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Sample records for cryogenic ferromagnetic iron

  1. Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Gingrich, Eric C.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2015-03-01

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic materials are of interest for both scientific and technological purposes. In principle, either the amplitude of the critical current or superconducting phase shift across the junction can be controlled by the relative magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers in the junction. Our approach concentrates on phase control utilizing two junctions in a SQUID geometry. We will report on efforts to control the phase of junctions carrying either spin-singlet or spin-triplet supercurrent for cryogenic memory applications. Supported by Northorp Grumman Corporation and by IARPA under SPAWAR Contract N66001-12-C-2017.

  2. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  3. Competing ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic interactions in iron nitride ζ-Fe2N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Sandeep; Salunke, H. G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper discusses the magnetic state of zeta phase of iron nitride viz. ζ-Fe2N on the basis of spin polarized first principles electronic structure calculations together with a review of already published data. Results of our first principles study suggest that the ground state of ζ-Fe2N is ferromagnetic (FM) with a magnetic moment of 1.528μB on the Fe site. The FM ground state is lower than the anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) state by 8.44 meV and non-magnetic (NM) state by 191 meV per formula unit. These results are important in view of reports which claim that ζ-Fe2N undergoes an AFM transition below 10 K and others which do not observe any magnetic transition up to 4.2 K. We argue that the experimental results of AFM transition below 10 K are inconclusive and we propose the presence of competing FM and AFM superexchange interactions between Fe sites mediated by nitrogen atoms, which are consistent with Goodenough-Kanamori-Anderson rules. We find that the anti-ferromagnetically coupled Fe sites are outnumbered by ferromagnetically coupled Fe sites leading to a stable FM ground state. A Stoner analysis of the results also supports our claim of a FM ground state.

  4. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  5. Phase Sensitive Measurements of Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Bethany Maria

    A Josephson junction is made up of two superconducting layers separated by a barrier. The original Josephson junctions, studied in the early 1960's, contained an insulating barrier. Soon thereafter, junctions with normal-metal barriers were also studied. Ferromagnetic materials were not even theoretically considered as a barrier layer until around 1980, due to the competing order between ferromagnetic and superconducting systems. However, many exciting physical phenomena arise in hybrid superconductor/ferromagnetic devices, including devices where the ground state phase difference between the two superconductors is shifted by pi. Since their experimental debut in 2001, so-called pi junctions have been demonstrated by many groups, including my own, in systems with a single ferromagnetic layer. In this type of system, the phase of the junction can be set to either 0 or pi depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer. Of interest, however, is the ability to control the phase of a single junction between the 0 and pi states. This was theoretically shown to be possible in a system containing two ferromagnetic layers (spin-valve junctions). If the materials and their thicknesses are properly chosen to manipulate the electron pair correlation function, then the phase state of a spin-valve Josephson junction should be capable of switching between the 0 and ? phase states when the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic layers are oriented in the antiparallel and parallel configurations, respectively. Such a phase-controllable junction would have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, which is a necessary component to an ultra-low power superconducting computer. A fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. The goal of this work was to experimentally verify this prediction for a phase-controllable ferromagnetic Josephson junction. To address this

  6. Quantum oscillations and ferromagnetic hysteresis observed in iron filled multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzola-Quiquia, J; Klingner, N; Krüger, J; Molle, A; Esquinazi, P; Leonhardt, A; Martínez, M T

    2012-01-13

    We report on the electrical transport properties of single multiwall carbon nanotubes with and without an iron filling as a function of temperature and magnetic field. For the iron filled nanotubes the magnetoresistance shows a magnetic behavior induced by iron, which can be explained by taking into account a contribution of s-d hybridization. In particular, ferromagnetic-like hysteresis loops were observed up to 50 K for the iron filled multiwall carbon nanotubes. The magnetoresistance shows quantum interference phenomena such as universal conductance fluctuations and weak localization effects.

  7. Quantum oscillations and ferromagnetic hysteresis observed in iron filled multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzola-Quiquia, Jose; Klingner, Niko; Molle, Axel [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, University of Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Leonhardt, Albrecht [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Carbon-based materials as multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are attractive for spintronics because spin is only weakly coupled to the lattice, leading to large spin-flip scattering length and long spin relaxation times. In this contribution we have investigated the electrical transport properties of iron filled MWCNT (outer diameter 150 nm, inner diameter 25 nm and length 2000 nm) as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We observed quantum interference effects, i.e. universal conductance fluctuations, and weak localization effects. The in-plane magnetoresistance shows typical butterfly structure revealing the ferromagnetic properties of the Fe-filled MWCNT. The ferromagnetic hysteresis was observed up to 40K.

  8. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkov, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The application of cryogenics in various areas of science and technology is related in a popular way. Utilization of cryogenics in the following production processes is described: separation of air, gas mixtures; production of helium; separation of hydrogen isotopes; production of deuterium. Applications of cryogenics in refrigerating engineering, superconductivity and high-energy physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, superconducting electric motors and electric energy storages are considered

  9. Shape Memory Polyurethane Materials Containing Ferromagnetic Iron Oxide and Graphene Nanoplatelets

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Magdalena; Strankowski, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent materials, such as memory shape polymers, have attracted considerable attention due to wide range of possible applications. Currently, intensive research is underway, in matters of obtaining memory shape materials that can be actuated via inductive methods, for example with help of magnetic field. In this work, an attempt was made to develop a new polymer composite—polyurethane modified with graphene nanoplates and ferromagnetic iron oxides—with improved mechanical properties and ...

  10. ε-iron nitrides: Intrinsic anomalous Hall ferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Ke Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The anomalous Hall effect in ε-iron nitrides (ε-Fe3-xN, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 has been systematically investigated taking advantage of the fact that the exchange splitting of ε-Fe3-xN can be continuously tuned through the nitrogen concentration. It has been found that the anomalous Hall conductivity, σ x y A H , is proportional to the saturation magnetization MS, i.e., σ x y A H = S H M S , across significant variations in the saturation magnetization (96–1146 emu/cc. This relationship is in excellent agreement with the intrinsic mechanism as well as with the unified theory of AHE. Our results also demonstrate that the anomalous Hall conductivity is sensitive to the exchange splitting of the band structure.

  11. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenics refers to the coldest area known in nature. This temperature range has an upper limit arbitrarily defined as -100 degrees C (-250 degrees C by some) and a lower limit of absolute zero. These limits separate it from the temperature range generally used in refrigerating engineering. One important application of cryogenics is the separation ad purification of air into its various components (oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and the rare gases). Other important developments have been the large-scale production of liquid hydrogen; helium extraction from natural gas; storage and transport of liquefied gases such as oxygen, argon, nitrogen, helium, neon, xenon, and hydrogen; liquefaction of natural gas for ocean transport and peak shaving; and many new types of cryogenic refrigeration devices. This paper introduces the topic of cryogenic engineering. Cryogenic processes generally range from ambient conditions to the boiling point of the cryogenic fluid. Cryogenic cycles also incorporate two or more pressure levels. These properties must also cover the vapor, vapor-liquid, and sometimes the solid regions. Therefore, the physical properties of fluids over a great range of temperatures and pressures must be known. Solubility of contaminants must be known in order to design for their removal. The main physical properties for design purposes are those usually used in unit operations, such as fluid flow, heat transfer, and the like, in addition to those directly related to the Joule-Thomson effect and expansion work. Properties such as density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, vapor pressure, and vapor-liquid equilibriums are generally obtained in graphical, tabular, or equation form, as a function of temperature and pressure

  12. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Chui

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  13. Ferromagnetic nuclear resonance investigation of the surface magnetization in iron sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Tompa, K.

    1977-09-01

    The role of the domain structure and domain properties in ferromagnetic nuclear resonance (FNR) experiments is reconsidered. Using the FNR signal intensity as a measure of surface domain wall volume, it is found that the behaviour of the surface magnetization differs from that of the bulk magnetization of iron sheets. Namely, a critical field below which the FNR signal remains unchanqed is observed in the surface magnetization. This lag of surface domain wall annihilation is sensitive to the given surface conditions and in particular to the rolling deformation. Considering the small skin depth, FNR as a surface testing method is discussed. (D.P.)

  14. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  15. Slurry Erosion Behavior of Destabilized and Deep Cryogenically Treated Cr-Mn-Cu White Cast Irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gupta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of destabilization treatment and destabilization followed by cryogenic treatment have been evaluated on the microstructural evolution and sand-water slurry erosion behavior of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast irons. The phase transformations after the destabilization and cryotreatment have been characterized by bulk hardness measurement, optical and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis. The static corrosion rate has been measured in tap water (with pH=7 and the erosion-corrosion behavior has been studied by slurry pot tester using sand-water slurry. The test results indicate that the cryogenic treatment has a significant effect in minimizing the as-cast retained austenite content and transforming into martensitic and bainitic matrix embedded with ultra-fine M7C3 alloy carbides. In contrast, by conventional destabilization treatment retained austenite in the matrix are not fully eliminated. The slurry erosive wear resistance has been compared with reference to destabilized and cryotreated high chromium iron samples which are commonly employed for such applications. The cryotreated Cr-Mn-Cu irons have exhibited a comparable erosive wear performance to those of high chromium irons. Higher hardness combined with improved corrosion resistance result in better slurry erosion resistance.

  16. Quantitative ferromagnetic resonance analysis of CD 133 stem cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamarra, L F; Pavon, L F; Marti, L C; Moreira-Filho, C A; Amaro, E Jr; Pontuschka, W M; Mamani, J B; Costa-Filho, A J; Vieira, E D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a quantitative method for analysis of the concentration of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION), determined by means of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), with the nanoparticles coupled to a specific antibody (AC 133), and thus to express the antigenic labeling evidence for the stem cells CD 133 + . The FMR efficiency and sensitivity were proven adequate for detecting and quantifying the low amounts of iron content in the CD 133 + cells (∼6.16 x 10 5 pg in the volume of 2 μl containing 4.5 x 10 11 SPION). The quantitative method led to the result of 1.70 x 10 -13 mol of Fe (9.5 pg), or 7.0 x 10 6 nanoparticles per cell. For the quantification analysis via the FMR technique it was necessary to carry out a preliminary quantitative visualization of iron oxide-labeled cells in order to ensure that the nanoparticles coupled to the antibodies are indeed tied to the antigen at the stem cell surface and that the cellular morphology was conserved, as proof of the validity of this method. The quantitative analysis by means of FMR is necessary for determining the signal intensity for the study of molecular imaging by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  17. Quantitative ferromagnetic resonance analysis of CD 133 stem cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamarra, L F; Pavon, L F; Marti, L C; Moreira-Filho, C A; Amaro, E Jr [Instituto Israelita de Ensino e Pesquisa Albert Einstein, IIEPAE, Sao Paulo 05651-901 (Brazil); Pontuschka, W M; Mamani, J B [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05315-970 (Brazil); Costa-Filho, A J; Vieira, E D [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos 13560-970 (Brazil)], E-mail: lgamarra@einstein.br

    2008-05-21

    The aim of this work is to provide a quantitative method for analysis of the concentration of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION), determined by means of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), with the nanoparticles coupled to a specific antibody (AC 133), and thus to express the antigenic labeling evidence for the stem cells CD 133{sup +}. The FMR efficiency and sensitivity were proven adequate for detecting and quantifying the low amounts of iron content in the CD 133{sup +} cells ({approx}6.16 x 10{sup 5} pg in the volume of 2 {mu}l containing 4.5 x 10{sup 11} SPION). The quantitative method led to the result of 1.70 x 10{sup -13} mol of Fe (9.5 pg), or 7.0 x 10{sup 6} nanoparticles per cell. For the quantification analysis via the FMR technique it was necessary to carry out a preliminary quantitative visualization of iron oxide-labeled cells in order to ensure that the nanoparticles coupled to the antibodies are indeed tied to the antigen at the stem cell surface and that the cellular morphology was conserved, as proof of the validity of this method. The quantitative analysis by means of FMR is necessary for determining the signal intensity for the study of molecular imaging by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  18. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N B; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. © 2015 Scientific Reports.

  19. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Aigu L.

    2015-06-23

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. © 2015 Scientific Reports.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of three-magnon process driven by ferromagnetic resonance in yttrium iron garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, R. O. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Centro Interdisciplinar de Ciências da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguaçu, PR (Brazil); Holanda, J.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M., E-mail: rezende@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Vilela-Leão, L. H. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Centro Acadêmico do Agreste, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 55002-970 Caruaru, PE (Brazil); Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L. [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-11

    We report an investigation of the dynamics of the three-magnon splitting process associated with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in films of the insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG). The experiments are performed with a 6 μm thick YIG film close to a microstrip line fed by a microwave generator operating in the 2–6 GHz range. The magnetization precession is driven by the microwave rf magnetic field perpendicular to the static magnetic field, and its dynamics is observed by monitoring the amplitude of the FMR absorption peak. The time evolution of the amplitude reveals that if the frequency is lowered below a critical value of 3.3 GHz, the FMR mode pumps two magnons with opposite wave vectors that react back on the FMR, resulting in a nonlinear dynamics of the magnetization. The results are explained by a model with coupled nonlinear equations describing the time evolution of the magnon modes.

  1. Effects of iron deficiency on anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in Bi-doped LiZn ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bi-doped LiZn ferrites with different iron deficiencies were fabricated by a conventional ceramic method. Anisotropy constant (K1 was calculated and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR linewidth (ΔH was investigated. Crystalline anisotropy broadening linewidth (ΔHa and porosity broadening linewidth (ΔHp were derived by an approximate calculation based on dipolar narrowing theory, which play a significant role in contributions to FMR linewidth and occupy more than 90 % of ΔH. Physical and static magnetic properties of LiZn ferrite with iron deficiency are presented, which supports a decline in linewidths with increasing iron deficiency. Iron deficiency makes K1, ΔHa and ΔHp reduce. The results also show that ΔHp is the majority of contributions to ΔH in Bi-doped LiZn ferrite and densification is an effective method to decrease ΔH.

  2. Electronic and magnetic coupling of iron and copper phthalocyanine to ferromagnetic Co(100) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Felix; Sauther, Jens; Lach, Stefan; Ziegler, Christiane [Department of Physics, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin Schroedinger Str. 56, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Ali, Ehesan; Oppeneer, Peter [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Box 530, Uppsala University, S-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Metallo-phthalocyanines are organic semiconductors which show in certain cases promising magnetic properties, advertising them for use in organic spintronics. Here, copper (CuPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) were grown on ultra thin layers of Co(100) substrates with well known highly spin-polarized electron injection capability. Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals different interactions between the pyrolytic nitrogen atoms and the cobalt surface for the two phthalocyanines. The analysis of the different multiplet structures appearing for the nitrogen core levels in the submonolayer regime and UPS investigations of the valence band electronic structure of the Co dominated region near the Fermi level indicates a particularly electronic coupling and a rehybridisation of the molecular orbitals with the cobalt orbitals. In order to clarify the influence of the two different central atoms on the electronic- and subsequently the magnetic coupling to the Co substrate, theoretical calculations using the GGA and GGA+U methodologies on a structure of Fe/Cu-phthalocyanine adsorbed on a 3-layered cobalt surface were performed indicating a ferromagnetic coupling between FePc and Co.

  3. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment and tempering on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of a wear-resistant austempered alloyed bainitic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liqing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of deep cryogenic treatment in combination with conven- tional heat treatment process was investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed bainitic ductile iron. Three processing schedules were employed to treat this alloyed ductile iron including direct tempering treatment, tempering.+deep cryogenic treatment and deep cryogenic treatment.+tempering treatments. The microstructure and mechanical behavior, especially the wear resistance, have been evaluated after treated by these three schedules. The results show that martensite microstructure can be obviously refined and the precipitation of dispersed carbides is promoted by deep cryogenic treatment at .−196 ∘C for 3 h after tempered at 450 ∘C for 2 h. In this case, the alloyed bainitic ductile iron possesses rather high hardness and wear-resistance than those processed by other two schedules. The main wear mechanism of the austempered alloyed ductile iron with deep cryogenic treatment and tempering is micro-cutting wear in association with plastic deformation wear.

  4. Chemical solution synthesis and ferromagnetic resonance of epitaxial thin films of yttrium iron garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Irene; Jiménez-Cavero, Pilar; Vila-Fungueiriño, J. M.; Magén, Cesar; Sangiao, Soraya; de Teresa, José Maria; Morellón, Luis; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2017-12-01

    We report the fabrication of epitaxial Y3F e5O12 (YIG) thin films on G d3G a5O12 (111) using a chemical solution method. Cubic YIG is a ferrimagnetic material at room temperature, with excellent magneto-optical properties, high electrical resistivity, and a very narrow ferromagnetic resonance, which makes it particularly suitable for applications in filters and resonators at microwave frequencies. But these properties depend on the precise stoichiometry and distribution of F e3 + ions among the octahedral/tetrahedral sites of a complex structure, which hampered the production of high-quality YIG thin films by affordable chemical methods. Here we report the chemical solution synthesis of YIG thin films, with excellent chemical, crystalline, and magnetic homogeneity. The films show a very narrow ferromagnetic resonance (long spin relaxation time), comparable to that obtained from high-vacuum physical deposition methods. These results demonstrate that chemical methods can compete to develop nanometer-thick YIG films with the quality required for spintronic devices and other high-frequency applications.

  5. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and wear performance of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast iron grinding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthi, M. K.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2013-12-01

    The phase transformation and grinding wear behavior of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast irons subjected to destabilization treatment followed by air cooling or deep cryogenic treatment were studied as a part of the development program of substitute alloys for existing costly wear resistant alloys. The microstructural evolution during heat treatment and the consequent improvement in grinding wear performance were evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, bulk hardness, impact toughness and corrosion rate measurements, laboratory ball mill grinding wear test etc. The deep cryogenic treatment has a significant effect in minimizing the retained austenite content and converts it to martensite embedded with fine M7C3 alloy carbides. The cumulative wear losses in cryotreated alloys are lesser than those with conventionally destabilized alloys followed by air cooling both in wet and dry grinding conditions. The cryotreated Cr-Mn-Cu irons exhibit comparable wear performance to high chromium irons.

  6. Achieving DFT accuracy with a machine-learning interatomic potential: Thermomechanics and defects in bcc ferromagnetic iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Daniele; Daff, Thomas D.; Csányi, Gábor; Marzari, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    We show that the Gaussian Approximation Potential (GAP) machine-learning framework can describe complex magnetic potential energy surfaces, taking ferromagnetic iron as a paradigmatic challenging case. The training database includes total energies, forces, and stresses obtained from density-functional theory in the generalized-gradient approximation, and comprises approximately 150,000 local atomic environments, ranging from pristine and defected bulk configurations to surfaces and generalized stacking faults with different crystallographic orientations. We find the structural, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of the GAP model to be in excellent agreement with those obtained directly from first-principles electronic-structure calculations. There is good transferability to quantities, such as Peierls energy barriers, which are determined to a large extent by atomic configurations that were not part of the training set. We observe the benefit and the need of using highly converged electronic-structure calculations to sample a target potential energy surface. The end result is a systematically improvable potential that can achieve the same accuracy of density-functional theory calculations, but at a fraction of the computational cost.

  7. Ferromagnetic resonance in a single crystal of iron borate and magnetic field tuning of hybrid oscillations in a composite structure with a dielectric: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, M. A.; Zavislyak, I. V.; Chumak, H. L.; Strugatsky, M. B.; Yagupov, S. V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The high-frequency properties of a composite resonator comprised single crystal iron borate (FeBO 3 ), a canted antiferromagnet with a weak ferromagnetic moment, and a polycrystalline dielectric were investigated at 9–10 GHz. Ferromagnetic resonance in this frequency range was observed in FeBO 3 for bias magnetic fields of ∼250 Oe. In the composite resonator, the magnetic mode in iron borate and dielectric mode are found to hybridize strongly. It is shown that the hybrid mode can be tuned with a static magnetic field. Our studies indicate that coupling between the magnetic mode and the dielectric resonance can be altered from maximum hybridization to a minimum by adjusting the position of resonator inside the waveguide. Magnetic field tuning of the resonance frequency by a maximum of 145 MHz and a change in the transmitted microwave power by as much as 16 dB have been observed for a bias field of 250 Oe. A model is discussed for the magnetic field tuning of the composite resonator and theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with the data. The composite resonator with a weak ferromagnet and a dielectric is of interest for application in frequency agile devices with electronically tunable electrodynamic characteristics for the mm and sub-mm wave bands

  8. Mapping the Superconducting Anti-ferromagnetic C4 Phase in Iron-Pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadel, Ryan; Taddei, Keith; Bugaris, Dan; Lapidus, Saul; Claus, Helmut; Phelan, Daniel; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Chmaissem, Omar

    Following the discovery of the microscopic coexistence of antifermagnetic spin density waves and superconductivity in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 and the low temperature re-entrance to the novel magnetic C4 tetragonal phase in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2, there has been significant interest in developing an understanding of the properties and formation of these phases and analyzing their dependence on temperature and composition in hole-doped 122 alkaline earth metal/iron-pnictides. We describe the mapping of various Ba, Sr, and Ca 122 phase diagrams with systematically controlled levels of hole-doping of alkaline metal onto the alkaline earth metal site, which was investigated via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Our elaborate synthesis, diffraction work, and analysis maps and firmly establishes the C4 phase space in these ternary diagrams as well as the boundary lines that separate the individual phases, and provides natural clues as well as a framework to investigate the stability and formation of the C4 domes that shift location with doping contents in the phase diagrams. Work at Argonne was supported by US DOE, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  9. Self-induced inverse spin-Hall effect in an iron and a cobalt single-layer films themselves under the ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Kazunari; Teki, Yoshio; Shikoh, Eiji

    2018-05-01

    The inverse spin-Hall effect (ISHE) is produced even in a "single-layer" ferromagnetic material film. Previously, the self-induced ISHE in a Ni80Fe20 film under the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was discovered. In this study, we observed an electromotive force (EMF) in an iron (Fe) and a cobalt (Co) single-layer films themselves under the FMR. As origins of the EMFs in the films themselves, the ISHE was main for Fe and dominant for Co, respectively 2 and 18 times larger than the anomalous Hall effect. Thus, we demonstrated the self-induced ISHE in an Fe and a Co single-layer films themselves under the FMR.

  10. Comparative study of magnetic properties and the anticancer effect of superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the nanocomplex with doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orel, V.E.; Shevchenko, A.D.; Rikhal's'kij, O.Yu.; Romanov, A.V.; Orel, Yi.V.; Lukyin, S.M.; Burlaka, A.P.; Venger, Je.F.

    2015-01-01

    Mechano-magneto-chemically synthesized magnetic nanocomplex (MNC) of superparamagnetic iron oxide Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NP) and anticancer drug doxorubicin (DR) had significantly lower saturation magnetic moment and magnetic hysteresis loop area as compared to the MNC of ferro- magnetic NP. However, the last was characterized by lower coercivity. MNC of superparamagnetic NP and DR had g-factors of 2.00, 2.30, and 4.00. MNC of ferromagnetic NP and DR had the g-factor of 2.50, and the integrated intensity of electron spin resonance signals was by 61% greater. Superparamagnetic iron oxide Fe 3 O 4 NP in MNC with DR initiated a greater antitumor effect during magnetic nanotherapy of animals with carcinosarcoma Walker-256 as compared to the MNC composed of ferromagnetic NP and DR. In the future, superparamagnetic iron oxide Fe 3 O 4 NP as a part of the nanocomplex with DR can be used in theranostics - a methodology that combines magnetic resonance diagnostics and magnetic nanotherapy using MNC both as therapeutic and diagnostic agents

  11. SrFe1‑xMoxO2+δ : parasitic ferromagnetism in an infinite-layer iron oxide with defect structures induced by interlayer oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianhui; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jiyin; Wang, Yang; Yuan, Xueyou; Li, Yang; Wu, Liang

    2018-04-01

    The recent discovered compound SrFeO2 is an infinite-layer-structure iron oxide with unusual square-planar coordination of Fe2+ ions. In this study, SrFe1‑xMoxO2+δ (x parasitic ferromagnetism of the compound and its relationship to the defect structures are investigated. It is found that substitution of high-valent Mo6+ for Fe2+ results in excess oxygen anions O2‑ inserted at the interlayer sites for charge compensation, which further causes large atomic displacements along the c-axis. Due to the robust but flexible Fe-O-Fe framework, the samples are well crystallized within the ab-plane, but are significantly poorer crystallized along the c-axis. Defect structures including local lattice distortions and edge dislocations responsible for the lowered crystallinity are observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Both the magnetic measurements and electron spin resonance spectra provide the evidence of a parasitic ferromagnetism (FM). The week FM interaction originated from the imperfect antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering could be ascribed to the introduction of uncompensated magnetic moments due to substitution of Mo6+ (S = 0) for Fe2+ (S = 2) and the canted/frustrated spins resulted from defect structures.

  12. Coexistence of multiphase superconductivity and ferromagnetism in lithiated iron selenide hydroxide [(L i1 -xF ex) OH ]FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Christian; Valmianski, Ilya; Pachmayr, Ursula; Basaran, Ali C.; Johrendt, Dirk; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2018-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for (a) multiphase superconductivity and (b) coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a single structural phase of lithiated iron selenide hydroxide [(L i1 -xF ex )OH]FeSe. Magnetic field modulated microwave spectroscopy data confirms superconductivity with at least two distinct transition temperatures attributed to well-defined superconducting phases at TSC 1=40 ±2 K and TSC 2=35 ±2 K. Magnetometry data for the upper critical fields reveal a change in the magnetic order (TM=12 K) below TSC 1 and TSC 2 that is consistent with ferromagnetism. This occurs because the superconducting coherence length is much smaller than the structural coherence length, allowing for several different electronic and magnetic states on a single crystallite. The results give insight into the physics of complex multinary materials, where several phenomena governed by different characteristic length scales coexist.

  13. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, L.; Šob, Mojmír; Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G-H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2014), 086002-1-086002-17 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0311; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : electronic structure * magnetism * iron * ab initio calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  14. Molecular ferromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    This past year has been one of substantial advancement in both the physics and chemistry of molecular and polymeric ferromagnets. The specific heat studies of (DMeFc)(TCNE) have revealed a cusp at the three-dimensional ferromagnetic transition temperature with a crossover to primarily 1-D behavior at higher temperatures. This paper discusses these studies

  15. A novel type of electrochemical sensor based on ferromagnetic carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles for direct determination of hemoglobin in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Edyta; Donten, Mikolaj; Kowalczyk, Agata; Bystrzejewski, Michal; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P; Nowicka, Anna M

    2015-02-15

    An effective, fast, facile and direct electrochemical method of determination of hemoglobin (Hb) in blood sample without any sample preparation is described. The method is accomplished by using the ferromagnetic electrode modifier (carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles) and an external magnetic field. The successful voltammetric determination of hemoglobin is achieved in PBS buffer as well as in the whole blood sample. The obtained results show the excellent electroactivity of Hb. The measurements are of high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection limit is estimated to be 0.7 pM. The electrochemical determination data were compared with the gravimetric data obtained with a quartz crystal microbalance. The agreement between these results is very good. The changes of the electrode surface morphology before and after Hb detection are monitored by electron microscopy. The functionality of the electrochemical sensor is tested with human and rat blood samples. The concentration of hemoglobin in the blood samples determined by using voltammetric/gravimetric detection is in perfect agreement with the data obtained from typical clinical analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sign of inverse spin Hall voltages generated by ferromagnetic resonance and temperature gradients in yttrium iron garnet platinum bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreier, Michael; Lotze, Johannes; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T B; Bauer, Gerrit E W; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Daimon, Shunsuke; Kikkawa, Takashi; Saitoh, Eiji; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Lauer, Viktor; Chumak, Andrii V; Serga, Alexander A; Hillebrands, Burkard; Flipse, Joost; Van Wees, Bart J

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a concerted effort to determine the absolute sign of the inverse spin Hall effect voltage generated by spin currents injected into a normal metal. We focus on yttrium iron garnet (YIG)∣platinum bilayers at room temperature, generating spin currents by microwaves and temperature gradients. We find consistent results for different samples and measurement setups that agree with theory. We suggest a right-hand-rule to define a positive spin Hall angle corresponding to the voltage expected for the simple case of scattering of free electrons from repulsive Coulomb charges. (paper)

  17. Room temperature ferromagnetism of iron-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods synthesized by a low temperature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melghit, Khaled [Chemistry Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman)], E-mail: melghit@squ.edu.om; Bouziane, Khalid [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman)

    2008-04-03

    Nanorods of Fe-TiO{sub 2} were synthesized at 100 deg. C and room pressure by mixing titanium oxide wet gel TiO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O with a boiling solution of iron nitrate. The results of EDAX, performed on different selected area of the sample, revealed a homogeneous composition of about 3 at% Fe. Electron diffraction and XRD measurements show that the as-prepared Fe-TiO{sub 2} and annealed one at 550 deg. C have both a single rutile structure with no indication about the presence of a secondary phase. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that both as-prepared Fe-TiO{sub 2} and annealed one at 550 deg. C have nanorod-shape with dimensions length by diameter of about 60 x 5 nm and 52 x 12 nm, respectively. Magnetization measurements show that both samples present a nonzero remanence and a coercivity of 108 and 120 Oe, respectively. At higher temperature, 850 deg. C, Fe-TiO{sub 2} decomposes to rutile TiO{sub 2} and new iron-titanate phase.

  18. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  19. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Sob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-02-26

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ(B) and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ(B) when the atomic volume is larger than 22 ų. It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I(3d) = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B) for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ(B). Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0-4.0 μ(B)) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I(h)(3d) = (0.272 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B). The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 ų), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  20. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Šob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ B and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ B when the atomic volume is larger than 22 Å 3 . It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I 3d = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ B for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ B . Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0–4.0 μ B ) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I 3d h =(0.272±0.006) eV/μ B . The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 Å 3 ), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  1. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  2. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  3. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  4. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-08-26

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  5. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  6. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  7. Ferromagnetic nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, C A F; Hayward, T J; Llandro, J; Schackert, F; Morecroft, D; Bland, J A C; Klaeui, M; Laufenberg, M; Backes, D; Ruediger, U; Castano, F J; Ross, C A; Heyderman, L J; Nolting, F; Locatelli, A; Faini, G; Cherifi, S; Wernsdorfer, W

    2007-01-01

    Ferromagnetic metal rings of nanometre range widths and thicknesses exhibit fundamentally new spin states, switching behaviour and spin dynamics, which can be precisely controlled via geometry, material composition and applied field. Following the discovery of the 'onion state', which mediates the switching to and between vortex states, a range of fascinating phenomena has been found in these structures. In this overview of our work on ring elements, we first show how the geometric parameters of ring elements determine the exact equilibrium spin configuration of the domain walls of rings in the onion state, and we show how such behaviour can be understood as the result of the competition between the exchange and magnetostatic energy terms. Electron transport provides an extremely sensitive probe of the presence, spatial location and motion of domain walls, which determine the magnetic state in individual rings, while magneto-optical measurements with high spatial resolution can be used to probe the switching behaviour of ring structures with very high sensitivity. We illustrate how the ring geometry has been used for the study of a wide variety of magnetic phenomena, including the displacement of domain walls by electric currents, magnetoresistance, the strength of the pinning potential introduced by nanometre size constrictions, the effect of thermal excitations on the equilibrium state and the stochastic nature of switching events

  8. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C; Jimenez D, J; Cejudo A, J; Hernandez M, V [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  9. Cryogenic regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kush, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Importance of regenerators in cryogenic refrigerators is highlighted. Design aspects of regenerator are reviewed and the factors involved in the selection of regenerator material are enumerated. Various methods used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and regenerator effectiveness are mentioned. Variation of effectiveness with various parameters is calculated by a computer programme using the ideal, Ackermann and Tipler formulae. Results are presented in graphical form. Listing of the computer programme is given in the Appendix. (author)

  10. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhmatullin, R. M., E-mail: rrakhmat@kpfu.ru; Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L. [Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  11. An electromagnetically actuated fiber optic switch using magnetized ferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandojirao-S, Praveen; Dhaubanjar, Naresh; Phuyal, Pratibha C.; Chiao, Mu; Chiao, J.-C.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of a fiber optic switch actuated electromagnetically. The ferromagnetic gel coated optical fiber is actuated using external electromagnetic fields. The ferromagnetic gel consists of ferromagnetic powders dispersed in epoxy. The fabrication utilizes a simple cost-effective coating setup. A direct fiberto-fiber alignment eliminates the need for complementary optical parts and the displacement of fiber switches the laser coupling. The magnetic characteristics of magnetized ferromagnetic materials are performed using alternating gradient magnetometer and the magnetic hysteresis curves are measured for different ferromagnetic materials including iron, cobalt, and nickel. Optical fiber switches with various fiber lengths are actuated and their static and dynamic responses for the same volume of ferromagnetic gel are summarized. The highest displacement is 1.345 mm with an input current of 260mA. In this paper, the performance of fiber switches with various coating materials is presented.

  12. Cryogenic photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardin, G.

    2000-03-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  13. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  14. Magnon-photon interaction in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, K.N.

    1980-01-01

    A magnon-photon interaction for the magnetic vector of the electromagnetic wave perpendicular to the direction of magnetization in a ferromagnet is constructed with the use of Bogoliubov transformation. The resulting magnon-photon interaction is found to contain several interesting new radiation effects. The self-energy of the magnon is calculated and life times arising from the radiation scattering are predicted. The magnon frequency shift due to the radiation field is found. One of the terms arising from the one-magnon one-photon scattering gives a line width that is in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured value of ferromagnetic resonance line width in yttrium iron garnet. (orig.)

  15. LDR cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T.

    1988-01-01

    A brief summary from the 1985 Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Asilomar 2 workshop of the requirements for LDR cryogenic cooling is presented. The heat rates are simply the sum of the individual heat rates from the instruments. Consideration of duty cycle will have a dramatic effect on cooling requirements. There are many possible combinations of cooling techniques for each of the three temperatures zones. It is clear that much further system study is needed to determine what type of cooling system is required (He-2, hybrid or mechanical) and what size and power is required. As the instruments, along with their duty cycles and heat rates, become better defined it will be possible to better determine the optimum cooling systems.

  16. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanai, K.

    2017-01-01

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed.

  17. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasanai, K., E-mail: krisakronmsu@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed. - Highlights: • The conductance spectra of a FM/FM/FM junction were calculated. • The conductance spectra were suppressed by the exchange energy. • The exchange energy and the potential strength play similar roles in the junctions.

  18. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasanai, K.

    2017-01-01

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed. - Highlights: • The conductance spectra of a FM/FM/FM junction were calculated. • The conductance spectra were suppressed by the exchange energy. • The exchange energy and the potential strength play similar roles in the junctions.

  19. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Targets with thin ferromagnetic layers for transient field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallant, J.L.; Dmytrenko, P.

    1982-01-01

    Multilayer targets containing a central layer sufficiently thin so that all recoil nuclei can traverse it and subsequently stop in a suitable cubic environment have been prepared. Such targets are required in experiments making use of a magnetic field acting on an ion moving through a ferromagnetic material. The preparation and annealing of the ferromagnetic foils (iron and gadolinium) and the fabrication of the multilayer targets are described. (orig.)

  1. The Physics of Ferromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2012-01-01

    This book covers both basic physics of ferromagnetism such as magnetic moment, exchange coupling, magnetic anisotropy and recent progress in advanced ferromagnetic materials. Special interests are focused on NdFeB permanent magnets and the materials studied in the field of spintronics. In the latter, development of tunnel magnetoresistance effect through so called giant magnetoresistance effect is explained.

  2. Mechanical milling of a nano structured ductile iron powder under dry, wet and cryogenic atmospheres; Proceso de molturacion mecanica en medio seco, humedo y criogenico de polvo de hierro ductil nanoestructurado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinca, N.; Hurtado, E.; Cano, I. G.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of this study, is to obtain an effective particle and grain size reduction of a nano structured iron powder by mechanical milling under different milling media. One of the main challenges in this study is to work with this material of great ductility.The variables of the study to be optimized have been the following: speed of rotation, powder to ball ratio (PBR) and the percentage of control agent to induce an effective powder fracturing in front of cold welding. The powder has been characterized by a Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyser, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, X-ray diffraction.Through the comparative study, it is found that operating under dry milling conditions: there is a more effective particle size reduction of 43 % and grain size reduction of 62 %. In wet conditions has been reduced the amount of oxide, as well as to obtain a more homogenous distribution of the resulting powder. The results under cryogenic media is presented as promising. (Author) 15 refs.

  3. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  4. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  5. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  6. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  7. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  8. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  9. The Kondo effect in ferromagnetic atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M Reyes; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquín; Palacios, Juan José; Jacob, David; Natelson, Douglas; Untiedt, Carlos

    2009-04-30

    Iron, cobalt and nickel are archetypal ferromagnetic metals. In bulk, electronic conduction in these materials takes place mainly through the s and p electrons, whereas the magnetic moments are mostly in the narrow d-electron bands, where they tend to align. This general picture may change at the nanoscale because electrons at the surfaces of materials experience interactions that differ from those in the bulk. Here we show direct evidence for such changes: electronic transport in atomic-scale contacts of pure ferromagnets (iron, cobalt and nickel), despite their strong bulk ferromagnetism, unexpectedly reveal Kondo physics, that is, the screening of local magnetic moments by the conduction electrons below a characteristic temperature. The Kondo effect creates a sharp resonance at the Fermi energy, affecting the electrical properties of the system; this appears as a Fano-Kondo resonance in the conductance characteristics as observed in other artificial nanostructures. The study of hundreds of contacts shows material-dependent log-normal distributions of the resonance width that arise naturally from Kondo theory. These resonances broaden and disappear with increasing temperature, also as in standard Kondo systems. Our observations, supported by calculations, imply that coordination changes can significantly modify magnetism at the nanoscale. Therefore, in addition to standard micromagnetic physics, strong electronic correlations along with atomic-scale geometry need to be considered when investigating the magnetic properties of magnetic nanostructures.

  10. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Z.; Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T c  = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Z., E-mail: honda@fms.saitama-u.ac.jp; Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T. [KYOKUGEN (Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions), Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  12. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  13. Cryogenics for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Three cryogenic questions of importance to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are discussed: the primary cooling requirement, the secondary cooling requirement, and the instrument changeout requirement.

  14. Nuclear orientation of rare earth impurities in ferromagnetic host metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keus, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are described investigating the behaviour of the metals Nd and Lu as impurities in a ferromagnetic host metal - iron, cobalt and nickel. The systems have been studied with the aid of nuclear orientation, making use of the interactions between the atom nuclei and the electrons - the so called hyperfine interactions. (C.F.)

  15. MOSFET's for Cryogenic Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaye, R.; Ventrice, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Study seeks ways to build transistors that function effectively at liquid-helium temperatures. Report discusses physics of metaloxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) and performances of these devices at cryogenic temperatures. MOSFET's useful in highly sensitive cryogenic preamplifiers for infrared astronomy.

  16. MFTF magnet cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    The prime requirement of the cryogenics of the magnets is to assure a superconducting state for the magnet coils, a large task considering their enormous size. The following presentation addresses the principal topics that have been considered in this cryogenic design

  17. Superconducting Ferromagnetic Nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gufei; Samuely, Tomas; Xu, Zheng; Jochum, Johanna K; Volodin, Alexander; Zhou, Shengqiang; May, Paul W; Onufriienko, Oleksandr; Kačmarčík, Jozef; Steele, Julian A; Li, Jun; Vanacken, Johan; Vacík, Jiri; Szabó, Pavol; Yuan, Haifeng; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Cerbu, Dorin; Samuely, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2017-06-27

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are two mutually antagonistic states in condensed matter. Research on the interplay between these two competing orderings sheds light not only on the cause of various quantum phenomena in strongly correlated systems but also on the general mechanism of superconductivity. Here we report on the observation of the electronic entanglement between superconducting and ferromagnetic states in hydrogenated boron-doped nanodiamond films, which have a superconducting transition temperature T c ∼ 3 K and a Curie temperature T Curie > 400 K. In spite of the high T Curie , our nanodiamond films demonstrate a decrease in the temperature dependence of magnetization below 100 K, in correspondence to an increase in the temperature dependence of resistivity. These anomalous magnetic and electrical transport properties reveal the presence of an intriguing precursor phase, in which spin fluctuations intervene as a result of the interplay between the two antagonistic states. Furthermore, the observations of high-temperature ferromagnetism, giant positive magnetoresistance, and anomalous Hall effect bring attention to the potential applications of our superconducting ferromagnetic nanodiamond films in magnetoelectronics, spintronics, and magnetic field sensing.

  18. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Leonhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology.

  19. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissker, Uhland; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology. PMID:28883334

  20. Integrated cryogenic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanarena, D.B.; Rao, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated cryogenic pressure-temperature, level-temperature, and flow-temperature sensors have several advantages over the conventional single parameter sensors. Such integrated sensors were not available until recently. Pressure Systems, Inc. (PSI) of Hampton, Virginia, has introduced precalibrated precision cryogenic pressure sensors at the Los Angeles Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1989. Recently, PSI has successfully completed the development of integrated pressure-temperature and level-temperature sensors for use in the temperature range 1.5-375K. In this paper, performance characteristics of these integrated sensors are presented. Further, the effects of irradiation and magnetic fields on these integrated sensors are also reviewed

  1. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  2. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  3. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  4. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  5. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  6. Temperature measurement error due to the effects of time varying magnetic fields on thermocouples with ferromagnetic thermoelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples with ferromagnetic thermoelements (iron, Alumel, Nisil) are used extensively in industry. We have observed the generation of voltage spikes within ferromagnetic wires when the wires are placed in an alternating magnetic field. This effect has implications for thermocouple thermometry, where it was first observed. For example, the voltage generated by this phenomenon will contaminate the thermocouple thermal emf, resulting in temperature measurement error

  7. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  8. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  9. Superconducting Ferromagnetic Nanodiamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, G.; Samuely, T.; Xu, Z.; Jochum, J. K.; Volodin, A.; Zhou, S. Q.; May, P. W.; Onufriienko, O.; Kacmarik, J.; Steele, J. A.; Li, J.; Vanacken, J.; Vacík, Jiří; Szabo, P.; Yuan, H. F.; Roeffaers, M. B. J.; Cerbu, D.; Samuely, P.; Hofkens, J.; Moshchalkov, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 6 (2017), s. 5358-5366 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nanodiamond * superconductivity and ferromagnetism * spin fluctuations * giant positive magnetoresistance * anamalous Hall effect Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nano-materials (production and properties ) Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  10. Calculated electronic structure of chromium surfaces and chromium monolayers on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victora, R.H.; Falicov, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the magnetic and electronic properties of the chromium (100) and (110) surfaces and of a chromium monolayer on the (100) and (110) iron surfaces is presented. It is found that (i) the (100) chromium surface is ferromagnetic with a greatly enhanced spin polarization (3.00 electrons); (ii) a substantial enhancement of the spin imbalance exists several (>5) layers into the bulk; (iii) the (110) chromium surface is antiferromagnetic with a large (2.31) spin imbalance; (iv) the (100) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is ferromagnetic, with a huge spin imbalance (3.63), and aligned antiferromagnetically with respect to the bulk iron; (v) the (110) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is also ferromagnetic, with a spin imbalance of 2.25 and antiferromagnetically aligned to the iron. The spin imbalance of chromium on iron (100) is possibly the largest of any transition-metal system

  11. Hysteresis in conducting ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Carl S.; Winchell, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Maxwell's magnetic diffusion equation is solved for conducting ferromagnetic cylinders to predict a magnetic wave velocity, a time delay for flux penetration and an eddy current field, one of five fields in the linear unified field model of hysteresis. Measured Faraday voltages for a thin steel toroid are shown to be proportional to magnetic field step amplitude and decrease exponentially in time due to maximum rather than average permeability. Dynamic permeabilities are a field convolution of quasistatic permeability and the delay function from which we derive and observe square root dependence of coercivity on rate of field change

  12. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  14. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  15. Cryogenic process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems

  16. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF cryogenic system consists of 3 refrigeration systems: Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), and End Station Refrigerator (ESR). CHL is the main cryogenic system for CEBAF, consisting of a 4.8 kW, 2.0 K refrigerator and transfer line system to supply 2.0 K and 12 kW of 50 K shield refrigeration for the Linac cavity cryostats and 10 g/s of liquid for the end stations. This paper describes the 9-year effort to commission these systems, concentrating on CHL with the cold compressors. The cold compressors are a cold vacuum pump with an inlet temperature of 3 K which use magnetic bearings, thereby eliminating the possibility of air leaks into the subatmospheric He

  17. A comprehensive study of ferromagnetic resonance and structural properties of iron-rich nickel ferrite (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4}, x≤1) films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachauri, Neha; Khodadadi, Behrouz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Singh, Amit V. [Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Mohammadi, Jamileh Beik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Martens, Richard L. [Central Analytical Facility (CAF), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); LeClair, Patrick R.; Mewes, Claudia; Mewes, Tim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Gupta, Arunava [Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed study of the structural and ferromagnetic resonance properties of spinel nickel ferrite (NFO) films, grown on (100)-oriented cubic MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates by direct liquid injection chemical vapor deposition (DLI-CVD) technique. Three different compositions of NFO films (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} where x=1, 0.8, 0.6) deposited at optimized growth temperature of 600 °C are characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), and broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) techniques. XRD confirms the growth of epitaxial, single crystalline Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} films. The out-of-plane lattice constant (c) obtained for Ni{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2.2}O{sub 4} film is slightly higher than the bulk value (0.833 nm), indicating only partial strain relaxation whereas for the other two compositions (x=1 and x=0.6) films exhibit complete relaxation. The in-plane and out-of-plane FMR linewidths measurements at 10 GHz give the lowest values of 458 Oe and 98 Oe, respectively, for Ni{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2.2}O{sub 4} film as compared to the other two compositions. A comprehensive frequency (5–40 GHz) and temperature (10–300 K) dependent FMR study of the Ni{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2.2}O{sub 4} sample for both in-lane and out-of-plane configurations reveals two magnon scattering (TMS) as the dominant in-plane relaxation mechanism. It is observed that the TMS contribution to the FMR linewidth scales with the saturation magnetization M{sub s}. In-plane angle-dependent FMR measurements performed on the same sample show that the ferromagnetic resonance field (H{sub res}) and the FMR linewidth (ΔH) have a four-fold symmetry that is consistent with the crystal symmetry of the spinel. SEM measurements show formation of pyramid-like microstructures at the surface of the Ni{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2.2}O{sub 4} sample, which can explain the observed four-fold symmetry of the FMR linewidth.

  18. Cryogenic support member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is described for restraining a cryogenic system comprising; a rod having a depression at a first end. The rod is made of non-metallic material. The non-metallic material has an effectively low thermal conductivity; a metallic plug; and a metallic sleeve. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod and assembled thereto such that the plug is disposed inside the depression of the rod. The sleeve is disposed over the depression in the rod and the rod is clamped therebetween. The shrink-fit clamping the rod is generated between the metallic plug and the metallic sleeve

  19. Magnetoresistance of individual ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Butschkow, Christian H.; Reiger, Elisabeth; Geißler, Stefan; Rudolph, Andreas; Soda, Marcello; Schuh, Dieter; Woltersdorf, Georg; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    We investigate, angle dependent, the magnetoresistance (MR) of individual self-assembled ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires at cryogenic temperatures. The shape of the MR traces and the observed strong anisotropies in transport can be ascribed to the interplay of the negative magnetoresistance effect and a strong uniaxial anisotropy with the magnetic easy direction pointing along the wire axis. The magnetoresistance can be well described by a quantitative analysis based on the ...

  20. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  1. Ferromagnetic shape memory materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Robert Jay

    Ferromagnetic shape memory materials are a new class of active materials which combine the properties of ferromagnetism with those of a diffusionless, reversible martensitic transformation. These materials have been the subject of recent study due to the unusually large magnetostriction exhibited in the martensitic phase. In this thesis we report the results of experiments which characterize the magnetic and magnetomechanical properties of both austenitic and martensitic phases of ferromagnetic shape memory material Ni2MnGa. In the high temperature cubic phase, anisotropy and magnetostriction constants are determined for a range of temperatures from 50°C down to the transformation temperature, with room temperature values of K1 = 2.7 +/- 104 ergs/cm3 and lambda100 = -145 muepsilon. In the low temperature tetragonal phase, the phenomenon of field-induced variant rearrangement is shown to produce anomalous results when traditional techniques for determining anisotropy and magnetostriction properties are employed. The requirement of single variant specimen microstructure is explained, and experiments performed on such a specimen confirm a uniaxial anisotropy within each martensitic variant with anisotropy constant Ku = 2.45 x 106 ergs/cm3 and a magnetostriction constant of lambdasv = -288 +/- 73 muepsilon. A series of magnetomechanical experiments investigate the effects of microstructure bias, repeated field cycling, varying field ramp rate, applied load, and specimen geometry on the variant rearrangement phenomenon in the martensitic phase. In general, the field-induced strain is found to be a function of the variant microstructure. Experiments in which the initial microstructure is biased towards a single variant state with an applied load generate one-time strains of 4.3%, while those performed with a constant bias stress of 5 MPa generate reversible strains of 0.5% over a period of 50 cycles. An increase in the applied field ramp rate is shown to reduce the

  2. Cryogenic vacuum pump design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, A.J.; Lessard, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the problems and tradeoffs involved in cryogenic vacuum pump analysis, design and manufacture. Particular attention is paid to the several issues unique to cryopumps, e.g., radiation loading, adsorption of noncondensible gases, and regeneration. A general algorithm for cryopump design is also proposed. 12 references

  3. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  4. Optical orientation in ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, V L

    2008-01-01

    The physics of optical pumping of semiconductor electrons in ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrids is discussed. Optically oriented semiconductor electrons detect the magnetic state of a ferromagnetic film. In turn, the ferromagnetism of the hybrid can be controlled optically with the help of a semiconductor. Spin–spin interactions near the ferromagnet/semiconductor interface play a crucial role in the optical readout and the manipulation of ferromagnetism

  5. Optical orientation in ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, V. L.

    2008-11-01

    The physics of optical pumping of semiconductor electrons in ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrids is discussed. Optically oriented semiconductor electrons detect the magnetic state of a ferromagnetic film. In turn, the ferromagnetism of the hybrid can be controlled optically with the help of a semiconductor. Spin-spin interactions near the ferromagnet/semiconductor interface play a crucial role in the optical readout and the manipulation of ferromagnetism.

  6. Optical Orientation in Ferromagnet/Semiconductor Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Korenev, V. L.

    2008-01-01

    The physics of optical pumping of semiconductor electrons in the ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrids is discussed. Optically oriented semiconductor electrons detect the magnetic state of the ferromagnetic film. In turn, the ferromagnetism of the hybrid can be controlled optically with the help of the semiconductor. Spin-spin interactions near the interface ferromagnet/semiconductor play crucial role in the optical readout and the manipulation of ferromagnetism.

  7. Cryogenic system for the HERA magnet measurement facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, H.R. Jr.; Clausen, M.; Kebler, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the design for a helium, cryogenic distribution system that allows independent operation and testing of superconducting magnets of the HERA project before they are installed in the 6-km ring tunnel. The 820-GeV proton storage ring of HERA will contain approximately 650 magnets having superconducting coils which are clamped by aluminum/stainless-steel collars and surrounded by a yoke of magnetic iron at liquid helium temperature. When the magnets arive at DESY from the manufacture, each magnet will be individually tested at helium operating conditions in the magnet measurement facility to insure the quality of the magnetic characteristics and the cryogenic performance. The capabilities of the cryogenic system and the schedule for magnet testing are discussed

  8. Ferromagnetic Objects Magnetovision Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2013-12-02

    This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth's field distortions caused by various ferromagnetic objects were carried out. The ability for passive detection of hidden or buried dangerous objects and the determination of their location was demonstrated.

  9. Ferromagnetic Objects Magnetovision Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth’s field distortions caused by various ferromagnetic objects were carried out. The ability for passive detection of hidden or buried dangerous objects and the determination of their location was demonstrated.

  10. Non-ferromagnetic overburden casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Harris, Christopher Kelvin; Mason, Stanley Leroy

    2010-09-14

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one system for electrically insulating an overburden portion of a heater wellbore is described. The system may include a heater wellbore located in a subsurface formation and an electrically insulating casing located in the overburden portion of the heater wellbore. The casing may include at least one non-ferromagnetic material such that ferromagnetic effects are inhibited in the casing.

  11. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  12. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  13. Cryogenics for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A wide-ranging study of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) structural and cryogenic requirements was made. Concepts and computational methods have been developed for all of the major problems in these areas. Design analyses have been made to provide more detailed information on some items and experimental work has been performed to create data bases in the areas of superfluid heat transfer, superfluid dielectric properties, heat transfer from conductors, and in the thermal and mechanical properties of materials at low temperatures. In most cases optimum solutions have not been made because of the developing nature of the overall study but methodology for optimization has been worked out for essentially all SMES cryogenic and structural elements. The selection of 1.8 K cooling and all aluminum systems in bedrock continues to be the best choice

  14. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  15. Chemiluminescence in cryogenic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotnik, S. V.; Kazakov, Valeri P.

    1989-04-01

    The literature data on chemiluminescence (CL) in cryogenic matrices have been classified and correlated for the first time. The role of studies on phosphorescence and CL at low temperatures in the development of cryochemistry is shown. The features of low-temperature CL in matrices of nitrogen and inert gases (fine structure of spectra, matrix effects) and the data on the mobility and reactivity of atoms and radicals at very low temperatures are examined. The trends in the development of studies on CL in cryogenic matrices, such as the search for systems involving polyatomic molecules and extending the forms of CL reactions, are followed. The reactions of active nitrogen with hydrocarbons that are accompanied by light emission and CL in the oxidation of carbenes at T >= 77 K are examined. The bibliography includes 112 references.

  16. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  17. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  18. PREFACE: Half Metallic Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowben, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Since its introduction by de Groot and colleagues in the early 1980s [1], the concept of half metallic ferromagnetism has attracted great interest. Idealized, half-metals have only one spin channel for conduction: the spin-polarized band structure exhibits metallic behavior for one spin channel, while the other spin band structure exhibits a gap at the Fermi level. Due to the gap for one spin direction, the density of states at the Fermi level has, theoretically, 100 & spin polarization. This gap in the density of states in one spin at the Fermi level, for example ↓ so N↓ (EF) = 0, also causes the resistance of that channel to go to infinity. At zero or low temperatures, the nonquasiparticle density of states (electron correlation effects), magnons and spin disorder reduce the polarization from the idealized 100 & polarization. At higher temperatures magnon-phonon coupling and irreversible compositional changes affect polarization further. Strategies for assessing and reducing the effects of finite temperatures on the polarization are now gaining attention. The controversies surrounding the polarization stability of half metallic ferromagnets are not, however, limited to the consideration of finite temperature effects alone. While many novel half metallic materials have been predicted, materials fabrication can be challenging. Defects, surface and interface segregation, and structural stability can lead to profound decreases in polarization, but can also suppress long period magnons. There is a 'delicate balance of energies required to obtain half metallic behaviour: to avoid spin flip scattering, tiny adjustments in atomic positions might occur so that a gap opens up in the other spin channel' [2]. When considering 'spintronics' devices, a common alibi for the study of half metallic systems, surfaces and interfaces become important. Free enthalpy differences between the surface and the bulk will lead to spin minority surface and interface states, as well as

  19. Cryogenic high current discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meierovich, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    Z-pinches formed from frozen deuterium fibers by a rapidly rising current have enhanced stability and high neutron yield. The efforts to understand the enhanced stability and neutron yield on the basis of classical picture of Bennett equilibrium of the current channel has not given satisfactory results. The traditional approach does not take into account the essential difference between the frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinches and the usual Z-pinches such as exploding wires or classical gas-puffed Z-pinches. The very low temperature of the fiber atoms (10 K), together with the rapidly rising current, result in the coexistence of a high current channel with unionized fiber atoms for a substantial period of time. This phenomena lasts during the risetime. This approach takes into account the difference of the breakdown in a dielectric deuterium fiber and the breakdown in a metallic wire. This difference is essential to the understanding of specific features of cryogenic high current discharges. Z-pinches in frozen deuterium fibers should be considered as a qualitatively new phenomenon on the boundary of cryogenic and high current physics. It is a start of a new branch in plasma physics: the physics of cryogenic high current discharges

  20. CEBAF cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.; Rode, C.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. These accelerating cavities are arranged in pairs in a cryounit. The ensemble of four cryounits (8 cavities) together with their end caps makes up a complete cryostat called a cryogenic module. The four cryounit helium vessels are cross connected to each other and share a common cryogen supply, radiation shield and insulating vacuum. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2 K and the 4.5 K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0 K at .031 ATM and 4.4 K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  1. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  2. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  3. Formation of ferromagnetic interface between β-FeSi2 and Si(111) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Azusa N.; Hattori, Ken; Kodama, Kenji; Hosoito, Nobuyoshi; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial β-FeSi 2 thin films were grown on Si(111)7x7 clean surfaces by solid phase epitaxy in ultrahigh vacuum: iron deposition at low temperature and subsequent annealing. We found that a ferromagnetic interface layer of iron-rich silicides forms between a β-FeSi 2 surface layer and a Si(111) substrate spontaneously from transmission electron microscopy observations and magnetization measurements

  4. Dynamical response of vibrating ferromagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaganidze, E; Ziese, M

    2000-01-01

    The resonance frequency of vibrating ferromagnetic reeds in a homogeneous magnetic field can be substantially modified by intrinsic and extrinsic field-related contributions. Searching for the physical reasons of the field-induced resonance frequency change and to study the influence of the spin glass state on it, we have measured the low-temperature magnetoelastic behavior and the dynamical response of vibrating amorphous and polycrystalline ferromagnetic ribbons. We show that the magnetoelastic properties depend strongly on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The influence of the re-entrant spin glass transition on these properties is discussed. We present clear experimental evidence that for applied fields perpendicular to the main area of the samples the behavior of ferromagnetic reeds is rather independent of the material composition and magnetic state, exhibiting a large decrease of the resonance frequency. This effect can be very well explained with a model based on the dynamical response of t...

  5. Cryogenic implications for DT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souers, P.C.

    1977-10-01

    Cryogenic hydrogen data is being compiled for magnetic fusion engineering. Many physical properties of DT can be extrapolated from H 2 and D 2 values. The phase diagram properties of the D 2 -DT-T 2 mixture are being measured. Three properties which will be greatly affected by tritium should be measured. In order of their perceived importance, they are: (1) solid thermal conductivity, (2) solid mechanical strength, and (3) gaseous electrical conductivity. The most apparent need for DT data is in Tokomak fuel pellet injection. Cryopumping and distillation applications are also considered

  6. Kodak AMSD Cryogenic Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Hammon, John; Barrett, David; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGST will be an IR based optical system that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. As part of the AMSD program, Kodak must demonstrate the ability of our system to perform at these very cold temperatures. Kodak will discuss the test approach that will be used for cryogenic testing at MSFC's XRCF.

  7. Cryogenic forced convection refrigerating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method of refrigerating products by contact with a refrigerating gas which comprises introducing product into a refrigeration zone, contacting the product with the refrigerating gas for a sufficient time to refrigerate it to the appropriate extent and removing the refrigerated product. The improvement for producing the refrigeration gas from a liquid cryogen such that essentially all of the liquid cryogen is fully vaporized before contacting the product comprises: (a) introducing the liquid cryogen, selected from the group consisting of liquid air and liquid nitrogen, at elevated pressure into an ejector as the motive fluid to accelerate a portion of a warm refrigerating gas through the ejector while mixing the cryogen and gas to effect complete vaporization of the liquid cryogen and substantial cooling of the portion of the refrigerating gas resulting in a cold discharge gas which is above the liquefaction temperature of the cryogen; (b) introducing the cold discharge gas into a forced circulation pathway of refrigerating gas and producing a cold refrigerating gas which contacts and refrigerates product and is then at least partially recirculated; (c) sensing the temperature of the refrigerating gas in the forced circulation pathway and controlling the introduction of liquid cryogen with regard to the sensed temperature to maintain the temperature of the discharge gas above the liquefacton temperature of the cryogen utilized

  8. Cryogenics in CEBAF HMS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogensberger, P.; Ramsauer, F.; Brindza, P.; Wines, R.; Koefler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will report upon the final design, manufacturing and tests of CEBAF's HMS Dipole cryogenic equipment. The liquid nitrogen circuits, the helium circuits and thermal insulation of the magnet will be addressed. The cryogenic reservoir and control module as an integral part of the HMS Dipole magnet will be presented. The construction, manufacturing, tests and final performance of the HMS Dipole cryogenic system will be reported. The LN 2 circuit and the He circuit are tied together by the control system for cool down, normal operation and standby. This system monitors proper temperature differences between both circuits and controls the cryogenic supply to meet the constraints. Implementation of the control features for the cryogenic system into the control system will be reported

  9. STM observations of ferromagnetic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawro, A.; Kasuya, A.

    1998-01-01

    Co, Fe and Ni clusters of nanometer size, deposited on silicon and graphite (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), were observed by a scanning tunneling microscope. Deposition as well as the scanning tunneling microscope measurements were carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum system at room temperature. Detailed analysis of Co cluster height was done with the scanning tunneling microscope equipped with a ferromagnetic tip in a magnetic field up to 70 Oe. It is found that bigger clusters (few nanometers in height) exhibit a dependence of their apparent height on applied magnetic field. We propose that such behaviour originates from the ferromagnetic ordering of cluster and associate this effect to spin polarized tunneling. (author)

  10. Magnetic excitations in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdyna, J.K.; Liu, X.; Zhou, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic excitations in a series of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor films were studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Using the FMR approach, multi-mode spin wave resonance spectra have been observed, whose analysis provides information on magnetic anisotropy (including surface anisotropy), distribution of magnetization precession within the GaMnAs film, dynamic surface spin pinning (derived from surface anisotropy), and the value of exchange stiffness constant D. These studies illustrate a combination of magnetism and semiconductor physics that is unique to magnetic semiconductors

  11. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Amita [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous

  12. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  13. Ferromagnetic Swimmers - Devices and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joshua; Petrov, Peter; Winlove, C. Peter; Gilbert, Andrew; Bryan, Matthew; Ogrin, Feodor

    2017-11-01

    Microscopic swimming devices hold promise for radically new applications in lab-on-a-chip and microfluidic technology, diagnostics and drug delivery etc. We propose a new class of autonomous ferromagnetic swimming devices, actuated and controlled solely by an oscillating magnetic field. Experimentally, these devices (3.6 mm) are based on a pair of interacting ferromagnetic particles of different size and different anisotropic properties joined by an elastic link and actuated by an external time-dependent magnetic field. The net motion is generated through a combination of dipolar interparticle gradient forces, time-dependent torque and hydrodynamic coupling. We investigate the dynamic performance of a prototype (3.6 mm) of the ferromagnetic swimmer in fluids of different viscosity as a function of the external field parameters and demonstrate stable propulsion over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Manipulation of the external magnetic field resulted in robust control over the speed and direction of propulsion. We also demonstrate our ferromagnetic swimmer working as a macroscopic prototype of a microfluidic pump. By physically tethering the swimmer, instead of swimming, the swimmer generates a directional flow of liquid around itself.

  14. Debye-Waller Factor in Neutron Scattering by Ferromagnetic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradezhenko, G. V.; Melnikov, N. B.; Reser, B. I.

    2018-04-01

    We obtain an expression for the neutron scattering cross section in the case of an arbitrary interaction of the neutron with the crystal. We give a concise, simple derivation of the Debye-Waller factor as a function of the scattering vector and the temperature. For ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we estimate the Debye-Waller factor in the range of scattering vectors characteristic of polarized magnetic neutron scattering experiments. In the example of iron, we compare the results of harmonic and anharmonic approximations.

  15. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO x /Pd 0.82 Ni 0.18 /Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to π-coupling is observed for a thickness d F =6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd 0.82 Ni 0.18 interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd 0.82 Ni 0.18 has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  16. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  17. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  18. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  19. Energy gap of ferromagnet-superconductor bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halterman, Klaus; Valls, Oriol T

    2003-10-15

    The excitation spectrum of clean ferromagnet-superconductor bilayers is calculated within the framework of the self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Because of the proximity effect, the superconductor induces a gap in the ferromagnet spectrum, for thin ferromagnetic layers. The effect depends strongly on the exchange field in the ferromagnet. We find that as the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer increases, the gap disappears, and that its destruction arises from those quasiparticle excitations with wave vectors mainly along the interface. We discuss the influence that the interface quality and Fermi energy mismatch between the ferromagnet and superconductor have on the calculated energy gap. We also evaluate the density of states in the ferromagnet, and we find it in all cases consistent with the gap results.

  20. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H C

    2013-03-01

    The pure and Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles of the series Cu(1-x)Fe(x)O (x = 0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) were successfully prepared by a simple low temperature sol-gel method using metal nitrates and citric acid. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction data showed that all the samples were single phase crystallized in monoclinic structure of space group C2/c with average crystallite size of about 25 nm and unit cell volume decreases with increasing iron doping concentration. TEM micrograph showed nearly spherical shaped agglomerated particles of 4% Fe-doped CuO with average diameter 26 nm. Pure CuO showed weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature with coercive field of 67 Oe. The ferromagnetic properties were greatly enhanced with Fe-doping in the CuO matrix. All the doped samples showed ferromagnetism at room temperature with a noticeable coercive field. Saturation magnetization increases with increasing Fe-doping, becomes highest for 4% doping then decreases for further doping which confirms that the ferromagnetism in these nanoparticles are intrinsic and are not resulting from any impurity phases. The ZFC and FC branches of the temperature dependent magnetization (measured in the range of 10-350 K by SQUID magnetometer) look like typical ferromagnetic nanoparticles and indicates that the ferromagnetic Curie temperature is above 350 K.

  1. Calculation of ferromagnetic resonance spectra for chains of magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a taxonomically diverse group of bacteria that have chains of ferromagnetic crystals inside. These bacteria mostly live in the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) of aquatic environments. The magnetic chains orient the bacteria parallel to the Earth's magnetic field and help them to maintain their position near the OAI. These chains show the fingerprint of natural selection acting to optimize the magnetic moment per unit iron. This is achieved in a number of ways: the alignment in chains, a narrow size range, crystallographic perfection and chemical purity. Because of these distinctive characteristics, the particles can still be identified after the bacteria have died. Such magnetofossils are useful both as records of bacterial evolution and environmental markers. They can most reliably be identified by microscopy, but that is very labor-intensive. A number of magnetic measurements have been developed to identify magnetofossils quickly and non-invasively. However, the only test that can specifically identify the chain structure is ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which measures the response to a magnetic field oscillating at microwave frequencies. Although the experimental side of ferromagnetic resonance is well developed, the theoretical models for interpreting them have been limited. A new method is presented for calculating resonance frequencies as well as complete power spectra for chains of interacting magnetic particles. Spectra are calculated and compared with data for magnetotactic bacteria.

  2. Dimensionality Driven Enhancement of Ferromagnetic Superconductivity in URhGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Daniel; Aoki, Dai; Brison, Jean-Pascal; Flouquet, Jacques; Knebel, Georg; Nakamura, Ai; Pourret, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    In most unconventional superconductors, like the high-Tc cuprates, iron pnictides, or heavy-fermion systems, superconductivity emerges in the proximity of an electronic instability. Identifying unambiguously the pairing mechanism remains nevertheless an enormous challenge. Among these systems, the orthorhombic uranium ferromagnetic superconductors have a unique position, notably because magnetic fields couple directly to ferromagnetic order, leading to the fascinating discovery of the reemergence of superconductivity in URhGe at a high field. Here we show that uniaxial stress is a remarkable tool allowing the fine-tuning of the pairing strength. With a relatively small stress, the superconducting phase diagram is spectacularly modified, with a merging of the low- and high-field superconducting states and a significant enhancement of the superconductivity. The superconducting critical temperature increases both at zero field and under a field, reaching 1 K, more than twice higher than at ambient pressure. This enhancement of superconductivity is shown to be directly related to a change of the magnetic dimensionality detected from an increase of the transverse magnetic susceptibility: In addition to the Ising-type longitudinal ferromagnetic fluctuations, transverse magnetic fluctuations also play an important role in the superconducting pairing.

  3. μ+-meson method of investigation of monocrystalline samples of ferromagnetic metals magnetized to saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelkin, V.N.; Miloserdin, V.Yu.; Smilga, V.P.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis and calculation have been performed with respect to local magnetic fields in nickel, cobalt and iron lattices with the use of the Ehwald's method. Based on the calculation results regularities have been established of the behaviour of muons in the given ferromagnetic materials in the absence of muon diffusion. It has been found that the μ + meson method makes it possible to study the position of a hydrogen light isotope (muonium) in the metal crystal lattice, deformation and stressed state of the lattice, to measure the contact and dipole fields. The advantages of the μ + meson method in the study of ferromagnetic properties are shown

  4. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  5. Dirac Magnons in Honeycomb Ferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S. Pershoguba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the Dirac electron dispersion in graphene [A. H. Castro Neto, et al., The Electronic Properties of Graphene, Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 109 (2009RMPHAT0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.81.109] led to the question of the Dirac cone stability with respect to interactions. Coulomb interactions between electrons were shown to induce a logarithmic renormalization of the Dirac dispersion. With a rapid expansion of the list of compounds and quasiparticle bands with linear band touching [T. O. Wehling, et al., Dirac Materials, Adv. Phys. 63, 1 (2014ADPHAH0001-873210.1080/00018732.2014.927109], the concept of bosonic Dirac materials has emerged. We consider a specific case of ferromagnets consisting of van der Waals-bonded stacks of honeycomb layers, e.g., chromium trihalides CrX_{3} (X=F, Cl, Br and I, that display two spin wave modes with energy dispersion similar to that for the electrons in graphene. At the single-particle level, these materials resemble their fermionic counterparts. However, how different particle statistics and interactions affect the stability of Dirac cones has yet to be determined. To address the role of interacting Dirac magnons, we expand the theory of ferromagnets beyond the standard Dyson theory [F. J. Dyson, General Theory of Spin-Wave Interactions, Phys. Rev. 102, 1217 (1956PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.102.1217, F. J. Dyson, Thermodynamic Behavior of an Ideal Ferromagnet, Phys. Rev. 102, 1230 (1956PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.102.1230] to the case of non-Bravais honeycomb layers. We demonstrate that magnon-magnon interactions lead to a significant momentum-dependent renormalization of the bare band structure in addition to strongly momentum-dependent magnon lifetimes. We show that our theory qualitatively accounts for hitherto unexplained anomalies in nearly half-century-old magnetic neutron-scattering data for CrBr_{3} [W. B. Yelon and R. Silberglitt, Renormalization of Large-Wave-Vector Magnons in

  6. Dirac Magnons in Honeycomb Ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershoguba, Sergey S.; Banerjee, Saikat; Lashley, J. C.; Park, Jihwey; Ågren, Hans; Aeppli, Gabriel; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    The discovery of the Dirac electron dispersion in graphene [A. H. Castro Neto, et al., The Electronic Properties of Graphene, Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 109 (2009), 10.1103/RevModPhys.81.109] led to the question of the Dirac cone stability with respect to interactions. Coulomb interactions between electrons were shown to induce a logarithmic renormalization of the Dirac dispersion. With a rapid expansion of the list of compounds and quasiparticle bands with linear band touching [T. O. Wehling, et al., Dirac Materials, Adv. Phys. 63, 1 (2014), 10.1080/00018732.2014.927109], the concept of bosonic Dirac materials has emerged. We consider a specific case of ferromagnets consisting of van der Waals-bonded stacks of honeycomb layers, e.g., chromium trihalides CrX3 (X =F , Cl, Br and I), that display two spin wave modes with energy dispersion similar to that for the electrons in graphene. At the single-particle level, these materials resemble their fermionic counterparts. However, how different particle statistics and interactions affect the stability of Dirac cones has yet to be determined. To address the role of interacting Dirac magnons, we expand the theory of ferromagnets beyond the standard Dyson theory [F. J. Dyson, General Theory of Spin-Wave Interactions, Phys. Rev. 102, 1217 (1956), 10.1103/PhysRev.102.1217, F. J. Dyson, Thermodynamic Behavior of an Ideal Ferromagnet, Phys. Rev. 102, 1230 (1956), 10.1103/PhysRev.102.1230] to the case of non-Bravais honeycomb layers. We demonstrate that magnon-magnon interactions lead to a significant momentum-dependent renormalization of the bare band structure in addition to strongly momentum-dependent magnon lifetimes. We show that our theory qualitatively accounts for hitherto unexplained anomalies in nearly half-century-old magnetic neutron-scattering data for CrBr3 [W. B. Yelon and R. Silberglitt, Renormalization of Large-Wave-Vector Magnons in Ferromagnetic CrBr3 Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering: Spin-Wave Correlation

  7. Exchange bias in nearly perpendicularly coupled ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bu, K.M.; Kwon, H.Y.; Oh, S.W.; Won, C.

    2012-01-01

    Exchange bias phenomena appear not only in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic systems but also in ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic systems in which two layers are nearly perpendicularly coupled. We investigated the origin of the symmetry-breaking mechanism and the relationship between the exchange bias and the system's energy parameters. We compared the results of computational Monte Carlo simulations with those of theoretical model calculation. We found that the exchange bias exhibited nonlinear behaviors, including sign reversal and singularities. These complicated behaviors were caused by two distinct magnetization processes depending on the interlayer coupling strength. The exchange bias reached a maximum at the transition between the two magnetization processes. - Highlights: ► Exchange bias phenomena are found in perpendicularly coupled F/F systems. ► Exchange bias exhibits nonlinear behaviors, including sign reversal and singularities. ► These complicated behaviors were caused by two distinct magnetization processes. ► Exchange bias reached a maximum at the transition between the two magnetization processes. ► We established an equation to maximize the exchange bias in perpendicularly coupled F/F system.

  8. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  9. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  10. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  11. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  12. Magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continentino, M.A.

    The propagation of magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets is studied from the point of view of the theory of random frequency modulation. It is shown that the spin waves in the hydrodynamic limit are well described by perturbation theory while the roton-like magnetic excitations with wavevector about the peak in the structure factor are not. A criterion of validity of perturbation theory is found which is identical to a narrowing condition in magnetic resonance. (author) [pt

  13. Cryogenic system of the nuclotron - a new superconducting synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Agapov, N.N.; Belushkin, V.A.; D'yachkov, E.I.; Khodzhibagiyan, H.G.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Makarov, L.G.; Matyushevsky, E.A.; Smirnov, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting relativistic heavy ion accelerator was commissioned the last week of March in Dubna, and the first deuteron beam was circulated in the ring. The total cold mass of the magnetic system is about 80 tons. The magnet with a open-quotes coldclose quotes iron yoke and a hollow superconductor winding is refrigerated by a two-phase helium flow. All 160 magnets are connected in parallel with supply and return helium headers about 250 meters long. The cryogenic supply system is based on three helium refrigerators with a total capacity of 4.8 kW at 4.5 K. The results on the commissioning of the cryogenic system are presented

  14. Cryogenic system of the nuclotron - a new superconducting synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Agapov, N.N.; Belushkin, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    The superconducting relativistic heavy ion accelerator was commissioned the last week of March in Dubna, and the first deuteron beam was circulated in the ring. The total cold mass of the magnetic system is about 80 tons. The magnet with a 'cold' iron yoke and a hollow superconductor winding is refrigerated by a two-phase helium flow. All 160 magnets are connected in parallel with supply and return helium headers about 250 meters long. The cryogenic supply system is based on three helium refrigerators with a total capacity of 4.8 kW at 4.5 K. The results on the commissioning of the cryogenic system are presented. 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Ferromagnetic nanostructures by laser manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, R.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Lithography based on laser focusing of a beam of neutral iron atoms shows great promise for creating nanomagnetic structures. Laser focusing is a relatively new area, where successful experiments have been performed with, e.g., chromium atoms. Iron is perhaps one of the most difficult elements for

  16. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  17. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  18. CEBAF cryogenic system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.; Brindza, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a standing wave superconducting linear accelerator with a maximum energy of 4 GeV and 200 μA beam current. The 418 Cornell/CEBAF superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are arranged in two 0.5 GeV linacs with magnetic recirculating arcs at each end. There is one recirculating arc for each energy beam that is circulating and any three of the four correlated energies may be supplied to any of the three experimental halls. The cryogenics system for CEBAF consists of a 5kW central helium refrigerator and a transfer line system to supply 2.2 K 2.8 ATM helium to the cavity cryostats, 40 K helium at 3.5 ATM to the radiation shields and 4.5K helium at 2.8 ATM to the superconducting magnetic spectrometers in the experimental halls. Both the 2.2K and the 4.5K helium are expanded by Joule-Thompson (JT) valves in the individual cryostats yielding 2.0K at .031 ATM and 4.4K at 1.2 ATM respectively. The Central Helium Refrigerator is located in the center of the CEBAF racetrack with the transfer lines located in the linac tunnels

  19. Efficiency of homopolar generators without ferromagnetic circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    E.m.f. and weights of homopolar generators (HG) without a ferromagnetic circuit and of similar generator with a ferromagnetic circuit are compared at equal armature diameters and armature rotative speed. HG without ferromagnetic cuircuit of disk and cylinder types with hot and superconducting excitation winding are considered. Areas of the most reasonable removal of a ferromagnetic circuit in the HG layout are found. The plots of relationships between the e.m.f. and HG weight that permit to estimate the efficiency of ''nonferrite'' HG constructions are presented

  20. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  1. One step facile synthesis of ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suppiah, Durga Devi; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my

    2016-09-15

    The ferromagnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were influenced by the nanoparticle size, hence importance were given to the synthesis method. This paper clearly shows that magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by employing one step controlled precipitation method using a single salt (Iron(II) sulfate) iron precursor. The acquired titration curve from this method provides vital information on the possible reaction mechanism leading to the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles formation. Goethite (α-FeOOH) was obtained at pH 4, while the continuous addition of hydroxyl ions (OH{sup −}) forms iron hydroxides (Fe(OH){sub 2}). This subsequently reacts with the goethite, producing magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at pH 10. Spectroscopy studies validate the magnetite phase existence while structural and morphology analysis illustrates cubic shaped magnetite with an average size of 35 nm was obtained. The synthesized magnetite might be superparamagnetic though lower saturation magnetization (67.5 emu/g) measured at room temperature as compared to bulk magnetite. However the nanoparticles surface anisotropy leads to higher remanence (12 emu/g) and coercivity (117.7 G) making the synthesized magnetite an excellent candidate to be utilized in recording devices. The understanding of the magnetite synthesis mechanism can not only be used to achieve even smaller magnetite nanoparticles but also to prepare different types of iron oxides hydroxides using different iron precursor source. - Highlights: • Magnetite strong magnetism properties make it versatile in various applications including biomedical and electromagnetic materials. • Sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) anion plays a major role in the structure control of iron oxide during synthesis. • Phase pure magnetite nanoparticles with high magnetism properties can be obtained using a single salt (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) method.

  2. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  3. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  4. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  5. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nanoparticles induced by a stream of polarized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhushner, M.A.; Gatin, A.K.; Grishin, M.V.; Shub, B.R. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of RAS, 4, Kosygin Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kim, V.P.; Khomutov, G.B. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lenin Gory 1-2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ilegbusi, O.J. [University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Trakhtenberg, L.I. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of RAS, 4, Kosygin Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The remagnetization of ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles of several thousand cubic nanometers by spin-polarized current is investigated. For this purpose, magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and deposited on a conductive nonmagnetic substrate. The remagnetization is conducted in high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The STM tip from magnetized iron wire constitutes one electrode while the ferromagnetic nanoparticle on the graphite surface represents the second electrode. The measured threshold value of remagnetization current (I{sub thresh}=9 nA) is the lowest value of current at which remagnetization occurs. The change in nanoparticle magnetization is detected by the effect of giant magnetic resistance, specifically, the dependence of the weak polarized current (Iferromagnetic nanoclusters. The peculiarities of size dependence of the observed effects are explained. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic nanoparticle in STM with ferromagnetic tip. • Change of the direction of nanoparticle magnetization by current I>I{sub cr}=9 nA. • GMR effect used to control change of magnetization.

  6. Selected physico-mechanical characteristics of cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Pradyuman; Mohite, Ashish M.; Singh, Krishna K.; Kumar, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    In this communication, selected physicomechanical characteristics of ground turmeric (cv. Prabha) were investigated for cryogenic and ambient grinding conditions of turmeric at different moisture contents (4, 6, 8 and 10% w.b.). A cryogenic grinder (Model: 100 UPZ, Hosokawa Alpine, Germany) and a micro pulverizer (hammer mill) were used for cryogenic and ambient grinding, respectively. The ground turmeric was graded in three grades viz. Gr-I, Gr-II and Gr-III with a sieve shaker using BSS Nos. 40, 85 and pan, respectively. Tap densities for cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric decreased from 678.7 (Gr-I) to 546.7 kgm-3 (Gr-III) and from 642.3 (Gr-I) to 468.6 kgm-3 (Gr-III), respectively, with the moisture increase. The angle of repose for cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric increased linearly from 26.85 (Gr-I) to 34.0° (Gr-III) and from 23.10 (Gr-I) to 28.06° (Gr-III), respectively with the increase in moisture content. The static coefficient of friction was the highest on plywood surface followed by mild steel sheet and galvanized iron sheet. The cryoground samples were found better in colour. Thermal conductivity of cryo-ground samples was higher than that of ambient ground samples. These physico-mechanical characteristics of cryogenic and ambient ground turmeric will be helpful for packaging, handling, and storage.

  7. Onset of itinerant ferromagnetism associated with semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the magnetic and transport properties of the TiNb1−CoSn solid solution compounds with half Heusler cubic MgAgAs-type structure have been studied. This work shows the onset of ferromagnetism associated with a semiconductor to metal transition. The transition occurs directly from ferromagnetic metal to ...

  8. Voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyao Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroics, where the ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity are simultaneously exhibiting, is of great importance to achieve compact, fast and energy efficient voltage controllable magnetic/microwave devices. Particularly, these devices are widely used in radar, aircraft, cell phones and satellites, where volume, response time and energy consumption is critical. Researchers realized electric field tuning of magnetic properties like magnetization, magnetic anisotropy and permeability in varied multiferroic heterostructures such as bulk, thin films and nanostructure by different magnetoelectric (ME coupling mechanism: strain/stress, interfacial charge, spin–electromagnetic (EM coupling and exchange coupling, etc. In this review, we focus on voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR in multiferroics. ME coupling-induced FMR change is critical in microwave devices, where the electric field tuning of magnetic effective anisotropic field determines the tunability of the performance of microwave devices. Experimentally, FMR measurement technique is also an important method to determine the small effective magnetic field change in small amount of magnetic material precisely due to its high sensitivity and to reveal the deep science of multiferroics, especially, voltage control of magnetism in novel mechanisms like interfacial charge, spin–EM coupling and exchange coupling.

  9. Spin flip inelastic scattering in electron energy loss spectroscopy of a ferromagnetic metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocchetta, C.J.; Tosatti, E.; Yin, S.

    1986-11-01

    A model ferromagnetic metal is used to calculate the spin-polarization which occurs during inelastic electron-metal scattering with the production of an electron-hole pair. The polarization is found to have contributions from unequal spin-flip as well as non-flip energy loss rates. Our results indicate an asymmetry of the order of a few percent with parameters roughly modelling iron. (author)

  10. Spin wave isolator based on frequency displacement nonreciprocity in ferromagnetic bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shichi, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke-shichi@murata.com; Matsuda, Kenji; Okajima, Shingo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Okada, Takekazu [Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Kyoto 617-8555 (Japan); Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi, E-mail: goto@ee.tut.ac.jp; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Mitsuteru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibari-Ga-Oka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We demonstrated the spin wave isolator using bilayer ferromagnetic media comprising single crystalline and poly-crystalline yttrium iron garnet films, which can control the propagation frequency of magnetostatic waves by the direction of applied magnetic field. This isolator's property does not depend on their thickness then this can be downsized and integrated for nano-scale magnonic circuits. Calculated dispersion relationship shows good agreement with measured one.

  11. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  12. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  13. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors

  15. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  16. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  17. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-11-01

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  18. Temperature dependent dynamic susceptibility calculations for itinerant ferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J. F.

    1980-10-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have revealed a variety of interesting and unusual phenomena associated with the spin dynamics of the 3-d transition metal ferromagnets nickel and iron. An extensive series of calculations based on the itinerant electron formalism has demonstrated that the itinerant model does provide an excellent quantitative as well as qualitative description of the measured spin dynamics of both nickel and iron at low temperatures. Recent angular photo emission experiments have indicated that there is a rather strong temperature dependence of the electronic spin-splitting which, from relatively crude arguments, appears to be inconsistent with neutron scattering results. In order to investigate this point and also the origin of spin-wave renormalization, a series of calculations of the dynamic susceptibility of nickel and iron has been undertaken. The results of these calculations indicate that a discrepancy exists between the interpretations of neutron and photoemission experimental results regarding the temperature dependence of the spin-splitting of the electronic energy bands.

  19. Magnetic properties of iron nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvell, J.; Ayieta, E.; Gavrin, A.; Cheng, Ruihua; Shah, V. R.; Sokol, P.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe nanoparticles with different sizes synthesized by a physical deposition technique have been investigated experimentally. We have used a high pressure sputtering technique to deposit iron nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. The nanoparticles are then analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device techniques. TEM and AFM data show that the particle size could be tuned by adjusting the deposition conditions. The magnetic properties have been investigated from temperature dependent magnetization M(T) and field dependent magnetization M(H) measurements. The results show that two phases including both ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic particles are present in our system. From these data we extracted the superparamagnetic critical size to be 9 nm for our samples. Ferromagnetic particles are single magnetic domain particles and the magnetic properties can be explained by the Stoner and Wohlfarth model. For the superparamagnetic phase, the effective anisotropy constant, K eff , decreases as the particle size increases.

  20. Inhomogeneous superconductivity in a ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontos, T.; Aprili, M.; Lesueur, J.; Genet, F.; Boursier, R.; Grison, X.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied a new superconducting state where the condensate wave function resulting from conventional pairing, is modified by an exchange field. Superconductivity is induced into a ferromagnetic thin film (F) by the proximity effect with a superconducting reservoir (S). We observed oscillations of the superconducting order parameter induced in F as a function of the distance from the S/F interface. They originate from the finite momentum transfer provided to Cooper pairs by the splitting of the spin up and down bands. We measured the superconducting density of states in F by tunneling spectroscopy and the Josephson critical current when F is coupled with a superconducting counter-electrode. Negative values of the superconducting order parameter are revealed by capsized tunneling spectra in F and a negative Josephson coupling (π-junction)

  1. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Yushen [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and College of Physics and Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Deng, Xiaohui [Department of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Zhang, G. P. [Department of Physics, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  2. Dipolar ferromagnets and glasses (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, T.F.; Wu, W.; Ellman, B.; Yang, J.; Aeppli, G.; Reich, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    What is the ground state and what are the dynamics of 10 23 randomly distributed Ising spins? We have attempted to answer these questions through magnetic susceptibility, calorimetric, and neutron scattering studies of the randomly diluted dipolar-coupled Ising magnet LiHo x Y 1-x F 4 . The material is ferromagnetic for dipole concentrations at least as low as x=0.46, with a Curie temperature obeying mean-field scaling relative to that of pure LiHoF 4 . In the dilute spin limit, an x=0.045 crystal shows very unusual glassy properties characterized by decreasing barriers to relaxation as T→0. Its properties are consistent with a single low degeneracy ground state with a large gap for excitations. A slightly more concentrated x=0.167 sample, however, supports a complex ground state with no appreciable gap, in accordance with prevailing theories of spin glasses. The underlying causes of such disparate behavior are discussed in terms of random clusters as probed by neutron studies of the x=0.167 sample. In addition to tracing the evolution of the glassy and ferromagnetic states with dipole concentration, we investigate the effects of a transverse magnetic field on the Ising spin glass, LiHo 0.167 Y 0.833 F 4 . The transverse field mixes the eigenfunctions of the ground-state Ising doublet with the otherwise inaccessible excited-state levels. We observe a rapid decrease in the characteristic relaxation times, large changes in the spectral form of the relaxation, and a depression of the spin-glass transition temperature with the addition of quantum fluctuations

  3. Preparation and characterization of flexible ferromagnetic nanocomposites for microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Teena; Kanoth, Bipinbal P.; Nijas, C.M.; Joy, P.A.; Joseph, Joseph M.; Kuthirummal, Narayanan; Thachil, Eby T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (∼20 nm) were synthesised by co-precipitation method. • Nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed in natural rubber through latex stage processing. • Mechanical properties and magnetic properties of composites improved with loading Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. • Imaginary part of permeability increases with nanoparticle loading improving the microwave absorption characteristics. • Infrared spectra reveal strong interaction between NR and iron oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (∼20 nm) were synthesized using the chemical co-precipitation method with a view of developing flexible and easily processable ferromagnetic materials with high mouldability to be used as microwave absorbers. The nanoparticles prepared were incorporated into natural rubber through latex stage processing. This novel processing method gives better dispersion of particles in the rubber matrix. The composites were characterized using XRD, SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer, dynamic mechanical analyzer, cavity perturbation, thermogravimetry (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS). A notable improvement in the mechanical properties of composites was observed upon adding Fe 3 O 4 particles. Magnetic and microwave characteristics of the composites indicate the formation of a flexible ferromagnetic material with good microwave absorption characteristics

  4. Preparation and characterization of flexible ferromagnetic nanocomposites for microwave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Teena; Kanoth, Bipinbal P. [Department of Polymer Science & Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, 682022, Kerala (India); Nijas, C.M. [Department of Electronics, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, 682022, Kerala (India); Joy, P.A. [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Joseph, Joseph M. [Inter University Centre for Nanomaterials and Devices, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India); Kuthirummal, Narayanan, E-mail: kuthirummaln@cofc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Thachil, Eby T., E-mail: ethachil@gmail.com [Department of Polymer Science & Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, 682022, Kerala (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (∼20 nm) were synthesised by co-precipitation method. • Nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed in natural rubber through latex stage processing. • Mechanical properties and magnetic properties of composites improved with loading Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Imaginary part of permeability increases with nanoparticle loading improving the microwave absorption characteristics. • Infrared spectra reveal strong interaction between NR and iron oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (∼20 nm) were synthesized using the chemical co-precipitation method with a view of developing flexible and easily processable ferromagnetic materials with high mouldability to be used as microwave absorbers. The nanoparticles prepared were incorporated into natural rubber through latex stage processing. This novel processing method gives better dispersion of particles in the rubber matrix. The composites were characterized using XRD, SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer, dynamic mechanical analyzer, cavity perturbation, thermogravimetry (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS). A notable improvement in the mechanical properties of composites was observed upon adding Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles. Magnetic and microwave characteristics of the composites indicate the formation of a flexible ferromagnetic material with good microwave absorption characteristics.

  5. Estimation of error fields from ferromagnetic parts in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, A. Bonito [Fusion for Energy (Spain); Chiariello, A.G.; Formisano, A.; Martone, R. [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dip. di Ing. Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, I-81031 Napoli (Italy); Portone, A., E-mail: alfredo.portone@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (Spain); Testoni, P. [Fusion for Energy (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The paper deals with error fields generated in ITER by magnetic masses. ► Magnetization state is computed from simplified FEM models. ► Closed form expressions adopted for the flux density of magnetized parts are given. ► Such expressions allow to simplify the estimation of the effect of iron pieces (or lack of) on error field. -- Abstract: Error fields in tokamaks are small departures from the exact axisymmetry of the ideal magnetic field configuration. Their reduction below a threshold value by the error field correction coils is essential since sufficiently large static error fields lead to discharge disruption. The error fields are originated not only by magnets fabrication and installation tolerances, by the joints and by the busbars, but also by the presence of ferromagnetic elements. It was shown that superconducting joints, feeders and busbars play a secondary effect; however in order to estimate of the importance of each possible error field source, rough evaluations can be very useful because it can provide an order of magnitude of the correspondent effect and, therefore, a ranking in the request for in depth analysis. The paper proposes a two steps procedure. The first step aims to get the approximate magnetization state of ferromagnetic parts; the second aims to estimate the full 3D error field over the whole volume using equivalent sources for magnetic masses and taking advantage from well assessed approximate closed form expressions, well suited for the far distance effects.

  6. Feasibility of introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk high-Tc superconductors to enhance the performance of present maglev systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zigang; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Suyu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ferromagnetic materials guide the flux distribution of the PMG to bulk positions. ► With ferromagnetic materials, guidance performance can be enhanced greatly. ► A new HTS Maglev system with onboard ferromagnetic materials is designed. ► The design can meet large guidance force requirements for practical applications. -- Abstract: Performance improvement is a long-term research task for the promotion of practical application of promising high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic levitation (maglev) vehicle technologies. We studied the feasibility to enhance the performance of present HTS Maglev systems by introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk superconductors. The principle here is to make use of the high magnetic permeability of ferromagnetic materials to alter the flux distribution of the permanent magnet guideway for the enhancement of magnetic field density at the position of the bulk superconductors. Ferromagnetic iron plates were added to the upper surface of bulk superconductors and their geometric and positioning effects on the maglev performance were investigated experimentally. Results show that the guidance performance (stability) was enhanced greatly for a particular setup when compared to the present maglev system which is helpful in the application where large guidance forces are needed such as maglev tracks with high degrees of curves

  7. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  8. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated

  9. High-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Fe)Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Nguyen Thanh; Hai, Pham Nam; Anh, Le Duc; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    We show high-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga_1_−_x,Fe_x)Sb (x = 23% and 25%) thin films grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and anomalous Hall effect measurements indicate intrinsic ferromagnetism of these samples. The Curie temperature reaches 300 K and 340 K for x = 23% and 25%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far in intrinsic III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  10. High-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Fe)Sb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Nguyen Thanh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physics, Ho Chi Minh City University of Pedagogy, 280, An Duong Vuong Street, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City 748242 (Viet Nam); Hai, Pham Nam [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-0033 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN), The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Anh, Le Duc [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN), The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-05-09

    We show high-temperature ferromagnetism in heavily Fe-doped ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga{sub 1−x},Fe{sub x})Sb (x = 23% and 25%) thin films grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and anomalous Hall effect measurements indicate intrinsic ferromagnetism of these samples. The Curie temperature reaches 300 K and 340 K for x = 23% and 25%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far in intrinsic III-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  11. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  12. Coexistence of Superconductivity and Ferromagnetism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KBHEEMA

    Ferromagnetic alignment can be expected to be strongly opposed by superconductivity. .... To obtain temperature dependent of energy gap of equation (23), we used the same techniques to solve the integral .... band metal ZrZn2. Nature, 412: ...

  13. Ferromagnetic and twin domains in LCMO manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, G.; Markovich, V.; Mogilyanski, D.; Beek, C. van der; Mukovskii, Y.M.

    2005-01-01

    Ferromagnetic and twin domains in lightly Ca-doped La 1-x Ca x MnO 3 single crystals have been visualized and investigated by means of the magneto-optical technique. Both types of domains became visible below the Curie temperature. The dominant structures seen in applied magnetic field are associated with magneto-crystalline anisotropy and twin domains. In a marked difference to the twin domains which appear only in applied magnetic field, ferromagnetic domains show up in zero applied field and are characterized by oppositely oriented spontaneous magnetization in adjacent domains. Ferromagnetic domains take form of almost periodic, corrugated strip-like structures. The corrugation of the ferromagnetic domain pattern is enforced by the underlying twin domains

  14. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  15. COOLING STAGES OF CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Троценко, А. В.

    2011-01-01

    The formalized definition for cooling stage of low temperature system is done. Based on existing information about the known cryogenic unit cycles the possible types of cooling stages are single out. From analyses of these stages their classification by various characteristics is suggested. The results of thermodynamic optimization of final throttle stage of cooling, which are used as working fluids helium, hydrogen and nitrogen, are shown.

  16. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  17. Synthesis and magnetic characterizations of uniform iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, FuYi; Li, XiaoYi; Zhu, Yuan; Tang, ZiKang

    2014-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles with a cubic shape were prepared by the decomposition of homemade iron oleate in 1-octadecene with the presence of oleic acid. The particle shape and size uniformity are sensitive to the quantity of oleic acid. XRD, HRTEM and SAED results indicated that the main phase content of as-prepared iron oxide nanoparticles is Fe 3 O 4 with an inverse spinel structure. Magnetic measurements revealed that the as-prepared iron oxide nanoparticles display a ferromagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 295 K. At low temperatures the magnetic anisotropy of the aligned nanoparticles caused the appearance of a hysteresis loop.

  18. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castles, S.H.; Schein, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is described for use in craft such as launch, orbital and space vehicles subject to changes in orientation and conditions of vibration and weightlessness comprising: an insulated tank; a porous open celled sponge-like material disposed substantially throughout the contained volume of the insulated tank; a cryogenic fluid disposed within the sponge-like material; a cooling finger immersed in the cryogenic fluid, the finger extending from inside the insulated tank externally to an outside source such as an instrument detector for the purpose of transmitting heat from the outside source into the cryogenic fluid; means for filling the insulated tank with cryogenic fluid; and means for venting vaporized cryogenic fluid from the insulated tank

  19. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  20. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al 2 O 3 tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or π coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, π) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-π Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-π junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum Φ 0 . Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T → 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  1. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  2. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation

  3. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owerre, S A

    2017-01-01

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1–3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) spin–orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases. (paper)

  4. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S A

    2017-05-10

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  5. The cryogenic control system of EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L.B.; Zhow, Z.W.; Xia, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A reliable and flexible duplex control system is required for cryogenic system. ► The cryogenic control system is based on Delta-V DCS. ► It has been proved to be an effective way to control cryogenic process. ► It will provide useful experience and inspiration for the development in the cryogenic control engineering. - Abstract: A large scale helium cryogenic system is one of the key components for the EAST tokamak device for the cooling of PF and TF coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines, current leads and cryopumps. Since the cooling scheme of the EAST cryogenic system is fairly complicated, a reliable and flexible control system is required for cryogenic system. The cryogenic control system is based on DeltaV DCS which is the process control software developed by Emerson Company. The EAST cryogenic system has been in operation for four years and has been proved to be safe, stable and energy saving by the past 7 experiments. This paper describes the redundant control network, hardware configuration, software structure, auxiliary system and the new development in the future.

  6. Inductive measurements of ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, R.C.; Kennewell, K.; Crew, D.C.; Stamps, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The rapid advance in magnetic data storage has driven groundbreaking work in the science that underpins the properties of ferromagnetic materials at high frequencies. Recent work in this area has included the use of precession in order to produce ultra-high speed switching of magnetic elements, the generation of excited dynamical structures by application of inhomogeneous field pulses, and examination of the propagation of localized spin waves. This paper describes explorations of ultra-fast magnetization dynamics being undertaken at The University of Western Australia. We have studied the differences in magnetization dynamics in simple permalloy films when a sample is excited with sharp pulse compared to the to the dynamics generated by the application of a small amplitude continuous wave signal. We have observed a difference in the resonant frequency determined from these two excitations and will propose reasons for the different resonance responses of the system. Using the ultra-fast techniques described above we have measured dynamical properties that are significantly different to the static properties. These results are explained by the dynamical measurements being made on time scales smaller than the characteristic relaxation time. Future applications of these devices will be to examine broadening of line widths and frequency shifts associated with the excitation of magnetostatic modes, factors limiting quasiballistic reversal and differences between the dynamic and static properties of magnetic materials

  7. Carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Story, T.

    2007-01-01

    In semiconductor spintronics the key materials issue concerns ferromagnetic semiconductors that would, in particular, permit an integration (in a single multilayer heterostructure) of standard electronic functions of semiconductors with magnetic memory function. Although classical semiconductor materials, such as Si or GaAs, are nonmagnetic, upon substitutional incorporation of magnetic ions (typically of a few atomic percents of Mn 2+ ions) and very heavy doping with conducting carriers (at the level of 10 20 - 10 21 cm -3 ) a ferromagnetic transition can be induced in such diluted magnetic semiconductors (also known as semimagnetic semiconductors). In the lecture the spectacular experimental observations of carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism will be discussed for three model semiconductor crystals. p - Ga 1-x Mn x As currently the most actively studied and most perspective ferromagnetic semiconductor of III-V group, in which ferromagnetism appears due to Mn ions providing both local magnetic moments and acting as acceptor centers. p - Sn 1-x Mn x Te and p - Ge 1-x Mn x Te classical diluted magnetic semiconductors of IV-VI group, in which paramagnet-ferromagnet and ferromagnet-spin glass transitions are found for very high hole concentration. n - Eu 1-x Gd x Te mixed magnetic crystals, in which the substitution of Gd 3+ ions for Eu 2+ ions creates very high electron concentration and transforms antiferromagnetic EuTe (insulating compound) into ferromagnetic n-type semiconductor alloy. For each of these materials systems the key physical features will be discussed concerning: local magnetic moments formation, magnetic phase diagram as a function of magnetic ions and carrier concentration as well as Curie temperature and magnetic anisotropy engineering. Various theoretical models proposed to explain the effect of carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors will be briefly discussed involving mean field approaches based on Zener and RKKY

  8. Feasibility of introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk high-Tc superconductors to enhance the performance of present maglev systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zigang; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Suyu

    2013-02-01

    Performance improvement is a long-term research task for the promotion of practical application of promising high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic levitation (maglev) vehicle technologies. We studied the feasibility to enhance the performance of present HTS Maglev systems by introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk superconductors. The principle here is to make use of the high magnetic permeability of ferromagnetic materials to alter the flux distribution of the permanent magnet guideway for the enhancement of magnetic field density at the position of the bulk superconductors. Ferromagnetic iron plates were added to the upper surface of bulk superconductors and their geometric and positioning effects on the maglev performance were investigated experimentally. Results show that the guidance performance (stability) was enhanced greatly for a particular setup when compared to the present maglev system which is helpful in the application where large guidance forces are needed such as maglev tracks with high degrees of curves.

  9. Transport measurements on superconducting iron pnictides and Heusler compounds; Transportmessungen an Supraleitenden Eisenpniktiden und Heusler-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombor, Dirk

    2014-09-05

    In this work, results of electronic transport measurements are discussed for superconducting iron pnictides as well as for ferromagnetic Heusler compounds. The iron pnictides are a recently discovered class of high temperature superconductors where magnetism might play a crucial role. While the 122-pnictides show antiferromagnetism and migrate to the superconducting state upon doping, ferromagnetism has been observed in doped LiFeAs. On the other hand, in the undoped state this material shows interesting superconducting properties. Among other properties, Heusler compounds are well known due to their ferromagnetism. Co{sub 2}FeSi, which was investigated in this work, is one of the strongest ferromagnets. Beside this, one predicts this compound to be a half-metallic ferromagnet with completely spin polarized electronic transport where all conducting electrons have the same spin. The here addressed properties can well be investigated with the method of electronic transport measurements, whose results on single crystals are discussed in this work.

  10. Role of iron oxide impurities in electrocatalysis by multiwall carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electro-catalytic oxidation of dopamine, and reduction of hydro- gen peroxide have ... herent ferromagnetic properties at room temperature, which have been used to ... tion of ferrocene in ethanol gave iron oxide nanoparticles. (Io-NPs) with an .... anism shows strong dependence on the nature of the elec- trode surface.

  11. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  12. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  13. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    OpenAIRE

    von Hahn, Robert; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A.; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion a...

  14. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  15. Observation of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.; Wigen, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation of a ferromagnetic resonance signal arising from a microscopic (∼20μmx40μm) particle of thin (3μm) yttrium iron garnet film using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The large signal intensity in the resonance spectra suggests that MRFM could become a powerful microscopic ferromagnetic resonance technique with a micron or sub-micron resolution. We also observe a very strong nonresonance signal which occurs in the field regime where the sample magnetization readily reorients in response to the modulation of the magnetic field. This signal will be the main noise source in applications where a magnet is mounted on the cantilever. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Spin exchange between ion probes and localized moments in ferromagnets as the origin of transient fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelberg, F.; Das, T.P.; Speidel, K.

    1993-01-01

    The transient field phenomenon has been ascribed to a polarization transfer between the electrons of the ionic projectiles and the surplus of majority spin electrons of the ferromagnetic host over the minority spin electrons. Earlier attempts to explain this crucial process failed to account for the order of magnitude of the experimentally observed transient field strengths. A recent model which proposes spin exchange scattering between bound projectile electrons and quasifree host electrons as the mechanism of polarization transfer arrives at the correct orders of magnitude but is in conflict with the weak velocity dependence of the experimental polarization, exhibiting a strongly decreasing behavior with increasing velocity. The new model presented here proposes spin exchange between the ionic shell and localized electrons of the ferromagnet as a more adequate approach to the problem. It is shown that calculations involving hydrogenlike ions explain the size of the experimentally observed polarization effects as well as their velocity dependence for various ion probes traversing thin iron foils

  17. FERROMAGNETIC NANOTUBES IN PORES OF TRACK MEMBRANES FOR THE FLEXIBLE ELECTRONIC ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Kaniukov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the template synthesis of ferromagnetic (Fe, Co, Ni nanotubes in the pores of track membranes were studied. The aim of this work was determination of nanotubes basic structural and magnetic parameters and demonstration of the possibility of application in the flexible electronics elements.By electrochemical deposition, ferromagnetic nanotubes with a diameter of 110 nm and an aspect ratio of 100 were formed in the pores of polyethylene terephthalate track membranes. The morphology of the obtained nanostructures were studied by scanning electron microscopy, the elemental composition was determined by the energy-dispersion analysis. Using the X-ray structural analysis, the main parameters of the crystal structure were established: lattice type, lattice parameter and average crystallite size. The magnetic properties were studied by the method of vibrational magnetometry.It was shown that in the selected conditions of synthesis without reference to the type of ferromagnetic metals nanotubes had the same dimensions – length, diameter and wall thickness. The produced nanotubes consisted of iron, cobalt and nickel, respectively without oxides impurities. Nanotubes had a polycrystalline structure of walls with a body-centered cubic (iron, face-centered cubic (cobalt and nickel crystal lattice. According to the main magnetic parameters, nanotubes belonged to a group of soft magnetic materials. Also, the presence of magnetic anisotropy, which is caused by the features of crystalline structure and shape of the nanostructures.Based on the analysis of structural and magnetic characteristics of ferromagnetic nanotubes which were synthesized in the pores of track membranes, were proposed the main principles of their using in the elements’ of flexible electronics constructing (magnetic field direction sensors and magnetic memory elements. 

  18. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlig, K

    2012-01-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4 He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4 He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  19. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review briefly our first cryogen-free dilution refrigerator (CF-DR) which was precooled by a GM cryocooler. We then show how today's dry DRs with pulse tube precooling have developed. A few examples of commercial DRs are explained and noteworthy features pointed out. Thereby we describe the general advantages of cryogen-free DRs, but also show where improvements are still desirable. At present, our dry DR has a base temperature of 10 mK and a cooling capacity of 700 μW at a mixing chamber temperature of 100 mK. In our cryostat, in most recent work, an additional refrigeration loop was added to the dilution circuit. This 4He circuit has a lowest temperature of about 1 K and a refrigeration capacity of up to 100 mW at temperatures slightly above 1 K; the dilution circuit and the 4He circuit can be run separately or together. The purpose of this additional loop is to increase the cooling capacity for experiments where the cooling power of the still of the DR is not sufficient to cool cold amplifiers and cables, e.g. in studies on superconducting quantum circuits or astrophysical applications.

  20. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  1. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  2. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  3. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. von; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2016-06-15

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm{sup −3} is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10{sup −14} mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  4. Spin Currents and Spin Orbit Torques in Ferromagnets and Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ming

    demonstrate the device operation by using micromagnetic modeling which involves studying the magnetic coupling induced by fringe fields from chiral DWs in perpendicularly magnetized nanowires. The last part of my thesis project reports spin transport and spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O 12 (YIG)/NiO/Pt trilayers with varied NiO thickness. To characterize the spin transport through NiO we excite ferromagnetic resonance in YIG with a microwave frequency magnetic field and detect the voltage associated with the inverse spin-Hall effect (ISHE) in the Pt layer. The ISHE signal is found to decay exponentially with the NiO thickness with a characteristic decay length of 3.9 nm. However, in contrast to the ISHE response, as the NiO thickness increases the SMR signal goes towards zero abruptly at a NiO thickness of 4 nm, highlighting the different length scales associated with the spin-transport in NiO and SMR in such trilayers.

  5. Spectrum of ferromagnetic transition metal magnetic excitations and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemskij, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    Quantum statistical models of ferromagnetic transition metals as well as methods of their solutions are reviewed. The correspondence of results on solving these models and the data on scattering thermal neutrons in ferromagnetic is discussed

  6. Giant magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection in ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, A.V.; Sukhorukov, Yu.P.; Loshkareva, N.N.; Mostovshchikova, E.V.; Bebenin, N.G.; Gan'shina, E.A.; Granovsky, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a brief review on magnetotransmission (magnetoabsorption) and magnetoreflection of natural (unpolarized) light in ferromagnetic chromium chalcogenide spinel, manganites with perovskite structure and thin-film metallic nanostructures in the middle infrared spectral range. The magnetooptical effects under discussion are of high interest for numerous and promising applications in the infrared optoelectronics. - Highlights: • Magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection of light in ferromagnetic are presented. • The effects are greater than common magnetooptical phenomena in the infrared. • The effects may have a different origin depending on a material or spectral range. • Possible applications of the magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection are discussed

  7. Giant magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection in ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, A.V., E-mail: telegin@imp.uran.ru [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of RAS, 620137 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sukhorukov, Yu.P.; Loshkareva, N.N.; Mostovshchikova, E.V.; Bebenin, N.G. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of RAS, 620137 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gan' shina, E.A.; Granovsky, A.B. [Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    We present a brief review on magnetotransmission (magnetoabsorption) and magnetoreflection of natural (unpolarized) light in ferromagnetic chromium chalcogenide spinel, manganites with perovskite structure and thin-film metallic nanostructures in the middle infrared spectral range. The magnetooptical effects under discussion are of high interest for numerous and promising applications in the infrared optoelectronics. - Highlights: • Magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection of light in ferromagnetic are presented. • The effects are greater than common magnetooptical phenomena in the infrared. • The effects may have a different origin depending on a material or spectral range. • Possible applications of the magnetotransmission and magnetoreflection are discussed.

  8. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  9. Magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferromagnet multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.; Maley, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    We argue that superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers of nanoscale period should exhibit strong pinning of vortices by the magnetic domain structure in magnetic fields below the coercive field when ferromagnetic layers exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The estimated maximum magnetic pinning energy for single vortex in such a system is about 100 times larger than the pinning energy by columnar defects. This pinning energy may provide critical currents as high as 10 6 -10 7 A/cm 2 at high temperatures (but not very close to T c ) at least in magnetic fields below 0.1 T. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. Magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferromagnet multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskii, L. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, CUNY Lehman College 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York 10468-1589 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chudnovsky, E. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, CUNY Lehman College, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York 10468-1589 (United States); Maley, M. P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2000-05-01

    We argue that superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers of nanoscale period should exhibit strong pinning of vortices by the magnetic domain structure in magnetic fields below the coercive field when ferromagnetic layers exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The estimated maximum magnetic pinning energy for single vortex in such a system is about 100 times larger than the pinning energy by columnar defects. This pinning energy may provide critical currents as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} at high temperatures (but not very close to T{sub c}) at least in magnetic fields below 0.1 T. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Itinerant Ferromagnetism in Ultracold Fermi Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC. Thermodyna......Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC...

  12. Proximity effects in ferromagnet/superconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.L.; Sun, G.Y.; Yang, L.Y.; Xing, D.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Nambu spinor Green's function approach is applied to study proximity effects in ferromagnet/superconductor (FM/SC) structures. They include the induced superconducting order parameter and density of states (DOS) with superconducting feature on the FM side, and spin-dependent DOS within the energy gap on the SC side. The latter indicates an appearance of gapless superconductivity and a coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in a small regime near the interface. The influence of exchange energy in FM and barrier strength at interface on the proximity effects is discussed

  13. Wellhead with non-ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson, Richard A [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2009-05-19

    Wellheads for coupling to a heater located in a wellbore in a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one wellhead may include a heater located in a wellbore in a subsurface formation; and a wellhead coupled to the heater. The wellhead may be configured to electrically couple the heater to one or more surface electrical components. The wellhead may include at least one non-ferromagnetic material such that ferromagnetic effects are inhibited in the wellhead. Systems and methods for using such wellheads for treating a subsurface formation are described herein.

  14. Vortex dynamics in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, M.Z.; Adamus, Z. [Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, PL-02668 Warsaw, (Poland); Konczykowski, M. [CEA, DSM, DRECAM, Lab Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS-UMR 7642, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Zhu, L.Y.; Chien, C.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Phys and Astron, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The dependence of vortex dynamics on the geometry of magnetic domain pattern is studied in the superconducting/ferromagnetic bilayers, in which niobium is a superconductor, and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy serves as a ferromagnetic layer. Magnetic domain patterns with different density of domains per surface area and different domain size, w, are obtained for Co/Pt with different thickness of Pt. The dense patterns of domains with the size comparable to the magnetic penetration depth (w {>=} {lambda}) produce large vortex pinning and smooth vortex penetration, while less dense patterns with larger domains (w {>=}{>=} {lambda}) enhance pinning less effectively and result in flux jumps during flux motion. (authors)

  15. Temperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar,; Harold J. , Harris; Kelvin, Christopher [Houston, TX

    2012-07-17

    A heater is described. The heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The ferromagnetic conductor is positioned relative to the electrical conductor such that an electromagnetic field produced by time-varying current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor confines a majority of the flow of the electrical current to the electrical conductor at temperatures below or near a selected temperature.

  16. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Ferromagnets as pure spin current generators and detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Danru; Miao, Bingfeng; Chien, Chia -Ling; Huang, Ssu -Yen

    2015-09-08

    Provided is a spintronics device. The spintronics can include a ferromagnetic metal layer, a positive electrode disposed on a first surface portion of the ferromagnetic metal layer, and a negative electrode disposed on a second surface portion of the ferromagnetic metal.

  18. Towards ferromagnet/superconductor junctions on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakkayil, Shijin Babu

    2015-01-01

    Ever since A. Aspect et al. performed the famous 1982 experiment to prove the violation of Bell's inequality, there have been suggestions to conduct the same experiment in a solid state system. Some of those proposals involve superconductors as the source of entangled electron pair and spin depended interfaces as the optical analogue of polariser/filter. Semiconductors can serve as the best medium for such an experiment due to their long relaxation lengths. So far there are no reports on a ferromagnet/superconductor junctions on a semiconductor even though such junctions has been successfully realised in metallic systems. This thesis reports the successful fabrication of ferromagnet/superconductor junction along with characterising measurements in a perfectly two dimensional zero-gap semiconductor known as graphene. Since it's discovery in 2004, graphene has attracted prodigious interest from both academia and industry due to it's inimitable physical properties: very high mobility, high thermal and electrical conductivity, a high Young's modulus and impermeability. Graphene is also expected to have very long spin relaxation length and high spin life time because of it's low spin orbit coupling. For this reason and since researchers are always looking for novel materials and devices to comply with the high demands for better and faster data storage devices, graphene has emanated as a brand new material system for spin based devices. The very first spin injection and detection in graphene was realised in 2007 and ever since, the focal point of the research has been to improve the spin transport properties. A part of this thesis discusses a new fabrication recipe which has a high yield for successfully contacting graphene with a ferromagnet. A high starting yield for ferromagnetic contacts is a irremissible condition for combining superconducting contacts to the device to fabricate ferromagnet/superconductor junctions. Any fabrication recipe

  19. Towards ferromagnet/superconductor junctions on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkayil, Shijin Babu

    2015-07-01

    Ever since A. Aspect et al. performed the famous 1982 experiment to prove the violation of Bell's inequality, there have been suggestions to conduct the same experiment in a solid state system. Some of those proposals involve superconductors as the source of entangled electron pair and spin depended interfaces as the optical analogue of polariser/filter. Semiconductors can serve as the best medium for such an experiment due to their long relaxation lengths. So far there are no reports on a ferromagnet/superconductor junctions on a semiconductor even though such junctions has been successfully realised in metallic systems. This thesis reports the successful fabrication of ferromagnet/superconductor junction along with characterising measurements in a perfectly two dimensional zero-gap semiconductor known as graphene. Since it's discovery in 2004, graphene has attracted prodigious interest from both academia and industry due to it's inimitable physical properties: very high mobility, high thermal and electrical conductivity, a high Young's modulus and impermeability. Graphene is also expected to have very long spin relaxation length and high spin life time because of it's low spin orbit coupling. For this reason and since researchers are always looking for novel materials and devices to comply with the high demands for better and faster data storage devices, graphene has emanated as a brand new material system for spin based devices. The very first spin injection and detection in graphene was realised in 2007 and ever since, the focal point of the research has been to improve the spin transport properties. A part of this thesis discusses a new fabrication recipe which has a high yield for successfully contacting graphene with a ferromagnet. A high starting yield for ferromagnetic contacts is a irremissible condition for combining superconducting contacts to the device to fabricate ferromagnet/superconductor junctions. Any fabrication recipe

  20. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  1. Tunneling Conductance in Ferromagnetic Metal/Normal Metal/Spin-Singlet -Wave Ferromagnetic Superconductor Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Emamipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of scattering theory, we study the tunneling conductance in a system including two junctions, ferromagnetic metal/normal metal/ferromagnetic superconductor, where ferromagnetic superconductor is in spin-singlet -wave pairing state. The non-magnetic normal metal is placed in the intermediate layer with the thickness ( which varies from 1 nm to 10000 nm. The interesting result which we have found is the existence of oscillations in conductance curves. The period of oscillations is independent of FS and FN exchange field while it depends on . The obtained results can serve as a useful tool to determine the kind of pairing symmetry in ferromagnetic superconductors.

  2. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  3. Cryogenic polarized target facility: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.; Nash, H.K.; Roberson, N.; Schneider, M.; Seagondollar, W.; Soderstrum, J.

    1985-01-01

    The TUNL cryogenically polarized target facility consists of a 3 He- 4 He dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet, together capable of maintaining samples at between 10 and 20 mK in magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla. At these temperatures and magnetic fields brute-force nuclear orientation occurs. Polarizations from 20 to 60% are attainable in about twenty nonzero spin nuclei. Most are metals, ranging in mass from 6 Li to 209 Bi, but the nuclei 1 H and 3 He are also polarizable via this method. The main effort is directed towards a better determination of the effective spin-spin force in nuclei. These experiments are briefly described and the beam stabilization system, cryostat and polarized 3 He targets are discussed

  4. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  5. Moessbauer effect studies of magnetic interactions in iron and dilute iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, F. van der; Schurer, P.J.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A temperature-dependent Moessbauer study was conducted in FeX alloys, where X = Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni, aimed at solving the problem of 'what is localized and what is itinerant in iron ferromagnetism'. The experimental results are interpreted using a phenomenological model based on a modified Zener-Vonsovskij theory. Absorption spectra of FeX alloys were measured as a function of temperature. It was found that the 3d magnetic moments in iron were mainly localized while exchange coupling was provided by partly itinerant 3d electrons. (L.D.)

  6. Ferromagnetism in poly(N-perfluorophenylpyrrole)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čík, G., E-mail: gabriel.cik@stuba.sk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Šeršeň, F. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Dlháň, L. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Zálupský, P. [Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Rapta, P. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hrnčariková, K. [Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Plecenik, T. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic properties of the synthesized poly(N-perfluorophenylpyrrole) were studied. The synthesized polymer dissolves in common organic solvents. By the zero-field cooling-field cooling method (ZFC–FC) we found that at low temperatures (T{sub b}<50 K) the synthetic polymer reaches a state with prevailing ferromagnetism. The synthesized polymer retained ferromagnetism even at 300 K. The anomalous magnetic behavior was explained in terms of spin–spin interaction of triplet polarons. As can be seen from the calculated spin density of SOMO and SOMO 1 such a state arise as a consequence of 1-D spin interactions of polarons. Based on the calculated and visualized spin density (SOMO) on the polymer chain such interactions can be explained by the theory of flat-band-ferromagnetism. - Highlights: • We synthesized a new conducting polymer poly(N-perfluorophenylpyrrole). • By the ZFC–FC and EPR methods we measured magnetic properties of the prepared polymer. • We discussed stability and interactions of the polarons in triplet states. • At low temperatures the synthesized polymer reached ferromagnetism.

  7. On piezomagnetism at viscoplasticity of ferromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micunovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with viscoplasticity of ferromagnetic materials. Tensor representation is applied to a set of evolution equations comprising the plastic stretching and residual magnetization tensors. Small magnetoelastic strains of isotropic insulators are considered in detail in two special cases of finite as well as small plastic strain. A special emphasis is given to piezomagnetism effects in the case of uniaxial cycling strain (author)

  8. Magnetic profiles in ferromagnetic/superconducting superlattices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Santamaria, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Complutense de Madrid

    2007-02-28

    The interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity has been of longstanding fundamental research interest to scientists, as the competition between these generally mutually exclusive types of long-range order gives rise to a rich variety of physical phenomena. A method of studying these exciting effects is by investigating artificially layered systems, i.e. alternating deposition of superconducting and ferromagnetic thin films on a substrate, which enables a straight-forward combination of the two types of long-range order and allows the study of how they compete at the interface over nanometer length scales. While originally studies focused on low temperature superconductors interchanged with metallic ferromagnets, in recent years the scope has broadened to include superlattices of high T{sub c} superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance oxides. Creating films where both the superconducting as well as the ferromagnetic layers are complex oxide materials with similar crystal structures (Figure 1), allows the creation of epitaxial superlattices, with potentially atomically flat and ordered interfaces.

  9. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist

  10. Ferromagnetic hysteresis and the effective field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Jiles-Atherton model of the behavior of ferromagnetic materials determines the irreversible magnetization from the effective field by using a differential equation. This paper presents an exact, analytical solution to the equation, one displaying hysteresis. The inclusion of magnetomechanical

  11. Ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductor heterojunction systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, B.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2002), s. 393-403 ISSN 0268-1242 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/98/0085; GA MŠk OC P5.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * heterostructures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2002

  12. Pseudospin anisotropy classification of quantum Hall ferromagnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2000), s. 035305-1 - 035305-9 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/98/0085 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : quantum Hall ferromagnets * anisotropy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2000

  13. Skyrmion physics in Bose-Einstein ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate has not only line-like vortex excitations, but in general, also allows for pointlike topological excitations, i.e., skyrmions. We discuss the thermodynamic stability and the dynamic properties of these skyrmions for both spin-1/2 and

  14. Nonmonotonic critical temperature in superconductor ferromagnet bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fominov, Ya. V.; Fominov, I.V.; Chtchelkatchev, N.M.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2002-01-01

    The critical temperature Tc of a superconductor/ferromagnet (SF) bilayer can exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the thickness df of the F layer. SF systems have been studied for a long time; according to the experimental situation, a ¿dirty¿ limit is often considered which implies that the mean free

  15. Magnetization dissipation in ferromagnets from scattering theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetization dynamics of ferromagnets is often formulated in terms of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The reactive part of this equation describes the response of the magnetization in terms of effective fields, whereas the dissipative part is parametrized by the Gilbert damping

  16. Room-temperature ferromagnetic and photoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the ferromagnetic nature of ITO and the strength of magnetization is superior to those of In2O3 and SnO2. However, ... ties in the spintronic devices, the materials suitable for such devices ... into suitable quartz test tubes (10mm) whose interior was enclosed in .... related to metal indium In0 with binding energy 443.6 eV was.

  17. Neutron Depolarization in Submicron Ferromagnetic Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rekveldt, M.Th.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron depolarization technique is based on the loss of polarization of a polarized neutron beam after transmission through ferromagnetic substances. This loss, caused by Larmor precession in individual domains, determines the mean domain size, the mean square direction cosines of the domains

  18. Lattice effects on ferromagnetism in perovskite ruthenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetism and its evolution in the orthorhombic perovskite system Sr1–xCaxRuO3 have been widely believed to correlate with structural distortion. The recent development of high-pressure synthesis of the Ba-substituted Sr1–yBayRuO3 makes it possible to study ferromagnetism over a broader phase diagram, which includes the orthorhombic Imma and the cubic phases. However, the chemical substitutions introduce the A-site disorder effect on Tc, which complicates determination of the relationship between ferromagnetism and structural distortion. By clarifying the site disorder effect on Tc in several unique series of ruthenates in which the average bond length 〈A–O〉 remains the same but the bond-length variance varies, we are able to demonstrate a parabolic curve of Tc versus mean bond length 〈A–O〉. A much higher Tc ∼ 177 K than that found in orthorhombic SrRuO3 can be obtained from the curve at a bond length 〈A–O〉, which makes the geometric factor t = 〈A–O〉/(√2〈Ru–O〉) ∼ 1. This result reveals not only that the ferromagnetism in the ruthenates is extremely sensitive to the lattice strain, but also that it has an important implication for exploring the structure–property relationship in a broad range of oxides with perovskite or a perovskite-related structure. PMID:23904477

  19. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  20. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  1. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  2. The cryogenic control system of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; WANG Ke-Xiang; ZHAO Ji-Jiu; YUE Ke-Juan; DAI Ming-Sui; HUANG Yi-Ling; JIANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade Project(BEPCⅡ).The system consists of a Siemens PLC(ST-PLC,Programmable Logic Controller)for the compressor control,an Allen Bradley(AB)PLC for the cryogenic equipments,and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System(EPICS)that integrates the PLCs.The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control,PID(Proportional-Integral-Differential)control loops,real-time data access and data storage,alarm handler and human machine interface.It is capable of automatic recovery as well.This paper describes the BEPCⅡ cryogenic control system,data communication between ST-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers(IOCs),and the integration of the flow control,the low level interlock,the AB-PLC,and EPICS.

  3. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of...

  4. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Bremer, J; Delany, M; Diaz, A; Doubnik, R; Haaf, K; Henstchel, S; Norris, B; Voirin, E

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  5. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets, are described. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member

  6. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  7. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, D.; Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Delaney, M.; Diaz, A.; Doubnik, R.; Haaf, K.; Hentschel, S.; Norris, B.; Voirin, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  8. Magnetic damping phenomena in ferromagnetic thin-films and multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzawi, S.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Atkinson, D.

    2017-11-01

    Damped ferromagnetic precession is an important mechanism underpinning the magnetisation processes in ferromagnetic materials. In thin-film ferromagnets and ferromagnetic/non-magnetic multilayers, the role of precession and damping can be critical for spintronic device functionality and as a consequence there has been significant research activity. This paper presents a review of damping in ferromagnetic thin-films and multilayers and collates the results of many experimental studies to present a coherent synthesis of the field. The terms that are used to define damping are discussed with the aim of providing consistent definitions for damping phenomena. A description of the theoretical basis of damping is presented from early developments to the latest discussions of damping in ferromagnetic thin-films and multilayers. An overview of the time and frequency domain methods used to study precessional magnetisation behaviour and damping in thin-films and multilayers is also presented. Finally, a review of the experimental observations of magnetic damping in ferromagnetic thin-films and multilayers is presented with the most recent explanations. This brings together the results from many studies and includes the effects of ferromagnetic film thickness, the effects of composition on damping in thin-film ferromagnetic alloys, the influence of non-magnetic dopants in ferromagnetic films and the effects of combining thin-film ferromagnets with various non-magnetic layers in multilayered configurations.

  9. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  10. Neutron detection with cryogenics and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Zane W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.; Burger, Arnold; Woodfield, Brian F.; Niedermayr, Thomas; Dragos Hau, I.; Labov, Simon E.; Friedrich, Stephan; Geoffrey West, W.; Pohl, Kenneth R.; Berg, Lodewijk van den

    2005-01-01

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI 2 for direct detection of neutrons. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Fundamental of cryogenics (for superconducting RF technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This review briefly illustrates a few fundamental concepts of cryogenic engineering, the technological practice that allows reaching and maintaining the low-temperature operating conditions of the superconducting devices needed in particle accelerators. To limit the scope of the task, and not to duplicate coverage of cryogenic engineering concepts particularly relevant to superconducting magnets that can be found in previous CAS editions, the overview presented in this course focuses on superconducting radio-frequency cavities.

  12. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Stephen H. (Inventor); Schein, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is provided for use in craft such as launch, orbital, and space vehicles subject to substantial vibration, changes in orientation, and weightlessness. The cooler contains a small pore, large free volume, low density material to restrain a cryogen through surface tension effects during launch and zero-g operations and maintains instrumentation within the temperature range of 10 to 140 K. The cooler operation is completely passive, with no inherent vibration or power requirements.

  13. A hall for assembly and cryogenic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaunier, J.; Buhler, S.; Caruette, A.; Chevrollier, R.; Junquera, T.; Le Scornet, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Cryodrome, an assembly hall and the testing ground for cryogenic equipment and R and D experiments for the superconducting cavities is going to be transformed for its future missions. The cryogenic utilities, especially the He low pressure pumping capacity, was rearranged and extended to a new area. Space was provided to install CRYHOLAB, a new horizontal cryostat for cavity testing. Automatic control and supervision of the utilities and the experimental area are rebuilt and updated. (authors)

  14. Feasibility of introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk high-T{sub c} superconductors to enhance the performance of present maglev systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zigang, E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.com [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory (ASCLab), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Traction Power (TPL), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Jiasu [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory (ASCLab), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Ya [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory (ASCLab), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Traction Power (TPL), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Suyu [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory (ASCLab), Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2013-02-14

    Highlights: ► Ferromagnetic materials guide the flux distribution of the PMG to bulk positions. ► With ferromagnetic materials, guidance performance can be enhanced greatly. ► A new HTS Maglev system with onboard ferromagnetic materials is designed. ► The design can meet large guidance force requirements for practical applications. -- Abstract: Performance improvement is a long-term research task for the promotion of practical application of promising high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic levitation (maglev) vehicle technologies. We studied the feasibility to enhance the performance of present HTS Maglev systems by introducing ferromagnetic materials to onboard bulk superconductors. The principle here is to make use of the high magnetic permeability of ferromagnetic materials to alter the flux distribution of the permanent magnet guideway for the enhancement of magnetic field density at the position of the bulk superconductors. Ferromagnetic iron plates were added to the upper surface of bulk superconductors and their geometric and positioning effects on the maglev performance were investigated experimentally. Results show that the guidance performance (stability) was enhanced greatly for a particular setup when compared to the present maglev system which is helpful in the application where large guidance forces are needed such as maglev tracks with high degrees of curves.

  15. Iron sulfide (troilite) inclusion extracted from Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite: Composition, structure and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M.I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Klencsár, Z. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudósok körútja 2, Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Petrova, E.V.; Grokhovsky, V.I. [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Chukin, A.V. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Applied Mathematics, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Shtoltz, A.K. [Department of Electrophysics, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Maksimova, A.A. [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Felner, I. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z. [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest (Hungary); Semionkin, V.A. [Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-01

    Iron sulfide (troilite) inclusion extracted from Sikhote-Alin IIAB iron meteorite was examined for its composition, structure and magnetic properties by means of several complementary analytical techniques such as: powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The applied techniques consistently indicated the presence of daubréelite (FeCr{sub 2}S{sub 4}) as a minority phase beside troilite proper (FeS). As revealed by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, the Fe atoms in troilite were in different microenvironments associated with either the ideal FeS structure or that of a slightly iron deficient Fe{sub 1–x}S. Phase transitions of troilite were detected above room temperature by ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. A novel analysis of 295 and 90 K {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra was carried out and the hyperfine parameters associated with the ideal structure of troilite were determined by considering the orientation of the hyperfine magnetic field in the eigensystem of the electric field gradient at the {sup 57}Fe nucleus. - Highlights: • The presence of daubréelite in iron sulfide inclusion in Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite. • The presence of the ideal FeS and iron deficient Fe{sub 1–x}S in iron sulfide inclusion. • New way of the iron sulfide Mössbauer spectrum approximation.

  16. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  17. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  18. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  19. Electric-field-induced extremely large change in resistance in graphene ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu

    2018-01-01

    A colossal magnetoresistance (˜100×10^3% ) and an extremely large magnetoresistance (˜1×10^6% ) have been previously explored in manganite perovskites and Dirac materials, respectively. However, the requirement of an extremely strong magnetic field (and an extremely low temperature) makes them not applicable for realistic devices. In this work, we propose a device that can generate even larger changes in resistance in a zero-magnetic field and at a high temperature. The device is composed of graphene under two strips of yttrium iron garnet (YIG), where two gate voltages are applied to cancel the heavy charge doping in the YIG-induced half-metallic ferromagnets. By calculations using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, we demonstrate that, when a proper gate voltage is applied on the free ferromagnet, changes in resistance up to 305×10^6% (16×10^3% ) can be achieved at the liquid helium (nitrogen) temperature and in a zero magnetic field. We attribute such a remarkable effect to a gate-induced full-polarization reversal in the free ferromagnet, which results in a metal-state to insulator-state transition in the device. We also find that the proposed effect can be realized in devices using other magnetic insulators, such as EuO and EuS. Our work should be helpful for developing a realistic switching device that is energy saving and CMOS-technology compatible.

  20. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  1. Cryogenic thermometer calibration system using a helium cooling loop and a temperature controller [for LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Chanzy, E; Thermeau, J P; Bühler, S; Joly, C; Casas-Cubillos, J; Balle, C

    1998-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay and CERN are designing in close collaboration a fully automated cryogenic thermometer calibration facility which will calibrate in 3 years 10,000 cryogenic thermometers required for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operation. A reduced-scale model of the calibration facility has been developed, which enables the calibration of ten thermometers by comparison with two rhodium-iron standard thermometers in the 1.8 K to 300 K temperature range under vacuum conditions. The particular design, based on a helium cooling loop and an electrical temperature controller, gives good dynamic performances. This paper describes the experimental set-up and the data acquisition system. Results of experimental runs are also presented along with the estimated global accuracy for the calibration. (3 refs).

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  3. Magneto-active shape memory composites by incorporating ferromagnetic microparticles in a thermo-responsive polyalkenamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, J M; German, L; Iturrondobeitia, M; Alonso, J; Laza, J M; Vilas, J L; León, L M

    2009-01-01

    Covalently crosslinked semi-crystalline polyalkenamer-based shape memory polymers (SMPs) were prepared and characterized. Thermal and thermo-mechanical properties of thermo-sensitive polymers manufactured by melt compounding were investigated, and shape memory features demonstrated. For remote activation of shape recovery properties, electromagnetic inductive heating of a series of iron-based ferromagnetic microparticles was evaluated for subsequent incorporation into a shape memory polymeric matrix. The inductive heating capacity of micro-sized iron-filled polyalkenamers with different volume fraction contents was optimized and a comparison of thermo-mechanical properties of filled and unfilled shape memory polymeric networks was performed. Electromagnetically triggered shape memory properties of easily formed composites were documented and shape memory recovery rates comparable to those obtained by conventional heating methods were demonstrated for further research and design of new types of applications

  4. Optimization of a cryogenic current comparator for the application as beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geithner, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the present thesis was to improve by the application of new materials and concepts the noise-limited resolution as well as the band width of a cryogenic current comparator for the measurement of the time behavior of smallest beam currents, consisting of a superconducting meander-shaped screening, a superconducting pick-up coil, a superconducting matching transformer, and a SQID sensor, and to reduce its sensitivity against mechanical oscillations. because of this the present thesis deals with the systematic study of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials and their noise contributions for the application in pick-up coils respectively transformers. The main topic of this thesis layed thereby on the characterization of novel amorphous as well as nanocrystalline materials at low temperatures, for which hitherto no reliable values were present in the literature.

  5. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  6. Topological Aspects of Solitons in Ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jirong; Wang Jibiao; Li Ran; Xu Donghui; Duan Yishi

    2008-01-01

    Two kinds of topological soliton (skyrmion and magnetic vortex ring) in ferromagnets are studied. They have the common topological origin, a tensor H αβ = n-vector · (∂ α n-vector x ∂ β n-vector ), which describes the non-trivial distribution of local orientation of magnetization n-vector at large distances in space. The topological stability of skyrmion is protected by the winding number. Knot-like topological defect as magnetic vortex rings is also studied. On the assumption that magnetic vortex rings are geometric lines, we present their δ-function distribution in ferromagnetic materials. Furthermore, it is briefly shown that Hopf invariant is a proper topological invariant to describe the topology of magnetic vortex rings

  7. Ferromagnetism of Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Pal Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetism without d-orbital electrons seems to be unrealistic; however, recent observations of magnetism in non-magnetic oxides, such as ZnO, HfO2, and MgO, have opened new avenues in the field of magnetism. Magnetism exhibited by these oxides is known as d° ferromagnetism, as these oxides either have completely filled or unfilled d-/f-orbitals. This magnetism is believed to occur due to polarization induced by p-orbitals. Magnetic polarization in these oxides arises due to vacancies, the excitation of trapped spin in the triplet state. The presence of vacancies at the surface and subsurface also affects the magnetic behavior of these oxides. In the present review, origins of magnetism in magnesium oxide are discussed to obtain understanding of d° ferromagnetism.

  8. Ising ferromagnet: zero-temperature dynamic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P M C de; Newman, C M; Sidoravicious, V; Stein, D L

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic evolution at zero temperature of a uniform Ising ferromagnet on a square lattice is followed by Monte Carlo computer simulations. The system always eventually reaches a final, absorbing state, which sometimes coincides with a ground state (all spins parallel), and sometimes does not (parallel stripes of spins up and down). We initiate here the numerical study of 'chaotic time dependence' (CTD) by seeing how much information about the final state is predictable from the randomly generated quenched initial state. CTD was originally proposed to explain how nonequilibrium spin glasses could manifest an equilibrium pure state structure, but in simpler systems such as homogeneous ferromagnets it is closely related to long-term predictability and our results suggest that CTD might indeed occur in the infinite volume limit

  9. Silicon spintronics with ferromagnetic tunnel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, R; Sharma, S; Dash, S P; Min, B C

    2012-01-01

    In silicon spintronics, the unique qualities of ferromagnetic materials are combined with those of silicon, aiming at creating an alternative, energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are represented by the orientation of the electron spin. Here we review the cornerstones of silicon spintronics, namely the creation, detection and manipulation of spin polarization in silicon. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts are the key elements and provide a robust and viable approach to induce and probe spins in silicon, at room temperature. We describe the basic physics of spin tunneling into silicon, the spin-transport devices, the materials aspects and engineering of the magnetic tunnel contacts, and discuss important quantities such as the magnitude of the spin accumulation and the spin lifetime in the silicon. We highlight key experimental achievements and recent progress in the development of a spin-based information technology. (topical review)

  10. On the critical frontiers of Potts ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, A.C.N. de; Tsallis, C.

    1981-01-01

    A conjecture concerning the critical frontiers of q- state Potts ferromagnets on d- dimensional lattices (d > 1) which generalize a recent one stated for planar lattices is formulated. The present conjecture is verified within satisfactory accuracy (exactly in some cases) for all the lattices or arrays whose critical points are known. Its use leads to the prediction of: a) a considerable amount of new approximate critical points (26 on non-planar regular lattices, some others on Husimi trees and cacti); b) approximate critical frontiers for some 3- dimensional lattices; c) the possibly asymptotically exact critical point on regular lattices in the limit d→infinite for all q>=1; d) the possibly exact critical frontier for the pure Potts model on fully anisotropic Bethe lattices; e) the possibly exact critical frontier for the general quenched random-bond Potts ferromagnet (any P(J)) on isotropic Bethe lattices. (Author) [pt

  11. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  12. Cryogenic Deflashing for Rubber Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deflashing is the process of removal of excess flashes from the rubber products. Initially deflashing was a manual operation where dozen of workers, seated at small work stations would take each part and trim the excess rubber off with scissors, knives or by grinding. Still the same method is employed in most of the rubber industry. The drawbacks of this method are demand inconsistent and repeatable quality. Work done by hand is often inconsistent. There are commercially available cryogenic deflashing machine but they are too expensive hence cost effectiveness is also a prime factor. The objective of this paper is to develop a technique, to identify the media through which the flashes can be removed easily and effectively. Based on the test results obtained from testing of five different types of media, ABCUT Steel media gave best results. The testing of the ABCUT Steel media on rubber samples like O-rings, grommet tail door, bottom bush etc. shows good results.

  13. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  14. A cryogenic infrared calibration target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ⩽ 0.003, from 800 to 4800 cm-1 (12 - 2 μm). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10 000 cm-1 (25 - 1 μm) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ⩽ 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ˜4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials—Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder—are characterized and presented.

  15. Ferromagnetism in doped or undoped spintronics nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, You

    2010-10-01

    Much interest has been sparked by the discovery of ferromagnetism in a range of oxide doped and undoped semiconductors. The development of ferromagnetic oxide semiconductor materials with giant magnetoresistance (GMR) offers many advantages in spintronics devices for future miniaturization of computers. Among them, TM-doped ZnO is an extensively studied n-type wide-band-gap (3.36 eV) semiconductor with a tremendous interest as future mini-computer, blue light emitting, and solar cells. In this talk, Co-doped ZnO and Co-doped Cu2O semiconductor nanoclusters are successfully synthesized by a third generation sputtering-gas-aggregation cluster technique. The Co-doped nanoclusters are ferromagnetic with Curie temperature above room temperature. Both of Co-doped nanoclusters show positive magnetoresistance (PMR) at low temperature, but the amplitude of the PMRs shows an anomalous difference. For similar Co doping concentration at 5 K, PMR is greater than 800% for Co-doped ZnO but only 5% for Co-doped Cu2O nanoclusters. Giant PMR in Co-doped ZnO which is attributed to large Zeeman splitting effect has a linear dependence on applied magnetic field with very high sensitivity, which makes it convenient for the future spintronics applications. The small PMR in Co-doped Cu2O is related to its vanishing density of states at Fermi level. Undoped Zn/ZnO core-shell nanoparticle gives high ferromagnetic properties above room temperature due to the defect induced magnetization at the interface.

  16. Fractal effects on excitations in diluted ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, D.

    1981-08-01

    The low energy spin-wave like excitations in diluted ferromagnets near percolation threshold are studied. For this purpose an explicit use of the fractal model for the backbone of the infinite percolating cluster due to Kirkpatrick is made. Three physical effects are identified, which cause the softening of spin-waves as the percolation point is approached. The importance of fractal effects in the calculation of density of states and the low temperature thermodynamics is pointed out. (author)

  17. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  18. Anomalous hall effect in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Niu, Q.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 20 (2002), s. 207208-1-207208-4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0912; GA MŠk OC P5.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * anomalous Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.323, year: 2002

  19. Magnon squeezing states in a ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junfeng; Cheng Ze; Ping Yunxia; Wan Jinyin; Zhang Yanmin

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we discuss squeezing state of magnon in ferromagnet, which permits a reduction in the quantum fluctuation of the spin component to below the zero-point quantum noise level of coherent magnon states. We investigate the generation of squeezed magnon state through calculating the expectation values of spin component fluctuation. The mean field theory is introduced in dealing with the nonlinear interaction terms of Hamiltonian of magnon system

  20. Tunable Magnon Weyl Points in Ferromagnetic Pyrochlores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, Alexander; Henk, Jürgen; Mertig, Ingrid

    2016-10-07

    The dispersion relations of magnons in ferromagnetic pyrochlores with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction are shown to possess Weyl points, i. e., pairs of topologically nontrivial crossings of two magnon branches with opposite topological charge. As a consequence of their topological nature, their projections onto a surface are connected by magnon arcs, thereby resembling closely Fermi arcs of electronic Weyl semimetals. On top of this, the positions of the Weyl points in reciprocal space can be tuned widely by an external magnetic field: rotated within the surface plane, the Weyl points and magnon arcs are rotated as well; tilting the magnetic field out of plane shifts the Weyl points toward the center Γ[over ¯] of the surface Brillouin zone. The theory is valid for the class of ferromagnetic pyrochlores, i. e., three-dimensional extensions of topological magnon insulators on kagome lattices. In this Letter, we focus on the (111) surface, identify candidates of established ferromagnetic pyrochlores which apply to the considered spin model, and suggest experiments for the detection of the topological features.

  1. Ferroelectricity with Ferromagnetic Moment in Orthoferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yusuke

    2010-03-01

    Exotic multiferroics with gigantic magnetoelectric (ME) coupling have recently been attracting broad interests from the viewpoints of both fundamental physics and possible technological application to next-generation spintronic devices. To attain a strong ME coupling, it would be preferable that the ferroelectric order is induced by the magnetic order. Nevertheless, the magnetically induced ferroelectric state with the spontaneous ferromagnetic moment is still quite rare apart from a few conical-spin multiferroics. To further explore multiferroic materials with both the strong ME coupling and spontaneous magnetization, we focused on materials with magnetic structures other than conical structure. In this talk we present that the most orthodox perovskite ferrite systems DyFeO3 and GdFeO3 have ``ferromagnetic-ferroelectric,'' i.e., genuinely multiferroic states in which weak ferromagnetic moment is induced by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction working on Fe spins and electric polarization originates from the striction due to symmetric exchange interaction between Fe and Dy (Gd) spins [1] [2]. Both materials showed large electric polarization (>0.1 μC/cm^2) and strong ME coupling. In addition, we succeeded in mutual control of magnetization and polarization with electric- and magnetic-fields in GdFeO3, and attributed the controllability to novel, composite domain wall structure. [4pt] [1] Y. Tokunaga et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 097205 (2008). [0pt] [2] Y. Tokunaga et al., Nature Mater. 8, 558 (2009).

  2. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  3. Weak ferromagnetic component on the bulk ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, C.B.R. [Departamento de Física, Campus prof. Aluísio de Campos, UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Mendonça, E.C. [Departamento de Física, Campus prof. Alberto Carvalho, UFS, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Silva, L.S. [Departamento de Física, Campus prof. Aluísio de Campos, UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Folly, W.S.D.; Meneses, C.T. [Departamento de Física, Campus prof. Alberto Carvalho, UFS, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Duque, J.G.S., E-mail: gerivaldoduque@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Campus prof. Alberto Carvalho, UFS, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Magnetization data on the bulk ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} antiferromagnetic compound (T{sub N}≈10 K) obtained via solid state reaction at different synthesis temperatures show one weak ferromagnetic component at room temperature. We have related it with the cationic disorder effect present on spinel structure of our bulk samples which comes from the magnetic interaction between iron ions sit on both octahedral and tetrahedral sites. The magnetization measurements show to all samples a clear peak around 10 K consistent with the antiferromagnetic phase transition. On the other hand, after extracted the paramagnetic component, the hysteresis loops measured at room temperature display one weak ferromagnetic component. Once the T-dependence of magnetization does not fit to a Curie–Weiss law to temperatures well above the magnetic transition we have used a combination of the Curie–Weiss law (paramagnetic spins) and a typical temperature dependence of M{sub 0}, M{sub 0}(T)=M{sub 0}(0)[1−(T/T{sub C}){sup 2}]{sup 0.5} (ordered ferromagnetic spins). We note an increase of the M{sub 0}(0) as function of the synthesis temperature. This reinforce our supposition of a cationic disorder effect driving the system to present two kinds of magnetic interactions between iron ions on A and B sites. - Highlights: • Study of the cationic disorder at bulk ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound. • Structural and magnetization characterization. • The observation of two magnetic phases.

  4. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  5. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  6. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his

  7. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  8. Status of the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Becker, Arno; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; Goullon, Johannes; Grieser, Manfred; Krantz, Claude; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Repnow, Roland; Schornikov, Andrey; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A novel cryogenic storage ring is currently under construction at the MPIK. By electrostatic ion optical elements, the 35 m circumference Cryogenic Storage Ring will be able to store ions at energies of up to 300 keV per charge unit without any mass limitations. The CSR consists of a cryogenic ({proportional_to}5 K) beam pipe surrounded by two radiation shields (40 and 80 K) in a large outer, thermal insulation vacuum. Extreme vacuum (density {proportional_to}10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) will be achieved by 2 K cryopumping as demonstrated in a prototype ion beam trap. The ion optics was completely assembled within the precision cryogenic mounting and shielding structure of the first corner. There, cooldown tests to {proportional_to}40 K were performed which confirmed the required sub-millimeter accuracy of the specially designed electrode positioning under large temperature changes. The high-voltage connections to the cryogenic electrodes were installed and breakdown tests will be reported. Based on the test results the beam pipe, electrode mounting and shielding structures are under final construction for mounting during 2012.

  9. Ferromagnetism appears in nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Zdenek [Institute of Physics ASCR v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sun, Shih-Jye, E-mail: sjs@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Varga, Marian [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hsiung [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hua-Shu [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Kromka, Alexander [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Horak, Pavel [Nuclear Physics Institute, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-15

    The nanocrystalline diamond films turn to be ferromagnetic after implanting various nitrogen doses on them. Through this research, we confirm that the room-temperature ferromagnetism of the implanted samples is derived from the measurements of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Samples with larger crystalline grains as well as higher implanted doses present more robust ferromagnetic signals at room temperature. Raman spectra indicate that the small grain-sized samples are much more disordered than the large grain-sized ones. We propose that a slightly large saturated ferromagnetism could be observed at low temperature, because the increased localization effects have a significant impact on more disordered structure. - Highlights: • Nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. • Nitrogen implants made a Raman deviation from the typical nanocrystalline diamond films. • The ferromagnetism induced from the structure distortion is dominant at low temperature.

  10. Magnetic Properties of Iron Clusters in Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzain, M., E-mail: elzain@squ.edu.om; Al Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Gismelseed, A.; Rais, A.; Al-Omari, I.; Bouziane, K. [College of Science, Department of Physics (Oman); Widatallah, H. [Khartoum University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Sudan)

    2004-12-15

    The discrete variational method is used to study the effect of interactions of iron impurities on the magnetic moments, hyperfine fields and isomer shifts at iron sites in silver. We study small clusters of iron atoms as they grow to form FCC phase that is coherent with the silver lattice. The effects of the lattice relaxation and the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic couplings are also considered. When Fe atoms congregate around a central Fe atom in an FCC arrangement under ferromagnetic coupling, the local magnetic moment and the contact charge density at the central atom hardly change as the cluster builds up, whereas the hyperfine field increases asymptotically as the number of Fe nearest neighbors increases. Introduction of antiferromagnetic coupling has minor effect on the local magnetic moments and isomer shifts, however it produces large reduction in the hyperfine field. The lattice relaxation of the surrounding Fe atoms towards a BCC phase around a central Fe atom leads to reduction in the magnetic moment accompanied by increase in the magnetic hyperfine field.

  11. Tunnel barrier and noncollinear magnetization effects on shot noise in ferromagnetic/semiconductor/ferromagnetic heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Xingtao; Liu Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the scattering approach, we investigate transport properties of electrons in a one-dimensional waveguide that contains a ferromagnetic/semiconductor/ferromagnetic heterojunction and tunnel barriers in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. We simultaneously consider significant quantum size effects, quantum coherence, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and noncollinear magnetizations. It is found that the tunnel barrier plays a decisive role in the transmission coefficient and shot noise of the ballistic spin electron transport through the heterojunction. When the small tunnel barriers are considered, the transport properties of electrons are quite different from those without tunnel barriers

  12. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  13. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-01-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ∼12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ∼14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ∼ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  14. Modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the influence of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Górecki, K; Rogalska, M; Zarȩbski, J; Detka, K

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the use of SPICE software. Some disadvantages of the selected literature models of such cores are discussed. A modified model of ferromagnetic cores taking into account the influence of temperature on the magnetizing characteristics and the core losses is proposed. The form of the elaborated model is presented and discussed. The correctness of this model is verified by comparing the calculated and the measured characteristics of the selected ferromagnetic cores.

  15. A method for measuring exchange stiffness in ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girt, Erol; Huttema, W.; Montoya, E.; Kardasz, B.; Eyrich, C.; Heinrich, B.; Mryasov, O. N.; Dobin, A. Yu.; Karis, O.

    2011-01-01

    An exchange stiffness, A ex , in ferromagnetic films is obtained by fitting the M(H) dependence of two ferromagnetic layers antiferromagnetically coupled across a nonmagnetic spacer layer with a simple micromagnetic model. In epitaxial and textured structures this method allows measuring A ex between the crystallographic planes perpendicular to the growth direction of ferromagnetic films. Our results show that A ex between [0001] planes in textured Co grains is 1.54 ± 0.12 x 10 -11 J/m.

  16. A Reference Guide for Cryogenic Properties of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisend, John G

    2003-09-16

    A thorough knowledge of the behavior of materials at cryogenic temperatures is critical for the design of successful cryogenic systems. Over the past 50 years, a tremendous amount of material properties at cryogenic temperatures have been measured and published. This guide lists resources for finding these properties. It covers online databases, computer codes, conference proceedings, journals, handbooks, overviews and monographs. It includes references for finding reports issued by government laboratories and agencies. Most common solids and fluids used in cryogenics are covered.

  17. Room temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO prepared by microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyu Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Clear room temperature ferromagnetism has been observed in ZnO powders prepared by microemulsion. The O vacancy (VO clusters mediated by the VO with one electron (F center contributed to the ferromagnetism, while the isolated F centers contributed to the low temperature paramagnetism. Annealing in H2 incorporated interstitial H (Hi in ZnO, and removed the isolated F centers, leading to the suppression of the paramagnetism. The ferromagnetism has been considered to originate from the VO clusters mediated by the Hi, leading to the enhancement of the coercivity. The ferromagnetism disappeared after annealing in air due to the reduction of Hi.

  18. Ferromagnetic pairing states on two-coupled chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akinori

    2008-01-01

    We propose a concrete model which exhibits ferromagnetism and electron-pair condensation simultaneously. The model is defined on two chains and consists of the electron hopping term, the on-site Coulomb repulsion and a ferromagnetic interaction which describes ferromagnetic coupling between two electrons, one on a bond in a chain and the other on a site in the other chain. It is rigorously shown that the model has fully-polarized ferromagnetic pairing ground states. The higher dimensional version of the model is also presented

  19. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  20. The Management of Cryogens at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2005-01-01

    CERN is a large user of industrially procured cryogens essentially liquid helium and nitrogen. Recent contracts have been placed by the Organization for the delivery of quantities up to 280 tons of liquid helium over four years and up to 50000 tons of liquid nitrogen over three years. Main users are the very large cryogenic system of the LHC accelerator complex, the physics experiments using superconducting magnets and liquefied gases and all the related test facilities whether industrial or laboratory scale. With the commissioning of LHC, the need of cryogens at CERN will considerably increase and the procurement policy must be adapted accordingly. In this paper, we discuss procurement strategy for liquid helium and nitrogen, including delivery rates, distribution methods and adopted safety standards. Global turnover, on site re-liquefaction capacity, operational consumption, accidental losses, purification means and storage capacity will be described. Finally, the short to medium term evolution of the Orga...

  1. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  2. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  3. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackowrth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electro-magnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exists simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers

  4. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  5. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  6. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  7. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... filling density for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid is defined as the percent ratio of the weight of lading in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in...

  8. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher.

  9. Nonlinear FMR spectra in yttrium iron garnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Bunkov, P.M. Vetoshko, I.G. Motygullin, T.R. Safin, M.S. Tagirov, N.A. Tukmakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of demagnetizing effect studies in yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O12 thin films are reported. Experiments were performed on X-Band of electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer at room temperature. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra were obtained for one-layer single crystal YIG films for different values of the applied microwave power. Nonlinear FMR spectra transformation by the microwave power increasing in various directions of magnetic field sweep was observed. It is explained by the influence of the demagnetization action of nonequilibrium magnons.

  10. Cryogenic propulsion for lunar and Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Future missions to the moon and Mars have been investigated with regard to propulsion system selection. The results of this analysis show that near state-of-the-art LO2/LH2 propulsion technology provides a feasible means of performing lunar missions and trans-Mars injections. In other words, existing cryogenic space engines with certain modifications and product improvements would be suitable for these missions. In addition, present day cryogenic system tankage and structural weights appear to scale reasonably when sizing for large payload and high energy missions such as sending men to Mars.

  11. Computer automation of a dilution cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, C.

    1992-09-01

    This study has been realized in the framework of studies on developing new technic for low temperature detectors for neutrinos and dark matter. The principles of low temperature physics and helium 4 and dilution cryostats, are first reviewed. The cryogenic system used and the technic for low temperature thermometry and regulation systems are then described. The computer automation of the dilution cryogenic system involves: numerical measurement of the parameter set (pressure, temperature, flow rate); computer assisted operating of the cryostat and the pump bench; numerical regulation of pressure and temperature; operation sequence full automation allowing the system to evolve from a state to another (temperature descent for example)

  12. Cryogenic test facility at VECC, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Amit; Bhunia, Uttam; Pradhan, J.; Sur, A.; Bhandari, R.K.; Ranganathan, R.

    2003-01-01

    In view of proposed K-500 superconducting cyclotron project, cryogenic test facility has been set up at the centre. The facility can broadly be categorized into two- a small scale test facility and a large scale test facility. This facility has been utilized for the calibration of liquid helium level probe, cryogenic temperature probe, and I-B plot for a 7 T superconducting magnet. Spiral-shaped superconducting short sample with specific dimension and specially designed stainless steel sample holder has already been developed for the electrical characterisation. The 1/5 th model superconducting coil along with its quench detection circuit and dump resistor has also been developed

  13. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  14. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  15. Coexistence of 3d-ferromagnetism and superconductivity in (Li{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}OH)(Fe{sub 1-y}Li{sub y}Se)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckner, Felix; Sarkar, Rajib; Kamusella, Sirko; Klauss, Hans-Henning [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Luetkens, Hubertus [Paul-Scherrer-Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Pachmayr, Ursula; Nitsche, Fabian; Johrendt, Dirk [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In the family of iron-based superconductors, where the superconducting dome is usually separated from the magnetic phase, only few compounds show ferromagnetism arising in the superconducting state. The so far discovered examples show ferromagnetic ordering of Eu{sup 2+} ions. In this context, the presented ordering of iron orbitals in (Li{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}OH)(Fe{sub 1-y}Li{sub y}Se) is unique. We performed a wealth of experimental methods to characterize the physics in this system, including dc resistivity and magnetization. With use of local probes (μSR,NMR,Moessbauer), we are able to describe the emergence of bulk ferromagnetism and superconductivity in a microscopic scale. Both phenomena can coexist, though they compete with each other, due to a spatial separation in the multilayer system.

  16. Magnetic microstructure of nanocrystalline ferromagnets and nanocrystalline systems combining ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, J.; Wagner, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Wiedenmann, A. [HMI Berlin (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    Magnetic small-angle neutron scattering measurements were performed on nanostructured ferromagnetic materials on the basis of Fe, Ni and Co, produced preferentially by the inert-gas condensation technique, with the aim to determine the magnetic microstructure of mesoscopic small-particle systems. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  17. Dynamic detection of spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices by ferromagnetic resonance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Paul A.; Liu, Changjiang; Patel, Sahil; Peterson, Tim; Geppert, Chad C.; Christie, Kevin; Stecklein, Gordon; Palmstrøm, Chris J.

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices is its precession in a magnetic field. This is the basis for detection techniques such as the Hanle effect, but these approaches become ineffective as the spin lifetime in the semiconductor decreases. For this reason, no electrical Hanle measurement has been demonstrated in GaAs at room temperature. We show here that by forcing the magnetization in the ferromagnet to precess at resonance instead of relying only on the Larmor precession of the spin accumulation in the semiconductor, an electrically generated spin accumulation can be detected up to 300 K. The injection bias and temperature dependence of the measured spin signal agree with those obtained using traditional methods. We further show that this new approach enables a measurement of short spin lifetimes (C. Liu, S. J. Patel, T. A. Peterson, C. C. Geppert, K. D. Christie, C. J. Palmstrøm, and P. A. Crowell, "Dynamic detection of electron spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices by ferromagnetic resonance," Nature Communications 7, 10296 (2016). http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10296

  18. Spin Transport in Ferromagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Textures

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins A.

    2016-12-07

    In this dissertation, we provide an accurate description of spin transport in magnetic textures and in particular, we investigate in detail, the nature of spin torque and magnetic damping in such systems. Indeed, as will be further discussed in this thesis, the current-driven velocity of magnetic textures is related to the ratio between the so-called non-adiabatic torque and magnetic damping. Uncovering the physics underlying these phenomena can lead to the optimal design of magnetic systems with improved efficiency. We identified three interesting classes of systems which have attracted enormous research interest (i) Magnetic textures in systems with broken inversion symmetry: We investigate the nature of magnetic damping in non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets. Based on phenomenological and microscopic derivations, we show that the magnetic damping becomes chiral, i.e. depends on the chirality of the magnetic texture. (ii) Ferromagnetic domain walls, skyrmions and vortices: We address the physics of spin transport in sharp disordered magnetic domain walls and vortex cores. We demonstrate that upon spin-independent scattering, the non-adiabatic torque can be significantly enhanced. Such an enhancement is large for vortex cores compared to transverse domain walls. We also show that the topological spin currents owing in these structures dramatically enhances the non-adiabaticity, an effect unique to non-trivial topological textures (iii) Antiferromagnetic skyrmions: We extend this study to antiferromagnetic skyrmions and show that such an enhanced topological torque also exist in these systems. Even more interestingly, while such a non-adiabatic torque inuences the undesirable transverse velocity of ferromagnetic skyrmions, in antiferromagnetic skyrmions, the topological non-adiabatic torque directly determines the longitudinal velocity. As a consequence, scaling down the antiferromagnetic skyrmion results in a much more efficient spin torque.

  19. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Mn:Ge(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Adrian Lungu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of a room temperature ferromagnetic Mn-Ge system obtained by simple deposition of manganese on Ge(001, heated at relatively high temperature (starting with 250 °C. The samples were characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE. Samples deposited at relatively elevated temperature (350 °C exhibited the formation of ~5–8 nm diameter Mn5Ge3 and Mn11Ge8 agglomerates by HRTEM, while XPS identified at least two Mn-containing phases: the agglomerates, together with a Ge-rich MnGe~2.5 phase, or manganese diluted into the Ge(001 crystal. LEED revealed the persistence of long range order after a relatively high amount of Mn (100 nm deposited on the single crystal substrate. STM probed the existence of dimer rows on the surface, slightly elongated as compared with Ge–Ge dimers on Ge(001. The films exhibited a clear ferromagnetism at room temperature, opening the possibility of forming a magnetic phase behind a nearly ideally terminated Ge surface, which could find applications in integration of magnetic functionalities on semiconductor bases. SQUID probed the co-existence of a superparamagnetic phase, with one phase which may be attributed to a diluted magnetic semiconductor. The hypothesis that the room temperature ferromagnetic phase might be the one with manganese diluted into the Ge crystal is formulated and discussed.

  20. The generalized spherical model of ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costache, G.

    1977-12-01

    The D→ infinity of the D-vectorial model of a ferromagnetic film with free surfaces is exactly solved. The mathematical mechanism responsible for the onset of a phase transition in the system is a generalized sticking phenomenon. It is shown that the temperature at which the sticking appears, the transition temperature of the model is monotonously increasing with increasing the number of layers of the film, contrary to what happens in the spherical model with overall constraint. Certain correlation inequalities of Griffiths type are shown to hold. (author)

  1. Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic film with perpendicular magnetization M{sub 0} on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4{pi}M{sub 0}>1; {lambda}{sub L} being the London penetration length.

  2. Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic film with perpendicular magnetization M 0 on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4πM 0 c1 the SC is in the Meissner state and the equilibrium domain width in the film, l, scales as (l/4πλ L )=(l N /4πλ L ) 2/3 with the domain width on a normal (nonsuperconducting) substrate, l N /4πλ L >>1; λ L being the London penetration length

  3. Ferromagnetic Film on a Superconducting Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    We study the equilibrium domain structure and magnetic flux around a ferromagnetic (FM) film with perpendicular magnetization M_0 on a superconducting (SC) substrate. At 4{\\pi}M_0> 1. Here \\lambda_L is the London penetration length. For 4{\\pi}M_0 > H_{c1} and l_{N} in excess of about 35 {\\lambda}_{L}, the domains are connected by SC vortices. We argue that pinning of vortices by magnetic domains in FM/SC multilayers can provide high critical currents.

  4. Itinerant ferromagnetism in the narrow band limit

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S H

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that in the narrow band, strong interaction limit the paramagnetic state of an itinerant ferromagnet is described by the disordered local moment state. As a result, the Curie temperature is orders of magnitude lower than what is expected from the large exchange splitting of the spin bands. An approximate analysis has also been carried out for the partially ordered state, and the result explains the temperature evolvement of the magnetic contributions to the resistivity and low-energy optical conductivity of CrO sub 2.

  5. Eddy current inspection of mildly ferromagnetic tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, W.R.; Carter, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The past decade has seen the development of eddy current probes for inspection of the mildly ferro-magnetic alloy Monel 400. Due to the rapid advances in permanent magnet technology similar probes have been upgraded to magnetically saturate, and hence inspect, the duplex stainless steel Sandvik 3RE60, which has saturation induction more than twice that of Monel 400. Prototypes of these probes have been tested in three ways: saturation capability, quality of typical eddy current data, and ability to eliminate permeability induced signals. Successful laboratory testing, potential applications, and limitations of these type probes are discussed

  6. Excitation spectrum of ferromagnetic xxz-chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Stoll, E.

    1983-01-01

    In the history of xxz-Heisenberg spin chains, understanding of the dynamic form factors (DFF) is much less advanced. In this paper the DFF of ferromagnetic xxz chains as a tool to probe and interpret excitation spectrum is reviewed. The Isingheisenberg chain, and the Planar-Heisenberg chain (where HF approximations become exact) are studied. The results provide instructive connections between spin systems, interacting fermions and bosons. Various new aspects--thermally induced bound state effects in terms of central peaks in DFF for Isinglike xxz chains; the possibility to observe bound states in S /SUB zz/ (q,w) accessible by neutron scattering techniques, in the planar system--are found

  7. Spin transport in ferromagnetically contacted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.; Morgan, C.; Schneider, C.M. [Peter Gruenberg Institut, PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich and JARA Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We present magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different ferromagnetic leads. A sample with permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) contacts shows the expected tunneling-type MR effect. Measurements on devices with CoPd contacts show a larger change of resistance with magnetic field. However, only minor loops are observed, which is explained with domain wall pinning. This is supported by magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements, which reveal a complicated bubble and stripe domain pattern. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Electrical and magnetic behavior of iron doped nickel titanate (Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenin, Nayagam; Karthik, Arumugam; Sridharpanday, Mathu; Selvam, Mohanraj; Srither, Saturappan Ravisekaran; Arunmetha, Sundarmoorthy; Paramasivam, Palanisamy; Rajendran, Venkatachalam, E-mail: veerajendran@gmail.com

    2016-01-01

    Iron doped nickel titanate (Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3}) ferromagnetic nanoparticles with different concentrations of Fe (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mol) were synthesized using precipitation route with precursor source such as nickel nitrate and iron nitrate solutions. The prepared magnetic nanopowders were investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, vibrating sample magnetometer, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to explore the structural, ferromagnetic, and dielectric properties. The obtained XRD pattern shows formation of iron doped nickel titanate in orthorhombic structure. The crystallite size ranges from 57 to 21 nm and specific surface area ranges from 11 to 137 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The hysteresis loops of nanomagnetic materials show ferromagnetic behavior with higher magnitude of coercivity (H{sub c}) 867–462 Oe. The impedance analysis of ferromagnetic materials explores the ferro-dielectric behavior with enhanced properties of Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles at higher Fe content. - Highlights: • Iron doped nickel titanate magnetic nanoparticles. • Ferromagnetic magnetism behavior with higher magnitude of coercivity. • Dielectric behavior of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with increase of Fe content.

  9. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  12. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  20. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  3. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  4. Cryogenic beam loss monitoring for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurfürst, C.

    2013-01-01

    A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system was installed on the outside surface of the LHC magnet cryostats to protect the accelerator equipment from beam losses. The protection is achieved by extracting the beam from the ring in case thresholds imposed on measured radiation levels are exceeded. Close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the present BLM system is sensitive to particle showers generated in the interaction region of the two beams. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The particle showers measured by the present BLM configuration are partly shielded by the cryostat and the iron yoke of the magnets. The system can hence be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the protected element, i. e. the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass of the magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The advantage is that the dose measured by the Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitor (CryoBLM) would more precisely correspond to the dose deposited in the superconducting coil. The main challenges of this placement are the low temperature of 1.9 K and the integrated dose of 2 MGy in 20 years. Furthermore the CryoBLM should work in a magnetic field of 2 T and at a pressure of 1.1 bar, withstanding a fast pressure rise up to 20 bar in case of a magnet quench. The detector response should be linear between 0.1 and 10 mGy/s and faster than 1 ms. Once the detectors are installed in the LHC magnets, no access will be possible. Hence the detectors need to be available, reliable and stable for 20 years. Following intense research it became clear that no existing technology was proven to work in such conditions. The candidates under investigation in this work are diamond and silicon detectors and an ionisation chamber, using the liquid helium itself as particle detection medium

  5. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  6. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  7. Nuclear heat sources for cryogenic refrigerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, B.; Schock, A.; King, W.G.; Kline, T.; Russo, F.A.

    1975-01-01

    Spacecraft cryogenic refrigerators require thermal inputs on the order of 1000 W. First, the characteristics of solar-electric and radioisotope heat source systems for supplying this thermal input are compared. Then the design of a 238 Pu heat source for this application is described, and equipment for shipping and handling the heat source is discussed. (LCL)

  8. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  9. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  10. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  11. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M; Pernau, H-F; Strunk, C; Scheer, E; Pietsch, T

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  12. Cryogenic refrigeration for cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau-Baguer, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Neutron moderation by means of a fluid at cryogenic temperature is a very interesting way to obtain cold neutrons. Today, a number of nuclear research reactors are using this technology. This paper deals with thermodynamics and technology which are used for cooling Cold Neutron Sources

  13. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  14. Cryogenic Filters for RFI Mitigation in Radioastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Tuccari, G.; Caddemi, A.; Barbarino, S.; Nicotra, G.; Consoli, F.; Schilliro, F.; Catalfamo, F.

    2005-01-01

    RFI mitigation in Radioastronomy can be achieved adopting cryogenic filters in appropriate typologies. A study has been conducted in L, C and X band with the evaluation of the filter architecture in copper, with theoretical estimation, computer simulations, prototypes realization, laboratory measurements. Such work has been preliminary to the realization of HTS samples with the purpose of a similar complete characterization approach.

  15. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  16. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  17. Nonlinear wave propagation through a ferromagnet with damping in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    magnetic waves in a ferromagnet can be reduced to an integro-differential equation. Keywords. Solitons; integro-differential equations; reductive perturbation method. PACS Nos 41.20 Jb; 05.45 Yv; 03.50 De; 78.20 Ls. 1. Introduction. The phenomenon of propagation of electromagnetic waves in ferromagnets are not only.

  18. Levitation properties of maglev systems using soft ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Zhou, You-He

    2015-03-01

    Soft ferromagnets are widely used as flux-concentration materials in the design of guideways for superconducting magnetic levitation transport systems. In order to fully understand the influence of soft ferromagnets on the levitation performance, in this work we apply a numerical model based on the functional minimization method and the Bean’s critical state model to study the levitation properties of an infinitely long superconductor immersed in the magnetic field created by a guideway of different sets of infinitely long parallel permanent magnets with soft ferromagnets between them. The levitation force, guidance force, magnetic stiffness and magnetic pole density are calculated considering the coupling between the superconductor and soft ferromagnets. The results show that the levitation performance is closely associated with the permanent magnet configuration and with the location and dimension of the soft ferromagnets. Introducing the soft ferromagnet with a certain width in a few configurations always decreases the levitation force. However, for most configurations, the soft ferromagnets contribute to improve the levitation performance only when they have particular locations and dimensions in which the optimized location and thickness exist to increase the levitation force the most. Moreover, if the superconductor is laterally disturbed, the presence of soft ferromagnets can effectively improve the lateral stability for small lateral displacement and reduce the degradation of levitation force.

  19. Spin Heat Accumulation Induced by Tunneling from a Ferromagnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Marun, I.J.; Wees, B.J. van; Jansen, R.

    2014-01-01

    An electric current from a ferromagnet into a nonmagnetic material can induce a spin-dependent electron temperature. Here, it is shown that this spin heat accumulation, when created by tunneling from a ferromagnet, produces a non-negligible voltage signal that is comparable to that due to the

  20. Modelling the power losses in the ferromagnetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detka Kalina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of describing power losses in ferromagnetic materials is considered. The limitations of Steinmetz formula are shown and a new analytical description of losses in a considered material is proposed. The correctness of the developed description is demonstrated experimentally by comparing the results of calculation with the catalogue characteristics for different ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Magnetic excitons in singlet-ground-state ferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R.J.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bucher, E.

    1971-01-01

    The authors report measurements of the dispersion of singlet-triplet magnetic excitons as a function of temperature in the singlet-ground-state ferromagnets fcc Pr and Pr3Tl. Well-defined excitons are observed in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regions, but with energies which are nearly...

  2. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  3. Giant proximity effect in ferromagnetic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Silvia; Charlton, Tim; Quintanilla, Jorge; Suter, Andreas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Prokscha, Thomas; Salman, Zaher; Forgan, Ted

    2013-03-01

    The proximity effect is a phenomenon where an ordered state leaks from a material into an adjacent one over some finite distance, ξ. For superconductors, this distance is ~ the coherence length. Nevertheless much longer-range, ``giant'' proximity effects have been observed in cuprate junctions. This surprising effect can be understood as a consequence of critical opalescence. Since this occurs near all second order phase transitions, giant proximity effects should be very general and, in particular, they should be present in magnetic systems. The ferromagnetic proximity effect has the advantage that its order parameter (magnetization) can be observed directly. We investigate the above phenomenon in Co/EuS bilayer films, where both materials undergo ferromagnetic transitions but at rather different temperatures (bulk TC of 1400K for Co and 16.6K for EuS). A dramatic increase in the range of the proximity effect is expected near the TC of EuS. We present the results of our measurements of the magnetization profiles as a function of temperature, carried out using the complementary techniques of low energy muon rotation and polarized neutron reflectivity. Work supported by EPSRC, STFC and ONR grant N00014-09-1-0177 and NSF grant DMR 0504158.

  4. Titanium nitride room-temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Iu.G., E-mail: morozov@ism.ac.ru [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belyakov, O.A. [Ogarev Mordovia State University, Saransk, 68 Bol' shevistskaya Street, 430005 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P., E-mail: i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Sathasivam, S. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Kuznetcov, M.V., E-mail: maxim1968@mail.ru [All-Russian Research Institute on Problems of Civil Defense and Emergencies of Emergency Control Ministry of Russia (EMERCOM), 7 Davidkovskaya Street, Moscow, 121352 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-05

    Cubic and near-spherical TiN nanoparticles ranging in average size from 20 to 125 nm were prepared by levitation-jet aerosol synthesis through condensation of titanium vapor in an inert gas flow with gaseous nitrogen injection. The nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET measurements, UV–Vis, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and vibrating-sample magnetometry. Room-temperature ferromagnetism with maximum magnetization up to 2.5 emu/g was recorded for the nanoparticles. The results indicate that the observed ferromagnetic ordering was related to the defect Ti–N structures on the surface of nanoparticles. This suggestion is in good correlation with the measured spectroscopical data. - Highlights: • Levitation-jet aerosol synthesis of TiN nanoparticles (NPs). • SEM, XRD, BET, UV–vis, FT-IR, Raman, XPS and magnetic characterization of the NPs. • Correlation between optical and XPS measurements data and maximum magnetization of the NPs.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  6. Evaluation of ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions for the site-specific radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia of MX11 sarcoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusentsov, Nikolai A.; Gogosov, V.V.; Brusentsova, T.N.; Sergeev, A.V.; Jurchenko, N.Y.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu; Shumakov, L.I

    2001-07-01

    Seventeen different ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions were prepared and evaluated for application in radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia. Specific power absorption rates were measured at 0.88 MHz to range from 0 to 240 W per gram of iron for different preparations. Survival of MX11 cells mixed with ferrofluids and subjected to radiofrequency was much lower than with RF without ferrofluid or ferrofluid alone.

  7. Forced-ferromagnetic state in a Tm.sub.2./sub.Fe.sub.17./sub.H.sub.5./sub. single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, Evgeniya; Kuz'min, M.D.; Skourski, Y.; Doerr, M.; Iwasieczko, W.; Wosnitza, J.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 24 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 24LT01. ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : single crystal * hydride * forced-ferromagnetic state * rare- earth -iron intermetallic compound Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  8. Evaluation of ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions for the site-specific radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia of MX11 sarcoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusentsov, Nikolai A.; Gogosov, V.V.; Brusentsova, T.N.; Sergeev, A.V.; Jurchenko, N.Y.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Shumakov, L.I.

    2001-01-01

    Seventeen different ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions were prepared and evaluated for application in radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia. Specific power absorption rates were measured at 0.88 MHz to range from 0 to 240 W per gram of iron for different preparations. Survival of MX11 cells mixed with ferrofluids and subjected to radiofrequency was much lower than with RF without ferrofluid or ferrofluid alone

  9. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-09-18

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing.

  10. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Iron/iron oxide core-shell nanoclusters for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang You; Antony, Jiji; Sharma, Amit; Nutting, Joseph; Sikes, Daniel; Meyer, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. Most magnetic particles or beads currently used in biomedical applications are based on ferromagnetic iron oxides with very low specific magnetic moments of about 20-30 emu/g. Here we report a new approach to synthesize monodispersed core-shell nanostructured clusters with high specific magnetic moments above 200 emu/g. Iron nanoclusters with monodispersive size of diameters from 2 nm to 100 nm are produced by our newly developed nanocluster source and go to a deposition chamber, where a chemical reaction starts, and the nanoclusters are coated with iron oxides. HRTEM Images show the coatings are very uniform and stable. The core-shell nanoclusters are superparamagnetic at room temperature for sizes less than 15 nm, and then become ferromagnetic when the cluster size increases. The specific magnetic moment of core-shell nanoclusters is size dependent, and increases rapidly from about 80 emu/g at the cluster size of around 3 nm to over 200 emu/g up to the size of 100 nm. The use of high magnetic moment nanoclusters for biomedical applications could dramatically enhance the contrast for MRI, reduce the concentration of magnetic particle needs for cell separation, or make drug delivery possible with much lower magnetic field gradients

  12. Spin-flip scattering effect on the current-induced spin torque in ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhengang; Su Gang; Jin Biao; Zheng Qingrong

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the current-induced spin transfer torque of a ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet tunnel junction by taking the spin-flip scatterings into account. It is found that the spin-flip scattering can induce an additional spin torque, enhancing the maximum of the spin torque and giving rise to an angular shift compared to the case when the spin-flip scatterings are neglected. The effects of the molecular fields of the left and right ferromagnets on the spin torque are also studied. It is found that τ Rx /I e (τ Rx is the spin-transfer torque acting on the right ferromagnet and I e is the tunneling electrical current) does vary with the molecular fields. At two certain angles, τ Rx /I e is independent of the molecular field of the right ferromagnet, resulting in two crossing points in the curve of τ Rx /I e versus the relevant orientation for different molecular fields

  13. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  14. XPS and FTIR spectroscopic study on microwave treated high phosphorus iron ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Mamdouh; Fabritius, Timo; Elmahdy, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Khalek, Nagui A.; El-Aref, Mortada; Elmanawi, Abd El-Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of microwave radiation on structure and chemical state of high phosphorus iron ore was studied. • FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) dissociated. • High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). • Microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases. - Abstract: A growing interest in microwave heating has emerged recently. Several potential microwave applications regarding minerals’ processing have been investigated. This paper investigates the effect of microwave radiation on Egyptian high phosphorus iron ore. Three different iron ore samples have varying Fe 2 O 3 and P 2 O 5 contents and mineralogical textures were studied. A comparative study has been carried out between untreated and microwave treated iron ore. XRD and FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the crystallinity of iron bearing minerals (hematite) increased, while the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) and other gangues dissociated. High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). This means that after microwave radiation iron oxide (hematite, Fe 3+ ) transformed into more magnetic phase. The results indicated that microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases

  15. Perfect GMR effect in gapped graphene-based ferromagnetic normal ferromagnetic junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Karbaschi; Gholam Reza Rashedi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the quantum transport property in gapped graphene-based ferromagnetic/normal/ferromagnetic (FG/NG/FG) junctions by using the Dirac–Bogoliubov–de Gennes equation. The graphene is fabricated on SiC and BN substrates separately, so carriers in FG/NG/FG structures are considered as massive relativistic particles. Transmission prob-ability, charge, and spin conductances are studied as a function of exchange energy of ferromagnets (h), size of graphene gap, and thickness of normal graphene region (L) respectively. Using the experimental values of Fermi energy in the normal graphene part (EFN∼400 meV) and energy gap in graphene (260 meV for SiC and 50 meV for BN substrate), it is shown that this structure can be used for both spin-up and spin-down polarized current. The latter case has different behavior of gapped FG/NG/FG from that of gapless FG/NG/FG structures. Also perfect charge giant magnetoresistance is observed in a range of EFN−mv2F

  16. Magnetic excitations in transition-metal ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Y.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given on current neutron scattering experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory on transition-metal ferromagnets Ni, Fe, Pd 2 MnSn and MnSi. The scattering intensity in constant-energy scans, observed above T/sub c/ in all of these materials, exhibited a clear peak at finite momentum transfers. Using a simple scattering function with double-Lorentzian shape, we demonstrate that this peak is a manifestation of simple diffusive spin fluctuations. Experimental results of several parameters are compared in the context of localized-moment and itinerant-electron pictures. The ratio of spin wave stiffness constant D and transition temperature kT/sub c/ is shown to be a good yardstick for the degree of itinerancy of d-electrons

  17. ''Soft'' Anharmonic Vortex Glass in Ferromagnetic Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Ettouhami, A. M.; Saunders, Karl; Toner, John

    2001-01-01

    Ferromagnetic order in superconductors can induce a spontaneous vortex (SV) state. For external field H=0 , rotational symmetry guarantees a vanishing tilt modulus of the SV solid, leading to drastically different behavior than that of a conventional, external-field-induced vortex solid. We show that quenched disorder and anharmoinc effects lead to elastic moduli that are wave-vector dependent out to arbitrarily long length scales, and non-Hookean elasticity. The latter implies that for weak external fields H , the magnetic induction scales universally like B(H)∼B(0)+cH α , with α∼0.72 . For weak disorder, we predict the SV solid is a topologically ordered glass, in the ''columnar elastic glass'' universality class

  18. Room temperature ferromagnetic gadolinium silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimani, Magundappa Ravi L.; Gupta, Shalabh; Harstad, Shane; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Jiles, David C.

    2018-03-06

    A particle usable as T1 and T2 contrast agents is provided. The particle is a gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particle that is ferromagnetic at temperatures up to 290 K and is less than 2 .mu.m in diameter. An MRI contrast agent that includes a plurality of gadolinium silicide (Gd.sub.5Si.sub.4) particles that are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter is also provided. A method for creating gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particles is also provided. The method includes the steps of providing a Gd5Si4 bulk alloy; grinding the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy into a powder; and milling the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy powder for a time of approximately 20 minutes or less.

  19. Muon spin relaxation in ferromagnets. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.; Karlsson, E.B.

    1991-04-01

    Expressions for the dipolar and hyperfine contributions to the relaxation rate of muons implanted in a ferromagnet are presented and analysed using the Heisenberg model of spin-waves including dipolar and Zeeman energies. Calculations for EuO indicate that relaxation is likely to be dominated by the hyperfine mechanism, even if the ratio of the hyperfine and dipolar coupling constants is small. The hyperfine mechanism is sensitive to the dipolar energy of the atomic spins, whereas the dipolar mechanisms depend essentially on the exchange energy. For both mechanisms there is an almost quadratic dependence on temperature, throughout much of the ordered magnetic phase, which reflects two-spin-wave difference events from the Raman-type relaxation processes. (author)

  20. Ferromagnetic rollers in a harmonic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    We present the emergence of flocking and global rotation in a system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field confined in a harmonic potential. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clock / counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle re-orientations due to shape imperfections. We also emphasize a subtle role of rotational noise: While the low-frequency flocking appears to be noise-insensitive, the reentrant flocking happens to be noise-activated. Moreover, we uncover a new relation between collective motion and synchronisation.

  1. Quantum stability for the Heisenberg ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargheer, Till; Beisert, Niklas; Gromov, Nikolay

    2008-01-01

    Highly spinning classical strings on RxS 3 are described by the Landau-Lifshitz model or equivalently by the Heisenberg ferromagnet in the thermodynamic limit. The spectrum of this model can be given in terms of spectral curves. However, it is a priori not clear whether any given admissible spectral curve can actually be realized as a solution to the discrete Bethe equations, a property which can be referred to as stability. In order to study the issue of stability, we find and explore the general two-cut solution or elliptic curve. It turns out that the moduli space of this elliptic curve shows a surprisingly rich structure. We present the various cases with illustrations and thus gain some insight into the features of multi-cut solutions. It appears that all admissible spectral curves are indeed stable if the branch cuts are positioned in a suitable, non-trivial fashion.

  2. Critical behavior of ferromagnetic Ising thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossio, P.; Mazo-Zuluaga, J.; Restrepo, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we study the magnetic properties and critical behavior of simple cubic ferromagnetic thin films. We simulate LxLxd films with semifree boundary conditions on the basis of the Monte Carlo method and the Ising model with nearest neighbor interactions. A Metropolis dynamics was implemented to carry out the energy minimization process. For different film thickness, in the nanometer range, we compute the temperature dependence of the magnetization, the magnetic susceptibility and the fourth order Binder's cumulant. Bulk and surface contributions of these quantities are computed in a differentiated fashion. Additionally, according to finite size scaling theory, we estimate the critical exponents for the correlation length, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization. Results reveal a strong dependence of critical temperature and critical exponents on the film thickness. The obtained critical exponents are finally compared to those reported in literature for thin films

  3. Surface effects in the Potts ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Sarmento, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Within a real space renormalisation group framework, the phase diagram of a semi-infinite cubic-lattice q-state Potts ferromagnet is studied, in which the free surface coupling constant J sub(S) = (1+Δ)J sub(B) might be different from the bulk one J sub(B). The starting value Δ sub(c) (q) is calculated above which surface order is possible even if bulk order is absent. Our results can be alternatively seen as approximate for the simple cubic lattice (as a matter of fact, the Ising value Δ sub(c) (2) obtained approaches the series result better than any other theory known consequently Δ sub(c) (q) is expected to be quite satisfactory even for q not= 2) or as exact for a well defined diamond-like hierarchical lattice. In the q →0 limit, Δ sub(c) diverges as 1/√q. (Author) [pt

  4. Heat exchanges in a quenched ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corberi, Federico; Zannetti, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , and CNISM, Unita di Salerno, Universita di Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Gonnella, Giuseppe; Piscitelli, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari and INFN, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    The off-equilibrium probability distribution of the heat exchanged by a ferromagnet in a time interval after a quench below the critical point is calculated analytically in the large-N limit. The distribution is characterized by a singular threshold Q{sub C} < 0, below which a macroscopic fraction of heat is released by the k = 0 Fourier component of the order parameter. The mathematical structure producing this phenomenon is the same responsible for the order parameter condensation in the equilibrium low temperature phase. The heat exchanged by the individual Fourier modes follows a non-trivial pattern, with the unstable modes at small wave vectors warming up the modes around a characteristic finite wave vector k{sub M}. Two internal temperatures, associated with the k = 0 and k = k{sub M} modes, rule the heat currents through a fluctuation relation similar to the one for stationary systems in contact with two thermal reservoirs. (fast track communication)

  5. Evaluation of phase transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory Fe-Pd alloy by magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yasubumi; Tamoto, Shizuka; Kubota, Takeshi; Okazaki, Teiko; Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2002-07-01

    The possibility to detect the phase transformation with martensites by heating or cooling as well as stress-loading in ferromagnetic shape memory Fe-30at percent Pd alloy thin foil by using magnetic Markhausen noise sensor was studied. MBHN is caused by the irregular interactions between magnetic domain and thermally activated martensite twins during magnetization. In general, the envelope of the MBHN voltage versus time signals in Fe-29at percent Pd ribbon showed two peaks during magnetization, where secondary peak at intermediate state of magnetization process decreased with increasing temperature, while the MBHN envelopes in pure iron did not change with increasing temperature. The variety of MBHN due to the phase transformation was apt to arise at higher frequency part of spectrum during intermediate state of magnetization process and it decreased with disappearance of martensite twins. Besides, MBHN increased monotonically with increasing loading stress and then, it decreased with unloading, however MBHN showed large hysteresis between loading and unloading passes. Based on the experimental results from MBHN measurements for both thermoelastic and stress-induced martensite phase transformations in Fe-30at percent Pd ribbon samples, MBHN method seems a useful technique to non-destructive evaluation of martensite phase transformation of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  6. Metallographic study of ferrite → sigma transformation using ferromagnetic colloid, microprobe analysis, and color etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.J.; Crouse, R.S.; Sikka, V.K.; King, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel base metal and weldments are usually adversely affected by prolonged exposure to temperatures in the 482-900 0 C (900-1652 0 F) range. One cause of the property alteration is related to the transformation of relatively ductile delta-ferrite to less ductile sigma-phase. Attempts to identify sigma and delta ferrite phases by color staining techniques alone are well documented; however, the results are often questionable due to the difficulty in maintaining consistent color identifications. This investigation is concerned with the microstructural responses of the ferromagnetic delta-ferrite phase and the paramagnetic sigma-phase to a ferromagnetic iron colloid in a magnetic field. Such positive or negative responses of the two phases to the colloid offer a more definitive identification. With this technique, the identification of small amounts of these phases in the microstructure is limited only by the highest magnification and resolution of the optical microscope. The procedure is substantiated in this metallographic study with microprobe analysis and color metallography. Several examples of the correlative use of these three techniques in identifying varying amounts of delta-ferrite yields sigma transformation are presented

  7. Ultrastructural and some functional changes in tumor cells treated with stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, O V; Todor, I N; Khayetsky, I K; Tregubova, N A; Lukianova, N Yu; Chekhun, V F

    2010-12-01

    To study the ultrastructure and some functional indexes of tumor cells treated with stabilized iron nanoparticles in vitro. 3-[4,5dimethylthiazol-2-1]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-test, electron microscopy, polarography with applying of closed Clark's electrode. It was shown that cultivation of cells with stabilized Fe(3)O(4) leads to intracellular accumulation of ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The most active ferromagnetic uptake by cells has been observed after 24 and 48 h of incubation. The presence of ferromagnetic in cells led to altered mitochondrial structure that caused the decrease of oxygen uptake rate in the cells of all studied lines. Ferromagnetic released from the majority of cells via exocytosis or clasmacytosis after a certain period of time. The number of dead cells or cells with severe damage was moderate, so cytotoxic action of stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles was minimal toward the studied cell lines. the presence of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in culture medium led to alterations in mitochondria ultrastructural organization and decrease of oxygen uptake by mitochondria in sensitive and anticancer-drugs resistant cells.

  8. Development of cryogenic permanent magnet undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Shirasawa, Katsutoshi; Kitamura, Hideo; Bizen, Teruhiko; Seike, Takamitsu; Marechal, Xavier; Tsuru, Rieko; Iwaki, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A short period undulator increases not only the photon energy of undulator radiation, but also the brilliance due to its increased number of undulator periods. As a result, brilliant undulator radiation becomes available in the photon energy range, which is currently covered by wigglers. In order to develop a short period undulator, high performance magnets are indispensable and superconductive undulators have been actively investigated in recent years. In this paper, however, we propose a new approach, so called a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB magnets at the temperatures around 150 K. The current status of this cryogenic permanent magnet undulator development at SPring-8 is presented including the results of the magnetic field measurements on a prototype undulator. (author)

  9. ODH, oxygen deficiency hazard cryogenic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustynowicz, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    An oxygen deficiency exists when the concentration of oxygen, by volume, drops to a level at which atmosphere supplying respiratory protection must be provided. Since liquid cryogens can expand by factors of 700 (LN 2 ) to 850 (LH e ), the uncontrolled release into an enclosed space can easily cause an oxygen-deficient condition. An oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH) fatality rate per hour (OE) is defined as: OE = Σ N i P i F i , where N i = number of components, P i = probability of failure or operator error, and F i = fatality factor. ODHs range from open-quotes unclassifiedclose quotes (OE -9 1/h) to class 4, which is the most hazardous (OE>10 -1 1/h). For Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) buildings where cryogenic systems exist, failure rate, fatality factor, reduced oxygen ratio, and fresh air circulation are examined

  10. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  11. The Cryogenic Supervision System in NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hsing-Chieh; Chiou, Wen-Song; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Tsai, Zong-Da

    2005-01-01

    The helium cryogenic system in NSRRC is a fully automatic PLC system using the Siemens SIMATIC 300 controller. Modularization in both hardware and software makes it easy in the program reading, the system modification and the problem debug. Based on the Laview program we had developed a supervision system taking advantage of the Internet technology to get system's real-time information in any place. The functions of this supervision system include the real-time data accessing with more than 300 digital/analog signals, the data restore, the history trend display, and the human machine interface. The data is accessed via a Profibus line connecting the PLC system and the supervision system with a maximum baud rate 1.5 Mbit/s. Due to this supervision system, it is easy to master the status of the cryogenic system within a short time and diagnose the problem.

  12. Characterization of titanium alloys for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reytier, M.; Kircher, F.; Levesy, B.

    2002-01-01

    Titanium alloys are employed in the design of superconducting magnet support systems for their high mechanical strength associated with their low thermal conductivity. But their use requires a careful attention to their crack tolerance at cryogenic temperature. Measurements have been performed on two extra low interstitial materials (Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Ti-6Al-4V ELI) with different thickness and manufacturing process. The investigation includes the tensile properties at room and liquid helium temperatures using smooth and notched samples. Moreover, the fracture toughness has been determined at 4.2 K using Compact Tension specimens. The microstructure of the different alloys and the various fracture surfaces have also been studied. After a detailed description of the experimental procedures, practical engineering characteristics are given and a comparison of the different titanium alloys is proposed for cryogenic applications

  13. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  14. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  15. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  16. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  17. Neutron depolarization study of static and dynamic magnetic properties of ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuesser, N.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis neutron depolarization experiments are performed on amorphous and crystalline ferromagnetic materials. The subjects studied are concerned with 'domain structure in magnetically weak uniaxial amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons', 'static critical behaviour at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition', 'small magnetic anisotropy in nickel near T c ', and 'magnetization reversal in conducting ferromagnets'. 87 refs.; 37 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Single-magnon tunneling through a ferromagnetic nanochain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Ostrovsky, V.

    2010-01-01

    Magnon transmission between ferromagnetic contacts coupled by a linear ferromagnetic chain is studied at the condition when the chain exhibits itself as a tunnel magnon transmitter. It is shown that dependently on magnon energy at the chain, a distant intercontact magnon transmission occurs either in resonant or off-resonant tunneling regime. In the first case, a transmission function depends weakly on the number of chain sites whereas at off-resonant regime the same function manifests an exponential drop with the chain length. Change of direction of external magnetic field in one of ferromagnetic contacts blocks a tunnel transmission of magnon.

  19. Ferromagnetic properties of Mn-doped AlN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Bao, H.Q.; Song, B.; Wang, W.J.; Chen, X.L.; He, L.J.; Yuan, W.X.

    2008-01-01

    Mn-doped AlN polycrystalline powders with a wurtzite structure were synthesized by solid-state reactions. A red-orange band at 600 nm, due to Mn 3+ incorporated into the AlN lattice, is observed in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum at room temperature (RT). Magnetic measurements show the samples possess hysteresis loops up to 300 K, indicating that the obtained powders are ferromagnetic at around RT. The Mn concentration-induced RT ferromagnetism is less than 1 at%. Our results confirm that the RT ferromagnetism can be realized in Mn-doped AlN

  20. Flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, M.Z.; Abal' Oshev, A. [Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, PL-02668 Warsaw, (Poland); Konczykowski, M. [CEA/DSM/DRECAM, Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Konczykowski, M. [Ecole Polytech, CNRS - UMR 7642, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Cheng, X.M.; Zhu, L.Y.; Chien, C.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Phys and Astron, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    An array of miniature Hall sensors is used to study the magnetic flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayer consisting of Nb as a superconducting layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as a ferromagnetic layer, separated by an amorphous Si layer to avoid the proximity effect. It is found that the magnetic domains in the ferromagnetic layer create a large edge barrier in the superconducting layer which delays flux penetration. The smooth flux profiles observed in the absence of magnetic pinning change into terraced profiles in the presence of domains. (authors)

  1. Six-state, three-level, six-fold ferromagnetic wire system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2013-01-01

    Six stable states at remanence were identified in iron wire samples of 6-fold spatial symmetry using micromagnetic simulations and the finite element method. Onion and domain-wall magnetic states were tailored by sample shape and guided by an applied magnetic field with a fixed in-plane direction. Different directions of externally applied magnetic fields revealed a tendency for stability or nonstability of the considered states. -- Highlights: ► In a ferromagnetic wire sample six stable states at remanence were discovered. ► Presented wires provide new effects not met in classical thin-layered solutions. ► The mechanism of working results from competing demagnetizing and exchange fields. ► For different physical conditions onion and domain-wall states were observed. ► Wire samples of 6-fold symmetry can lead to many-level information storage devices

  2. Pressure dependence of the magnetic properties of various weakly ferromagnetic transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buis, N.

    1979-01-01

    A large number of experimental results are summarized obtained in an apparatus designed for the measurement of magnetization under high pressures (up to 5k bar gas pressure), at temperatures from 4.2K to room temperature and in magnetic fields up to 5.1 T. Two alloy systems studied were Zr (Fesub(1-x)Cosub(x)) 2 and Y(Fesub(x)Cosub(1-x)) 2 and no consistent picture could be deduced from the large pressure effects on the magnetization. Apparently, one cannot apply the model for weak itinerant ferromagnetism on Zr(Fesub(1-x)Cosub(x)) 2 or a simple giant moment model on Y(Fesub(x)Cosub(1-x)) 2 with small iron content, because the magnetic behaviour of both systems is too complicated. (C.F.)

  3. Six-state, three-level, six-fold ferromagnetic wire system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blachowicz, T., E-mail: tomasz.blachowicz@polsl.pl [Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Ehrmann, A. [Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Six stable states at remanence were identified in iron wire samples of 6-fold spatial symmetry using micromagnetic simulations and the finite element method. Onion and domain-wall magnetic states were tailored by sample shape and guided by an applied magnetic field with a fixed in-plane direction. Different directions of externally applied magnetic fields revealed a tendency for stability or nonstability of the considered states. -- Highlights: ► In a ferromagnetic wire sample six stable states at remanence were discovered. ► Presented wires provide new effects not met in classical thin-layered solutions. ► The mechanism of working results from competing demagnetizing and exchange fields. ► For different physical conditions onion and domain-wall states were observed. ► Wire samples of 6-fold symmetry can lead to many-level information storage devices.

  4. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  5. Uses of cryogenics in power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungnickel, H

    1975-05-01

    A review of the present and possible future uses of cryogenic engineering and applied superconductivity. The applications discussed cover: transport of natural gas, superconducting N/sub 2/-filled cable for 275 kV. Cable with Ni/Ti conductor, homopolar machines with dix-type superconducting field coils, and superconducting magnetic propulsion. Important references to original works from different countries describing the latest developments are given.

  6. Experiments with a cryogenic torsion balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The torsion balance is a remarkably capable instrument for the measurement of slowly varying exceedingly small forces; indeed its potential abilities are still largely untapped. The author outlines some of the virtues (and limitations) of the torsion balance, and presents a menu of gravitation-related experiments to which it may be applied. He discusses plans for developing torsion balances operating at cryogenic temperatures, and describes an experiment to search for anomalous long-range interactions associated with intrinsic spin. (Auth.)

  7. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  8. Effects of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings on itinerant ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengnan; Xu, Liping; Wan, Yong; Yan, Xu

    2018-02-01

    Based on Stoner model for itinerant ferromagnet, effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on ferromagnetism were investigated at zero temperature. It was found that SOC will enhance the critical ferromagnetic exchange interaction for spontaneous magnetization, and then suppress ferromagnetism. In case of the coexistence of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOCs, the mixture of the two spin-orbit couplings showed stronger suppressed effect on ferromagnetism than only one kind of SOC alone. When the two SOCs mixed with equal magnitude, ferromagnetism in itinerant ferromagnet was suppressed to minimum.

  9. Numerical and experimental comparison of electromechanical properties and efficiency of HTS and ferromagnetic hysteresis motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inacio, D; Inacio, S; Pina, J; Goncalves, A; Neves, M Ventim; Rodrigues, A Leao

    2008-01-01

    Hysteresis motors are very attractive in a wide range of fractional power applications, due to its torque-speed characteristics and simplicity of construction. This motor's performance is expected to improve when HTS rotors are used, and in fact, hysteresis motors have shown to be probably the most viable electrical machines using HTS materials. While these motors, either conventional or HTS, are both hysteresis motors, they base their operation on different physical phenomena: hysteretic behaviour in conventional ferromagnetic materials is due to the material's non-linear magnetic properties, while in HTS materials the hysteresis has an ohmic nature and is related with vortices' dynamics. In this paper, theoretical aspects of both conventional and HTS hysteresis motors are discussed, its operation principles are highlighted, and the characteristics of both motors are presented. The characteristics, obtained both by experimental tests and numerical simulation (made with commercial software), are compared, in order to evaluate not only the motor's electromechanical performances but also the overall systems efficiency, including cryogenics for the HTS device

  10. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  11. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  12. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Cryogenic Thermometers

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Suraci, A; Togny, F; Vauthier, N

    1999-01-01

    The stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), impose that the cryogenic temperature sensors meet compelling demands such as long-term stability, radiation hardness, readout accuracy better than 5 mK at 1.8 K and compatibility with industrial control equipment. This paper presents the results concerning long-term stability of resistance temperature sensors submitted to cryogenic thermal cycles. For this task a simple test facility has been designed, constructed and put into operation for cycling simultaneously 115 cryogenic thermometers between 300 K and 4.2 K. A thermal cycle is set to last 71/4 hours: 3 hours for either cooling down or warming up the sensors and 1 respectively 1/4 hour at steady temperature conditions at each end of the temperature cycle. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) drives automatically this operation by reading 2 thermometers and actuating on 3 valves and 1 heater. The first thermal cycle was accomplished in a...

  13. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  14. Cryogenic characterization of LEDs for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Jérôme; Philippon, Anne; How, Lip Sun; Delbergue, Audrey; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Cillierre, David; Danto, Pascale; Boutillier, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of EUCLID project, the Calibration Unit of the VIS (VISible Imager) instrument must provide an accurate and well characterized light source for in-flight instrument calibration without noise when it is switched off. The Calibration Unit consists of a set of LEDs emitting at various wavelengths in the visible towards an integrating sphere. The sphere's output provides a uniform illumination over the entire focal plane. Nine references of LEDs from different manufacturers were selected, screened and qualified under cryogenic conditions. Testing this large quantity of samples led to the implementation of automated testing equipment with complete in-situ monitoring of optoelectronic parameters as well as temperature and vacuum values. All the electrical and optical parameters of the LED have been monitored and recorded at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These results have been compiled in order to show the total deviation of the LED electrical and electro-optical properties in the whole mission and to select the best suitable LED references for the mission. This qualification has demonstrated the robustness of COTS LEDs to operate at low cryogenic temperatures and in the space environment. Then 6 wavelengths were selected and submitted to an EMC sensitivity test at room and cold temperature by counting the number of photons when LEDs drivers are OFF. Characterizations were conducted in the full frequency spectrum in order to implement solutions at system level to suppress the emission of photons when the LED drivers are OFF. LEDs impedance was also characterized at room temperature and cold temperature.

  15. Properties of strain gages at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Nobuo; Fujiyoshi, Toshimitsu.

    1978-01-01

    At the time of developing superconduction generators, the stress measurement for rotor parts is required to grasp the safety and performance of the rotor at cryogenic temperature, which is cooled with liquid helium. In case of carrying out the stress measurement with strain gages, the problems are as follows. The strain gages and lead wires are exposed to cryogenic temperature from 4 to 10 K and strong magnetic field of about 3T, and subjected to high centrifugal acceleration of about 500G. In order to establish the techniques of the stress measurement under such conditions, the adhesives and damp-proof coatings for strain gages and strain gages themselves in Japan and foreign countries were examined on the properties at cryogenic temperature. As for the properties of strain gages, mainly the apparent strain owing to temperature change was investigated, and the change of the gage factors was studies only at liquid nitrogen temperature. The stress measurement with strain gages at low temperature had been studied in detail down to liquid nitrogen temperature concerning LNG tanks. The experimental apparatus, the samples, the testing methods and the test results of cooling tests on adhesives and damp-proof coatings, and the temperature characteristics of strain gages are reported. The usable adhesives and coatings were found, and correction by accurate temperature measurement is required for apparent strain. (Kako, I.)

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  19. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Anindya [Fermilab; Rane, Tejas [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  20. Cryogenic Safety HSE Seminar | 21 - 23 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC being the world’s largest superconducting installation, it’s not surprising that CERN is a world leader in cryogenic safety. On 21 and 22 September, over 100 experts in cryogenic safety will be coming to CERN to take part in CERN’s first Cryogenic Safety Seminar, which aims to stimulate collaboration and further the state of the art in this increasingly important field.  

  1. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  2. Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Samoilov, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures was experimentally examined. The average ozone concentration in the volume of the discharge tube was less at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperatures. The production of condensed ozone have been determined by measuring the ozone concentration when the walls was heated and ozone evaporated. The energy yield of ozone generation at cryogenic temperatures has been calculated. The maximum value was 200 g/kWh

  3. The DFBX cryogenic distribution boxes for the LHC straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, Jon P.; Corradi, Carol A.; Green, Michael A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Knolls, Michael J.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Rasson, Joseph E.; Reavill, Dulie; Turner, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The DFBX distribution boxes are designed to connect the LHC cryogenic distribution system to the interaction region quadrupoles [1] and dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DFBX distribution boxes also have the current leads for the superconducting interaction region magnets and the LHC interaction region correction coils. The DFBX boxes also connect the magnet and cryogenic instrumentation to the CERN data collection system. The DFBX boxes serve as the cryogenic circulation center and the nerve center for four of the LHC straight sections. This report describes primarily the cryogenic function of the DFBXs

  4. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; CERN; Ronayette, L.; GHMFL, Grenoble; Rabehl, R.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test

  5. Thermal Stabilization of Cryogenic System in Superconducting Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Jae; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hyung Hee; Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joon Sun; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Radiology has some useful applications for medical purpose. For cancer therapy, the superconducting cyclotron should generate heavy ion beams. It radiates heavy ion beams to cancer patients. In order to make cyclotron system stable, the cryogenic system which makes superconducting state should work constantly. However, radiation heat transfer of cryogenic system should be considered because liquid helium's boiling point is extremely low and there is huge temperature difference between the cryogenic system and ambient temperature. Accordingly, thermal analysis should be carried out. In this paper, the numerical analysis of the cryogenic system in practical superconducting cyclotron show temperature distribution and suggest the number of coolers using ANSYS Workbench program

  6. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  7. Tunneling time and Hartman effect in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Sattari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using transfer-matrix and stationary phase methods, we study the tunneling time (group delay time in a ferromagnetic monolayer graphene superlattice. The system we peruse consists of a sequence of rectangular barriers and wells, which can be realized by putting a series of electronic gates on the top of ferromagnetic graphene. The magnetization in the two ferromagnetic layers is aligned parallel. We find out that the tunneling time for normal incident is independent of spin state of electron as well as the barrier height and electron Fermi energy while for the oblique incident angles the tunneling time depends on the spin state of electron and has an oscillatory behavior. Also the effect of barrier width on tunneling time is also investigated and shown that, for normal incident, the Hartman effect disappears in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice but it appears for oblique incident angles when the x component of the electron wave vector in the barrier is imaginary.

  8. Possible mechanism for d0 ferromagnetism mediated by intrinsic defects

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenkui

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of several intrinsic defects on the magnetic behavior of ZnS nanostructures using hybrid density functional theory to gain insights into d0 ferromagnetism. Previous studies have predicted that the magnetism is due to a coupling between partially filled defect states. By taking into account the electronic correlations, we find an additional splitting of the defect states in Zn vacancies and thus the possibility of gaining energy by preferential filling of hole states, establishing ferromagnetism between spin polarized S 3p holes. We demonstrate a crucial role of neutral S vacancies in promoting ferromagnetism between positively charged S vacancies. S dangling bonds on the nanoparticle surface also induce ferromagnetism. This journal is

  9. Comment on ``Ferromagnetic film on a superconducting substrate''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2002-10-01

    A superconducting substrate is not able to shrink drastically domains in a ferromagnetic film, contrary to the prediction of Bulaevskii and Chudnovsky. This is shown on the basis of the exact solution for the stripe domain structure.

  10. Polarised neutron diffraction studies on weak ferromagnetism - a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishna, P.

    1982-10-01

    The physical basis of the phenomenon of weak ferromagnetism in certain antiferromagnetic insulators is briefly discussed. A survey of the contributions of polarised neutron diffraction towards the elucidation of different aspects of this field is presented

  11. Penetration of magnetic field in ferromagnetic transformer sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, R; Ziolkowski, M

    1981-01-12

    The paper deals with the penetration of magnetic field in a ferromagnetic transformer sheet. The flux-density distribution is computed using Galerkin's procedure. The different boundary conditions and the nonlinear B/H characteristic is taken into account.

  12. Possible mechanism for d0 ferromagnetism mediated by intrinsic defects

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of several intrinsic defects on the magnetic behavior of ZnS nanostructures using hybrid density functional theory to gain insights into d0 ferromagnetism. Previous studies have predicted that the magnetism is due to a

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Xudong; Liu, Liangliang; Wang, Zhu; Wu, Yichu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen doping on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles was investigated. Hydrogen was incorporated by annealing under 5% H 2 in Ar ambient at 700 °C. Room-temperature ferromagnetism was induced in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles, and the observed ferromagnetism could be switched between “on” and “off” states through hydrogen annealing and oxygen annealing process, respectively. It was found that Zn vacancy and OH bonding complex (V Zn  + OH) was crucial to the observed ferromagnetism by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy analysis. Based on first-principles calculations, V Zn  + OH was favorable to be presented due to the low formation energy. Meanwhile, this configuration could lead to a magnetic moment of 0.57 μ B . The Raman and photoluminescence measurements excluded the possibility of oxygen vacancy as the origin of the ferromagnetism

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xudong; Liu, Liangliang; Wang, Zhu; Wu, Yichu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen doping on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles was investigated. Hydrogen was incorporated by annealing under 5% H2 in Ar ambient at 700 °C. Room-temperature ferromagnetism was induced in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles, and the observed ferromagnetism could be switched between "on" and "off" states through hydrogen annealing and oxygen annealing process, respectively. It was found that Zn vacancy and OH bonding complex (VZn + OH) was crucial to the observed ferromagnetism by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy analysis. Based on first-principles calculations, VZn + OH was favorable to be presented due to the low formation energy. Meanwhile, this configuration could lead to a magnetic moment of 0.57 μB. The Raman and photoluminescence measurements excluded the possibility of oxygen vacancy as the origin of the ferromagnetism.

  15. Micromagnetic simulation of exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezelt, Harald, E-mail: harald.oezelt@fhstp.ac.at [Industrial Simulation, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Matthias Corvinus-Straße 15, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Kovacs, Alexander; Reichel, Franz; Fischbacher, Johann; Bance, Simon [Industrial Simulation, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Matthias Corvinus-Straße 15, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Gusenbauer, Markus [Center for Integrated Sensor Systems, Danube University Krems, Viktor Kaplan-Straße 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Schubert, Christian; Albrecht, Manfred [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Straße 70, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Schrefl, Thomas [Industrial Simulation, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Matthias Corvinus-Straße 15, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Center for Integrated Sensor Systems, Danube University Krems, Viktor Kaplan-Straße 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    Exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic heterostructures are a possible material composition for future magnetic storage and sensor applications. In order to understand the driving mechanisms in the demagnetization process, we perform micromagnetic simulations by employing the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The magnetization reversal is dominated by pinning events within the amorphous ferrimagnetic layer and at the interface between the ferrimagnetic and the ferromagnetic layer. The shape of the computed magnetization reversal loop corresponds well with experimental data, if a spatial variation of the exchange coupling across the ferri-/ferromagnetic interface is assumed. - Highlights: • We present a model for exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic heterostructures. • We incorporate the microstructural features of the amorphous ferrimagnet. • A distribution of interface exchange coupling is assumed to fit experimental data. • The reversal is dominated by pinning within the ferrimagnet and at the interface.

  16. Remote field eddy current testing of ferromagnetic tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, B.

    1990-01-01

    In order to test ferromagnetic tubes using internal probes, Intercontrole and the CEA have carried out theoretical and experimental works and developed a method to adapt the Remote Field Eddy Current technique which has been known and used for 30 years now. This document briefly recalls the basic principles of the Remote Field Eddy Current technique, the various steps of the works carried out and mainly describes examples of field inspection of ferromagnetic tubes and pipes [fr

  17. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The low temperature (4< T(K)<350) magnetic properties of chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles

  18. Magnetic nesting and co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kapaev, V.V.; Kopaev, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of providing for the magnetic nesting conditions of the electron spin dispersion law the co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity is possible by any high magnetization. The co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in the layered cuprate compounds of the RuSr 2 GdCu 2 O 8 -type is explained on this basis, wherein due to the nonstrict provision of the magnetic nesting condition there exists the finite but sufficiently high critical magnetization [ru

  19. Pressure-induced weak ferromagnetism in uranium dioxide, UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, H; Kato, H; Tokunaga, Y; Kambe, S; Walstedt, R E; Nakamura, A; Tateiwa, N; Kobayashi, T C

    2003-01-01

    The dc magnetization of insulating UO 2 under high pressure up to ∼1 GPa has been measured using a piston-cylinder cell. Pressure-induced weak ferromagnetism appeared at low pressure (∼0.2 GPa). Both the remanent magnetization and the coercive force increase as pressure increases. This weak ferromagnetism may come from spin canting or from uncompensated moments around grain boundaries

  20. Finite temperature magnon spectra in yttrium iron garnet from a mean field approach in a tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ka

    2018-04-01

    We study magnon spectra at finite temperature in yttrium iron garnet using a tight-binding model with nearest-neighbor exchange interaction. The spin reduction due to thermal magnon excitation is taken into account via the mean field approximation to the local spin and is found to be different at two sets of iron atoms. The resulting temperature dependence of the spin wave gap shows good agreement with experiment. We find that only two magnon modes are relevant to the ferromagnetic resonance.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

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  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  10. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

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  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

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    Medline Plus

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  18. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  2. Spin Orbit Torque in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2016-06-21

    Electrons not only have charges but also have spin. By utilizing the electron spin, the energy consumption of electronic devices can be reduced, their size can be scaled down and the efficiency of `read\\' and `write\\' in memory devices can be significantly improved. Hence, the manipulation of electron spin in electronic devices becomes more and more appealing for the advancement of microelectronics. In spin-based devices, the manipulation of ferromagnetic order parameter using electrical currents is a very useful means for current-driven operation. Nowadays, most of magnetic memory devices are based on the so-called spin transfer torque, which stems from the spin angular momentum transfer between a spin-polarized current and the magnetic order parameter. Recently, a novel spin torque effect, exploiting spin-orbit coupling in non-centrosymmetric magnets, has attracted a massive amount of attention. This thesis addresses the nature of spin-orbit coupled transport and torques in non-centrosymmetric magnetic semiconductors. We start with the theoretical study of spin orbit torque in three dimensional ferromagnetic GaMnAs. Using the Kubo formula, we calculate both the current-driven field-like torque and anti-damping-like torque. We compare the numerical results with the analytical expressions in the model case of a magnetic Rashba two-dimensional electron gas. Parametric dependencies of the different torque components and similarities to the analytical results of the Rashba two-dimensional electron gas in the weak disorder limit are described. Subsequently we study spin-orbit torques in two dimensional hexagonal crystals such as graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene. In the presence of staggered potential and exchange field, the valley degeneracy can be lifted and we obtain a valley-dependent Berry curvature, leading to a tunable antidamping torque by controlling the valley degree of freedom. This thesis then addresses the influence of the quantum spin Hall

  3. High energy excitations in itinerant ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prange, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Itinerant magnets, those whose electrons move throughout the crystal, are described by band theory. Single particle excitations offer confirmation of band theory, but their description requires important corrections. The energetics of magnetism in iron and nickel is also described in band theory but requires complex bands. Magnetism above the critical temperature and the location of the critical temperature offer discriminants between the two major models of magnetism at high temperature and can be addressed by high energy excitations

  4. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  6. Novel superconducting state in ferromagnetic superconductor UCoGe. Microscopic coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity probed by 59Co-NQR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Kenji; Hattori, Taisuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Yusuke; Sato, Noriaki K.; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Tamura, Nobuyuki; Satoh, Isamu

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between ferromagnetism and superconductivity in ferromagnetic superconductor UCoGe from 59 Co nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Our experimental results indicate the microscopic coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in UCoGe, and suggest a 'self-induced vortex state' in its superconducting state. We also review NQR experiments, which play an important role in this study. (author)

  7. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  8. Magnetic evolution of itinerant ferromagnetism and interlayer antiferromagnetism in cerium doped LaCo{sub 2}P{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yong; Kong, Yixiu; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Anmin [Department of Physics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Functional Materials & Micro-nano Devices, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); He, Rui [Department of Physics, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614 (United States); Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@ruc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Functional Materials & Micro-nano Devices, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2017-05-01

    ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type phosphide ACo{sub 2}P{sub 2} (A=Eu, La, Pr, Nd, Ce) has the same structure as iron arsenides, but their magnetic behaviors are quite distinct. In this paper, we grew a series of La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}Co{sub 2}P{sub 2} single crystals (x=0.0 to1.0), made structural and magnetic characterizations. We found the introduction of cerium induces a rapid decrease of c-axis and a change from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic states. Compared to other trivalent doped compounds, the enhancement of ferromagnetism with doping is suppressed and the transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism appear earlier. By employing first-principles band-structure calculations, we identify the increase of Ce valence suppress the itinerant ferromagnetism and leading to formation of P-P bonding with the shortening of c-axis. The bonding effectively drives an increase of interlayer antiferromagnetic interaction, eventually leads to antiferromagnetic ordering of cobalt in high-doping region.

  9. TWO FERROMAGNETIC SPHERES IN HOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury A. Krasnitsky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of two spherical conductors is studied quite in detail with bispherical coordinates usage and has numerous appendices in an electrostatics. The boundary-value problem about two ferromagnetic spheres enclosed on homogeneous and infinite environment in which the lack of spheres exists like homogeneous magnetic field is considered. The solution of Laplace's equation in the bispherical system of coordinates allows us to find the potential and field distribution in all spaces, including area between spheres. The boundary conditions in potential continuity and in ordinary density constituent of spheres surfaces induction flux are used. It is supposed that spheres are identical, and magnetic permeability of their material is expressed in  >> 0. The problem about falling of electromagnetic plane wave on the system of two spheres, which possesses electrically small sizes, can be considered as quasistationary. The scalar potentials received as a result of Laplace's equation solution are represented by the series containing Legendre polynomials. The concept of two spheres system effective permeability is introduced. It is equal to the advantage in magnitude of magnetic induction flux vector through a certain system’s section arising due to its magnetic properties. Necessary ratios for the effective permeability referred to the central system’s section are obtained. Particularly, the results can be used during the analysis of ferroxcube core clearance, which influences on the magnetic antenna properties. 

  10. Vortex precession in thin elliptical ferromagnetic nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaspel, C.E., E-mail: craig.zaspel@umwestern.edu

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • A general form for the magnetostatic energy is calculated for the vortex state in a ferromagnetic ellipse. • The ellipse magnetostatic energy is minimized by conformal mapping the circular disk onto the ellipse. • The gyrotropic precession frequency is obtained in general for a range of ellipticities. - Abstract: The magnetostatic energy is calculated for a magnetic vortex in a noncircular elliptical nanodisk. It is well-known that the energy of a vortex in the circular disk is minimized though an ansatz that eliminates the magnetostatic charge at the disk edge. Beginning with this ansatz for the circular disk, a conformal mapping of a circle interior onto the interior of an ellipse results in the magnetization of the elliptical disk. This magnetization in the interior of an ellipse also has no magnetostatic charge at the disk edge also minimizing the magnetostatic energy. As expected the energy has a quadratic dependence on the displacement of the vortex core from the ellipse center, but reflecting the lower symmetry of the ellipse. Through numerical integration of the magnetostatic integral a general expression for the energy is obtained for ellipticity values from 1.0 to about 0.3. Finally a general expression for the gyrotropic frequency as described by the Thiele equation is obtained.

  11. Ferromagnetic resonance studies of lunar core stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, R. M.; Cirlin, E. H.; Goldberg, I. B.; Crowe, H.

    1976-01-01

    We first review the evidence which links the characteristic ferromagnetic resonance observed in lunar fines samples with agglutinatic glass produced primarily by micrometeorite impacts and present new results on Apollo 15, 16, and 17 breccias which support this link by showing that only regolith breccias contribute significantly to the characteristic FMR intensity. We then provide a calibration of the amount of Fe metal in the form of uniformly magnetized spheres required to give our observed FMR intensities and discuss the theoretical magnetic behavior to be expected of Fe spheres as a function of size. Finally, we present FMR results on samples from every 5 mm interval in the core segments 60003, 60009, and 70009. These results lead us to suggest: (1) that secondary mixing may generally be extensive during regolith deposition so that buried regolith surfaces are hard to recognize or define; and (2) that local grinding of rocks and pebbles during deposition may lead to short scale fluctuations in grain size, composition, and apparent exposure age of samples.

  12. Ferromagnetic characteristics of HfFe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, N.; Belosevic-Cavor, J.; Cekic, B.; Manasijevic, M.; Milosevic, Z. . E-mail address of correspoding author: novnik@rt270.vin.bg.ac.yu; Novakovic, N.)

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic hyperfine fields at 181 Ta ion-probe sites in the HfFe 2 polycrystalline binary compound were measured using the time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method. Measurements were performed in the absence of polarizing external magnetic field, at room temperature. The existence of two different structures, dominant cubic MgCu 2 -type and hexagonal MgZn 2 -type in our HfFe 2 sample was refined. Both structures are ferromagnetic with Curie temperatures, which differ significantly (588 K for MgCu 2 and 427 K for MgZn 2 ). The corresponding values of hyperfine fields are H hf 13.8±0.1 T for MgCu 2 -type structure and H hf = 8.0±0.2 T for MgZn 2 -type structure. Calculations using LAPW-Wien 97 program package are in progress and preliminary results are in good agreement with experiment. The analysis includes qualitative explanation of the exchange interactions mechanism between magnetic dipole moment of the observed 181 Ta ion-probe and magnetic dipole moments of the nearest neighbours on the corresponding coordination polyhedra. All these results will be published recently. (author)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  14. Room temperature ferromagnetic gadolinium silicide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadimani, Magundappa Ravi L.; Gupta, Shalabh; Harstad, Shane; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Jiles, David C.

    2018-03-06

    A particle usable as T1 and T2 contrast agents is provided. The particle is a gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particle that is ferromagnetic at temperatures up to 290 K and is less than 2 .mu.m in diameter. An MRI contrast agent that includes a plurality of gadolinium silicide (Gd.sub.5Si.sub.4) particles that are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter is also provided. A method for creating gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particles is also provided. The method includes the steps of providing a Gd5Si4 bulk alloy; grinding the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy into a powder; and milling the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy powder for a time of approximately 20 minutes or less.

  15. Oxide Ferromagnetic Semiconductors for Spin-Electronic Transprt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the viability of oxide magnetic semiconductors as potential materials for spintronics. We identified some members of the solid solution series of ilmenite (FeTiO3) and hematite (Fe2O3), abbreviated as (IH) for simplicity, for our investigations based on their ferromagnetic and semiconducting properties. With this objective in focus we limited our investigations to the following members of the modified Fe-titanates: IH33 (ilmenitehematite with 33 atomic percent hematite), IH45 (ilmenite-hematite with 45 atomic percent hematite), Mn-substituted ilmenite (Mn-FeTiO3), and Mn-substituted pseudobrookite (Mn- Fe2TiO5). All of them are: (1) wide bandgap semiconductors with band gaps ranging in values between 2.5 to 3.5 eV; (2) n-type semiconductors; (3) they exhibit well defined magnetic hysteresis loops and (4) their magnetic Curie points are greater than 400K. Ceramic, film and single crystal samples were studied and based on their properties we produced varistors (also known as voltage dependent resistors) for microelectronic circuit protection from power surges, three-terminal microelectronic devices capable of generating bipolar currents, and an integrated structured device with controlled magnetic switching of spins. Eleven refereed journal papers, three refereed conference papers and three invention disclosures resulted from our investigations. We also presented invited papers in three international conferences and one national conference. Furthermore two students graduated with Ph.D. degrees, three with M.S. degrees and one with B.S. degree. Also two post-doctoral fellows were actively involved in this research. We established the radiation hardness of our devices in collaboration with a colleague in an HBCU institution, at the Cyclotron Center at Texas A and M University, and at DOE National Labs (Los Alamos and Brookhaven). It is to be appreciated that we met most of our goals and expanded vastly the scope of

  16. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    CERN Document Server

    Nasu, S; Morimoto, S; Kawakami, T; Kuzushita, K; Takano, M

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure sup 5 sup 7 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO sub 3 , CaFeO sub 3 and La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 O sub 3. The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO sub 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  17. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Saburo; Suenaga, Tomoya; Morimoto, Shotaro; Kawakami, Takateru; Kuzushita, Kaori; Takano, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO 3 , CaFeO 3 and La 1/3 Sr 2/3 O 3 . The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  18. Proceedings of the 26th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference - International Cryogenic Material Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Sharma, R. G.; Kar, S.

    2017-02-01

    International Conference ICEC 26 - ICMC 2016 was organized at New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016. Previous conference ICEC25-ICMC 2014 was held at the University of Twente, The Netherlands in July 2014. Next Conference ICEC 27- ICMC 2018 will be held at Oxford, UK during September 3-7, 2018 1. Introduction This is a biennial international conference on cryogenic engineering and cryogenics materials organized by the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee and the International Cryogenic Material Committee. For some years, the host country has been alternating between Europe and Asia. The present conference was held at the Manekshaw Convention Centre, New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016 and hosted jointly by the Indian Cryogenics Council (ICC) and the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Put all together as many as 547 persons participated in the conference. Out of these 218 were foreign delegates coming from 25 countries and the rest from India. 2. Inaugural Session & Course Lectures The pre conference short course lectures on “Cryocoolers” and “Superconducting Materials for Power Applications” were organized on 7th March. Cryocooler course was given jointly by Dr. Chao Wang from M/s. Cryomech, USA and Prof. Milind Atrey from IIT Bombay, India. The Course on Superconducting Materials was given by Prof. Venkat Selvamanickam from the University of Houston, USA. The conference was inaugurated in the morning of March 8th in a typical Indian tradition and in the presence of the Chief Guest, Dr. R Chidambaram (Principle Scientific Adviser to Govt. of India), Guest of Honour, Prof. H Devaraj (Vice Chairman University Grant Commission), Prof Marcel ter Brake ( Chair, ICEC Board), Prof. Wilfried Goldacker (Chair, ICMC board), Dr. D Kanjilal (Director IUAC), Dr R K Bhandari, (President, Indian Cryogenic Council ). Dr. T S Datta, Chair Local Organizing Committee coordinated the proceedings of the inaugural function. 3. Technical

  19. Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L.

    2004-01-01

    The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator

  20. Performance of Magnetic-Superconductor Non-Contact Harmonic Drive for Cryogenic Space Applications: Speed, Torque and Efficiency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Valiente-Blanco, Ignacio; Cristache, Cristian; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco-Antonio; Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic Drives are widely used in space mainly because of their compactness, large reduction ratio ad zero backlash. However, their use in extreme environments like in cryogenic temperatures is still a challenge. Lubrication, lifetime and fatigue are still issues under these conditions.The MAGDRIVE project, funded by the EU Space FP7 was devoted to test a new concept of harmonic drive reducer. By using the magnetic distance force interactions of magnets and ferromagnetic materials, all the conventional mechanical elements of a Harmonic Drives (teeth, flexspline and ball bearings) are substituted by contactless mechanical components (magnetic gear and superconducting magnetic bearings). The absence of contact between any moving parts prevents wear, lubricants are no longer required and the operational life time is greatly increased. As the magnetic transmission is continuous there is no backlash in the reduction. MAG SOAR Company is already providing contactless mechanical components for space applications able to operate in a wide range of temperatures.In this paper the tests results of a -1:20 ratio MAGDRIVE prototype are reported. In these tests successful operation at 40 K and 10-3 Pa was demonstrated for more than 1.5 million input cycles. A maximum torque of 3 Nm and efficiency higher than 75% at 3000 rpm were demonstrated. The maximum tested input speed was 3000 rpm -six times the previous existing record for harmonic drives at cryogenic temperature.