WorldWideScience

Sample records for cryogenic vacuum tests

  1. Cryogenic vacuum pump design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, A.J.; Lessard, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the problems and tradeoffs involved in cryogenic vacuum pump analysis, design and manufacture. Particular attention is paid to the several issues unique to cryopumps, e.g., radiation loading, adsorption of noncondensible gases, and regeneration. A general algorithm for cryopump design is also proposed. 12 references

  2. SNS Cryogenic Test Facility Kinney Vacuum Pump Commissioning and Operation at 2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraff, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built and commissioned an independent Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) in support of testing in the Radio-frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Superconducting Radio-frequency Cavity (SRF) testing was initially conducted with the CTF cold box at 4.5 K. A Kinney vacuum pump skid consisting of a roots blower with a liquid ring backing pump was recently added to the CTF system to provide testing capabilities at 2 K. System design, pump refurbishment and installation of the Kinney pump will be presented. During the commissioning and initial testing period with the Kinney pump, several barriers to achieve reliable operation were experienced. Details of these lessons learned and improvements to skid operations will be presented. Pump capacity data will also be presented.

  3. SNS Cryogenic Test Facility Kinney Vacuum Pump Commissioning and Operation at 2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degraff, Brian D. [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P. [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Neustadt, Thomas S. [ORNL

    2017-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built and commissioned an independent Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) in support of testing in the Radio-frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Superconducting Radio-frequency Cavity (SRF) testing was initially conducted with the CTF cold box at 4.5 K. A Kinney vacuum pump skid consisting of a roots blower with a liquid ring backing pump was recently added to the CTF system to provide testing capabilities at 2 K. System design, pump refurbishment and installation of the Kinney pump will be presented. During the commissioning and initial testing period with the Kinney pump, several barriers to achieve reliable operation were experienced. Details of these lessons learned and improvements to skid operations will be presented. Pump capacity data will also be presented.

  4. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1-1/2 in. inner pipe size, 3 in. vacuum jacket, and 4 in. inner pipe size, 6 in. vacuum jacket The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 in. and 6 in. pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  5. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1 1/2 inches inner pipe size, 3 inches vacuum jacket, and 4 inches inner pipe size, 6 inches vacuum jacket. The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 inch and 6 inch pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  6. Six movements measurement system employed for GAIA secondary mirror positioning system vacuum tests at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Sánchez Rodríguez, Antonio; Garranzo García-Ibarrola, Daniel; Belenguer Dávila, Tomás

    2008-07-01

    In this work, the optical measurement system employed to evaluate the performance of a 6 degrees of freedom (dof) positioning mechanism under cryogenic conditions is explored. The mechanism, the flight model of three translations and three rotations positioning mechanism, was developed by the Spanish company SENER (for ASTRIUM) to fulfil the high performance requirements from ESA technology preparatory program for the positioning of a secondary mirror within the GAIA Astrometric Mission. Its performance has been evaluated under vacuum and temperature controlled conditions (up to a 10-6mbar and 100K) at the facilities of the Space Instrumentation Laboratory (LINES) of the Aerospace Technical Nacional Institute of Spain (INTA). After the description of the 'alignment tool' developed to compare a fixed reference with the optical signal corresponding to the movement under evaluation, the optical system that allows measuring the displacements and the rotations in the three space directions is reported on. Two similar bread-boards were defined and mounted for the measurements purpose, one containing two distancemeters, in order to measure the displacements through the corresponding axis, and an autocollimator in order to obtain the rotations on the plane whose normal vector is the axis mentioned before, and other one containing one distancemeter and one autocollimator. Both distancemeter and autocollimator measurements have been combined in order to extract the information about the accuracy of the mechanism movements as well as their repeatability under adverse environmental conditions.

  7. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  8. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Payload Transport Rail System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sam; Homan, Jonathan; Speed, John

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the "Great Observatories", scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describe the challenges of developing, integrating and modifying new payload rails capable of transporting payloads within the thermal vacuum chamber up to 65,000 pounds. Ambient and Cryogenic Operations required to configure for testing will be explained. Lastly review historical payload configurations stretching from the Apollo program era to current James Webb Space Telescope testing.

  9. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Liquid Nitrogen System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sammy; Homan, Jonathan; Montz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the “Great Observatories”, scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describes the steps performed in efforts to convert the existing the 60’s era Liquid Nitrogen System from a forced flow (pumped) process to a natural circulation (thermo-siphon) process. In addition, the paper will describe the dramatic conservation of liquid nitrogen to support the long duration thermal vacuum testing. Lastly, describe the simplistic and effective control system which results in zero to minimal human inputs during steady state conditions.

  10. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  11. Superconductivity, magnetics, cryogenics, and vacuum coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Ballou, J.K.; Beaver, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Engineering Sciences Department continued to provide consultation, design, and experiment to support the plasma physics activities of the Division while inaugurating a comprehensive program to develop superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion devices. This newly funded program is aimed at producing toroidal superconducting magnets for an experimental power reactor by the mid 1980's. Other superconducting work, such as the 14-T niobium tin solenoid designed last year for use in Moessbauer experiments, has been fabricated, successfully tested, and delivered to the Physics Division. This coil, which used a 1.27-cm wide Nb 3 Sn conductor operating at 14 T with a coil current density of 11,000 A/cm, represents an advance in the state-of-the-art. The conceptual design was provided for a subcooler to extend the ORMAK operating temperature to 70 0 K and thus allow operation at fields up to 25 kG with the present generators. The detailed design, fabrication, installation supervision, and acceptance testing of the subcooler were provided by the UCCND engineering organization. Further support to the ORMAK program was provided by the vacuum-coating activity through an investigation of sputtering erosion of the ORMAK liner. In addition, a program was undertaken to develop a variety of refractory surfaces of metals, alloys, and intermetallic compounds on stainless steel for use as first walls in future fusion devices. Adherent thick-film metallic and compound coatings deposited in vacuum by several mechanisms were produced and tested. (U.S.)

  12. Kodak AMSD Cryogenic Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Hammon, John; Barrett, David; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGST will be an IR based optical system that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. As part of the AMSD program, Kodak must demonstrate the ability of our system to perform at these very cold temperatures. Kodak will discuss the test approach that will be used for cryogenic testing at MSFC's XRCF.

  13. Development of distortion measurement system for large deployable antenna via photogrammetry in vacuum and cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengsong; Jiang, Shanping; Yang, Linhua; Zhang, Bolun

    2018-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of high precision thermal distortion measurement foraΦ4.2m deployable mesh antenna of satellite in vacuum and cryogenic environment, based on Digital Close-range Photogrammetry and Space Environment Test Technology of Spacecraft, a large scale antenna distortion measurement system under vacuum and cryogenic environment is developed in this paper. The antenna Distortion measurement system (ADMS) is the first domestic independently developed thermal distortion measurement system for large antenna, which has successfully solved non-contact high precision distortion measurement problem in large spacecraft structure under vacuum and cryogenic environment. The measurement accuracy of ADMS is better than 50 μm/5m, which has reached international advanced level. The experimental results show that the measurement system has great advantages in large structural measurement of spacecrafts, and also has broad application prospects in space or other related fields.

  14. Vacuum Bellows, Vacuum Piping, Cryogenic Break, and Copper Joint Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design in preparation for construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak. During the course of this work, questions have arisen in regard to safety barriers and equipment reliability as important facets of system design. The vacuum system designers have asked several questions about the reliability of vacuum bellows and vacuum piping. The vessel design team has asked about the reliability of electrical breaks and copper-copper joints used in cryogenic piping. Research into operating experiences of similar equipment has been performed to determine representative failure rates for these components. The following chapters give the research results and the findings for vacuum system bellows, power plant stainless steel piping (amended to represent vacuum system piping), cryogenic system electrical insulating breaks, and copper joints.

  15. Infrared detectors and test technology of cryogenic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaole; Liu, Xingxin; Xing, Mailing; Ling, Long

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic camera which is widely used in deep space detection cools down optical system and support structure by cryogenic refrigeration technology, thereby improving the sensitivity. Discussing the characteristics and design points of infrared detector combined with camera's characteristics. At the same time, cryogenic background test systems of chip and detector assembly are established. Chip test system is based on variable cryogenic and multilayer Dewar, and assembly test system is based on target and background simulator in the thermal vacuum environment. The core of test is to establish cryogenic background. Non-uniformity, ratio of dead pixels and noise of test result are given finally. The establishment of test system supports for the design and calculation of infrared systems.

  16. A honeycomb sandwich structure vacuum jacket for cryogenic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, M.; Kasai, S.; Kato, S.

    1988-11-01

    Cryogenic targets (H 2 , D 2 and 4 He) have been built for use in the study of photonuclear reactions with π sr spectrometer, TAGX at the 1.3 GeV Tokyo electron synchrotron. A new type of vacuum jacket fabricated from plastic honeycomb core and Mylar skins has been used in the target system for more than 5000 hours. The average radiation thickness and the average density of this jacket are measured to be 3.3 x 10 -3 X 0 and 0.15 g/cm 3 , respectively. (author)

  17. Cryogenic vacuum pumping at the LBL 88-inch cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elo, D.; Morris, D.; Clark, D.J.; Gough, R.A.

    1978-09-01

    A cryogenic vacuum pumping panel has been in operation at the 88-inch cyclotron since 1974. The nude pumping panel is located in the acceleration chamber. The pumping surface consists of tubing cooled to 20 0 K by a closed loop helium refrigeration system. The pumping surfaces are shielded from radiation heat loads and water vapors by liquid nitrogen cooled baffles. The panel was designed for an average pumping speed of 14,000 liters/sec. for air. This approximately tripled the total effective pumping on the acceleration chamber from the existing diffusion pumped system, significantly reducing charge exchange losses of heavy ions during acceleration. Design, installation and performance characteristics are described

  18. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  19. Studies of structural material degassing in cryogenic vacuum technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshmarov, Yu.A.; Kupriyanov, V.I.; Ivanov, A.E.; Chubarov, E.V.; Dryamov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The choice and design of cryogenic vacuum pumping equipment require a reliable knowledge of qualitative and quantitative gassing parameters characteristic of the structural materials now in use. The gassing study has been made on the plates of stainless steel, copper and aluminium at a pressure of 1.33 (10 -3 -10 -5 ) Pa (10 -5 -10 -7 mm Hg) at room temperature and degassing duration up to 50 hours. An approximate method is proposed for the determination of the diffusion coefficients initial concentration of dissolved in metals gases, and gaseous exchange coefficient for various components of the gas dissolved in steel copper and aluminium alloys. The data obtained permit the designing of pumping equipment for various vacuum systems

  20. ATLAS magnet common cryogenic, vacuum, electrical and control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Delruelle, N; Geich-Gimbel, C; Haug, F; Olesen, G; Pengo, R; Sbrissa, E; Tyrvainen, H; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The superconducting Magnet System for the ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN comprises a Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and a Central Solenoid with overall dimensions of 20 m diameter by 26 m length and a stored energy of 1.6 GJ. Common proximity cryogenic and electrical systems for the toroids are implemented. The Cryogenic System provides the cooling power for the 3 toroid magnets considered as a single cold mass (600 tons) and for the CS. The 21 kA toroid and the 8 kA solenoid electrical circuits comprise both a switch-mode power supply, two circuit breakers, water cooled bus bars, He cooled current leads and the diode resistor ramp-down unit. The Vacuum System consists of a group of primary rotary pumps and sets of high vacuum diffusion pumps connected to each individual cryostat. The Magnet Safety System guarantees the magnet protection and human safety through slow and fast dump treatment. The Magnet Control System ensures control, regulation and monitoring of the operation of the magnets. The update...

  1. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.; Chronis, W.C.

    1985-08-01

    This paper includes an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility. The following subsystems are included: 500kW nitrogen reliquefier, subcoolers, and distribution system; 15kW helium refrigerator/liquefier and distribution system; helium recovery and storage system; rough vacuum and high vacuum systems

  2. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  3. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  4. Precision mechanisms for optics in a vacuum cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R.; Elswijk, E.; Tromp, N.; Kragt, J.; Kroes, G.; Hanenburg, H.; de Haan, M.; Schuil, M.; Teuwen, M.; Janssen, H.; Venema, L.

    2017-11-01

    To achieve superb stability in cryogenic optical systems, NOVA-ASTRON generally designs optical instruments on the basis of a 'no adjustments' philosophy. This means that in principle no corrections are possible after assembly. The alignment precision and consequently the performance of the instrument is guaranteed from the design, the tolerance analysis and the detailed knowledge of the material behavior and manufacturing process. This resulted in a higher degree of integrated optomechanical-cryogenic design with fewer parts, but with a higher part complexity. The 'no adjustments' strategy is successful because in the end the risk on instrument performance and project delays is much reduced. Astronomical instrument specifications have become more challenging over the years. Recent designs of the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope Interferometer (ESO VLTI) 4 Telescope combiner MATISSE include hundreds of optical components in a cryogenic environment. Despite the large number of optical components the alignment accuracy and stability requirements are in the order of nanometers. The 'no adjustments' philosophy would be too costly in this case, because all components would need to meet extremely tight manufacturing specifications. These specifications can be relaxed dramatically if cryogenic mechanisms are used for alignment. Several mechanisms have been developed: a tip-tilt mirror mechanism, an optical path distance mechanism, a slider mechanism, a bistable cryogenic shutter and a mirror mounting clip. Key aspects of these mechanisms are that the optical element and mechanism are combined in a compact single component, driven by e.g. self braking piezo actuators in order to hold position without power. The design, realization and test results of several mechanisms are presented in this paper.

  5. Testing of Prototype Magnetic Suspension Cryogenic Transfer Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Nagy, Z. F.; Sojourner, S. J.; Shu, Q. S.; Cheng, G.; Susta, J. T.

    2006-04-01

    A 6-meter prototype cryogenic transfer line with magnetic suspension was tested for its mechanical and thermal performance at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). A test facility with two cryogenic end-boxes was designed and commissioned for the testing. Suspension mechanisms were verified through a series of tests with liquid nitrogen. The thermal performance of the prototype was determined using the new test apparatus. The tested prototype has incorporated temperature and vacuum pressure data acquisition ports, customized interfaces to cryogenic end-boxes, and instrumentation. All tests were conducted under simulated onsite transfer line working conditions. A static (boiloff rate measurement) testing method was employed to demonstrate the gross heat leak in the tested article. The real-time temperature distribution, vacuum level, levitation distance, and mass flow rate were measured. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the testing facility design and preparation, test procedure, and primary test results. Special arrangements (such as turning on/off mechanical support units, observing levitation gap, and setting up the flowmeter) in testing of such a magnetically levitated transfer line are also discussed. Preliminary results show that the heat leak reduction of approximately one-third to one-half is achievable through such transfer lines with a magnetic suspension system.

  6. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  7. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  8. A hall for assembly and cryogenic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaunier, J.; Buhler, S.; Caruette, A.; Chevrollier, R.; Junquera, T.; Le Scornet, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Cryodrome, an assembly hall and the testing ground for cryogenic equipment and R and D experiments for the superconducting cavities is going to be transformed for its future missions. The cryogenic utilities, especially the He low pressure pumping capacity, was rearranged and extended to a new area. Space was provided to install CRYHOLAB, a new horizontal cryostat for cavity testing. Automatic control and supervision of the utilities and the experimental area are rebuilt and updated. (authors)

  9. Cryogenic thermal storage system for discontinuous industrial vacuum processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scaringella M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials are proposed for refrigerating systems in discontinuous industrial vacuum processes where temperatures as low as −140 ÷ −100°C are necessary within time-frames representing 10÷20% of total operating time. An application is proposed for cooling systems used in a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD apparatus. A prototype has been manufactured which couples a cryopump with a reservoir filled with MethylCycloPentane (MCP-C6H12 and a distribution line where nitrogen in the gaseous state is flowing. Preliminary tests show that temperatures of about −120°C are actually achieved within time windows compatible with PVD applications.

  10. Cryogenic test facility at VECC, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Amit; Bhunia, Uttam; Pradhan, J.; Sur, A.; Bhandari, R.K.; Ranganathan, R.

    2003-01-01

    In view of proposed K-500 superconducting cyclotron project, cryogenic test facility has been set up at the centre. The facility can broadly be categorized into two- a small scale test facility and a large scale test facility. This facility has been utilized for the calibration of liquid helium level probe, cryogenic temperature probe, and I-B plot for a 7 T superconducting magnet. Spiral-shaped superconducting short sample with specific dimension and specially designed stainless steel sample holder has already been developed for the electrical characterisation. The 1/5 th model superconducting coil along with its quench detection circuit and dump resistor has also been developed

  11. Tribological properties of polymers PI, PTFE and PEEK at cryogenic temperature in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihua; Zheng, Fei; Wang, Tingmei

    2016-04-01

    The effects of temperature, sliding speed and load on the tribological properties of polyimide (PI), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) at cryogenic temperature in vacuum were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer. At cryogenic temperature, polymers show higher hardness which results in decreasing contact area between the friction pairs. Moreover, the real surface area in contact between steel ball and polymer disk determines the friction coefficient instead of the formation and adhesion of the transfer film. Thus, the friction coefficients at cryogenic temperatures are lower than at room temperature. On the other hand, wear rates of the three polymers decrease as temperature decreases since molecular mobility and migration are limited at cryogenic temperatures. For the visco-elasticity of PI, PTFE and PEEK, the friction coefficients fall as the load increases.

  12. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  13. Cryogenic Testing of Different Seam Concepts for Multilayer Insulation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent testing in a cylindrical, comparative cryostat at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory has focused on various seam concepts for multilayer insulation systems. Three main types of seams were investigated: straight overlap, fold-over, and roll wrapped. Each blanket was comprised of 40 layer pairs of reflector and spacer materials. The total thickness was approximately 12.5-mm, giving an average layer density of 32 layers per centimeter. The blankets were tested at high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum using liquid nitrogen to maintain the cold boundary temperature at 77 K. Test results show that all three seam concepts are all close in thermal performance; however the fold-over method provides the lowest heat flux. For the first series of tests, seams were located 120 degrees around the circumference of the cryostat from the previous seam. This technique appears to have lessened the degradation of the blanket due to the seams. In a follow-on test, a 20 layer blanket was tested in a roll wrapped configuration and then cut down the side of the cylinder, taped together, and re-tested. This test result shows the thermal performance impact of having the seams all in one location versus having the seams clocked around the vessel. This experimental investigation indicates that the method of joining the seams in multilayer insulation systems is not as critical as the quality of the installation process.

  14. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Geyari, C

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to prevent intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR intersecting storage rings. (19 refs).

  15. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyari, C.

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to preventing intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR Intersecting Storage Rings. (author)

  16. Cryogenic system for production testing and measurement of Fermilab energy saver superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Bianchi, A.J.; Barger, R.K.; Johnson, F.B.; McGuire, K.J.; Pinyan, K.D.; Wilson, F.R.

    1983-03-01

    The cryogenic system of the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been used to provide cooling for the testing of approximately 1200 Energy Saver superconducting magnets. The system provides liquid helium, liquid nitrogen, gas purification, and vacuum support for six magnet test stands. It provides for simultaneous high current testing of two superconducting magnets and non-high current cold testing of two additional magnets. The cryogenic system has been in operation for about 32000 hours. The 1200 magnets have taken slightly more than three years to test

  17. Cryogenic system for production testing and measurement of Fermilab energy saver superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Barger, R.K.; Bianchi, A.J.; Cooper, W.E.; Johnson, F.B.; McGuire, K.J.; Pinyan, K.D.; Wilson, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    The cryogenic system of the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been used to provide cooling for the testing of approximately 1200 Energy Saver superconducting magnets. The system provides liquid helium, liquid nitrogen, gas purification, and vacuum support for six magnet test stands. It provides for simultaneous high current testing of two superconducting magnets and nonhigh current cold testing of two additional magnets. The cryogenic system has been in operation for about 32000 hours. The 1200 magnets have taken slightly more than three years to test

  18. Development of a camera casing suited for cryogenic and vacuum applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaquis, S. C.; Gornea, R.; Janos, S.; Lüthi, M.; von Rohr, Ch Rudolf; Schenk, M.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, and operation of a PID temperature controlled and vacuum tight camera casing. The camera casing contains a commercial digital camera and a lighting system. The design of the camera casing and its components are discussed in detail. Pictures taken by this cryo-camera while immersed in argon vapour and liquid nitrogen are presented. The cryo-camera can provide a live view inside cryogenic set-ups and allows to record video.

  19. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  20. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  1. (abstract) Cryogenic Telescope Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchik, T. S.; Chave, R. G.; Nash, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    An optical test Dewar is being constructed with the unique capability to test mirrors of diameter less than or equal to 1 m, f less than or equal to 6, at temperatures from 300 to 4.2 K with a ZYGO Mark IV interferometer. The design and performance of this facility will be presented.

  2. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  3. Photogrammetry of the Map Instrument in a Cryogenic Vacuum Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M.; Packard, E.; Pazar, R.

    2000-01-01

    MAP Instrument requirements dictated that the instruments Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) and Thermal Reflector System (TRS) maintain a high degree of structural integrity at operational temperatures (photogrammetry camera. This paper will discuss MAP's Instrument requirements, how those requirements were verified using photogrammetry, and the test setup used to provide the environment and camera movement needed to verify the instrument's requirements.

  4. Experimental tests of vacuum energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    While the current vacuum energy of the Universe is very small, in our standard cosmological picture it has been much larger at earlier epochs. We try to address the question of what are possible ways to try to experimentally verify this. One direction is to look for systems where vacuum energy constitutes a non-negligible fraction of the total energy, and study the properties of those. Another possibility is to focus on the epochs around cosmic phase transitions, when the vacuum energy is of the same order as the total energy. Along these lines we investigate properties of neutron stars and the imprint of phase transitions on primordial gravitational waves.

  5. Gas Condensates onto a LHC Type Cryogenic Vacuum System Subjected to Electron Cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    Baglin, V

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gas desorbed via photon stimulated molecular desorption or electron stimulated molecular desorption will be physisorbed onto the beam screen held between 5 and 20 K. Studies of the effects of the electron cloud onto a LHC type cryogenic vacuum chamber have been done with the cold bore experiment (COLDEX) installed in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Experiments performed with gas condensates such as H2, H2O, CO and CO2 are described. Implications for the LHC design and operation are discussed.

  6. Field Testing of Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, Aaron [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Frankman, Dave [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Andrew [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Stitt, Kyler [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Larry [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-07-17

    Sustainable Energy Solutions has been developing Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ (CCC) since 2008. In that time two processes have been developed, the External Cooling Loop and Compressed Flue Gas Cryogenic Carbon Capture processes (CCC ECL™ and CCC CFG™ respectively). The CCC ECL™ process has been scaled up to a 1TPD CO2 system. In this process the flue gas is cooled by an external refrigerant loop. SES has tested CCC ECL™ on real flue gas slip streams from subbituminous coal, bituminous coal, biomass, natural gas, shredded tires, and municipal waste fuels at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, cement kilns, and pilot-scale research reactors. The CO2 concentrations from these tests ranged from 5 to 22% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at a modest rate. The CCC CFG™ process has been scaled up to a .25 ton per day system. This system has been tested on real flue gas streams including subbituminous coal, bituminous coal and natural gas at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, and pilot-scale research reactors. CO2 concentrations for these tests ranged from 5 to 15% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at 90+%. Hg capture was also verified and the resulting effluent from CCC CFG™ was below a 1ppt concentration. This paper will focus on discussion of the capabilities of CCC, the results of field testing and the future steps surrounding the development of this technology.

  7. He leaks in the CERN LHC beam vacuum chambers operating at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V

    2007-01-01

    The 27 km long large hadron collider (LHC), currently under construction at CERN, will collide protons beam at 14 TeV in the centre of mass. In the 8 arcs, the superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles of the FODO cells operate with superfluid He at 1.9 K. In the 8 long straight sections, the cold bores of the superconducting magnets are held at 1.9 or 4.5 K. Thus, in the LHC, 75% of the beam tube vacuum chamber is cooled with He. In many areas of the machine, He leaks could appear in the beam tube. At cryogenic temperature, the gas condenses onto the cold bores or beam screens, and interacts with the circulating beam. He leaks creates a He front propagating along the vacuum chambers, which might cause magnet quench. We discuss the consequences of He leaks, the possible means of detections, the strategies to localise them and the methods to measure their size.

  8. Thermal Vacuum Integrated System Test at B-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Space Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA s third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility during pump down of the vacuum chamber, operation of the liquid nitrogen heat sink (or cold wall) and the infrared lamp array. A vacuum level of 1.3x10(exp -4)Pa (1x10(exp -6)torr) was achieved. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K (140deg R) along the entire inner surface of the vacuum chamber. The recently rebuilt and modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m at a chamber diameter of 6.7 m (22 ft) and along 11 m (36 ft) of the chamber s cylindrical vertical interior. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface. The data acquired matched pretest predictions and demonstrated system functionality.

  9. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-01-01

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m 3 storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  10. Research on vacuum insulation for cryocables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graneau, P.

    1974-01-01

    Vacuum insulation, as compared with solid insulation, simplifies the construction of both resistive or superconducting cryogenic cables. The common vacuum space in the cable can furnish thermal insulation between the environment and the cryogenic coolant, provide electrical insulation between conductors, and establish thermal isolation between go- and return-coolant streams. The differences between solid and vacuum high voltage insulation are discussed, and research on the design, materials selection, and testing of vacuum insulated cryogenic cables is described

  11. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  12. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed Ground Test Article Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to CRYOTE ground test data. The CRYOTE ground test artide was jointly developed by Innovative Engineering Solutions, United Launch Alliance and NASA KSC. The test article was constructed out of a titanium alloy tank, Sapphire 77 composite skin (similar to G10), an external secondary payload adapter ring, thermal vent system, multi layer insulation and various data acquisition instrumentation. In efforts to understand heat loads throughout this system, the GTA (filled with liquid nitrogen for safety purposes) was subjected to a series of tests in a vacuum chamber at Marshall Space Flight Center. By anchoring analytical models against test data, higher fidelity thermal environment predictions can be made for future flight articles which would eventually demonstrate critical cryogenic fluid management technologies such as system chilldown, transfer, pressure control and long term storage. Significant factors that influenced heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation performance, tank fill levels and pressures and even contact conductance coefficients. This report demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established and includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses.

  13. Cryogenic test of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worden, P.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle is the hypothesis that the ratio of internal and passive gravitational mass is the same for all bodies. A greatly improved test of this principle is possible in an orbiting satellite. The most promising experiments for an orbital test are adaptations of the Galilean free-fall experiment and the Eotvos balance. Sensitivity to gravity gradient noise, both from the earth and from the spacecraft, defines a limit to the sensitivity in each case. This limit is generally much worse for an Eotvos balance than for a properly designed free-fall experiment. The difference is related to the difficulty of making a balance sufficiently isoinertial. Cryogenic technology is desirable to take full advantage of the potential sensitivity, but tides in the liquid helium refrigerant may produce a gravity gradient that seriously degrades the ultimate sensitivity. The Eotvos balance appears to have a limiting sensitivity to relative difference of rate of fall of about 2 x 10 -14 in orbit. The free-fall experiment is limited by helium tide to about 10 -15 ; if the tide can be controlled or eliminated the limit may approach 10 -18 . Other limitations to equivalence principle experiments are discussed. An experimental test of some of the concepts involved in the orbital free-fall experiment is continuing. The experiment consists in comparing the motions of test masses levitated in a superconducting magnetic bearing, and is itself a sensitive test of the equivalence principle. At present the levitation magnets, position monitors and control coils have been tested and major noise sources identified. A measurement of the equivalence principle is postponed pending development of a system for digitizing data. The experiment and preliminary results are described

  14. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  15. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkov, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The application of cryogenics in various areas of science and technology is related in a popular way. Utilization of cryogenics in the following production processes is described: separation of air, gas mixtures; production of helium; separation of hydrogen isotopes; production of deuterium. Applications of cryogenics in refrigerating engineering, superconductivity and high-energy physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, superconducting electric motors and electric energy storages are considered

  16. Vacuum leak test technique of JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Atsushi; Arai, Takashi; Kodama, Kozo; Sasaki, Noboru; Saidoh, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    Since a vacuum vessel of JT-60 is very large (167 m 3 ) and is combined with many components, such as magnetic coils, neutral beam injection systems and RF heating systems, etc., the position of leak testing exceeds 700. The two kind of techniques for vacuum leak test used in JT-60 has been described. Firstly the probe helium gas can be fed remotely in the three-dimensionally sectioned 54 regions of the JT-60 torus. The leak test was very rapidly performed by using this method. Secondly the helium detector system has been modified by the additional installation of the cryopump, which reduced the background level of the deuterium gas. The sensitivity of vacuum leak test with the cryopump was two orders of magnitude larger than that of without it. The examples of the performed vacuum leak test are stated. The vacuum leaks during experiments were 9 times. They were caused by thermal strain and plasma discharge. The vacuum leaks just after maintenance are 36 times which mainly caused by mis-installation. (author)

  17. Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L.

    2004-01-01

    The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator

  18. Manufacture of superhigh vacuum testing tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kusuo; Suzui, Koichi; Horigome, Toshio

    1981-01-01

    This apparatus is one of the preliminary experiment equipments for the vacuum system of a UVSOR, and the main objective is to obtain the clean vacuum below 10 - 10 Torr. From the viewpoint of manufacture, there is no problem, but all the works from the design through manufacture, assembling and adjustment of the apparatus, to the obtaining of required vacuum were carried out by the authors themselves. The design and its points, and manufacture are described. In order to obtain clean vacuum and maintain it for long period, the surface cleaning of vacuum tanks is very important. Therefore the method of electrolytic polishing was adopted for the purpose, and its effectiveness was examined. After the surface treatment by two methods, the evacuation test was carried out, and the attained pressure was compared. Electrolytic polishing seemed to be effective. As the method of suppressing surface degasification, there is argon bombardment method. It was attempted to improve the pressure attained by baking only further by this method. By baking at 250 deg C for 30 hr only, the final pressure attained was 1.7 x 10 - 10 Torr, and by making argon bombardment twice during baking, it was 0.9 x 10 - 10 Torr, thus slight improvement was obtained. The main objective to obtain vacuum below 10 - 10 Torr was accomplished, but surface treatment requires more experience. (Kako, I.)

  19. Results of KEPCO HTS cable system tests and design of hybrid cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.H.; Sohn, S.H.; Yang, H.S.; Hwang, S.D.; Kim, D.L.; Ryoo, H.S.; Choi, H.O.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the compatibility as a power utility facility, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) had installed a 22.9 kV, 1250 A, 100 m long high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable system. Using the HTS cable, various tests have been performed to investigate electrical and thermo-mechanical properties. Since 2005, a series of thermal cycle tests between liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) and ambient temperatures have been conducted using a vacuum-pump driven open-loop cryogenic system with a capacity of 3 kW. In the tests, although the open-loop cryogenic system was reliable to operate the HTS cable system, it was not effective in economic view point because LN 2 consumption was larger than expected. In order to secure against unexpected emergencies and solve the problem of LN 2 consumption, a hybrid cryogenic system was designed and installed. A stirling cryocooler was employed and combined with the open-loop cryogenic system. Considering the average heat load at rated condition, the cooling capacity of the cryocooler was determined to 4 kW at 77 K. In this paper, results of performance tests and the design of the hybrid cooling system are presented.

  20. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  1. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenics refers to the coldest area known in nature. This temperature range has an upper limit arbitrarily defined as -100 degrees C (-250 degrees C by some) and a lower limit of absolute zero. These limits separate it from the temperature range generally used in refrigerating engineering. One important application of cryogenics is the separation ad purification of air into its various components (oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and the rare gases). Other important developments have been the large-scale production of liquid hydrogen; helium extraction from natural gas; storage and transport of liquefied gases such as oxygen, argon, nitrogen, helium, neon, xenon, and hydrogen; liquefaction of natural gas for ocean transport and peak shaving; and many new types of cryogenic refrigeration devices. This paper introduces the topic of cryogenic engineering. Cryogenic processes generally range from ambient conditions to the boiling point of the cryogenic fluid. Cryogenic cycles also incorporate two or more pressure levels. These properties must also cover the vapor, vapor-liquid, and sometimes the solid regions. Therefore, the physical properties of fluids over a great range of temperatures and pressures must be known. Solubility of contaminants must be known in order to design for their removal. The main physical properties for design purposes are those usually used in unit operations, such as fluid flow, heat transfer, and the like, in addition to those directly related to the Joule-Thomson effect and expansion work. Properties such as density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, vapor pressure, and vapor-liquid equilibriums are generally obtained in graphical, tabular, or equation form, as a function of temperature and pressure

  2. Cryogenic aspects of the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, W.H.; Nelson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper covers the design and construction of the MFTF cryogenic system and a description of the operating procedures throughout the many functional modes. The coils and the cryopanels for maintaining the high vacuum environment weigh 417,000 kg (920,000 lb) and must be cooled from room temperature to 4.5 k. The cryogenic system for MFTF consists of a closed-loop helium system with a 3000-W helium refrigerator that uses gas-bearing expansion turbines and oil-flooded screw compressors. In addition, liquid helium storage facilities have adequate capacity for standby operation, and a complete helium-purification plant is capable of processing 17 m 3 /min (600 scfm). An open-loop liquid nitrogen system (with provision for later addition of a nitrogen recondenser) provides the required refrigeration for the radiation shields that must be maintained at 85 K

  3. Challenges of in-vacuum and cryogenic permanent magnet undulator technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Che Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An in-vacuum undulator (IVU provides a means to reach high-brilliance x rays in medium energy storage rings. The development of short period undulators with low phase errors creates the opportunity for an unprecedented brilliant light source in a storage ring. Since the spectral quality from cryogenic permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs has surpassed that of IVUs, NdFeB or PrFeB CPMUs have been proposed for many new advanced storage rings to reach high brilliance x-ray photon beams. In a low emittance ring, not only the performance of the undulator but also the choice of the lattice functions are important design considerations. Optimum betatron functions and a zero-dispersion function shall be provided in the straight sections for IVU/CPMUs. In this paper, relevant factors and design issues for IVUs and CPMUs are discussed together with many technological challenges in short period undulators associated with beam induced–heat load, phase errors, and the deformation of support girders.

  4. Challenges of in-vacuum and cryogenic permanent magnet undulator technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Che; Kitamura, Hideo; Yang, Chin-Kang; Chang, Cheng-Hsing; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-06-01

    An in-vacuum undulator (IVU) provides a means to reach high-brilliance x rays in medium energy storage rings. The development of short period undulators with low phase errors creates the opportunity for an unprecedented brilliant light source in a storage ring. Since the spectral quality from cryogenic permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs) has surpassed that of IVUs, NdFeB or PrFeB CPMUs have been proposed for many new advanced storage rings to reach high brilliance x-ray photon beams. In a low emittance ring, not only the performance of the undulator but also the choice of the lattice functions are important design considerations. Optimum betatron functions and a zero-dispersion function shall be provided in the straight sections for IVU/CPMUs. In this paper, relevant factors and design issues for IVUs and CPMUs are discussed together with many technological challenges in short period undulators associated with beam induced-heat load, phase errors, and the deformation of support girders.

  5. Cryogenic System for the Cryomodule Test Stand at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Michael J. [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-10-09

    This paper describes the cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS) at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) located at Fermilab. CMTS is designed for production testing of the 1.3 GHz and 3.9GHz cryomodules to be used in the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLSII), which is an upgrade to an existing accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This paper will focus on the cryogenic system that extends from the helium refrigeration plant to the CMTS cave. Topics covered will include component design, installation and commissioning progress, and operational plans. The paper will conclude with a description of the heat load measurement plan.

  6. Radiation Requirements and Testing of Cryogenic Thermometers for the Ilc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T.; Filippov, Yu. P.; Filippova, E. Yu.; Mokhov, N. V.; Nakao, N.; Klebaner, A. L.; Korenev, S. A.; Theilacker, J. C.; Trenikhina, J.; Vaziri, K.

    2008-03-01

    Large quantity of cryogenic temperature sensors will be used for operation of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Most of them will be subject to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. Understanding of particle energy spectra, accumulated radiation dose in thermometers and its impact on performance are vital in establishing technical specification of cryogenic thermometry for the ILC. Realistic MARS15 computer simulations were performed to understand the ILC radiation environment. Simulation results were used to establish radiation dose requirements for commercially available cryogenic thermometers. Two types of thermometers, Cernox® and TVO, were calibrated prior to irradiation using different technique. The sensors were subjected then to up to 200 kGy electron beam irradiation with kinetic energy of 5 MeV, a representative of the situation at the ILC operation. A post-irradiation behavior of the sensors was studied. The paper describes the MARS15 model, simulation results, cryogenic test set-up, irradiation tests, and cryogenic test results.

  7. Radiation requirements and testing of cryogenic thermometers for the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Filippov, Yu.P.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nakao, N.; Klebaner, A.L.; Korenev, S.A.; Theilacker, J.C.; Trenikhina, J.; Vaziri, K.

    2007-01-01

    Large quantity of cryogenic temperature sensors will be used for operation of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Most of them will be subject to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. Understanding of particle energy spectra, accumulated radiation dose in thermometers and its impact on performance are vital in establishing technical specification of cryogenic thermometry for the ILC. Realistic MARS15 computer simulations were performed to understand the ILC radiation environment. Simulation results were used to establish radiation dose requirements for commercially available cryogenic thermometers. Two types of thermometers, Cernox(reg s ign) and TVO, were calibrated prior to irradiation using different technique. The sensors were subjected then to up to 200 kGy electron beam irradiation with kinetic energy of 5 MeV, a representative of the situation at the ILC operation. A post-irradiation behavior of the sensors was studied. The paper describes the MARS15 model, simulation results, cryogenic test set-up, irradiation tests, and cryogenic test results

  8. Test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokuda, E.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration (CRD). Air monitors will be used to sample for the tracer elements neodymium, terbium, and ytterbium, and dysprosium. The results from this air monitoring will be used to determine if the CRD is successful in controlling dust and minimizing contamination. Procedures and equipment specifications for the test are included

  9. Cylindrical cryogenic calorimeter testing of six types of multilayer insulation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Johnson, W. L.

    2018-01-01

    Extensive cryogenic thermal testing of more than 100 different multilayer insulation (MLI) specimens was performed over the last 20 years for the research and development of evacuated reflective thermal insulation systems. From this data library, 26 MLI systems plus several vacuum-only systems are selected for analysis and comparison. The test apparatus, methods, and results enabled the adoption of two new technical consensus standards under ASTM International. Materials tested include reflectors of aluminum foil or double-aluminized Mylar and spacers of fiberglass paper, polyester netting, silk netting, polyester fabric, or discrete polymer standoffs. The six types of MLI systems tested are listed as follows: Mylar/Paper, Foil/Paper, Mylar/Net, Mylar/Blanket, Mylar/Fabric, Mylar/Discrete. Also tested are vacuum-only systems with different cold surface materials/finishes including stainless steel, black, copper, and aluminum. Testing was performed between the boundary temperatures of 78 K and 293 K (and up to 350 K) using a thermally guarded one-meter-long cylindrical calorimeter (Cryostat-100) for absolute heat flow measurement. Cold vacuum pressures include the full range from 1 × 10-6 torr to 760 torr with nitrogen as the residual gas. System variations include number of layers from one to 80 layers, layer densities from 0.5 to 5 layers per millimeter, and installation techniques such layer-by-layer, blankets (multi-layer assemblies), sub-blankets, seaming, butt-joining, spiral wrapping, and roll-wrapping. Experimental thermal performance data for the different MLI systems are presented in terms of heat flux and effective thermal conductivity. Benchmark cryogenic-vacuum thermal performance curves for MLI are given for comparison with different insulation approaches for storage and transfer equipment, cryostats, launch vehicles, spacecraft, or science instruments.

  10. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  11. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  12. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.; Nelson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper will include an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem will be discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility

  13. Test method for measuring insulation values of cryogenic pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, J.F.M.; Blokland, H.; Klaver, B.W.; Beld, C. van de

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a large-area heat flux and temperature sensor (HFT) is used for the evaluation of the insulation value of cryogenic pipes. The HFT is flexible and clamp-on. The test method is relatively simple and can be used in-situ. The HFT makes it possible to monitor insulation performance over

  14. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10 -6 torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing

  15. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  16. Procurement specification high vacuum test chamber and pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The specification establishes requirements for a high-vacuum test chamber, associated vacuum pumps, valves, controls, and instrumentation that shall be designed and fabricated for use as a test chamber for testing a closed loop Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Ground Demonstration System (GDS). The vacuum system shall include all instrumentation required for pressure measurement and control of the vacuum pumping system. A general outline of the BIPS-GDS in the vacuum chamber and the preliminary piping and instrumentation interface to the vacuum chamber are shown

  17. Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liujin

    2006-01-01

    MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R and D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH2) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN2 and LH2. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R and D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner

  18. Cryogenic actuator testing for the SAFARI ground calibration setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, C.; Eggens, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, A. C. T.; Detrain, A.; Smit, H.; Dieleman, P.

    2012-09-01

    For the on-ground calibration setup of the SAFARI instrument cryogenic mechanisms are being developed at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, including a filter wheel, XYZ-scanner and a flipmirror mechanism. Due to the extremely low background radiation requirement of the SAFARI instrument, all of these mechanisms will have to perform their work at 4.5 Kelvin and low-dissipative cryogenic actuators are required to drive these mechanisms. In this paper, the performance of stepper motors, piezoelectric actuators and brushless DC-motors as cryogenic actuators are compared. We tested stepper motor mechanical performance and electrical dissipation at 4K. The actuator requirements, test setup and test results are presented. Furthermore, design considerations and early performance tests of the flipmirror mechanism are discussed. This flipmirror features a 102 x 72 mm aluminum mirror that can be rotated 45°. A Phytron stepper motor with reduction gearbox has been chosen to drive the flipmirror. Testing showed that this motor has a dissipation of 49mW at 4K with a torque of 60Nmm at 100rpm. Thermal modeling of the flipmirror mechanism predicts that with proper thermal strapping the peak temperature of the flipmirror after a single action will be within the background level requirements of the SAFARI instrument. Early tests confirm this result. For low-duty cycle operations commercial stepper motors appear suitable as actuators for test equipment in the SAFARI on ground calibration setup.

  19. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  20. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  1. Cryogenic distribution system for ITER proto-type cryoline test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Shah, N.; Badgujar, S.; Sarkar, B.

    2012-01-01

    Design validation for ITER cryoline will be carried out by proto-type test on cryoline. The major objectives of the test will be to ensure the mechanical integrity, reliability, thermal stress and heat load as well as checking of assembly and fabrication procedures. The cryogenics system has to satisfy the functional operating scenario of the cryoline. Cryoplant, distribution box (DB) including liquid helium (LHe) tank constitute the cryogenic system for the test. Conceptual system architecture is proposed with a commercially available refrigerator/liquefier and custom designed DB housing cold compressor, cold circulator as well as phase separator with sub-merged heat exchanger. System level optimization, mainly with DB and LHe tank with options, has been studied to minimize the cold power required for the system. Aspen HYSYS is used for the purpose of process simulation. The paper describes the system architecture and the optimized design as well as process simulation with associated results. (author)

  2. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  3. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2011-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the IS 1M hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  4. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  5. New Technique for Cryogenically Cooling Small Test Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.; Henderson, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat removal techniques to rapidly cool small test articles to Earth-Moon L2 temperatures of 77 K were accomplished through the use of liquid nitrogen (LN2). By maintaining a selected pressure range on the saturation curve, test articles were cooled below the LN2 boiling point at ambient pressure in less than 30 min. Difficulties in achieving test pressures while maintaining the temperature tolerance necessitated a modification to the original system to include a closed loop conductive cold plate and cryogenic shroud

  6. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Testing of LHC Series Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Axensalva, J; Herblin, L; Lamboy, J P; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Vuillerme, B

    2005-01-01

    The ~1800 superconducting magnets for the LHC machine shall be entirely tested at reception before their installation in the tunnel. For this purpose and in order to reach the reliability and efficiency at the nominal load required for an industrial operation for several years, we have gradually upgraded and retrofitted the cryogenic facilities installed in the early nineties for the testing at CERN of prototypes and preseries magnets. The final infrastructure of the test station, dedicated to check industrially the quality of the series magnets, is now nearly complete. We present the general layout and describe the overall performance of the system.

  7. Testing the Foundations of Relativity Using Cryogenic Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Braxmaier, C.; Herrmann, S.; Pradl, O.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Mlynek, J.; Schiller, S.; Peters, A.

    We present a new generation of experiments using cryogenic optical resonators(COREs) to test the foundations of relativity. The experiments test the isotropy of the speed of light (Michelson-Morley experiment), the independece of the speed of light from the velocity of the laboratory (Kennedy-Thorndike experiments), and the gravitational redshift for clocks based on an electronic transition. Compared with the best previous results, our tests have already yielded improvements up to a factor of three. Future versions promise significant improvements.

  8. Upgrade of the Cryogenic CERN RF Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pirotte, O; Brunner, O; Inglese, V; Koettig, T; Maesen, P; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  9. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.; Koettig, T.

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented

  10. Lyophilized histidine investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cryogenics: Deprotonation in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Juan F.; Groebner, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Lyophilized histidine samples were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lyophilized samples were prepared from aqueous solutions at a pH in the range between ∼1.5 and ∼10, and with no further addition of electrolyte. The use of cryogenics allowed the determination of protonated to unprotonated molar ratios of sites in L-histidine, which correlates well with the dissociation constants of the residual amino acid sites. When cryogenics was not used deprotonation of the lyophilized samples occurred, where the degree and the total concentration of deprotonated sites correlates well with the formation constants and the decrease in Cl concentration, respectively. This later relation clearly indicates a correlation between deprotonation and the desorption of HCl from lyophilized samples

  11. Lyophilized histidine investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cryogenics: Deprotonation in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Juan F. [Inorganic Chemistry, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden)]. E-mail: juan.cardenas@chem.umu.se; Groebner, Gerhard [Biophysical Chemistry, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2005-08-15

    Lyophilized histidine samples were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lyophilized samples were prepared from aqueous solutions at a pH in the range between {approx}1.5 and {approx}10, and with no further addition of electrolyte. The use of cryogenics allowed the determination of protonated to unprotonated molar ratios of sites in L-histidine, which correlates well with the dissociation constants of the residual amino acid sites. When cryogenics was not used deprotonation of the lyophilized samples occurred, where the degree and the total concentration of deprotonated sites correlates well with the formation constants and the decrease in Cl concentration, respectively. This later relation clearly indicates a correlation between deprotonation and the desorption of HCl from lyophilized samples.

  12. Cryogenics for a vertical test stand facility for testing superconducting radio frequency cavities at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kush, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical Test Stand (VTS) Facility is located in a newly constructed building of Cryo-Engineering and Cryo-Module Development Division (CCDD). This test facility is one of the important facilities to develop SCRF technologies for superconducting accelerators like Indian Spallation Neutron Source. VTS has to be used for regular testing of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Niobium cavities at nominal frequency of 1.3 GHz/ 650 MHz at 4 K / 2 K liquid helium (LHe) bath temperatures. Testing of these cavities at 2 K evaluates cavity processing methods, procedures and would also serve as a pre-qualification test for cavity to test it in horizontal cryostat, called horizontal test stand, with other cavity components such as tuner and helium vessel. Cryogenic technologies play a major role in these cavity testing facilities. Achieving and maintaining a stable temperature of 2 K in these test stands on regular and reliable basis is a challenging task and require broad range of cryogenic expertise, large scale system level understanding and many in-house technological and process developments. Furthermore this test stand will handle large amount of liquid helium. Therefore, an appropriately designed infrastructure is required to handle such large amount of helium gas generated during the operation of VTS .This paper describes the different cryogenic design aspects, initial cryogenic operation results and different cryogenic safety aspects. (author)

  13. A dynamic model for beam tube vacuum effects on the SSC cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.H.; Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Xu, X.; Yuecel, A.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic interaction between the beam-gas scattering induced energy deposition and the SSC cryogenic system is studied by integrating a cryogenic system dynamic simulator with an adsorption model and a beam-gas scattering and energy deposition model. Simulation results are obtained for a 1km long SSC arc section where the beam tube pressure in one of the dipoles is increased up to 150 times its nominal operating pressure. The beam-gas scattering induced heat loads arising from such high pressure perturbations can be very high locally but do not overload the cryogenic system. They are more likely to induce a magnet quench as they result in coil temperatures that largely exceed the desired operating limit. Simulations are also carried out for the case where a large external heat load of 1W/m is imposed on the coldmass of a half-cell in the section. Results show that the coldmass temperatures rise significantly with the added heat load but the energy deposition in the cold mass due to beam-gas scattering remains low despite the increase in the beam tube temperature

  14. A dynamic model for beam tube vacuum effects on the SSC cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.H.; Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Xu, X.; Yuecel, A.

    1992-03-01

    The dynamic interaction between the beam-gas scattering induced energy deposition and the SSC cryogenic system is studied by integrating a cryogenic system dynamic simulator with an adsorption model and a beam-gas scattering and energy deposition model. Simulation results are obtained for a 1 km long SSC arc section where the beam tube pressure in one of the dipoles in increased up to 150 times its nominal operating pressure. The beam-gas scattering induced heat loads arising from such high pressure perturbations can be very locally but do not overload the cryogenic system. They are more likely to induce a magnet quench as they result in coil temperatures that largely exceed the desired operating limit. Simulations are also carried out for the case where a large external heat load of 1 W/m is imposed on the coldmass of a half-cell in the section. Results show that the coldmass temperatures rise significantly with the added heat load but the energy deposition in the coldmass due to beam-gas scattering remains low despite the increase in the beam tube temperature

  15. Vacuum Acceptance Tests for the UHV Room Temperature Vacuum System of the LHC during LS1

    CERN Document Server

    Cattenoz, G; Bregliozzi, G; Calegari, D; Gallagher, J; Marraffa, A; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    During the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) first long shut down (LS1), a large number of vacuum tests are carried out on consolidated or newly fabricated devices. In such a way, the vacuum compatibility is assessed before installation in the UHV system of the LHC. According to the equipment’s nature, the vacuum acceptance tests consist in functional checks, leak test, outgassing rate measurements, evaluation of contaminants by Residual Gas Analysis (RGA), pumping speed measurements and qualification of the H2 sticking probability of Non-Evaporable-Getter (NEG) coating. In this paper, the methods used for the tests and the acceptance criteria are described. A summary of the measured vacuum characteristics for the tested components is also given.

  16. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  17. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  18. A Cryogenic Test Stand for LHC Quadrupole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.H.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Peterson, T.J.; Rabehl, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    A new test stand for testing LHC interaction region (IR) quadrupole magnets at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The test stand uses a double bath system with a lambda plate to provide the magnet with a stagnant bath of pressurized He II at 1.9 K and 0.13 MPa. A cryostated magnet 0.91 m in diameter and up to 13 m in length can be accommodated. This paper describes the system design and operation. Issues related to both 4.5 K and 1.9 K operations and magnet quenching are highlighted. An overview of the data acquisition and cryogenics controls systems is also included

  19. Development of a vacuum leak test method for large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Katsumi; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed leak detection technology for liquid helium temperature experiments in large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities. In JAEA, a cryosorption pump that uses an absorbent cooled by liquid nitrogen with a conventional helium leak detector, is used to detect helium gas that is leaking from pressurized welded joints of pipes and valves in a vacuum chamber. The cryosorption pump plays the role of decreasing aerial components, such as water, nitrogen and oxygen, to increase the sensitivity of helium leak detection. The established detection sensitivity for helium leak testing is 10 -10 to 10 -9 Pam 3 /s. A total of 850 welded and mechanical joints inside the cryogenic test facility for the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiments have been tested. In the test facility, 73 units of glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) insulation break are used. The amount of helium permeation through the GFRP was recorded during helium leak testing. To distinguish helium leaks from insulation-break permeation, the helium permeation characteristic of the GFRP part was measured as a function of the time of helium charging. Helium permeation was absorbed at 6 h after helium charging, and the detected permeation is around 10 -7 Pam 3 /s. Using the helium leak test method developed, CSMC experiments have been successfully completed. (author)

  20. Design, implementation, and testing of a cryogenic loading capability on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, T. R.; Krishnan, V. B.; Vaidyanathan, R. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Clausen, B.; Sisneros, T.; Livescu, V.; Brown, D. W.; Bourke, M. A. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    A novel capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during loading at cryogenic temperatures on the spectrometer for materials research at temperature and stress at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This capability allowed for the application of dynamic compressive forces of up to 250 kN on standard samples controlled at temperatures between 300 and 90 K. The approach comprised of cooling thermally isolated compression platens that in turn conductively cooled the sample in an aluminum vacuum chamber which was nominally transparent to the incident and diffracted neutrons. The cooling/heat rate and final temperature were controlled by regulating the flow of liquid nitrogen in channels inside the platens that were connected through bellows to the mechanical actuator of the load frame and by heaters placed on the platens. Various performance parameters of this system are reported here. The system was used to investigate deformation in Ni-Ti-Fe shape memory alloys at cryogenic temperatures and preliminary results are presented.

  1. Multiple (Two) Met Bel 601 In Series Ultimate Vacuum Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    SRNL Environmental and Chemical Process Technology (E&CPT) was requested to perform testing of vacuum pumps per a verbal request from the Customer, SRNL Hydrogen Processing Technology. Tritium Operations is currently having difficulties procuring the Normetex™® Model 15 m3/hr (9 CFM) vacuum pump (formerly Normetex Pompes, now EumecaSARL). One possible solution proposed by Hydrogen Processing Technology personnel is to use two Senior Aerospace Metal Bellows MB-601 vacuum pumps piped with the heads in series, and the pumps in series (Figure 1 below). This memorandum documents the ultimate vacuum testing that was performed to determine if this concept was a viable alternate vacuum pump strategy. This testing dovetails with previous pump evaluations documented in references 1 and 2.

  2. Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S. [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies, Sassenage (France); Souli, M. [GANIL, Caen (France); Commeaux, C. [IPN, Orsay (France)

    2014-01-29

    The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL (“Grand Accélérateur d’Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

  3. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  4. Evaluation tests of industrial vacuum bearings for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, S.; Sasaki, A.; Haraguchi, M.; Imagawa, K.; Nishimura, M.; Kawashima, N.

    2001-09-01

    Tribological performance of industrial vacuum bearings was experimentally evaluated for space use. The bearings selected for investigation were an 8 mm bore-sized deep-groove ball bearing lubricated with a sputtered MoS2 film and that lubricated with an ion-plated Ag film, commercially delivered from three Japanese domestic bearing-manufacturers. Based on survey results of tribological requirements for the existing satellite mechanisms, four types of bearing tests were defined and conducted: a vacuum test at room temperature, an atmosphere-resistant test, a thermal vacuum test and a vibration test. In addition to these tests, variation in tribological performance of the industrial bearings was also investigated. The results of more than eighty tests demonstrated that the industrial vacuum bearings had sufficient lubrication lives with low frictional torque and their data were reasonably repeatable, indicating very good potentiality for space use.

  5. Cryogenic tests of the first two LHC quadrupole prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevey, P.; Deregel, J.; Perot, J.; Rifflet, J.M.; Vedrine, P.; Cortella, J.; Le Coroller, A.

    1994-01-01

    Two LHC (Large Hadron Collider) twin aperture quadrupole prototypes were constructed at CEA Saclay (a CERN-CEA collaboration agreement). Their main characteristics are: 3.05 m length, 56 mm coil aperture, 180 mm between the two apertures, 252 T/m nominal gradient at 15060 A. They have been tested and measured in the 1.8 K Saclay test facility in an horizontal cryostat. The magnets are instrumented in order to investigate their behaviour during cool-down, stand-by, powering and current ramping, quenching and warming-up. A summary of the cryogenic, mechanical, pressure and electrical measurements is presented. The quench protection heaters are efficient down to 3000 A. Losses during ramping up and down are reported. (from authors) 5 fig., 11 ref

  6. UHV testing of upgraded vacuum chambers for Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindal, B.K.; Kumar, K.V.A.N.P.S.; Ramshiroman; Bhange, Nilesh; Yadav, D.P.; Sridhar, R.; Shukla, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV, 100 mA dedicated electron storage ring operating at pressure 10 -10 mbar range without beam and 10 -9 mbar range with beam using triode sputter ion pump (SIP) and titanium sublimation pump (TSP) combination. Indus-1 storage ring is presently working with six operational beam lines installed at three bending magnets. To accommodate two more beam lines and to reduce number of demountable joints, up-gradation of Indus-1 UHV system was planned. Salient features of upgraded vacuum system are bending magnet vacuum chambers with one extra port for additional beam line and straight section vacuum chambers with integrated TSP body. Half of the Indus-1 storage ring vacuum envelope with two bending magnet vacuum chamber and six straight section vacuum chambers were assembled with pumps, gauges etc, leak tested and tested for its UHV performance. Ultimate vacuum 5x10 -10 mbar with SIP and 2x10 -10 mbar after TSP pumping were achieved. Residual gas analyser (RGA) spectrum recorded for residual gas analysis indicated the imprints of a typical all metal UHV system having H 2 as major gas. This paper describes UHV testing of upgraded, newly fabricated vacuum chambers for Indus-1 storage ring. (author)

  7. Vacuum ultra-violet and ultra-violet scintillation light detection by means of silicon photomultipliers at cryogenic temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, A., E-mail: andrea.falcone@pv.infn.it [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bertoni, R. [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Boffelli, F. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bonesini, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Cervi, T. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Menegolli, A. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Montanari, C.; Prata, M.C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Simonetta, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Spanu, M. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Torti, M. [University of Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Zani, A. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    We tested the performance of two types of silicon photomultipliers, AdvanSiD ASD-NUV-SiPM3S-P and Hamamatsu 3×3 MM-50 UM VUV2, both at room (300 K) and at liquid nitrogen (77 K) temperature: breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, signal shape, gain and dark counts rate have been studied as function of temperature. The response of the devices to ultra-violet light is also studied. - Highlights: • We tested 2 SiPMs both at room and at cryogenic temperature. • Breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, gain and dark rate were measured. • Efficiency for VUV light detection was measured.

  8. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  9. Design, production, and testing of field effect transistors. [cryogenic MOSFETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, N.

    1982-01-01

    Cryogenic MOSFETS (CRYOFETS), specifically designed for low temperature preamplifier application with infrared extrinsic detectors were produced and comparatively tested with p-channel MOSFETs under matched conditions. The CRYOFETs exhibit lower voltage thresholds, high source-follower gains at lower bias voltage, and lower dc offset source voltage. The noise of the CRYOFET is found to be 2 to 4 times greater than the MOSFET with a correspondingly lower figure of merit (which is established for source-follower amplifiers). The device power dissipation at a gain of 0.98 is some two orders of magnitude lower than for the MOSFET. Further, CRYOFETs are free of low temperature I vs V character hysteresis and balky conduction turn-on effects and operate effectively in the 2.4 to 20 K range. These devices have promise for use on long term duration sensor missions and for on-focal-plane signal processing at low temperatures.

  10. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  11. Stability time of a DT-filled cryogenic ICF target in a high vacuum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebey, P.S.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Following the successful pressure loading with DT of a thin-walled plastic inertial fusion target shell (such as those designed for use at the OMEGA facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE)), continual care must be taken to safeguard the shell from being exposed to unacceptable pressure differentials across its wall. In particular, once the DT has been condensed into a liquid or solid phase and the outside pressure has been reduced, the target must be maintained below some upper cutoff temperature such that the vapor pressure of the DT is below the bursting pressure for the shell. Through the process of β-decay the DT self-heats, but while the shell is in a high vacuum environment (P much-lt 0.8 Pa (6 mtorr) for the OMEGA layering sphere) there is only a negligible heat loss mechanism. This will cause the temperature to increase. A calculation has been done to estimate the rate of temperature increase of the loaded target under high vacuum conditions. A functional form for calculating the target's temperature increase given its starting temperature is presented. An overall result is that under high vacuum conditions the DT changes from a solid at 10 K to a liquid at 37 K (T c = 39.4 K) in about 19 minutes. This holding time is significantly less if the initial temperature is higher, the initial state is liquid, or the upper allowed temperature is lower. Simplifying assumptions which were made and their impact on interpreting the results of this calculation are discussed

  12. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation of the Fermilab superconducting Tevatron accelerator is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics run at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed the author to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which have taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, the new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach this goal. New features are being added to the controls systems which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  13. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed us to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which has taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, our new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach our goal. New features are being added to the control system which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  14. Heat flux to the helium cryogenic system elements in the case of incidental vacuum vessel ventilation with atmospheric air

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The selection process for size in safety equipment for cold vessels or process pipes in cryogenic systems should take into consideration the incidental ventilation of the vacuum vessel with atmospheric air. In this case, a significant heat input toward the cold elements of the system can be expected. A number of experimental investigations have been done for the elements at liquid helium temperature which have been covered with 10 layers of MLI. The typical values of the heat flux were measured in a range of 3.7 to 5.0 kW/m2 of the element surface. The helium temperature parts are typically surrounded by thermal shields that are kept in a temperature range of 50-80K. On the external side, the thermal shields are covered with 30-40 layers of MLI while on the internal side, the shields are bare. The theoretical calculations of heat flux to the thermal shield, with respect to the possibility of air condensation and freezing on the bare side of the thermal shield, show that the heat flux to the thermal shield can...

  15. Cryogenic Pupil Alignment Test Architecture for Aberrated Pupil Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Brent; Kubalak, David A.; Antonille, Scott; Ohl, Raymond; Hagopian, John G.

    2009-01-01

    A document describes cryogenic test architecture for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) integrated science instrument module (ISIM). The ISIM element primarily consists of a mechanical metering structure, three science instruments, and a fine guidance sensor. One of the critical optomechanical alignments is the co-registration of the optical telescope element (OTE) exit pupil with the entrance pupils of the ISIM instruments. The test architecture has been developed to verify that the ISIM element will be properly aligned with the nominal OTE exit pupil when the two elements come together. The architecture measures three of the most critical pupil degrees-of-freedom during optical testing of the ISIM element. The pupil measurement scheme makes use of specularly reflective pupil alignment references located inside the JWST instruments, ground support equipment that contains a pupil imaging module, an OTE simulator, and pupil viewing channels in two of the JWST flight instruments. Pupil alignment references (PARs) are introduced into the instrument, and their reflections are checked using the instrument's mirrors. After the pupil imaging module (PIM) captures a reflected PAR image, the image will be analyzed to determine the relative alignment offset. The instrument pupil alignment preferences are specularly reflective mirrors with non-reflective fiducials, which makes the test architecture feasible. The instrument channels have fairly large fields of view, allowing PAR tip/tilt tolerances on the order of 0.5deg.

  16. Investigation of the process of vacuum freeze drying of bacterial concentrates for the meat industry with cryogenic freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Poymanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research results of the nutritional value of the products manufactured are presented in the article. The main directions of bacterial concentrates application in the meat industry were determined. The analysis of starter cultures was given. The range of products manu-factured with bacterial concentrates was analyzed. It was shown that the introduction of innovative technologies will enable dynamic development of both large and small enterprises, which will create prerequisites for the growth of the Russian market of meat products. Economic efficiency of the studied substances treatment methods was proved. The relevance of the development of technology of pro-duction of dry bacterial concentrates with cryogenic freezing was proved. An integrated approach to the development of competitive domestic technologies and equipment for cryofreezing and sublimation dehydration by the use of granulation for the intensification of the internal heat and mass transfer, reducing specific energy consumption through the use of a combined cold supply system was pro-posed. Results of the study of the kinetics of the freezing process with the traditional method and cryofreezing are given in the paper. Rational parameters of the cryofreezing process were proposed. The optimum composition of cryoprotective medium was recommended. The research of the process of bacterial concentrate vacuum sublimation dehydration in the layer and granular form were conducted. The research confirmed that the use of the cryofreezing and granulation can increase the number of viable microorganisms in the bacterial concentrate and reduce the drying time. Rational vacuum sublimation dehydration modes were proposed. Methods of reduc-ing the defects of the processed products and improvement of the efficiency of production facilities were specified. Quality indicators of dried bacterial concentrates were given. The results obtained allow to carry out engineering calculations

  17. First Cryogenic Testing of the ATLAS Superconducting Prototype Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Haug, F; Mayri, C; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroids and the barrel toroid made of eight coils (BT) symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. All these magnets will be individually tested in an experimental area prior to their final installation in the underground cavern of the LHC collider. A dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed and built for this purpose. It mainly consists of a 1'200 W at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit, a cryostat housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps, a distribution valve box and transfer lines. Prior to the start of the series tests of the BT magnets, two model coils are used at this facility. The first one, the so-called B00 of comparatively small size, contains the three different types of superconductors used for the ATLAS magnets which are wound on a cylindrical mandrel. The second magnet, the B0, is a reduced model of basically identical design concept as the...

  18. Vacuum vessel for the tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerich, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    In 1980, the US Department of Energy gave the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory approval to design and build a tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to support the goals of the National Mirror Program. We designed the MFTF-B vacuum vessel both to maintain the required ultrahigh vacuum environment and to structurally support the 42 superconducting magnets plus auxiliary internal and external equipment. During our design work, we made extensive use of both simple and complex computer models to arrive at a cost-effective final configuration. As part of this work, we conducted a unique dynamic analysis to study the interaction of the 32,000-tonne concrete-shielding vault with the 2850-tonne vacuum vessel system. To maintain a vacuum of 2 x 10 -8 torr during the physics experiments inside the vessel, we designed a vacuum pumping system of enormous capacity. The vacuum vessel (4200-m 3 internal volume) has been fabricated and erected, and acceptance tests have been completed at the Livermore site. The rest of the machine has been assembled, and individual systems have been successfully checked. On October 1, 1985, we began a series of integrated engineering tests to verify the operation of all components as a complete system

  19. Tribological properties of magnet structural materials at cryogenic temperatures in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Akira; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Yoshino, Yasuhiro; Iida, Shin-ichiro; Sugimoto, Makoto; Yoshida, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    Tribological properties of structural materials of a superconducting magnet for a nuclear fusion reactor were investigated at temperatures of 293 K, 77 K and about 5 K in vacuum. Specimen materials were JN1, JN2 and SUS316L steels, copper and its alloys, and GFRP. The properties of the coefficient of friction against the number of cycles were classified into two groups; smooth friction and fluctuating friction. The latter was caused by the strong adhesion dependent on the material combination and temperature. The coefficient of friction of the smooth friction was low less than 0.6. The upper coefficient of friction of fluctuating friction reaches more than 3. The temperature dependence of the coefficient of friction was also examined from 5 K to 130 K. Combinations of Cu-Cu and JN2-cupronickel showed high friction over the temperature, but JN1-Cu and JN2-Cu showed clear temperature dependence where the friction was high at temperatures between 45 K and 90 K. (author)

  20. Tests of vacuum interrupters for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.; Parsons, M.; Honig, E.; Lindsay, J.

    1979-04-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project at Princeton University requires the insertion of a resistor in an excited ohmic-heating coil circuit to produce a plasma initiation pulse (PIP). It is expected that the maximum duty for the switching system will be an interruption of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Vacuum interrupters were selected as the most economical means to satisfy these requirements. However, it was felt that some testing of available systems should be performed to determine their reliability under these conditions. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 interruptions each at 24 kA and 25 kV. One system employed special Westinghouse type WL-33552 interrupters in a circuit designed by LASL. This circuit used a commercially available actuator and a minimum size counterpulse bank and saturable reactor. The other used Toshiba type VGB2-D20 interrupters actuated by a Toshiba mechanism in a Toshiba circuit using a larger counterpulse bank and saturable reactor

  1. Mechanical Tensile Testing of Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bryan L.; Martinez, Raul M.; Shirron, Peter; Tuttle, Jim; Galassi, Nicholas M.; Mcguinness, Daniel S.; Puckett, David; Francis, John J.; Flom, Yury

    2011-01-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thennal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  2. Systematic vacuum study of the ITER model cryopump by test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xueli; Haas, Horst; Day, Christian [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The primary pumping systems on the ITER torus are based on eight tailor-made cryogenic pumps because not any standard commercial vacuum pump can meet the ITER working criteria. This kind of cryopump can provide high pumping speed, especially for light gases, by the cryosorption on activated charcoal at 4.5 K. In this paper we will present the systematic Monte Carlo simulation results of the model pump in a reduced scale by ProVac3D, a new Test Particle Monte Carlo simulation program developed by KIT. The simulation model has included the most important mechanical structures such as sixteen cryogenic panels working at 4.5 K, the 80 K radiation shield envelope with baffles, the pump housing, inlet valve and the TIMO (Test facility for the ITER Model Pump) test facility. Three typical gas species, i.e., deuterium, protium and helium are simulated. The pumping characteristics have been obtained. The result is in good agreement with the experiment data up to the gas throughput of 1000 sccm, which marks the limit for free molecular flow. This means that ProVac3D is a useful tool in the design of the prototype cryopump of ITER. Meanwhile, the capture factors at different critical positions are calculated. They can be used as the important input parameters for a follow-up Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulation for higher gas throughput.

  3. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF cryogenic system consists of 3 refrigeration systems: Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), and End Station Refrigerator (ESR). CHL is the main cryogenic system for CEBAF, consisting of a 4.8 kW, 2.0 K refrigerator and transfer line system to supply 2.0 K and 12 kW of 50 K shield refrigeration for the Linac cavity cryostats and 10 g/s of liquid for the end stations. This paper describes the 9-year effort to commission these systems, concentrating on CHL with the cold compressors. The cold compressors are a cold vacuum pump with an inlet temperature of 3 K which use magnetic bearings, thereby eliminating the possibility of air leaks into the subatmospheric He

  4. Precision test of vacuum polarization in heavy muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubler, T.; Kaeser, K.; Robert-Tissot, B.; Schaller, L.A.; Schellenberg, L.; Schneuwly, H.

    1978-01-01

    In order to test the QED corrections, and in particular the vacuum polarization, muonic 4f-3d transitions in Ba and Ce and 5g-4f transitions in Tl and Pb have been measured using Ge(Li) detectors. An absolute energy accuracy of +- 8 eV corresponding to a relative error of 17-19 ppm has been obtained. The experimental energies agree with theory within the total uncertainty of +- 10 eV. This corresponds to a test of the QED vacuum polarization calculations of between 0.35% and 0.50%. (Auth.)

  5. Tests of a vacuum breaker for the FTU commutation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, R.; Lovisetto, L.; Cornago, F.

    1984-01-01

    A two poles vacuum breaker, equipped with saturable inductances and capacitor banks to produce an artificial current zero, appears the most suitable solution to satisfy these requirements with high reliability of operation and limited maintenance. Two series of tests have been conducted to evaluate the performance and reliability of the system and in particular the erosion of the electrodes as a function of number of operations. The test results have been very satisfactory. At least 1000 full power pulses can be envisaged before replacing the vacuum bottles. (author)

  6. Cryogenic test facility instrumentation with fiber optic and fiber optic sensors for testing superconducting accelerator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajas, H.; Bajko, M.; Castaldo, B.; Consales, M.; Cusano, A.; Giordano, M.; Giloux, C.; Perez, J. C.; Sansone, L.; Viret, P.

    2017-12-01

    The magnets for the next steps in accelerator physics, such as the High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL- LHC) and the Future Circular Collider (FCC), require the development of new technologies for manufacturing and monitoring. To meet the HL-LHC new requirements, a large upgrade of the CERN SM18 cryogenic test facilities is ongoing with the implementation of new cryostats and cryogenic instrumentation. The paper deals with the advances in the development and the calibration of fiber optic sensors in the range 300 - 4 K using a dedicated closed-cycle refrigerator system composed of a pulse tube and a cryogen-free cryostat. The calibrated fiber optic sensors (FOS) have been installed in three vertical cryostats used for testing superconducting magnets down to 1.9 K or 4.2 K and in the variable temperature test bench (100 - 4.2 K). Some examples of FOS measurements of cryostat temperature evolution are presented as well as measurements of strain performed on a subscale of High Temperature Superconducting magnet during its powering tests.

  7. Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ting; Casagrande, Fabio; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

  8. Transport of liquid state nitrogen through long length service lines during thermal/vacuum testing. [in a Nimbus 6 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and analytical aspects associated with the transport are presented. Included is a definition of the problems and difficulties imposed by the servicing of a typical solid cryogen system, as well as a discussion of the transport requirements and of the rationale which governed their solution. A successful detailed transport configuration is defined, and the application of established mathematics to the design approach is demonstrated. The significance of head pressure, pressure drop, line friction, heat leak, Reynolds number, and the fundamental equilibrium demands of pressure and temperature were examined as they relate to the achievement of liquid state flow. Performance predictions were made for the transport system, and several analytical quantities are tabulated. These data are analyzed and compared with measured and calculated results obtained while actually servicing a solid cryogen system during thermal/vacuum testing.

  9. Results of radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on some selected organic materials for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future, particle accelerators and detectors as well as fusion reactors will operate at cryogenic temperatures. At temperatures as low as 2 K, the organic materials used for the insulation of the superconducting magnets and cables will be exposed to high radiation levels. In this work, a representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations and epoxy-type-impregnated resins were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of nuclear reactors, both at ambient and cryogenic temperatures, and were subsequently mechanically tested. The results show that the radiation degradation is never worse in a cryogenic fluid than it is in usual ambient conditions. (author)

  10. Vacuum Drying Tests for Storage of Aluminum Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.; Large, W.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    A total inventory of up to approximately 32,000 aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al SNF) assemblies are expected to be shipped to Savannah River Site (SRS) from domestic and foreign research reactors over the next several decades. Treatment technologies are being developed as alternatives to processing for the ultimate disposition of Al SNF in the geologic repository. One technology, called Direct/Co-disposal of Al SNF, would place the SNF into a canister ready for disposal in a waste package, with or without canisters containing high-level radioactive waste glass logs, in the repository. The Al SNF would be transferred from wet storage and would need to be dried in the Al SNF canister. The moisture content inside the Al SNF canister is limited to avoid excessive Al SNF corrosion and hydrogen buildup during interim storage before disposal. A vacuum drying process was proposed to dry the Al SNF in a canister. There are two major concerns for the vacuum drying process. One is water inside the canister could become frozen during the vacuum drying process and the other one is the detection of dryness inside the canister. To vacuum dry an irradiated fuel in a heavily shielded canister, it would be very difficult to open the lid to inspect the dryness during the vacuum drying operation. A vacuum drying test program using a mock SNF assembly was conducted to demonstrate feasibility of drying the Al SNF in a canister. These tests also served as a check-out of the drying apparatus for future tests in which irradiated fuel would be loaded into a canister under water followed by drying for storage

  11. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  12. Testing program for burning plasma experiment vacuum vessel bolted joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsueh, P.K.; Khan, M.Z.; Swanson, J.; Feng, T.; Dinkevich, S.; Warren, J.

    1992-01-01

    As presently designed, the Burning Plasma Experiment vacuum vessel will be segmentally fabricated and assembled by bolted joints in the field. Due to geometry constraints, most of the bolted joints have significant eccentricity which causes the joint behavior to be sensitive to joint clamping forces. Experience indicates that as a result of this eccentricity, the joint will tend to open at the side closest to the applied load with the extent of the opening being dependent on the initial preload. In this paper analytical models coupled with a confirmatory testing program are developed to investigate and predict the non-linear behavior of the vacuum vessel bolted joint

  13. Accelerated vacuum testing of long life ball bearings and sliprings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, C. R.; Christy, R. I.; Cunningham, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Extensive analytical studies and testing have been conducted on bearings and sliprings in vacuum at temperatures from 30 to 130 F. Thirty-six bearings lubricated with two types of oil were tested in vacuum of less than 10 to the minus 8th power torr at speeds from 55 to 180 rpm. Temperatures, load, speed, and oil viscosity were varied to evaluate the effects on life and wear. All bearings performed successfully during a 7-month test, and the potential merits of the two oils were compared. Over 25 different, dry-lubricated brush/slipring material combinations have been tested, with variations of brush and ring design and surface speed. Test results indicate the probability of 10 years or more of slipring and brush lifetime with properly designed brushes for 1-in.-diameter ring rotating at 60 rpm.

  14. Construction of cryogenic testing system and tensile deformation behavior of AISI 300 series stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.; Nahm, S.H.; Huh, Y.H.; Lee, J.J.; Bahng, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    For practical application of cryogenic engineering, development and characterization of structural materials for use at low temperatures are essential. For these purposes, a system for mechanical testing at liquid helium temperatures was developed and it was shown that the precision and accuracy of the system met the requirements of standards for materials testing machines. Using this system, tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304,316 and 310S austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures was investigated. Tests were conducted on round, tensile specimens having a 6.25mm diameter at 4,77, and 295 K and loading rate was 0.5mm/min. Serrations were observed in all alloys at 4 K. The stress-displacement curves at 77 and 4 K showed different tendency from those at 298 K. As the testing temperature decreased, ultimate strengths of 304 and 316 were largely increased compared to the increase of yield strengths, but the increase of ultimate strength of 310S was almost the same to that of yield strength. Type 310S had the highest yield strength and the lowest tensile strength at all temperatutes. These tensile characteristics were considered to be strongly affected by austenite stability.(Author)

  15. Thermal stratification in LH2 tank of cryogenic propulsion stage tested in ISRO facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, M.; Raj, R. Edwin; Narayanan, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are used as oxidizer and fuel respectively in cryogenic propulsion system. These liquids are stored in foam insulated tanks of cryogenic propulsion system and are pressurized using warm pressurant gas supplied for tank pressure maintenance during cryogenic engine operation. Heat leak to cryogenic propellant tank causes buoyancy driven liquid stratification resulting in formation of warm liquid stratum at liquid free surface. This warm stratum is further heated by the admission of warm pressurant gas for tank pressurization during engine operation. Since stratified layer temperature has direct bearing on the cavitation free operation of turbo pumps integrated in cryogenic engine, it is necessary to model the thermal stratification for predicting stratified layer temperature and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation. These inputs are required for estimating the minimum pressure to be maintained by tank pressurization system. This paper describes configuration of cryogenic stage for ground qualification test, stage hot test sequence, a thermal model and its results for a foam insulated LH2 tank subjected to heat leak and pressurization with hydrogen gas at 200 K during liquid outflow at 38 lps for engine operation. The above model considers buoyancy flow in free convection boundary layer caused by heat flux from tank wall and energy transfer from warm pressurant gas etc. to predict temperature of liquid stratum and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation in stage qualification tests carried out in ISRO facility.

  16. Preliminary test of vacuum system of SPring-8 synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hideo; Yoneyama, Katsuji; Shimada, Taihei

    1992-01-01

    In this report, on the several points which it is desirable to be confirmed beforehand when the vacuum system of the synchrotron is designed, the results of the test by making the vacuum system for one normal cell simulating the actual machine are reported. Further by making three types of sample ducts, the ordinary type of 1.65 mm thickness, the rib-reinforced type of 0.3 mm thickness and bellows structure, the rate of released gas and the effect to eddy current were examined, for the purpose of taking the countermeasures to the eddy current accompanying the synchrotron operation. The mockup of the normal cell was composed of a duct of 10 m length, two ion pumps of 20 l/s, and a turbo molecular pump of 50 l/s, and the material of the ducts is SUS316L, and the sectional form is elliptic of 72 x 34. In the vacuum test of the normal cell, the exhaust characteristics at the time of rise and pressure distribution were verified. The measurement of the rate of released gas in the ducts and the measurement of current and voltage induced in the ducts are reported. The sufficient performance can be expected with the exhaust system used, and the time required for the rise of the vacuum system was clarified. (K.I.)

  17. Full Cryogenic Test of 600 A HTS Hybrid Current Leads for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Mosawi, MK; Beduz, C; Ballarino, A; Yang, Y

    2007-01-01

    For full cryogenic test of CERN 600 A High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads prior to integration into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a ded. facility has been designed, constructed and operated at the University of Southampton. The facility consists of purpose-built test cryostats, 20 K helium gas supply, helium gas flow and temperature control systems and quench protection system. Over 400 such leads have already been successfully tested and qualified for installation at CERN. This paper describes various design and operation aspects of the test facility and presents the detailed cryogenic test results of the CERN 600 A current leads, including steady state 20 K flow rates.

  18. A cryogenic test stand for full length SSC magnets with superfluid capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.J.; Mazur, P.O.

    1989-02-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility performs testing of the full scale SSC magnets on test stands capable of simulating the cryogenic environment of the SSC main ring. One of these test stands, Stand 5, also has the ability to operate the magnet under test at temperatures from 1.8K to 4.5K with either supercritical helium or subcooled liquid, providing at least 25 Watts of refrigeration. At least 50 g/s flow is available from 2.3K to 4.5K, whereas superfluid operation occurs with zero flow. Cooldown time from 4.5K to 1.8K is 1.5 hours. A maximum current capability of 10,000 amps is provided, as is instrumentation to monitor and control the cryogenic conditions. This paper describes the cryogenic design of this test stand. 8 refs., 6 figs

  19. Design and construction of the SSCL magnet test laboratory cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, M.A.; Kobel, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a brief summary of the execution, by Process Systems International, Inc. (PSI), of the Design and Construction of the SSCL Magnet Test Laboratory Cryogenic Systems. This $30 million project requires the expenditure of over 200,000 manhours and the procurement of $17 million in materials within a two year period. SSC magnets will be performance tested at the Magnet Test Laboratory (MTL) and the Accelerator System String Test (ASST) facility under conditions simulating the environment of the SSC main ring. The cryogenic system consists of test stands (five for MTL, one for ASST) and the associated equipment including cryogenic storage, purification, thermal conditioning, and helium refrigeration necessary to support the test program

  20. A Cryogenic Test Set-Up for the Qualification of Pre-Series Test Cells for the LHC Cryogenic Distribution Line

    CERN Document Server

    Livran, J; Parente, C; Riddone, G; Rybkowski, D; Veillet, N

    2000-01-01

    Three pre-series Test Cells of the LHC Cryogenic Distribution Line (QRL) [1], manufactured by three European industrial companies, will be tested in the year 2000 to qualify the design chosen and verify the thermal and mechanical performances. A dedicated test stand (170 m x 13 m) has been built for extensive testing and performance assessment of the pre-series units in parallel. They will be fed with saturated liquid helium at 4.2 K supplied by a mobile helium dewar. In addition, LN2 cooled helium will be used for cool-down and thermal shielding. For each of the three pre-series units, a set of end boxes has been designed and manufactured at CERN. This paper presents the layout of the cryogenic system for the pre-series units, the calorimetric methods as well as the results of the thermal calculation of the end box test.

  1. He leak testing of Indus-2 dipole vacuum chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindal, B.K.; Bhavsar, S.T.; Shukla, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Centre for Advanced Technology is developing its second synchrotron radiation source INDUS-2 which is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. Dipole vacuum chambers are the vital components of Indus-2 vacuum system. Each of these chambers is approx. 3.6 m long and 0.67 m wide with 24 nos. of ports of various sizes. The dipole chambers were made by machining two halves and they are then lip welded together. The dipole chamber has approx. 14 m of total weld length and it was leak tested for leak tightness of the order of 10 -10 mbar 1/s. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD) was utilized for the leak testing. Subsequently the leaks of various orders in welding joints were repaired and leak tightness achieved. This paper describes the experiences during leak testing of 20 nos. of aluminum dipole chambers for INDUS-2

  2. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  3. Development of bonding techniques for cryogenic components. 1. HIP bonding tests between Ti and cryogenic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Ouchi, Nobuo; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Hideo

    2002-05-01

    Around the super conducting (SC) coils of SC linear accelerator or fusion reactor, several kinds of dissimilar material joints will be needed. In case of fusion reactor, pure titanium has been proposed as jacket material of SC coil. Pure titanium has many advantages, for instance, almost same thermal expansion with Nb 3 Sn SC coil, non-magnetivity and good workability. However, it is difficult to bond Ti and cryogenic stainless steels by welding. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new bonding techniques and we started the development of the bonding technology by hot isostatic press (HIP) method to bond titanium with stainless steels. In this experiments, optimization of HIP bonding condition and evaluation of bonding strength were performed by metallurgical observation, mechanical property tests and heat cycle test. (author)

  4. Demonstration tests for manufacturing the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsusuke; Onozuka, Masanori; Usui, Yukinori; Urata, Kazuhiro; Tsujita, Yoshihiro; Nakahira, Masataka; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Ohmori, Junji; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Demonstration tests for manufacturing and assembly of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel have been conducted to confirm manufacturing and assembly process of the vacuum vessel (VV). The full-scale partial mock-up fabrication was planned and is in progress. The results will be available in the near future. Field-joint assembly procedure has been demonstrated using a test stand. Due to limited accessibility to the outer shell at the field joint, some operations, including alignment of the splice plates, field-joint welding, and examination, were found to be very difficult. In addition, a demonstration test on the selected back-seal structures was performed. It was found that the tested structures have insufficient sealing capabilities and need further improvement. The applicability of ultrasonic testing methods has been investigated. Although side drilled holes of 2.4 mm in diameter were detected, detection of the slit-type defects and defect characterization were found to be difficult. Feasibility test of liquid penetrant testing has revealed that the selected liquid penetrant testing (LPT) solutions have sufficient low outgas rates and are applicable to the VV

  5. Demonstration tests for manufacturing the ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Katsusuke [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works, Wadasaki-cho 1-1-1, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: katsusuke_shimizu@mhi.co.jp; Onozuka, Masanori [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Usui, Yukinori; Urata, Kazuhiro; Tsujita, Yoshihiro [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works, Wadasaki-cho 1-1-1, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Nakahira, Masataka; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Ohmori, Junji; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Demonstration tests for manufacturing and assembly of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel have been conducted to confirm manufacturing and assembly process of the vacuum vessel (VV). The full-scale partial mock-up fabrication was planned and is in progress. The results will be available in the near future. Field-joint assembly procedure has been demonstrated using a test stand. Due to limited accessibility to the outer shell at the field joint, some operations, including alignment of the splice plates, field-joint welding, and examination, were found to be very difficult. In addition, a demonstration test on the selected back-seal structures was performed. It was found that the tested structures have insufficient sealing capabilities and need further improvement. The applicability of ultrasonic testing methods has been investigated. Although side drilled holes of 2.4 mm in diameter were detected, detection of the slit-type defects and defect characterization were found to be difficult. Feasibility test of liquid penetrant testing has revealed that the selected liquid penetrant testing (LPT) solutions have sufficient low outgas rates and are applicable to the VV.

  6. A Low Heat Inleak Cryogenic Station for Testing HTS Current Leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A; Gomes, P; Métral, L; Serio, L; Suraci, A

    1999-01-01

    The LHC will be equipped with about 8000 superconducting magnets of all types. The total current to be transported into the cryogenic enclosure amounts to some 3360 kA. In order to reduce the heat load into the liquid helium, CERN intends to use High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) material for leads having current ratings up to 13 kA. The resistive part of the leads is cooled by forced flow of gaseous helium between 20 K and 300 K. The HTS part of the lead is immersed in a 4.5 K liquid helium bath, operates in self cooling conditions and is hydraulically separated from the resistive part. A cryogenic test station has been designed and built in order to assess the thermal and electrical performances of 13 kA prototype current leads. We report on the design, commissioning and operation of the cryogenic test station and illustrate its performance by typical test results of HTS current leads.

  7. Cold vacuum drying residual free water test description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Residual free water expected to remain in a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) after processing in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility is investigated based on three alternative models of fuel crevices. Tests and operating conditions for the CVD process are defined based on the analysis of these models. The models consider water pockets constrained by cladding defects, water constrained in a pore or crack by flow through a porous bed, and water constrained in pores by diffusion. An analysis of comparative reaction rate constraints is also presented indicating that a pressure rise test can be used to show MCO's will be thermally stable at operating temperatures up to 75 C

  8. Thermal analysis of a coaxial helium panel of a cryogenic vacuum pump for advanced divertor of DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Langhorn, A.; Schaubel, K.; Smith, J.

    1991-08-01

    It is planned to install a 50,000 1/s cryogenic pump for particle removal in the D3-D tokamak. A critical component of this cryogenic pump will be a helium panel which has to be maintained at a liquid helium temperature. The outer surface area of the helium panel has an area of 1 m 2 and consists of a 2.5 cm diameter, 10 m long tube. From design considerations, a coaxial geometry is preferable since it requires a minimum number of welds. However, the coaxial geometry also results in a counter flow heat exchanger arrangement, where the outgoing warm fluid will exchange heat with incoming cold fluid. This is of concern since the helium panel must be cooled from liquid nitrogen temperature to liquid helium temperature in less than 5 minutes for successful operation of the cryogenic pump. In order to analyze the thermal performance of the coaxial helium panel, a finite difference computer model of the geometry was prepared. The governing equations took into account axial as well as radial conduction through the tube walls. The variation of thermal properties was modeled. The results of the analysis showed that although the coaxial geometry behaves like a counter flow heat exchanger, within the operating range of the cryogenic pump a rapid cooldown of the helium panel from liquid nitrogen temperature to the operating temperature is feasible. A prototypical experiment was also performed at General Atomics (GA) which verified the concept and the analysis. 4 refs., 8 figs

  9. Use of thermal sieve to allow optical testing of cryogenic optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Wook; Cai, Wenrui; Burge, James H

    2012-05-21

    Full aperture testing of large cryogenic optical systems has been impractical due to the difficulty of operating a large collimator at cryogenic temperatures. The Thermal Sieve solves this problem by acting as a thermal barrier between an ambient temperature collimator and the cryogenic system under test. The Thermal Sieve uses a set of thermally controlled baffles with array of holes that are lined up to pass the light from the collimator without degrading the wavefront, while attenuating the thermal background by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. This paper provides the theory behind the Thermal Sieve system, evaluates the optimization for its optical and thermal performance, and presents the design and analysis for a specific system.

  10. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  11. Automatic Management Systems for the Operation of the Cryogenic Test Facilities for LHC Series Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Herblin, L; Lamboy, J P; Vullierme, B

    2006-01-01

    Prior to their final preparation before installation in the tunnel, the ~1800 series superconducting magnets of the LHC machine shall be entirely tested at reception on modular test facilities. The operation 24 hours per day of the cryogenic test facilities is conducted in turn by 3-operator teams, assisted in real time by the use of the Test Bench Priorities Handling System, a process control application enforcing the optimum use of cryogenic utilities and of the "Tasks Tracking System", a web-based e-traveller application handling 12 parallel 38-task test sequences. This paper describes how such computer-based management systems can be used to optimize operation of concurrent test benches within technical boundary conditions given by the cryogenic capacity, and how they can be used to study the efficiency of the automatic steering of all individual cryogenic sub-systems. Finally, this paper presents the overall performance of the cryomagnet test station for the first complete year of operation at high produ...

  12. Cryogenic testing of fluoropolymer-coated stainless steel tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.B.

    1989-11-01

    Stainless steel tubing coated internally with two different types of fluorinated polymers were subjected to microscopic examination after a welding operation had been performed on the tubing. The welded assemblies were photographed and subjected to repeated cycles between liquid helium and room temperature. The green tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) coating peeled back in the area subjected to welding heat and displayed cracking all over its surface without regard to proximity to the weld area. The dark fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) coating showed a tendency to char or burn away progressively in the weld area. The dark (FEP) coating did not crack as extensively as the green TFE coating, but did show a few areas of ''crazing'' or cracking of the topmost surface after cryogenic exposure. 12 figs

  13. Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors: Simulation of Signal Formation & Irradiation Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091318; Stamoulis, G; Vavougios, D

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system of the Large Hadron Collider is responsible for the pro- tection of the machine from damage and for the prevention of a magnet quench. Near the interaction points of the LHC, in the triplet magnets area, the BLMs are sensitive to the collision debris, limiting their ability to distinguish beam loss signal from signal caused due to the collision products. Placing silicon & diamond detectors inside the cold mass of the mag- nets, in liquid helium temperatures, would provide significant improvement to the precision of the measurement of the energy deposition in the superconducting coil of the magnet. To further study the signal formation and the shape of the transient current pulses of the aforementioned detectors in cryogenic temperatures, a simulation application has been developed. The application provides a fast way of determining the electric field components inside the detectors bulk and then introduces an initial charge distribution based on the properties of the radiat...

  14. Instrumentation, Field Network And Process Automation for the LHC Cryogenic Line Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Bager, T; Bertrand, G; Casas-Cubillos, J; Gomes, P; Parente, C; Riddone, G; Suraci, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic control system and associated instrumentation of the test facility for 3 pre-series units of the LHC Cryogenic Distribution Line. For each unit, the process automation is based on a Programmable Logic Con-troller implementing more than 30 closed control loops and handling alarms, in-terlocks and overall process management. More than 160 sensors and actuators are distributed over 150 m on a Profibus DP/PA network. Parameterization, cali-bration and diagnosis are remotely available through the bus. Considering the diversity, amount and geographical distribution of the instru-mentation involved, this is a representative approach to the cryogenic control system for CERN's next accelerator.

  15. Manufacture, testing and assembly preparation of the JET vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbez, J.; Baeumel, S.; Dean, J.R.; Duesling, G.; Froger, C.; Hemmerich, J.L.; Walravens, M.; Walter, K.; Winkel, T.

    1983-01-01

    To reach the target pressure of 10 -9 mbar, JET's double-walled Inconel vacuum vessel is being manufactured and assembled in clean conditions and with meticulous leak detection. Each octant (1/8 of the torus) is baked in an oven to 520 0 C and leak tested at 350 0 C to reveal leaks as small as 10 -9 mbar l/s, which are repaired. In service the vessel will be baked periodically to 500 0 C by CO 2 passing between its walls. The single-walled ports will be electrically heated. (author)

  16. TV borehole inspection and vacuum testing of roof strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herget, G.

    1982-01-01

    To improve quality control of roof conditions, a program was carried out at Elliot Lake uranium mines in Ontario, Canada to test a portable TV camera system. This camera has a 29 mm diameter probe and is capable of identifying crack locations, crack width and approximate dip direction. The extent of fractures in the roof was checked with the aid of a vacuum system by placing packers in various boreholes and checking for communication. The removal of some rock bolts indicated an increase in fracture extent

  17. Vacuum arc switched inverter tests at 2.5 MVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.N.; Gilmour, A.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of the unloaded vacuum arc switch (VAS) inverter is undertaken; a key element in this analysis is the assumption of a constant voltage drop of 50 volts across each VAS while it is conducting. From this analysis a constant VAS-voltage model is developed to explain the VAS inverter operation. A comparison of data obtained from laboratory tests of the inverter is made with data obtained from this model, and agreement is found to be within 10% for up to 15 alternations

  18. Analysis and test of a breadboard cryogenic hydrogen/Freon heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, L. F.; Hooper, J.

    1973-01-01

    System studies required to verify a tube-in-tube cryogenic heat exchanger as optimum for the space shuttle mission are described. Design of the optimum configuration, which could be fabricated from commercially available hardware, is discussed. Finally, testing of the proposed configuration with supercritical hydrogen and Freon 21 is discussed and results are compared with thermal and dynamic analysis.

  19. Development and flight test of metal-lined CFRP cryogenic tank for reusable rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Ken; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Sato, Eiichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Namiki, Fumiharu; Tanaka, Kohtaro; Watabe, Yoko

    2005-07-01

    A cryogenic tank made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) shell with aluminum thin liner has been designed as a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank for an ISAS reusable launch vehicle, and the function of it has been proven by repeated flights onboard the test vehicle called reusable vehicle testing (RVT) in October 2003. The liquid hydrogen tank has to be a pressure vessel, because the fuel of the engine of the test vehicle is supplied by fuel pressure. The pressure vessel of a combination of the outer shell of CFRP for strength element at a cryogenic temperature and the inner liner of aluminum for gas barrier has shown excellent weight merit for this purpose. Interfaces such as tank outline shape, bulk capacity, maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP), thermal insulation, pipe arrangement, and measurement of data are also designed to be ready onboard. This research has many aims, not only development of reusable cryogenic composite tank but also the demonstration of repeated operation including thermal cycle and stress cycle, familiarization with test techniques of operation of cryogenic composite tanks, and the accumulation of data for future design of tanks, vehicle structures, safety evaluation, and total operation systems.

  20. The cryogenic pumping section of KATRIN and the test experiment TRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Eichelhardt, F

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) employs a Cryogenic Pumping Section (CPS) at ~ 4.5 K to suppress the tritium penetration into the spectrometers. A test experiment (TRAP - Tritium Argon frost Pump) has been set up to investigate the tritium pumping performance of the CPS.

  1. Development and Testing of an ISRU Soil Mechanics Vacuum Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2014-01-01

    For extraterrestrial missions, earth based testing in relevant environments is key to successful hardware development. This is true for both early component level development and system level integration. For In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the moon, hardware must interface with the surface material, or regolith, in a vacuum environment. A relevant test environment will therefore involve a vacuum chamber with a controlled, properly conditioned bed of lunar regolith simulant. However, in earth-based granular media, such as lunar regolith simulant, gases trapped within the material pore structures and water adsorbed to all particle surfaces will release when exposed to vacuum. Early vacuum testing has shown that this gas release can occur violently, which loosens and weakens the simulant, altering the consolidation state. A mid-size chamber (3.66 m tall, 1.5 m inner diameter) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been modified to create a soil mechanics test facility. A 0.64 m deep by 0.914 m square metric ton bed of lunar simulant was placed under vacuum using a variety of pumping techniques. Both GRC-3 and LHT-3M simulant types were used. Data obtained from an electric cone penetrometer can be used to determine strength properties at vacuum including: cohesion, friction angle, bulk density and shear modulus. Simulant disruptions, caused by off-gassing, affected the strength properties, but could be mitigated by reducing pump rate. No disruptions were observed at pressures below 2.5 Torr, regardless of the pump rate. The slow off-gassing of the soil at low pressure lead to long test times; a full week to reach 10(exp -5) Torr. Robotic soil manipulation would enable multiple ISRU hardware test within the same vacuum cycle. The feasibility of a robotically controlled auger and tamper was explored at vacuum conditions.

  2. Operation of the cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronis, W.C.; Slack, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to cool the entire MFTF-B system from ambient to operating temperature in less than 10 days. The system was successfully operated in the recent plant and capital equipment (PACE) acceptance tests, and results from these tests helped us correct problem areas and improve the system

  3. Lessons Learned During Cryogenic Optical Testing of the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, James; Reardon, Patrick; Geary, Joseph; Robinson, Brian; Stahl, Philip; Eng, Ron; Kegley, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Optical testing in a cryogenic environment presents a host of challenges above and beyond those encountered during room temperature testing. The Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs) are 1.4 m diameter, ultra light-weight (mA2), off-axis parabolic segments. They are required to have 250 nm PV & 50 nm RMS surface figure error or less at 35 K. An optical testing system, consisting of an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (PI), a diffractive null corrector (DNC), and an Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), was used to measure the surface figure & radius-of-curvature of these mirrors at the operational temperature within the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Ah4SD program was designed to improve the technology related to the design, fabrication, & testing of such mirrors in support of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This paper will describe the lessons learned during preparation & cryogenic testing of the AMSDs.

  4. Performance of the JT-60SA cryogenic system under pulsed heat loads during acceptance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, C.; Bonne, F.; Roussel, P.; Lamaison, V.; Girard, S.; Fejoz, P.; Goncalves, R.; Vallet, J. C.; Legrand, J.; Fabre, Y.; Pudys, V.; Wanner, M.; Cardella, A.; Di Pietro, E.; Kamiya, K.; Natsume, K.; Ohtsu, K.; Oishi, M.; Honda, A.; Kashiwa, Y.; Kizu, K.

    2017-12-01

    The JT-60SA cryogenic system a superconducting tokamak currently under assembly at Naka, Japan. After one year of commissioning, the acceptance tests were successfully completed in October 2016 in close collaboration with Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (ALaT), the French atomic and alternative energies commission (CEA), Fusion for Energy (F4E) and the Quantum Radiological Science and Technology (QST). The cryogenic system has several cryogenic users at various temperatures: the superconducting magnets at 4.4 K, the current leads at 50 K, the thermal shields at 80 K and the divertor cryo-pumps at 3.7 K. The cryogenic system has an equivalent refrigeration power of about 9.5 kW at 4.5 K, with peak loads caused by the nuclear heating, the eddy currents in the structures and the AC losses in the magnets during cyclic plasma operation. The main results of the acceptance tests will be reported, with emphasis on the management of the challenging pulsed load operation using a liquid helium volume of 7 m3 as a thermal damper.

  5. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L B; Liu, S X; Gu, K X; Zhou, Y; Wang, J J

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper. (paper)

  6. Integration test of ITER full-scale vacuum vessel sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, M.; Koizumi, K.; Oka, K.

    2001-01-01

    The full-scale Sector Model Project, which was initiated in 1995 as one of the Large Seven R and D Projects, completed all R and D activities planned in the ITER-EDA period with the joint effort of the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT), the Japanese, the Russian Federation (RF) and the United States (US) Home Teams. The fabrication of a full-scale 18 toroidal sector, which is composed of two 9 sectors spliced at the port center, was successfully completed in September 1997 with the dimensional accuracy of ± 3 mm for the total height and total width. Both sectors were shipped to the test site in JAERI and the integration test was begun in October 1997. The integration test involves the adjustment of field joints, automatic Narrow Gap Tungsten Inert Gas (NG-TIG) welding of field joints with splice plates, and inspection of the joint by ultrasonic testing (UT), which are required for the initial assembly of ITER vacuum vessel. This first demonstration of field joint welding and performance test on the mechanical characteristics were completed in May 1998 and the all results obtained have satisfied the ITER design. In addition to these tests, the integration with the mid plane port extension fabricated by the Russian Home Team, and the cutting and re-welding test of field joints by using full-remotized welding and cutting system developed by the US Home Team, are planned as post EDA activities. (author)

  7. Integration test of ITER full-scale vacuum vessel sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, M.; Koizumi, K.; Oka, K.

    1999-01-01

    The full-scale Sector Model Project, which was initiated in 1995 as one of the Large Seven ITER R and D Projects, completed all R and D activities planned in the ITER-EDA period with the joint effort of the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT), the Japanese, the Russian Federation (RF) and the United States (US) Home Teams. The fabrication of a full-scale 18 toroidal sector, which is composed of two 9 sectors spliced at the port center, was successfully completed in September 1997 with the dimensional accuracy of - 3 mm for the total height and total width. Both sectors were shipped to the test site in JAERI and the integration test was begun in October 1997. The integration test involves the adjustment of field joints, automatic Narrow Gap Tungsten Inert Gas (NG-TIG) welding of field joints with splice plates, and inspection of the joint by ultrasonic testing (UT), which are required for the initial assembly of ITER vacuum vessel. This first demonstration of field joint welding and performance test on the mechanical characteristics were completed in May 1998 and the all results obtained have satisfied the ITER design. In addition to these tests, the integration with the mid plane port extension fabricated by the Russian Home Team, and the cutting and re-welding test of field joints by using full-remotized welding and cutting system developed by the US Home Team, are planned as post EDA activities. (author)

  8. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  9. Cryogenic Design of the New High Field Magnet Test Facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, V.; Pirotte, O.; De Rijk, G.; Bajko, M.; Craen, A. Vande; Perret, Ph.; Hanzelka, P.

    In the framework of the R&D program related to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) upgrades, a new High Field Magnet (HFM) vertical test bench is required. This facility located in the SM18 cryogenic test hall shall allow testing of up to 15 tons superconducting magnets with energy up to 10 MJ in a temperature range between 1.9 K and 4.5 K. The article describes the cryogenic architecture to be inserted in the general infrastructure of SM18 including the process and instrumentation diagram, the different operating phases including strategy for magnet cool down and warm up at controlled speed and quench management as well as the design of the main components.

  10. ITER Task T332a (1995): Low-inventory cryogenic distillation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, K.; Robins, J.; Bellamy, D.

    1996-01-01

    Previous work at Ontario Hydro Technologies (OHT) had shown that small hydrogen cryogenic columns could be stably controlled and designed to much lower inventories than had been previously thought possible. Among the results were measurements of height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) versus holdup for Helipak A and B packings in columns up to 20 mm diameter. ITER cryogenic distillation column designs suggest that the final high-tritium column could be 30-70 mm diameter. The objective of this ITER task was to test scale-up of OHT low inventory columns to ITER dimensions. In 1994 OHT built a suitable test facility. In 1995, two low-inventory packings were tested. (author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  11. A new cryogenic test facility for large superconducting devices at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Serio, L; Stewart, L; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    To expand CERN testing capability to superconducting devices that cannot be installed in existing test facilities because of their size and/or mass, CERN is building a new cryogenic test facility for large and heavy devices. The first devices to be tested in the facility will be the S-FRS superconducting magnets for the FAIR project that is currently under construction at the GSI Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The facility will include a renovated cold box with 1.2 kW at 4.5 K equivalent power with its compression system, two independent 15 kW liquid nitrogen precooling and warm-up units, as well as a dedicated cryogenic distribution system providing cooling power to three independent test benches. The article presents the main input parameters and constraints used to define the cryogenic system and its infrastructure. The chosen layout and configuration of the facility is presented and the characteristics of the main components are described.

  12. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Soyars, W. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  13. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  14. FaceSheet Push-off Tests to Determine Composite Sandwich Toughness at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Herring, Helen M.

    2001-01-01

    A new novel test method, associated analysis, and experimental procedures are developed to investigate the toughness of the facesheet-to-core interface of a sandwich material at cryogenic temperatures. The test method is designed to simulate the failure mode associated with facesheet debonding from high levels of gas pressure in the sandwich core. The effects of specimen orientation are considered, and the results of toughness measurements are presented. Comparisons are made between room and liquid nitrogen (-196 C) test temperatures. It was determined that the test method is insensitive to specimen facesheet orientation and strain energy release rate increases with a decrease in the test temperature.

  15. Cryogenic magnet tests for the LHC process operation using web-based tools and facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hemelsoet, G H; Chohan, V; Veyrunes, E

    2005-01-01

    For the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN, an essential requirement is the acceptance test of its 1706 Cryo-magnets in cryogenic conditions in a purpose-built facility at CERN. Several teams ensure the proper operation of the infrastructure on a round the clock basis. The cold test part is one of the key elements amongst many other essential activities requiring magnet transport and connections/disconnections, cryogenic preparation and pumping, cooling down to 1.9 K as well warm up before disconnection & removal. All these operations involve multi-tasking and usage of 12 test benches with nominal turn-round time per dipole magnet of 120 hours. It also involves multiple teams of industrial contractors, a support contract for cryogenics operation, CERN staff in magnet testing Operation, aided by a large external collaboration of visiting staff for round the clock operation. This paper gives a flavour of the operation and exposes the software tools that were necessary, designed and developed t...

  16. Cryogenic test of the 4 K / 2 K insert for the ARIEL e-Linac cryomodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Ma, Y.; Harmer, P.; Kishi, D.; Koveshnikov, A.; Muller, N.; Vrielink, A.; O'Brien, M.; Ahammed, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF requires a 50 MeV superconducting electron linac consisting of five nine cell 1.3 GHz cavities divided into three cryomodules with one, two and two cavities in each module respectively. LHe is distributed in parallel to each module at 4 K and at ∼1.2 bar. Each module has a cryogenic insert on board that receives the 4 K liquid and produces 2 K into a cavity phase separator. The module combines a 4 K phase separator, a plate and fin heat exchanger from DATE and a J-T valve expanding into the 2 K phase separator. The unit also supplies 4 K liquid to thermal intercepts in the module in siphon loops that return the vaporized liquid to the 4 K reservoir. For testing purposes the unit is outfitted with a dummy 2 K phase separator and thermal intercepts with variable heaters that mimic the final heat loads in order to test the cryogenic performance. The design of the 4 K / 2 K insert, the results of the cold tests and a summary of the test infrastructure including cryogenics services will be presented

  17. Cryogenic test of the 4 K / 2 K insert for the ARIEL e-Linac cryomodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Ma, Y.; Harmer, P.; Kishi, D.; Koveshnikov, A.; Muller, N.; Vrielink, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); O' Brien, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Ahammed, M. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Kolkata (India)

    2014-01-29

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF requires a 50 MeV superconducting electron linac consisting of five nine cell 1.3 GHz cavities divided into three cryomodules with one, two and two cavities in each module respectively. LHe is distributed in parallel to each module at 4 K and at ∼1.2 bar. Each module has a cryogenic insert on board that receives the 4 K liquid and produces 2 K into a cavity phase separator. The module combines a 4 K phase separator, a plate and fin heat exchanger from DATE and a J-T valve expanding into the 2 K phase separator. The unit also supplies 4 K liquid to thermal intercepts in the module in siphon loops that return the vaporized liquid to the 4 K reservoir. For testing purposes the unit is outfitted with a dummy 2 K phase separator and thermal intercepts with variable heaters that mimic the final heat loads in order to test the cryogenic performance. The design of the 4 K / 2 K insert, the results of the cold tests and a summary of the test infrastructure including cryogenics services will be presented.

  18. Impact of Drilling Operations on Lunar Volatiles Capture: Thermal Vacuum Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Paulsen, Gale; Zacny, Kris; Smith, Jim

    2015-01-01

    In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) enables future planetary exploration by using local resources to supply mission consumables. This idea of 'living off the land' has the potential to reduce mission cost and risk. On the moon, water has been identified as a potential resource (for life support or propellant) at the lunar poles, where it exists as ice in the subsurface. However, the depth and content of this resource has yet to be confirmed on the ground; only remote detection data exists. The upcoming Resource Prospector mission (RP) will 'ground-truth' the water using a rover, drill, and the RESOLVE science package. As the 2020 planned mission date nears, component level hardware is being tested in relevant lunar conditions (thermal vacuum). In August 2014 a series of drilling tests were performed using the Honeybee Robotics Lunar Prospecting Drill inside a 'dirty' thermal vacuum chamber at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The drill used a unique auger design to capture and retain the lunar regolith simulant. The goal of these tests was to investigate volatiles (water) loss during drilling and sample transfer to a sample crucible in order to validate this regolith sampling method. Twelve soil samples were captured over the course of two tests at pressures of 10(exp-5) Torr and ambient temperatures between -80C to -20C. Each sample was obtained from a depth of 40 cm to 50 cm within a cryogenically frozen bed of NU-LHT-3M lunar regolith simulant doped with 5 wt% water. Upon acquisition, each sample was transferred and hermetically sealed inside a crucible. The samples were later baked out to determine water wt% and in turn volatile loss by following ASTM standard practices. Of the twelve tests, four sealed properly and lost an average of 30% of their available water during drilling and transfer. The variability in the results correlated well with ambient temperature (lower the temperature lower volatiles loss) and the trend agreed with the sublimation rates for the

  19. The Mirror Fusion Test Facility cryogenic system: Performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a 14-kW, 4.35-K helium refrigeration system that proved to be highly successful and cost-effective. All operating objectives were met, while remaining within a few percent of initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used in MFTF allowed decisions to be made quickly and effectively, and it helped keep costs down. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, key aspects of subcontractor specifications, and subcontractor interactions are reviewed, as well as highlights of the system tests, operation, and present equipment status. Organizations planning large, high-technology systems may benefit from this experience with the MFTF cryogenic system

  20. Test Results of Selected Commercial DC/DC Converters under Cryogenic Temperatures - A Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    DC/DC converters are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management and distribution, signal conditioning, and motor control. Design of DC/DC converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance, simplify design, and reduce development and launch costs. In this work, the performance of nine COTS modular, low-tomedium power DC/DC converters was investigated under cryogenic temperatures. The converters were evaluated in terms of their output regulation, efficiency, and input and output currents. At a given temperature, these properties were obtained at various input voltages and at different load levels. A summary on the performance of the tested converters was given. More comprehensive testing and in-depth analysis of performance under long-term exposure to extreme temperatures are deemed necessary to establish the suitability of these and other devices for use in the harsh environment of space exploration missions.

  1. Simple test for physical stability of cryogenic tank insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossello, D.

    1968-01-01

    Qualitative test determines the ability of insulation liners used on liquid hydrogen tanks to withstand stresses produced by the thermal shocks imparted to the insulation during tank filling and drainage. Test specimens are bonded to metal plates with a low thermal expansion coefficient and are immersed in liquid hydrogen.

  2. Tests of industrial ethylene-propylene rubber high voltage cable for cryogenic use

    CERN Document Server

    Balhan, B; Goddard, B; Muratori, G; Otwinowski, S; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Wang, H; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1999-01-01

    At the beginning of 1999 UCLA has received a prototype High Voltage Cryogenic Cable supplied fee of charge by Pirelli. The cable is intended for more than ten years of service at 100 kV D.C. and liquid argon temperature. Thecable uses an all welded construction, whichi is axially tight and free of ionizable voids. The cable was submitted to a number of mechanical and electrical tests as described below.

  3. Mirror fusion test facility cryogenic system - performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the MFTF is a helium refrigeration system that proved to be successful and cost effective. All operating objectives were met while remaining within a few percent of the initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used at MFTF is assessed. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, and subcontractor specifications and interactions are reviewed along with highlights of system testing, documentation, and operation

  4. SEU tests performed on the digital communication system for LHC cryogenic instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas-Cubillos, J.; Faccio, F.; Gomes, P.; Martin, M.A.; Rodriguez-Ruiz, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The future LHC particle accelerator will use a large number of cryogenic sensors and actuators, most of which are located inside the machine tunnel and therefore in a radiation environment. These elements will communicate through a fieldbus. This paper reports the irradiation study carried out on WorldFIP fieldbus communication system. A digital communication system based on WorldFIP fieldbus protocol has been implemented and single event effects and total ionizing dose radiation tests have been performed on it

  5. Thermal vacuum test of space equipment: tests of SIR-2 instrument Chandrayaan-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, P.

    2008-11-01

    We describe the reasons of proceeding Thermal-Vacuum tests for space electronic. We will answer on following questions: why teams are doing TV tests, what kind of phases should be simulated, which situations are the most critical during TV tests, what kind of results should be expected, which errors can be detect. As an example, will be shown TV-test of SIR-2 instrument for Chandrayaan-1 moon mission.

  6. Installation for fatigue testing of materials at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushenkov, I.D.; Chernetskij, V.K.; Il'ichev, V.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    A new installation for mechanical fatigue tests of structural material samples is described, in which the possibility to conduct tests in the range of lower temperatures (4.2-300 K) is ensured. The installation permits to carry out fatigue tests using the method of axial loading of annular (up to 6 mm in diameter) and plane (up to 12 mm wide) samples during symmetric, asymmetric and pulsing loading cycles. It is shown that the installation suggested has quite extended operation possibilities and, coincidentally, it is characterized by design simplicity, compactness, comparatively low metal consumption and maintenance convenience

  7. Automatic control of NASA Langley's 0.3-meter cryogenic test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, J. J.; Balakrishna, S.

    1980-01-01

    Experience during the past 6 years of operation of the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center has shown that there are problems associated with efficient operation and control of cryogenic tunnels using manual control schemes. This is due to the high degree of process crosscoupling between the independent control variables (temperature, pressure, and fan drive speed) and the desired test condition (Mach number and Reynolds number). One problem has been the inability to maintain long-term accurate control of the test parameters. Additionally, the time required to change from one test condition to another has proven to be excessively long and much less efficient than desirable in terms of liquid nitrogen and electrical power usage. For these reasons, studies have been undertaken to: (1) develop and validate a mathematical model of the 0.3-meter cryogenic tunnel process, (2) utilize this model in a hybrid computer simulation to design temperature and pressure feedback control laws, and (3) evaluate the adequacy of these control schemes by analysis of closed-loop experimental data. This paper will present the results of these studies.

  8. Upgrade of the cryogenic infrastructure of SM18, CERN main test facility for superconducting magnets and RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, A.; Dhalla, F.; Gayet, P.; Serio, L.

    2017-12-01

    SM18 is CERN main facility for testing superconducting accelerator magnets and superconducting RF cavities. Its cryogenic infrastructure will have to be significantly upgraded in the coming years, starting in 2019, to meet the testing requirements for the LHC High Luminosity project and for the R&D program for superconducting magnets and RF equipment until 2023 and beyond. This article presents the assessment of the cryogenic needs based on the foreseen test program and on past testing experience. The current configuration of the cryogenic infrastructure is presented and several possible upgrade scenarios are discussed. The chosen upgrade configuration is then described and the characteristics of the main newly required cryogenic equipment, in particular a new 35 g/s helium liquefier, are presented. The upgrade implementation strategy and plan to meet the required schedule are then described.

  9. Status of the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; Goullon, Johannes; Grieser, Manfred; Krantz, Claude; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Repnow, Roland; Schornikov, Andrey; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A novel cryogenic storage ring is currently under construction at the MPIK. By electrostatic ion optical elements, the 35 m circumference Cryogenic Storage Ring will be able to store ions at energies of up to 300 keV per charge unit without any mass limitations. The CSR consists of a cryogenic ({proportional_to}5 K) beam pipe surrounded by two radiation shields (40 and 80 K) in a large outer, thermal insulation vacuum. Extreme vacuum (density {proportional_to}10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) will be achieved by 2 K cryopumping as demonstrated in a prototype ion beam trap. The ion optics was completely assembled within the precision cryogenic mounting and shielding structure of the first corner. There, cooldown tests to {proportional_to}40 K were performed which confirmed the required sub-millimeter accuracy of the specially designed electrode positioning under large temperature changes. The high-voltage connections to the cryogenic electrodes were installed and breakdown tests will be reported. Based on the test results the beam pipe, electrode mounting and shielding structures are under final construction for mounting during 2012.

  10. Testing of a cryogenic recooler heat exchanger at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoletti, A.; Wu, K.C.

    1993-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has tested a recooler heat exchanger intended to be used in the cryogenic system of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The unit is required to transfer 225 Watts from a supercritical helium stream flowing at 100 g/s to a helium bath boiling at 4.25 K. Measurements made with heat loads of 50 to over 450 Watts on the unit indicate its cooling capacity is greater than 400 Watts, as expected, and it will be suitable for use in the RHIC ring. Presented are the modifications made to BNL's MAGCOOL test facility that were necessary for testing, test procedure, and recooler performance

  11. ITER task T48 (1994); low-inventory cryogenic distillation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, K.; Robins, J.; Bellamy, D.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work at Ontario Hydro Technologies (OHT) had shown that small cryogenic columns could be stably controlled and designed to much lower inventories than had been previously thought possible. Among the results were measurements of Height-of-Equivalent-Theoretical-Plate (HETP) versus holdup for Heli-Pak A and B in columns up to 20 mm diameter. ITER cryogenic distillation column designs suggest that the final high-tritium columns could be 30-70 mm diameter. The objective of this ITER task was to design and construct a column section for demonstration of scale-up of low inventory cryogenic distillation. The experiments were to be carried out in an upgraded Cryogenics Distillation Laboratory at OHT, in the facility used for previous low-inventory column tests. The ITER scaled-up test system as the following characteristics: 55 W condenser capacity; 30 mm diameter column loaded with Helipak B; 1500 mm packed height. The first task was to design and build the scaled-up test facility. In order to reduce costs, it was necessary to use existing 30-35 W helium refrigerators. Therefore, to provide 60-W duty to the scaled-up column, the two refrigerators had to be well coupled thermally, but not mechanically, since the refrigerator cold heads have very thin shells. The solution was to attach the column firmly to one cold head and indirectly to an adjacent cold head through flexible copper braid. Several iterations were required to obtain the desired good heat transfer with flexible mechanical connection. This facility is now operational and ready to begin measurements on the 30 mm column. Also during 1994, the Princeton Tritium Processing System (TPS) was installed and commissioned. The results from this experience are relevant to the ITER distillation system. 2 refs., 10 figs

  12. ITER task T48 (1994); low-inventory cryogenic distillation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodall, K; Robins, J; Bellamy, D [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada). Research Div.; Sood, S; Fong, C [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    Previous work at Ontario Hydro Technologies (OHT) had shown that small cryogenic columns could be stably controlled and designed to much lower inventories than had been previously thought possible. Among the results were measurements of Height-of-Equivalent-Theoretical-Plate (HETP) versus holdup for Heli-Pak A and B in columns up to 20 mm diameter. ITER cryogenic distillation column designs suggest that the final high-tritium columns could be 30-70 mm diameter. The objective of this ITER task was to design and construct a column section for demonstration of scale-up of low inventory cryogenic distillation. The experiments were to be carried out in an upgraded Cryogenics Distillation Laboratory at OHT, in the facility used for previous low-inventory column tests. The ITER scaled-up test system as the following characteristics: 55 W condenser capacity; 30 mm diameter column loaded with Helipak B; 1500 mm packed height. The first task was to design and build the scaled-up test facility. In order to reduce costs, it was necessary to use existing 30-35 W helium refrigerators. Therefore, to provide 60-W duty to the scaled-up column, the two refrigerators had to be well coupled thermally, but not mechanically, since the refrigerator cold heads have very thin shells. The solution was to attach the column firmly to one cold head and indirectly to an adjacent cold head through flexible copper braid. Several iterations were required to obtain the desired good heat transfer with flexible mechanical connection. This facility is now operational and ready to begin measurements on the 30 mm column. Also during 1994, the Princeton Tritium Processing System (TPS) was installed and commissioned. The results from this experience are relevant to the ITER distillation system. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Completed Gravity Probe B Undergoes Thermal Vacuum Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. In this photograph, the completed space vehicle is undergoing thermal vacuum environment testing. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation.)

  14. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  15. ITER task T332a (1996) low-inventory cryogenic distillation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, K.; Bellamy, D.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this ITER task was to perform tests which would improve the accuracy of the ITER Isotope Separation System (ISS) tritium inventory estimates and to allow designers to lower the tritium and hydrogen inventory estimates. The work program was also designed to give a better understanding of cryogenic distillation hydraulics and provide information which would improve process control. The work program this year addressed the following specific task objectives. Measure the detailed hydraulics for deuterium/deuterium hydride mixtures in a cryogenic distillation column using Helipak C packing. Determine maximum vapour velocity, HETP and tritium and deuterium inventory data for a column that can be operated right up to flooding conditions. Determine if a proprietary surface treatment improves the wetting characteristics for hydrogen on stainless steel packing. Measure the isotope separation and inventory performance of a Helipak C column large enough to handle up to 45 mm. Investigate additional hydraulic effects in the reboiler and column. 7 refs., 7 figs

  16. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  17. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  18. Comparison of different cryogenic control strategies via simulation applied to a superconducting magnet test bench at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, P.; Coppier, H.; De Paola, D.; di Bernardo, M.; Guarino, A.; Pedemonte, B. Luz; Pezzetti, M.

    2017-12-01

    Industrial process controllers for cryogenic systems used in test facilities for superconducting magnets are typically PIDs, tuned by operational expertise according to users’ requirements (covering cryogenic transients and associated thermo-mechanical constraints). In this paper, an alternative fully-automatic solution, equally based on PID controllers, is proposed. Following the comparison of the operational expertise and alternative fully-automatic approaches, a new process control configuration, based on an estimated multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) model is proposed. The new MIMO model-based approach fulfils the required operational constraints while improving performance compared to existing solutions. The analysis and design work is carried out using both theoretical and numerical tools and is validated on the case study of the High Field Magnet (HFM) cryogenic test bench running at the SM18 test facility located at CERN. The proposed solution have been validated by simulation using the CERN ECOSIMPRO software tools using the cryogenic library (CRYOLIB [1]) developed at CERN.

  19. Vacuum system design considerations of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand (ATS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS), in operation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, includes a hydrogen ion source, low- and high-energy beam-transport sections, and a 425-MHz radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. A 425-MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) and a powered ''buncher'' matching section have been constructed and will be installed on the ATS. The vacuum systems required for the various sections of the ATS are designed to provide: (1) high gas-load capability, as required in the ion source, and (2) high-vacuum capability in the high-power, radio-frequency accelerator sections (where fast vacuum-system response time is of importance) through the use of distributed, differential pumping as a principal vacuum-system feature. This paper describes properties of accelerator materials, vacuum-systems engineering and analysis, vacuum equipment used, and ATS vacuum-system performance

  20. Vacuum system for the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.J.; Green, D.; Sink, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    The vacuum system for TFTR is described. Insofar as possible, conventional and ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components and technology will be employed. Subassemblies will be prebaked in vacuum to reduce subsequent outgassing, and assembly will employ TIG welding and metal gaskets. It is not anticipated that the totally assembled torus with its numerous diagnostic appendages will be baked in situ to a high temperature, however a lower bakeout temperature (approximately 250 0 C) is under consideration. Final vacuum conditioning will be performed using discharge cleaning to obtain a specific outgassing rate of less than or = to 10 -10 Torr liter/sec cm 2 hydrogen isotopes and less than or = to 10 -12 Torr liter/sec cm 2 of other gases, and a base pressure of less than or = to 5 x 10 -8 Torr

  1. A surface science compatible epifluorescence microscope for inspection of samples under ultra high vacuum and cryogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Christian; Paulheim, Alexander; Rohbohm, Nils; Merkel, Rudolf; Sokolowski, Moritz

    2017-08-01

    We modified an epi-illumination light microscope and mounted it on an ultra high vacuum chamber for investigating samples used in a surface science experiment. For easy access and bake out, all optical components are placed outside the vacuum and the sample is imaged through a glass window. The microscope can be operated in reflection brightfield or epifluorescence mode to image the sample surface or fluorescent dye molecules adsorbed on it. The homemade sample mounting was made compatible for the use under the microscope; sample temperatures as low as 6 K can be achieved. The performance of the microscope is demonstrated on two model samples: Brightfield-images of a well-prepared Ag(100) surface show a macroscopic corrugation of the surface, although low energy electron diffraction data indicate a highly ordered crystalline surface. The surface shows macroscopic protrusions with flat regions, about 20-200 μm in diameter, in between. Fluorescence images of diluted 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylicacid dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules adsorbed on an ultrathin epitaxial KCl film on the Ag(100) surface show a shading effect at surface protrusions due to an inclined angle of incidence of the PTCDA beam during deposition. For some preparations, the distribution of the fluorescence intensity is inhomogeneous and shows a dense network of bright patches about 5 μm in diameter related to the macroscopic corrugation of the surface. We propose that such a light microscope can aid many surface science experiments, especially those dealing with epitaxial growth or fluorescent materials.

  2. Development and testing of immersed-Bz diodes with cryogenic anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, Nichelle Lee; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Portillo, Salvador; Cooper, Graham; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Johnston, Mark D.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; McLean, John; Molina, Isidro; Droemer, Darryl W.; Welch, Dale R.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Van De Valde, David M.; Gregerson, Darryl; Maenchen, John Eric; O'Malley, John

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating and developing high-dose, high-brightness flash radiographic sources. The immersed-B z diode employs large-bore, high-field solenoid magnets to help guide and confine an intense electron beam from a needle-like cathode 'immersed' in the axial field of the magnet. The electron beam is focused onto a high-atomic-number target/anode to generate an intense source of bremsstrahlung X-rays. Historically, these diodes have been unable to achieve high dose (> 500 rad (at) m) from a small spot (< 3 mm diameter). It is believed that this limitation is due in part to undesirable effects associated with the interaction of the electron beam with plasmas formed at either the anode or the cathode. Previous research concentrated on characterizing the behavior of diodes, which used untreated, room temperature (RT) anodes. Research is now focused on improving the diode performance by modifying the diode behavior by using cryogenic anodes that are coated in-situ with frozen gases. The objective of these cryogenically treated anodes is to control and limit the ion species of the anode plasma formed and hence the species of the counter-streaming ions that can interact with the electron beam. Recent progress in the development, testing and fielding of the cryogenically cooled immersed diodes at Sandia is described.

  3. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  4. James Webb Space Telescope Core 2 Test - Cryogenic Thermal Balance Test of the Observatorys Core Area Thermal Control Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Paul; Parrish, Keith; Thomson, Shaun; Marsh, James; Comber, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, will be the largest astronomical telescope ever sent into space. To observe the very first light of the early universe, JWST requires a large deployed 6.5-meter primary mirror cryogenically cooled to less than 50 Kelvin. Three scientific instruments are further cooled via a large radiator system to less than 40 Kelvin. A fourth scientific instrument is cooled to less than 7 Kelvin using a combination pulse-tube Joule-Thomson mechanical cooler. Passive cryogenic cooling enables the large scale of the telescope which must be highly folded for launch on an Ariane 5 launch vehicle and deployed once on orbit during its journey to the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. Passive cooling of the observatory is enabled by the deployment of a large tennis court sized five layer Sunshield combined with the use of a network of high efficiency radiators. A high purity aluminum heat strap system connects the three instrument's detector systems to the radiator systems to dissipate less than a single watt of parasitic and instrument dissipated heat. JWST's large scale features, while enabling passive cooling, also prevent the typical flight configuration fully-deployed thermal balance test that is the keystone of most space missions' thermal verification plans. This paper describes the JWST Core 2 Test, which is a cryogenic thermal balance test of a full size, high fidelity engineering model of the Observatory's 'Core' area thermal control hardware. The 'Core' area is the key mechanical and cryogenic interface area between all Observatory elements. The 'Core' area thermal control hardware allows for temperature transition of 300K to approximately 50 K by attenuating heat from the room temperature IEC (instrument electronics) and the Spacecraft Bus. Since the flight hardware is not available for test, the Core 2 test uses high fidelity and flight-like reproductions.

  5. Vacuum system for the test accumulation ring for the NUMATRON project (TARN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Akira

    1979-01-01

    The vacuum system for the test accumulation ring for the NUMATRON project (TARN) being constructed in the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, for the purpose of accumulating fundamental data on high energy, heavy ion acceleration is presented. The main specifications of TARN are as follows: repetition rate 1 Hz, average radius 5.06 m, the radius of curvature 1.333 m, circumference 31.795 m, the length of a unit cell 3.974 m, the length of a long straight section 1.8 m, the number of unit cells 8, superperiodicity 8, and the structure of a unit cell FODO. The vacuum level of TARN lower than 1 x 10 -10 Torr is necessary. The preliminary test apparatuses, number one and two, for obtaining the basic data on superhigh vacuum were constructed. The characteristics of a molecular vacuum pump and the high temperature baking effect were tested with the number one test apparatus. The glow discharge cleaning effect of the model vacuum chamber for deflecting magnets was tested, utilizing the number two test apparatus. The pressure curve in course of time during pump down, the residual gas components, the residual gas spectrum in vacuum state and the change of residual gas components before and after the glow discharge cleaning are shown as these testing results. The vacuum gauges, which are used for TARN for measuring both the total pressure and the partial pressure of gas, are explained. The vacuum system, the vacuum chamber, the vacuum pumps, the expected exhausting speed and the partial functional test results for the vacuum system are introduced. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Rolling contact fatigue in a vacuum test equipment and coating analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Danyluk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with wear and performance testing of thin solid film lubrication and hard coatings in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), a process which enables rapid accumulation of stress cycles compared with testing in oil at atmospheric pressure. The authors' lucid and authoritative narrative broadens readers' understanding of the benefits of UHV testing: a cleaner, shorter test is achieved in high vacuum, disturbance rejection by the deposition controller may be optimized for maximum fatigue life of the coating using rolling contact fatigue testing (RCF) in a high vacuum, and RCF testing in UHV

  7. Thermal and Fluid Modeling of the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) Ground Test Article (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to data acquired from a ground test article (GTA) for the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed - CRYOTE. To accomplish this analysis, it was broken into four primary tasks. These included model development, pre-test predictions, testing support at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC} and post-test correlations. Information from MSFC facilitated the task of refining and correlating the initial models. The primary goal of the modeling/testing/correlating efforts was to characterize heat loads throughout the ground test article. Significant factors impacting the heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation (MLI) performance, tank fill levels, tank pressures, and even contact conductance coefficients. This paper demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established, and it includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses seen during testing.

  8. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation with Silk Net Spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W L; Frank, D J; Nast, T C; Fesmire, J E

    2015-01-01

    Early comprehensive testing of cryogenic multilayer insulation focused on the use of silk netting as a spacer material. Silk netting was used for multiple test campaigns that were designed to provide baseline thermal performance estimates for cryogenic insulation systems. As more focus was put on larger systems, the cost of silk netting became a deterrent and most aerospace insulation firms were using Dacron (or polyester) netting spacers by the early 1970s. In the midst of the switch away from silk netting there was no attempt to understand the difference between silk and polyester netting, though it was widely believed that the silk netting provided slightly better performance. Without any better reference for thermal performance data, the silk netting performance correlations continued to be used. In order to attempt to quantify the difference between the silk netting and polyester netting, a brief test program was developed. The silk netting material was obtained from Lockheed Martin and was tested on the Cryostat-100 instrument in three different configurations, 20 layers with both single and double netting and 10 layers with single netting only. The data show agreement within 15 - 30% with the historical silk netting based correlations and show a substantial performance improvement when compared to previous testing performed using polyester netting and aluminum foil/fiberglass paper multilayer insulation. Additionally, the data further reinforce a recently observed trend that the heat flux is not directly proportional to the number of layers installed on a system. (paper)

  9. On the applicability of dye penetrant tests on vacuum components: Allowed or forbidden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Michael, E-mail: Michael.schroeder@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Biedermann, Christoph; Vilbrandt, Reinhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: The study aims to clarify the applicability of dye penetrant tests on components exposed to high-vacuum. The results show, that the PT application on components for use under vacuum conditions can in general be allowed. The test surface should have a simple geometry. No gaps or holes. An efficient cleaning after PT is necessary. If PT is foreseen TIG should used as the welding procedure. PT tested components should be baked out after the cleaning in a vacuum chamber at min 150 °C. -- Abstract: The penetrant testing (PT) is a common non-destructive procedure for the testing of components and in particular of welds. With PT it is possible to detect surface imperfections (e.g. cracks) which have a special potential to lead to the failure of the component or of the weld. PT is substantially more sensitive than a purely visual examination. Because the complicated geometries of fusion experiments make the accessibility for repairs during the operation extremely difficult, very high efforts on testing with sensitive procedures, for instance with dye penetrant testing during assembly is required. In contrast to this desire for widespread penetrant testing, however, is the general fear that dye penetrant tested components or welds, which are used in the vacuum, are contaminated by the dye in such a way that they do not fulfill the cleanliness requirements for vacuum components. Therefore dye penetrant testing of such vacuum components is usually considered problematic. This study aims to clarify the applicability of dye penetrant tests on components exposed to high-vacuum. Recommendations are formulated concerning the PT procedure of vacuum components and the cleaning procedures for penetrant tested areas under vacuum necessary after a dye penetrant test.

  10. Performance of a Cryogenic Multipath Herriott Cell Vacuum-Coupled to a Bruker IFS-125HR System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Arlan; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Brown, Linda; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate modeling of atmospheric trace gases requires detailed knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters at temperatures and pressures relevant to the atmospheric layers where the spectroscopic signatures form. Pressure-broadened line shapes, frequency shifts, and their temperature dependences, are critical spectroscopic parameters that limit the accuracy of state-of-the-art atmospheric remote sensing. In order to provide temperature dependent parameters from controlled laboratory experiments, a 20.946 ± 0.001 m long path Herriott cell and associated transfer optics were designed and fabricated at Connecticut College to operate in the near infrared using a Bruker 125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The cell body and gold coated mirrors are fabricated with Oxygen-Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper. Transfer optics are through-put matched for entrance apertures smaller than 2 mm. A closed-cycle Helium refrigerator cools the cell and cryopumps the surrounding vacuum box. This new system and its transfer optics are fully evacuated to ˜10 mTorr (similar to the pressure inside the interferometer). Over a period of several months, this system has maintained extremely good stability in recording spectra at gas sample temperatures between 75 and 250 K. The absorption path length and cell temperatures are validated using CO spectra. The characterization of the Herriott cell is described along with its performance and future applications. We thank Drs. V. Malathy Devi and D. Chris Benner at The College of William and Mary for helpful discussion. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Innovative Ultra-High Efficiency Cryogenic Actuators for Rocket Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SBIR Phase I project will develop advanced ultra-high efficiency cryogenic actuators for NASA cryogenic fluid transfer application. The actuator will have low...

  12. New muonic-atom test of vacuum polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, M.S.; Carter, A.L.; Hincks, E.P.; Kessler, D.; Wadden, J.S.; Hargrove, C.K.; McKee, R.J.; Mes, H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    In order to check the discrepancy between calculation and experiment in muonic atoms, we have remeasured the 5g-4f transitions in Pb and the 5g-4f and the 4f-3d transitions in Ba. Our new results show no discrepancy and confirm recent theoretical calculations of vacuum polarization to within 0.5%

  13. Radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on selected organic materials for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Szeless, B.; Tavlet, M.

    1997-01-01

    Future multi-TeV particle accelerators like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will use superconducting magnets in which organic materials will be exposed to high radiation levels at temperatures as low as 2 K. A representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations, epoxy resins and composites were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of a nuclear reactor. Depending on the type of materials, the integrated radiation doses varied between 180 kGy and 155 MGy. During irradiation, the samples were kept close to the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen, i.e. at 80 K, and thereafter stored in liquid nitrogen and transferred at the same temperature into the testing device for measurement of tensile and flexural strength. Tests were carried out on the same materials at similar dose rates at room temperature, and the results are compared with the ones obtained at cryogenic temperature. They show that within the selected dose range, a number of organic materials are suitable for use in radiation fields of the LHC at cryogenic temperature

  14. Results of radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on some selected organic materials for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Szeless, B.; Tavlet, M.; Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Future multi-TeV particle accelerators like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will use superconducting magnets where organic materials will be exposed to high radiation levels at temperatures as low as 2 K. A representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations, and epoxy-type impregnated resins were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of a nuclear reactor. Depending on the type of materials, the integrated radiation doses varied between 180 kGy and 155 MGy. During irradiation, the samples were kept close to the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen i.e. ∼ 80 K and thereafter stored in liquid nitrogen and transferred at the same temperature into the testing device for measurement of tensile and flexural strength. Tests were carried out on the same materials at similar dose rates at room temperature, and the results were compared with those obtained at cryogenic temperature. They show that, within the selected dose range, a number of organic materials are suitable for use in the radiation field of the LHC at cryogenic temperature. (orig.)

  15. Vacuum pumping of tritium in fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Compound cryopumps of three different designs will be tested with deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures under simulated fusion reactor conditions at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now being constructed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The first of these pumps is already in operation, and its preliminary performance is presented. The supporting vacuum facility necessary to regenerate these fusion facility cryopumps is also described. The next generation of fusion system vacuum pumps may include non-cryogenic or conventional-cryogenic hybrid systems, several of which are discussed

  16. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  17. Design of a cryogenic test facility for evaluating the performance of interferometric components of the SPICA/SAFARI instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian T.; Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.

    2014-08-01

    The Japanese SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA), a 3 m class telescope cooled to ~ 6 K, will provide extremely low thermal background far-infrared observations. An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (SAFARI) is being developed to exploit the low background provided by SPICA. Evaluating the performance of the interferometer translation stage and key optical components requires a cryogenic test facility. In this paper we discuss the design challenges of a pulse tube cooled cryogenic test facility that is under development for this purpose. We present the design of the cryostat and preliminary results from component characterization and external optical metrology.

  18. A 6 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator for CERN's Cryogenic Test Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau, G.M.; Bonneton, M.

    1994-01-01

    For purposes of testing the present LEP superconducting resonant cavities and the future LHC magnets, CERN built a test station the cryogenic power of which is presently supplied by a dedicated 6 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator. The thermodynamic cycle is discussed and special emphasis is put on a new cryogenic expansion turbine operating in the liquid phase. Information is given about: the cycle screw compressors' performances, the general performance of the refrigerator, the expected efficiency enhancement due to the liquid turbine, an off-design turn down operation

  19. Pressure-Fed LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control System for Spacecraft: Transient Modeling and Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    An integrated cryogenic liquid oxygen, liquid methane (LOX/LCH4) reaction control system (RCS) was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. The RCS is a subsystem of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), a pressure-fed LOX/LCH4 propulsion system composed of a single 2,800 lbf main engine, two 28 lbf RCS engines, and two 7 lbf RCS engines. Propellants are stored in four 48 inch diameter 5083 aluminum tanks that feed both the main engine and RCS engines in parallel. Helium stored cryogenically in a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) flows through a heat exchanger on the main engine before being used to pressurize the propellant tanks to a design operating pressure of 325 psi. The ICPTA is capable of simultaneous main engine and RCS operation. The RCS engines utilize a coil-on-plug (COP) ignition system designed for operation in a vacuum environment, eliminating corona discharge issues associated with a high voltage lead. There are two RCS pods on the ICPTA, with two engines on each pod. One of these two engines is a heritage flight engine from Project Morpheus. Its sea level nozzle was removed and replaced by an 85:1 nozzle machined using Inconel 718, resulting in a maximum thrust of 28 lbf under altitude conditions. The other engine is a scaled down version of the 28 lbf engine, designed to match the core and overall mixture ratios as well as other injector characteristics. This engine can produce a maximum thrust of 7 lbf with an 85:1 nozzle that was additively manufactured using Inconel 718. Both engines are film-cooled and capable of limited duration gas-gas and gas-liquid operation, as well as steady-state liquid-liquid operation. Each pod contains one of each version, such that two engines of the same thrust level can be fired as a couple on opposite pods. The RCS feed system is composed of symmetrical 3/8 inch lines

  20. Engineering Sensitivity Improvement of Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection System by Means Global Hard Vacuum Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigit Asmara Santa

    2006-01-01

    The engineering sensitivity improvement of Helium mass spectrometer leak detection using global hard vacuum test configuration has been done. The purpose of this work is to enhance the sensitivity of the current leak detection of pressurized method (sniffer method) with the sensitivity of 10 -3 ∼ 10 -5 std cm 3 /s, to the global hard vacuum test configuration method which can be achieved of up to 10 -8 std cm 3 /s. The goal of this research and development is to obtain a Helium leak test configuration which is suitable and can be used as routine bases in the quality control tests of FPM capsule and AgInCd safety control rod products. The result is an additional instrumented vacuum tube connected with conventional Helium mass spectrometer. The pressure and temperature of the test object during the leak measurement are simulated by means of a 4.1 kW capacity heater and Helium injection to test object, respectively. The addition of auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump of 2.4 l/s pumping speed which is directly connected to the vacuum tube, will reduce 86 % of evacuation time. The reduction of the measured sensitivity due to the auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump can be overcome by shutting off the pump soon after Helium mass spectrometer reaches its operating pressure condition. (author)

  1. Vacuum tests of a beamline front-end mock-up at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Nielsen, R.W.; Kruy, T.L.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A-mock-up has been constructed to test the functioning and performance of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) front ends. The mock-up consists of all components of the APS insertion-device beamline front end with a differential pumping system. Primary vacuum tests have been performed and compared with finite element vacuum calculations. Pressure distribution measurements using controlled leaks demonstrate a better than four decades of pressure difference between the two ends of the mock-up. The measured pressure profiles are consistent with results of finite element analyses of the system. The safety-control systems are also being tested. A closing time of ∼20 ms for the photon shutter and ∼7 ms for the fast closing valve have been obtained. Experiments on vacuum protection systems indicate that the front end is well protected in case of a vacuum breach

  2. Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Eric; Philpot, Brian; Trott, Aaron; Lawrence, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC's) large rocket engine test facility requires the use of liquid propellants, including the use of cryogenic fluids like liquid hydrogen as fuel, and liquid oxygen as an oxidizer (gases which have been liquefied at very low temperatures). These fluids require special handling, storage, and transfer technology. The biggest problem associated with transferring cryogenic liquids is product loss due to heat transfer. Vacuum jacketed piping is specifically designed to maintain high thermal efficiency so that cryogenic liquids can be transferred with minimal heat transfer. A vacuum jacketed pipe is essentially two pipes in one. There is an inner carrier pipe, in which the cryogenic liquid is actually transferred, and an outer jacket pipe that supports and seals the vacuum insulation, forming the "vacuum jacket." The integrity of the vacuum jacketed transmission lines that transfer the cryogenic fluid from delivery barges to the test stand must be maintained prior to and during engine testing. To monitor the vacuum in these vacuum jacketed transmission lines, vacuum gauge readings are used. At SSC, vacuum gauge measurements are done on a manual rotation basis with two technicians, each using a handheld instrument. Manual collection of vacuum data is labor intensive and uses valuable personnel time. Additionally, there are times when personnel cannot collect the data in a timely fashion (i.e., when a leak is detected, measurements must be taken more often). Additionally, distribution of this data to all interested parties can be cumbersome. To simplify the vacuum-gauge data collection process, automate the data collection, and decrease the labor costs associated with acquiring these measurements, an automated system that monitors the existing gauges was developed by Invocon, Inc. For this project, Invocon developed a Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System (WIMVSS) that provides the ability to gather vacuum

  3. Cryogenic and Gas System Piping Pressure Tests (A Collection of PT Permits)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, Russell A.

    2002-01-01

    This engineering note is a collection of pipe pressure testing documents for various sections of piping for the D-Zero cryogenic and gas systems. High pressure piping must conform with FESHM chapter 5031.1. Piping lines with ratings greater than 150 psig have a pressure test done before the line is put into service. These tests require the use of pressure testing permits. It is my intent that all pressure piping over which my group has responsibility conforms to the chapter. This includes the liquid argon and liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogenic systems. It also includes the high pressure air system, and the high pressure gas piping of the WAMUS and MDT gas systems. This is not an all inclusive compilation of test documentation. Some piping tests have their own engineering note. Other piping section test permits are included in separate safety review documents. So if it isn't here, that doesn't mean that it wasn't tested. D-Zero has a back up air supply system to add reliability to air compressor systems. The system includes high pressure piping which requires a review per FESHM 5031.1. The core system consists of a pressurized tube trailer, supply piping into the building and a pressure reducing regulator tied into the air compressor system discharge piping. Air flows from the trailer if the air compressor discharge pressure drops below the regulator setting. The tube trailer is periodically pumped back up to approximately 2000 psig. A high pressure compressor housed in one of the exterior buildings is used for that purpose. The system was previously documented, tested and reviewed for Run I, except for the recent addition of piping to and from the high pressure compressor. The following documents are provided for review of the system: (1) Instrument air flow schematic, drg. 3740.000-ME-273995 rev. H; (2) Component list for air system; (3) Pressure testing permit for high pressure piping; (4) Documentation from Run I contained in D-Zero Engineering note

  4. Commissioning of the LHC Cryogenic System Subsystems Cold Commissioning in Preparation of Full Sector Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Serio, L; Ferlin, G; Gilbert, N; Gruehagen, Henning; Knoops, S; Parente, C; Sanmartí, M

    2006-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of installation and commissioning at nominal operating temperatures. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC will be produced using eight large cryogenic plants installed on five technical sites and distributed around the 26.7-km circumference ring located in a deep underground tunnel. The status of the cryogenic system commissioning is presented together with the experience gained in operating and commissioning it.

  5. Thermal-vacuum facility with in-situ mechanical loading. [for testing space construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.; Holzer, R. P.; Uffen, B.; Mabson, G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a thermal-vacuum space simulator used to assess property changes of fiber-reinforced polymer composite systems. The facility can achieve a vacuum of approximately .0000001 torr with temperatures ranging from -200 to +300 F. Some preliminary experimental results are presented for materials subjected to thermal loading up to 200 F. The tests conducted include the evaluation of matrix modulus and strength, coefficients of thermal expansion, and fracture toughness. Though the experimental program is at an early stage, the data appear to indicate that these parameters are influenced by hard vacuum.

  6. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  7. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  8. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  9. Sapphire scintillation tests for cryogenic detectors in the Edelweiss dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, M

    2007-07-15

    Identifying the matter in the universe is one of the main challenges of modern cosmology and astrophysics. An important part of this matter seems to be made of non-baryonic particles. Edelweiss is a direct dark matter search using cryogenic germanium bolometers in order to look for particles that interact very weakly with the ordinary matter, generically known as WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). An important challenge for Edelweiss is the radioactive background and one of the ways to identify it is to use a larger variety of target crystals. Sapphire is a light target which can be complementary to the germanium crystals already in use. Spectroscopic characterization studies have been performed using different sapphire samples in order to find the optimum doping concentration for good low temperature scintillation. Ti doped crystals with weak Ti concentrations have been used for systematic X ray excitation tests both at room temperature and down to 30 K. The tests have shown that the best Ti concentration for optimum room temperature scintillation is 100 ppm and 50 ppm at T = 45 K. All concentrations have been checked by optical absorption and fluorescence. After having shown that sapphire had interesting characteristics for building heat-scintillation detectors, we have tested if using a sapphire detector was feasible within a dark matter search. During the first commissioning tests of Edelweiss-II, we have proved the compatibility between a sapphire heat scintillation detector and the experimental setup. (author)

  10. Engineering and Cryogenic Testing of the ISAC-II Medium Beta Cryomodule

    CERN Document Server

    Stanford, G; Laxdal, R E; Rawnsley, B; Ries, T; Sekatchev, I

    2004-01-01

    The medium beta section of the ISAC-II Heavy Ion Accelerator consists of five cryomodules each containing four quarter wave bulk niobium resonators and one superconducting solenoid. A prototype cryomodule has been designed and assembled at TRIUMF. The cryomodule vacuum space contains a mu-metal shield, an LN2 cooled, copper, thermal shield, plus the cold mass and support system. This paper will describe the design goals, engineering choices and fabrication and assembly techniques as well as report the results of the initial cold tests. In particular we will summarize the alignment procedure and the results from the wire position monitoring system.

  11. Compressive fatigue tests on a unidirectional glass/polyester composite at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, E.L.; El-Marazki, L.O.; Young, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The fatigue testing of a unidirectional glass-reinforced polyester composite at cryogenic temperatures to simulate the cyclic compressive loads of the magnet support struts in a superconductive magnetic energy storage unit is reported. Right circular cylindrical specimens were tested at 77, 4.2 K and room temperature at different stress levels using a 1-Hz haversine waveform imposed upon a constant baseload in a load-controlled closed-loop electrohydraulic test machine. Two failure modes, uniform mushrooming near one end and a 45 deg fracture line through the middle of the specimen, are observed, with no systematic difference in fatigue life between the modes. Fatigue lives obtained at 77 and 4.2 K are found to be similar, with fatigue failure at 100,000 cycles occurring at stress levels of 70 and 75% of the ultimate compressive strengths of specimens at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The room temperature fatigue lives of the glass/polyester specimens are found to be intermediate between those reported for glass/epoxy composites with different glass contents costing over twice as much

  12. A high field and cryogenic test facility for neutron irradiated superconducting wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, A.; Miyata, H.; Yoshida, M.; Iio, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Toyama, T.

    2017-12-01

    A 15.5 T superconducting magnet and a variable temperature insert (VTI) system were installed at a radiation control area in Oarai center in Tohoku University to investigate the superconducting properties of activated superconducting materials by fast neutron. The superconductivity was measured at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. During these tests, some inconvenient problems were observed and the additional investigation was carried out. The variable temperature insert was designed and assembled to perform the superconducting property tests. without the liquid helium. To remove the heat induced by radiation and joule heating, high purity aluminum rod was used in VTI. The thermal contact was checked by FEM analysis and an additional support was added to confirm the decreasing the stress concentration and the good thermal contact. After the work for improvement, it was affirmed that the test system works well and all troubles were resolved. In this report, the improved technical solution is described and the first data set on the irradiation effect on Nb3Sn wire is presented.

  13. Instrumentation, Field Network and Process Automation for the Cryogenic System of the LHC Test String

    CERN Document Server

    Suraci, A; Balle, C; Blanco-Viñuela, E; Casas-Cubillos, J; Gomes, P; Pelletier, S; Serio, L; Vauthier, N; Balle, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    CERN is now setting up String 2, a full-size prototype of a regular cell of the LHC arc. It is composed of two quadrupole, six dipole magnets, and a separate cryogenic distribution line (QRL) for the supply and recovery of the cryogen. An electrical feed box (DFB), with up to 38 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) leads, powers the magnets. About 700 sensors and actuators are distributed along four Profibus DP and two Profibus PA field buses. The process automation is handled by two controllers, running 126 Closed Control Loops (CCL). This paper describes the cryogenic control system, associated instrumentation, and their commissioning.

  14. Super-light-weighted HB-Cesic® mirror cryogenic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilliers, Christophe; Krödel, Matthias R.; Sodnik, Zoran; Robert, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Future scientific space missions require ever more demanding large optics that work at cryogenic temperatures. In the frame of a Darwin assessment study conducted under ESA contract by TAS, the need of future very lightweight cryogenic mirrors with superior optical quality has been identified. Such mirrors need to be of size up to 3.5 m in diameter, with a mass of less than 250 kg (i.e. 25 kg/m2) and possess excellent optical quality at cryogenic temperature down to 40 K.

  15. Testing of a Spray-Bar Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System for Upper Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lak, Tibor; Flachbart, Robin; Nguyen, Han; Martin, James

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a fundamental technology need that involves practically all uses of subcritical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule- Thomson (J-T) valve to extract then-nal energy from the propellant. In a cooperative effort, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (N4HTB) was used to test a unique "spray bar" TVS system developed by Boeing. A schematic of this system is included in Figure 1. The system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it radially into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the spray bar heat exchanger element, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. Figure 2 is a plot of ullage pressure (P4) and liquid vapor pressure (PSAI) versus time. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. The primary advantage of the

  16. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Gautier, C.; Hemez, F.; Bultman, N.K.

    2000-01-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS

  17. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Chen; C. Gautier; F. Hemez; N. K. Bultman

    2000-02-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS

  18. Helium leak testing of superconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryogenic lines of SST -1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thankey, P.L.; Joshi, K.S.; Semwal, P.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Khan, Z.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak SST - 1 is under commissioning at Institute for Plasma Research. It comprises of a toroidal doughnut shaped plasma chamber, surrounded by liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, housed in a cryostat chamber. The cryostat has two cooling circuits, (1) liquid nitrogen cooling circuit operating at 80 K to minimize the radiation heat load on the magnets, and (2) liquid helium cooling circuit to cool magnets and cold mass support structure to 4.5 K. In this paper we describe (a) the leak testing of copper - SS joints, brazing joints, interconnecting joints of the superconducting magnets, and (b) the leak testing of the liquid nitrogen cooling circuit, comprising of the main supply header, the thermal shields, interconnecting pipes, main return header and electrical isolators. All these tests were carried out using both vacuum and sniffer methods. (author)

  19. Ultracold neutron source at the PULSTAR reactor: Engineering design and cryogenic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkina, E., E-mail: ekorobk@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2500 Stinson Drive, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Medlin, G. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wehring, B.; Hawari, A.I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2500 Stinson Drive, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Huffman, P.R.; Young, A.R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Beaumont, B. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Palmquist, G. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    Construction is completed and commissioning is in progress for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The source utilizes two stages of neutron moderation, one in heavy water at room temperature and the other in solid methane at ∼40K, followed by a converter stage, solid deuterium at 5 K, that allows a single down scattering of cold neutrons to provide UCN. The UCN source rolls into the thermal column enclosure of the PULSTAR reactor, where neutrons will be delivered from a bare face of the reactor core by streaming through a graphite-lined assembly. The source infrastructure, i.e., graphite-lined assembly, heavy-water system, gas handling system, and helium liquefier cooling system, has been tested and all systems operate as predicted. The research program being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source includes the physics of UCN production, fundamental particle physics, and material surface studies of nanolayers containing hydrogen. In the present paper we report details of the engineering and cryogenic design of the facility as well as results of critical commissioning tests without neutrons.

  20. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  1. Vacuum-to-air interface for the advanced test accelerator beam director

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.; Kavanagh, D.P.; Addis, R.B.; Weiss, W.C.; Livenspargar, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air transition was created to facilitate the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) electron beam 1-Hz pulse rate. It is necessary that a pulsed particle beam go from a region at 10 -6 torr through a 1-cm-diam maximum aperture into a region at 760 torr. This must be accomplished without the use of windows or solid barriers. Two tests will be conducted on the vacuum-to-air interface. The first determines pressure profiles through 1.0-mm- and 10.0-mm-diam orifices. The second test employs an expendable foil and foil advancement mechanism. In this paper, the experimental results of the orifice test are presented and the analytical results are compared with the empirical results. The foil advancement test will be documented after the test is completed. The mechanism serves both as an orifice and as a fast-acting vacuum valve. In operation, the electron beam penetrates the thin foil, thereby creating an aperture of minimum geometry. During the balance of the pulse cycle, after the beam duration, the foil is advanced to seal the opening and recover the almost negligible loss in vacuum

  2. StructUre and test results of the Tokamak-7 device cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, I.V.; VolobUev, A.N.; Zhul'kin, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    A cryogenic system (CS) of the Tokamak-7 (T-7) installation with the longitudinal field superconducting magnetic system (SMS) is described. The CS is designed for cool-down, cryostatic cooling and heating of the T-7 cryogenic objects and consists of a helium system (HS) and a nitrogen cryogenic system (NCS). The HS consists of:a a heliUm delivery system intended for distributing and controlling the helium flows in the SMS; cryogenic helium units; a 1.25 m 3 volume for storing liquid helium; a compressor compartment using piston compressors at the 3 MPa operating pressure and 140 g/s total capacity; gaseous helium storages (3600 m 3 under normal conditions); helium cleaning and drying systems; a gas holder of 20 m 3 operating volume; cryogenic pipelines and pipe fittings. The NCS operates on delivered nitrogen and includes a 120 m 3 liquid nitrogen storage, evaporators and electric heaters producing up to 230 g/s of gaseous nitrogen at 300 K, a separator, cryogenic pipelines and fittings. It is found that the CS has the necessary cold production reserve, ensures reliable operation of the Tokamak-7 device and permits to carry out practically continuous plasma experiments

  3. Development and test of a cryogenic trap system dedicated to confinement of radioactive volatile isotopes in SPIRAL2 post-accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souli, M.; Dolégiéviez, P.; Fadil, M.; Gallardo, P.; Levallois, R.; Munoz, H.; Ozille, M.; Rouillé, G.; Galet, F.

    2011-12-01

    A cryogenic trap system called Cryotrap has been studied and developed in the framework of nuclear safety studies for SPIRAL2 accelerator. The main objective of Cryotrap is to confine and reduce strongly the migration of radioactive volatile isotopes in beam lines. These radioactive gases are produced after interaction between a deuteron beam and a fissile target. Mainly, Cryotrap is composed by a vacuum vessel and two copper thermal screens maintained separately at two temperatures T1=80 K and T2=20 K. A Cryocooler with two stages at previous temperatures is used to remove static heat losses of the cryostat and ensure an efficient cooling of the system. Due to strong radiological constraints that surround Cryotrap, the coupling system between Cryocooler and thermal screens is based on aluminum thermo-mechanical contraction. The main objective of this original design is to limit direct human maintenance interventions and provide maximum automated operations. A preliminary prototype of Cryotrap has been developed and tested at GANIL laboratory to validate its design, and determine its thermal performance and trapping efficiency. In this paper, we will first introduce briefly SPIRAL2 project and discuss the main role of Cryotrap in nuclear safety of the accelerator. Then, we will describe the proposed conceptual design of Cryotrap and its main characteristics. After that, we will focus on test experiment and analyze experimental data. Finally, we will present preliminary results of gas trapping efficiency tests.

  4. Development and test of a cryocatcher-prototype for the control of the dynamic vacuum in SIS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozyk, Lars

    2012-01-01

    In the FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research GmbH, high intensity heavy ion beams will be provided by the superconducting synchrotron SIS100. Medium charge state ions will be used instead of high charge state ions. The medium charge state ions on the one hand shift the space charge limit towards higher intensities and, on the other hand, avoid intensity losses in stripper stages. The most demanding challenges in the operation with medium charge state heavy ions are beam losses due to charge exchange in collisions with residual gas molecules. Further ionized ions are separated from the circulating beam and get lost on the chamber wall, while releasing a big amount of gas via ion stimulated desorption. The local pressure rise increases the probability for further charge exchange of beam ions, and a self-amplification can evolve. This process may result in a complete beam loss. One way to damp this amplification is given by the installation of ion-catchers or collimators, which ensure perpendicular loss on special low desorbing surfaces at the positions of beam loss. The ion optical lattice of the SIS100 of the FAIR accelerator complex has been optimized for the usage of collimators. Almost 100% of the ionization losses can be caught by the ion-catcher system. In the arcs of the synchrotron, a total of 60 ion-catchers is located between the superconducting quadrupoles in a cryogenic environment. This thesis adresses the development, the construction, and the test of a cryocatcher prototype. In SIS18, an ion-catcher system has been installed successfully. In this work it is compared to the ion-catcher system of SIS100, and different measurements with the existing system are presented. Based on the requirements for the new system, the collimator block and its support structure, as well as the surrounding cryogenic, copper plated vacuum chamber is described. The cold surface of the vacuum chamber acts

  5. Testing the intrinsic noise of a coil-magnet actuator for cryogenic gravitational wave interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, Paolo, E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2011-07-21

    The third generation gravitational wave interferometers that will operate underground and at cryogenic temperatures will need a complex and sophisticated control system to satisfy the requirements on the alignment and position of its optics and keep the detector at its working point. The force actuators of the control systems of the present interferometers are for the most part coil-magnet actuators. To check the possibility of using these actuators also at low temperature we have tested the magnetization and the magnetization noise of an SmCo magnet at 4.2 K. The magnetization loss, measured with a fluxgate magnetometer, is 7%. The magnetization noise has been measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The application of dc and ac (0.1 Hz) magnetic fields of an amplitude comparable to that needed to produce on the magnet a force large enough for the control system does not change the measured noise. The equivalent maximum force noise produced by the actuator as a result of the magnetization noise of the magnet has been evaluated. Its effect on the sensitivity of a third generation interferometer (Einstein Telescope) is negligible with respect to the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  6. Testing the intrinsic noise of a coil-magnet actuator for cryogenic gravitational wave interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falferi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The third generation gravitational wave interferometers that will operate underground and at cryogenic temperatures will need a complex and sophisticated control system to satisfy the requirements on the alignment and position of its optics and keep the detector at its working point. The force actuators of the control systems of the present interferometers are for the most part coil-magnet actuators. To check the possibility of using these actuators also at low temperature we have tested the magnetization and the magnetization noise of an SmCo magnet at 4.2 K. The magnetization loss, measured with a fluxgate magnetometer, is 7%. The magnetization noise has been measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The application of dc and ac (0.1 Hz) magnetic fields of an amplitude comparable to that needed to produce on the magnet a force large enough for the control system does not change the measured noise. The equivalent maximum force noise produced by the actuator as a result of the magnetization noise of the magnet has been evaluated. Its effect on the sensitivity of a third generation interferometer (Einstein Telescope) is negligible with respect to the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  7. Dynamic simulations for preparing the acceptance test of JT-60SA cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Poncet, J. M.; Rousset, B.

    2016-12-01

    Power generation in the future could be provided by thermo-nuclear fusion reactors like tokamaks. There inside, the fusion reaction takes place thanks to the generation of plasmas at hundreds of millions of degrees that must be confined magnetically with superconductive coils, cooled down to around 4.5 K. Within this frame, an experimental tokamak device, JT-60SA is currently under construction in Naka (Japan). The plasma works cyclically and the coil system is subject to pulsed heat loads. In order to size the refrigerator close to the average power and hence optimizing investment and operational costs, measures have to be taken to smooth the heat load. Here we present a dynamic model of the JT-60SA's Auxiliary Cold box (ACB) for preparing the acceptance tests of the refrigeration system planned in 2016 in Naka. The aim of this study is to simulate the pulsed load scenarios using different process controls. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro® and the associated cryogenic library: CRYOLIB.

  8. Using the method of statistic tests for determining the pressure in the UNC-600 vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiver, A.M.; Mirzoev, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to simulate the process of pumping-out the UNC-600 vacuum chamber. The simulation is carried out by the Monte-Carlo statistic test method. It is shown that the pressure value in every liner of the chamber may be determined from the pressure in the pump branch pipe, determined by the discharge current of this pump. Therefore, it is possible to precise the working pressure in the ion guide of the UNC-600 vacuum chamber [ru

  9. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  10. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  11. Design of horizontal test cryostat for testing two 650 MHz cavities: cryogenic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, P.; Gilankar, S.; Kush, P. K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.; Choubey, R.; Ghosh, R.; Jain, A.; Patel, H.; Gupta, P. D.; Hocker, A.; Ozelis, J. P.; Geynisman, M.; Reid, C.; Poloubotko, V.; Mitchell, D.; Peterson, T. J.; Nicol, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Horizontal Test Cryostat has been designed for testing two 650 MHz "dressed" Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities in a single testing cycle at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, India (RRCAT) in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA (FNAL). This cryostat will facilitate testing of two 5-cell 650 MHz SCRF cavities, in CW or pulsed regime, for upcoming High Intensity Superconducting Proton Accelerator projects at both countries. Two such HTS facilities are planned, one at RRCAT for Indian Spallation Neutron Source project (ISNS), which is on the horizon, and the other at FNAL, USA. A test cryostat, a part of horizontal test stand-2 (HTS-2) will be set up at RRCAT for Indian project. In order to maximize the utility of this facility, it can also be used to test two dressed 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities and other similarly-sized devices. The facility assumes, as an input, the availability of liquid nitrogen at 80 K and liquid helium at 4.5 K and 2 K, with a refrigeration capacity of approximately 50 W at 2 K. Design work of cryostat has been completed and now procurement process is in progress. This paper discusses salient features of the cryostat. It also describes different design calculations and ANSYS analysis for cool down of few subsystems like cavity support system and liquid nitrogen cooled thermal radiation shield of horizontal test cryostat..

  12. Night vision imaging system design, integration and verification in spacecraft vacuum thermal test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yonghong; Wang, Jing; Gong, Zhe; Li, Xiyuan; Pei, Yifei; Bai, Tingzhu; Zhen, Haijing

    2015-08-01

    The purposes of spacecraft vacuum thermal test are to characterize the thermal control systems of the spacecraft and its component in its cruise configuration and to allow for early retirement of risks associated with mission-specific and novel thermal designs. The orbit heat flux is simulating by infrared lamp, infrared cage or electric heater. As infrared cage and electric heater do not emit visible light, or infrared lamp just emits limited visible light test, ordinary camera could not operate due to low luminous density in test. Moreover, some special instruments such as satellite-borne infrared sensors are sensitive to visible light and it couldn't compensate light during test. For improving the ability of fine monitoring on spacecraft and exhibition of test progress in condition of ultra-low luminous density, night vision imaging system is designed and integrated by BISEE. System is consist of high-gain image intensifier ICCD camera, assistant luminance system, glare protect system, thermal control system and computer control system. The multi-frame accumulation target detect technology is adopted for high quality image recognition in captive test. Optical system, mechanical system and electrical system are designed and integrated highly adaptable to vacuum environment. Molybdenum/Polyimide thin film electrical heater controls the temperature of ICCD camera. The results of performance validation test shown that system could operate under vacuum thermal environment of 1.33×10-3Pa vacuum degree and 100K shroud temperature in the space environment simulator, and its working temperature is maintains at 5° during two-day test. The night vision imaging system could obtain video quality of 60lp/mm resolving power.

  13. Development of a large lithium coolant system for operation under vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Schwartz, K.E.; Meadows, G.E.; Berg, J.D.

    1983-11-01

    Argon and vacuum systems for the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) were tested to demonstrate vacuum-break capability, vacuum pumping performance, and vacuum sensor compatibility with a hostile liquid metal vapor/aerosol environment. Mechanical, diffusion and cryogenic vacuum pumps were evaluated. High-vacuum levels in the 10 -3 Pa range were achieved over a 270 0 C flowing lithium system. Ionization, thermal conductivity, capacitance manometer, and compound-type pressure sensors were evaluated to determine the effects of this potentially deleterious environment. Screening elbows were evaluated as pressure sensor protective devices. A dual-purpose vacuum-level/nitrogen partial-pressure sensor was evaluated as a means of detecting air in-leakage. Several types of static mechanical vacuum seals were also evaluated. Measurements of the vapor/aerosol generation were made at several system locations and operating conditions

  14. Thermal and Alignment Analysis of the Instrument-Level ATLAS Thermal Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal analysis and test design performed in preparation for the ATLAS thermal vacuum test. NASA's Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) will be flown as the sole instrument aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2). It will be used to take measurements of topography and ice thickness for Arctic and Antarctic regions, providing crucial data used to predict future changes in worldwide sea levels. Due to the precise measurements ATLAS is taking, the laser altimeter has very tight pointing requirements. Therefore, the instrument is very sensitive to temperature-induced thermal distortions. For this reason, it is necessary to perform a Structural, Thermal, Optical Performance (STOP) analysis not only for flight, but also to ensure performance requirements can be operationally met during instrument-level thermal vacuum testing. This paper describes the thermal model created for the chamber setup, which was used to generate inputs for the environmental STOP analysis. This paper also presents the results of the STOP analysis, which indicate that the test predictions adequately replicate the thermal distortions predicted for flight. This is a new application of an existing process, as STOP analyses are generally performed to predict flight behavior only. Another novel aspect of this test is that it presents the opportunity to verify pointing results of a STOP model, which is not generally done. It is possible in this case, however, because the actual pointing will be measured using flight hardware during thermal vacuum testing and can be compared to STOP predictions.

  15. Hanford spent nuclear fuel cold vacuum drying proof of performance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides the test procedure for cold testing of the first article skids for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) process at the Facility. The primary objective of this testing is to confirm design choices and provide data for the initial start-up parameters for the process. The current scope of testing in this document includes design verification, drying cycle determination equipment performance testing of the CVD process and MCC components, heat up and cool-down cycle determination, and thermal model validation

  16. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  17. Mercury Conditions for the MESSENGER Mission Simulated in High- Solar-Radiation Vacuum Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2003-01-01

    The MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, planned for launch in March 2004, will perform two flybys of Mercury before entering a year-long orbit of the planet in September 2009. The mission will provide opportunities for detailed characterization of the surface, interior, atmosphere, and magnetosphere of the closest planet to the Sun. The NASA Glenn Research Center and the MESSENGER spacecraft integrator, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, have partnered under a Space Act Agreement to characterize a variety of critical components and materials under simulated conditions expected near Mercury. Glenn's Vacuum Facility 6, which is equipped with a solar simulator, can simulate the vacuum and high solar radiation anticipated in Mercury orbit. The MESSENGER test hardware includes a variety of materials and components that are being characterized during the Tank 6 vacuum tests, where the hardware will be exposed to up to 11 suns insolation, simulating conditions expected in Mercury orbit. In 2002, ten solar vacuum tests were conducted, including beginning of life, end of life, backside exposure, and solar panel thermal shock cycling tests. Components tested include candidate solar array panels, sensors, thermal shielding materials, and communication devices. As an example, for the solar panel thermal shock cycling test, two candidate solar array panels were suspended on a lift mechanism that lowered the panels into a liquid-nitrogen-cooled box. After reaching -140 C, the panels were then lifted out of the box and exposed to the equivalent of 6 suns (8.1 kilowatts per square meters). After five cold soak/heating cycles were completed successfully, there was no apparent degradation in panel performance. An anticipated 100-hr thermal shield life test is planned for autumn, followed by solar panel flight qualification tests in winter. Glenn's ongoing support to the MESSENGER program has been instrumental in

  18. HV Test of the CTS Edgeless Silicon Detector in Vacuum and Close to a Grounded Plate

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, Vladimir; Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    The TOTEM Roman Pot Silicon sensors will be operated in vacuum to minimise the mechanical stress of the thin metal window which separates the detector package from the ultra high vacuum of the beam. To approach the beam axis as close as possible the detectors will be mounted with their edge at a distance of the order 100 - 200 um from the thin metal window. As the detectors will be run in overdepletion mode to allow the full charge collection within the shaping time of the readout electronics, there will be a potential drop of more than 100 V across their edge. Moreover this potential drop might need to be further increased with the accumulated radiation dose. The main goals of the tests described in this note are: - Characterisation of the voltage-current characteristics when the detector edge is in the direct vicinity of a grounded metal plate which simulates the above mentioned vacuum window; - Demonstration of the detector operation in vacuum at different pressures.

  19. Preparation of W/CuCrZr monoblock test mock-up using vacuum brazing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kongkham Premjit; Khirwadkar, Samir S.; Bhope, Kedar; Patel, Nikunj; Mokaria, Prakash K.; Mehta, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Development of the joining for W/CuCrZr monoblock PFC test mock-up is an interest area in Fusion R and D. W/Cu bimetallic material has prepared using OFHC copper casting approach on the radial surface of W monoblock tile surface. The W/Cu bimetallic material has been joined with CuCrZr tube (heat sink) material with the vacuum brazing route. Vacuum brazing of W/Cu-CuCrZr has been performed @ 970 °C for 10 mins using NiCuMn-37 filler material under deep vacuum environment (10 -6 mbar). Graphite fixtures were used for OFHC copper casting and vacuum brazing experiments. The joint integrity of W/Cu-CuCrZr monoblock mock-up on W/Cu and Cu-CuCrZr has been checked using ultrasonic immersion technique. Micro-structural examination and Spot-wise elemental analysis have been carried out using HR-SEM and EDAX. The results of the experimental work will be discussed in the paper. (author)

  20. A cryogenic optical feedthrough using polarization maintaining fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M J; Collins, C J; Speake, C C

    2016-03-01

    Polarization maintaining optical fibers can be used to transmit linearly polarized light over long distances but their use in cryogenic environments has been limited by their sensitivity to temperature changes and associated mechanical stress. We investigate experimentally how thermal stresses affect the polarization maintaining fibers and model the observations with Jones matrices. We describe the design, construction, and testing of a feedthrough and fiber termination assembly that uses polarization maintaining fiber to transmit light from a 633 nm HeNe laser at room temperature to a homodyne polarization-based interferometer in a cryogenic vacuum. We report on the efficiency of the polarization maintaining properties of the feedthrough assembly. We also report that, at cryogenic temperatures, the interferometer can achieve a sensitivity of 8 × 10(-10) rad/√Hz at 0.05 Hz using this feedthrough.

  1. Evacuation apparatus with cryogenic pump and trap assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahl, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evacuation apparatus comprising a vessel defining a vacuum chamber therein, vacuumizing means communicating with an opening to said vacuum chamber for selectively drawing a vacuum therein comprising cryogenic pump means disposed closely adjacent to said opening and defined by substantial cryogenically cooled trap surfaces for freezing-out water vapor from air evacuated from said vacuum chamber, said opening being common to said vacuum chamber and to said cryogenic pump means, valve means for selectively opening or closing the opening to said vacuum chamber and movable from a first position within said cryogenic pump means closing said opening to a second position within said cryogenic pump means directly exposing said vacuum chamber to said cryogenic pump means, through said opening, baffle means disposed closely adjacent to the opening to said vacuum chamber for providing substantial open communication to said vacuum chamber and for substantially preventing ingress of contaminants into said vacuum chamber, said baffle means being positioned to provide an optically dense view of said opening when viewed from a downstream side of said baffle means, and a plurality of longitudinally spaced and cryogenically cooled fins mounted in nested relationship within said baffle means and disposed in out-of-contact relationship therewith, said fins being positioned to provide an optically dense view of the downstream side of said baffle means when viewed from said openings. The cryogenic pump is adapted for use in an evacuation apparatus comprising a housing defining an opening to a vacuum chamber, a plurality of metallic plates defining a first chamber therein communicating with said vacuum chamber through said opening and further defining a second chamber at least partially surrounding said first chamber and adapted to be at least partially filled with a cryogenic liqui.d

  2. Large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Final design of the facility is nearing completion, and 20% of the construction has been accomplished. A large vacuum chamber, houses the test assembly which is coupled to appropriate cryogenic, electrical, instrumentation, diagnostc systems. Adequate assembly/disassembly areas, shop space, test control center, offices, and test support laboratories are located in the same building. Assembly and installation operations are accomplished with an overhead crane. The major subsystems are the vacuum system, the test stand assembly, the cryogenic system, the experimental electric power system, the instrumentation and control system, and the data aquisition system

  3. Cryogenic Testing of High Current By-Pass Diode Stacks for the Protection of the Superconducting Magnets in the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, A.; Hagedorn, D.; Della Corte, A.; Fiamozzi Zignani, C.; Turtu, S.; Brown, D.; Rout, C.

    2004-06-01

    For the protection of the LHC superconducting magnets, about 2100 specially developed by-pass diodes were manufactured by DYNEX SEMICONDUCTOR LTD (Lincoln, GB) and about 1300 of these diodes were mounted into diode stacks and submitted to tests at cryogenic temperatures. To date about 800 dipole diode stacks and about 250 quadrupole diode stacks for the protection of the superconducting lattice dipole and lattice quadrupole magnets have been assembled at OCEM (Bologna,Italy) and successfully tested in liquid helium at ENEA (Frascati, Italy). This report gives an overview of the test results obtained so far. After a short description of the test installations and test procedures, a statistical analysis is presented for test data during diode production as well as for the performance of the diode stacks during testing in liquid helium, including failure rates and degradation of the diodes.

  4. Managing the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Vacuum Test for Safety and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory is a NASA/JPL mission to send the next generation of rover to Mars. Originally slated for launch in 2009, development problems led to a delay in the project until the next launch opportunity in 2011. Amidst the delay process, the Launch/Cruise Solar Thermal Vacuum Test was undertaken as risk reduction for the project. With varying maturity and capabilities of the flight and ground systems, undertaking the test in a safe manner presented many challenges. This paper describes the technical and management challenges and the actions undertaken that led to the ultimate safe and successful execution of the test.

  5. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  6. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  7. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity’s inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  8. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  9. UHV testing of vacuum components and diagnostic devices, related to installation of Undulators in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnakala, K.C.; Tiwari, S.K.; Bhange, N.J.; Yadav, D.P.; Babbar, L.K.; Netram; Sridhar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Two Insertion Devices, both planar Undulators (U1 and U2), have been successfully installed and commissioned in Indus-2, in Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. The radiation from these Undulators are expected to be 2 to 3 orders of magnitude brighter than the radiation from the Bending Magnets. As required for the installation of these Insertion Devices in Indus-2 ring, two vacuum sections (LS 2 and LS 3) were modified. Apart from the main Undulator chambers (which were procured from the Manufacturer), several other components were developed in UHVT Section and Beam Diagnostic Section, for this purpose. The components include Taper chambers, Beam Position Indicators (both Insertion Device BPI-s and Upgraded BPI-s) and RF shielded bellows.Taper chambers were needed for the smooth transition of cross-section of vacuum envelope, from the normal straight section chamber (with dimensions: 36 mm x 86 mm) to the Undulator chamber (with dimensions: 17 mm x 81 mm). These chambers were required at both entry and exit of Undulator chambers. IDBPI-s and Upgraded BPI-s were needed for the precise monitoring of electron beam position, before the entry into the Undulator and after exiting the Undulator, at various critical positions. Bellows were required to be connected at various positions, during the assembly of vacuum chambers, for the mechanical flexibility. RF shielding was mandatory inside these bellows, to provide a smooth contour of the vacuum envelope, inside these bellows. All these components were tested in the UHV Lab, and confirmed for their UHV compatibility, prior to the actual assembly in the ring. Afterwards, these components were successfully installed in Indus-2 ring, by December, 2014. This paper narrates the UHV-tests carried out, including the assembly, leak-testing, baking, pumping etc. and the results. (author)

  10. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  11. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  12. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  13. Test of a cryogenic set-up for a 10 meter long liquid nitrogen cooled superconducting power cable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Træholt, Chresten; Rasmussen, Carsten; Kühle (fratrådt), Anders Van Der Aa

    2000-01-01

    High temperature superconducting power cables may be cooled by a forced flow of sub-cooled liquid nitrogen. One way to do this is to circulate the liquid nitrogen (LN2) by means of a mechanical pump through the core of the cable and through a sub-cooler.Besides the cooling station, the cryogenics...... cable. We report on our experimental set-up for testing a 10 meter long high temperature superconducting cable with a critical current of 3.2 kA at 77K. The set-up consists of a custom designed cable end termination, current lead, coolant feed-through, liquid nitrogen closed loop circulation system...

  14. High vacuum test of the dynamic components of the cyclotron dee chamber at the 224 cm variable energy cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.; Bandopadhyay, D.K.; Ghosh, D.K.; Gowariker, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 224 cm Variable Energy Cyclotron constructed and commissioned at Calcutta comprises a number of dynamic components in the high vacuum Dee Chamber. The static and dynamic conditions of these components have to be tested for high vacuum worthiness prior to their installation in the Dee Tank. A special set up was fabricated and used for simulating the Dee Chamber conditions and testing the components. A high vacuum of the order of 1 x 10 -5 torr was achieved under both dynamic and static conditions with and without coolant hydraulic pressures. The details of the set up, methods employed for the various tests carried out and the results obtained are described. (auth.)

  15. Vacuum Technology for Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiggiato, P [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The basic notions of vacuum technology for superconducting applications are presented, with an emphasis on mass and heat transport in free molecular regimes. The working principles and practical details of turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps are introduced. The specific case of the Large Hadron Collider’s cryogenic vacuum system is briefly reviewed.

  16. Improving the Bevatron vacuum to 10-10 torr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Elioff, T.; Grunder, H.

    1981-03-01

    Pressure of approx. 10 -10 torr is needed in the Bevatron to accelerate partially-stripped very-heavy ions (e.g. U 69+ ) in the Bevatron without significant loss due to interactions with the residual gas. This ultra-high vacuum will be achieved by installing (summer and fall 1981) a cryogenic liner, mostly 12 0 K, surrounding the Bevatron circulating beam. The novel construction features are presented along with results from successful tests of prototype sections. This is believed to be the largest application of cryogenic pumping to particle accelerators yet undertaken

  17. Cryogenic characterization of LEDs for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Jérôme; Philippon, Anne; How, Lip Sun; Delbergue, Audrey; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Cillierre, David; Danto, Pascale; Boutillier, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of EUCLID project, the Calibration Unit of the VIS (VISible Imager) instrument must provide an accurate and well characterized light source for in-flight instrument calibration without noise when it is switched off. The Calibration Unit consists of a set of LEDs emitting at various wavelengths in the visible towards an integrating sphere. The sphere's output provides a uniform illumination over the entire focal plane. Nine references of LEDs from different manufacturers were selected, screened and qualified under cryogenic conditions. Testing this large quantity of samples led to the implementation of automated testing equipment with complete in-situ monitoring of optoelectronic parameters as well as temperature and vacuum values. All the electrical and optical parameters of the LED have been monitored and recorded at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These results have been compiled in order to show the total deviation of the LED electrical and electro-optical properties in the whole mission and to select the best suitable LED references for the mission. This qualification has demonstrated the robustness of COTS LEDs to operate at low cryogenic temperatures and in the space environment. Then 6 wavelengths were selected and submitted to an EMC sensitivity test at room and cold temperature by counting the number of photons when LEDs drivers are OFF. Characterizations were conducted in the full frequency spectrum in order to implement solutions at system level to suppress the emission of photons when the LED drivers are OFF. LEDs impedance was also characterized at room temperature and cold temperature.

  18. Installation and commissioning of a cryogen distribution system for the TPS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H. H.; Hsiao, F. Z.; Li, H. C.; Lin, M. C.; Wang, C.; Liao, W. R.; Lin, T. F.; Chiou, W. S.; Chang, S. H.; Chuang, P. S. D.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogen distribution system was installed and commissioned to transfer liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid helium (LHe) from storage dewars to superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities for the 3-GeV Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) project. The cryogen distribution system comprises one distribution valve box (DVB), four control valve boxes (CVB) and seven sections of multichannel transfer line (MCL). The DVB distributes the LHe and LN2 to the CVB, and then to the SRF cavities through independent vacuum-jacketed transfer lines. The vaporized GHe and GN2 from the cryomodules are collected via the MCL. The cryogen distribution system was installed and commissioned from October 2014 to the end of March 2015. This paper presents the installation, pre-commissioning and commissioning of the cryogen distribution system, and describes the heat load test. Thermal acoustic oscillation (TAO) was found in the GHe process line; this phenomenon and its solution are also presented and discussed.

  19. Vacuum mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  20. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the large hadron collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Corte, A.; Catitti, A.; Chiarelli, S.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Verdini, L.; Gharib, A.; Hagedorn, D.; Turtu, S.; Basile, G. L.; Taddia, G.; Talli, M.; Viola, R.

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported

  1. Use of the TACL [Thaumaturgic Automated Control Logic] system at CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] for control of the Cryogenic Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, E.; Keesee, M.; Bork, R.; Grubb, C.; Lahti, G.; Sage, J.

    1989-01-01

    A logic-based control software system, called Thaumaturgic Automated Control Logic (TACL), is under development at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The first version of the software was placed in service in November, 1987 for control of cryogenics during the first superconducting RF cavity tests at CEBAF. In August, 1988 the control system was installed at the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) at CEBAF. CTF generated liquid helium in September, 1988 and is now in full operation for the current round of cavity tests. TACL is providing a powerful and flexible controls environment for the operation of CTF. 3 refs

  2. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  3. Practical-scale tests of cryogenic molecular sieve for separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Taylor, D.J.; Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    Earlier bench-scale work at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory examined a number of adsorbents for their suitability for separating low-concentration hydrogen (no tritium) from helium. One of the effective adsorbents was Linde 5A molecular sieve. Recently, experiments including tritium were conducted using practical-scale adsorbers. These tests used existing cryogenic molecular sieve beds (CMSB's) which each contain about 1.6 kg of Linde 5A molecular sieve. They are part of the TSTA integrated tritium processing system. Gas was fed to each CMSB at about 13 SLPM with a nominal composition of 99% He, 0.98% H 2 and 0.02% HT. In all cases, for an extended period of time, the beds allowed no detectable (via Raman spectroscopy) hydrogen isotopes to escape in the bed effluent. Thereafter, the hydrogen isotopes appeared in the bed exit with a relatively sharp breakthrough curve. This work concludes that cryogenic molecular sieve adsorption is an practical and effective means of separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from a helium carrier

  4. The application of cryogenics to high Reynolds number testing in wind tunnels. I - Evolution, theory, and advantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Dress, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    During the time which has passed since the construction of the first wind tunnel in 1870, wind tunnels have been developed to a high degree of sophistication. However, their development has consistently failed to keep pace with the demands placed on them. One of the more serious problems to be found with existing transonic wind tunnels is their inability to test subscale aircraft models at Reynolds numbers sufficiently near full-scale values to ensure the validity of using the wind tunnel data to predict flight characteristics. The Reynolds number capability of a wind tunnel may be increased by a number of different approaches. However, the best solution in terms of model, balance, and model support loads, as well as in terms of capital and operating cost appears to be related to the reduction of the temperature of the test gas to cryogenic temperatures. The present paper has the objective to review the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept and to describe its more important advantages.

  5. Preliminary hazard analysis for the Brayton Isotope Ground Demonstration System (including vacuum test chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    The Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) of the BIPS-GDS is a tabular summary of hazards and undesired events which may lead to system damage or failure and/or hazard to personnel. The PHA reviews the GDS as it is envisioned to operate in the Vacuum Test Chamber (VTC) of the GDS Test Facility. The VTC and other equipment which will comprise the test facility are presently in an early stage of preliminary design and will undoubtedly undergo numerous changes before the design is frozen. The PHA and the FMECA to follow are intended to aid the design effort by identifying areas of concern which are critical to the safety and reliability of the BIPS-GDS and test facility

  6. Strength assessment of a cryostat used by the hollow electron test station.

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The following report explains the work I have done on my summer student work project and the experience I have gained during the process. The work consisted of a strength assessment of a cryogenic vacuum insulated vessel according to European regulations. The cryogenic vacuum insulated vessel is used for the cooling of the solenoids. The solenoids are used in the hollow electron test station and create the magnetic fields used for testing electron guns and validating the concept of a hollow electron lens.

  7. Design of vacuum vessel for Indian Test Facility (INTF) for 100 keV neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Jaydeep; Yadav, Ashish; Gangadharan, Roopesh; Prasad, Rambilas; Ulahannan, Shino; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thickness calculation and optimization for the main shell, ducts, Dishends and top lid on the main shell. • Nozzle and flange design for the port openings. • Support structure design for the main shell and ducts. • FEA validation of the INTF vessel for operational, seismic and lifting condition. - Abstract: The Indian Test Facility (INTF) vacuum vessel is designed to install a full-scale test set-up of Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) [1] for the qualification of beam parameters and the behavior of beam-line components prior to installation and operation in ITER. Vacuum vessel is designed in cylindrical shape having length of ∼9 m with diameter of ∼4.5 m and has a detachable top-lid for mounting as well as removal of internal components during installation and maintenance phases. The Vessel has hemispherical dish-ends with large openings for high-voltage bushing on one side and duct on another side. Vessel is provided with openings for hydraulic, cryo, gas-feed and diagnostics. Vessel duct is composed of three segments with length ranges from 3 m to 5 m with diameter of ∼1.5 m and one vessel at the end to house the second calorimeter. The objective of this paper is to present the design and analysis of vacuum vessel, with respect to its functional and operational requirements. The design calculations are done as per ASME-BPVC SectionVIII-Div.1 and subsequently Finite Element Analysis (FEM) method has been adopted to verify the design.

  8. Design of vacuum vessel for Indian Test Facility (INTF) for 100 keV neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Jaydeep, E-mail: Jaydeep.joshi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ashish; Gangadharan, Roopesh [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Prasad, Rambilas [Madan Mohan Malaviya University of Technology, Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh 273001 (India); Ulahannan, Shino [Airframe Aerodesigns Pvt. Ltd., HAL Airport Exit Road, Old Airport Road, Bengaluru 17 (India); Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Thickness calculation and optimization for the main shell, ducts, Dishends and top lid on the main shell. • Nozzle and flange design for the port openings. • Support structure design for the main shell and ducts. • FEA validation of the INTF vessel for operational, seismic and lifting condition. - Abstract: The Indian Test Facility (INTF) vacuum vessel is designed to install a full-scale test set-up of Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) [1] for the qualification of beam parameters and the behavior of beam-line components prior to installation and operation in ITER. Vacuum vessel is designed in cylindrical shape having length of ∼9 m with diameter of ∼4.5 m and has a detachable top-lid for mounting as well as removal of internal components during installation and maintenance phases. The Vessel has hemispherical dish-ends with large openings for high-voltage bushing on one side and duct on another side. Vessel is provided with openings for hydraulic, cryo, gas-feed and diagnostics. Vessel duct is composed of three segments with length ranges from 3 m to 5 m with diameter of ∼1.5 m and one vessel at the end to house the second calorimeter. The objective of this paper is to present the design and analysis of vacuum vessel, with respect to its functional and operational requirements. The design calculations are done as per ASME-BPVC SectionVIII-Div.1 and subsequently Finite Element Analysis (FEM) method has been adopted to verify the design.

  9. Feasibility analysis of vacuum sieve tray for tritium extraction in the HCLL test blanket system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okino, Fumito, E-mail: fumito.okino@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University Institute of Advanced Energy, 611-0011 Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Calderoni, Pattrick [Fusion For Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Kasada, Ryuta; Konishi, Satoshi [Kyoto University Institute of Advanced Energy, 611-0011 Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The authors discovered faster mass transport on a droplet falling in a vacuum. • Primary cause of the hydrogen release from droplet is by the oscillation of a droplet. • The spherical oscillation induces the internal advection and enhances mass transfer. • This assumption agreed with previous experimental results. - Abstract: This paper describes the quantitative analysis for the design of a tritium extraction system that uses liquid PbLi droplets in vacuum (Vacuum Sieve Tray, VST), for application to the ITER helium-cooled lithium lead (HCLL) test blanket system (TBS). The parametric dependences of tritium extraction efficiency from the main geometrical features such as initial droplet velocity, nozzle head height, nozzle diameter, and flow rate are discussed. With nozzle diameters between 0.4 and 0.6 mm, extraction efficiency is estimated from 0.77 to 0.96 at the falling height of 0.5 m, with flow rate between 0.2 and 1.0 kg/s. The device has a height of 1.6 m, within the external dimensions of the HCLL Test Blanket Module (TBM), and no additional pumping power is required. The attained results are considered attractive not only for ITER, but also in view of the application of the VST concept as a candidate tritium extraction system for the European Union's demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). The extraction efficiency of a single droplet column, which is the basis of the design analysis presented, has been validated experimentally with hydrogen. However, further experiments are required on an integrated system with size relevant to the proposed HCLL-TBS design to validate system-level effects, particularly regarding the desorption process in an array of multiple droplets.

  10. The Insulation Vacuum Barrier for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Magnet Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Skoczen, Blazej; Trilhe, P

    2000-01-01

    The sectorisation of the insulation vacuum of the LHC magnet cryostats, housing the superconducting magnets, which operate in a 1.9 K superfluid helium bath, is achieved by means of vacuum barriers. Each vacuum barrier is a leak-tight austenitic stainless steel thin-wall structure, mainly composed of large diameter (between 0.6 m and 0.9 m) bellows and concentric corrugated cylinders. It is mounted in the Short Straight Section (SSS) [1], between the magnet helium enclosure and the vacuum vessel. This paper presents the design of the vacuum barrier, concentrating mostly on its expected thermal performance, to fulfil the tight LHC heat in-leak budgets. Pressure and leak test results, confirming the mechanical design of two prototypes manufactured in industry, and the preparation of one of these vacuum barriers for cryogenic testing in an SSS prototype, are also mentioned.

  11. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Radiation Tests on the Complete System of the Instrumentation of the LHC Cryogenics at the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gousiou, E; Casas Cubillos, J; de la Gama Serrano, J

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 6000 electronic cards for the instrumentation of the LHC cryogenics, housed in crates and distributed around the 27 km tunnel. Cards and crates will be exposed to a complex radiation field during the 10 years of LHC operation. Rad-tol COTS and rad-hard ASIC have been selected and individually qualified during the design phase of the cards. The test setup and the acquired data presented in this paper target the qualitative assessment of the compliance with the LHC radiation environment of an assembled system. It is carried out at the CNGS test facility which provides exposure to LHC-like radiation field.

  13. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  14. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Summer D.; Broerman, Craig D.; Swickrath, Michael; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O control become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solidamine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with nonregenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA implements radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrated the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or sub-ambient atmosphere.

  15. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meezan, N. B., E-mail: meezan1@llnl.gov; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  16. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10 15 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield

  17. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  18. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  19. A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope tested on Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    to a very localized heating induced by irradiation with 675 nm wavelength light from a semiconductor laser. The hot spot is moved by a specially designed piezoelectric scanner sweeping the tip of a single-mode optical fiber a few µm above the circuit. Depending on the scanner design the scanning area can...... be as large as 50×500 µm2 at 4.2 K. The microscope can be operated in the temperature range 2–300 K using a standard temperature controller. The central microscope body is mounted inside the vacuum can of a dip-stick-type cryoprobe. A damped spring system is used to reduce interference from extraneous...

  20. Test of Topmetal-II{sup −} in liquid nitrogen for cryogenic temperature TPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Shuguang; Fan, Yan; An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Huang, Guangming; Liu, Jun; Pei, Hua; Sun, Xiangming, E-mail: xmsun@phy.ccnu.edu.cn; Yang, Ping; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Le; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Topmetal-II{sup −} is a highly pixelated direct charge sensor that contains a 72×72 pixel array of 83 μm pitch size. The key feature of Topmetal-II{sup −} is that it can directly collect charges via metal nodes of each pixel to form two-dimensional images of charge cloud distributions. Topmetal-II{sup −} was proved to measure charged particles without amplification at room temperature. To measure its performance at cryogenic temperature, a Topmetal-II{sup −} sensor is embedded into a liquid nitrogen dewar. The results presented in this paper show that Topmetal-II{sup −} can also operate well at this low temperature with a noise (ENC) of 12 e{sup −} lower than that at room temperature (13 e{sup −}). From the noise perspective, Topmetal-II{sup −} is a promising candidate for the next generation readout of liquid argon and xenon time projection chamber (TPC) used in experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter.

  1. Structural integrity testing of glass-ceramic/molybdenum vacuum tube frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    In this study, vacuum tube subassemblies made of glass-ceramic insulators sealed to inner and outer molybdenum frames were loaded in compression to failure with a tensile test machine. Several factors were varied in processing these subassemblies. These factors included etching and nonetching of molybdenum piece parts, annealing and nonannealing of subassemblies, and vapor and non-vapor honing of insulators after sealing. After failure, the subassemblies were examined for fracture patterns. In most cases, fracture started at points near the lower portion of the inner sleeve-insulator interface. More load was carried by subassemblies having molybdenum piece parts that were acid etched. No difference appeared between the strength of subassemblies having annealed and nonannealed glass-ceramic insulators. Parts with vapor-honed insulators failed at substantially lower loads

  2. Design and test of a vacuum distillation method for determining carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irmisch, R.; Rettig, D.; Woelke, K.

    1976-08-01

    A method is described for determining total and carbonate carbon in sodium samples until 10 g. Sodium is removed by vacuum distillation at 300 0 C and the carbon in the residue is converted to carbon dioxide by combustion in a stream of air or thermic splitting in a stream of cover gas at 1000 0 C. The carbon dioxide is measured manometrically. It is therefore not necessary to carry out calibration. Distillation and combustion rig are combined with inertgas filled transfer box. Therefore the sodium sample does not get into touch with air. Test of this method was carried out with Na 2 CO 3 and WC. Carbon recoveries were for Na 2 CO 3 between 103 and 107% and for WC between 92 and 96%. The blank value found being 9 μg C and sensitivity 3 μg C. (author)

  3. Numerical investigation for combustion characteristics of vacuum residue (VR) in a test furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreedhara, S.; Huh, Kang Y.; Park, Hoyoung

    2007-01-01

    It has become inevitable to search for alternative fuels due to current worldwide energy crisis. In this paper combustion characteristics of vacuum residue (VR) is investigated numerically against experimental data in typical operating conditions of a furnace. Heat release reaction is modeled as sequential steps of devolatilization, simplified gas phase reaction and char oxidation as for pulverized coal. Thermal and fuel NO are predicted by the conditional moment closure (CMC) method for estimation of elementary reaction rates. It turns out that Sauter mean diameter (SMD) of VR droplets is a crucial parameter for better combustion efficiency and lower NO. Reasonable agreement is achieved for spatial distributions of major species, temperature and NO for all test cases with different fuel and steam flow rates

  4. Cryogenic system for VECC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, G; Bhattacharyya, T K; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    VEC Centre, Kolkata in India is at an advanced stage of commissioning a K500 superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting coil of the magnet for cyclotron is cooled by liquid helium. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the Dees of the radiofrequency system, maintain the vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The cryogenic system for magnet for cyclotron has been tested by cooling the coil and energizing the magnet. The cryogenic system for cryopanels has also been tested. Heater and temperature sensor were placed on the liquid helium cold head for cryopanel. The temperature of the cold head was observed to be below 20 K upto a heat load of 11.7 watt.

  5. Reconfiguration of NASA GRC's Vacuum Facility 6 for Testing of Advanced Electric Propulsion System (AEPS) Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John T.; Haag, Thomas W.; Mackey, Jonathan A.; McVetta, Michael S.; Sorrelle, Luke T.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Gilligan, Ryan P.; hide

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight propulsion system. The HERMeS thruster is being developed and tested at NASA GRC and NASA JPL through support of the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) and is intended to be used as the electric propulsion system on the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) of the recently announced Deep Space Gateway (DSG). The Advanced Electric Propulsion System (AEPS) contract was awarded to Aerojet-Rocketdyne to develop the HERMeS system into a flight system for use by NASA. To address the hardware test needs of the AEPS project, NASA GRC launched an effort to reconfigure Vacuum Facility 6 (VF-6) for high-power electric propulsion testing including upgrades and reconfigurations necessary to conduct performance, plasma plume, and system level integration testing. Results of the verification and validation testing with HERMeS Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU)-1 and TDU-3 Hall thrusters are also included.

  6. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.; Rode, C.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. These accelerating cavities are arranged in pairs in a cryounit. The ensemble of four cryounits (8 cavities) together with their end caps makes up a complete cryostat called a cryogenic module. The four cryounit helium vessels are cross connected to each other and share a common cryogen supply, radiation shield and insulating vacuum. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2 K and the 4.5 K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0 K at .031 ATM and 4.4 K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  7. The cryogenic cooling program at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical program in cryogenic cooling of high-heat-load optics at the Advanced-Photon Source. A prototype liquid nitrogen pumping system has been procured. This pump provides a variable flow rate of 1 to 10 gpm of pressurized liquid nitrogen and is sized to handle up to 5 kW of optic heat load. Also, a high-vacuum, double-crystal monochromator testing tank has been fabricated. This system will be used to test cryogenic crystals at existing synchrotron sources. A finite element analysis has been performed for a cryogenically cooled Si crystal in the inclined geometry for Undulator A at 100 mA. The inclination angle was 80 degrees. It was set to diffract from the (111) planes at the first harmonic energy of 4.2 keV. The maximum slope error in the diffraction plane was calculated to be about 1 μrad with a peak temperature of 94 K. An analysis has also been performed for a cryogenically-cooled ''thin'' crystal oriented in the Bragg geometry which accepts 87% of the lst harmonic photons at 3.866 keV. The total absorbed power was 131 W at 100 mA current and the peak temperature was 124 K

  8. Cryogenics in CEBAF HMS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogensberger, P.; Ramsauer, F.; Brindza, P.; Wines, R.; Koefler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will report upon the final design, manufacturing and tests of CEBAF's HMS Dipole cryogenic equipment. The liquid nitrogen circuits, the helium circuits and thermal insulation of the magnet will be addressed. The cryogenic reservoir and control module as an integral part of the HMS Dipole magnet will be presented. The construction, manufacturing, tests and final performance of the HMS Dipole cryogenic system will be reported. The LN 2 circuit and the He circuit are tied together by the control system for cool down, normal operation and standby. This system monitors proper temperature differences between both circuits and controls the cryogenic supply to meet the constraints. Implementation of the control features for the cryogenic system into the control system will be reported

  9. Vacuum system design and tritium inventory for the charge exchange diagnostic on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of charge exchange analyzers for the measurement of ion temperature in fusion plasma experiments requires a direct connection between the diagnostic and plasma-discharge vacuum chambers. Differential pumping of the gas load from the diagnostic stripping cell operated at > or approx. = 10 -3 Torr is required to maintain the analyzer chamber at a pressure of -6 Torr. The migration of gases between the diagnostic and plasma vacuum chambers must be minimized. In particular, introduction of the analyzer stripping cell gas into the plasma chamber having a base pressure of -8 Torr must be suppressed. The charge exchange diagnostic for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is comprised of two analyzer systems designed to contain a total of 18 independent mass/energy analyzers and one diagnostic neutral beam rated at 80 keV, 15 A. The associated arrays of multiple, interconnected vacuum systems were analyzed using the Vacuum System Transient Simulator (Vsts) computer program which models the transient transport of multigas species through complex networks of ducts, valves, traps, vacuum pumps, and other related vacuum system components. In addition to providing improved design performance at reduced costs, the analysis yields estimates for the exchange of tritium from the torus to the diagnostic components and of the diagnostic working gases to the torus

  10. The vacuum system reform and test of the super-critical 600mw unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Wan, Zhonghai; Lu, Jin; Chen, Wen; Cai, Wen

    2017-11-01

    The deficiencies of the designed vacuum system of the super-critical unit is pointed out in this paper, and then it is reformed by the steam ejector. The experimental results show that the vacuum of the condenser can be improved, the coal consumption can be reduced and the plant electricity consumption can be lowered dramatically at a small cost of the steam energy consumption. Meanwhile, the water-ring vacuum pumps cavitation problems can be solved.

  11. Manufacturing, assembly and tests of SPIDER Vacuum Vessel to develop and test a prototype of ITER neutral beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.zaccaria@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete S.p.A.), Padova (Italy); Valente, Matteo; Rigato, Wladi; Dal Bello, Samuele; Marcuzzi, Diego; Agostini, Fabio Degli; Rossetto, Federico; Tollin, Marco [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete S.p.A.), Padova (Italy); Masiello, Antonio [Fusion for Energy F4E, Barcelona (Spain); Corniani, Giorgio; Badalocchi, Matteo; Bettero, Riccardo; Rizzetto, Dario [Ettore Zanon S.p.A., Schio (VI) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The SPIDER experiment aims to qualify and optimize the ion source for ITER injectors. • The large SPIDER Vacuum Vessel was built and it is under testing at the supplier. • The main working and assembly steps for production are presented in the paper. - Abstract: The SPIDER experiment (Source for the Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an RF plasma) aims to qualify and optimize the full size prototype of the negative ion source foreseen for MITICA (full size ITER injector prototype) and the ITER Heating and Current Drive Injectors. Both SPIDER and MITICA experiments are presently under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova (I), with the financial support from IO (ITER Organization), Fusion for Energy, Italian research institutions and contributions from Japan and India Domestic Agencies. The vacuum vessel hosting the SPIDER in-vessel components (Beam Source and calorimeters) has been manufactured, assembled and tested during the last two years 2013–2014. The cylindrical vessel, about 6 m long and 4 m in diameter, is composed of two cylindrical modules and two torispherical lids at the ends. All the parts are made by AISI 304 L stainless steel. The possibility of opening/closing the vessel for monitoring, maintenance or modifications of internal components is guaranteed by bolted junctions and suitable movable support structures running on rails fixed to the building floor. A large number of ports, about one hundred, are present on the vessel walls for diagnostic and service purposes. The main working steps for construction and specific technological issues encountered and solved for production are presented in the paper. Assembly sequences and tests on site are furthermore described in detail, highlighting all the criteria and requirements for correct positioning and testing of performances.

  12. Manufacturing, assembly and tests of SPIDER Vacuum Vessel to develop and test a prototype of ITER neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccaria, Pierluigi; Valente, Matteo; Rigato, Wladi; Dal Bello, Samuele; Marcuzzi, Diego; Agostini, Fabio Degli; Rossetto, Federico; Tollin, Marco; Masiello, Antonio; Corniani, Giorgio; Badalocchi, Matteo; Bettero, Riccardo; Rizzetto, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The SPIDER experiment aims to qualify and optimize the ion source for ITER injectors. • The large SPIDER Vacuum Vessel was built and it is under testing at the supplier. • The main working and assembly steps for production are presented in the paper. - Abstract: The SPIDER experiment (Source for the Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an RF plasma) aims to qualify and optimize the full size prototype of the negative ion source foreseen for MITICA (full size ITER injector prototype) and the ITER Heating and Current Drive Injectors. Both SPIDER and MITICA experiments are presently under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova (I), with the financial support from IO (ITER Organization), Fusion for Energy, Italian research institutions and contributions from Japan and India Domestic Agencies. The vacuum vessel hosting the SPIDER in-vessel components (Beam Source and calorimeters) has been manufactured, assembled and tested during the last two years 2013–2014. The cylindrical vessel, about 6 m long and 4 m in diameter, is composed of two cylindrical modules and two torispherical lids at the ends. All the parts are made by AISI 304 L stainless steel. The possibility of opening/closing the vessel for monitoring, maintenance or modifications of internal components is guaranteed by bolted junctions and suitable movable support structures running on rails fixed to the building floor. A large number of ports, about one hundred, are present on the vessel walls for diagnostic and service purposes. The main working steps for construction and specific technological issues encountered and solved for production are presented in the paper. Assembly sequences and tests on site are furthermore described in detail, highlighting all the criteria and requirements for correct positioning and testing of performances.

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  14. Design and performance tests of gas circulation heating of JT-60U vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsuga, M.; Masuzaki, T.; Sago, H.; Nishikane, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Iritani, Y.; Murakami, T.; Horiike, H.; Neyatani, Y.; Ninomiya, H.; Matsukawa, M.; Ando, T.; Miyachi, I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that in the final stage of construction of the upgraded JT-60 device (JT-60U), baking tests of the vacuum vessel was performed. The vessel torus was heated-up to 300 degrees C by means of the nitrogen gas circulation system and electric heaters mounted on the outboard solid wall of the vessel. The design of the gas flow channels inside the double-wall structure of the vessel was done based on flow model tests, fluid analysis, and flow network analysis. The results of the baking tests were satisfactory. In maintaining 300 degrees C bake-out temperature, required heating power of the gas circulation system and outboard heaters was 520kW and 50kW, respectively. The temperature distribution over the vessel wall was within 300 ± 30 degrees C. It was also shown or suggested that heat-up and cool-down time is about 30 hours. The baking tests data have been reflected on operations for plasma experiments

  15. Failure analysis of glass-ceramic insulators of shock tested vacuum (neutron) tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight investigative techniques were used to examine the glass-ceramic insulators in vacuum (neutron) tubes. The insulators were extracted from units that had been subjected to low temperature mechanical shock tests. Two of the three units showed reduced neutron output after these tests and an insulator on one of these two was cracked completely through which probably occurred during shock testing. The objective of this study was to determine if any major differences existed between the insulators of these tubes. After eight analyses, it was concluded that no appreciable differences existed. It appeared that cracking of the one glass-ceramic sample was initiated at inner-sleeve interface voids. For this sample, the interface void density was much higher than is presently acceptable. All insulators were made with glass-ceramic having a Na 2 O content of 4.6 wt%. An increased Na 2 O content will cause an increase in the coefficient of expansion and will reduce the residual stress level since the molybdenum has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the insulator. Thus, it is believed that a decrease in interface voids and an increase in Na 2 O should aid in reduced cracking of the insulator during these tests

  16. Full-size solar dynamic heat receiver thermal-vacuum tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, L. M.; Kaufmann, K. J.; Mclallin, K. L.; Kerslake, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    The testing of a full-size, 102 kW, solar dynamic heat receiver utilizing high-temperature thermal energy storage is described. The purpose of the test program was to quantify receiver thermodynamic performance, operating temperatures, and thermal response to changes in environmental and power module interface boundary conditions. The heat receiver was tested in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cold shrouds and an aperture cold plate to partly simulate a low-Earth-orbit environment. The cavity of the receiver was heated by an infrared quartz lamp heater with 30 independently controllable zones to allow axially and circumferentially varied flux distributions. A closed-Brayton cycle engine simulator conditioned a helium-xenon gas mixture to specific interface conditions to simulate the various operational modes of the solar dynamic power module on the Space Station Freedom. Inlet gas temperature, pressure, and flow rate were independently varied. A total of 58 simulated orbital cycles, each 94 minutes in duration, was completed during the test period.

  17. Multi-parameter fibre Bragg grating sensor-array for thermal vacuum cycling test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Ahlers, B.; Toet, P.; Casarosa, G.; Appolloni, M.

    2017-11-01

    Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor systems based on optical fibres are gaining interest in space applications. Studies on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of the reusable launchers using FBG sensors have been carried out in the Future European Space Transportation Investigations Programme (FESTIP). Increasing investment in the development on FBG sensor applications is foreseen for the Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP). TNO has performed different SHM measurements with FBGs including on the VEGA interstage [1, 2] in 2006. Within the current project, a multi-parameter FBG sensor array demonstrator system for temperature and strain measurements is designed, fabricated and tested under ambient as well as Thermal Vacuum (TV) conditions in a TV chamber of the European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC site. The aim is the development of a multi-parameters measuring system based on FBG technology for space applications. During the TV tests of a Space Craft (S/C) or its subsystems, thermal measurements, as well as strain measurements are needed by the engineers in order to verify their prediction and to validate their models. Because of the dimensions of the test specimen and the accuracy requested to the measurement, a large number of observation/measuring points are needed. Conventional sensor systems require a complex routing of the cables connecting the sensors to their acquisition unit. This will add extra weight to the construction under test. FBG sensors are potentially light-weight and can easily be multiplexed in an array configuration. The different tasks comply of a demonstrator system design; its component selection, procurement, manufacturing and finally its assembly. The temperature FBG sensor is calibrated in a dedicated laboratory setup down to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature at TNO. A temperature-wavelength calibration curve is generated. After a test programme definition a setup in thermal vacuum is realised at ESA premises including a mechanical

  18. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan; Le, Hung V.

    2010-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PC1V1) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  19. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of A Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and test data validation of the thermal model that is the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented to validate the model are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Centigrade of the thermal vacuum test data, and was found to be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed, however, to refine the thermal model to further improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank. Temperatures predictions in this portion were found to be 2-2.5 degrees Centigrade lower than the test data. A road map to apply the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  20. Hadronic vacuum polarization and the test of quantum electrodynamics at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdt, V.P.; Faustov, R.N.; Karimkhodzhaev, A.

    1978-01-01

    A hadronic vacuum polarization correction to the photon propagator is found by using the Dubnicka-Meshcheryakov parametrization of the pion electromagnetic form factor and new experimental data on the e + e - hadrons annihilation cross section. The contribution from the hadronic vacuum polarization to the muon anomalous magnetic moment and the Lamb shift in muonic atoms are calculated

  1. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Construction and commissioning of a hydrogen cryogenic distillation system for tritium recovery at ICIT Rm. Valcea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana, George, E-mail: george.ana@icsi.ro [Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, Ion [Karlsruhe Istitute for Technologies, Tritium Laboratory, Eggenstein-Leopoldshaffen (Germany); Draghia, Mirela [ISTECH, Timisoara (Romania); Bucur, Ciprian; Balteanu, Ovidiu; Vijulie, Mihai; Popescu, Gheorghe; Costeanu, Claudiu; Sofilca, Nicolae; Stefan, Iulia; Daramus, Robert; Niculescu, Alina; Oubraham, Anisoara; Spiridon, Ionut; Vasut, Felicia; Moraru, Carmen; Brad, Sebastian [Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Pasca, Gheorghe [ISTECH, Timisoara (Romania)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Cryogenic distillation (CD) process is being employed for tritium separation from tritiated hydrogen mixtures. • Process control and safety phylosophy with the detritiation plant from Rm. Vâlcea. • Tests undertaken prior to commissioning of the CD system from Rm. Vâlcea. • Preliminary experiments with the CD system (non-radiological). - Abstract: Cryogenic distillation (CD) of hydrogen in combination with Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) or Combined Electrolytic Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process is used for tritium removal/recovery from tritiated water. Tritiated water is being obtained after long time operation of CANDU reactors, or in case of ITER mainly by the Detritiation System (DS). The cryogenic distillation system (CDS) used to remove/recover tritium from a hydrogen stream consists of a cascade of cryogenic distillation columns and a refrigeration unit which provides the cooling capacity for the condensers of CD columns. The columns, together with the condensers and the process heat-exchangers are accommodated in a vacuumed cold box. In the particularly case of the ICIT Plant, the cryogenic distillation cascade consists of four columns with diameters between 100–7 mm and it has been designed to process up to 10 mc/h of tritiated deuterium. This paper will present the steps undertaken for construction and commissioning of a pilot plant for tritium removal/recovery by cryogenic distillation of hydrogen. The paper will show besides preliminary data obtained during commissioning, also general characteristics of the plant and its equipments.

  3. 3D thermography for improving temperature measurements in thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. W.; Simpson, R.; Parian, J. A.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.; Sablerolle, S.; Ertel, H.

    2017-09-01

    The application of thermography to thermal vacuum (TV) testing of spacecrafts is becoming a vital additional tool in the mapping of structures during thermal cycles and thermal balance (TB) testing. Many of the customers at the European Space Agency (ESA) test centre, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), The Netherlands, now make use of a thermal camera during TB-TV campaigns. This complements the use of embedded thermocouples on the structure, providing the prospect of monitoring temperatures at high resolution and high frequency. For simple flat structures with a well-defined emissivity, it is possible to determine the surface temperatures with reasonable confidence. However, for most real spacecraft and sub-systems, the complexity of the structure's shape and its test environment creates inter-reflections from external structures. This and the additional complication of angular and spectral variations of the spacecraft surface emissivity make the interpretation of the radiation detected by a thermal camera more difficult in terms of determining a validated temperature with high confidence and well-defined uncertainty. One solution to this problem is: to map the geometry of the test specimen and thermal test environment; to model the surface temperatures and emissivity variations of the structures and materials; and to use this model to correct the apparent temperatures recorded by the thermal camera. This approach has been used by a team from NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Psi-tran, and PhotoCore, working with ESA, to develop a 3D thermography system to provide a means to validate thermal camera temperatures, based on a combination of thermal imaging photogrammetry and ray-tracing scene modeling. The system has been tested at ESTEC in ambient conditions with a dummy spacecraft structure containing a representative set of surface temperatures, shapes, and spacecraft materials, and with hot external sources and a high power lamp as a sun

  4. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  5. Performance of the MFTF magnet cryogenic power leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    The cryogenic power lead system for the MFTF superconducting magnets has been acceptance tested and operated with the magnets. This system, which includes 5-m-long superconducting buses, 1.5-m-long vapor-cooled transition leads, external warm buses, and a cryostack, can conduct up to 6000 A (dc) and operate adiabatically for long periods. We present both design details and performance data; our MFTF version is an example of a reliable lead system for large superconducting magnets contained in a much larger vacuum vessel

  6. Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orcutt, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions

  7. Construction of a Thermal Vacuum Chamber for Environment Test of Triple CubeSat Mission TRIO-CINEMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jeheon; Lee, Seongwhan; Yoon, Seyoung; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho; Lee, Donghun; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-01

    TRiplet Ionospheric Observatory-CubeSat for Ion, Neutron, Electron & MAgnetic fields (TRIO-CINEMA) is a CubeSat with 3.14 kg in weight and 3-U (10 × 10 × 30 cm) in size, jointly developed by Kyung Hee University and UC Berkeley to measure magnetic fields of near Earth space and detect plasma particles. When a satellite is launched into orbit, it encounters ultrahigh vacuum and extreme temperature. To verify the operation and survivability of the satellite in such an extreme space environment, experimental tests are conducted on the ground using thermal vacuum chamber. This paper describes the temperature control device and monitoring system suitable for CubeSat test environment using the thermal vacuum chamber of the School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University. To build the chamber, we use a general purpose thermal analysis program and NX 6.0 TMG program. We carry out thermal vacuum tests on the two flight models developed by Kyung Hee University based on the thermal model of the TRIO-CINEMA satellite. It is expected from this experiment that proper operation of the satellite in the space environment will be achieved.

  8. Construction of a Thermal Vacuum Chamber for Environment Test of Triple CubeSat Mission TRIO-CINEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeheon Jeon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available TRiplet Ionospheric Observatory-CubeSat for Ion, Neutron, Electron & MAgnetic fields (TRIO-CINEMA is a CubeSat with 3.14 kg in weight and 3-U (10 × 10 × 30 cm in size, jointly developed by Kyung Hee University and UC Berkeley to measure magnetic fields of near Earth space and detect plasma particles. When a satellite is launched into orbit, it encounters ultrahigh vacuum and extreme temperature. To verify the operation and survivability of the satellite in such an extreme space environment, experimental tests are conducted on the ground using thermal vacuum chamber. This paper describes the temperature control device and monitoring system suitable for CubeSat test environment using the thermal vacuum chamber of the School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University. To build the chamber, we use a general purpose thermal analysis program and NX 6.0 TMG program. We carry out thermal vacuum tests on the two flight models developed by Kyung Hee University based on the thermal model of the TRIO-CINEMA satellite. It is expected from this experiment that proper operation of the satellite in the space environment will be achieved.

  9. Development of a Methodology for Conducting Hall Thruster EMI Tests in Metal Vacuum Chambers of Arbitrary Shape and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Alec D.

    2000-01-01

    While the closed-drift Hall thruster (CDT) offers significant improvement in performance over conventional chemical rockets and other advanced propulsion systems such as the arcjet, its potential impact on spacecraft communication signals must be carefully assessed before widespread use of this device can take place. To this end, many of the potentially unique issues that are associated with these thrusters center on its plume plasma characteristics and the its interaction with electromagnetic waves. Although a great deal of experiments have been made in characterizing the electromagnetic interference (EMI) potential of these thrusters, the interpretation of the resulting data is difficult because most of these measurements have been made in vacuum chambers with metal walls which reflect radio waves emanating from the thruster. This project developed a means of assessing the impact of metal vacuum chambers of arbitrary size or shape on EMI experiments, thereby allowing for test results to be interpreted properly. Chamber calibration techniques were developed and initially tested at RIAME using their vacuum chamber. Calibration experiments were to have been made at Tank 5 of NASA GRC and the 6 m by 9 m vacuum chamber at the University of Michigan to test the new procedure, however the subcontract to RIAME was cancelled by NASA memorandum on Feb. 26. 1999.

  10. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  11. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  12. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, A. N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Li, M. S. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, 13565-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  13. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 108, in agreement with prediction.

  14. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C; Jimenez D, J; Cejudo A, J; Hernandez M, V [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of CBA first string full cell vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.L.; Briggs, J.; Christianson, C.; Stattel, P.

    1983-01-01

    The CBA (Colliding Beam Accelerator, formerly known as ISABELLE) Full Cell Magnet System consisting of six superconducting dipole magnets and two superconducting quadrupole magnets requires two separate vacuum systems. One, known as beam vacuum operates below 3 x 10 -11 Torr and the other, known as insulating vacuum, operates at less than 10 -7 Torr to isolate cryo circuits from atmosphere and from the uhv beam tubes. The uhv bore tube is isolated from the 4.0 0 K magnet by thirty-six (36) layers of superinsulation and insulating vacuum. Heat load measurements on the bore tube have been completed and found to agree with data obtained in smaller controlled experiments. Measurements of helium, accumulated on cryogenic pumped charcoal panels over many weeks, have verified sensitive helium mass spectrometer leak detection methods for vacuum integrity, providing sound design of the welded complex. The Full Cell was assembled and operated under conditions that would exist in the completed machine. Pressures below 2 x 10 -11 Torr beam vacuum requirement and below 2 x 10 -7 Torr insulating vacuum, were routinely achieved during all phases of the Full Cell operation and support systems testing

  16. Lifetime of Manet steel in load-cycling tests in vacuum at 20 and 550deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmaier, H.; Schmitz, W.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue tests in vacuum were carried out on the Manet heat of DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (X13Cr10.7Ni0.85Mo0.75V0.22) in push-pull type, stress-controlled experiments at room temperature and 823 K. The fatigue life was determined as a function of stress amplitude, mean stress, frequency and hold time. At 823 K creep has a strong influence on the life time, particularly at low frequencies and long hold times in tension. The results are phenomenologically described by a simple linear damage summation approach. Even at room temperature the life time of specimens tested in vacuum is about an order of magnitude higher than of those tested in air. This stresses the importance of providing the correct test environment in collecting fatigue data for the design of fusion devices. (orig./MM)

  17. Cryogenic regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kush, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Importance of regenerators in cryogenic refrigerators is highlighted. Design aspects of regenerator are reviewed and the factors involved in the selection of regenerator material are enumerated. Various methods used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and regenerator effectiveness are mentioned. Variation of effectiveness with various parameters is calculated by a computer programme using the ideal, Ackermann and Tipler formulae. Results are presented in graphical form. Listing of the computer programme is given in the Appendix. (author)

  18. Development of a test procedure for cryogenic adhesive tapes; Entwicklung einer Testprozedur fuer kryogene Klebebaender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funke, Thomas; Haberstroh, Christoph [TU Dresden (Germany). Bitzer-Professur fuer Kaelte-, Kryo- und Kompressorentechnik; Mayrhofer, Robert; Stipsitz, Johannes [RUAG Space GmbH, Wien (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    At cryostats and dewars for lowest temperatures - especially in connection with liquid-helium cooling at around 4 K, as well at the most applications of the superconductivity - often joints and shutters on the base of low-temperature suited adhesive tapes are required. A current method for the thermal isolation of cold surfaces is their covering with highly reflecting aluminium foils, which are fastened by adhesive aluminium tapes. Selection, usage, and reliability estimation of presumably suited adhesive tapes respectively aluminium tapes occurs presently rather heuristically. A corresponding testing apparature for the measurement of the maximal pulling force was developed and tested by means of a series of test measurements. The testing set-up and measurement results for the validation of the measurement concept with adhesive aluminium tapes are presented in this contribution.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Cryo-Vacuum (CV) Test Campaign Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda; Whitehouse, Paul; Lui, Yan; Banks, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    JWST Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) has completed its system-level testing program at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In March 2016, ISIM was successfully delivered for integration with the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after the successful verification of the system through a series of three cryo-vacuum (CV) tests. The first test served as a risk reduction test; the second test provided the initial verification of the fully-integrated flight instruments; and the third test verified the system in its final flight configuration. The complexity of the mission has generated challenging requirements that demand highly reliable system performance and capabilities from the Space Environment Simulator (SES) vacuum chamber. As JWST progressed through its CV testing campaign, deficiencies in the test configuration and support equipment were uncovered from one test to the next. Subsequent upgrades and modifications were implemented to improve the facility support capabilities required to achieve test requirements. This paper: (1) provides an overview of the integrated mechanical and thermal facility systems required to achieve the objectives of JWST ISIM testing, (2) compares the overall facility performance and instrumentation results from the three ISIM CV tests, and (3) summarizes lessons learned from the ISIM testing campaign.

  20. HISTRAP [Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics] vacuum test stand for pressures of 10-12 Torr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.W.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed synchrotron/cooler/storage ring accelerator optimized for advanced atomic physics research. The ring has a circumference of 46.8 m, a bore diameter of about 15 cm, and requires a vacuum of 10 -12 Torr in order to decelerate highly-charged very-heavy ions down to low energies. To be able to test components and procedures to achieve this pressure, a test stand approximately modeling one-sixteenth of the ring vacuum chamber has been built. The 3.5-m-long test stand has been fabricated from 10-cm-diameter components, with 316LN stainless steel flanges. Prior to assembly, these components were vacuum fired at 950/degree/C at a pressure of 10 -4 Torr. The test stand is bakeable in situ at 300/degree/C. Pumping is achieved with two 750-L/s titanium sublimator pumps and one 60-L/s ion pump. Pressure is measured with two extractor ion gauges and a 10 -14 PP RGA. The roughing for the test stand consists of cryosorption pumps followed by a cryopump. A pressure of 4 x 10 -12 Torr has been achieved. 7 refs., 5 figs

  1. Evolution, calibration, and operational characteristics of the two-dimensional test section of the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Ray, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a review of the development of the world's first cryogenic pressure tunnel, the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). Descriptions of the instrumentation, data acquisition systems, and physical features of the two-dimensional 8- by 24-in, (20.32 by 60.96 cm) and advanced 13- by 13-in (33.02 by 33.02 cm) adaptive-wall test-section inserts of the 0.3-m TCT are included. Basic tunnel-empty Mach number distributions, stagnation temperature distributions, and power requirements are included. The Mach number capability of the facility is from about 0.20 to 0.90. Stagnation pressure can be varied from about 80 to 327 K.

  2. Proposal to negotiate, without competitive tendering, a contract for the manufacture, testing and delivery of 320 cryogenic helium mass flowmeters for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the manufacture, testing and delivery of 320 cryogenic helium mass flowmeters for the LHC. Following a market survey (MS-2602/LHC/LHC) carried out amoung 37 firms in twelve Member States and six firms in two non-Member States, a price enquiry for qualifying prototypes was sent on 20 November 1998 to nine selected firms and the received prototypes were evaluated. As a result of this process a request for quotation was sent to one firm The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm EMERSON PROCESS MANAGEMENT/FISHER-ROSEMOUNT (CH), without competitive tendering, for the manufacture, testing and delivery of 320 cryogenic helium mass flowmeters for an amount of 1 804 840 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, with options for up to 10 additional cryogenic helium mass flowmeters and an extension of the guarantee period to five years for all units for an amount of 219 090 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to 2 023 930 Swi...

  3. Design and Operation of an IR-CAGE For Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Communication Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuersching, C.

    2004-08-01

    A specific infrared radiation device was designed and manufactured for infrared simulation on a communication satellite. For the thermal vacuum test of this satellite, radiation fields with different sizes, shapes and radiation intensities were required to deliver additional heating power onto the space- craft panels. Five of the six sides of the cube- shaped satellite had to be equipped with flat IR- frames so that a cage surrounding the S/C had to be designed. The following features of the IR-cage were re- quired: A lightweight, but still rigid construction of the frame with space-proofed materials; using of standard components for cost reasons; radiation intensities of 400 to 1100 W/m2; a computer-based system for individual control of the heating circuits; a user friendly and safe handling of the operation panel and the recording of all operational parame- ter. The mechanical construction was realised by using aluminium profiles. The standard components al- lowed completing the mechanical set-up within a short time. After some investigation concerning the heating devices it was decided to use heating strips for the radiation fields of low intensity and com- mercial IR-quartz radiators for fields with higher intensity. A special suspension for the heating strips was designed to keep them under defined tension. The power supplies for the heating circuits were computer-controlled. The software allowed the individual power setting of each heater. Addition- ally an automatic mode for controlling the heaters by a reference thermocouple was foreseen. Beside design features of the cage, this paper will also describe the heater concept and the control system, and it will have a look at QA relevant mat- ters.

  4. The neutral beam test facility cryopumping operation: preliminary analysis and design of the cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravil, B.; Henry, D.; Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Van Houtte, D.

    2004-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating and current drive system is to be equipped with a cryosorption cryopump made up of 12 panels connected in parallel, refrigerated by 4.5 K 0.4 MPa supercritical helium. The pump is submitted to a non homogeneous flux of H 2 or D 2 molecules, and the absorbed flux varies from 3 Pa.m -3 .s -1 to 35 Pa.m -3 .s -1 . In the frame of the 'ITER first injector and test facility CSU-EFDA task' (TW3-THHN-IITF1), the ITER reference cryo-system and cryo-plant designs have been assessed and compared to optimised designs devoted to the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF). The 4.5 K cryo-panel, which has a mass of about 1000 kg, must be periodically regenerated up to 90 K and occasionally to 470 K. The cool-down time after regeneration depends strongly on the refrigeration capacity. Fast regeneration and cool-down of the cryo-panels are not considered a priority for the test facility operation, and an analysis of the consequences of a limited cold power refrigerator on the cooling down time has been carried out and will be discussed. This paper presents a preliminary evaluation of the NBTF cryo-plant and the associated process flow diagram. (authors)

  5. Design, fabrication and test of a liquid hydrogen titanium honeycomb cryogenic test tank for use as a reusable launch vehicle main propellant tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, Patrick B.; Keller, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) utilizing LOX\\LH2 as the propellant require lightweight durable structural systems to meet mass fraction goals and to reduce overall systems operating costs. Titanium honeycomb sandwich with flexible blanket TPS on the windward surface is potentially the lightest-weight and most operable option. Light weight is achieved in part because the honeycomb sandwich tank provides insulation to its liquid hydrogen contents, with no need for separate cryogenic insulation, and in part because the high use temperature of titanium honeycomb reduces the required surface area of re-entry thermal protection systems. System operability is increased because TPS needs to be applied only to surfaces where temperatures exceed approximately 650 K. In order to demonstrate the viability of a titanium sandwich constructed propellant tank, a technology demonstration program was conducted including the design, fabrication and testing of a propellant tank-TPS system. The tank was tested in controlled as well as ambient environments representing ground hold conditions for a RLV main propellant tank. Data collected during each test run was used to validate predictions for air liquefaction, outside wall temperature, boil-off rates, frost buildup and its insulation effects, and the effects of placing a thermal protection system blanket on the external surface. Test results indicated that titanium honeycomb, when used as a RLV propellant tank material, has great promise as a light-weight structural system.

  6. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  7. Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosek, Jacek; Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide; Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix

    2014-01-01

    In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes

  8. Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosek, Jacek [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland and CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211, Switzerland and ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-01-29

    In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes.

  9. Vacuum decay container/closure integrity testing technology. Part 1. ASTM F2338-09 precision and bias studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Heinz; Stauffer, Tony; Chen, Shu-Chen Y; Lee, Yoojin; Forster, Ronald; Ludzinski, Miron; Kamat, Madhav; Godorov, Phillip; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2009-01-01

    ASTM F2338-09 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Detection of Leaks in Packages by Vacuum Decay Method is applicable for leak-testing rigid and semi-rigid non-lidded trays; trays or cups sealed with porous barrier lidding materials; rigid, nonporous packages; and flexible, nonporous packages. Part 1 of this series describes the precision and bias studies performed in 2008 to expand this method's scope to include rigid, nonporous packages completely or partially filled with liquid. Round robin tests using three VeriPac 325/LV vacuum decay leak testers (Packaging Technologies & Inspection, LLC, Tuckahoe, NY) were performed at three test sites. Test packages were 1-mL glass syringes. Positive controls had laser-drilled holes in the barrel ranging from about 5 to 15 microm in nominal diameter. Two different leak tests methods were performed at each site: a "gas leak test" performed at 250 mbar (absolute) and a "liquid leak test" performed at about 1 mbar (absolute). The gas leak test was used to test empty, air-filled syringes. All defects with holes > or = 5.0 microm and all no-defect controls were correctly identified. The only false negative result was attributed to a single syringe with a ASTM F2338-09 test method and the precision and bias study report are available by contacting ASTM International in West Conshohocken, PA, USA (www.astm.org).

  10. Cryogenic photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardin, G.

    2000-03-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  11. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  12. Program user's manual: cryogen system for the analysis for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility being designed and constructed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory requires a liquid helium liquefaction, storage, distribution, and recovery system and a liquid nitrogen storage and distribution system. To provide a powerful analytical tool to aid in the design evolution of this system through hardware, a thermodynamic fluid flow model was developed. This model allows the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to verify that the design meets desired goals and to play what if games during the design evolution. For example, what if the helium flow rate is changed in the magnet liquid helium flow loop; how does this affect the temperature, fluid quality, and pressure. This manual provides all the information required to run all or portions of this program as desired. In addition, the program is constructed in a modular fashion so changes or modifications can be made easily to keep up with the evolving design

  13. Analysis of conditions for magnetron discharge initiation at vacuum camera testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeneva, Raina; Dineff, Peter; Darjanova, Denitza

    2002-01-01

    Models of electric field distribution for two typical cases of vacuum camera internal pressure control are investigated. New relations between the maximum magnetron discharge current value I max and the maximum electric field strength radial component value E τ max are established. (Author)

  14. Results of a cleanup and treatment test at the Nevada test site: Evaluation of vacuum removal of Pu-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.H.; Essington, E.H.; Miller, F.L. Jr.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Orcutt, J.A.; Romney, E.M.; Shugart, J.W.; Sorom, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of removing contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site with a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner. Our results show that this method is effective, relatively easy, and safe for equipment operators. With four passes of the truck-mounted vacuum, 92% of the 241Am (and the accompanying 239 + 240Pu) was removed and resuspension rates were reduced by more than 99%. The ecological impact was, however, serious in terms of soil erosion and destruction of small animal habitats. Compared to standard earth-moving techniques, vacuuming permits a significant reduction in the volume of soil collected to achieve the desired level of decontamination, and the volume reduction could result in cost savings for packaging, shipment, and burial. This cost savings would only be realized for projects involving decontamination of the top 5 cm of soil

  15. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  16. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-15

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  17. The E-3 Test Facility at Stennis Space Center: Research and Development Testing for Cryogenic and Storable Propellant Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, John T.; Chandler, Craig A.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader a broad overview of the current upgraded capabilities of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center E-3 Test Facility to perform testing for rocket engine combustion systems and components using liquid and gaseous oxygen, gaseous and liquid methane, gaseous hydrogen, hydrocarbon based fuels, hydrogen peroxide, high pressure water and various inert fluids. Details of propellant system capabilities will be highlighted as well as their application to recent test programs and accomplishments. Data acquisition and control, test monitoring, systems engineering and test processes will be discussed as part of the total capability of E-3 to provide affordable alternatives for subscale to full scale testing for many different requirements in the propulsion community.

  18. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P.R. (China)

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  19. Cryogenic trapping of keV ion beams at the CSR prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Lange, Michael; Orlov, Dimitry; Sieber, Thomas; Hahn, Robert von; Varju, Jozef; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institut of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    A Cryogenic Trap for Fast ion beams (CTF) was built to explore cooling techniques and test thermal decoupling of ion optics for the development of the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). These challenging projects will lead to a new experimental field of atomic and molecular physics with keV ion beams. The cold conditions of 2-10 K minimize the blackbody radiation field and are expected to lead to extremely low restgas densities (equivalent pressure at room temperature {approx}10{sup -13} mbar) which result in long storage lifetimes and for molecular ions to radiative cooling to their ro-vibrational ground states. The CTF consists of two stacks of electrostatic mirror electrodes allowing the storage of up to 20 keV ion beams. Cryogenic ion beam storage has been realized with this device using a liquid helium refrigeration system to cool down the experimental trapping area to few-Kelvin cryogenic temperatures and experiments with cryogenically trapped molecular nitrogen ions have been performed to verify the low vacuum conditions by measuring their storage lifetimes.

  20. Study on chromosome aberrations test determinated by micro-whole blood culture in vacuum blood collection tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhihong; Han Fang'an; Ge Qinjuan; Wu Xiao; Chen Juan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop an easier and efficient method of culturing the chromosome and analyzing the aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes. Methods: Micro whole was cultured for 54 hours in home-made vacuum blood collection tube, and then collection, slice-making, microscopy detection for the chromosome aberrations was done. The difference of the results was analysed by comparing with the common method. Results: For 60 radiologists and 30 contrasts, the chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes were examed by this system, the lymphocytes and chromosome were clear and alive and easier to analyse. Compared with the common method, there was no significantly difference between the two analyzing results. Conclusion: The chromosome aberrations test by micro whole blood culture in vacuum blood collection tube is easier and efficient, and is worthy of being widely popularized. (authors)

  1. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  2. Thermo-optical vacuum testing of IRNSS laser retroreflector array qualification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, L.; Boni, A.; Ciocci, E.; Contessa, S.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G.; Intaglietta, N.; Martini, M.; Mondaini, C.; Patrizi, G.; Salvatori, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Lops, C.; Cantone, C.; Tuscano, P.; Maiello, M.; Venkateswaran, R.; Chakraborty, P.; Ramana Reddy, C. V.; Sriram, K. V.

    2017-09-01

    We describe the activities performed by SCF_Lab (Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory) of INFN-LNF for the thermo-optical vacuum testing activity of a IRNSS (Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System) LRA (Laser Retroreflector Array), under contract for ISRO-LEOS. To our knowledge, this is the first publication on the characterization of the optical performance of an LRA operating at about 36,000 km altitude (typical of regional GNSS segments, namely QZSS, COMPASS-G) executed in fully representative, carefully lab-simulated space conditions. In particular, this is the only such publication concerning IRNSS. Since laser ranging to its altitude is more challenging than to GNSS altitudes (from about 19,100 km for GLONASS to about 23,200 km for Galileo), comparative measurements were long awaited by ILRS (International Laser Ranging Service) and we present measurements of the absolute laser return to ground stations of the ILRS in terms of lidar OCS (Optical Cross Section) at the IRNSS relevant value of velocity aberration, in turn derived from measurements of the full FFDP (Far Field Diffraction Pattern) over a very large range of velocity aberrations. These measurements were acquired: (i) on a full-size qualification model of a IRNSS CCR (Cube Corner Retroreflector) LRA that ISRO-LEOS provided to INFN-LNF; (ii) during the lab-simulation of a 1/4 orbit segment, in which the LRA CCRs are exposed to the perturbation of the sun heat at varying angles, from grazing incidence (90° with respect to the direction perpendicular to the plane of array), up to the perpendicular to the LRA, with a same time variation consistent with the actual space orbit. In this 1/4 orbit condition, the LRA experiences potentially large thermal degradations of the OCS, depending on the detailed thermal and mechanical design of the LRA. Since all GNSS constellations have different LRA designs or configurations, this is another

  3. Design, fabrication and test of double-wall vacuum vessel for JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikawa, Takashi; Ioki, Kimihiro; Ninomiya, Hiromasa.

    1994-01-01

    A double-wall vacuum vessel was designed and fabricated for JT-60U (an upgraded machine of JT-60), which has a plasma current up to 6 MA and a large plasma volume (100 m 3 ). A new concept of Inconel 625 all-welded structure was adopted to the vessel, that comprises an inner plate, square tubes and an outer plate. The vacuum vessel with a multi-arc D-shaped cross section was fabricated by using hot-sizing press. The electromagnetic and structural analysis has been performed for plasma disruption loads. Dynamic responses of the vessel were measured during plasma disruptions, and the observed displacement had a good agreement with the result of FEM analysis. (author)

  4. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  5. A Conclusive Test of Abelian Dominance Hypothesis for Topological Charge in the QCD Vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Shoichi; Miyamura, Osamu

    1998-01-01

    We study the topological feature in the QCD vacuum based on the hypothesis of abelian dominance. The topological charge $Q_{\\rm SU(2)}$ can be explicitly represented in terms of the monopole current in the abelian dominated system. To appreciate its justification, we directly measure the corresponding topological charge $Q_{\\rm Mono}$, which is reconstructed only from the monopole current and the abelian component of gauge fields, by using the Monte Carlo simulation on SU(2) lattice. We find ...

  6. LDR cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T.

    1988-01-01

    A brief summary from the 1985 Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Asilomar 2 workshop of the requirements for LDR cryogenic cooling is presented. The heat rates are simply the sum of the individual heat rates from the instruments. Consideration of duty cycle will have a dramatic effect on cooling requirements. There are many possible combinations of cooling techniques for each of the three temperatures zones. It is clear that much further system study is needed to determine what type of cooling system is required (He-2, hybrid or mechanical) and what size and power is required. As the instruments, along with their duty cycles and heat rates, become better defined it will be possible to better determine the optimum cooling systems.

  7. Polymer-Reinforced, Non-Brittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary application for cryogenic insulating foams will be fuel tank applications for fueling systems. It is crucial for this insulation to be incorporated into systems that survive vacuum and terrestrial environments. It is hypothesized that by forming an open-cell silica-reinforced polymer structure, the foam structures will exhibit the necessary strength to maintain shape. This will, in turn, maintain the insulating capabilities of the foam insulation. Besides mechanical stability in the form of crush resistance, it is important for these insulating materials to exhibit water penetration resistance. Hydrocarbon-terminated foam surfaces were implemented to impart hydrophobic functionality that apparently limits moisture penetration through the foam. During the freezing process, water accumulates on the surfaces of the foams. However, when hydrocarbon-terminated surfaces are present, water apparently beads and forms crystals, leading to less apparent accumulation. The object of this work is to develop inexpensive structural cryogenic insulation foam that has increased impact resistance for launch and ground-based cryogenic systems. Two parallel approaches will be pursued: a silica-polymer co-foaming technique and a post foam coating technique. Insulation characteristics, flexibility, and water uptake can be fine-tuned through the manipulation of the polyurethane foam scaffold. Silicate coatings for polyurethane foams and aerogel-impregnated polyurethane foams have been developed and tested. A highly porous aerogel-like material may be fabricated using a co-foam and coated foam techniques, and can insulate at liquid temperatures using the composite foam

  8. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    OpenAIRE

    von Hahn, Robert; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A.; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion a...

  9. Investigation of Thermal and Vacuum Transients on the LHC Prototype Magnet String

    CERN Document Server

    Cruikshank, P; Riddone, G; Tavian, L

    1996-01-01

    The prototype magnet string, described in a companion paper, is a full-scale working model of a 50-m length of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN's new accelerator project, which will use high-field superconducting magnets operating below 2 K in superfluid helium. As such, it provides an excellent test bed for practising standard operating modes of LHC insulation vacuum and cryogenics, as well as for experimentally assessing accidental behaviour and failure modes, and thus verifying design calculations. We present experimental investigation of insulation vacuum pumpdown, magnet forced-flow cooldown and warmup, and evolution of residual vacuum pressures and temperatures in natural warmup, as well as catastrophic loss of insulation vacuum. In all these transient modes, experimental results are compared with simulated behaviour, using a non-linear, one-dimensional thermal model of the magnet string.

  10. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  11. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  12. Spray-on foam insulations for launch vehicle cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2012-04-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex array of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of 200-260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the different

  13. Final dimensional test with alu-jig travelling through the CMS Inner vacuum tank

    CERN Multimedia

    Hubert Gerwig

    2001-01-01

    The inner vacuum tank is an object of 13m lenght and 6m diameter that is completely made of stainless steel SS304. To allow insertion of the inner detectors, especially the hadronic calorimeter, a rail at 9 and 3 o'clock position is integral part of the cylindrical tank. To insert, weld and finally machine this rail was a big challenge for the manufacturer. The dummy jig presented on the pictures represents the diameter of the most outer corner of the hadronic calorimeter plus a scintillator and some cables.

  14. Design and properties of a cryogenic dip-stick scanning tunneling microscope with capacitive coarse approach control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, R; Hänke, T; Baumann, D; Kaiser, M; Nag, P K; Voigtländer, R; Lindackers, D; Büchner, B; Hess, C

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, setup, and operation of a new dip-stick scanning tunneling microscope. Its special design allows measurements in the temperature range from 4.7 K up to room temperature, where cryogenic vacuum conditions are maintained during the measurement. The system fits into every (4)He vessel with a bore of 50 mm, e.g., a transport dewar or a magnet bath cryostat. The microscope is equipped with a cleaving mechanism for cleaving single crystals in the whole temperature range and under cryogenic vacuum conditions. For the tip approach, a capacitive automated coarse approach is implemented. We present test measurements on the charge density wave system 2H-NbSe2 and the superconductor LiFeAs which demonstrate scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy data acquisition with high stability, high spatial resolution at variable temperatures and in high magnetic fields.

  15. The use of non-destructive testing in COSY, an ultrahigh vacuum research plant of KFA, Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, G.; Pauly, F.; Stechemesser, H.

    1993-01-01

    This report shows that the development, the construction and the later successful operation of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) plants in the pressure range of ≤ 10 -10 mbar is not possible without the use of highly sensitive non-destructive testing. Using the example of the large scale precision plant COSY, it is shown that only by observing basic UHV manufacturing conditions and the thorough use of the helium leak-finding technique and mass-spectrometric residual gas analysis can the required leakage rates ( -10 mbar. 1 . s -1 ) and surface cleanliness be achieved. (orig.) [de

  16. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Design, manufacturing and tests of first cryogen-free MgB2 prototype coils for offshore wind generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, G; Sanz, S; Pujana, A; Merino, J M; Apiñaniz, S; Marino, I; Iturbe, R; Nardelli, D

    2014-01-01

    Although renewable sector has started to take advantage of the offshore wind energy recently, the development is very intense. Turbines reliability, size, and cost are key aspects for the wind industry, especially in marine locations. A superconducting generator will allow a significant reduction in terms of weight and size, but cost and reliability are two aspects to deal with. MgB 2 wire is presented as one promising option to be used in superconducting coils for wind generators. This work shows the experimental results in first cryogen-free MgB 2 prototype coils, designed according to specific requirements of TECNALIA's wind generator concept.

  18. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply, testing, installation and commissioning of the proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS toroid magnet system

    CERN Document Server

    European Organization for Nuclear Research

    2002-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply, testing, installation and commissioning of the proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS toroid magnet system. Following a market survey carried out among 61 firms in ten Member States and 14 firms in three non-Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2624/EP/ATLAS) was sent on 19 April 2002 to four firms and three consortia in six Member States and two firms in one non-Member State. By the closing date, CERN had received three tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with AIR LIQUIDE ITALIA (IT), the lowest bidder, for the supply, testing, installation and commissioning of the proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS toroid magnet system for a total amount not exceeding 2 840 000 euros (4 191 300 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange which has been used is that stipulated in the tender. This procurement will be financed by the ATLAS Common Fund and CERN's contribution will not exceed 8...

  19. Development of a Cryogenic Radiation Detector for Mapping Radio Frequency Superconducting Cavity Field Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Dotson, Danny W

    2005-01-01

    There is a relationship between field emissions in a Super Conducting RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-rays). External (room temperature) detectors are shielded from the onset of low energy X-rays by the vacuum and cryogenic stainless steel module walls. An internal measuring system for mapping field emissions would assist scientists and engineers in perfecting surface deposition and acid washing module surfaces. Two measurement systems are undergoing cryogenic testing at JLab. One is an active CsI photodiode array and the second is an X-ray film camera. The CsI array has operated sucessfully in a cavity in liquid Helium but saturated at higher power due to scattering in the cavity. A shield with an aperature similar to the X-ray film detector is being designed for the next series of tests which will be completed before PAC-05.

  20. COR1 Engineering Test Unit Measurements at the NCAR/HAO Vacuum Tunnel Facility, October-November 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William

    2002-01-01

    The Engineering Test Unit (ETU) of COR1 was made in two configurations. The first configuration, ETU-1, was for vibration testing, while the second, ETU-2, was for optical testing. This is a report on the optical testing performed on ETU-2 at the NCAR/HAO Vacuum Tunnel Facility during the months of October and November, 2002. This was the same facility used to test the two previous breadboard models. In both configurations, the first two tube sections were complete, with all optical elements aligned. The vibration model ETU-1 had the remaining tube sections attached, with mass models for the remaining optics, for the various mechanisms, and for the focal plane assembly. It was then converted into the optical model ETU-2 by removing tube sections 3 to 5, and mounting the remaining optics on commercial mounts. (The bandpass filter was also installed into tube 2, which had been replaced in ETU-1 by a mass model, so that pre- and post-vibration optical measurements could be made.) Doublet 2 was installed in a Newport LP-2 carrier, and aligned to the other optics in the first two tube sections. The LP-2 adjustment screws were then uralened so that the alignment could be maintained during shipping. Because neither the flight polarizer nor Hollow Core Motor were available, they were simulated by a commercial polarizer and rotational mount, both from Oriel corporation. The Oriel rotational stage was not designed for vacuum use, but it was determined after consultation with the company, and lab testing, that the stage could be used in the moderate vacuum conditions at the NCAR/HAO facility. The shutter and focal plane assembly were simulated with the same camera used for the previous two breadboard tests. The focal plane mask was simulated with a plane of BK7 glass with a mask glued on, using the same procedure as for the Lyot spot on Doublet 1, and mounted in an adjustable LP-2 carrier. Two masks were made, one made to the precise specifications of the optical design, the

  1. Cryogenic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, L.; Javellaud, J.; Caro, C.; Gilguy, R.; Testard, O.

    1966-06-01

    The cryostats presented here were built from standard parts; this makes it possible to construct a great variety of apparatus at minimum cost. The liquid nitrogen and helium reservoirs were designed so as to reduce losses to a minimum, and so as to make the cryostats as autonomous as possible. The experimental enclosure which is generally placed in the lower part of the apparatus requires a separate study in every case. Furthermore, complete assemblies such as transfer rods, isolated traps and high vacuum valves, were designed with a similar regard for the economic aspects and for the need for standardization. This equipment thus satisfies a great variety of experimental needs; it is readily adaptable and the consumptions of helium and liquid nitrogen are very low. (authors) [fr

  2. Cryogenic laboratory (80 K - 4 K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brad, Sebastian; Steflea, Dumitru

    2002-01-01

    condensing temperature (65 K). In the Joule-Thompson valve, the helium is expanded to 1.2 bar (corresponding to approx. 4.4 K). The resulting helium-liquid-mixture is transferred to the LHe container via a coaxial, vacuum-insulated transfer pipe. The He-cold-gas in the LHe container is transferred back to the low-pressure side of the heat exchanger E 205 to the cold-box via the transfer pipe. In the counter-flow to the cooling high-pressure flow the gas is now heated up to approx. 293 K in the heat exchangers. The gas leaving the cold-box at a pressure of approx. 1.07 bar is transferred to the suction side of the screw compressor together with the feed gas out of the helium reserve container via PC 111. To put into service the helium liquefier Type L5 tests were made to determine the performances and the cryogenic cycle efficiency: modified and complete components and spare parts, in order to adapted to our laboratory conditions; rebuild the liquid helium feeding system for the helium liquid tank and changed all the missed spare parts; redesigned the configuration for helium gas plant supplying system; vacuum test in order to determine that the leakage rates remain within tolerance levels; functioning tests for transfer line, oil-injected screw-compressor, helium recovery unit and electrical control unit. (authors)

  3. Test of the beam effect on vacuum arc occurrence in a high-gradient accelerating structure for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2130409; Gagliardi, Martino

    A new generation of lepton colliders capable of reaching TeV energies is pres- ently under development, and to succeed in this task it is necessary to show that the technology for such a machine is available. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a possible design option among the future lepton collider projects. It consists of two normal-conducting linacs. Accelerating structures with a gradient of the order of 100 MV/m are necessary to reach the required high energies within a reasonable machine length. One of the strictest require- ments for such accelerating structures is a relatively low occurrence of vacuum arcs. CLIC prototype structures have been tested in the past, but only in absence of beam. In order to proof the feasibility of the high gradient technology for building a functional collider, it is necessary to understand the effect of the beam presence on the vacuum breakdowns. Tests of this type have never been performed previously. The main goal of this work is to provide a first measurement of t...

  4. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI

  5. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A. [Quest Thermal Group, 6452 Fig Street Suite A, Arvada, CO 80004 (United States); Mills, G. L. [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp, 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  6. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  7. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for LOX/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/methane propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. In order to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability in the vacuum conditions and eliminate corona discharge issues, a coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed. The ICPTA uses spark-plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark-plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp.-2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, Plum Brook testing demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/methane propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  8. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  9. An object-oriented approach to cryogenic control systems for the CERN test facilities: a case study based on the UNICOS framework.

    CERN Document Server

    Dudek, Michał

    2010-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts, the first of which is more general and presents the reason of particle collision research, the LHC accelerator and its main detectors (Chapter 1). It also provides information about the test stations in SM18, the cryogenic architecture of the hall and the significant properties of the liquid helium, which make him perfect coolant for the superconducting devices (Chapter 2). The second part of this thesis presents the revamping of the SM18 test facility. It describes the previous functional view and changes that were done. The new layout of the Radio Frequency Cavities rack and communication is also presented (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 gives the information about the software frameworks, code generation for the PLC and the synoptic production.

  10. Mimicking Martian dust: An in-vacuum dust deposition system for testing the ultraviolet sensors on the Curiosity rover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado, J. M.; Martín-Soler, J.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and developed an in-vacuum dust deposition system specifically conceived to simulate and study the effect of accumulation of Martian dust on the electronic instruments of scientific planetary exploration missions. We have used this device to characterize the dust effect on the UV sensor of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station in the Mars science Laboratory mission of NASA in similar conditions to those found on Mars surface. The UV sensor includes six photodiodes for measuring the radiation in all UV wavelengths (direct incidence and reflected); it is placed on the body of Curiosity rover and it is severely affected by the dust deposited on it. Our experimental setup can help to estimate the duration of reliable reading of this instrument during operation. We have used an analogous of the Martian dust in chemical composition (magnetic species), color, and density, which has been characterized by X-ray spectroscopy. To ensure a Brownian motion of the dust during its fall and a homogeneous coverage on the instrumentation, the operating conditions of the vacuum vessel, determined by partial pressures and temperature, have to be modified to account for the different gravities of Mars with respect to Earth. We propose that our designed device and operational protocol can be of interest to test optoelectronic instrumentation affected by the opacity of dust, as can be the degradation of UV photodiodes in planetary exploration

  11. Mimicking Martian dust: An in-vacuum dust deposition system for testing the ultraviolet sensors on the Curiosity rover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM–CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    We have designed and developed an in-vacuum dust deposition system specifically conceived to simulate and study the effect of accumulation of Martian dust on the electronic instruments of scientific planetary exploration missions. We have used this device to characterize the dust effect on the UV sensor of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station in the Mars science Laboratory mission of NASA in similar conditions to those found on Mars surface. The UV sensor includes six photodiodes for measuring the radiation in all UV wavelengths (direct incidence and reflected); it is placed on the body of Curiosity rover and it is severely affected by the dust deposited on it. Our experimental setup can help to estimate the duration of reliable reading of this instrument during operation. We have used an analogous of the Martian dust in chemical composition (magnetic species), color, and density, which has been characterized by X-ray spectroscopy. To ensure a Brownian motion of the dust during its fall and a homogeneous coverage on the instrumentation, the operating conditions of the vacuum vessel, determined by partial pressures and temperature, have to be modified to account for the different gravities of Mars with respect to Earth. We propose that our designed device and operational protocol can be of interest to test optoelectronic instrumentation affected by the opacity of dust, as can be the degradation of UV photodiodes in planetary exploration.

  12. Research of the cold shield in cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. B.; Zheng, J. P.; Wu, X. L.; Cui, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    To realize zero boil-off storage of cryogenic liquids, a cryocooler that can achieve a temperature below the boiling point temperature of the cryogenic liquid is generally needed. Taking into account that the efficiency of the cryocooler will be higher at a higher operating temperature, a novel thermal insulation system using a sandwich container filled with cryogenic liquid with a higher boiling point as a cold radiation shield between the cryogenic tank and the vacuum shield in room temperature is proposed to reduce the electricity power consumption. A two-stage cryocooler or two separate cryocoolers are adopted to condense the evaporated gas from the cold shield and the cryogenic tank. The calculation result of a 55 liter liquid hydrogen tank with a liquid nitrogen shield shows that only 14.4 W of electrical power is needed to make all the evaporated gas condensation while 121.7 W will be needed without the liquid nitrogen shield.

  13. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K A; Bhatt, S B

    2012-01-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ∼ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  14. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  15. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  16. The cryogenic cooling program in high-heat-load optics at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes some of the aspects of the cryogenic optics program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A liquid-nitrogen-cooled, high-vacuum, double crystal monochromator is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A pumping system capable of delivering a variable flow rate of up to 10 gallons per minute of pressurized liquid nitrogen and removing 5 kilowatts of x-ray power is also being constructed. This specialized pumping system and monochromator will be used to test the viability of cryogenically cooled, high-heat-load synchrotron optics. It has been determined that heat transfer enhancement will be required for optics used with APS insertion devices. An analysis of a porous-matrix-enhanced monochromator crystal is presented. For the particular case investigated, a heat transfer enhancement factor of 5 to 6 was calculated

  17. Vibration Considerations for Cryogenic Tanks Using Glass Bubbles Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Fesmire, James E.; Sass, Jared P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system has been previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical, vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate has been reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationary tanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significant vibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles represent two harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulation materials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested for vibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjected to random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures of insulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particle analysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tank applications. A thermal performance update on field demonstration testing of a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank, retrofitted with glass bubbles, is presented. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, aerogel, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank, mobile tanker, vibration.

  18. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  19. Plasma modeling of MFTF-B and the sensitivity to vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.D.; Rensink, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) is a large tandem mirror device currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The completed facility will consist of a large variety of components. Specifically, the vacuum vessel that houses the magnetic coils is basically a cylindrical vessel 60 m long and 11 m in diameter. The magnetics system consists of some 28 superconducting coils, each of which is located within the main vacuum vessel. Twenty of these coils are relatively simple solenoidal coils, but the remaining eight are of a more complicated design to provide an octupole component to certain regions of the magnetic field. The vacuum system is composed of a rough vacuum chain, used to evacuate the vessel from atmospheric pressure, and a high vacuum system, used to maintain good vacuum conditions during a plasma shot. High vacuum pumping is accomplished primarily by cryogenic panels cooled to 4.5 0 K. The MFTF-B coil set is shown together with typical axial profiles of magnetic field (a), electrostatic potential (b), and plasma density (c). The plasma is divided into nine regions axially, as labelled on the coil set in Figure 1. The central cell, which is completely azimuthally symmetric, contains a large volume plasma that is confined by a combination of the magnetic fields and the electrostatic potentials in the yin-yang cell

  20. Vacuum system for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, O.

    1995-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is planned at CERN will be housed in the tunnel of the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) and will store two counter-rotating proton beams with energies of up to 7 TeV in a 27 km accelerator/storage ring with superconducting magnets. The vacuum system for the LHC will be at cryogenic temperatures (between 1.9 and 20 K) and will be exposed to synchrotron radiation emitted by the protons. A stringent limitation on the vacuum is given by the energy deposition in the superconducting coils of the magnets due to nuclear scattering of the protons on residual gas molecules because this may provoke a quench. This effect imposes an upper limit to a local region of increased gas density (e.g. a leak), while considerations of beam lifetime (100 h) will determine more stringent requirements on the average gas density. The proton beam creates ions from the residual gas which may strike the vacuum chamber with sufficient energy to lead to a pressure 'run-away' when the net ion induced desorption yield exceeds a stable limit. These dynamic pressure effects will be limited to an acceptable level by installing a perforated 'beam screen' which shields the cryopumped gas molecules at 1.9 K from synchrotron radiation and which also absorbs the synchrotron radiation power at a higher and, therefore, thermodynamically more efficient temperature. (author)

  1. Tests of dry mechanical forepumps for use in the ITER vacuum pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhof, U.; Kammerer, B.; Perinic, D.

    1995-04-01

    This report is a description of the design and construction of FORTE (Forepumps Test Facility) which has been built in order to enable testing of the pumping speeds of prototypical mechanical forepumps connected in series, as proposed for the ITER forepump system. Three NORMETEX pumps (1300, 600, 60 m 3 /h) and one METAL BELLOWS pump (6m 3 /h) have been integrated into the test bench. Measurements of the pumping characteristics were performed, both with the single pumps and with trains of series connected pumps, using the gases N 2 , H 2 , D 2 , He as well as ITER typical gas mixture. The results of the tests are presented. (orig.)

  2. Structural design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel and manufacturing qualification tests for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsusuke; Shibui, Masanao; Koizumi, Koichi; Kanamori, Naokazu; Nishio, Satoshi; Sasaki, Takashi; Tada, Eisuke

    1992-09-01

    Conceptual design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel has been done for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The vacuum vessel concept is based on a thin-double-wall structure, which consists of inner and outer plates and rib stiffeners. Internal shielding structures, which provide neutron irradiation shielding to protect TF coils, are set up between the inner plate and the outer plate of the vessel to avoid complexity of machine systems such as supporting systems of blanket modules. The vacuum vessel is assembled/disassembled by remote handling, so that welding joints are chosen as on-site joint method from reliability of mechanical strength. From a view point of assembling TF coils, the vacuum vessel is separated at the side of port, and is divided into 32 segments similar to the ITER-CDA reference design. Separatrix sweeping coils are located in the vacuum vessel to reduce heat fluxes onto divertor plates. Here, the coil structure and attachment to the vacuum vessel have been investigated. A sectorized saddle-loop coil is available for assembling and disassembling the coil. To support electromagnetic loads on the coils, they are attached to the groove in the vacuum vessel by welding. Flexible multi-plate supporting structure (compression-type gravity support), which was designed during CDA, is optimized by investigating buckling and frequency response properties, and concept on manufacturing and fabrication of the gravity support are proposed. Partial model of the vacuum vessel is manufactured for trial, so that fundamental data on welding and fabrication are obtained. From mechanical property tests of weldment and partial models, mechanical intensity and behaviors of the weldment are obtained. Informations on FEM-modeling are obtained by comparing analysis results with experimental results. (author)

  3. Vacuum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  4. Non-destructive vacuum decay method for pre-filled syringe closure integrity testing compared with dye ingress testing and high-voltage leak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Andrea; Amari, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    In reaction to the limitations of the traditional sterility test methods, in 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued the guidance "Container and Closure System Integrity Testing in Lieu of Sterility Testing as a Component of the Stability Protocol for Sterile Products" encouraging sterile drug manufacturers to use properly validated physical methods, apart from conventional microbial challenge testing, to confirm container closure integrity as part of the stability protocol. The case study presented in this article investigated the capability of four container closure integrity testing methods to detect simulated defects of different sizes and types on glass syringes, prefilled both with drug product intended for parenteral administration and sterile water. The drug product was a flu vaccine (Agrippal, Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy). Vacuum decay, pharmacopoeial dye ingress test, Novartis specific dye ingress test, and high-voltage leak detection were, in succession, the methods involved in the comparative studies. The case study execution was preceded by the preparation of two independent sets of reference prefilled syringes, classified, respectively, as examples of conforming to closure integrity requirements (negative controls) and as defective (positive controls). Positive controls were, in turn, split in six groups, three of with holes laser-drilled through the prefilled syringe glass barrel, while the other three with capillary tubes embedded in the prefilled syringe plunger. These reference populations were then investigated by means of validated equipment used for container closure integrity testing of prefilled syringe commercial production; data were collected and analyzed to determine the detection rate and the percentage of false results. Results showed that the vacuum decay method had the highest performance in terms of detection sensitivity and also ensured the best reliability and repeatability of measurements. An innovative technical

  5. Integration of test modules in the main blanket and vacuum vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Sato, Satoshi; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Togami, Ikuhide; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa.

    1995-07-01

    Typical test modules for water-cooled and helium-cooled ceramic breeder blankets have been designed, and their major design parameters are summarized. Among various candidates studied in Japan at present, BOT (Breeder Out of Tube) type of blanket is exemplified here. The integration scheme of the test module into ITER basic machine is also shown. Even with other type of blanket, the integration scheme won't be affected. The composition and space requirement of cooling and tritium recovery systems for the test module have also been studied. (author)

  6. Vacuum extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maagaard, Mathilde; Oestergaard, Jeanett; Johansen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate an Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scale for vacuum extraction. Design. Two-part study design: Primarily, development of a procedure-specific checklist for vacuum extraction. Hereafter, validation of the developed OSATS scale for vac...

  7. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  8. Measurement of heat transfers in cryogenic tank with several configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khemis, O.; Bessaieh, R.; Ait Ali, M.; Francois, M.X.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented here concerns the measurement of heat transfer in a cryogenic tank with several configurations. The experimental test incorporates the conductive heat in the neck, the convection heat transfers between the inner wall of the neck and the ascending vapor resulting from boiling, and the radiation heat transfers between the external envelope and the tank through a vacuum of 10 -8 mm Hg. An experimental prototype was produced in collaboration with the nuclear center of Orsay in France according to a didactic design, which takes into account the Wexler effect and the importance of the radiation compared to the conduction-convection heat transfer. The addition of a screen radiative ventilated with variable position on the neck (which can effectively replace several tens of floating screens), in order to find the optimal position, which minimizes the radiation flux, is presented in this paper

  9. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  10. Experimental laser fusion devices and related vacuum problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Campbell, D.E.; Glaros, S.S.; Hurley, C.A.; Kobierecki, M.W.; McFann, C.B. Jr.; Monjes, J.A.; Patton, H.G.; Rienecker, F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Laser fusion experiments require hard vacuum in the laser-beam spatial filters, target chambers and for target diagnostics instruments. Laser focusing lenses and windows, and target alignment windows must hold vacuum without optical distortion, and must be protected from target debris. The vacuum must be sufficient to prevent residual gas breakdown in focused laser light, avoid arcing at high voltage terminals, minimize contamination and melting of cryogenic targets, and prevent adsorption of the target's microfusion radiation before it reaches the diagnostics instruments

  11. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  12. Analyses and tests for the baking system of the RFX vacuum vessel by eddy currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collarin, P.; Sonato, P.; Zaccaria, P.; Zollino, G.

    1995-01-01

    The electrical, thermal and mechanical analyses carried out for the design of a new baking system for RFX by eddy currents are presented. The results of an experimental test on RFX with low heating power are reported as well. They gave confidence in the numerical analyses so as the working conditions with the nominal heating power were computed. (orig.)

  13. Analyses and tests for the baking system of the RFX vacuum vessel by eddy currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collarin, P. [Gruppo di Padova per Ricerche sulla Fusione, Univ. di Padova (Italy); Sonato, P. [Gruppo di Padova per Ricerche sulla Fusione, Univ. di Padova (Italy); Zaccaria, P. [Gruppo di Padova per Ricerche sulla Fusione, Univ. di Padova (Italy); Zollino, G. [Gruppo di Padova per Ricerche sulla Fusione, Univ. di Padova (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The electrical, thermal and mechanical analyses carried out for the design of a new baking system for RFX by eddy currents are presented. The results of an experimental test on RFX with low heating power are reported as well. They gave confidence in the numerical analyses so as the working conditions with the nominal heating power were computed. (orig.).

  14. High power test of RF window and coaxial line in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, D.; Champion, M.; Gormley, M.; Kerns, Q.; Koepke, K.; Moretti, A.

    1993-01-01

    Primary rf input couplers for the superconducting accelerating cavities of the TESLA electron linear accelerator test to be performed at DESY, Hamburg, Germany are under development at both DESY and Fermilab. The input couplers consist of a WR650 waveguide to coaxial line transition with an integral ceramic window, a coaxial connection to the superconducting accelerating cavity with a second ceramic window located at the liquid nitrogen heat intercept location, and bellows on both sides of the cold window to allow for cavity motion during cooldown, coupling adjustments and easier assembly. To permit in situ high peak power processing of the TESLA superconducting accelerating cavities, the input couplers are designed to transmit nominally 1 ms long, 2 MW peak, 1.3 GHz rf pulses from the WR650 waveguide at room temperature to the cavities at 1.8 K. The coaxial part of the Fermilab TESLA input coupler design has been tested up to 1.7 MW using the prototype 805 MHz rf source located at the A0 service building of the Tevatron. The rf source, the testing system and the test results are described

  15. Development and testing of bumper limiter of aluminum alloy vacuum vessel for reacting plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikawa, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Ioki, K.; Irie, T.; Nayama, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Onozuka, M.; Tomita, M.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of graphite bumper limiters were designed and trially fabricated for a reacting plasma device, R-tokamak. High heat load tests were conducted to examine thermal behavior and thermal shock resistance of the limiters by using a 100kW electron beam facility. The experimental data were compared with the results of 3-D thermal analysis

  16. Development and testing of bumper limiter of aluminum alloy vacuum vessel for reacting plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchikawa, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Ioki, K.; Irie, T.; Nayama, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Onozuka, M.; Tomita, M.

    1985-07-01

    Two types of graphite bumper limiters were designed and trially fabricated for a reacting plasma device, R-tokamak. High heat load tests were conducted to examine thermal behavior and thermal shock resistance of the limiters by using a 100kW electron beam facility. The experimental data were compared with the results of 3-D thermal analysis.

  17. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  18. Cryogenics for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Three cryogenic questions of importance to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are discussed: the primary cooling requirement, the secondary cooling requirement, and the instrument changeout requirement.

  19. Tritium handling experience in vacuum systems at TSTA [Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Jenkins, E.M.; Walthers, C.R.; Yoshida, H.; Fukui, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Compound cryopumps have been added to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) integrated fusion fuel loop. Operations have been performed which closely simulate an actual fusion reactor pumping scenario. In addition, performance data have been taken that support the concept of using coconut charcoal as a sorbent at 4K for pumping helium. Later tests show that coconut charcoal may be used to co-pump D,T and He mixtures on a single 4K panel. Rotary spiral pumps have been used successfully in several applications at TSTA and have acquired more than 9000 hours of maintenance-free operation. Metal bellows pumps have been used to back the spiral pumps and have been relatively trouble free in loop operations. Bellows pumps also have more than 9000 hours of maintenance-free operation. 5 refs., 6 figs

  20. FRIB Cryogenic Distribution System and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Yang, Shuo [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Nellis, Timothy [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Jones, S. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The MSU-FRIB cryogenic distribution system supports the 2 K primary, 4 K primary, and 35 - 55 K shield operation of more than 70 loads in the accelerator and the experimental areas. It is based on JLab and SNS experience with bayonet-type disconnects between the loads and the distribution system for phased commissioning and maintenance. The linac transfer line, which features three separate transfer line segments for additional independence during phased commissioning at 4 K and 2 K, connects the folded arrangement of 49 cryomodules and 4 superconducting dipole magnets and a fourth transfer line supports the separator area cryo loads. The pressure reliefs for the transfer line process lines, located in the refrigeration room outside the tunnel/accelerator area, are piped to be vented outdoors. The transfer line designs integrate supply and return flow paths into a combined vacuum space. The main linac distribution segments are produced in a small number of standard configurations; a prototype of one such configuration has been fabricated at Jefferson Lab and has been installed at MSU to support testing of a prototype FRIB cryomodule.

  1. Wall adjustment strategy software for use with the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel adaptive wall test section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    The Wall Adjustment Strategy (WAS) software provides successful on-line control of the 2-D flexible walled test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This software package allows the level of operator intervention to be regulated as necessary for research and production type 2-D testing using and Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS). The software is designed to accept modification for future requirements, such as 3-D testing, with a minimum of complexity. The WAS software described is an attempt to provide a user friendly package which could be used to control any flexible walled AWTS. Control system constraints influence the details of data transfer, not the data type. Then this entire software package could be used in different control systems, if suitable interface software is available. A complete overview of the software highlights the data flow paths, the modular architecture of the software and the various operating and analysis modes available. A detailed description of the software modules includes listings of the code. A user's manual is provided to explain task generation, operating environment, user options and what to expect at execution.

  2. MYRRHA cryogenic system study on performances and reliability requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junquera, T.; Chevalier, N.R.; Thermeau, J.P.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2015-01-01

    A precise evaluation of the cryogenic requirements for accelerator-driven system such as the MYRRHA project has been performed. In particular, operation temperature, thermal losses, and required cryogenic power have been evaluated. A preliminary architecture of the cryogenic system including all its major components, as well as the principles for the cryogenic fluids distribution has been proposed. A detailed study on the reliability aspects has also been initiated. This study is based on the reliability of large cryogenic systems used for accelerators like HERA, LHC or SNS Linac. The requirements to guarantee good cryogenic system availability can be summarised as follows: 1) Mean Time Between Maintenance (MTBM) should be > 8 000 hours; 2) Valves, heat exchangers and turbines are particularly sensitive elements to impurities (dust, oil, gases), improvements are necessary to keep a minimal level in these components; 3) Redundancy studies for all elements containing moving/vibrating parts (turbines, compressors, including their respective bearings and seal shafts) are necessary; 4) Periodic maintenance is mandatory: oil checks, control of screw compressors every 10.000-15.000 hours, vibration surveillance programme, etc; 5) Special control and maintenance of utilities equipment (supply of cooling water, compressed air and electrical supply) is necessary; 6) Periodic vacuum checks to identify leakage appearance such as insulation vacuum of transfer lines and distribution boxes are necessary; 7) Easily exchangeable cold compressors are required

  3. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  4. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  5. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. von; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2016-06-15

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm{sup −3} is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10{sup −14} mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  6. Cosmic vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernin, Artur D

    2001-01-01

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Cosmic vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernin, Artur D [P.K. Shternberg State Astronomical Institute at the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-30

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. Vacuum pumping concepts for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homeyer, W.G.

    1980-09-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) poses unique vacuum pumping requirements due to its large size and long burn characteristics. These requirements include torus vacuum pumping initially and between burns and pumping of neutralized gas from divertor collector chambers. It was found that the requirements could be met by compound cryopumps in which molecular sieve 5A is used as the cryosorbent. The pumps, ducts, and vacuum valves required are large but fit with other ETF components and do not require major advances in vacuum pumping technology. Several additional design, analytical, and experimental studies were identified as needed to optimize designs and provide better design definition for the ETF vacuum pumping systems

  9. Recent Ground Hold and Rapid Depressurization Testing of Multilayer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2014-01-01

    In the development of flight insulation systems for large cryogenic orbital storage (spray on foam and multilayer insulation), testing need include all environments that are experienced during flight. While large efforts have been expended on studying, bounding, and modeling the orbital performance of the insulation systems, little effort has been expended on the ground hold and ascent phases of a mission. Historical cryogenic in-space systems that have flown have been able to ignore these phases of flight due to the insulation system being within a vacuum jacket. In the development phase of the Nuclear Mars Vehicle and the Shuttle Nuclear Vehicle, several insulation systems were evaluated for the full mission cycle. Since that time there had been minimal work on these phases of flight until the Constellation program began investigating cryogenic service modules and long duration upper stages. With the inception of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, a specific need was seen for the data and as such, several tests were added to the Cryogenic Boil-off Reduction System liquid hydrogen test matrix to provide more data on a insulation system. Testing was attempted with both gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and gaseous helium (GHe) backfills. The initial tests with nitrogen backfill were not successfully completed due to nitrogen liquefaction and solidification preventing the rapid pumpdown of the vacuum chamber. Subsequent helium backfill tests were successful and showed minimal degradation. The results are compared to the historical data.

  10. MOSFET's for Cryogenic Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaye, R.; Ventrice, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Study seeks ways to build transistors that function effectively at liquid-helium temperatures. Report discusses physics of metaloxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) and performances of these devices at cryogenic temperatures. MOSFET's useful in highly sensitive cryogenic preamplifiers for infrared astronomy.

  11. MFTF magnet cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    The prime requirement of the cryogenics of the magnets is to assure a superconducting state for the magnet coils, a large task considering their enormous size. The following presentation addresses the principal topics that have been considered in this cryogenic design

  12. Static and dynamic analyses on the MFTF [Mirror Fusion Test Facility]-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel System: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large-scale, tandem-mirror-fusion experiment. MFTF-B comprises many highly interconnected systems, including a magnet array and a vacuum vessel. The vessel, which houses the magnet array, is supported by reinforced concrete piers and steel frames resting on an array of foundations and surrounded by a 7-ft-thick concrete shielding vault. The Pittsburgh-Des Moines (PDM) Corporation, which was awarded the contract to design and construct the vessel, carried out fixed-base static and dynamic analyses of a finite-element model of the axicell vessel and magnet systems, including the simulation of various loading conditions and three postulated earthquake excitations. Meanwhile, LLNL monitored PDM's analyses with modeling studies of its own, and independently evaluated the structural responses of the vessel in order to define design criteria for the interface members and other project equipment. The assumptions underlying the finite-element model and the behavior of the axicell vessel are described in detail in this report, with particular emphasis placed on comparing the LLNL and PDM studies and on analyzing the fixed-base behavior with the soil-structure interaction, which occurs between the vessel and the massive concrete vault wall during a postulated seismic event. The structural members that proved sensitive to the soil effect are also reevaluated

  13. A proposal of ITER vacuum vessel fabrication specification and results of the full-scale partial mock-up test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takeda, Nobukazu; Onozuka, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kakudate, Satoshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The structure and fabrication methods of the ITER vacuum vessel have been investigated and defined by the ITER international team. However, some of the current specifications are very difficult to be achieved from the manufacturing point of view and will lead to cost increase. In the mock-up fabrication, it is planned to conduct the following items: 1. Feasibility of the Japanese proposed VV structure and fabrication methods and the applicability to the ITER are to be confirmed; 2. Assembly procedure and inspection procedure are to be confirmed; 3. Manufacturing tolerances are to be assessed; 4. Manufacturing schedule is to be assessed. This report summarizes the Japanese proposed specification of the VV mock-up describing differences between the ITER supplied design. General scope of the mock-up fabrication and the detailed dimensions are also shown. In the VV fabrication, several types of weld joint configuration will be used. This report shows the joint configurations proposed by Japan to be used for the inner shell connection, the rib-to-shell connection and outer shell connection, and the housing-to-shell connection, respectively. Non-destructive testing considered to be applied to each joint configuration is also presented. A series of the fabrication and assembly procedures for the mock-up are presented in this report, together with candidates of welding configurations. Finally, the report summarizes the results of mock-up fabrication, including results of nondestructive examination of weld lines, obtained welding deformation and issues revealed from the fabrication experience. (orig.)

  14. ASME Section VIII Recertification of a 33,000 Gallon Vacuum-jacketed LH2 Storage Vessel for Densified Hydrogen Testing at NASA Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Adam M.; Notardonato, William U.; Jumper, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) has been developed at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. GODU-LH2 has three main objectives: zero-loss storage and transfer, liquefaction, and densification of liquid hydrogen. A cryogenic refrigerator has been integrated into an existing, previously certified, 33,000 gallon vacuum-jacketed storage vessel built by Minnesota Valley Engineering in 1991 for the Titan program. The dewar has an inner diameter of 9.5 and a length of 71.5; original design temperature and pressure ranges are -423 F to 100 F and 0 to 95 psig respectively. During densification operations the liquid temperature will be decreased below the normal boiling point by the refrigerator, and consequently the pressure inside the inner vessel will be sub-atmospheric. These new operational conditions rendered the original certification invalid, so an effort was undertaken to recertify the tank to the new pressure and temperature requirements (-12.7 to 95 psig and -433 F to 100 F respectively) per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. This paper will discuss the unique design, analysis and implementation issues encountered during the vessel recertification process.

  15. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  16. LHC vacuum system

    CERN Document Server

    Gröbner, Oswald

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, now in the advanced construction phase at CERN, comprises two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7-TeV energy. The machine is housed in the existing LEP tunnel with a circumference of 26.7 km and requires a bending magnetic field of 8.4 T with 14-m long superconducting magnets. The beam vacuum chambers comprise the inner 'cold bore' walls of the magnets. These magnets operate at 1.9 K, and thus serve as very good cryo-pumps. In order to reduce the cryogenic power consumption, both the heat load from synchrotron radiation emitted by the proton beams and the resistive power dissipation by the beam image currents have to be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K and is inserted inside the vacuum chamber. The design of this beam screen represents a technological challenge in view of the numerous and often conflicting requirements and the very tight mechanical tolerances imposed. The synchrotron radiation produces strong outgassing from the...

  17. Laboratory facility for production of cryogenic targets for hot plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Cwiek, E.

    1990-10-01

    Results of preliminary operational tests of the cryogenic stand designed for the production of small droplets of liquid hydrogen or deuterium are presented. Such cryogenic micro-targets are needed for nuclear and thermonuclear experiments. (author)

  18. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; CERN; Ronayette, L.; GHMFL, Grenoble; Rabehl, R.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test

  19. Integrated cryogenic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanarena, D.B.; Rao, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated cryogenic pressure-temperature, level-temperature, and flow-temperature sensors have several advantages over the conventional single parameter sensors. Such integrated sensors were not available until recently. Pressure Systems, Inc. (PSI) of Hampton, Virginia, has introduced precalibrated precision cryogenic pressure sensors at the Los Angeles Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1989. Recently, PSI has successfully completed the development of integrated pressure-temperature and level-temperature sensors for use in the temperature range 1.5-375K. In this paper, performance characteristics of these integrated sensors are presented. Further, the effects of irradiation and magnetic fields on these integrated sensors are also reviewed

  20. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  1. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  2. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  3. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  4. A Cryogenic Test Station for the Pre-series 2400 W @ 1.8 K Refrigeration Units for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S; Gully, P; Jäger, B; Millet, F; Roussel, P; Tavian, L

    2002-01-01

    The cooling capacity below 2 K for the superconducting magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN, will be provided by eight refrigeration units at 1.8 K, each of them coupled to a 4.5 K refrigerator. The supply of the series units is linked to successful testing and acceptance of the pre-series delivered by the two selected vendors. To properly assess the performance of specific components such as cold compressors and some process specificities a dedicated test station is necessary. The test station is able to process up to 130 g/s between 4.5 & 20 K and aims at simulating the steady and transient operational modes foreseen for the LHC. After recalling the basic characteristics of the 1.8 K refrigeration units and the content of the acceptance tests of the pre-series, the principle of the test cryostat is detailed. The components of the test station and corresponding layout are described. The first testing experience is presented as well as preliminary results of the pre-series units.

  5. Preliminary test of remote manual instrumentation & control type system for vacuum unit of 350 KeV / 10 mA electron beam machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudiyanto

    2003-01-01

    Remote manual instrumentation & control type for vacuum unit of 350 KeV/10 mA Electron Beam Machine is being completed. The system consisting of a remote manual controlled and a remote acquisition system. A remote manual (50 m) controlled is based on the on/off status of 220 Volt terminal supply for pneumatic valves and vacuum pumps, in this case the power supply switch of pneumatic valves and pumps have already been selected On. Remote acquisition of vacuum level can be done by using a CCTV camera which is place in front of the panning gauge and TGP.300 Balzer unit.The CCTV system equipped with 6 cameras, one TV monitor and a multiplexer unit to arranged a selected picture on it. One of the camera was mounted on the rotator unit, it can be controlled (rotating left / right) for different monitoring orientations required by using infrared controller. A trial test of the remote manual control system for vacuum unit of the Electron Beam Machine showed a good performance. (author)

  6. Investigation on the development of the cryogenic thermosiphon for the cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, S. G.; Rho, C. H.; Kim, S. H.; Chang, G. T.; Cheong, J. H.; In, S. H.; Choi, C. H.; Kim, Y. G.; Park, I. U.; Choi, E. J.

    2005-03-01

    Survey of international and domestic research activities : examination of the CNS-related thermosiphon research materials to investigate the state of the art, summary of the project work scope based on previous research results. Design and fabrication of the experimental mock-up thermosiphon for the HANARO CNS facility : determination of the design parameters for the experimental apparatus, fabrication of the cryogenic thermosiphon with glass dewar for the purpose of direct visual observation of two-phase phenomena, overall check of the whole fabrication process to investigate potential cryogenic problems and seek the solutions, examination of vacuum insulation method for cryogenic thermosiphon. Performance test of the mock-up thermosiphon : temperature and pressure measurements of the working fluid inside thermosiphon during stable operation under various thermal loads of the moderator, cooling capacity control of the condenser to avoid solidification of the working fluid of thermosiphon, investigation of flooding limit to explore the usefulness of a single transfer tube, liquid quantity and void fraction measurements in the moderator under various thermal loads, experimental verification of self-regulation characteristic with and without buffer tank

  7. Investigation on the development of the cryogenic thermosiphon for the cold neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, S. G.; Rho, C. H.; Kim, S. H.; Chang, G. T.; Cheong, J. H.; In, S. H.; Choi, C. H.; Kim, Y. G.; Park, I. U.; Choi, E. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Survey of international and domestic research activities : examination of the CNS-related thermosiphon research materials to investigate the state of the art, summary of the project work scope based on previous research results. Design and fabrication of the experimental mock-up thermosiphon for the HANARO CNS facility : determination of the design parameters for the experimental apparatus, fabrication of the cryogenic thermosiphon with glass dewar for the purpose of direct visual observation of two-phase phenomena, overall check of the whole fabrication process to investigate potential cryogenic problems and seek the solutions, examination of vacuum insulation method for cryogenic thermosiphon. Performance test of the mock-up thermosiphon : temperature and pressure measurements of the working fluid inside thermosiphon during stable operation under various thermal loads of the moderator, cooling capacity control of the condenser to avoid solidification of the working fluid of thermosiphon, investigation of flooding limit to explore the usefulness of a single transfer tube, liquid quantity and void fraction measurements in the moderator under various thermal loads, experimental verification of self-regulation characteristic with and without buffer tank.

  8. Vacuum gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, B.D.; Priestland, C.R.D.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to vacuum gauges, particularly of the type known as Penning gauges, which are cold cathode ionisation gauges, in which a magnetic field is used to lengthen the electron path and thereby increase the number of ions produced. (author)

  9. Ricor's anniversary of 50 innovative years in cryogenic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Avishai; Segal, Victor; Pundak, Nachman; Bar Haim, Zvi; Danziger, Menachem

    2017-05-01

    Ricor cryogenics was founded in 1967 and since then it has focused on innovative technologies in the cryogenic field. The paper reviews the initial research and development efforts invested in various technologies that have yielded products such as Cryostats for Mossbauer Effect measurement, Liquid gas Dewar containers, Liquid helium vacuum transfer tubes, Cryosurgery and other innovative products. The major registered patents that matured to products such as a magnetic vacuum valve operator, pumped out safety valve and other innovations are reviewed here. As a result of continuous R and D investment, over the years a new generation of innovative Stirling cryogenic products has developed. This development began with massive split slip-on coolers and has progressed as far as miniature IDDCA coolers mainly for IR applications. The accumulated experience in Stirling technology is used also as a platform for developing self-contained water vapor pumps known as MicroStar and NanoStar. These products are also used in collaboration with a research institute in the field of High Temperature Superconductors. The continuous growth in the cryogenic products range and the need to meet market demands have motivated the expansion, of Ricor's manufacturing facility enabling it to become a world leader in the cryocooler field. To date Ricor has manufactured more than 120,000 cryocoolers. The actual cryogenic development efforts and challenges are also reviewed, mainly in the field of long life cryocoolers, ruggedized products, miniaturization and products for space applications.

  10. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  11. CERN Vacuum-System Activities during the Long Shutdown 1: The LHC Beam Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Chiggiato, P; Jimenez, JM; Lanza, G

    2014-01-01

    After the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) and the consolidation of the magnet bus bars, the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will operate with nominal beam parameters. Larger beam energy, beam intensities and luminosity are expected. Despite the very good performance of the beam vacuum system during the 2010-12 physics run (Run 1), some particular areas require attention for repair, consolidation and upgrade. Among the main activities, a large campaign aiming at the repair of the RF bridges of some vacuum modules is conducted. Moreover, consolidation of the cryogenic beam vacuum systems with burst disk for safety reasons is implemented. In addition, NEG cartridges, NEG coated inserts and new instruments for the vacuum system upgrade are installed. Besides these activities, repair, consolidation and upgrades of other beam equipment such as collimators, kickers and beam instrumentations are carried out. In this paper, the motivation and the description for such activities, together with the expected beam vacuum performa...

  12. Testing local Lorentz and position invariance and variation of fundamental constants by searching the derivative of the comparison frequency between a cryogenic sapphire oscillator and hydrogen maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobar, Michael Edmund; Wolf, Peter; Bize, Sebastien; Santarelli, Giorgio; Flambaum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The cryogenic sapphire oscillator at the Paris Observatory has been continuously compared to various hydrogen masers since 2001. The early data sets were used to test local Lorentz invariance in the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl (RMS) framework by searching for sidereal modulations with respect to the cosmic microwave background, and represent the best Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to date. In this work, we present continuous operation over a period of greater than six years from September 2002 to December 2008 and present a more precise way to analyze the data by searching the time derivative of the comparison frequency. Because of the long-term operation we are able to search both sidereal and annual modulations. The results give P KT =β RMS -α RMS -1=-1.7(4.0)x10 -8 for the sidereal and -23(10)x10 -8 for the annual term, with a weighted mean of -4.8(3.7)x10 -8 , a factor of 8 better than previous. Also, we analyze the data with respect to a change in gravitational potential for both diurnal and annual variations. The result gives β H-Maser -β CSO =-2.7(1.4)x10 -4 for the annual and -6.9(4.0)x10 -4 for the diurnal terms, with a weighted mean of -3.2(1.3)x10 -4 . This result is 2 orders of magnitude better than other tests that use electromagnetic resonators. With respect to fundamental constants a limit can be provided on the variation with ambient gravitational potential and boost of a combination of the fine structure constant (α), the normalized quark mass (m q ), and the electron to proton mass ratio (m e /m p ), setting the first limit on boost dependence of order 10 -10 .

  13. Thermal Performance of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation at Various Layer Spacings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley Louis

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) has been shown to be the best performing cryogenic insulation system at high vacuum (less that 10 (exp 3) torr), and is widely used on spaceflight vehicles. Over the past 50 years, many investigations into MLI have yielded a general understanding of the many variables that are associated with MLI. MLI has been shown to be a function of variables such as warm boundary temperature, the number of reflector layers, and the spacer material in between reflectors, the interstitial gas pressure and the interstitial gas. Since the conduction between reflectors increases with the thickness of the spacer material, yet the radiation heat transfer is inversely proportional to the number of layers, it stands to reason that the thermal performance of MLI is a function of the number of layers per thickness, or layer density. Empirical equations that were derived based on some of the early tests showed that the conduction term was proportional to the layer density to a power. This power depended on the material combination and was determined by empirical test data. Many authors have graphically shown such optimal layer density, but none have provided any data at such low densities, or any method of determining this density. Keller, Cunnington, and Glassford showed MLI thermal performance as a function of layer density of high layer densities, but they didn't show a minimal layer density or any data below the supposed optimal layer density. However, it was recently discovered that by manipulating the derived empirical equations and taking a derivative with respect to layer density yields a solution for on optimal layer density. Various manufacturers have begun manufacturing MLI at densities below the optimal density. They began this based on the theory that increasing the distance between layers lowered the conductive heat transfer and they had no limitations on volume. By modifying the circumference of these blankets, the layer density can easily be

  14. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for Oxygen/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal-Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/liquid methane (LCH4) rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/LCH4 propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability at these conditions while preventing corona discharge issues. The ICPTA uses spark plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp -2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, hot-fire testing at Plum Brook demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/LCH4 propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  15. Thermal Design of a Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Suk Yang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System (PSICS cooled by a stirling cryocooler has been designed. The PSICS has an IR sensor inside the cold box which is cooled by a stirling cryocooler with refrigeration capacity of 500mW at 80K in a vacuum vessel. It is important to minimize the heat load so that the background thermal noise can be reduced. In order to design the cryogenic system with low heat load and to reduce the remained heat load, we have performed numerical analyses. In this paper, we present the design factors and the results obtained by the thermal analysis of the PSICS.

  16. Series Supply of Cryogenic Venturi Flowmeters for the ITER Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, J; Poncet, J M; Ercolani, E; Clayton, N; Journeaux, J Y

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the ITER project, the CEA-SBT has been contracted to supply 277 venturi tube flowmeters to measure the distribution of helium in the superconducting magnets of the ITER tokamak. Six sizes of venturi tube have been designed so as to span a measurable helium flowrate range from 0.1 g/s to 400g/s. They operate, in nominal conditions, either at 4K or at 300K, and in a nuclear and magnetic environment. Due to the cryogenic conditions and the large number of venturi tubes to be supplied, an individual calibration of each venturi tube would be too expensive and time consuming. Studies have been performed to produce a design which will offer high repeatability in manufacture, reduce the geometrical uncertainties and improve the final helium flowrate measurement accuracy. On the instrumentation side, technologies for differential and absolute pressure transducers able to operate in applied magnetic fields need to be identified and validated. The complete helium mass flow measurement chain will be qualified in four test benches: - A helium loop at room temperature to insure the qualification of a statistically relevant number of venturi tubes operating at 300K.- A supercritical helium loop for the qualification of venturi tubes operating at cryogenic temperature (a modification to the HELIOS test bench). - A dedicated vacuum vessel to check the helium leak tightness of all the venturi tubes. - A magnetic test bench to qualify different technologies of pressure transducer in applied magnetic fields up to 100mT. (paper)

  17. FST-formation of cryogenic layer inside spherical shells of HiPER-class. Results of mathematical modeling and mock-ups testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belolipetskiy, A.A.; Lalinina, E.A.; Panina, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Current stage in the IFE research has passed to a closing stage: creation of the experimental reactor and realization of electric power generation. HiPER is a proposed European High Power laser Energy Research facility dedicated to demonstrating the feasibility of laser driven fusion for IFE reactor. The HiPER facility operation requires the formation and delivery of spherical shock ignition cryogenic targets with a rate of several Hz. The targets must be free-standing, or un-mounted. At the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), significant progress has been made in the technology development based on rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets which refers to as FST layering method. It allows one to form cryogenic targets with a required rate. In this report, we present the results of a feasibility study on high rep-rate formation of HiPER-class targets by FST. We consider two types of the baseline target for shock ignition. The first one (BT-2) is a 2.094-mm diameter compact polymer shell with a 3 μm thick wall. The solid layer thickness is 211 μm. The second (BT-2a) consists of a 2.046-mm diameter compact polymer shell (3 μm thick also) having a DT-filled CH foam (70 μm) on its inner surface, and then a 120 μm thick solid layer of pure DT. The work addresses the physical concept, and the modeling results of the major stages of FST technologies for different shell materials: Filling stage optimization (computation): optimal filling of a target batch up to ∼ 1000 atm at 300 K requires minimizing the diffusion fill time due to using the ramp filling method for both BT-2 and BT-2a; Depressurization stage optimization (computation and experiments): it requires providing the shell container leak proofness during the process of its cooling down to a depressurization temperature. This allows one to fulfill the technical requirements on the risks minimization associated with the damage of the HiPER-class targets

  18. Cryogenic explosion environment modeling and testing of space shuttle and light-weight radioisotope heater unit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.W.

    1985-10-01

    In order to assess the risk to the world's populace in the event of a Space Shuttle accident when radioisotope-containing heat sources are on board, testing of that system must be performed to determine release point, environments required, and the size distribution of the released fuel. To evaluate the performance of the Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) (101 of these 1-W items are placed on the Galileo spacecraft which will be launched from the Space Shuttle), some high-velocity impact and flyer plate testing was carried out. The results showed that a bare urania-fueled LWRHU clad (approximately 1-mm thick platinum-30 wt % rhodium alloy) will withstand 1100 m/s flyer plate (3.5-mm thick aluminum) impacts and 330 m/s impacts upon the Space Shuttle floor (approximately 12-mm thick aluminum) without rupture or fuel release. Velocities in the order of 600 m/s on a steel surface will cause clad failure with fuel release. The fuel breakup patterns were characterized as to quantity in a specific size range. These data were employed in the formal Safety Analysis Report for the LWRHU to support the planned 1986 Galileo launch. 19 figs

  19. Design of load-to-failure tests of high-voltage insulation breaks for ITER's cryogenic network

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S A E; Aviles Santillana, I; Sgobba, S; Foussat, A

    2015-01-01

    The development of new generation superconducting magnets for fusion research, such as the ITER experiment, is largely based on coils wound with so-called cable-in-conduit conductors. The concept of the cable-in-conduit conductor is based on a direct cooling principle, by supercritical helium, flowing through the central region of the conductor, in close contact with the superconducting strands. Consequently, a direct connection exists between the electrically grounded helium coolant supply line and the highly energised magnet windings. Various insulated regions, constructed out of high-voltage insulation breaks, are put in place to isolate sectors with different electrical potential. In addition to high voltages and significant internal helium pressure, the insulation breaks will experience various mechanical forces resulting from differential thermal contraction phenomena and electro-magnetic loads. Special test equipment was designed, prepared and employed to assess the mechanical reliability of the insul...

  20. Testing of improved polyimide actuator rod seals at high temperature and under vacuum conditions for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellereite, B. K.; Waterman, A. W.; Nelson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Polyimide second-stage rod seals were evaluated to determine their suitability for applications in space station environments. The 6.35-cm (2.5-in.)K-section seal was verified for thermal cycling operation between room temperature and 478 K (400 F) and for operation in a 133 micron PA(0.000001 mm Hg) vacuum environment. The test seal completed the scheduled 96 thermal cycles and 1438 hr in vacuum with external rod seal leakage well within the maximum allowable of two drops per 25 actuation cycles. At program completion, the seals showed no signs of structural degradation. Posttest inspection showed the seals retained a snug fit against the shaft and housing walls, indicating additional wear life capability. Evaluation of a molecular flow section during vacuum testing, to inhibit fluid loss through vaporization, showed it to be beneficial with MIL-H-5606, a petroleum-base fluid, in comparison with MIL-H-83282, a synthetic hydrocarbon-base fluid.

  1. Detecting leaks in vacuum bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum bag can be readily detected by eye, using simple chemical reaction: combination of ammonia and acetic acid vapors to produce cloudy white smoke. Technique has been successfully used to test seam integrity and to identify minute pinholes in vacuum bag used in assembly of ceramic-tile heat shield for Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  2. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  3. Commissioning of cryogenic system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bin; He, Chongchao; Li, Na; Ding, Meiying; Wang, Yaqiong; Yu, Zhang; He, Kun

    2017-12-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source(CSNS) cryogenic system provides supercritical cryogenic hydrogen to neutron moderators, including a helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop and hydrogen safety equipment. The helium refrigerator is provided by Linde with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K. Hydrogen loop system mainly includes cryogenic hydrogen pipes, hydrogen circulator cold-box and accumulator cold-box. Cryogenic hydrogen pump, ortho-para convertor, helium-hydrogen heat-exchanger, hydrogen heater and accumulator are integrated in hydrogen circulation cold-box, and accumulator cold-box. Hydrogen safety equipment includes safety valves, rupture disk, hydrogen sensor, flame detector and other equipment to ensure that cryogenic system in dangerous situations will go down, vents, or takes other measures. The cryogenic system commissioning work includes four steps. First, in order to test the refrigerating capacity of refrigerator, when acceptance testing, refrigerator internal heater was used as thermal load. Second, using simulation load as heat load of moderator, hydrogen loop use helium instead of hydrogen, and cooled down to 20 K, then re-warming and test the leak detection of hydrogen loop system. Third, base on the step 2, using hydrogen as working medium, and optimized the control logic. Forth, cryogenic system with the moderators joint commissioning. Now, cryogenic system is connected with the moderators, and the forth step will be carried out in the near future.

  4. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system

  5. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  6. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  7. Cryogenic process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems

  8. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  9. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  10. Beam screen cryogenic control improvements for the LHC run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068353; Rogez, Edouard; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Ferlin, Gerard; Tovar-Gonzalez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the improvements made on the cryogenic control system for the LHC beam screens. The regulation objective is to maintain an acceptable temperature range around 20 K which simultaneously ensures a good LHC beam vacuum and limits cryogenic heat loads. In total, through the 27 km of the LHC machine, there are 485 regulation loops affected by beam disturbances. Due to the increase of the LHC performance during Run 2, standard PID controllers cannot keeps the temperature transients of the beam screens within desired limits. Several alternative control techniques have been studied and validated using dynamic simulation and then deployed on the LHC cryogenic control system in 2015. The main contribution is the addition of a feed-forward control in order to compensate the beam effects on the beam screen temperature based on the main beam parameters of the machine in real time.

  11. Cryogenic support member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is described for restraining a cryogenic system comprising; a rod having a depression at a first end. The rod is made of non-metallic material. The non-metallic material has an effectively low thermal conductivity; a metallic plug; and a metallic sleeve. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod and assembled thereto such that the plug is disposed inside the depression of the rod. The sleeve is disposed over the depression in the rod and the rod is clamped therebetween. The shrink-fit clamping the rod is generated between the metallic plug and the metallic sleeve

  12. The Management of Cryogens at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2005-01-01

    CERN is a large user of industrially procured cryogens essentially liquid helium and nitrogen. Recent contracts have been placed by the Organization for the delivery of quantities up to 280 tons of liquid helium over four years and up to 50000 tons of liquid nitrogen over three years. Main users are the very large cryogenic system of the LHC accelerator complex, the physics experiments using superconducting magnets and liquefied gases and all the related test facilities whether industrial or laboratory scale. With the commissioning of LHC, the need of cryogens at CERN will considerably increase and the procurement policy must be adapted accordingly. In this paper, we discuss procurement strategy for liquid helium and nitrogen, including delivery rates, distribution methods and adopted safety standards. Global turnover, on site re-liquefaction capacity, operational consumption, accidental losses, purification means and storage capacity will be described. Finally, the short to medium term evolution of the Orga...

  13. LHC : The World's Largest Vacuum Systems being commissioned at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, J M

    2008-01-01

    When it switches on in 2008, the 26.7 km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum around the cryogenic magnets and the liquid helium transfer lines. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for "cleaning" the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings - a vacuum technology that was born and industrialized at CERN. The pumping scheme is completed using 780 ion pumps to remove noble gases and to provide pressure interlocks to the 303 vacuum safety valves. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani a...

  14. Modeling and analysis of chill and fill processes for the cryogenic storage and transfer engineering development unit tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Cartagena, W.; Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    NASA's future missions may require long-term storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU), a NASA in-house effort supported by both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Glenn Research Center, is a cryogenic fluid management (CFM) test article that primarily serves as a manufacturing pathfinder and a risk reduction task for a future CFM payload. The EDU test article comprises a flight-like tank, internal components, insulation, and attachment struts. The EDU is designed to perform integrated passive thermal control performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a test-like vacuum environment. A series of tests, with LH2 as a testing fluid, was conducted at Test Stand 300 at MSFC during the summer of 2014. The objective of this effort was to develop a thermal/fluid model for evaluating the thermodynamic behavior of the EDU tank during the chill and fill processes. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, an MSFC in-house general-purpose computer program for flow network analysis, was utilized to model and simulate the chill and fill portion of the testing. The model contained the LH2 supply source, feed system, EDU tank, and vent system. The test setup, modeling description, and comparison of model predictions with the test data are presented.

  15. Regulating vacuum pump speed with feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludington, D.C.; Aneshansley, D.J.; Pellerin, R.; Guo, F.

    1992-01-01

    Considerable energy is wasted by the vacuum pump/motor on dairy farms. The output capacity (m 3 /min or cfm) of the vacuum pump always exceeds the capacity needed to milk cows and wash pipelines. Vacuum pumps run at full speed and load regardless of actual need for air. Excess air is admitted through a controller. Energy can be saved from electrical demand reduced by regulating vacuum pump speed according to air based on air usage. An adjustable speed drive (ASD) on the motor and controlled based upon air usage, can reduce the energy used by the vacuum pump. However, the ASD unit tested could not maintain vacuum levels within generally accepted guidelines when air usage changed. Adding a high vacuum reserve and a dual vacuum controller between the vacuum pump and the milking pipeline brought vacuum stability within guidelines. The ASD/dual vacuum system can reduce energy consumption and demand by at least 50 percent during milking and provide better vacuum stability than conventional systems. Tests were not run during washing cycles. Using 1990 costs and only the energy saved during milking, the simple payback on investment in new equipment for a 5 hp motor, speed controller and vacuum regulator would be about 5 years

  16. Cryogenic technology review of cold neutron source facility for localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hun Cheol; Park, D. S.; Moon, H. M.; Soon, Y. P. [Daesung Cryogenic Research Institute, Ansan (Korea); Kim, J. H. [United Pacific Technology, Inc., Ansan (Korea)

    1998-02-01

    This Research is performed to localize the cold neutron source(CNS) facility in HANARO and the report consists of two parts. In PART I, the local and foreign technology for CNS facility is investigated and examined. In PART II, safety and licensing are investigated. CNS facility consists of cryogenic and warm part. Cryogenic part includes a helium refrigerator, vacuum insulated pipes, condenser, cryogenic fluid tube and moderator cell. Warm part includes moderator gas control, vacuum equipment, process monitoring system. Warm part is at high level as a result of the development of semiconductor industries and can be localized. However, even though cryogenic technology is expected to play a important role in developing the 21st century's cutting technology, it lacks of specialists and the research facility since the domestic market is small and the research institutes and government do not recognize the importance. Therefore, it takes a long research time in order to localize the facility. The safety standard of reactor for hydrogen gas in domestic nuclear power regulations is compared with that of the foreign countries, and the licensing method for installation of CNS facility is examined. The system failure and its influence are also analyzed. 23 refs., 59 figs., 26 tabs. (Author)

  17. Development of high voltage PEEK wire with radiation-resistance and cryogenic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Hirata, T.; Araki, S.; Ohara, H.; Nishimura, H.

    1989-01-01

    High voltage electric wires insulated with highly-refined polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been developed for the wiring in fusion reactors, where the wire is required to withstand high voltage under high vacuum up to 10 -5 Torr. The PEEK wires having the advantages of PEEK resin including superior radiation resistance and cryogenic characteristics are usable over a wide range of temperature and in radiation fields. The results of withstand voltage tests proved that the PEEK wires exceeding 0.8 mm in insulation thickness withstand such specified high voltage conditions as 24 kV for 1 minutes by 10 times and 6.6 kV for 110 hours. The results also revealed that the withstand voltage is improved by providing a jacket layer over the insulation and decreased by periodical voltage charge, by bending of the specimen and by water in the conductor. This paper deal with the withstand voltage test results under varied conditions of the PEEK wires. (author)

  18. A Study of the Operation of Especially Designed Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2006-01-01

    In some experiments and applications there is need for large-area photosensitive detectors to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Nowadays, vacuum PMs are usually used for this purpose. We have developed special designs of planar photosensitive gaseous detectors able to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Such detectors are much cheaper PMs and are almost insensitive to magnetic fields. Results of systematic measurements of their quantum efficiencies, the maximum achievable gains and long-term stabilities will be presented. The successful operation of these detectors open realistic possibilities in replacing PMs by photosensitive gaseous detectors in some applications dealing with cryogenic liquids; for example in experiments using noble liquid TPCs or noble liquid scintillating calorimeters.

  19. Cryogen free low temperature sample environment for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichek, O; Evans, B E; Down, R B E; Bowden, Z A

    2009-01-01

    Recent increase in liquid helium cost caused by global helium supply problems rose significant concern about affordability of conventional cryogenic equipment. Luckily the progress in cryo-cooler technology offers a new generation of cryogenic systems with significantly reduced consumption and in some cases nearly complete elimination of cryogens. These cryogen-free systems also offer the advantage of operational simplicity and require less space than conventional cryogen-cooled systems. The ISIS facility carries on an internal development program intended to substitute gradually all conventional cryogenic systems with cryogen free systems preferably based on pulse tube refrigerators. A unique feature of this cryo-cooler is the absence of cold moving parts. This considerably reduces vibrations and increases the reliability of the cold head. The program includes few development projects which are aiming to deliver range of cryogen free equipment including top-loading cryostat, superconducting magnets and dilution refrigerators. Here we are going to describe the design of these systems and discuss the results of prototypes testing.

  20. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  1. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  2. Materials for high vacuum technology, an overview

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    In modern accelerators stringent requirements are placed on materials of vacuum systems. Their physical and mechanical properties, machinability, weldability or brazeability are key parameters. Adequate strength, ductility, magnetic properties at room as well as low temperatures are important factors for vacuum systems of accelerators working at cryogenic temperatures, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. In addition, baking or activation of Non-Evaporable Getters (NEG) at high temperatures impose specific choices of material grades of suitable tensile and creep properties in a large temperature range. Today, stainless steels are the dominant materials of vacuum constructions. Their metallurgy is extensively treated. The reasons for specific requirements in terms of metallurgical processes are detailed, in view of obtaining adequate purity, inclusion cleanliness, and fineness of the microstructure. In many cases these requirements are crucial to guarantee the final leak tightnes...

  3. A proposal of ITER vacuum vessel fabrication specification and results of the full-scale partial mock-up test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, M.; Takeda, N.; Kakudate, S.; Onozuka, M.

    2008-01-01

    The structure and fabrication methods of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) have been investigated and defined by the ITER International Team (IT). However, some of the current technical specifications are difficult to be achieved from the manufacturing point of view. To solve such an issue, this paper proposes an alternative specification of the VV to the IT's design. A series of the fabrication and assembly procedures for the mock-up are presented, together with candidates of welding configurations. Finally, the paper summarizes the results of mock-up fabrication, such as non-destructive examination of weld lines, obtained welding deformation and issues revealed from the fabrication experience. Based on the results, it is suggested that several issues such as clarification of conditions of repair welding, demonstration of welding distortion control and detectability/localization of internal defects should be solved before manufacturing the ITER VV

  4. A proposal of ITER vacuum vessel fabrication specification and results of the full-scale partial mock-up test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)], E-mail: nakahira.masataka@jaea.go.jp; Takeda, N.; Kakudate, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Onozuka, M. [Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems, Inc., 1700K Street NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20006 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    The structure and fabrication methods of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) have been investigated and defined by the ITER International Team (IT). However, some of the current technical specifications are difficult to be achieved from the manufacturing point of view. To solve such an issue, this paper proposes an alternative specification of the VV to the IT's design. A series of the fabrication and assembly procedures for the mock-up are presented, together with candidates of welding configurations. Finally, the paper summarizes the results of mock-up fabrication, such as non-destructive examination of weld lines, obtained welding deformation and issues revealed from the fabrication experience. Based on the results, it is suggested that several issues such as clarification of conditions of repair welding, demonstration of welding distortion control and detectability/localization of internal defects should be solved before manufacturing the ITER VV.

  5. Electric breakdown of high polymer insulating materials at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sanhyon; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1985-01-01

    Cryogenic properties : temperature dependence of E sub(b) and effects of media upon E sub(b) were investigated on several high polymers. Temperature conditions were provided by liquid He (4.2 K), liquid N 2 (77 K) and cryogen (dry ice-methyl alcohol, 194 K). Silicone oil was used also at ambient temperature and elevated temperature. Polymer film coated with gold by vacuum evaporation was placed in cryostat, and high tension from pulse generator was applied to the film. Dielectric breakdowns were detected by oscilloscope and observed visually. The results of experiment are summerized as follow. (1) E sub(b) of film in He is affected by medium remarkably, and covering with 3-methyl pentane is effective for increasing E sub(b). (2) Temperature dependence of E sub(b) was not recognized in cryogenic temperature below liquid N 2 . (3) Temperature characteristic of E sub(b) changes considerably at the critical temperature T sub(c), and T sub(c) is dependent on material. (4) Strength against dielectric breakdown under cryogenic temperature is not affected by bridging caused by irradiation of electron beam. (5) Dielectric breakdown is thought to be caused by electronic process such as electron avalanche. Consequently, for designing insulation for the temperature below liquid He, insulation design for liquid N 2 is thought to be sufficient. However, the degradation and breakdown by mechanical stress under cryogenic temperature must be taken into consideration. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  6. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  7. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  8. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  9. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  10. Test facility TIMO for testing the ITER model cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, H.; Day, C.; Mack, A.; Methe, S.; Boissin, J.C.; Schummer, P.; Murdoch, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme, FZK is involved in the research and development process for a vacuum pump system of a future fusion reactor. As a result of these activities, the concept and the necessary requirements for the primary vacuum system of the ITER fusion reactor were defined. Continuing that development process, FZK has been preparing the test facility TIMO (Test facility for ITER Model pump) since 1996. This test facility provides for testing a cryopump all needed infrastructure as for example a process gas supply including a metering system, a test vessel, the cryogenic supply for the different temperature levels and a gas analysing system. For manufacturing the ITER model pump an order was given to the company L' Air Liquide in the form of a NET contract. (author)

  11. Test facility TIMO for testing the ITER model cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, H.; Day, C.; Mack, A.; Methe, S.; Boissin, J.C.; Schummer, P.; Murdoch, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme, FZK is involved in the research and development process for a vacuum pump system of a future fusion reactor. As a result of these activities, the concept and the necessary requirements for the primary vacuum system of the ITER fusion reactor were defined. Continuing that development process, FZK has been preparing the test facility TIMO (Test facility for ITER Model pump) since 1996. This test facility provides for testing a cryopump all needed infrastructure as for example a process gas supply including a metering system, a test vessel, the cryogenic supply for the different temperature levels and a gas analysing system. For manufacturing the ITER model pump an order was given to the company L'Air Liquide in the form of a NET contract. (author)

  12. Leybold vacuum handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, K; Diels, Kurt

    1966-01-01

    Leybold Vacuum Handbook presents a collection of data sets that are essential for numerical calculation of vacuum plants and vacuum processes. The title first covers vacuum physics, which includes gas kinetics, flow phenomena, vacuum gauges, and vapor removal. Next, the selection presents data on vacuum, high vacuum process technology, and gas desorption and gettering. The text also deals with materials, vapor pressure, boiling and melting points, and gas permeability. The book will be of great interest to engineers and technicians that deals with vacuum related technologies.

  13. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  14. Cryogenics for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A wide-ranging study of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) structural and cryogenic requirements was made. Concepts and computational methods have been developed for all of the major problems in these areas. Design analyses have been made to provide more detailed information on some items and experimental work has been performed to create data bases in the areas of superfluid heat transfer, superfluid dielectric properties, heat transfer from conductors, and in the thermal and mechanical properties of materials at low temperatures. In most cases optimum solutions have not been made because of the developing nature of the overall study but methodology for optimization has been worked out for essentially all SMES cryogenic and structural elements. The selection of 1.8 K cooling and all aluminum systems in bedrock continues to be the best choice

  15. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  16. Chemiluminescence in cryogenic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotnik, S. V.; Kazakov, Valeri P.

    1989-04-01

    The literature data on chemiluminescence (CL) in cryogenic matrices have been classified and correlated for the first time. The role of studies on phosphorescence and CL at low temperatures in the development of cryochemistry is shown. The features of low-temperature CL in matrices of nitrogen and inert gases (fine structure of spectra, matrix effects) and the data on the mobility and reactivity of atoms and radicals at very low temperatures are examined. The trends in the development of studies on CL in cryogenic matrices, such as the search for systems involving polyatomic molecules and extending the forms of CL reactions, are followed. The reactions of active nitrogen with hydrocarbons that are accompanied by light emission and CL in the oxidation of carbenes at T >= 77 K are examined. The bibliography includes 112 references.

  17. Pengaruh unsur Tembaga (Cu terhadap fluiditas paduan Al-Si 11.8 wt% (ADC 12 dengan metode Vacuum Suction Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Suharno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Al-Si 11.8 wt% alloy which classified to eutectic Al-Si composition usually used to produce a flat casting product with high pressure die casting process. Alloying element become an important things to determine behavior and characteristic of aluminum. Copper added into aluminum to improve strength and hardness, but there has no many studies on the effect of copper on fluidity. This fluidity study is using vacuum suction test method and the microstructure is observed with SEM/EDS. Spectrometer test has been used to find out chemical composition of sample. The result of this study shows that with copper addition from 2.25 wt% to 3.11 wt%, the fluidity value has increased 24.11% on 680oC pouring temperature. On 3.11 wt% copper composition, fluidity value has increased 14.38% from 640oC pouring temperature to 700oC pouring temperature.

  18. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  19. Cryogenic high current discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meierovich, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    Z-pinches formed from frozen deuterium fibers by a rapidly rising current have enhanced stability and high neutron yield. The efforts to understand the enhanced stability and neutron yield on the basis of classical picture of Bennett equilibrium of the current channel has not given satisfactory results. The traditional approach does not take into account the essential difference between the frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinches and the usual Z-pinches such as exploding wires or classical gas-puffed Z-pinches. The very low temperature of the fiber atoms (10 K), together with the rapidly rising current, result in the coexistence of a high current channel with unionized fiber atoms for a substantial period of time. This phenomena lasts during the risetime. This approach takes into account the difference of the breakdown in a dielectric deuterium fiber and the breakdown in a metallic wire. This difference is essential to the understanding of specific features of cryogenic high current discharges. Z-pinches in frozen deuterium fibers should be considered as a qualitatively new phenomenon on the boundary of cryogenic and high current physics. It is a start of a new branch in plasma physics: the physics of cryogenic high current discharges

  20. Manufactured by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd of Harima, in Japan, the cryostat of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel underwent very strict cryogenic tests before being shipped to Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The cryostat consists of a vacuum chamber, a cylinder that is 5.5 metres in diameter, 7 metres long, and a concentric cold chamber to be filled with liquid argon that will house the detector. The whole unit is made out of aluminium 5083 and will weigh 210 tonnes when put together with the detector.