idealized climate model experiments to investigate the response to reductions in Saharan dust's radiative forcing over the tropical North Atlantic, we find that small (0.15°C) dust-related increases in regional sea surface temperatures are sufficient to cause significant northward shifts in the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone, increased precipitation in the western Sahel and Sahara, and reductions in easterly and northeasterly winds over dust source regions. Our results suggest that the amplifying feedback of dust on sea surface temperatures and regional climate may be significant and that accurate simulation of dust's radiative effects is likely essential to improving model representations of past and future precipitation variations in North Africa.

  16. The effects of mineral dust particles, aerosol regeneration and ice nucleation parameterizations on clouds and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on the formation of convective clouds and precipitation in the Eastern Mediterranean sea with a special emphasis on the role of mineral dust particles in these processes. We used a new detailed numerical cloud microphysics scheme that has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model in order to study aerosol-cloud interaction in 3-D configuration based on realistic meteorological data. Using a number of case studies we tested the contribution of mineral dust particles and different ice nucleation parameterizations to precipitation development. In this study we also investigated the importance of recycled (regenerated aerosols that had been released to the atmosphere following the evaporation of cloud droplets.

    The results showed that increased aerosol concentration due to the presence of mineral dust enhanced the formation of ice crystals. The dynamic evolution of the cloud system sets the time periods and regions in which heavy or light precipitation occurred in the domain. The precipitation rate, the time and duration of precipitation were affected by the aerosol properties only at small area scales (with areas of about 20 km2. Changes of the ice nucleation scheme from ice supersaturation dependent parameterization to a recent approach of aerosol concentration and temperature dependent parameterization modified the ice crystals concentrations but did not affect the total precipitation in the domain. Aerosol regeneration modified the concentration of cloud droplets at cloud base by dynamic recirculation of the aerosols but also had only a minor effect on precipitation.

    The major conclusion from this study is that the effect of mineral dust particles on clouds and total precipitation is limited by the properties of the atmospheric dynamics and the only effect of aerosol on precipitation may come from significant increase in the concentration

  17. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, M.; Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. With this aim, we have developed a new code, GRASH_Rev, that allows following the dynamics of dust grains in the shocked SN ejecta and computing the time evolution of the mass, composition, and size distribution of the grains. We considered four well-studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN 1987A, CasA, the Crab nebula, and N49. These sources have been observed with both Spitzer and Herschel, and the multiwavelength data allow a better assessment the mass of warm and cold dust associated with the ejecta. For each SN, we first identified the best explosion model, using the mass and metallicity of the progenitor star, the mass of 56Ni, the explosion energy, and the circumstellar medium density inferred from the data. We then ran a recently developed dust formation model to compute the properties of freshly formed dust. Starting from these input models, GRASH_Rev self-consistently follows the dynamics of the grains, considering the effects of the forward and reverse shock, and allows predicting the time evolution of the dust mass, composition, and size distribution in the shocked and unshocked regions of the ejecta. All the simulated models aagree well with observations. Our study suggests that SN 1987A is too young for the reverse shock to have affected the dust mass. Hence the observed dust mass of 0.7-0.9 M⊙ in this source can be safely considered as indicative of the mass of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta. Conversely, in the other three SNe, the reverse shock has already destroyed between 10-40% of the

  18. Distribution of dust from Kuiper belt objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkavyi, N N; Taidakova, T; Mather, J C; Gorkavyi, Nick N.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John C.

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) Using an efficient computational approach, we have reconstructed the structure of the dust cloud in the Solar system between 0.5 and 100 AU produced by the Kuiper belt objects. Our simulations offer a 3-D physical model of the `kuiperoidal' dust cloud based on the distribution of 280 dust particle trajectories produced by 100 known Kuiper belt objects ; the resulting 3-D grid consists of $1.9\\times 10^6$ cells containing $1.2\\times 10^{11}$ particle positions. The following processes that influence the dust particle dynamics are taken into account: 1) gravitational scattering on the eight planets (neglecting Pluto); 2) planetary resonances; 3) radiation pressure; and 4) the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) and solar wind drags. We find the dust distribution highly non-uniform: there is a minimum in the kuiperoidal dust between Mars and Jupiter, after which both the column and number densities of kuiperoidal dust sharply increase with heliocentric distance between 5 and 10 AU, and then form a plateau betwee...

  19. Subregional inversion of North African dust sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Jerónimo; Boucher, Olivier; Chevallier, Frédéric; Huneeus, Nicolás.

    2016-07-01

    The emission of mineral dust aerosols in arid and semiarid regions is a complex process whose representation in atmospheric models remains crude, due to insufficient knowledge about the aerosol lifting process itself, the lack of global data on soil characteristics, and the impossibility for the models to resolve the fine-scale variability in the wind field that drives some of the dust events. As a result, there are large uncertainties in the total emission flux of mineral dust, its natural variability at various timescales, and the possible contribution from anthropogenic land use changes. This work aims for estimating dust emissions and reduces their uncertainty over the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula—the largest dust source region of the globe. We use a data assimilation approach to constrain dust emission fluxes at a monthly resolution for 18 subregions. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite-derived aerosol optical depth is assimilated in a regional configuration of a general circulation model coupled to an aerosol model. We describe this data assimilation system and apply it for 1 year, resulting in a total mineral dust emissions flux estimate of 2900 Tg yr-1 over the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula for the year 2006. The analysis field of aerosol optical depth shows an improved fit relative to independent Aerosol Robotic Network measurements as compared to the model prior field.

  20. Can Dust Segregation Mimic a Cosmological Constant?

    CERN Document Server

    Simonsen, J T; Simonsen, Jakob T.; Hannestad, Steen

    1999-01-01

    Recent measurements of type Ia supernovae indicate that distant supernovae are substantially fainter than expected from the standard flat cold dark matter model. One possible explanation is that the energy density in our universe is in fact dominated by a cosmological constant. Another possible solution is that there are large amounts of grey dust in the intergalactic medium. Dust grains can be grey either because they are non-spherical or very large. We have numerically investigated whether grey dust can be emitted from high redshift galaxies without also emitting standard, reddening dust, which would have been visible in the spectra of high redshift objects. Our finding is that grain velocities are almost independent of ellipticity so that if greyness are due to the grains being elongated, it will not be possible to separate grey dust from ordinary dust. We also find that velocities are fairly independent of grain size, but we cannot rule out possible sputtering of small grains, so that large, grey dust gra...

  1. Arsenic immobilization of Teniente furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, R. [Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corp., Kawasaki (Japan); Tateiwa, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Almendares, C. [Centro de Investigacion Minera y Metalurgica, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, G. [CODELCO, Santiago (Chile). Division Ventanas

    2007-07-01

    A 5-year joint Japanese-Chilean project to modify the treatment of furnace dust from a converter in Chile producing harmful amounts of arsenic and lead was described. A pilot plant was constructed to evaluate the method's commercialization potential. Flue dust was recovered by a dust collector installed to capture suspended dust generated by the smelting furnace. Arsenic content was approximately 15 per cent. Ninety per cent of the arsenic was then liquidated to lixivia and dissolved by leaching flue dust with sulphuric acid. The leaching rate decreased when flue dust had a high content of residual sulfide ore. A flotation device was then incorporated in the treatment process in order to increase the copper recovery rate. A solvent recovery process was then adopted to recover the copper and zinc contained in the solution after the arsenic recovery. An economic evaluation of the process indicated that efforts should be made to improve the efficiency of the dust treatment method. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 10 figs.

  2. Galaxy Simulation with Dust Formation and Destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyama, Shohei; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Todoroki, Keita; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isolated galaxy with a new treatment for dust formation and destruction. To this aim, we treat dust and metal production self-consistently with star formation and supernova feedback. For dust, we consider a simplified model of grain size distribution by representing the entire range of grain sizes with large and small grains. We include dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by supernova (SN) shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. We find that the assumption of fixed dust-to-metal mass ratio becomes no longer valid when the galaxy is older than 0.2 Gyr, at which point the grain growth by accretion starts to contribute to the nonlinear rise of dust-to-gas ratio. As expected in our previous one-zone model, shattering triggers grain growth by accretion since it increases the total surface area of grains. Coagulation becomes significant when the galaxy age is greater than $\\sim$ 1 Gyr: a...

  3. Cold dust clumps in dynamically hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Hony, S; Panuzzo, P; Sauvage, M; Roman-Duval, J; Gordon, K D; Engelbracht, C; Israel, F P; Misselt, K; Okumura, K; Li, A; Bolatto, A; Skibba, R; Galliano, F; Matsuura, M; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Galametz, M; Hughes, A; Kawamura, A; Onishi, T; Paradis, D; Poglitsch, A; Reach, W T; Robitaille, T; Rubio, M; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    We present clumps of dust emission from Herschel observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their physical and statistical properties. We catalog cloud features seen in the dust emission from Herschel observations of the LMC, the Magellanic type irregular galaxy closest to the Milky Way, and compare these features with HI catalogs from the ATCA+Parkes HI survey. Using an automated cloud-finding algorithm, we identify clouds and clumps of dust emission and examine the cumulative mass distribution of the detected dust clouds. The mass of cold dust is determined from physical parameters that we derive by performing spectral energy distribution fits to 250, 350, and 500 micronm emission from SPIRE observations using DUSTY and GRASIL radiative transfer calculation with dust grain size distributions for graphite/silicate in low-metallicity extragalactic environments. The dust cloud mass spectrum follows a power law distribution with an exponent of gamma=-1.8 for clumps larger than 400 solar mass and is si...

  4. Electric Field Generation in Martian Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Marsin situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the MacroscopicTriboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric ModelingSystem (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system.Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  5. THE MEASUREMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF WOOD DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosario Proto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the woodworking industry presents many issues in terms of occupational health and safety. This study on exposure to wood dust could contribute to the realization of a prevention model in order to limit exposure to carcinogenic agents to the worker. The sampling methodology illustrated the analysis of dust emissions from the woodworking machinery in operation throughout the various processing cycles. The quantitative and qualitative assessment of exposure was performed using two different methodologies. The levels of wood dust were determined according to EN indications and sampling was conducted using IOM and Cyclon personal samplers. The qualitative research of wood dust was performed using an advanced laser air particle counter. This allowed the number of particles present to be counted in real time. The results obtained allowed for an accurate assessment of the quality of the dust emitted inside the workplace during the various processing phases. The study highlighted the distribution of air particles within the different size classes, the exact number of both thin and ultra-thin dusts, and confirmed the high concentration of thin dust particles which can be very harmful to humans.

  6. Dust Sources of Saturn's E Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, F.; Schmidt, J.; Albers, N.; Kempf, S.; Krivov, A. V.; Sremcevic, M.

    The recent detection of a dust plume at Enceladus' south pole sheds new light on the origin of the E ring of Saturn. The particles probably condense from gas vents escaping from a system of cracks covering the south pole that appears unusually hot in the Cassini infrared experiments. The main fraction of the E ring dust is created in these gas vents. Still, significant amounts of dust should originate from grains ejected by hypervelocity impacts of E ring particles (ERPs), or alternatively, of interplanetary dust grains (IDPs) on the Saturnian moons embedded in the E ring. We estimate the contributions of impactor -ejecta created dust at these various satellites in the ring, relative to the production rate of grains in the plume at Enceladus. Furthermore, we compare the amount of dust created by both projectile families - ERPs and IDPs - and predict that one can clearly discriminate between the ejecta raised by either projectile families in the data of the Cassini dust detector (CDA) collected at close flybys with the moons embedded in the E ring.

  7. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  8. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  9. Characterization of African dust over southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A.; Dee Tomasi, F.; Filippo, E.; Manno, D.; Perrone, M. R.; Serra, A.; Tafuro, A. M.; Tepore, A.

    2003-12-01

    Dust samples from rainfall residues have been collected in southeast Italy (40º 20' N, 18º 6' E) during dust outbreaks occurred from April to June 2002 to characterize morphological and elemental particle composition by different techniques, and investigate the dependence of particle properties on source regions. Four-day analytical back trajectories and satellite images have been used to infer source regions of the investigated dust samples. It has been found that the TOMS absorbing aerosol index was in the range 0.7-2.2 over Southern Italy when samples have been collected. The particle-size and -shape analysis by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has revealed either that the particle-diameter distribution was between 0.3 and 30 mm with median-diameter values between 1.7-2.4 mm, and that the particles were characterized by a roundness factor varying from 0.8 to 2.5. The infrared transmission spectra have allowed recognizing that all dust samples contained a significant amount of illite. The X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) measurements have revealed that the Al/Si ratio of the transported dust varies from 0.41 to 0.50, and that the Al/Si, Ca/Al, K/Ca, and Fe/Ca ratios differ according to source regions and therefore can be used as indicators of dust source regions. Indeed, it has been found that dust samples with larger Ca/Al and Si/Al ratios and lower Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios, have been collected along dust events with a source region in northwestern Sahara. On the contrary, the samples collected along dust events with the origin mainly in Chad, Niger, Algeria and Lybia were characterized by larger Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios.

  10. Characterization of African dust over southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blanco

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust samples from rainfall residues have been collected in southeast Italy (40º 20' N, 18º 6' E during dust outbreaks occurred from April to June 2002 to characterize morphological and elemental particle composition by different techniques, and investigate the dependence of particle properties on source regions. Four-day analytical back trajectories and satellite images have been used to infer source regions of the investigated dust samples. It has been found that the TOMS absorbing aerosol index was in the range 0.7-2.2 over Southern Italy when samples have been collected. The particle-size and -shape analysis by a scanning electron microscope (SEM has revealed either that the particle-diameter distribution was between 0.3 and 30 mm with median-diameter values between 1.7-2.4 mm, and that the particles were characterized by a roundness factor varying from 0.8 to 2.5. The infrared transmission spectra have allowed recognizing that all dust samples contained a significant amount of illite. The X-ray energy dispersive (EDX measurements have revealed that the Al/Si ratio of the transported dust varies from 0.41 to 0.50, and that the Al/Si, Ca/Al, K/Ca, and Fe/Ca ratios differ according to source regions and therefore can be used as indicators of dust source regions. Indeed, it has been found that dust samples with larger Ca/Al and Si/Al ratios and lower Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios, have been collected along dust events with a source region in northwestern Sahara. On the contrary, the samples collected along dust events with the origin mainly in Chad, Niger, Algeria and Lybia were characterized by larger Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios.

  11. Crystallization of proteins from crude bovine rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bo Y; Gulati, Sahil; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining protein crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies comprises the greatest challenge in the determination of protein crystal structures, especially for membrane proteins and protein complexes. Although high purity has been broadly accepted as one of the most significant requirements for protein crystallization, a recent study of the Escherichia coli proteome showed that many proteins have an inherent propensity to crystallize and do not require a highly homogeneous sample (Totir et al., 2012). As exemplified by RPE65 (Kiser, Golczak, Lodowski, Chance, & Palczewski, 2009), there also are cases of mammalian proteins crystallized from less purified samples. To test whether this phenomenon can be applied more broadly to the study of proteins from higher organisms, we investigated the protein crystallization profile of bovine rod outer segment (ROS) crude extracts. Interestingly, multiple protein crystals readily formed from such extracts, some of them diffracting to high resolution that allowed structural determination. A total of seven proteins were crystallized, one of which was a membrane protein. Successful crystallization of proteins from heterogeneous ROS extracts demonstrates that many mammalian proteins also have an intrinsic propensity to crystallize from complex biological mixtures. By providing an alternative approach to heterologous expression to achieve crystallization, this strategy could be useful for proteins and complexes that are difficult to purify or obtain by recombinant techniques.

  12. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, synthesizing, assembling, and characterizing functional tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLMs) as a novel platform for biophysical studies of and with artificial membranes or for sensor development employing, e.g., membrane integral receptor proteins. Chemical coupling schemes based on thiol groups for Au substrates or silanes used in the case of oxide surfaces allow for the covalent and, hence, chemically and mechanically robust attachment of anchor lipids to the solid support, stabilizing the proximal layer of a tethered membrane on the transducer surface. Surface plasmon optics, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence- and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques are used to characterize the build-up of these complex supramolecular interfacial architectures. We demonstrate, in particular, that bilayers with a specific electrical resistance of better than 10 M{omega} cm{sup 2} can be achieved routinely with this approach. The functionalization of the lipid membranes by the incorporation of peptides is demonstrated for the carrier valinomycin which shows in our tBLMs the expected discrimination by four orders of magnitude between the translocation of K{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-ions across the hydrophobic barrier. For the synthetic channel-forming peptide M2 the high electrical resistance of the bilayer with the correspondingly low background current allows for the recording of even single channel current fluctuations. From the many membrane proteins that we reconstituted so far we describe results obtained with the redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we also use a genetically modified mutant with a His-tag at either the C- or the N-terminus for the oriented attachment of the protein via the NTA/Ni{sup 2+} approach. With this strategy, we not only can control the density of the immobilized functional units, we introduce a completely new and alternative concept for the

  13. Ice crystal precipitation at Dome C site (East Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santachiara, G.; Belosi, F.; Prodi, F.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, falling ice crystals were collected on glass slides covered with a thin layer of 2% formvar in chloroform at the Dome Concordia site (Dome C), Antarctica. Samplings were performed in the framework of the 27th Italian Antarctica expedition of the Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica in the period 21 February-6 August 2012. Events of clear-sky precipitations and precipitations from clouds were considered and the replicas obtained were examined under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Several shapes of ice crystals were identified, including "diamond dust" (plates, pyramids, hollow and solid columns), and crystal aggregates varying in complexity. Single events often contained both small (10 μm to 50 μm) and large (hundreds of microns) crystals, suggesting that crystals can form simultaneously near the ground (height of a few hundred metres) and at higher layers (height of thousands of metres). Images of sampled crystal replicas showed that single bullets are not produced separately, but by the disintegration of combinations of bullets. Rimed ice crystals were absent in the Dome C samples, i.e. the only mode of crystal growth was water vapour diffusion. On considering the aerosol in the sampled crystals, we reached the conclusion that inertial impaction, interception and Brownian motion were insufficient to explain the scavenged aerosol. We therefore presume that phoretic forces play a role in scavenging during the crystal growth process.

  14. Balloon-borne and Raman lidar observations of Asian dust and cirrus cloud properties over Tsukuba, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsu; Orikasa, Narihiro; Nagai, Tomohiro; Murakami, Masataka; Tajiri, Takuya; Saito, Atsushi; Yamashita, Katsuya; Hashimoto, Akihiro

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distributions of the microphysical and optical properties of tropospheric aerosols and cirrus cloud were measured using an instrumented balloon and a ground-based Raman lidar over Tsukuba, Japan (36°N, 140°E), during the Asian dust events on 9 and 21 May 2007 to investigate the influence of Asian mineral dust on ice cloud formation in the upper troposphere. The instrumented balloon measured the particle size distribution, ice crystal images, dew/frost point, relative humidity, and temperature. The Raman lidar measured the particle backscattering and extinction coefficients and the depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532 nm. The results of the balloon measurements showed that supermicrometer (0.7 to 2.8 µm in optical-equivalent radius) dust particles and ice crystals (10 to 400 µm in maximum dimension) were present in the upper troposphere (8 to 12 km in altitude), with number concentrations varying from 5 × 10-3 to 0.6 cm-3 for dust and from 5 × 10-3 to 0.15 cm-3 for ice crystals. The Raman lidar measurement indicated that the particle depolarization ratios were 15 to 35% in the altitude range of 6 to 12 km, indicating the predominance of nonspherical particles in the region. The temperature ranged from -33 to -63°C, and the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi), estimated from the total (vapor plus condensate) water content obtained with the Snow White hygrometer in the cloud, was 130% at maximum on 9 May, which was close to the activation point of Asian mineral dust as ice nuclei to form ice crystals.

  15. Sensitivity Studies of Dust Ice Nuclei Effect on Cirrus Clouds with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Jensen, Eric J.; Gettelman, Andrew; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios; Lawson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this study the effect of dust aerosol on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds through heterogeneous ice nucleation is investigated in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) with two ice nucleation parameterizations. Both parameterizations consider homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and the competition between the two mechanisms in cirrus clouds, but differ significantly in the number concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) from dust. Heterogeneous nucleation on dust aerosol reduces the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation and thus the ice crystal number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) cirrus clouds compared to simulations with pure homogeneous nucleation. Global and annual mean shortwave and longwave cloud forcing are reduced by up to 2.0+/-0.1Wm (sup-2) (1 uncertainty) and 2.4+/-0.1Wm (sup-2), respectively due to the presence of dust IN, with the net cloud forcing change of -0.40+/-0.20W m(sup-2). Comparison of model simulations with in situ aircraft data obtained in NH mid-latitudes suggests that homogeneous ice nucleation may play an important role in the ice nucleation at these regions with temperatures of 205-230 K. However, simulations overestimate observed ice crystal number concentrations in the tropical tropopause regions with temperatures of 190- 205 K, and overestimate the frequency of occurrence of high ice crystal number concentration (greater than 200 L(sup-1) and underestimate the frequency of low ice crystal number concentration (less than 30 L(sup-1) at NH mid-latitudes. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the number concentrations and properties of heterogeneous IN (including dust aerosol) in the upper troposphere from the global perspective.

  16. Mineralogical analysis of attic dust samples for contamination source identification in an industrial area, Ajka, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völgyesi, Péter; Jordan, Gyozo; Gosar, Mateja; Szabó, Csaba; Miler, Miloš; Kónya, Péter; Bartha, András

    2013-04-01

    -bearing phases often occurred as spherical particles and skeletal crystals, indicating melting at high temperatures followed by fast cooling and, thus, their anthropogenic origin. Hollow gypsum phases found in the dust samples referred to anthropogenic sources, too. Spherical aluminosilicates formed mainly during coal combustion were commonly identified. On the other hand, only sporadic heavy metal-bearing phases were found. Detailed phase analysis enabled the identification of origin of airborne dust and concluded that contaminated fly ash from the coal-fired power plant dominates anthropogenic sources, besides the alumina industry, mining and traffic.

  17. Determination the Level of Dust ond Free Silica in Air of Khaf Iron Stone Quarries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dadpour4

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Silica is an inorganic material that found in the nature in various forms. The hazards of crystal of silica or α-quartz (free silica is greater than other forms. Exposure to dust that contains free silica result to pulmonary injury and result to silicosis and death finally. The present research was conducted in order to evaluate the level of workers exposure to free silica in air of Khaf Iron stone quarries."nMaterials and methods: The exposure level to total and respiratory dust measured based on personal and environmental sampling methods and concentration of dust determined based on gravimetric method. For determination of amounts of free silica, dust samples analyses based on X-ray diffraction (XRD method, and results compared with standard levels."nResults: The maximum amount of total dust and free silica measured in stone breaking station (800±155mg/m3 and 26.11±6.7 mg/m3 and minimum of them measured in official and safeguarding station (8.28±2.2 mg/m3 and 0.012±0.0019 mg/m3. The maximum amount of respiratory dust and free silica measured in red mound digging number 1 (66.14±13.45 mg/m3 and 1.48±0.39 mg/m3 and minimum of them measured in air hammer machine station (5.26±2.62 mg/m3 and 0.01±0.005 mg/m3."nConclusion: Amount of total dust only in official and safeguarding station was lower than standard levels of Iran. Amount of respiratory dust in all stations was greater than Iran standard levels. Furthermore the level of respiratory free silica only in airy hammer machine station was lower than standard level of Iran. Regarding to this amounts it is so essential to that with applying different methods generation and emission of dust protected.

  18. Convective dust clouds in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mitic, S; Ivlev, A V; Hoefner, H; Thoma, M H; Zhdanov, S; Morfill, G E

    2008-01-01

    The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.

  19. Dusts in ITER: diagnostics and removal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Worms, J.; Hong, S.H. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DRFC/SIPP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Delaporte, P. [Universite de la Mediterranee, LP3, UMR 6182 CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Onofrie, J.F. [University of Provence, IUSTI-CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Counsell, G. [Association Euratom/UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Winter, J. [lnstitute of Experimental Physics 2, Bochum (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Dusts will be present in ITER and will represent an issue in terms of safety. As a matter of facts, dusts will be created by interaction of the plasma with the in-vessel materials and will be thus made of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. They will be activated, tritiated and chemically toxic. Safety limits have been set in order to reduce these dust hazards. The first set of limits is based on a limitation of the radiological impact on environment in case of dust spreading. Tungsten has been used as representative of ITER dust because it is the most radiologically hazardous of the plasma facing materials. Thus the mobilizable dust inside the vacuum vessel has to be limited to few hundreds of kilograms of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. The objective of the second set of limits is to ensure that the dust chemical reactivity is adequately controlled. Indeed this reactivity is greatly enhanced on the hot surfaces of the divertor in case of steam ingress, oxidation of the metals, beryllium in particular, leading to hydrogen production and possible explosion. The dusts on the hot surfaces of the divertor should not exceed few kilograms of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. Some calculations have shown that the dusts limits inside the vacuum vessel could be reached in about 500 plasma pulses, and in any case before the assumed replacement of the divertor for planned maintenance. Thus techniques for dust diagnostics and removal need to be developed for ITER to ensure that the set of safety limits are fulfilled. To minimize the impact on the machine operation time, these techniques have to be elaborated considering the ITER vacuum vessel constraints if entering the machine (magnetic field, radiation, vacuum and temperature) or to be non invasive. This paper will present a strategy that could be developed at different periods of the machine operation (during/between pulses and during short or long maintenance periods) in order to monitor the

  20. Point discharge current measurements beneath dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Anderson, John P.; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri A.

    2016-12-01

    We document for the first time observations of point discharge currents under dust devils using a novel compact sensor deployed in summer 2016 at the USDA-ARS Jornada Experimental Range in New Mexico, USA. A consistent signature is noted in about a dozen events seen over 40 days, with a positive current ramping up towards closest approach, switching to a decaying negative current as the devil recedes. The currents, induced on a small wire about 10 cm above the ground, correlate with dust devil intensity (pressure drop) and dust loading, and reached several hundred picoAmps.