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Sample records for cruciate ligament ruptures

  1. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  2. Late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament after total knee replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, R. L.; Goodman, S. B.; Csongradi, J.

    1993-01-01

    To our knowledge there have been no reports of late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) as a cause of instability in PCL-retaining total knee prostheses. In our experience of 150 total knee replacements using PCL-retaining prosthesis, three cases (2.0%) of late rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament have occurred, each leading to chronic instability, disabling pain, and revision arthroplasty. In each case rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament was confirmed at the time of...

  3. Clinical diagnosis of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjammse, A; Gokeler, A; van der Schans, CP

    Study Design: Meta-analysis. Objectives: To define the accuracy of clinical tests for assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Background: The cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL, are among the most commonly injured structures of the knee. Given the increasing injury prevalence,

  4. Radiographic assessment of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the dairy cow: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhn, J.C.; Kneller, S.K.; Nelson, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Case records and radiographs of 37 dairy cows presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital with a diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture were reviewed. Signalment, history, duration of lameness prior to clinical presentation, and physical examination findings were evaluated. Survey radiographs were examined and radiographic lesions were documented. Individual cows were classified into groups (A, B, C) based on the severity of radiographic lesions, with Group A cows having minimal radiographic lesions. Cows in Groups A and B had radiographic lesions similar to Class I in beef bulls reported in another study.3,4 An attempt was made to relate the severity of radiographic lesions with age and duration of lameness. Group A animals tended to be younger cows (x@@= 4.58 years) with a short duration of lameness. Group B cows were older (x@@= 7.87 years) with a somewhat longer duration of lameness. Group C cows were slightly younger (x@@= 7.30 years) than Group B cows; however, their duration of lameness was much longer (x@@= 57.2 weeks vs 6.35 weeks for Group B and 2.54 weeks for Group A). The pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture and its associated lameness appeared to differ in dairy cows from beef bulls. The majority of animals in this study had radiographic lesions of mild to moderate severity (Groups A and B). In contrast, based on previous work, beef bulls had a greater tendency to be similar to our Group C designation. Beef bulls became lame with cranial cruciate ligament rupture only after severe lesions of degenerative joint disease had already occurred. It has been stated that lameness associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the beef bull is, therefore, secondary to degenerative joint disease. In contrast, the syndrome in dairy cows, as evidenced here, differs, since they often presented with cranial cruciate ligament rupture with little or no radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease

  5. [Magnetic resonance imaging features of a caudal cruciate ligament rupture associated with a suspected bone bruise lesion in a dog].

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    Schmohl, M; Konar, M; Tassani-Prell, M; Rupp, S

    2014-04-16

    In this case study we describe a surgically confirmed caudal cruciate ligament rupture in a 10-year-old Border Collie. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a complete rupture of the caudal cruciate ligament, a suspected bone bruise lesion on the proximolateral tibia and a muscle strain injury of the M. flexor digitorum lateralis. In human medicine, bone bruise lesions in MRI have been described as "footprint injuries" and can thereby explain the mechanism of trauma in ligament injuries. The combination of the MRI findings in this case can help to understand how the rarely diagnosed isolated rupture of the caudal cruciate ligament occurred in this dog.

  6. [Effects of posterior tibial slope on non-contact anterior cruciate ligament rupture and stability of anterior cruciate ligament rupture knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, De-bo; E, Sen; Wang, Bai-liang; Wang, Wei-guo; Guo, Wan-shou; Zhang, Qi-dong

    2013-05-07

    To retrospectively explore the correlation between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-ruptured knees, stability of ACL-rupture knee and posterior tibial slope (PTS). From January 2008 to October 2012, 150 knees with ACL rupture underwent arthroscopic surgery for ACL reconstruction. A control group was established for subjects undergoing arthroscopic surgery without ACL rupture during the same period. PTS was measured on a digitalized lateral radiograph. Lachman and mechanized pivot shift tests were performed for assessing the stability of knee. There was significant difference (P = 0.007) in PTS angle between the patients with ACL rupture (9.5 ± 2.2 degrees) and the control group (6.6 ± 1.8 degrees). Only among females, increased slope of tibial plateau had effect on the Lachman test. There was a higher positive rate of pivot shift test in patients of increased posterior slope in the ACL rupture group. Increased posterior tibial slope (>6.6) appears to contribute to non-contact ACL injuries in females. And the changes of tibial slope have no effect upon the Lachman test. However, large changes in tibial slope affect pivot shift.

  7. Effects on proprioception by Kinesio taping of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

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    Bischoff, Lars; Babisch, Christian; Babisch, Jürgen; Layher, Frank; Sander, Klaus; Matziolis, Georg; Pietsch, Stefan; Röhner, Eric

    2018-03-10

    The use of Kinesio tape (KT) to improve proprioception is a matter of considerable debate. In comparison, the rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament is a sufficiently well-investigated injury with a proven compromise of proprioception. The objective of the present study was to assess a supportive effect on proprioception after KT application, taking the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture as an example. Forty-eight patients who had suffered an ACL rupture, confirmed clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging, and who were treated conservatively or were awaiting surgery were included in this study. In all patients, a gait analysis was performed on the affected leg before and after KT application. In addition, the IKDC score, the Lysholm score, stability using the Rolimeter, and the angle reproduction test were determined. Thirty-nine men and nine women who had had an ACL rupture for at least 3 weeks were included in the study. Significant improvements were achieved on the affected knee joint for the gait analysis parameters touchdown and unrolling, cadence, stability and stance phase as well as an extension of the hip joint. The Lysholm score improved from 79.3 to 85.8 (p < 0.001) and the IKDC score from 60.2 to 71.3 points (p < 0.001). Significant improvements were achieved in the Rolimeter and angle reproduction test. The use of KT has a positive effect on proprioception in patients with an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Therefore, the application may improve gait pattern as well as the subjective function of the affected knee joint.

  8. Five-year follow-up of knee joint cartilage thickness changes after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, F; Wirth, W; Lohmander, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture involves increased risk of osteoarthritis. We explored cartilage thickness changes over five years after ACL rupture. Methods: 121 young active adults (26% women, age 18-35 years) with acute traumatic ACL rupture were studied (the KANON-trial). ...

  9. Physical therapy in the conservative treatment for anterior cruciate ligament rupture followed by contralateral rupture: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Arruda, Gilvan de Oliveira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2014-01-01

    Although the surgical reconstruction be the obvious indication for the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesion, there is no consensus on whether the results of surgery are superior to those obtained with nonsurgical management. The objective of this report was to describe a case of nonsurgical treatment for ACL rupture followed by a contralateral rupture. A 28-year-old female practitioner of muay-thai and handball suffered a non-contact ACL rupture in the left knee, and three months after the...

  10. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R.; Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B.

    1992-01-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T 1 - and T 2 weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.) [de

  12. Use of an extracapsular stabilization technique to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in two avian species.

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    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Spodnick, Gary; Degernes, Laurel; DeVoe, Ryan S; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2009-12-01

    An extracapsular stabilization technique was used to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in a trumpeter hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) and an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus). The hornbill demonstrated cranial drawer motion and severe rotational instability of the stifle from ruptures of the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments and stifle joint capsule. The luxation was reduced, and the fibula was cranially transposed, in relation to the tibiotarsus, and anchored with 2 positive profile threaded acrylic pins. A lateral extracapsular stabilization was then performed. The African grey parrot had a traumatic stifle luxation, and an open reduction and a lateral extracapsular stabilization were performed. Both birds regained function of the affected leg by 1 month after surgery. Extracapsular stabilization allows motion of the stifle joint to be maintained during the postoperative recovery period, an advantage over rigid stabilization. Maintaining motion in the stifle joint facilitates physical therapy and can aid in full recovery after avian stifle injuries.

  13. A report of the Maquet procedure for the management of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in a dog - a case report

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    Danilo Roberto Custódio Marques

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is the major cause of lameness and degenerative joint disease in the canine stifle. The cause of this disease is multifactorial, especially involving degenerative and inflammatory changes. Many techniques have been described for the management of this condition, and current recommendations include the use of corrective osteotomies, most recently using the Maquet (or modified Maquet procedure. This technique is fundamentally similar to the classical tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA, but without the use of the bone plate. The main advantages of using this technique are a shorter operative time and less use of implants. The main complication of this technique is an increased risk of tibial crest fracture. This report describes the Maquet technique for the treatment of a three-year-old male West White Terrier dog with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament. Cruciate ligament rupture was diagnosed by a positive cranial tibial drawer test. Mediolateral stifle radiography performed under anesthesia with the stifle in 135° of extension demonstrated a tibial plateau angle of 22°. A cage of six millimeters was necessary to allow advancement. The Maquet technique produced excellent post-operative results, including early weight-bearing and neutralization of the cranial tibial drawer. The consolidation time of the osteotomy was 63 days.

  14. One-leg hop kinematics 20 years following anterior cruciate ligament rupture: Data revisited using functional data analysis.

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    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Pini, Alessia; Vantini, Simone; Strandberg, Johan; Abramowicz, Konrad; Schelin, Lina; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-12-01

    Despite interventions, anterior cruciate ligament ruptures can cause long-term deficits. To assist in identifying and treating deficiencies, 3D-motion analysis is used for objectivizing data. Conventional statistics are commonly employed to analyze kinematics, reducing continuous data series to discrete variables. Conversely, functional data analysis considers the entire data series. Here, we employ functional data analysis to examine and compare the entire time-domain of knee-kinematic curves from one-leg hops between and within three groups. All subjects (n=95) were part of a long-term follow-up study involving anterior cruciate ligament ruptures treated ~20 years ago conservatively with physiotherapy only or with reconstructive surgery and physiotherapy, and matched knee-healthy controls. Between-group differences (injured leg, treated groups; non-dominant leg, controls) were identified during the take-off and landing phases, and in the sagittal (flexion/extension) rather than coronal (abduction/adduction) and transverse (internal/external) planes. Overall, surgical and control groups demonstrated comparable knee-kinematic curves. However, compared to controls, the physiotherapy-only group exhibited less flexion during the take-off (0-55% of the normalized phase) and landing (44-73%) phase. Between-leg differences were absent in controls and the surgically treated group, but observed during the flight (4-22%, injured leg>flexion) and the landing (57-85%, injured legFunctional data analysis identified specific functional knee-joint deviations from controls persisting 20 years post anterior cruciate ligament rupture, especially when treated conservatively. This approach is suggested as a means for comprehensively analyzing complex movements, adding to previous analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Molecular Markers of Inflammation in Dogs with Cruciate Ligament Rupture.

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    Peter Muir

    Full Text Available Mid-substance rupture of the canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR and associated stifle osteoarthritis (OA is an important veterinary health problem. CR causes stifle joint instability and contralateral CR often develops. The dog is an important model for human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture, where rupture of graft repair or the contralateral ACL is also common. This suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may increase ligament rupture risk. We investigated use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs to reduce systemic and stifle joint inflammatory responses in dogs with CR. Twelve dogs with unilateral CR and contralateral stable partial CR were enrolled prospectively. BM-MSCs were collected during surgical treatment of the unstable CR stifle and culture-expanded. BM-MSCs were subsequently injected at a dose of 2x106 BM-MSCs/kg intravenously and 5x106 BM-MSCs by intra-articular injection of the partial CR stifle. Blood (entry, 4 and 8 weeks and stifle synovial fluid (entry and 8 weeks were obtained after BM-MSC injection. No adverse events after BM-MSC treatment were detected. Circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower after BM-MSC injection. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP was decreased at 4 weeks and serum CXCL8 was increased at 8 weeks. Synovial CRP in the complete CR stifle was decreased at 8 weeks. Synovial IFNγ was also lower in both stifles after BM-MSC injection. Synovial/serum CRP ratio at diagnosis in the partial CR stifle was significantly correlated with development of a second CR. Systemic and intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs in dogs with partial CR suppresses systemic and stifle joint inflammation, including CRP concentrations. Intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs had profound effects on the correlation and conditional dependencies of cytokines using causal networks. Such treatment effects could ameliorate risk of a second CR by modifying the stifle joint

  16. Collagenolytic protease expression in cranial cruciate ligament and stifle synovial fluid in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Peter; Danova, Nichole A; Argyle, David J; Manley, Paul A; Hao, Zhengling

    2005-01-01

    To determine expression of collagenolytic genes and collagen degradation in stifle tissues of dogs with ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). Six dogs with CCL rupture and 11 dogs with intact CCL. Gene expression in CCL tissue and synovial fluid cells was studied using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Collagen degradation was studied using CCL explant cultures and a synovial fluid bioassay. Expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMP) was not found in young Beagles with intact CCL; however, increased expression of MMP-3 was found in CCL tissue from older hounds with intact CCL, when compared with young Beagles. In dogs with ruptured CCL, expression of MMP-2 and -9 was increased in stifle tissues, when compared with dogs with intact CCL. Similar to MMP-9, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin S was only found in stifle tissues from dogs with ruptured CCL; in contrast, expression of cathepsin K was found in all ruptured and intact CCL. Collagen degradation was increased in ruptured CCL, when compared with intact CCL. Rupture of the CCL is associated with up-regulation of expression of MMP-2 and -9 (gelatinase A and B), TRAP, and cathepsin S, and increased degradation of collagen. These findings suggest that MMP-2, -9, cathepsin S, and TRAP may be important mediators of progressive joint destruction in dogs with CCL rupture. These genes are markers for macrophages and dendritic cells. MMP and cathepsin S pathways may offer novel targets for anti-inflammatory medical therapy aimed at ameliorating joint degradation associated with inflammatory arthritis.

  17. Radiographic risk factors for contralateral rupture in dogs with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

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    Connie Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2 and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3 of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. CONCLUSION: Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are

  18. Bone contusions in the adolescent knee: confusion with rupture of anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Mota, J.; Guedea, A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most specific secondary findings, on magnetic resonance imaging, associated with acute rupture of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are bone contusions of lateral femoral condyle or tibial plateau.Given the marked specificity of these indirect findings (97% to 100%), their presence corroborates the diagnosis of ACL tears. The unreliability of these signs in adolescents has recently been reported. We present a case of subchondral bone contusion with intact ACL, the knowledge of which may prevent potential misinterpretations and unnecessary arthroscopic examinations. (Author) 9 refs

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of femoral fixation techniques (Aperfix and Endobutton in anterior cruciate ligament surgery: A clinical trial in men with complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture

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    Seyyed Raza Sharifzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is a Strengthener ligament of the knee. About 50 persons per 100,000 annually counter ACL rupture. Based on studies, the majority of people who have high mobility jobs, and had reconstruction surgery after ACL rupture, have returned to pre-injury level of activity. Aims We compared two methods of surgery (aperfix and endobutton in this article. We want to answer these two main questions in this study:1 is the effectiveness of surgical methods (aperfix and endobutton in patients with anterior cruciate ligament rupture, the same?.2 Are the aspects of the knee function, in two surgical methods (aperfix and endobutton after ACL reconstruction surgery, the same? Methods This study is a prospective clinical trial on patients who had complete ACL rupture in an isolated trauma, who were nominated for ACL reconstruction surgery. We excluded the cases that had underlying disease or other damages from the study. 100 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 50 individuals. Then each group underwent surgery. The femoral fixations were by the two common methods of ";;;;;;;;;;;Aperfix";;;;;;;;;;; or ";;;;;;;;;;;Endobutton";;;;;;;;;;;. We followed up, the cases one year after surgery and evaluated them by lysholm score as well as with IKDC score. Results The mean lysholm score and IKDC score do not have statistically significant difference in the two groups. (Mean lysholm score in Aperfix group=95.66 vs. 94.56 in Endobutton group (p=0.057 and IKDC score=92.32 in Aperfix group vs 92.20 in Endobutton group (p=0.28. However, in some aspects of knee function, such as locking, Swelling, and climbing stairs, patients who had undergone Aperfix approach, had better results. Conclusion Surgical methods have little difference however due to better results in some aspects of knee functions in this study and due to other studies, it can be said Aperfix method slightly has more benefits. Further investigations with larger

  20. The Use of Canine Stifle Orthotics for Cranial Cruciate Ligament Insufficiency

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    Brittany Jean Carr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess weight bearing of dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency with a custom stifle orthotic.Background: Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL insufficiency is the most common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs. While there are numerous options for surgical management, surgery is not always an option. Recently, the use of canine stifle orthotics has also emerged as a means to non-surgically manage patients with cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency.  Evidentiary value:  This is a retrospective study of ten dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture with a stifle orthotic.Methods: Medical records (January 2005- December 2012 of ten dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture with a stifle orthotic were reviewed.  Temporospatial gait analysis was performed using a pressure sensing walkway at baseline and 90 days or greater post orthotic placement to identify weight bearing with total pressure index % (TPI%.Results: TPI% improved significantly by 5.1% in the affected limb when compared to baseline (p = 0.0020. At final gait analysis, TPI% significantly improved by 3% in the affected limb with the orthotic off when compared to the unaffected limb (p = 0.0020.Conclusion: Custom canine stifle orthotics allow for improved weight bearing in the affected limb.Application: Custom canine stifle orthotics should be considered for cases with concurrent medical conditions or financial constraints that do not allow for surgical intervention.

  1. Comparison between arthroscopy and magnetic resonance studies of rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torregrosa, A.; Higueras, V.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Casillas, C.; Sanfeliu, M.

    1999-01-01

    To compare the reliability of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with that of arthroscopy in a large series of patients. A series of 149 patients underwent arthroscopy and MR study of the knee. The condition of the ACL was classified as normal, partial rupture (increased signal in the ligament with integral hypointense fibers) or complete rupture (complete interruption or failure to visualize the ligament). The agreement (kappa), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. MR images of ACL were normal in 114 of 116 normal cases; partial rupture was observed in 4 cases (versus 3 in arthroscopy) and complete rupture in 31 (versus 30 in arthroscopy). The agreement was excellent (kappa: 0.93; p < 0.001). For the diagnosis of normal ACL, the sensitivity of MR was 1, the specificity 0.98, the PPV 0.94 and the NPV 1. For the diagnosis of partial rupture, the sensitivity was 0.67, the specificity 0.98, the PPV 0.50 and the NPV 0.99. For complete rupture, the sensitivity was 0.97, the specificity 0.98, the PPV 0.94 and the NPV 0.99. The high sensitivity and specificity of MR observed in the diagnosis of integral ACL is somewhat reduced in cases of complete rupture and even lower in cases of partial rupture. It is important to differentiate the degree of rupture since the therapeutic management of the patient differs. (Author) 18 refs

  2. Medial collateral ligament healing one year after a concurrent medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament injury: an interdisciplinary study in rabbits.

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    Yamaji, T; Levine, R E; Woo, S L; Niyibizi, C; Kavalkovich, K W; Weaver-Green, C M

    1996-03-01

    The optimal treatment for concurrent injuries to the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligaments has not been determined, despite numerous clinical and laboratory studies. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of surgical repair of the medial collateral ligament on its biomechanical and biochemical properties 52 weeks after such injuries. In the left knee of 12 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, the medial collateral ligament was torn and the anterior cruciate ligament was transected and then reconstructed. This is an experimental model previously developed in our laboratory. In six rabbits, the torn ends of the medial collateral ligament were repaired, and in the remaining six rabbits, the ligament was not repaired. Fifty-two weeks after injury, we examined varus-valgus and anterior-posterior knee stability; structural properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex; and mechanical properties, collagen content, and mature collagen crosslinking of the medial collateral ligament. We could not detect significant differences between repair and nonrepair groups for any biomechanical or biochemical property. Our data support clinical findings that when the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligaments are injured concurrently and the anterior cruciate ligament is reconstructed, conservative treatment of the ruptured medial collateral ligament can result in successful healing.

  3. Dual-energy computed tomography of cruciate ligament injuries in acute knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Erno K. [Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Koskinen, Seppo K. [Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    To examine dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in evaluating cruciate ligament injuries. More specifically, the purpose was to assess the optimal keV level in DECT gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) images and to examine the usefulness of collagen-specific color mapping and dual-energy bone removal in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and the popliteus tendon. At a level 1 trauma center, a 29-month period of emergency department DECT examinations for acute knee trauma was reviewed by two radiologists for presence of cruciate ligament injuries, visualization of the popliteus tendon and the optimal keV level in GSI images. Three different evaluating protocols (GSI, bone removal and collagen-specific color mapping) were rated. Subsequent MRI served as a reference standard for intraarticular injuries. A total of 18 patients who had an acute knee trauma, DECT and MRI were found. On MRI, six patients had an ACL rupture. DECT's sensitivity and specificity to detect ACL rupture were 79 % and 100 %, respectively. The DECT vs. MRI intra- and interobserver proportions of agreement for ACL rupture were excellent or good (kappa values 0.72-0.87). Only one patient had a PCL rupture. In GSI images, the optimal keV level was 63 keV. GSI of 40-140 keV was considered to be the best evaluation protocol in the majority of cases. DECT is a usable method to evaluate ACL in acute knee trauma patients with rather good sensitivity and high specificity. GSI is generally a better evaluation protocol than bone removal or collagen-specific color mapping in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and popliteus tendon. (orig.)

  4. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: In young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, do patient reported or radiographic outcomes after five years differ between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed AC...... AND WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: The relative efficacy of surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation for short and long term outcomes of ACL rupture is debated. Clinicians and young active adult patients should consider rehabilitation as a primary treatment option following an acute ACL tear....

  5. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Little

    Full Text Available Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+ macrophages, CD3(+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p0.34, p0.31, p<0.05. Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  6. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (ppairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  7. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use.

  8. Rupture of posterior cruciate ligament leads to radial displacement of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Deng, Zhenhan; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Wenfeng; Hu, Yihe; Liao, Zhan; Li, Kanghua; He, Hongbo

    2017-07-11

    To explore the association between the rupture of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the radial displacement of medial meniscus under the conditions of different flexion and various axial loads. The radial displacement value of medial meniscus was measured for the specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle (ALB), 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle (PMB), and 12 complete ruptures. The measurement was conducted at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion angles under 200 N, 400 N, 600 N, 800 N and 1000 N of axial loads respectively. The displacement values of medial meniscus of the ALB rupture group increased at 0° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N, and at 30°, 60° and 90° flexion under all loads in comparison with the PCL intact group. The displacement values of the PMB rupture group was higher at 0° and 90° flexion under all loads, and at 30° and 60° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N loads. The displacement of the PCL complete rupture group increased at all flexion angles under all loads. Either partial or complete rupture of the PCL can increase in the radial displacement of the medial meniscus, which may explain the degenerative changes that occuring in the medial meniscus due to PCL injury. Therefore, early reestablishment of the PCL is necessarily required in order to maintain stability of the knee joint after PCL injury.

  9. MR imaging diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament injury: importance of ancillary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kang Ik; Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Jung Hwoi; Ki, Tae Sung; Park, Jong Oag

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of two ancillary findings of anterior tibial plateau bruise/fracture and popliteus muscle strain on MR diagnosis of posterior cruicate ligament injury. We retrospectively evaluated 48 patients with confirmed posterior cruciate ligament tear. We studied the incidence of anterior tibial plateau injury and popliteus muscle strain, and the specificity of popliteus muscle strain with or without bony injury. A complete tear of the posterior cruciate ligament was noted in 37 cases, a partial tear in 11. Anterior tibial plateau lesion was found in 21 of 48 cases (44%); This total was made up of 17/37 PCL complete tears (46%) and 4/11 partial tears (36%). The difference in the incidence of complete and partial tears is not statistically significant. Popliteus muscle injury was found in 20 of 48 cases (42%), the total consisted of 19/37 PCL complete tears (51%) and 1/11 partial tears (10%). The incidence of 42% is relatively high, approximating that of bony injury. The difference in the incidence of complete and partial tears is statistically significant (p < 0.006). Specificity for posterior cruciate ligament tear is 69%(20/29), and when concomitant with anterior tibial plateau injury is 94%(16/17). As in the case of anterior cruciate ligament injury, these documented ancillary findings of anterior tibial plateau and popliteus muscle injuries are very helpful when MR diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament injury itself and differentiation of partial and complete rupture are doubtful

  10. Rubber matting on an obstacle course causes anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and its removal eliminates them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Rodney P

    2002-04-01

    In June 1998, six unexpected anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures within 12 months were detected by routine injury surveillance in a cohort of Australian Army recruits. Local investigation, reported separately as a Case Report in this issue, suggested the cause to be an excessive coefficient of friction between rubber boot soles and newly laid rubber matting on one obstacle course, creating excessive knee torques. The matting was removed progressively, but not before two more ruptures occurred on one remaining section. In this retrospective study, chi 2 analyses were used to compare the incidence of ACL rupture in prehazard, hazard-exposed, and postintervention cohorts, and the average costs to the institution of each ACL rupture were determined. Zero, eight, and zero ACL ruptures occurred in the prehazard, hazard-exposed, and postintervention cohorts, respectively (chi 2 > 4.75 for 1 df, p < 0.03 for each change in incidence). The temporal relationships between hazard introduction or removal and changes in the incidence of ACL rupture were strong. The average institutional cost of each ACL rupture was AU$54,627 or US$34,322. Rubber matting on obstacle courses increases the risk of ACL rupture in the presence of speed and rubber-soled footwear. Routine injury surveillance and simple preventive processes save money and personnel.

  11. Chronic injuries of the cruciate ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pricca, P.; Cecchini, A.; Vecchioni, G.; Mariani, P.M.; Tansini, A.; Ferrario, A.

    1988-01-01

    The high incidence of cruciate ligament injuries as a result of acute knee trauma with hemartrosis and abuse of diagnostic arthroscopies call for a suitable radiological imaging of the central pivot. Computed Arthrotomography (CAT) was used to examine the knee joint in 20 cases of clinically suspected chronic cruciate ligament injury. The images were correlated with arthroscopic and/or arthrotomic findings. Thirteen lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (65%) were found, plus 1 lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) (5%), 2 associated lesions of ACL + PCL (10%), and 4 normal cases. Confirmation of pathology was available in all cases but one by arthroscopy and/or surgery. The central pivot diseases were classified as follows: absence, detachement, partial or complete tear. CAT findings of cruciate ligament injuries are emphasized and the role of the technique as compared to arthroscopy is discussed. CAT is useful in 3-D evaluation of central pivot and detection of different cruciate ligament injuries, with high sensitivity-specifity for ACL and high specifity-moderate sensitivity for PCL. In the evaluation of the chronic unstable knee, CAT is highly accurate and gives the surgeon useful information towards the planning of therapeutic procedures. CAT is almost non-invasive, well tolerated and easy to perform in out-patients, which make it a first-choice procedure in the screening of chronic ligament injuries

  12. Unilateral aplasia of both cruciate ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aplasia of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 28-year-old male presented with pain and the feeling of instability of his right knee after trauma. The provided MRI and previous arthroscopy reports did not indicate any abnormalities except cruciate ligament tears. He was referred to us for reconstruction of both cruciate ligaments. The patient again underwent arthroscopy which revealed a hypoplasia of the medial trochlea and an extremely narrow intercondylar notch. The tibia revealed a missing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL footprint and a single bump with a complete coverage with articular cartilage. There was no room for an ACL graft. A posterior cruciate ligament could not be identified. The procedure was ended since a ligament reconstruction did not appear reasonable. A significant notch plasty if not a partial resection of the condyles would have been necessary to implant a ligament graft. It is most likely that this would not lead to good knee stability. If the surgeon would have retrieved the contralateral hamstrings at the beginning of the planned ligament reconstruction a significant damage would have occurred to the patient. Even in seemingly clear diagnostic findings the arthroscopic surgeon should take this rare abdnormality into consideration and be familiar with the respective radiological findings. We refer the abnormal finding of only one tibial spine to as the "dromedar-sign" as opposed to the two (medial and a lateral tibial spines in a normal knee. This may be used as a hint for aplasia of the cruciate ligaments.

  13. Articular cartilage damage with intramedullary lesion (bone bruise) in anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Shuya; Ohdera, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masami; Hiroshima, Shiro; Yoshimoto, Eiji

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the intramedullary lesion on MRI and cartilage damage in patients associated with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Thirty-two cases documented by MRI and arthroscopy within one month from injury underwent ACL reconstruction using ST-G, and arthroscopy was performed again after surgery. The mean term between reconstruction and postoperative arthroscopy was twelve months. The cartilage damage on arthroscopy was compared with the intramedullary lesion on MRI. Cartilage damage was observed in 9 cases (28.1%) during the initial arthroscopy and in 16 cases (50.0%) during the second arthroscopy. Intramedullary lesion was detected in all 32 cases (total: 73 lesions) on MRI. Intramedullary lesion leading to cartilage damage was common in the geographic-type lateral femoral condyle. There was significant difference between the lateral meniscus tear and the cartilage damage of the lateral compartment. (author)

  14. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  15. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  16. MRI appearance of the distal insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: an additional criterion for ligament ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldrini, G.; Teixeira, P.G.; Chanson, A.; Osemont, B.; Louis, M.; Blum, A. [CHU Nancy, Service d' imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Erpelding, M.L. [CHU Nancy, Hopitaux de Brabois Allee du Morvan, Service Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-09-15

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears are frequent and if not diagnosed may lead to relevant patient disability. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the non-invasive diagnosis of these tears. Despite the high performance of this method some cases are challenging and the criteria described in the literature are not sufficient to reach a diagnosis. We propose a systematic method for the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament tears based on the aspect of its distal portion. Magnetic resonance studies of 132 knees were evaluated in correlation with arthroscopy. The performance of the proposed method was compared with that of classic imaging signs of anterior cruciate ligament tear. The impact of image quality and reader expertise on the proposed method and the classic signs of tear were taken into account. This method had a sensitivity and specificity of 91.1% and 82.9% for the detection of abnormal ACLs. The interobserver agreement (kappa) of the proposed method was significantly higher than that of the classic signs at all levels of expertise (0.89 vs 0.76). This method was not influenced by image quality. Distal ACL analysis identified more partial tears and synovialization (granulation scar tissue) than the conventional method (71% vs 58.5% for partial tears and 83.5% vs 58.5% for synovialization). The proposed classification has a high performance and reproducibility for the identification of abnormal anterior cruciate ligament. The results were influenced neither by the level of expertise of the readers nor by the image quality. (orig.)

  17. Current Concepts for Injury Prevention in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is the current standard of care for active patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgeries successfully restore the mechanical stability of the injured knee, postsurgical outcomes remain widely varied. Less than half of athletes who undergo ACLR return to sport within the first year after surgery, and it is estimated that approximately 1 in 4 to 1 in 5 young, active athletes who undergo ACLR will g...

  18. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. DESIGN...

  20. Modulators of the extracellular matrix and risk of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Masouda; Mannion, Sasha; Klug, Blake; Hobbs, Hayden; van der Merwe, Willem; Posthumus, Michael; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of ligaments continuously undergoes remodelling in order to maintain tissue homeostasis. Several key mediators of ECM remodelling were chosen for investigation in the present study. It is thought that polymorphisms within genes encoding signalling molecules may contribute to inter-individual variation in the responses to mechanical loading, potentially altering risk of injury. A genetic association study was conducted on 232 asymptomatic controls (CON) and 234 participants with surgically diagnosed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures; of which 135 participants reported a non-contact mechanism of injury (NON subgroup). All participants were genotyped for ten variants in eight genes encoding ECM remodelling proteins. Haplotypes and allele combinations were also inferred. The CASP8 rs3834129 ins allele was significantly over-represented in the male CON group compared to the male NON subgroup (p=0.047, OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.01-2.12). In female participants, the IL1B rs16944 TT genotype was significantly under-represented in the CON group compared to the NON subgroup (p=0.039, OR: 3.06, 95% CI: 1.09-8.64). Haplotype analysis revealed an under-representation of the CASP8 rs3834129-rs1045485 del-G haplotype in the CON group compared to both the ACL group (p=0.042; haplo.score:2.03) and the NON subgroup (p=0.037; haplo.score:2.09). Furthermore, following a pathway-based approach, genetic variants involved in the cell signalling cascade were associated with ACL injury risk. The novel independent associations and allele combinations observed implicate the apoptosis and cell signalling cascades as potential contributors to ACL injury susceptibility. Furthermore, these genetic variants may potentially modulate ECM remodelling in response to loading and ultimately contribute to ligament capacity. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the drawer test and the tibial compression test for differentiating between cranial and caudal stifle subluxation associated with cruciate ligament instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Might, Kelly R; Bachelez, Andréas; Martinez, Steven A; Gay, John M

    2013-05-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the drawer test (DT) alone and in combination with the tibial compression test (TCT) to detect stifle subluxation after transection of the cranial cruciate (CrCL), caudal cruciate (CdCL) or both cruciate ligaments (total cruciate ligament or TCL). Experimental study. Cadaveric, skeletally mature canine pelvic limb pairs (n = 8). Pelvic limbs disarticulated at the coxofemoral joint were randomly assigned to the following 1 of 4 groups: (1) limbs had complete transection of the CrCL; (2) limbs had complete transection of the CdCL; (3) limbs had complete transection of both ligaments; and (4) both ligaments were left intact. Participants performed the DT and the TCT and a diagnosis was given based on the DT and on the combination of these tests. DT had a poor sensitivity for correctly identifying CrCL (69%), CdCL (45%), and TCL (26%) rupture, but had a high sensitivity when identifying intact limbs (97%). Specificity for DT was greatest when identifying limbs with CdCL (97%) and TCL (92%) rupture, and the lowest when palpating limbs with CrCL rupture (75%). Combining DT and TCT did not increase sensitivity or specificity values, nor did an increased level of evaluator training. Independent of evaluator training, the DT alone or combined with the TCT poorly differentiates the cause of stifle instability associated with CrCL, CdCL, and TCL rupture. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Immediate physical therapy in dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament submitted to extracapsular surgical stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Berté

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the influence of immediate physical therapy on the functional recovery of hind limbs of dogs with experimental cranial cruciate ligament rupture which underwent surgical extracapsular stabilization as well as to verify its interference in joint stability. Eight dogs were randomly divided into two groups: GI (control (n=4 and GII (physical therapy (n=4. The dogs in GII underwent the following therapeutic treatments in the postoperative period: cryotherapy, passive joint movement, massage, passive straightening, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy (bath and aquatic mat and therapeutic exercises. We performed evaluations of the thigh circumference, goniometry, X-ray, and knee stability (drawer test. Results did not demonstrate a significant difference between the groups nor between different post-operative times. Regarding gait analysis, we found that the 4 dogs in GI remained in degree 3 of lameness 45 and 90 days postoperatively. However, in GII, one dog remained in degree 3 45 and 90 days after surgery; one dog changed from degree 3 to 4 90 days after surgery and the other 2 dogs changed from degree 3 to 5 90 days after surgery. It is possible to conclude that dogs with CCL rupture that undergo immediate physical therapy demonstrate better results in regards to functional gait recovery. The therapeutic modalities used in the immediate post-operative period did not cause instability of the operated knee. Further studies are needed with a larger number of dogs to indicate the immediate physical therapy in dogs with CCL ligament rupture which underwent extracapsular stabilization.

  3. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: single bundle versus anatomical double bundle techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Umeda Sasaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anterior cruciate ligament ruptures are frequent, especially in sports. Surgical reconstruction with autologous grafts is widely employed in the international literature. Controversies remain with respect to technique variations as continuous research for improvement takes place. One of these variations is the anatomical double bundle technique, which is performed instead of the conventional single bundle technique. More recently, there has been a tendency towards positioning the two bundles through double bone tunnels in the femur and tibia (anatomical reconstruction. OBJECTIVES: To compare, through biomechanical tests, the practice of anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a patellar graft to conventional single bundle reconstruction with the same amount of patellar graft in a paired experimental cadaver study. METHODS: Nine pairs of male cadaver knees ranging in age from 44 to 63 years were randomized into two groups: group A (single bundle and group B (anatomical reconstruction. Each knee was biomechanically tested under three conditions: intact anterior cruciate ligament, reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament, and injured anterior cruciate ligament. Maximum anterior dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibia rotation were recorded with knees submitted to a 100 N horizontal anterior dislocation force applied to the tibia with the knees at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: There were no differences between the two techniques for any of the measurements by ANOVA tests. CONCLUSION: The technique of anatomical double bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has a similar biomechanical behavior with regard to anterior tibial dislocation, rigidity, and passive internal tibial rotation.

  4. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance ima...

  5. Graft fixation in cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J; Weiler, A; Caborn, D N; Brown, C H; Johnson, D L

    2000-01-01

    Cruciate ligament reconstruction has progressed dramatically in the last 20 years. Anatomic placement of ligament substitutes has fostered rehabilitation efforts that stress immediate and full range of motion, immediate weightbearing, neuromuscular strength and coordination, and early return to athletic competition (3 months). This has placed extreme importance on secure graft fixation at the time of ligament reconstruction. Current ligament substitutes require a bony or soft tissue component to be fixed within a bone tunnel or on the periosteum at a distance from the normal ligament attachment site. Fixation devices have progressed from metal to biodegradable and from far to near-normal native ligament attachment sites. Ideally, the biomechanical properties of the entire graft construct would approach those of the native ligament and facilitate biologic incorporation of the graft. Fixation should be done at the normal anatomic attachment site of the native ligament (aperture fixation) and, over time, allow the biologic return of the histologic transition zone from ligament to fibrocartilage, to calcified fibrocartilage, to bone. The purpose of this article is to review current fixation devices and techniques in cruciate ligament surgery.

  6. Injuries to the cranial cruciate ligament and associated structures: summary of clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings from 10 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, M.; Grant, B.D.; Turner, T.A.; Nixon, A.J.; Brown, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings of 10 horses with injury to the cranial cruciate ligament are presented. The most consistent clinical signs included moderate to severe distension of the femoropatellar joint and a Grade III to a Grade V out of V lameness. Craniocaudal instability could be elicited in five horses under general anaesthesia and in one conscious horse. Radiographic evaluation of the stifles revealed that avulsion fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence was the most common finding in six out of 10 horses. Arthroscopic examination of the affected femorotibial joints were performed in five horses. This confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament injury or rupture. Post mortem examinations were performed on two horses which documented partial tears of the cranial cruciate ligament

  7. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue

  8. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue engineering.

  9. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  10. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Postural stability in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    6 Abstract Title: Postural stability in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objectives: The aim of this thesis was to find out if the postural stability is differed in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury and in the control group after the "4 steps - one leg stance" test had been performed. Methods: This study compared a group with anterior cruciate ligament injury and a control group on the basis of the "4 steps - one leg stance" test. Methods of comparison and analys...

  12. Clinical and radiographic aspects of the bovine pericardium as a substitute of the canine cranial cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendolan, A.P.; Rezende, C.M.F.; Melo, E.G.; Malm, C.; Gheller, V.A.; Oliveira, H.P.; Torres, R.C.S.; Araujo, F.A.

    2007-01-01

    The clinical and radiographic aspects of the bovine pericardium preserved in glicerin, were evaluated as a substitute for canine cranial cruciate ligament. Fifteen male mongrel dogs weighing between 17.4 and 31.6kg had the ligament experimentally ruptured and the stifle joint stabilized by an arthroscopical technique with bovine pericardium as a graft. The dogs were divided into three groups of five animals each. They were evaluated at 30, 90 and 120 days. The operated limb was imobillized for two weeks and clinical examination was performed weekly. Radiographs were taken monthly and the sinovial fluid was collect at 30, 90 and 120 days. Clinically, dogs presented high to moderate lameness, muscle hipotrophy in the operated limb and accentuated cranial drawer movement. Degenerative disease was detected in radiography. All dogs showed total rupture of the graft. Sinovial fluid analysis showed characteristics of inflammation. It can be concluded that pericardium graft failed prematurely, incited persistent inflammatory reaction and rejection phenomena. Thus, it cannot be recommended as a xenograft for cranial cruciate ligament replacement [pt

  13. Value of fat-suppressed PD-weighted TSE-sequences for detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions-Comparison to arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.W.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Frahm, Christian; Muhle, Claus; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions in comparison to arthroscopy. Materials and methods: In a prospective study 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5 T MR scanner (Vision[reg], Siemens, Erlangen) prior to arthroscopy using following sequences: (a) sagittal FS-PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15/105 ms); (b) sagittal PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE:3800/15/105 ms). Further imaging parameters: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256 x 256. A total of 62 anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL/PCL) were evaluated, standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (ppv) and negative predictive value (npv) and accuracy were calculated. Results: Twenty-one cruciate ligament ruptures were detected in arthroscopy, 19 ACL- and 2 PCL-ruptures (on MRI 34/124, 25/62 ACL, 9/62 PCL lesions). For all four sequences in the 31 patients with arthroscopic correlation sensitivity, specificity, ppv, npv and accuracy were 86%, 98%, 95%, 93% and 94% for detection of tears, and 84%, 100%, 100%, 80% and 90% for ACL-ruptures respectively. The two PCL-ruptures were true positive in all sequences, one intact PCL was diagnosed as torn (false positive). Conclusions: Fat-suppressed PDw/T2w TSE-MR sequences are comparable to PDw TSE sequences for the detection of ACL/PCL-lesions

  14. Long-term functional outcome after surgical repair of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mölsä, Sari H; Hyytiäinen, Heli K; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi M

    2014-01-01

    Background Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is a very common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Few studies, using objective and validated outcome evaluation methods, have been published to evaluate long-term (>1 year) outcome after CCL repair. A group of 47 dogs with CCL rupture treated with intracapsular, extracapsular, and osteotomy techniques, and 21 healthy control dogs were enrolled in this study. To evaluate long-term surgical outcome, at a minimum of 1.5 years after unilate...

  15. Strengthening exercises for old cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, Y; Lysholm, J; Lysholm, M; Gillquist, J

    1986-04-01

    Fifty-three consecutive patients with troublesome old cruciate ligament lesions underwent a 3-month thigh and calf muscle training program. Before training, the diagnosis was established by arthroscopy and clinical examination under anesthesia. Significant improvement in strength, performance, knee score, and activity level took place; the majority were improved and declined surgery. A period of strength training is recommended before the decision to undertake surgery for cruciate ligament injury.

  16. A Review on Biomechanics of Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Materials for Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marieswaran, M.; Jain, Ishita; Garg, Bhavuk; Sharma, Vijay

    2018-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the six ligaments in the human knee joint that provides stability during articulations. It is relatively prone to acute and chronic injuries as compared to other ligaments. Repair and self-healing of an injured anterior cruciate ligament are time-consuming processes. For personnel resuming an active sports life, surgical repair or replacement is essential. Untreated anterior cruciate ligament tear results frequently in osteoarthritis. Therefore, understanding of the biomechanics of injury and properties of the native ligament is crucial. An abridged summary of the prominent literature with a focus on key topics on kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint and various loads acting on the anterior cruciate ligament as a function of flexion angle is presented here with an emphasis on the gaps. Briefly, we also review mechanical characterization composition and anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as graft materials used for replacement/reconstruction surgeries. The key conclusions of this review are as follows: (a) the highest shear forces on the anterior cruciate ligament occur during hyperextension/low flexion angles of the knee joint; (b) the characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament at variable strain rates is critical to model a viscoelastic behavior; however, studies on human anterior cruciate ligament on variable strain rates are yet to be reported; (c) a significant disparity on maximum stress/strain pattern of the anterior cruciate ligament was observed in the earlier works; (d) nearly all synthetic grafts have been recalled from the market; and (e) bridge-enhanced repair developed by Murray is a promising technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, currently in clinical trials. It is important to note that full extension of the knee is not feasible in the case of most animals and hence the loading pattern of human ACL is different from animal models. Many of the published reviews on

  17. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan (Inventor); Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  18. A Review on Biomechanics of Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Materials for Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marieswaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the six ligaments in the human knee joint that provides stability during articulations. It is relatively prone to acute and chronic injuries as compared to other ligaments. Repair and self-healing of an injured anterior cruciate ligament are time-consuming processes. For personnel resuming an active sports life, surgical repair or replacement is essential. Untreated anterior cruciate ligament tear results frequently in osteoarthritis. Therefore, understanding of the biomechanics of injury and properties of the native ligament is crucial. An abridged summary of the prominent literature with a focus on key topics on kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint and various loads acting on the anterior cruciate ligament as a function of flexion angle is presented here with an emphasis on the gaps. Briefly, we also review mechanical characterization composition and anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as graft materials used for replacement/reconstruction surgeries. The key conclusions of this review are as follows: (a the highest shear forces on the anterior cruciate ligament occur during hyperextension/low flexion angles of the knee joint; (b the characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament at variable strain rates is critical to model a viscoelastic behavior; however, studies on human anterior cruciate ligament on variable strain rates are yet to be reported; (c a significant disparity on maximum stress/strain pattern of the anterior cruciate ligament was observed in the earlier works; (d nearly all synthetic grafts have been recalled from the market; and (e bridge-enhanced repair developed by Murray is a promising technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, currently in clinical trials. It is important to note that full extension of the knee is not feasible in the case of most animals and hence the loading pattern of human ACL is different from animal models. Many of the

  19. A rare case of stifle lameness: Rupture of the posterior cruciate ligamentum in a horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeren, P.R. van; Dik, K.J.; Barneveld, A.

    1985-01-01

    A 10-year-old Dutch Warmblood mare with a severe hind leg lameness was presented. Clinical examination seemed to point to a fracture in the region of the stifle joint. Radiological examination, however, showed a rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Injuries of this kind are rarely seen in the horse [de

  20. The Variants Within the COL5A1 Gene are Associated with Reduced Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień-Słodkowska Marta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the BstUI RFLP C/T (rs 12722 and DpnII RFLP C/T (rs 13946 COL5A1 polymorphisms, individually and as haplotypes, with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in recreational skiers. Subjects were 138 male recreational skiers with surgically diagnosed primary anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. The control group consisted of 183 apparently healthy male recreational skiers, who were without any self-reported history of ligament or tendon injury. DNA was extracted from buccal cells donated by the subjects and genotyping was carried out using real-time PCR. The genotype distributions for both polymorphisms met Hardy- Weinberg expectations in both groups. There were no significant differences in genotype distribution of allele frequencies of COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1 DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms between the ACL rupture and control groups. The T-T (BstUI RFLP T, DpnII RFLP T haplotype was the most common (55.6%. The haplotype T-C was not present in any of the subjects. There was an underrepresentation tendency of the C-T haplotype in the study group compared to controls under recessive mode of inheritance. Higher frequency of the COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms haplotype is associated with reduced risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in a group of apparently healthy male recreational skiers.

  1. STUDY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tummala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament is the weaker of the two cruciate ligaments stabilizing the knee joint, and therefore gets torn easier than the posterior cruciate ligament. OBJECTIVE To determine pattern of anterior cruciate ligament injury and its management in a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out for two years, 28 patients with ACL injury were included. A detailed history regarding the pattern of injury was noted and ACL reconstruction was done using BT Bautograft with mini-arthrotomy and arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The mean age of the study subjects was 30.6±7.3 years & majority were males. Majority of the ACL injury was sports related & was on the right knee. 64% underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction & majority of them had normal range of motion of the knee. CONCLUSION Our present study concludes that most common age group involved was 20-30 years & ACL injury was more common among males. Patients with an early ACL reconstruction were more satisfied with the end result. Also, ACL reconstruction techniques using BTB auto graft leads to good ligamentous stability and function of the knee.

  2. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  3. Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. How Do We Do It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are frequently seen in current practice mostly affecting the young, active subjects, and usually require ligament reconstruction in order to restore normal knee kinematics. As worldwide interest in anatomic reconstruction grew over the last decade, we have also refined our technique in order to restore the anatomical function as near to the normal as possible. This anatomical restoration concept is believed to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis, which the non-anatomic reconstructions fail to attain. The knowledge gained from the ACL anatomy, function and kinematics has helped in developing the current anatomic methods of reconstruction, which take into account patient anatomy, the rupture pattern, as well as the comorbidities. We present our approach to anatomical single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  4. The fibre bundle anatomy of human cruciate ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommersteeg, T. J.; Kooloos, J. G.; Blankevoort, L.; Kauer, J. M.; Huiskes, R.; Roeling, F. Q.

    1995-01-01

    The cruciate ligaments of the knee consist of numerous fascicles, groups of which comprise fibre bundles. The stabilising function of these ligaments is established by changes in the lengths and orientations of the fascicles. Understanding the function of knee ligaments thus requires an

  5. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging features of chronically torn anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Kuramochi, Masashi; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 knee joints with arthroscopically proved chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears were retrospectively evaluated. MRI demonstrated various features of chronic ACL tears: 19 knees revealed with no identifiable ligamentous structure, and 21 had residual ligamentous structures. These pseudoligaments, 14 discontinuous bands and seven continuous bands with elongation, were residual torn ligamentous fibers and/or synovial tissues. All the discontinuous bands were disrupted from the femoral attachment and were likely to traverse the lower intercondylar space. Six disrupted ligaments were attached to the lateral aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Coronal T2 * -weighted gradient echo images showed better delineation of the disrupted femoral attachment and adhesion to the PCL. A chronic ACL tear with minimal elongation or with PCL attachment at a higher position may occasionally be difficult to distinguish from an intact ligament. (author)

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A ganglion is a cystic formation close to joints or tendinous sheaths, frequently found in the wrist, foot or knee. Intra-articular ganglia of the knee are rare, and most of them are located in the anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical picture for these ganglia comprises pain and movement restrictions in the knee, causing significant impairment to the patient. Symptoms are non-specific, and anterior cruciate ligament ganglia are usually diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy. Not all ganglia diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging need to undergo surgical treatment: only those that cause clinical signs and symptoms do. Surgical results are considered good or excellent in the vast majority of cases. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male presented with pain in the left knee during a marathon race. Physical examination revealed limitation in the maximum range of knee extension and pain in the posterior aspect of the left knee. Radiographs of the left knee were normal, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multi-lobed cystic structure adjacent to the anterior cruciate ligament, which resembled a ganglion cyst. The mass was removed through arthroscopy, and pathological examination revealed a synovial cyst. Patient recovery was excellent, and he resumed his usual training routine five months later.

  8. Quantitative T2-Mapping and T2⁎-Mapping Evaluation of Changes in Cartilage Matrix after Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture and the Correlation between the Results of Both Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyue Tao; Yang Qiao; Yiwen Hu; Yuxue Xie; Rong Lu; Xu Yan; Shuang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Objectives. To quantitatively assess changes in cartilage matrix after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture using T2- and T2⁎-mapping and analyze the correlation between the results of both methods. Methods. Twenty-three patients and 23 healthy controls were enrolled and underwent quantitative MRI examination. The knee cartilage was segmented into six compartments, including lateral femur (LF), lateral tibia (LT), medial femur (MF), medial tibia (MT), trochlea (Tr), and patella (Pa)...

  9. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  10. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  11. Synovitis in dogs with stable stifle joints and incipient cranial cruciate ligament rupture: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleedorn, Jason A; Greuel, Erin N; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Markel, Mark D; Holzman, Gerianne; Muir, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate stifle joints of dogs for synovitis, before development of joint instability and cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR). Cross-sectional study. Dogs (n = 16) with CrCLR and stable contralateral stifles; 10 control dogs with intact CrCL. Arthritis and tibial translation were graded radiographically. Synovitis severity and cruciate pathology were assessed arthroscopically. Presence of inflammatory cells in synovial membrane biopsies was scored histologically. CrCLR stifle pairs and control stifles were compared. Radiographic evidence of arthritis, cranial tibial translation, and arthroscopic synovitis were increased in unstable stifles, when compared with stable contralateral stifles in CrCLR dogs (P < .05). Arthroscopic synovitis in both joints of CrCLR dogs was increased compared with controls, was correlated with radiographic arthritis (S(R) = 0.71, P < .05), and was present in all stable contralateral stifles. Arthroscopically, 75% of stable stifle joints had CrCL fiber disruption, which correlated with severity of synovitis (S(R) = 0.56, P < .05). Histologic evidence of synovitis was identified in all CrCLR dogs, but was only significantly correlated with arthroscopic observations in stable stifles (r(2) = 0.57, P < .005). Synovitis is an early feature of the CrCLR arthropathy in dogs before development of joint instability clinically. Severity of synovitis is correlated with radiographic arthritis in joints with minimal to no clinically detectable CrCL damage. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Does the Lever Sign Test Have Added Value for Diagnosing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ruptures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Miranda C.; Koster, Christiaan H.; Teunissen, Lennart P.J.; Oosterveld, Frits G.J.; Harmsen, Annelieke M.K.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Berg, Robert P.; Bloemers, Frank W.; Faber, Irene R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture based on a physical examination remains a challenge for both surgeons and physical therapists. The lever sign test was developed to overcome the practical limitations of other tests and to optimize diagnosis. An evaluation of the measurement properties of the lever sign test is needed to make adequate interpretations in practice. Purpose: To evaluate the reliability and diagnostic value of the lever sign test. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 94 patients were recruited between November 2014 and July 2016. Patients were included if they were at least 16 years old, suffered from knee trauma, and had indications for knee arthroscopic surgery. Lever sign, anterior drawer, Lachman, and pivot-shift test outcomes were examined by an orthopaedic/trauma surgeon and a physical therapist. A test-retest design was used to investigate interrater reliability. Moreover, the lever sign test outcomes, alone and in combination with the other diagnostic tests, were compared with arthroscopic results, which served as the gold standard for the test’s diagnostic value. Results: The lever sign test and pivot-shift test had kappa values exceeding 0.80 for interrater reliability. The kappa values for the anterior drawer test and Lachman test were 0.80 and 0.77, respectively. The lever sign test showed the highest specificity (100%) and the lowest sensitivity (39%) when compared with the other 3 tests. Moreover, its positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 65%, respectively, while an accuracy of 71% was calculated. Clustering the lever sign test parallel with the other 3 tests resulted in the highest accuracy of 91%. Conclusion: The lever sign test appears to have high interrater reliability and is the most specific test, showing a maximal positive predictive value. A positive lever sign test result indicates an ACL rupture. These results support the added value

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of cruciate ligaments after arthroscopic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kharat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to increase in road traffic and sports injuries, tears of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL of the knee are common. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an important tool of diagnosis and evaluation of these injuries. Methods: We carried out a prospective study on role of MRI on ten patients who had undergone ACL or PCL repair over a period of six months. In this report we present three illustrative cases to capture the spectrum of findings in our series to underline the role of MRI in management of such injuries and discuss the modalities of the procedure. Results: In our series, as demonstrated by the cases, MRI had an important role in diagnosis and evaluation of injuries to the cruciate ligaments. Conclusion: MRI can play an important role, particularly in tertiary centres, in diagnosis and evaluation of reconstructed ACL and PCL ligaments of the knee joint.

  14. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement on the radiographical diagnosis of canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Evelien; Van der Vekens, Elke; Verhoeven, Geert; de Rooster, Hilde; Van Ryssen, Bernadette; Samoy, Yves; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Van Tilburg, Johan; Devriendt, Nausikaa; Weekers, Frederik; Bertal, Mileva; Houdellier, Blandine; Scheemaeker, Stephanie; Versteken, Jeroen; Lamerand, Maryline; Feenstra, Laurien; Peelman, Luc; Nieuwerburgh, Filip Van; Saunders, Jimmy H; Broeckx, Bart J G

    2018-04-28

    Even though radiography is one of the most frequently used imaging techniques for orthopaedic disorders, it has been demonstrated that the interpretation can vary between assessors. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the intraobserver and interobserver agreement and the influence of level of expertise on the interpretation of radiographs of the stifle in dogs with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). Sixteen observers, divided in four groups according to their level of experience, evaluated 30 radiographs (15 cases with CCLR and 15 control stifles) twice. Each observer was asked to evaluate joint effusion, presence and location of degenerative joint disease, joint instability and whether CCLR was present or absent. Overall, intraobserver and interobserver agreement ranged from fair to almost perfect with a trend towards increased agreement for more experienced observers. Additionally, it was found that stifles that were classified with high agreement have either overt disease characteristics or no disease characteristics at all, in comparison to the ones that are classified with a low agreement. Overall, the agreement on radiographic interpretation of CCLR was high, which is important, as it is the basis of a correct diagnosis and treatment. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Ligament Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Wasim Sardar

    2016-01-01

    Ligaments are commonly injured in the knee joint, and have a poor capacity for healing due to their relative avascularity. Ligament reconstruction is well established for injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, however the use of autografts and allografts for ligament reconstruction are associated with complications, and outcomes are variable. Ligament tissue engineering using stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds is a novel technique that has the potential to provide an unlim...

  16. Altered postural control strategies in quiet standing more than 20 years after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte

    2016-05-01

    To explore long-term consequences of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on postural sway and control strategies during bilateral quiet standing, in subjects treated with or without reconstructive surgery compared to uninjured controls. 70 individuals who had unilateral ACL rupture 23±2.4 years ago (33 received ACL reconstructive surgery, ACLR, and 37 had physiotherapy only, ACLPT) and 33 uninjured matched controls (CTRL) (mean age 46±5.3) stood quietly with eyes closed for 3min on a firm and on a compliant surface, respectively. Center of pressure (CoP) was registered with a force plate and postural sway was calculated from center of mass (CoM) derived from 3D kinematics. Sway density (SD) analyses of CoP assessed distance and duration of stable phases. The torque controlling postural sway was estimated from CoP-CoM. Comparisons across conditions to CTRL revealed larger CoP-CoM-area in ACLR (p=0.017, CI: 10.95, 143.10), but not in ACLPT. Mean distance between SD-peaks was greater for ACLR (ppostural control efforts than CTRL but without significant differences in postural sway. Control efforts were thus not directly associated with sway and further research should be focused on variance in postural control strategies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Quadriceps Activation Failure After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture Is Not Mediated by Knee Joint Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    LYNCH, ANDREW D.; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID S.; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Descriptive prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES To investigate the relationships between knee joint effusion, quadriceps activation, and quadriceps strength. These relationships may help clinicians better identify impaired quadriceps activation. BACKGROUND After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, the involved quadriceps may demonstrate weakness. Experimental data have shown that quadriceps activation and strength may be directly mediated by intracapsular joint pressure created by saline injection. An inverse relationship between quadriceps activation and the amount of saline injected has been reported. This association has not been demonstrated for traumatic effusion. We hypothesized that traumatic joint effusion due to ACL rupture and postinjury quadriceps strength would correlate well with quadriceps activation, allowing clinicians to use effusion and strength measurement as a surrogate for electrophysiological assessment of quadriceps activation. METHODS Prospective data were collected on 188 patients within 100 days of ACL injury (average, 27 days) referred from a single surgeon. A complete clinical evaluation of the knee was performed, including ligamentous assessment and assessment of range of motion and effusion. Quadriceps function was electrophysiologically assessed using maximal volitional isometric contraction and burst superimposition techniques to quantify both strength and activation. RESULTS Effusion grade did not correlate with quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) (zero effusion: mean ± SD CAR, 93.5% ± 5.8%; trace effusion: CAR, 93.8% ± 9.5%; 1+ effusion: CAR, 94.0% ± 7.5%; 2+/3+ effusion: CAR, 90.6% ± 11.1%). These values are lower than normative data from healthy subjects (CAR, 98% ± 3%). CONCLUSION Joint effusion after ACL injury does not directly mediate quadriceps activation failure seen after injury. Therefore, it should not be used as a clinical substitute for electrophysiological assessment of quadriceps

  18. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    -constructions were stimulated. The sensory threshold was 3.4 times higher in the ACL than in the PCL. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and a typical inhibitory reflex could be elicited in 9 patients. The latency was the same as for the reflex from the PCL. The stimulus......Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... electrodes were inserted during arthroscopy into the normal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the reconstructed ACL in 11 patients who had a successful ACL re-construction 8 months to 12 years earlier. After the anesthesia had subsided, the PCL was stimulated electrically through the electrodes...

  19. Abnormal reflex activation of hamstring muscles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Graham M; Granger, Nicolas; Langley-Hobbs, Sorrel J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs are poorly understood. In this study hamstring muscle reflexes in response to cranial tibial translation were analysed to determine whether these active stabilisers of the stifle joint are differently activated in dogs with CCLR compared to control dogs. In a prospective clinical study reflex muscle activity from the lateral and medial hamstring muscles (biceps femoris and semimembranosus) was recorded using surface electrodes in control dogs (n=21) and dogs with CCLR (n=22). These electromyographic recordings were analysed using an algorithm previously validated in humans. The hamstring reflex was reliably and reproducibly recorded in normal dogs. Both a short latency response (SLR, 17.6±2.1ms) and a medium latency response (MLR, 37.7±2.7ms) could be identified. In dogs with unilateral CCLR, the SLR and MLR were not significantly different between the affected and the unaffected limbs, but the MLR latency of both affected and unaffected limbs in CCLR dogs were significantly prolonged compared to controls. In conclusion, the hamstring reflex can be recorded in dogs and the MLR is prolonged in dogs with CCLR. Since both affected and unaffected limbs exhibit prolonged MLR, it is possible that abnormal hamstring reflex activation is a mechanism by which progressive CCL damage may occur. The methodology allows for further investigation of the relationship between neuromuscular imbalance and CCLR or limitations in functional recovery following surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical testing of newly developed biomaterial designed for intra-articular reinforcement of partially ruptured cranial cruciate ligament: ex vivo pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Fedorová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with mechanical testing of newly developed material polyethylene terephtalate coated with polycaprolactone nanofibers in combination with biodagradable Hexalon ACL/PCL screws as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of partially ruptured cranial cruciate ligament. Four groups of ex vivo models of pig stifle joints were prepared and tested: a model with intact CCL (group 1, a model with partial CCL rupture (group 2, a model with CCL rupture stabilized with 7 mm Mersilene® strip (group 3, and a model with CCL rupture stabilized with 5 mm PET/PCL biomaterial strip (group 4. The models were loaded in the standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N and the shift (mm were monitored. The mean maximum peak power and the shift were 1266.0 ± 146.9 N and 13.7 ± 2.5 mm for group 1, and 1164.7 ± 228.2 N and 1 6.8 ± 3.3 mm for group 2, respectively. In all cases after reaching the maximum load, a tibial fracture occurred but never a CCL rupture. In groups 3 and 4, the initial fixation failure occurred in the mean values of 375.7 ± 81.5 and 360.4 ± 52.0 N, respectively, and with a bigger shift of 52.3 ± 11.9 mm and 39.4 ± 14.6 mm, respectively, compared to group 1. A critical point of failure was the anchoring in the bone. It can be concluded that the PET/PCL substitute in the ex vivo model has mechanically comparable properties with the clinically used Mersilene®, and based on its proven ability to carry stem cells it could be appropriate for partially ruptured CCL protection.

  1. BONE TUNNEL WIDENING AFTER ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT AUTOPLASTY WITH HAMSTRINGS (LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Slastinin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Such a phenomenon as bone tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament autoplasty with hamstrings has been known for 30 years. Despite the long history of this issue, the etiology is still not fully understood. The process of expansion of the bone tunnels is influenced by many factors such as graft fixation technique, surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol, as well as various biological factors. It is believed that this phenomenon has no influence on a functional result, but may create serious problems in revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery. Given the growing interest in the use of hamstring tendon grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, increasing number of these operations and as a result, of revision procedures, the search for methods of bone tunnel widening prevention is becoming more urgent.

  2. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  3. The magnetic resonance imaging appearance of the anterolateral ligament of the knee in association with anterior cruciate rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosy, Jonathan D.; Schranz, Peter J.; Patel, Anish; Anaspure, Rahul; Mandalia, Vipul I. [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been described. However, the appearance of this structure and injury, in the presence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is less well defined. We studied the incidence of injury to the ALL and the pattern of this injury on MRI. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective study of 375 consecutive MRI studies was performed. Cases were identified from a prospective database of ACL reconstruction patients. Following exclusions, 280 MRIs (277 patients; 197 males: 80 females; mean age 30.2 years, range, 16-54) were evaluated. Injury was defined as full thickness, partial thickness, or an avulsion fracture. Each study was independently assessed by two consultant musculoskeletal radiologists. Injury to the ALL was identified (by at least one observer) in only 10.7% of cases (2.50% full thickness, 7.50% partial thickness, and 0.71% avulsion fracture). There was an almost perfect level of interobserver agreement for both the identification of an injury (κ = 0.854) and grading of injury (κ = 0.858). The MRI incidence of ALL injury was significantly greater within 6 weeks of the knee injury (18.5 vs. 8.37%; p < 0.05). ALL injury was identified in only one-tenth of cases of ACL rupture. MRI changes can be reliably identified with strong agreement between observers. ALL injury is found more frequently on MRI within 6 weeks of the knee injury (compared to scans performed after this time period) suggesting that some injuries may resolve or become less visible. (orig.)

  4. Quadriceps Tendon Autograft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Eoghan T; Calvo-Gurry, Manuel; Withers, Dan; Farrington, Shane K; Moran, Ray; Moran, Cathal J

    2018-05-01

    To systematically review the current evidence to ascertain whether quadriceps tendon autograft (QT) is a viable option in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A literature review was conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Cohort studies comparing QT with bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) or hamstring tendon autograft (HT) were included. Clinical outcomes were compared, with all statistical analyses performed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 22.0, with P < .05 being considered statistically significant. We identified 15 clinical trials with 1,910 patients. In all included studies, QT resulted in lower rates of anterior knee pain than BPTB. There was no difference in the rate of graft rupture between QT and BPTB or HT in any of the studies reporting this. One study found that QT resulted in greater knee stability than BPTB, and another study found increased stability compared with HT. One study found that QT resulted in improved functional outcomes compared with BPTB, and another found improved outcomes compared with HT, but one study found worse outcomes compared with BPTB. Current literature suggests QT is a viable option in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, with published literature showing comparable knee stability, functional outcomes, donor-site morbidity, and rerupture rates compared with BPTB and HT. Level III, systematic review of Level I, II, and III studies. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical examination tests for the diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament rupture: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopkow, Christian; Freiberg, Alice; Kirschner, Stephan; Seidler, Andreas; Schmitt, Jochen

    2013-11-01

    Systematic literature review. To summarize and evaluate research on the accuracy of physical examination tests for diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear. Rupture of the PCL is a severe knee injury that can lead to delayed rehabilitation, instability, or chronic knee pathologies. To our knowledge, there is currently no systematic review of studies on the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests to evaluate the integrity of the PCL. A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 1946, Embase from 1974, and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database from 1985 until April 30, 2012. Studies were considered eligible if they compared the results of physical examination tests performed in the context of a PCL physical examination to those of a reference standard (arthroscopy, arthrotomy, magnetic resonance imaging). Methodological quality assessment was performed by 2 independent reviewers using the revised version of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. The search strategy revealed 1307 articles, of which 11 met the inclusion criteria for this review. In these studies, 11 different physical examination tests were identified. Due to differences in study types, different patient populations, and methodological quality, meta-analysis was not indicated. Presently, most physical examination tests have not been evaluated sufficiently enough to be confident in their ability to either confirm or rule out a PCL tear. The diagnostic accuracy of physical examination tests to assess the integrity of the PCL is largely unknown. There is a strong need for further research in this area. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3a.

  6. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Shigeyuki; Ariizumi, Mitsuko; Yamagishi, Tsuneo; Agata, Toshihiko; Tada, Shinpei; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects were 110 patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autografts who underwent clinical examination, MRI, and arthroscopy of the knee. T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in sagittal plane. Clinical findings were categorized into three groups: normal, borderline, and abnormal. The MRI appearances of the autografts were categorized into three types: straight continuous band (type I), interrupted band (type II) and generalized increased intensity band (type III). The clinical findings and MRI findings were compared with arthroscopic findings. Ninety-six percent of the type I showed no autograft tear on arthroscopy. In comparison with the clinical findings, MRI was found to be well correlated with arthroscopic findings. In conclusion, if the clinical findings are normal, patients are to be followed-up without MRI and arthroscopy. However, if clinical findings are either borderline or abnormal, MRI should be performed prior to arthroscopy. (author)

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of bell-hammer tear as an indirect sign of partial anterior cruciate ligament rupture on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Naouri, J F; Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Herman, S

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the bell-hammer sign in the diagnosis of partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee on MRI. A retrospective study was performed including all patients who underwent ACL reconstruction for partial or complete tears from 2008 to 2009. The diagnosis of partial or complete ACL tears was based on the appearance of the ligament bundles and the signal quality on MRI. On arthroscopy, which is considered the gold standard, each bundle was classified as normal, partially or completely torn depending on the extent of the rupture and the quality of the remaining fibres. The study included 312 patients, 83 women and 229 men (mean age 33.3 ± 19.6 years). A diagnosis of a tear was made in all patients on preoperative MRI. Arthroscopy did not show any normal ACL, 247/312 (79.2 %) complete tears and 65/312 (20.8%) partial tears, 50/65 (76.9%) on the anteromedial bundle (AM) and 15/65 (23.1%) the posterolateral bundle. The bell-hammer sign was found on MRI in 13/312 patients (4.5%). It involved 9/65 (13.8%) partial tears, all in the AM bundle, and 4/247 (1.6%) complete tears, significantly more frequent in cases of partial rupture (p hammer sign (sensitivity CI 95% = 23.1 ± 10%, specificity CI 95% = 95.9 ± 2.5%) and with the bell-hammer sign in 23/65 cases (sensitivity CI 95% = 35.4 ± 11%, specificity CI 95% = 93.9 ± 3%). The association of the bell-hammer sign with conventional radiological diagnostic criteria has improved diagnosis performance of MRI for partial tears but not significantly (ns). The most important interest of the bell-hammer sign in the day-to-day clinical work is to suggest partial tears on MRI. It aids making a diagnosis, but its absence does not exclude partial ACL rupture. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  8. Meniscal and cruciate ligaments tears diagnosed with MR imaging versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Kruczynski, J.; Bruszewski, J.

    1993-01-01

    MR studies of knee joints in 37 patients were performed. The clinical diagnostics was traumatic lesions of menisci or cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy of the knee joint was performed in 21 patients. MR showed meniscal lesion in 25 patients and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions in 18 patients. Arthroscopy showed meniscal lesions in 16 of 21 patients and ACL lesions in 11 of 21 patients. MR correlated with arthroscopy in 16 of examined menisci and 15 of 21 examined ACL. (author)

  9. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  10. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  11. Reconstruction of ACL Ligament rupture: results of 96 operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmasebi MN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL is one of the main knee stabilizing ligaments. Because of high incidence of ACL tearing especially in young athletes its reconstruction is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term results of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures using four strand hamstring auto graft and Bone patellar tendon autograph. "nMethods: The study group included 96 patients (3 female and 93 male with ACL teared who had been referred to our center in 5 years period (2002-2007. The subject which were Accessed in this study included meniscal injury concomitant chondral injury, determine the most common cause of ACL tearing, comparision of IKDC and lysholm score in all patients before and after surgery, and limitation of rang of motion of knee post operation. "nResults: Involvement was in the right knee in 38 patients and in the left knee in 58 patients. Mean age of patients was 27.6 years (19-48. Mean surgical delay was 18 month (1-77. The most common cause of tear was playing soccer. Meniscal injury was in 78 patients. (Medial meniscus in 63 patients, lateral meniscus in 29 patients Concommitent chondral injury was in 54 patients (56.25%. 68% of patients returned to preoperative functions sport activity. There was no limitation in extension and there was 6 patients limitation in flexion about 20º. In last visit of patients IKDS in class A and B was 96. "nConclusion: It is seem that arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL is a safe and good method in treatment of Knee stability. Use of IKDC and lysholm score for comparision of patients before and after surgery is helpful. The operation should be done early after injury. Reconstruction of ACL in older patients in the abscense of DJD is effective.

  12. Novel Insights into Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common sports injuries of the knee. ACL reconstruction has become, standard orthopaedic practice worldwide with an estimated 175,000 reconstructions per year in the United States.6 The ACL remains the most frequently studied

  13. Radiologic analysis of the medical collateral ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Che; Lee, Chang Jun; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung

    1979-01-01

    The medical collateral ligament rupture is the most common injury involving the knee joint ligaments. The ruptured medical collateral ligaments of 73 cases with clinical and surgical confirmations were radiologically analyzed. The results were obtained as follows: 1. The most risky age for tearing of the medical collateral ligament was third to fifth decades (50 cases of male and 23 of females). 2. The most common cause of the medical collateral ligament rupture was traffic accident (82.2%). 3. The mean distance of medial knee joint space was 7.9 ± 2.0 mm on the normal side and 13.7 ± 4.2 mm on the affected side. 4. The mean degree of knee joint space was 10.1 ± 2.5 on the normal side and 14.7 ± 3.8 on the affected side. 5. The fibula was the bone fractured most frequently in association with the medial collateral ligament rupture (30.6%).

  14. Subfailure injury of the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Yoldas, E; Oxland, T R; Crisco, J J

    1996-03-01

    Ligamentous injuries range in severity from a simple sprain to a complete rupture. Although sprains occur more frequently than complete failures, only a few studies have investigated the phenomena of these subfailure injuries. The purpose of our study was to document the changes in the load-deformation curve until the failure point, after the ligament has been subjected to an 80% subfailure stretch. Thirteen paired fresh rabbit bone-anterior cruciate ligament-bone preparations were used. One of the pairs (control) was stretched until failure; the other (experimental) was first stretched to 80% of the failure deformation of the control and then stretched to failure. Comparisons were made between the load-deformation curves of the experimental and control specimens. The nonlinear load-deformation curves were characterized by eight parameters: failure load (Ffail), failure deformation (Dfail), energy until failure (Efail), deformations measured at 5, 10, 25, and 50% of the failure load (D5, D10, D25, and D50, respectively), and stiffness measured at 50% of the failure force (K50). There were no significant differences in the values for Ffail, Dfail, and Efail between the experimental and control ligaments (p > 0.33). In contrast, the deformation values were all larger for the experimental than the control ligaments (p > 0.01). The deformations D5, D10, D25, and D50 (mean +/- SD) for the control were 0.36 +/- 0.13, 0.49 +/- 0.23, 0.81 +/- 0.35, and 1.23 +/- 0.41 mm. The corresponding deformations for the experimental ligaments were, respectively, 209, 186, 153, and 130% of the control values. K50 was also greater for the experimental ligament (125.0 +/- 41.7 N/mm compared with 108.7 +/- 31.4 N/mm, p < 0.03). These findings indicate that even though the strength of the ligament did not change due to a subfailure injury, the shape of the load-displacement curve, especially at low loads, was significantly altered. Under the dynamic in vivo loading conditions of daily

  15. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U

    1999-01-01

    We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000 and i...

  16. work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. ... Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and ... pain inside the knee were the most significant reason which affected ...

  17. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years. All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts. The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04 and during squat movement (p=0.01 in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73. CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  18. Postoperative evaluation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Measurements and abnormalities on radiographic and CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Choi, Yun Sun; KIm, Hyoung Seop; Choi, Nam Hong [Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a well-established procedure for repair of ACL injury. Despite improvement of surgical and rehabilitation techniques over the past decades, up to 25% of patients still fail to regain satisfactory function after an ACL reconstruction. With development of CT imaging techniques for reducing metal artifacts, multi-planar reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstruction, early post-operative imaging is increasingly being used to provide immediate feedback to surgeons regarding tunnel positioning, fixation, and device placement. Early post-operative radiography and CT imaging are easy to perform and serve as the baseline examinations for future reference.

  19. Extra-Articular Lateral Tenodesis for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego García-Germán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an extra-articular lateral tenodesis for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficient knee. A 46-year-old male patient sustained an ACL graft rupture after a motorcycle accident. He complained of rotational instability and giving-way episodes. His previous graft was fixed by an intra-articular femoral staple that was not possible to remove at the time of the ACL revision. A modified Lemaire procedure was then performed. He gained rotational stability and was able to resume his sporting activities. We believe that isolated extra-articular reconstructions may still have a role in selected indications including moderate-demand patients complaining of rotational instability after ACL graft failure.

  20. Extra-Articular Lateral Tenodesis for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Germán, Diego; Menéndez, Pablo; de la Cuadra, Pablo; Rodríguez-Arozena, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of an extra-articular lateral tenodesis for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient knee. A 46-year-old male patient sustained an ACL graft rupture after a motorcycle accident. He complained of rotational instability and giving-way episodes. His previous graft was fixed by an intra-articular femoral staple that was not possible to remove at the time of the ACL revision. A modified Lemaire procedure was then performed. He gained rotational stability and was able to resume his sporting activities. We believe that isolated extra-articular reconstructions may still have a role in selected indications including moderate-demand patients complaining of rotational instability after ACL graft failure. PMID:24369517

  1. Physiotherapy in patients with rupture LCA

    OpenAIRE

    Čížková, Karolína

    2012-01-01

    Author: Karolína Čížková Institution: Rehab clinic LF UK in Hradec Králové Topic of bachelor's thesis: Physiotherapy in patiens with rupture of ACL Supervisor: Mgr. Zuzana Hamarová Number of pages: 108 Number of annex: 11 Year of vindication 2012 Key words: ACL, knee, rupture of ACL, rehabilitation In general part of this bachelor's thesis is described anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics of the knee joint, mostly anterior cruciate ligament. It contents causes of injury of anterior cruciate ...

  2. Tissue engineering of ligaments: a comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eijk, F; Saris, D B F; Riesle, J; Willems, W J; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Verbout, A J; Dhert, W J A

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of ligaments. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of the anterior cruciate ligament. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), ACL, and skin fibroblasts were seeded onto a resorbable suture material [poly(L-lactide/glycolide) multifilaments] at five different seeding densities, and cultured for up to 12 days. All cell types tested attached to the suture material, proliferated, and synthesized extracellular matrix rich in collagen type I. On day 12 the scaffolds seeded with BMSCs showed the highest DNA content (p engineered ligament.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  4. 3-T MRI assessment of osteophyte formation in patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzer, Stephanie [Department of Radiology, Trauma Center Murnau, Murnau (Germany); Augat, Peter [Trauma Center Murnau and Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Biomechanics, Murnau (Germany); Atzwanger, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus [University Hospital Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    To define the number and distribution of osteophytes (OPs) in bilateral knee MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Bilateral knee MRIs of 20 patients with unilateral ACL rupture and reconstruction were retrospectively analyzed for OPs. OPs were graded following the KOSS (knee OA scoring system) classification and their compartmental distribution was assessed following the WORMS (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) classification. All examined knees revealed OPs. Knees with ACL rupture showed significant (p < 0.001) higher total numbers of OPs (mean 11.6; SD {+-} 4.4) than knees with intact ACL (mean 5.1; SD {+-} 2.3). Knees with ACL rupture showed increased OP formation in all knee compartments with predominance of marginal OPs in the lateral femorotibial compartment especially on the tibia. Our results show that after knee injury with ACL rupture and reconstruction, all knee compartments were involved in post-traumatic increase of OP formation. The most affected compartment was the lateral femorotibial compartment on the tibial side. (orig.)

  5. 3-T MRI assessment of osteophyte formation in patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, Stephanie; Augat, Peter; Atzwanger, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    To define the number and distribution of osteophytes (OPs) in bilateral knee MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Bilateral knee MRIs of 20 patients with unilateral ACL rupture and reconstruction were retrospectively analyzed for OPs. OPs were graded following the KOSS (knee OA scoring system) classification and their compartmental distribution was assessed following the WORMS (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) classification. All examined knees revealed OPs. Knees with ACL rupture showed significant (p < 0.001) higher total numbers of OPs (mean 11.6; SD ± 4.4) than knees with intact ACL (mean 5.1; SD ± 2.3). Knees with ACL rupture showed increased OP formation in all knee compartments with predominance of marginal OPs in the lateral femorotibial compartment especially on the tibia. Our results show that after knee injury with ACL rupture and reconstruction, all knee compartments were involved in post-traumatic increase of OP formation. The most affected compartment was the lateral femorotibial compartment on the tibial side. (orig.)

  6. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus late...

  7. Manual Khalifa Therapy Improves Functional and Morphological Outcome of Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture in the Knee: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ofner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is a high incidence injury usually treated surgically. According to common knowledge, it does not heal spontaneously, although some claim the opposite. Regeneration therapy by Khalifa was developed for injuries of the musculoskeletal system by using specific pressure to the skin. This randomized, controlled, observer-blinded, multicentre study was performed to validate this assumption. Thirty patients with complete ACL rupture, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI verified, were included. Study examinations (e.g., international knee documentation committee (IKDC score were performed at inclusion (t0. Patients were randomized to receive either standardised physiotherapy (ST or additionally 1 hour of Khalifa therapy at the first session (STK. Twenty-four hours later, study examinations were performed again (t1. Three months later control MRI and follow-up examinations were performed (t2. Initial status was comparable between both groups. There was a highly significant difference of mean IKDC score results at t1 and t2. After 3 months, 47% of the STK patients, but no ST patient, demonstrated an end-to-end homogeneous ACL in MRI. Clinical and physical examinations were significantly different in t1 and t2. ACL healing can be improved with manual therapy. Physical activity can be performed without pain and nearly normal range of motion after one treatment of specific pressure.

  8. Incidence and treatment of intra-articular lesions associated with anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Nistor, Dan; Buescu, Cristian; Pojar, Adina; Lucaciu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to retrospectively review the patients admitted and treated in the "Alexandru Rădulescu" Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic, Cluj-Napoca for an anterior cruciate ligament tear over a 2-year period and document the intra-articular lesions found at arthroscopy as well as the treatment used for these associated lesions. The case records of 88 patients operated for anterior cruciate ligament tear over a period of 2 years were reviewed. There were 67 males and 21 females with a mean age of 28.9 years, ranging from 14 to 49 years. After recording the patient demographics, we documented all the intra-articular lesions found during knee arthroscopy, as well as all procedures undertaken concomitant with the ACL reconstruction. 50 of the 88 patients (56.8%) had associated intra-articular lesions at the time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The most common injury found was a meniscus tear, 48 patients (54.5%) had a meniscal pathology at the time of ligament reconstruction, medial meniscus being the most frequent injured one, found in 37 patients. Meniscectomy and meniscus suture were the procedures performed for these lesions, meniscectomy being more frequent. Chondral defects were the next associated injuries found with an incidence of 15.9% of the cases. The medial side of the knee was the most common site of chondral pathology. ACL tears are frequently associated with other intra-articular lesions, especially medial meniscus tears and chondral defects affecting the medial compartment. Such pathology most often needs surgical attention during the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  9. Hip joint biomechanics in those with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, E; Zeni, J A; Axe, M J; Snyder-Mackler, L

    2017-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury results in altered kinematics and kinetics in the knee and hip joints that persist despite surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation. Abnormal movement patterns and a history of osteoarthritis are risk factors for articular cartilage degeneration in additional joints. The purpose of this study was to determine if hip joint biomechanics early after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction differ between patients with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis 5years after reconstruction. The study's rationale was that individuals who develop knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury may also demonstrate large alterations in hip joint biomechanics. Nineteen athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury completed standard gait analysis before (baseline) and after (post-training) extended pre-operative rehabilitation and at 6months, 1year, and 2years after reconstruction. Weightbearing knee radiographs were completed 5years after reconstruction to identify medial compartment osteoarthritis. Five of 19 patients had knee osteoarthritis at 5years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patients with knee osteoarthritis at 5years walked with smaller sagittal plane hip angles (P: 0.043) and lower sagittal (P: 0.021) and frontal plane (P: 0.042) external hip moments in the injured limb before and after reconstruction compared to those without knee osteoarthritis. The current findings suggest hip joint biomechanics may be altered in patients who develop post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Further study is needed to confirm whether the risk of non-traumatic hip pathology is increased after anterior cruciate ligament injury and if hip joint biomechanics influence its development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rupture of the meniscofibular ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyanli Oguz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The meniscofibular ligament is an anatomically defined ligament of the knee in humans. However, there are no data regarding the prognosis following injury to this ligament. Our case was a 42-year-old man who presented at our clinic with pain of the lateral side of his left knee. MRI of his left knee revealed the rupture of the meniscofibular ligament. The mechanism of injury was consistent with anatomical and mechanical studies of the meniscofibular ligament. The patient was treated conservatively for 1 year, but his pain did not resolve completely. A case series of patients with the same injury is required to establish an effective treatment for this rare injury.

  11. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyo...

  12. Acute and chronic tears of anterior cruciate ligament : role of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Jee, Won Hee; Im, Soo A; Chun, Ho Jong; Jung, Hyun Seouk; Kim, Soo Young; Kwon, Tae An; Song, Sun Wha; Choi, Kyu Ho

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in differentiating acute from chronic ligament tears of anterior cruciate ligament. Materials and Methods : MR images of 22 patients with arthroscopically proven complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament were retrospectively reviewed. The interval between injury and MR examination was one day to seven years. When ligament tear was detected on MR image with three months of injury, the case was considered acute;if detected after three months had elapsed, it was judged to be chronic. The extent of contrast enhancement was graded as 1, 2 or 3; grade 1, enhancement was confined to the expected ligament region; grade 2, enhancement extended to the joint capsule; grade 3, enhancement extended beyond the joint capsule. The grades of contrast enhancement correlated with the acute and chronic stages of ligament tears. Associated bone bruise and/or adjacent soft tissue edema were also evaluated. Results : Among 15 patients with acute ligament tear, nine (60%) showed grade 3 enhancement; among seven in whom tearing was chronic, four (57%) showed grade 1 enhancement. Bone bruising was present in 100% of acute tears (15/15) and 29 % of chronic tears (2/7). Soft tissue edema was associated in 87% of acute tears (13/15) and 29% of chronic tears(2/7). Conclusion : Fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging could help differentiate acute from chronic tears of anterior cruciate ligament, as well as bone bruising and tissue edema

  13. Correlation of intra-articular osseous measurements with posterior cruciate ligament length on MRI scans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orakzai, S H

    2010-01-01

    Six patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture, based on a positive posterior drawer test, had a normal appearance of the PCL on an MRI scan. It is postulated that the PCL had been ruptured but healed in a lengthened state. 12 volunteers with no history of knee trauma underwent an MRI scan of the knee. In this control group (n = 12), there was a close correlation between the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane and the PCL length, with a ratio of 2:1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.817-2.095). In the clinically abnormal group (n = 6), the ratio was 1.49:1 (95% CI = 1.206-1.782) (p< 0.0005). In conclusion, the ratio of the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane to the PCL length is a useful index for diagnosing PCL attenuation and lengthening in the presence of a normal morphological MR appearance.

  14. Epiphyseal osteochondroma of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekofsky, K M; Scott, W N; Fielding, J W

    1979-01-01

    An 8-year-old Black boy complained of pain, swelling, and a decreased range of motion in the knee. One arthrotomy operation was reported to show a normal knee joint. Six months later, a second arthrotomy demonstrated an osteochondroma growing from the epiphysis into the anterior cruciate ligament. Epiphyseal osteochondroma should be added to the working differential diagnosis on children with effusion and decrease of knee motion.

  15. Quadriceps rate of torque development and disability in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Hope C; Troy Blackburn, J; Ryan, Eric D; Luc-Harkey, Brittney A; Harkey, Matthew S; Padua, Darin A; Pietrosimone, Brian

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine associations between self-reported function (International Knee Documentation Committee Index), isometric quadriceps strength and rate of torque development in individuals with a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Forty-one individuals [31% male, BMI mean 25 (SD 4) kg/m 2 , months post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction mean 49 (SD 40)] completed the self-reported function and isometric quadriceps function testing. Rate of torque development was assessed at 0-100ms (early), 100-200ms (late) ms, and peak following the onset of contraction. Associations were examined between rate of torque development, strength, and self-reported function. Linear regression was used to determine the unique amount of variance explained by the combination of rate of torque development and strength. Higher rate of torque development 100-200ms is weakly associated with higher self-reported function in individuals with a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (r=0.274, p=0.091); however, rate of torque development 100-200ms does not predict a significant amount of variance in self-reported function after accounting for strength (ΔR 2 =0.003, P=0.721). Quadriceps strength has a greater influence on self-reported function compared to rate of torque development in individuals with an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with time from surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combining a joint health supplement with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. An exploratory controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo M. Martini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR is a very common pathology. Surgical stabilization is the first choice treatment, although it does not fully eliminate the increased risk of osteoarthritis. This preliminary study was carried out to explore whether a newly formulated joint health supplement would benefit metabolic, clinical and radiographic changes in dogs with CrCLR surgically treated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO. Besides chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine hydrochloride, the studied supplement contained anti-inflammatory and antioxidant ingredients, the main ones being N-palmitoyl-D-glucosamine (Glupamid® and quercetin. It was thus intended to target not only chondrodegenerative components of osteoarthritis, but also post-injury inflammatory response and oxidative stress of joint tissues. Thirteen dogs underwent TPLO and were randomly allocated to treatment (n = 6 and control groups (n = 7, the former receiving the joint supplement for 90 days. Lameness and radiographic osteoarthritis changes were scored before (i.e., baseline and at 30 and 90 days post-surgery. Synovial fluid samples were collected from injured stifles at the same time points. Levels of representative metabolites were measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a blinded fashion. In the metabolomic analysis, special attention was paid to lactate, due to its emerging recognition as a key marker of inflammation. In the last time period (from the 30th to the 90th day, lameness improved by a factor of 2.3 compared to control dogs. No significant difference was observed in the radiographic osteoarthritis score between groups. In the first postoperative month, lactate and creatine levels significantly dropped in treated compared to control dogs. Compared to surgery alone, combining the joint supplement with TPLO resulted in a trend to a better clinical outcome in the later time interval but did not influence

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS. There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario.

  18. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyun Jun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Sang Gook [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  19. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... and the sensory threshold was determined. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and inhibitory reflexes could be elicited from PCL in the quadriceps during active extension and in the hamstrings muscles during active flexion in all patients. Subsequently the ACL re...... amplitudes necessary to elicit reflexes from the ACL re-constructions were 2, 9 times higher than amplitudes that elicited reflexes from the PCL. Sensation and afferent reflex activity required a much stronger stimulus in the ACL graft compared to normal PCL. We suggest that the reason...

  20. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  1. The concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, M.; Muller, B. [=Bart; Murawski, C. D.; van Eck, C. F.; Fu, F. H.

    2014-01-01

    To describe the concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The PubMed/Medline database was searched using keywords pertaining to ACL reconstruction. Relevant articles were reviewed in order to summarize important concepts of individualized surgery in ACL

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Piyush; Horriat, Saman; Anand, Bobby S

    2018-06-15

    This article provides a detailed narrative review on the history and current concepts surrounding ligamentous repair techniques in athletic patients. In particular, we will focus on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as a case study in ligament injury and ligamentous repair techniques. PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases for papers relating to primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were searched by all participating authors. All relevant historical papers were included for analysis. Additional searches of the same databases were made for papers relating to biological enhancement of ligament healing. The poor capacity of the ACL to heal is one of the main reasons why the current gold standard surgical treatment for an ACL injury in an athletic patient is ACL reconstruction with autograft from either the hamstrings or patella tendon. It is hypothesised that by preserving and repairing native tissues and negating the need for autograft that primary ACL repair may represent a key step change in the treatment of ACL injuries. The history of primary ACL repair will be discussed and the circumstances that led to the near-abandonment of primary ACL repair techniques will be reviewed. There has been a recent resurgence in interest with regards to primary ACL repair. Improvements in imaging now allow for identification of tear location, with femoral-sided injuries, being more suitable for repair. We will discuss in details strategies for improving the mechanical and biological environment in order to allow primary healing to occur. In particular, we will explain mechanical supplementation such as Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation and Dynamic Intraligamentary Stabilisation techniques. These are novel techniques that aim to protect the primary repair by providing a stabilising construct that connects the femur and the tibia, thus bridging the repair. In addition, biological supplementation is being investigated as an adjunct and we will

  3. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulas, Anthony S.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    Background: Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells have high chondrogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Hachioji, Motomi; Saiga, Kenta; Takata, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cells have a character different from medial collateral ligament (MCL)-derived cells. However, the critical difference between ACL and MCL is still unclear in their healing potential and cellular response. The objective of this study was to investigate the mesenchymal differentiation property of each ligament-derived cell. Both ligament-derived cells differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In chondrogenesis, ACL-derived cells had the higher chondrogenic property than MCL-derived cells. The chondrogenic marker genes, Sox9 and alpha1(II) collagen (Col2a1), were induced faster in ACL-derived pellets than in MCL-derived pellets. Sox9 expression preceded the increase of Col2a1 in both pellet-cultured cells. However, the expression level of Sox9 and a ligament/tendon transcription factor Scleraxis did not parallel the increase of Col2a1 expression along with chondrogenic induction. The present study demonstrates that the balance between Sox9 and Scleraxis have an important role in the chondrogenic differentiation of ligament-derived cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo structural and cellular remodeling of engineered bone-ligament-bone constructs used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida, Shelby E; VanDusen, Keith W; Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Schlientz, Aleesa J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures rank among the most prevalent and costly sports-related injuries. Current tendon grafts used for ACL reconstruction are limited by suboptimal biomechanical properties. We have addressed these issues by engineering multiphasic bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs that develop structural and mechanical properties similar to native ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute remodeling process that occurs as the BLB grafts advance toward the adult ligament phenotype in vivo. Thus, we implanted BLB constructs fabricated from male cells into female host sheep and allowed 3, 7, 14, or 28 days (n = 4 at each time point) for recovery. To address whether or not graft-derived cells were even necessary, a subset of BLB constructs (n = 3) were acellularized, implanted, and allowed 28 days for recovery. At each recovery time point, the following histological analyses were performed: picrosirius red staining to assess collagen alignment and immunohistochemistry to assess both graft development and host immune response. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, performed on every explanted BLB, was used to detect the presence of graft-derived male cells remaining in the constructs and/or migration into surrounding host tissue. The analysis of the PCR and histology samples revealed a rapid migration of host-derived macrophages and neutrophils into the graft at 3 days, followed by increased collagen density and alignment, vascularization, innervation, and near complete repopulation of the graft with host cells within 28 days. This study provides a greater understanding of the processes of ligament regeneration in our BLB constructs as they remodel toward the adult ligament phenotype.

  6. Expression of modulators of extracellular matrix structure after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslauer, Carla M; Proffen, Benedikt L; Johnson, Victor M; Murray, Martha M

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) to heal after injury declines within the first 2 weeks after ACL rupture. To begin to explore the mechanism behind this finding, we quantified the expression of genes for collagen I and III, decorin, tenascin-C, and alpha smooth muscle actin, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -13 gene expression within multiple tissues of the knee joint after ACL injury in a large animal model over a 2-week postinjury period. Gene expression of collagen I and III, decorin, and MMP-1 was highest in the synovium, whereas the highest MMP-13 gene expression levels were found in the ACL. The gene expression for collagen and decorin increased over the 2 weeks to levels approaching that in the ligament and synovium; however, no significant increase in either of the MMPs was found in the provisional scaffold. This suggests that although the ACL and synovium up-regulate both anabolic and catabolic factors, the provisional scaffold is primarily anabolic in function. The relative lack of provisional scaffold formation within the joint environment may thus be one of the key reasons for ACL degradation after injury. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Henrique Frauendorf Cenni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  8. Ruptura do ligamento cruzado em cães: estudo retrospectivo da reconstituição com fascia lata Managment of cruciate ligament rupture in dogs: a retrospective study fascia lata autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Iamaguti

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo de 35 casos de ruptura de ligamento cruzado atendidos pelo Serviço de Cirurgia de Pequenos Animais da FMVZ-UNESP-Campus de Botucatu, no período janeiro de 1991 a junho de 1997. Os cães foram submetidos à técnica de PAATSAMA (1952, modificada para reconstituição do ligamento cruzado, que consistiu na passagem do retalho de fascia lata através da articulação do joelho e fixação no côndilo medial da tíbia e epicôndilo medial do fêmur. Pelos resultados obtidos, concluiu-se que esta técnica permite boa estabilização das superfícies articulares, com trans e pós operatório sem complicações, e permite recuperação completa da capacidade funcional do membro afetado.This is a retrospectivo study of 35 cases of cruciate ligament rupture, submitted to Small Animal Surgery Service at FMVZ - UNESP - Compus de Botucatu, from January, 1991 to June, 1997. The dogs underwent a modifica techniquefor reconstitution of the cruciate ligament. A flap of fascia lata was placed through the stifle joint andfixed at the medial condyle ofthe tíbia and the medial condyle of the femur. Results showed that this technique was simple and satisfactory, with no trans and post operative complications. The dogs totally recovered the function of the limbs in ali cases submitted to surgery.

  9. [Simultaneous Traumatic Rupture of Patellar Ligament and Contralateral Rupture of Quadriceps Femoris Muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladký, V; Havlas, V

    2017-01-01

    Our paper presents a unique case of a 64-year-old patient after a fall, treated with oral antidiabetic drugs for type II diabetes mellitus. Following a series of examinations, a bilateral injury was diagnosed - patellar ligament tear on the right side and rupture of quadriceps femoris muscle on the left side. It is a rare injury, complicated by simultaneous involvement of both knee joints. The used therapy consisted of a bilateral surgery followed by gradual verticalisation, first with the support of a walking frame and later with the use of forearm crutches. During the final examination, the patient demonstrated full flexion at both knees, while an extension deficit of approx. 5 degrees was still present on the left side. The right knee X-ray showed a proper position of the patella after the removal of temporary tension band wire. Although the clinical results of operative treatment of both the patellar ligament rupture and rupture of quadriceps femoris muscle are in most cases good, early operative treatment, proper technique and post-operative rehabilitation are a prerequisite for success. Key words: knee injuries, patellar ligament, quadriceps muscle, rupture.

  10. Finite Element Modelling of a Novel Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repairing Device

    OpenAIRE

    A.Vairis; M.Petousis; N.Vidakis; G.Stefanoudakis; B.Kandyla

    2014-01-01

    The knee anterior cruciate ligament which connects the femur to the tibia is often torn during sudden twisting motions resulting in knee instability with surgery being an effective treatment where the torn ligament is replaced with a graft. This study provides qualitative stress information on a restored knee which has been repaired using a novel device. This device has been designed to reduce graft damage and to minimize post-surgery complications. The device as well as the intac...

  11. The use of hamstring tendon graft for the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (benefi ts, problems and their solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Slastinin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for optimal graft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is going on. The donor site morbidity remains one of the major problems when using autografts. The article provides an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of using the hamstring tendon autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and the ways of solving the problems associated with using such types of grafts.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the posterior cruciate ligament in flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, William; Smithers, Troy; Harris, Craig; du Moulin, William; Molnar, Robert

    2018-06-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries of the knee are common and sometimes difficult to diagnose. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed using standard orthogonal plane views, is the investigation of choice. It can be particularly difficult to differentiate acute partial and complete tears and identify elongation of chronic healed tears. The aim of the paper is to describe a new method of positioning the patient with the knee flexed at 90°, allowing the PCL to be visualised in a position of greatest length and tension which may assist in differentiating and identifying these injuries. Four symptomatic patients with suspected PCL injuries, two acute and two chronic, were MRI scanned using a routine protocol with the knee in extension before performing oblique sagittal fast spin-echo (FSE) proton-density (PD) sequences with the knee positioned in 90° of flexion. The appearance of the PCLs were then qualitatively assessed. MRI scanning with the knee in flexion identified more extensive PCL injury than standard imaging. In the two patients with acute injuries, partial tears on the standard orthogonal plane views were found to be complete ruptures. In the two patients with chronic injuries, elongation of the PCL not identifiable on the standard orthogonal plane views was apparent. MRI scanning of the PCL with the knee flexed at 90° may help in differentiating partial and complete ruptures of the PCL and identifying elongation of the PCL in chronic injuries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Telomere length of anterior crucial ligament after rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsot, Elodie; Langberg, Henning; Krogsgaard, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    The regeneration of ligaments following injury is a slow process compared to the healing of many other tissues and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the proliferative potential of ligaments by assessing telomere length within three distinct parts...... of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) obtained during ACL reconstruction: the macroscopically injured proximal part and macroscopically noninjured mid- and distal portions in eight subjects (age 28 ± 8 years). The mean telomere length in ACL was within normal range of values usually reported for other...... tissues indicating that the endogenous machinery responsible for the proliferative potential of ligament is not implicated in its poor healing capacity. The three ACL parts showed similar mean TRF lengths (distal part: 11.5 ± 0.8 kbp, mid-portion: 11.8 ± 1.2 kbp, proximal part: 11.9 ± 1.6 kbp...

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear: Reliability of MR Imaging to Predict Stability after Conservative Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Ahn, Joong Mo; Yoon, Young Cheol; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Yoo, So Young; Kim, Seon Woo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the reliability of MR imaging to predict the stability of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after complete recovery of the ligament's continuity. Twenty patients with 20 knee injuries (13 males and 7 females; age range, 20 54) were enrolled in the study. The inclusion criteria were a positive history of acute trauma, diagnosis of the ACL tear by both the physical examination and the MR imaging at the initial presentation, conservative treatment, complete recovery of the continuity of the ligament on the follow up (FU) MR images and availability of the KT-2000 measurements. Two radiologists, who worked in consensus, graded the MR findings with using a 3-point system for the signal intensity, sharpness, straightness and the thickness of the healed ligament. The insufficiency of ACL was categorized into three groups according to the KT-2000 measurements. The statistic correlations between the grades of the MR findings and the degrees of ACL insufficiency were analyzed using the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (p < 0.05). The p-values for each category of the MR findings according to the different groups of the KT-2000 measurements were 0.9180 for the MR signal intensity, 1.0000 for sharpness, 0.5038 for straightness and 0.2950 for thickness of the ACL. The MR findings were not significantly different between the different KT-2000 groups. MR imaging itself is not a reliable examination to predict stability of the ACL rupture outcome, even when the MR images show an intact appearance of the ACL.

  15. Outcomes in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Mihai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Improving the outcomes in reconstructive surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL requires a rigorous and permanent assessment of specific parameters. Therefore, we can increase the degree of reproducibility of the procedure and identify particular aspects in order to achieve an adequate and individualized therapeutic approach for each case. In order to accomplish this goal, the use of complex means (scores of quantifying results is required. That includes objective means of verifying the parameters in knee surgery, and a subjective evaluation of the patient in order to compare the results.

  16. Quadriceps Strength and Endurance After Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tears Versus Matched Group With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Han, Seung-Beom; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Lee, Seok-Joo; Suh, Dong-Won; Jeong, Hye-Jin

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the preoperative strengths and endurances of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) versus posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and endurance were compared between 20 prospectively enrolled patients with isolated PCL tears and a retrospective, matched control group of 20 patients with isolated ACL tears. The maximal torque (60°/s) and total work (180°/s) of the quadriceps and hamstring were evaluated with an isokinetic testing device. Total work (1,094.4 ± 505.8 J v 797.5 ± 332.7 J, P = .035) and peak torque (129.9 ± 56.2 N ∙ m v 98.2 ± 37.4 N ∙ m, P = .046) of the quadriceps muscle on the involved side were higher in the PCL tear group than in the ACL tear group. However, there were no significant differences between the PCL tear group and ACL tear group in hamstring muscle strength (45.8 ± 42.3 N ∙ m and 46.0 ± 24.4 N ∙ m, respectively; P = .940) and endurance (429.3 ± 238.9 J and 382.4 ± 256.1 J, respectively; P = .574) on the involved side. The strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle of the injured limb were greater after PCL tears than after ACL tears. However, there were no significant between-group differences in hamstring muscle strength and endurance on the involved side. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: knee joint kinematics in 10 injury situations from female team handball and basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Shima, Yosuke; Iwasa, Junji; Myklebust, Grethe; Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2010-11-01

    The mechanism for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is still a matter of controversy. Video analysis of injury tapes is the only method available to extract biomechanical information from actual anterior cruciate ligament injury cases. This article describes 3-dimensional knee joint kinematics in anterior cruciate ligament injury situations using a model-based image-matching technique. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Ten anterior cruciate ligament injury video sequences from women's handball and basketball were analyzed using the model-based image-matching method. The mean knee flexion angle among the 10 cases was 23° (range, 11°-30°) at initial contact (IC) and had increased by 24° (95% confidence interval [CI], 19°-29°) within the following 40 milliseconds. The mean valgus angle was neutral (range, -2° to 3°) at IC, but had increased by 12° (95% CI, 10°-13°) 40 milliseconds later. The knee was externally rotated 5° (range, -5° to 12°) at IC, but rotated internally by 8° (95% CI, 2°-14°) during the first 40 milliseconds, followed by external rotation of 17° (95% CI, 13°-22°). The mean peak vertical ground-reaction force was 3.2 times body weight (95% CI, 2.7-3.7), and occurred at 40 milliseconds after IC (range, 0-83). Based on when the sudden changes in joint angular motion and the peak vertical ground-reaction force occurred, it is likely that the anterior cruciate ligament injury occurred approximately 40 milliseconds after IC. The kinematic patterns were surprisingly consistent among the 10 cases. All players had immediate valgus motion within 40 milliseconds after IC. Moreover, the tibia rotated internally during the first 40 milliseconds and then external rotation was observed, possibly after the anterior cruciate ligament had torn. These results suggest that valgus loading is a contributing factor in the anterior cruciate ligament injury mechanism and that internal tibial rotation is coupled with valgus motion. Prevention

  18. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait deviations in individuals with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shiek Abdullah; Button, Kate; Simic, Milena; Van Deursen, Robert; Pappas, Evangelos

    2016-06-01

    Altered joint motion that occurs in people with an anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee is proposed to play a role in the initiation of knee osteoarthritis, however, the exact mechanism is poorly understood. Although several studies have investigated gait deviations in individuals with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee in the frontal and transverse planes, no systematic review has summarized the kinematic and kinetic deviations in these two planes. We searched five electronic databases from inception to 14th October 2013, with key words related to anterior cruciate ligament, biomechanics and gait, and limited to human studies only. Two independent reviewers assessed eligibility based on predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria and methodological quality was evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement checklist. We identified 16 studies, totaling 183 subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee and 211 healthy subjects. Due to the variability in reported outcomes, we could only perform meta-analysis for 13 sagittal plane outcomes. The only significant finding from our meta-analysis showed that individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee demonstrated a significantly greater external hip flexor angular impulse compared to control (P=0.03). No consensus about what constitutes a typical walking pattern in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee can be made, nor can conclusions be derived to explain if gait deviations in the frontal and transverse plane contributed to the development of the knee osteoarthritis among this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Balance index score as a predictive factor for lower sports results or anterior cruciate ligament knee injuries in Croatian female athletes--preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke; Ravlić-Gulan, Jagoda; Gulan, Gordan; Matovinović, Damir

    2007-03-01

    Female athletes participating in high-risk sports suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee injury at a 4- to 6-fold greater rate than do male athletes. ACL injuries result either from contact mechanisms or from certain unexplained non-contact mechanisms occurring during daily professional sports activities. The occurrence of non-contact injuries points to the existence of certain factors intrinsic to the knee that can lead to ACL rupture. When knee joint movement overcomes the static and the dynamic constraint systems, non-contact ACL injury may occur. Certain recent results suggest that balance and neuromuscular control play a central role in knee joint stability, protection and prevention of ACL injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate balance neuromuscular skills in healthy Croatian female athletes by measuring their balance index score, as well as to estimate a possible correlation between their balance index score and balance effectiveness. This study is conducted in an effort to reduce the risk of future injuries and thus prevent female athletes from withdrawing from sports prematurely. We analysed fifty-two female athletes in the high-risk sports of handball and volleyball, measuring for their static and dynamic balance index scores, using the Sport KAT 2000 testing system. This method may be used to monitor balance and coordination systems and may help to develop simpler measurements of neuromuscular control, which can be used to estimate risk predictors in athletes who withdraw from sports due to lower sports results or ruptured anterior cruciate ligament and to direct female athletes to more effective, targeted preventive interventions. The tested Croatian female athletes with lower sports results and ACL knee injury incurred after the testing were found to have a higher balance index score compared to healthy athletes. We therefore suggest that a higher balance index score can be used as an effective risk predictor for lower sports results

  20. Isokinetic evaluation of internal/external tibial rotation strength after the use of hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Tanya; Forwell, Lorie; Litchfield, Robert; Kirkley, Alexandra; Amendola, Ned; Fowler, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of the knee after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the use of the semitendinosus and gracilis (hamstring) autografts has primarily focused on flexion and extension strength. The semitendinosus and gracilis muscles contribute to internal tibial rotation, and it has been suggested that harvest of these tendons for the purpose of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction contributes to internal tibial rotation weakness. Internal tibial rotation strength may be affected by the semitendinosus and gracilis harvest after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Prospective evaluation of internal and external tibial rotation strength. Inclusion criteria for subjects (N = 30): unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at least 2 years previously, a stable anterior cruciate ligament (problems after initial knee reconstruction, a normal contralateral knee, and the ability to comply with the testing protocol. In an attempt to minimize unwanted subtalar joint motion, subjects were immobilized using an ankle brace and tested at angular velocities of 60 degrees /s, 120 degrees /s, and 180 degrees /s at a knee flexion angle of 90 degrees . The mean peak torque measurements for internal rotation strength of the operative limb (60 degrees /s, 17.4 +/- 4.5 ft-lb; 120 degrees /s, 13.9 +/- 3.3 ft-lb; 180 degrees /s, 11.6 +/- 3.0 ft-lb) were statistically different compared to the nonoperated limb (60 degrees /s, 20.5 +/- 4.7 ft-lb; 120 degrees /s, 15.9 +/- 3.8 ft-lb; 180 degrees /s, 13.4 +/- 3.8 ft-lb) at 60 degrees /s (P = .012), 120 degrees /s (P = .036), and 180 degrees /s (P = .045). The nonoperative limb demonstrated greater strength at all speeds. The mean torque measurements for external rotation were statistically similar when compared to the nonoperated limb at all angular velocities. We have shown through our study that patients who undergo surgical intervention to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament with the use of autogenous

  1. Long-term functional outcome after surgical repair of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölsä, Sari H; Hyytiäinen, Heli K; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi M

    2014-11-19

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is a very common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Few studies, using objective and validated outcome evaluation methods, have been published to evaluate long-term (>1 year) outcome after CCL repair. A group of 47 dogs with CCL rupture treated with intracapsular, extracapsular, and osteotomy techniques, and 21 healthy control dogs were enrolled in this study. To evaluate long-term surgical outcome, at a minimum of 1.5 years after unilateral CCL surgery, force plate, orthopedic, radiographic, and physiotherapeutic examinations, including evaluation of active range of motion (AROM), symmetry of thrust from the ground, symmetry of muscle mass, and static weight bearing (SWB) of pelvic limbs, and goniometry of the stifle and tarsal joints, were done. At a mean of 2.8 ± 0.9 years after surgery, no significant differences were found in average ground reaction forces or SWB between the surgically treated and control dog limbs, when dogs with no other orthopedic findings were included (n = 21). However, in surgically treated limbs, approximately 30% of the dogs had decreased static or dynamic weight bearing when symmetry of weight bearing was evaluated, 40-50% of dogs showed limitations of AROM in sitting position, and two-thirds of dogs had weakness in thrust from the ground. The stifle joint extension angles were lower (P <0.001) and flexion angles higher (P <0.001) in surgically treated than in contralateral joints, when dogs with no contralateral stifle problems were included (n = 33). In dogs treated using the intracapsular technique, the distribution percentage per limb of peak vertical force (DPVF) in surgically treated limbs was significantly lower than in dogs treated with osteotomy techniques (P =0.044). The average long-term dynamic and static weight bearing of the surgically treated limbs returned to the level of healthy limbs. However, extension and flexion angles of the surgically treated stifles

  2. The possible role of the tibial plateau angle for the severity of osteoarthritis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Y.; Hara, Y.; Ochi, H.; Nezu, Y.; Harada, Y.; Yogo, T.; Orima, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine factors correlated with the severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) scoring in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR). Three radiographs of stifle joints (craniocaudal, mediolateral, and mediolateral radiograph with 90 degree flexion of the stifle and tarsal joints) were obtained from 36 dogs with CrCLR (Clinical group) and from 22 dogs without stifle joint disease (Control group). Information about these dogs was collected from the owners and from medical records. Radiographic OA scores in each dog in the clinical group were determined from radiographs using a numeric grading system previously reported. The tibial plateau angle (TPA) in each dog in both groups was measured on mediolateral radiographs with 90 degree flexion of the stifle and tarsal joints. The Mann-Whitney's U test was used for comparing variables between the clinical group and the control group, and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for evaluating correlations between radiographic OA scores and variables in the clinical group. No significant differences were detected between the clinical group and the control group for any of the variables. There were two positive correlations; one between the radiographic OA score and TPA (r=0.395, p=0.014); and the other between body weight and OA score (r=0.399, p=0.013) in the clinical group. Our results indicate that body weight and TPA could affect the severity of the radiographic OA score in dogs with CrCLR

  3. Comparative study on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: determination of isometric points with and without navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio J. Angelini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot. An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1 posterior cruciate ligament, 2 anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3 medial tibial spine; 4 distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5 femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6 variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments.

  4. Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments: a series of 31 cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Yongtao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A case series for ganglion cyst of the cruciate ligament with MRI findings, clinical presentation, and management options along with review of literature is presented. Methods Of 8663 consecutive patients referred for knee MR imaging, 31 were diagnosed with ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments, including 21 men and 10 women of ages 12 to 73 years (mean: 37. A review of charts revealed that knee pain was the chief complaint in all cases. Arthroscopic debridement of ganglion cyst was performed in 11 patients. Results MRI proved to be a valuable tool in diagnosing and deciding management of these cases. All 11 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment were symptom-free on a minimum follow-of one year. Conclusion Cyst formation associated with cruciate ligament of the knee is an infrequent cause of knee pain. MR imaging was important in confirming the cyst lesions and provided useful information prior to arthroscopy. Arthroscopic debridement of ganglion cyst produced excellent outcome without recurrence. This study describes the pertinent MRI and intraoperative findings of ganglion cyst.

  5. Dynamic restraint capacity of the hamstring muscles has important functional implications after anterior cruciate ligament injury and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Adam L; Creaby, Mark W; Newton, Robert U; Steele, Julie R

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between knee functionality of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) patients and hamstring antagonist torque generated during resisted knee extension. Cross-sectional. Laboratory based. Male ACLD subjects (n=10) (18-35 y) and 27 matched males who had undergone ACLR (14 patella tendon [PT] grafts and 13 combined semitendinosus/gracilis tendon grafts). Not applicable. Knee functionality was rated (0- to 100-point scale) by using the Cincinnati Knee Rating System. Using electromyography data from the semitendinosus (ST) and biceps femoris muscles, we created a mathematical model to estimate the opposing torque generated by the hamstrings during isokinetic knee extension in 10 degrees intervals from 80 degrees to 10 degrees knee flexion. Pearson product-moment correlations revealed that more functional ACLD subjects generated significantly (Phamstring antagonist torque throughout knee extension. In contrast, more functional PT subjects produced significantly lower hamstring antagonist torque at 80 degrees to 70 degrees knee flexion, whereas no significant associations were found between hamstring antagonist torque and knee functionality for the ST/gracilis tendon subjects. An increased hamstring antagonist torque generated by the more functional ACLD subjects, reflective of increased hamstring contractile force, is thought to represent a protective mechanism to compensate for mechanical instability. The restoration of anterior knee stability through ACLR negates the need for augmented hamstring antagonist torque.

  6. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  7. Arthrographic diagnosis of ruptured calcaneofibular ligament. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuust, M.

    1980-01-01

    A new projection, oblique axial, is recommended for the arthrography of the acute sprained ankle for the correct diagnosis of a ruptured calcaneofibular ligament. Its value is experimentally confirmed. (Auth.)

  8. Lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture associated with acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, Randy J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture, with or without related acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration. This study consisted of a prospective imaging analysis of consecutive 100 MRI studies in adult patients (mean age 56 years) presenting with low back pain. Alterations from the normal in the inter- and perispinal structures of the spine and perispinal soft tissues (e.g., spinal ligaments, perispinal muscles) were sought based upon studies on young volunteers without low back pain (n=10; mean age 23 years). Compared with the group without low back pain, many index cases (n=71, 71%) demonstrated hyperintensity (i.e., sprain or frank ligamentous rupture) of the interspinous ligament(s) on T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRI studies at one (20 of 71, 28%) or multiple (51 of 71, 72%) levels. Associated intrinsic spinal muscle (e.g., interspinalis, multifidus muscles) degeneration was observed in a minority of cases overall (n=7, 7%), but was only seen in association with cases also demonstrating interspinous ligament degeneration/rupture (7 of 71, 10%). Lumbosacral interspinous ligament sprain or frank rupture, as well as related acute-subacute autotraumatic intrinsic spinal muscle rupture/degeneration, may be overlooked by many observers if fat-suppressed, T2-weighted MRI is not acquired. These musculoligamentous alterations are on occasion the only abnormalities recognized on MRI of the lumbosacral spine and may theoretically be sources of low back morbidity that potentially may respond to specific therapy. Because this study was an observational one, based solely upon medical imaging, future research must focus upon the correlation of the relevance of these findings with an age-matched asymptomatic control group and longitudinal clinicoradiologic therapeutic trials. (orig.)

  9. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin-Wook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Seok-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2004-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Thirty-eight consecutive patients sho underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3%-96.7%, respectively and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3%-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities

  10. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van der Zanden, A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injury profile in Italian Serie A1-A2 women's volleyball league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetag, Francesca; Mazzilli, Massimiliano; Benis, Roberto; LA Torre, Antonio; Bonato, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures with subsequent surgery reconstruction impact on the professional career of A1-A2 Italian women's volleyball league players. Using an observational study with a retrospective case-series design for ACL ruptures, 125 teams with 1488 players were monitored. Subjects had to report level, role, injury modality, lower limb injured, laterality, period of the season and age. A total of 34 ACL ruptures were reported. Thirty-three (97%) were non-contact and 1 (3%) with contact. Twenty-one (61.7%) occurred in landing from a jump attack, 3 (8.8%) in landing from wall jump, 1 (3%) with apparent contact and 9 (26.5%) in other landing conditions. The most injured knee was the left limb (22, 64.7%) respect to the right limb (12, 35.3%). Fourteen (41.2%) ruptures occurred in spikers, 10 (29.4%) in middle blockers, 6 (17.6%) in setters, 3 (8.8%) in liberos and 1 (3%) in opposite hitters. Nine (26.5%) occurred in pre-season period, 16 (47%) in the first round, 4 (11.8%) in the second round, and 5 (14.7%) during play-off. The average age of the first ACL rupture was 23±3 years. We observed that female volleyball players of A1-A2 Italian volleyball league occurred mostly in a left non-contact ACL rupture during a landing condition and the spikers were the players most at risk. Therefore, it is desirable that coaches teach players variations of landing in order to avoid possible chronic overloading of ACL.

  12. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Parellada, J.Antoni; Parker, Laurence; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  13. Ligament rupture and unstable burst behaviors of axial flaws in steam generator U-bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Chi Bum, E-mail: bahn@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63 beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin [KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co. Inc., Seongnam 463-870 (Korea, Republic of); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted with U-bends. • In general, U-bends showed higher ligament rupture and burst pressures than straight tubes. • U-bend test data was bounded by 90% lower limit of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. • Prediction models for straight tubes could be conservatively applied to U-bends. - Abstract: Incidents of U-bend cracking in steam generator (SG) tubes have been reported, some of which have led to tube rupture. Experimental and analytical modeling efforts to determine the failure criteria of flawed SG U-bends are limited. To evaluate structural integrity of flawed U-bends, ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted on 57 and 152 mm bend radius U-bends with axial electrical discharge machining notches. In general, the ligament rupture and burst pressures of the U-bends were higher than those of straight tubes with similar notches. To quantitatively address the test data scatter issue, probabilistic models were introduced. All ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends were bounded by 90% lower limits of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. It was concluded that the prediction models for straight tubes could be applied to U-bends to conservatively evaluate the ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends with axial flaws.

  14. Ligament rupture and unstable burst behaviors of axial flaws in steam generator U-bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Oh, Young-Jin; Majumdar, Saurin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted with U-bends. • In general, U-bends showed higher ligament rupture and burst pressures than straight tubes. • U-bend test data was bounded by 90% lower limit of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. • Prediction models for straight tubes could be conservatively applied to U-bends. - Abstract: Incidents of U-bend cracking in steam generator (SG) tubes have been reported, some of which have led to tube rupture. Experimental and analytical modeling efforts to determine the failure criteria of flawed SG U-bends are limited. To evaluate structural integrity of flawed U-bends, ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted on 57 and 152 mm bend radius U-bends with axial electrical discharge machining notches. In general, the ligament rupture and burst pressures of the U-bends were higher than those of straight tubes with similar notches. To quantitatively address the test data scatter issue, probabilistic models were introduced. All ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends were bounded by 90% lower limits of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. It was concluded that the prediction models for straight tubes could be applied to U-bends to conservatively evaluate the ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends with axial flaws.

  15. Relationship between peri-incisional dysesthesia and the vertical and oblique incisions on the hamstrings harvest in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Laube Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of peri-incisional dysesthesia according to the skin incision technique for hamstring tendon graft harvest in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with ACL rupture were separated in two groups: group 1, with 19 patients submitted to the oblique skin incision to access the hamstrings and group 2-14 patients operated by vertical skin incision technique. The selected patients were assessed after surgery. Demographic data and prevalence of dysesthesia was measured by digital pressure around the skin incision and classified according to the Highet scale. RESULTS: The total rate of dysesthesia was 42% (14 patients. Five patients (26% on the oblique incision group reported dysesthesia symptoms. On the group submitted to the vertical incision technique, the involvement was 64% (nine patients. On the 33 knees evaluated, the superior lateral area was the most affected skin region, while the superior medial and inferior medial regions were affected in only one patient (7.1%. No statistical differences between both groups were observed regarding patients' weight, age, and height¸ as well as skin incision length. CONCLUSION: Patients who underwent reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the oblique access technique had five times lower incidence of peri-incisional dysesthesia when compared with those in whom the vertical access technique was used.

  16. Return to National Basketball Association Competition Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Fibular Collateral Ligament Injuries: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; O'Brien, Luke; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Cinque, Mark E; Chahla, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Numerous outcome studies regarding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction demonstrate the ability of athletes to return to a high level of play. However, to our knowledge, there is limited literature regarding return to play following injury to both the ACL and the fibular collateral ligament (FCL). We describe the case of a National Basketball Association (NBA) player who sustained a combined ACL and FCL knee injury and subsequently underwent surgical reconstruction of both affected ligaments. He was able to return to a preinjury level of competition at 9 months postoperatively. It is possible for athletes to return to competitive basketball and maintain a high production level following a single-staged reconstruction of both the ACL and the FCL.

  17. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) of the knee joint: Meniscus, cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage. Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Kniegelenks: Meniskus, Kreuzbaender und hyaliner Gelenkknorpel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. (Radiologie, Universitaetsspital, Zurich (Switzerland) Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiologische Abt.); Buess, E. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Rodriguez, M. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)); Imhoff, A. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1993-08-01

    The use of MRT for diagnosing injury to the meniscus, the cruciate ligaments and hyaline cartilage was evaluated retrospectively in 82 knee joints without any knowledge of operative findings. In 49 cases the results were verified by arthroscopy and in 33 cases by arthrotomy. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of MRT for meniscus lesions was 73.9%, 96.9%, and 94.6%. Corresponding values for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were 88.9%, 96.6%, and 94.7%, and for lesions of the hyaline cartilage 62.6%, 96.1%, and 87.9%, respectively. In addition to its high specificity, MRT proved accurate in excluding lesions of the meniscus (97.1%) of the anterior cruciate ligament (96.6%) and of hyaline cartilage (88.8%). A negative finding on MRT therefore makes the presence of a lesion of the meniscus, cruciate ligaments of cartilage unlikely. In such cases one is justified in delaying the use of arthroscopy or arthrotomy. (orig.)

  18. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: dynamic strain evaluation of the graft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Handl, Milan; Držík, M.; Cerulli, G.; Povýšil, C.; Chlpík, J.; Varga, F.; Amler, Evžen; Trč, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2007), s. 233-241 ISSN 0942-2056 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Anterior cruciate ligament * Tendon * Material properties Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.626, year: 2007

  19. Atypical hamstrings electromyographic activity as a compensatory mechanism in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, AL; Hof, AL; Halbertsma, JPK; van Raaij, JJAM; Schenk, W; Diercks, RL; van Horn, [No Value; van Horn, J.R.

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency may cause functional instability of the knee (noncopers), while other patients compensate and perform at the same level as before injury (copers). This pilot study investigated whether there is a compensatory electromyographic (EMG) activity of the

  20. Incidence of motion loss of the stifle joint in dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture surgically treated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy: longitudinal clinical study of 412 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandi, Avtar S; Schulman, Alan J

    2007-02-01

    To report the incidence of loss of stifle extension or flexion and its relationship with clinical lameness after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Longitudinal study. Dogs (n=280) with CCL rupture (n=412). TPLO was performed without meniscal release or arthrotomy. Angles of extension and flexion of the stifle were measured by goniometry to determine range of motion. Based upon motion loss, stifles were divided in 3 groups: no loss of extension or flexion (n=322), or =10 degrees loss of extension or flexion (n=12). Loss of extension or flexion > or =10 degrees was associated with significantly (P=.001) higher clinical lameness scores in comparison with no loss, or loss of extension or flexion or =10 degrees was less tolerable and less amenable to physical rehabilitation than flexion loss. Loss of extension or flexion > or =10 degrees was responsible for higher clinical lameness scores. Osteoarthrosis in the cranial femorotibial joint led to extension loss. Loss of extension or flexion should be assessed in dogs with persistent clinical lameness after TPLO so that early intervention can occur. Our study provides guidelines to define clinically relevant loss of extension or flexion of stifle joint after TPLO.

  1. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-03-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established.

  2. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Numerous papers on reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (ACL contribute to the significance of this method. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of the use of this surgical treatment method regardless the type of surgical intervention, graft, and the choice of the material for fixing. Methods. The study included 324 patients treated within the period from April 1997 to April 2004. Arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction was typically performed using the central one-third of the patellar ligament, as a graft, with bone blocks. Fixing was performed using screws (spongy or interferential, Mitek type. In the cases who required revision of the surgery, we used a graft m. semitendinosus and m. gracilise (STG or a graft of the patellar ligament (B-Pt-B. Fixation in these cases was performed using absorptive wedges according to the Rigidfix technique or metallic implants. Results. The analysis included the results of the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (B-Pt-B or STG graft in 139 of the knees. Chronic injuries were revealed in 132 (94.9% of the knees. According to the anamnesis and clinical findings, the feeling of instability prevailed in 132 (94.9% of the knees, pain in 72 (51.7%, effluents in 24 (17.2%, and blockages in 13 (9.3%. Early and late postoperative complications were noticeable in 3.5% each. Hypotrophy of the upper knee musculature up to 2 cm was present in 53.9% of the operated knees, while minor contractions in 13.6% of them. The final result of the reconstruction graded begusing the Lysholm Scale was 85.2, simultaneous reconstructions of other ligaments 75.3, and revision surgery 68.0. First-grade degenerative postoperative changes according to the K/L Scale were found in 55.0% of the surgically treated knees, while the worst, four-grade one in 2.5%. Conclusion. On the basis of these findings, we can conclude that this method is the method of choice in

  3. [Cruciate ligament injuries under gender aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabau, D E; Vitzthum, K; Mache, S; Groneberg, D A; Quarcoo, D

    2011-12-01

    An injury of cruciate ligament is one the most common knee injuries. This accident happens mostly without external impact and towards the end of training and competition sessions. Women, especially athletes playing team sports ball games such as soccer or disciplines such as tennis, are affected 2 to 8 times more often than men. Anatomic, biomechanical and endocrinological differences are currently discussed as potential risk factors. In terms of prevention, biomechanical impact is of greatest importance given its influenceability through various training opportunities. Training programs including endurance aspects, strengthening knee musculature, balance as well as plyometric trainings were most effective. Further studies should focus more on concomitants of course of injuries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Strategies for revision surgery after primary double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, Marcus; Muller, Bart; Murawski, Christopher D.; Baraga, Michael; van Eck, Carola Franziska; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to discuss pre- and intra-operative considerations as well as surgical strategies for different femoral and tibial tunnel scenarios in revision surgery following primary double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Based on the current literature of

  5. Extra-articular tenodesis combined with an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in acute anterior cruciate ligament tear in elite female football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzini, Matteo; Mazza, Daniele; Fabbri, Mattia; Lanzetti, Riccardo; Redler, Andrea; Iorio, Carlo; Monaco, Edoardo; Ferretti, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The growing popularity of elite soccer among female participants has led to increased incidents of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Many authors underline a positive glide after ACL reconstruction (ACLR), especially in women. In fact, an isolated intra-articular ACLR may be inadequate to control rotational instability after a combined injury of the ACL and the peripheral structures of the knee. Extra-articular procedures are sometimes used in primary cases displaying excessive antero-lateral rotatory instability. The purpose of this case series was to report subjective and objective outcomes after combined ACL and lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) with a minimum 4-year follow-up in a selected high-risk population of elite female football players. Between January 2007 and December 2010, 16 elite Italian female football players were included in the study. All patients underwent the same surgical technique: anatomical ACLR with autogenous semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. After the intra-articular reconstruction was performed, an additional extra-articular MacIntosh modified Coker-Arnold procedure was carried out. Patients were assessed pre- and post-operatively with the subjective and objective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation form, Tegner activity scale (TAS) and Lysholm score. Joint laxity was assessed with KT-1000 by measuring the side-to-side (S/S) differences in displacement at manual maximum (mm) testing. At a mean follow-up of 72.6 ± 8.1 months, two independent examiners reviewed all players. All of the patients had a fully recovered range of motion. Lachman test was negative in all patients (100 %). The evaluation of joint laxity and clinical evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement. No patients experienced complication or a re-rupture. The rationale of combining extra-articular procedures with ACLR is to restrict the internal rotation of the reconstructed knee, taking advantage of its

  6. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament with erosion of the lateral femoral condyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Yuguero, Mariano; Saez, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that produced osseous erosion of the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial em um gato: reconstituição com fáscia lata Cranial cruciate ligament rupture in a cat: reconstitution with fascia lata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Fernanda Villamayor Garcia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Em gatos, a ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial (RLCC trata-se de diagnóstico raro e a correção cirúrgica propicia o retorno mais rápido à função do membro. Foi atendida, no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, uma gata apresentando claudicação aguda e dor à palpação do joelho direito. O diagnóstico de RLCC foi realizado através dos testes de compressão tibial e gaveta cranial positivos e confirmado na cirurgia. Optou-se por realizar a reconstituição do ligamento com fáscia lata e, após achados clínicos pós-operatórios e em longo prazo concluiu-se que a técnica apresentou resultados satisfatórios neste caso.The cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR is rare diagnosis in cats and the surgical correction provides a faster return to limb function. A cat with acute lameness and pain on palpation of the right stifle was attended at the Veterinary Hospital of UFSM. The diagnosis of CCLR was performed by positive tibial compression test and positive cranial drawer sign and confirmed by surgery. We chose to perform the reconstruction of the ligament with fascia lata and after of the observe clinical postoperative and in the long-term it was concluded that the technique showed satisfactory results in this case.

  8. Do psychosocial interventions improve rehabilitation outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A; Bird, Mackenzie L; Van Hoy, Erin E; Huston, Laura J; Spindler, Kurt P; Archer, Kristin R

    2018-03-01

    To examine the role of psychosocial interventions in improving patient-reported clinical outcomes, including return to sport/activity, and intermediary psychosocial factors after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched from each database's inception to March 2017 for published studies in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Studies were included if they reported on the effects of a postoperative psychosocial intervention on a patient-reported clinical measure of disability, function, pain, quality of life, return to sport/activity, or intermediary psychosocial factor. Data were extracted using a standardized form and summary effects from each article were compiled. The methodological quality of randomized trials was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale and scores greater than 5/10 were considered high quality. A total of 893 articles were identified from the literature search. Of these, four randomized trials ( N = 210) met inclusion criteria. The four articles examined guided imagery and relaxation, coping modeling, and visual imagery as postoperative psychosocial interventions. Methodological quality scores of the studies ranged from 5 to 9. There were inconsistent findings for the additive benefit of psychosocial interventions for improving postoperative function, pain, or self-efficacy and limited evidence for improving postoperative quality of life, anxiety, or fear of reinjury. No study examined the effects of psychosocial interventions on return to sport/activity. Overall, there is limited evidence on the efficacy of postoperative psychosocial interventions for improving functional recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon- derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghebes, C.A.; Kelder, C.; Schot, T.; Renard, A.J.S.; Pakvis, D.F.M.; Fernandes, H.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying

  10. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D.; Goodwin, C.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goodwin, C. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-11-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.).

  12. Disadvantages and advantages of transtibial technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Brett N; Lubowitz, James H

    2014-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) femoral socket techniques have distinct advantages and disadvantages when considering the following techniques: transtibial, anteromedial portal, outside-in, and outside-in retroconstruction. There is no one perfect technique and we have an incomplete understanding of anatomical, biomechanical, isometry, stability, and clinical outcomes. Our primary focus is transtibial technique for creating the ACL femoral socket. Advantages include less invasive, isometric graft placement, stable Lachman exam, and minimal graft impingement with the tunnel and notch. Disadvantages include nonanatomic vertical graft placement that can cause rotational instability and positive pivot shift, interference screw divergence, graft-tunnel length mismatch, femoral socket constraint, posterior cruciate ligament impingement, and a short, oblique tibial tunnel that may undermine the medial plateau in an attempt to achieve anatomic ACL reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, M. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden); Thuomas, K.Aa. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Messner, K. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.).

  14. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, M.; Thuomas, K.Aa.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.)

  15. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  16. Effects of Wii balance board exercises on balance after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puh, Urška; Majcen, Nia; Hlebš, Sonja; Rugelj, Darja

    2014-05-01

    To establish the effects of training on Wii balance board (WBB) after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction on balance. Included patient injured her posterior cruciate ligament 22 months prior to the study. Training on WBB was performed 4 weeks, 6 times per week, 30-45 min per day. Center of pressure (CoP) sway during parallel and one-leg stance, and body weight distribution in parallel stance were measured. Additionally, measurements of joint range of motion and limb circumferences were taken before and after training. After training, the body weight was almost equally distributed on both legs. Decrease in CoP sway was most significant for one-leg stance with each leg on compliant surface with eyes open and closed. The knee joint range of motion increased and limb circumferences decreased. According to the results of this single case report, we might recommend the use of WBB for balance training after PCL reconstruction. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  17. 3D FSE Cube and VIPR-aTR 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging predicts canine cranial cruciate ligament structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Molly; Al saleh, Habib; Waller, Kenneth R; Bleedorn, Jason A; McCabe, Ronald P; Vanderby, Ray; Markel, Mark D; Brounts, Sabrina H; Block, Walter F; Muir, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) structural properties in client-owned dogs with incipient cruciate rupture would be advantageous. The objective of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of normal CrCL volume in an ex-vivo canine model predicts structural properties. Stifles from eight dogs underwent 3.0 Tesla 3D MRI. CrCL volume and normalized median grayscale values were determined using 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) Cube and Vastly under-sampled Isotropic PRojection (VIPR)-alternative repetition time (aTR) sequences. Stifles were then mechanically tested. After joint laxity testing, CrCL structural properties were determined, including displacement at yield, yield load, load to failure, and stiffness. Yield load and load to failure (R(2)=0.56, P 0.57, P <0.005). In conclusion, 3D MRI offers a predictive method for estimating canine CrCL structural properties. 3D MRI may be useful for monitoring CrCL properties in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of CT in the management of anterior cruciate ligament revision surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, C.; Chandramohan, M.; Chew, C.; Subedi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur most commonly in individuals between 18 and 29 years of age and are strongly correlated with sporting activity, with female athletes being at higher risk of ACL rupture than their male counterparts. ACL reconstruction is one of the most frequently performed procedures in orthopaedic surgery, having a reported incidence of 85 per 100,000 head of population in the at-risk age group. Subsequent graft failure is most commonly caused by recurrent trauma, followed by tunnel malpositioning, although the choice of graft type does not appear to affect outcome. The Danish ACL registry reported that ACL revisions accounted for 7.5% of all ACL reconstruction surgery performed between 2005 and 2008. Revision of ACL reconstruction is recognized to carry a worse outcome than primary reconstruction. Preoperative imaging has become a crucial part of surgical planning in these patients, with great reliance placed on computed tomography (CT). The radiologist should be able to recognize the types of primary repair and must be able to assess for the complications of primary surgery, such as tunnel malpositioning, tunnel widening, and fixation device failure. Revision is commonly a two-stage procedure with bone grafting of the tunnels prior to the definitive ligament repair. The radiologist should be able to asses for adequate bone graft incorporation. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the use of CT in the management of ACL revision surgery with examples of commonly used fixation devices; complications, such as tunnel widening and tunnel malpositioning; and bone graft incorporation

  19. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training.

  20. Quantitative T2-Mapping and T2⁎-Mapping Evaluation of Changes in Cartilage Matrix after Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture and the Correlation between the Results of Both Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hongyue; Qiao, Yang; Hu, Yiwen; Xie, Yuxue; Lu, Rong; Yan, Xu; Chen, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    To quantitatively assess changes in cartilage matrix after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture using T2- and T2 ⁎ -mapping and analyze the correlation between the results of both methods. Twenty-three patients and 23 healthy controls were enrolled and underwent quantitative MRI examination. The knee cartilage was segmented into six compartments, including lateral femur (LF), lateral tibia (LT), medial femur (MF), medial tibia (MT), trochlea (Tr), and patella (Pa). T2 and T2 ⁎ values were measured in full-thickness as well as superficial and deep layers of each cartilage compartment. Differences of T2 and T2 ⁎ values between patients and controls were compared using unpaired Student's t -test, and the correlation between their reciprocals was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. ACL-ruptured patients showed higher T2 and T2 ⁎ values in full-thickness and superficial layers of medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint. Meanwhile, patients exhibited higher T2 ⁎ values in deep layers of lateral tibiofemoral joint. The elevated percentages of T2 and T2 ⁎ value in superficial LT were most significant (20.738%, 17.525%). The reciprocal of T2 ⁎ value was correlated with that of T2 value ( r = 0.886, P T2 ⁎ -mapping might be more sensitive in detecting deep layer of cartilage than T2-mapping.

  1. Early Results of Anatomic Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Demet Pepele

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The goal in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is to restore the normal anatomic structure and function of the knee. In the significant proportion of patients after the traditional single-bundle ACLR, complaints of instability still continue. Anatomic double bundle ACLR may provide normal kinematics in knees, much closer to the natural anatomy. The aim of this study is to clinically assess the early outcomes of our anatomical double bundle ACLR. Material and Method: In our ...

  2. Pseudo-arthrosis repair of a posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogervorst, Paul; Gardeniers, J. W. M.; Moret-Wever, S.; van Kampen, A.

    2010-01-01

    A pseudo-arthrosis repair of a 4-year-old bony avulsion fracture of the PCL using a minimally invasive technique, screw fixation, and bone grafting is reported. The case presented seems to be rather unique due to the fragment size and the approach for pseudo-arthrosis repair. There was a good functional result following minimally invasive pseudo-arthrosis repair of a posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture. There are no previous reports of similar pseudo-arthrosis repairs, and other aut...

  3. Tourniquet-induced cardiovascular responses in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia: Effect of preoperative oral amantadine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abd Elmawgood

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative oral amantadine reduced tourniquet induced hypertension and postoperative analgesic requirements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia.

  4. MR Imaging findings of avulsion fracture of the tibial spine of the knee, focusing of cruciate ligament tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook

    2003-01-01

    To determine the presence of cruciate ligament tears following avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL, and to correlate the findings with those of surgery. Between March 1997 and May 2002, avulsion injury involving the ACL and PCL was diagnosed in 19 patients. Ten of these [8 males and 2 females aged 10-51 (avergae, 27.7) years] were included in this study. We assessed the presence of cruciate ligament tears at MR imaging, correlating the findings with those of surgery. Associated intra-articular injuries, treatment methods and follow-up results were also evaluated. Among seven patients with ACL avulsion injury, this was assessed at MR imaging as complete tear (n=1), partial tear (n=5), or intact (n=1), while all MR images of PCL avulsion injury (n=3) showed that this was partial teat. All imaging findings corresponded with the surgical findings. In four patients there was associated knee injury involving, respectively, teats of the medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, PCL and MCL, and popliteal ligament. Our findings showed that with one exception, patients with avulsion injury of the ACL or PCL had suffered either a partial or complete tear. MR imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of tears of the cruciate ligament which have not been noticed at surgery or arthroscopy in avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL

  5. MR imaging of the knee following cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal surgery; MRT des Kniegelenks nach Kreuzband- und Meniskusoperationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2009-03-15

    Due to the increasing number of surgical procedures performed on the knee, MR imaging of the postoperative knee has gained more and more importance. For the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts and postoperative menisci, basic knowledge of surgical techniques is essential in order to differentiate normal postoperative findings from transplant failure, retears, and complications. This article reviews technical aspects of MR imaging following knee surgery, basic principles of operative techniques for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and therapy of meniscal tears, normal postoperative findings, MR imaging criteria for recurrent lesions, and findings with typical complications. (orig.)

  6. Acute longitudinal ligament rupture following acute spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Hansom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL rupture in a 47- year-old gentleman following a bicycle accident. The ALL is a continuous band of a variable thickness that acts as a primary spinal stabiliser. Stress, strain or rupture of the ALL usually occurs as a result of hyperextension, with the primary perpetrator being whiplash injuries. Such injuries have been shown to result in cervical spine instability during extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending modes. Spine radiographs of such patients may be routinely assessed as normal, therefore this specific type of injury does not lend itself to identification by traditional imaging methods. This account demonstrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion of a ligamentous neck injury in the setting of normal plain radiographs but abnormal clinical examination.

  7. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  8. Peak knee biomechanics and limb symmetry following unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Associations of walking gait and jump-landing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven J; Blackburn, J Troy; Luc-Harkey, Brittney; Harkey, Matthew S; Stanley, Laura E; Frank, Barnett; Padua, Darin; Marshall, Stephen W; Spang, Jeffrey T; Pietrosimone, Brian

    2018-03-01

    Aberrant walking-gait and jump-landing biomechanics may influence the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis and increase the risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury, respectively. It remains unknown if individuals who demonstrate altered walking-gait biomechanics demonstrate similar altered biomechanics during jump-landing. Our aim was to determine associations in peak knee biomechanics and limb-symmetry indices between walking-gait and jump-landing tasks in individuals with a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Thirty-five individuals (74% women, 22.1 [3.4] years old, 25 [3.89] kg/m 2 ) with an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed 5-trials of self-selected walking-gait and jump-landing. Peak kinetics and kinematics were extracted from the first 50% of stance phase during walking-gait and first 100 ms following ground contact for jump-landing. Pearson product-moment (r) and Spearman's Rho (ρ) analyses were used to evaluate relationships between outcome measures. Significance was set a priori (P ≤ 0.05). All associations between walking-gait and jump-landing for the involved limb, along with the majority of associations for limb-symmetry indices and the uninvolved limb, were negligible and non-statistically significant. There were weak significant associations for instantaneous loading rate (ρ = 0.39, P = 0.02) and peak knee abduction angle (ρ = 0.36, p = 0.03) uninvolved limb, as well as peak abduction displacement limb-symmetry indices (ρ= - 0.39, p = 0.02) between walking-gait and jump-landing. No systematic associations were found between walking-gait and jump-landing biomechanics for either limb or limb-symmetry indices in people with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Individuals with an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction who demonstrate high-involved limb loading or asymmetries during jump-landing may not demonstrate similar biomechanics during

  9. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral

  10. Determining utility values in patients with anterior cruciate ligament tears using clinical scoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szucs Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several instruments and clinical scoring systems have been established to evaluate patients with ligamentous knee injuries. A comparison of individual articles in the literature is challenging, not only because of heterogeneity in methodology, but also due to the variety of the scoring systems used to document clinical outcomes. There is limited information about the correlation between used scores and quality of life with no information being available on the impact of each score on the utility values. The aim of this study was to compare the most commonly used scores for evaluating patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, and to establish corresponding utility values. These values will be used for the interpretation and comparison of outcome results in the currently available literature for different treatment options. Methods Four hypothetical vignettes were defined, based on different levels of activities after rupture of the ACL to simulate typical situations seen in daily practice. A questionnaire, including the Health Utility Index (HUI for utility values, the IKDC subjective score, the Lysholm and the Tegner score, was created and 25 orthopedic surgeons were asked to fill the questionnaire for each hypothetical patient as proxies for all patients they had treated and who would fit in that hypothetical vignette. Results The utility value as an indicator for quality of life increased with the level of activity. Having discomforts already during normal activities of daily living was rated with a mean utility value of 0.37 ± 0.19, half of that of a situation where mild sport activity was possible without discomfort (0.78 ± 0.11. All investigated scores were able to distinguish clearly (p Conclusions Here we report the correlation between the most commonly used scores for the assessment of patients with a ruptured ACL and utility values as an indicator of quality of life. Assumptions were based on expert

  11. Use of platelet-rich plasma for bioplastic processes stimulation after arthroscopic reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rybin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the scientific publications, the authors analyzed the possibilities and effectiveness of platelet- rich plasma (PRP application as a stimulator of engraftment and biological transformation of tendinous autografts and allografts after arthroscopic reconstruction of knee anterior cruciate ligament. The topic of impossibility of spontaneous recovery of torn anterior cruciate ligament of knee, and describe the staging of biological incorporation of tendinous transplant in a bone wall was discussed. The authors presented methods and techniques of accelerating engraftment of free tendinous graft into bone channels described in the literature and the difference of terms of remodeling the autografts and allografts. The effect of different techniques of sterilization and preservation of tendinous allografts on the change of their biological properties was disclosed.

  12. Histological characteristics of ligament healing after bio-enhanced repair of the transected goat ACL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D. Tan; Dellbrügge, Sietske; Tak, Paul P.; Woo, Savio L.-Y.; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, Niek C.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, healing of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is reconsidered. In a previous study, we have shown that the transected ACL can heal after treatment with the triple X locking suture alone or combined with small intestine submucosa (SIS). The first research question of this study was

  13. Retention versus sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty for treating osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, Wiebe C.; van den Boom, Lennard G. H.; Jacobs, Wilco; Clement, Darren J.; Wymenga, Ate A. B.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The functional and clinical basis on which to choose whether or not to retain the posterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty surgery remained unclear after a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis in 2005, which contained eight clinical trials. Several new trials

  14. Accuracy of clinical tests in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Swain (Michael S.); N. Henschke (Nicholas); S.J. Kamper (Steven); A.S. Downie (Aron S.); B.W. Koes (Bart); C. Maher (Chris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Numerous clinical tests are used in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury but their accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests for the diagnosis of ACL injury.Methods: Study Design: Systematic

  15. Factors that influence the intra-articular rupture pattern of the ACL graft following single-bundle reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Kropf, Eric J.; Romanowski, James R.; Lesniak, Bryson P.; Tranovich, Michael J.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2011-01-01

    The number of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgeries performed annually continues to rise. The purpose of this study was to determine the most common rupture pattern in ACL revision cases after previous single-bundle reconstruction. The second aim was to determine the relationship

  16. The role of the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, M. A.; Davis, K. E.; Meding, J. B.; Farris, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retention, PCL recession, and PCL excision during cruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Methods A total of 3018 anatomic graduated component total knee replacements were examined; 1846 of these retained the PCL, 455 PCLs were partially recessed, and in 717 the PCL was completely excised from the back of the tibia. Results Clinical scores between PCL groups favored excision for flexion (p knees, 98.2% for recessed knees, and 96.4% for excised knees (p = 0.0934, Wilcoxon; p = 0.0202, log-rank). Conclusions Despite some trade off in clinical performance, if the PCL is detached at the time of operation, conversion to a posterior-stabilised prosthesis may not be necessarily required as long as stability in the anteroposterior and coronal planes is achieved. PMID:23610673

  17. Can MRI distinguish between acute partial and complete anterior cruciate ligament tear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamato, Minoru; Yamagishi, Tsuneo.

    1996-01-01

    A study to elucidate the title problem was done. Subjects were 8 patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear diagnosed by both MRI and arthroscopy within 6 weeks after trauma, 14 patients with complete ACL tear diagnosed similarly and 10 control patients with arthroscopically intact ACL. Proton density-and T2-weighted MRI imaging of the sagittal section of the knee was performed with 1.5 T magnets (Siemens Magnetom H15, Shimadzu SMT150GUX) by using a dedicated knee coil, with slice thickness of 4-5 mm and 14-16 cm field of view. The examination was done on the primary (discontinuity of low signal band, abnormal axis of the ligament and focal or diffuse increased signal intensity) and secondary (bone bruise, anterior translocation of the tibia and PCL curvature value) signs of ACL tear. In proton density-weighted sagittal images, it was found easy to distinguish acute partial ACL tear from normal ligament but not from complete ACL tear. In T2-weighted images, partial ACL tear was suggested to keep continuity of the ligament. (H.O.)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of polycaprolactone for anterior cruciate ligament regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurlek, Ayse Cansu; Sevinc, Burcu; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat, E-mail: cerisken@etu.edu.tr

    2017-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently torn ligament in the knee, and complete healing is unlikely due to lack of vascularization. Current approaches for the treatment of ACL injuries include surgical interventions and grafting, however recent reports show that surgeries have 94% recurrency, and that repaired tissues are biomechanically inferior to the native tissue. These necessitate the need for new strategies for scar-free repair/regeneration of ACL injuries. Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a biodegradable and biocompatible synthetic polymer, which has been widely used in the connective tissue repair/regeneration attempts. Here, we report on the synthesis of PCL via ring opening polymerization using ε-caprolactone as the monomer, and ammonium heptamolybdate as a catalyst. The synthesized PCL was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It was then processed using electrospinning to form nanofiber-based scaffolds. These scaffolds were characterized in terms of surface as well as mechanical properties, and compared to the properties of commercially available PCL, and of native ACL tissue harvested from sheep. In addition, scaffolds fabricated with synthesized PCL were evaluated regarding their cell attachment capacity using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Our findings demonstrated that the synthesized PCL is similar to its commercially available counterpart in terms of surface morphology and mechanical properties. In addition, fibrous scaffolds generated with electrospinning showed weaker mechanical properties visa vis native ACL tissue in terms of ultimate stress, and elastic modulus. Also, the synthesized PCL can accommodate cell attachment when tested with hBMSCs. Putting together, these observations reveal that the PCL synthesized in this study could be a good candidate as a biomaterial for ligament repair or regeneration. - Highlights: • Synthesis of

  19. Synthesis and characterization of polycaprolactone for anterior cruciate ligament regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurlek, Ayse Cansu; Sevinc, Burcu; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently torn ligament in the knee, and complete healing is unlikely due to lack of vascularization. Current approaches for the treatment of ACL injuries include surgical interventions and grafting, however recent reports show that surgeries have 94% recurrency, and that repaired tissues are biomechanically inferior to the native tissue. These necessitate the need for new strategies for scar-free repair/regeneration of ACL injuries. Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a biodegradable and biocompatible synthetic polymer, which has been widely used in the connective tissue repair/regeneration attempts. Here, we report on the synthesis of PCL via ring opening polymerization using ε-caprolactone as the monomer, and ammonium heptamolybdate as a catalyst. The synthesized PCL was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It was then processed using electrospinning to form nanofiber-based scaffolds. These scaffolds were characterized in terms of surface as well as mechanical properties, and compared to the properties of commercially available PCL, and of native ACL tissue harvested from sheep. In addition, scaffolds fabricated with synthesized PCL were evaluated regarding their cell attachment capacity using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Our findings demonstrated that the synthesized PCL is similar to its commercially available counterpart in terms of surface morphology and mechanical properties. In addition, fibrous scaffolds generated with electrospinning showed weaker mechanical properties visa vis native ACL tissue in terms of ultimate stress, and elastic modulus. Also, the synthesized PCL can accommodate cell attachment when tested with hBMSCs. Putting together, these observations reveal that the PCL synthesized in this study could be a good candidate as a biomaterial for ligament repair or regeneration. - Highlights: • Synthesis of

  20. Relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament during simulated jump landing and sidestep cutting tasks: implications for injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Nesbitt, Rebecca J; Shearn, Jason T; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-09-01

    The medial collateral (MCL) and anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are, respectively, the primary and secondary ligamentous restraints against knee abduction, which is a component of the valgus collapse often associated with ACL rupture during athletic tasks. Despite this correlation in function, MCL ruptures occur concomitantly in only 20% to 40% of ACL injuries. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how athletic tasks load the knee joint in a manner that could lead to ACL failure without concomitant MCL failure. It was hypothesized that (1) the ACL would provide greater overall contribution to intact knee forces than the MCL during simulated motion tasks and (2) the ACL would show greater relative peak strain compared with the MCL during simulated motion tasks. Controlled laboratory study. A 6-degrees-of-freedom robotic manipulator articulated 18 cadaveric knees through simulations of kinematics recorded from in vivo drop vertical jump and sidestep cutting tasks. Specimens were articulated in the intact-knee and isolated-ligament conditions. After simulation, each ACL and MCL was failed in uniaxial tension along its fiber orientations. During a drop vertical jump simulation, the ACL experienced greater peak strain than the MCL (6.1% vs 0.4%; P < .01). The isolated ACL expressed greater peak anterior force (4.8% vs 0.3% body weight; P < .01), medial force (1.6% vs 0.4% body weight; P < .01), flexion torque (8.4 vs 0.4 N·m; P < .01), abduction torque (2.6 vs 0.3 N·m; P < .01), and adduction torque (0.5 vs 0.0 N·m; P = .03) than the isolated MCL. During failure testing, ACL specimens preferentially loaded in the anteromedial bundle failed at 637 N, while MCL failure occurred at 776 N. During controlled physiologic athletic tasks, the ACL provides greater contributions to knee restraint than the MCL, which is generally unstrained and minimally loaded. Current findings support that multiplanar loading during athletic tasks preferentially loads the ACL

  1. Editorial Commentary: All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Can Afford Satisfactory Clinical Outcome and Functional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2016-02-01

    Anatomic all-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft can afford satisfactory outcomes, achieving significant postoperative improvement in all clinical parameters. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors contributing to anterior cruciate ligament injury and pattern of presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.; Riaz, M.U.; Hassan, D.; Abbas, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the factors contributing to Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and their pattern of presentation. Methodology: This descriptive study included 45 patients diagnosed with ACL injury that were selected using non probability convenience sampling technique from department of orthopaedic and physical therapy of Mayo Hospital and Gurki Trust Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. The study was completed in 6 months of duration. Subjects that were diagnosed with ACL injury using MRI with positive Lachman and Anterior Drawer test. Data regarding demographics, onset of injury, mechanism, occupational, recreational, daily routines and clinical presentations were recorded. Data were analysed by SPSS. Results: Out of 45 patients, 38(84.4%) cases were male and 7(16.5%) were female. 76% belonged to 20 to 30 age range. Regarding source of injury to anterior cruciate ligament, 32% got it during cricket, 21% during mild to severe road side accident, 20% during running and other 27% during daily life activities twisting, jumping and other high impact activities. The individual involved very often in high impact activities were 8%, often 13% and less often 79%. Conclusion: Major risk factors found were engaging in high impact activities such as sports, running and jumping nature. Clinical presentations were edema, decreased mobility, mild to moderate pain and limited range of knee range of motion. (author)

  3. Criteria for Return to Sport after Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with lower reinjury risk (CR'STAL study): protocol for a prospective observational study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaud, Alexandre J M; Semay, Bertrand; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Testa, Rodolphe; Philippot, Rémi; Rossi, Jérémy; Edouard, Pascal

    2017-06-30

    The decision regarding when to return to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an important one. Using a variety of subjective and objective parameters, various attempts have been made to determine an optimal timeline for a return to sport after ACLR, but none have been validated.The aim of the present study is therefore to determine which criteria or combination of criteria could allow to return to sport with the lowest possible risk of reinjury. This study is a prospective cohort, single-centre study, with repeated assessments at 6, 9 and 12 months post-ACL surgical reconstruction and including a 3-year follow-up of patients' sporting activity and reinjuries. 275 patients will be included to test explanatory variables. Postural control analysis, knee laxity, questionnaires (International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11 (TSK-11), Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport After Reinjury (ACL-RSI) and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE)), modified Star Excursion Balance Test, running and sprinting biomechanics, Hop Tests and Isokinetic Tests will all be used. The primary outcome will be any reinjury during the follow-up period, defined as a graft rupture, a contralateral ACL rupture or any injury necessitating an interruption of training and requiring a medical consultation. Two groups will be constituted during the follow-up, separating reinjured from non-reinjured patients. In addition, classic analysis and data mining approaches will be used to build predictive models. The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and scientific presentations. Ethical approval was obtained through the ethics committee of the University Hospital of Saint-Etienne (reference number IRBN522015/CHUSTE). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  4. Clinical significance of bone bruises and cartilage lesions associated with anterior cruciate ligament injuries by magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawata, Koji; Yamamoto, Kichizo; Teshima, Ryota; Suzuki, Toshiro; Yamagata, Taiji.

    1995-01-01

    In 85 patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, we examined bone bruises retrospectively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 53 patients who underwent arthroscopy, the bone bruises were compared with the cartilage lesions. Depending on the time from their ligamentous injury to the performance of MRI, the patients were divided into three groups: the acute group (less than 1 months, n=29), the subacute group (between 1 and 12 months, n=29), and the chronic group (12 months or more, n=27). The detection rate of bone bruises by MRI was significantly higher in the acute group than in the other groups (p<0.0001). Bone bruises were always detected in the same locations of the lateral compartment of the knee joint. In four patients who observed bone bruises in the first MRI and underwent follow-up MRI 3-6 months later, bone bruises had disappeared in the follow-up MRI. In the acute group, bone bruises in the lateral femoral condyle were often found to be accompanied by cartilaginous injuries. In the subacute and chronic groups, the rate of degeneration of these cartilaginous lesions had progressed. (author)

  5. Estudo artroscópico da articulação do joelho em cães portadores de lesão do ligamento cruzado cranial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Cecilia Tatarunas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to report intra articular changes observed by means of arthroscopic in dogs bearing cranial cruciate ligament injuries. Sixty-three dogs (sixty-five knee joints with naturally occurring cranial cruciate injury were used. The arthroscopy was carried out before the ligament repair and the observed changes were both recorded and reported. According to the results obtained from this research it is significant to mention the presence of plicae on suprapatelar joint pouch; roughness, neovascularization and osteophytes in patella. The lateral meniscus presented axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and complete laceration. The medial meniscus showed bucket handle tear, complete laceration, axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and mineralization. The cranial cruciate ligament was completely ruptured, partially ruptured, interstitially ruptured and linked to the structures of the intercondylar notch. The caudal cruciate ligament showed vertical splits, besides fibrillation and partial rupture. Arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in dogs. It permits improved diagnostic capability when evaluating cartilage and sinovial changes, meniscus and ligaments tears.

  6. Retention of the posterior cruciate ligament versus the posterior stabilized design in total knee arthroplasty : a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, L.G.H.; Brouwer, R.W.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Bulstra, S.K.; van Raaij, J.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prosthetic design for the use in primary total knee arthroplasty has evolved into designs that preserve the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and those in which the ligament is routinely sacrificed (posterior stabilized). In patients with a functional PCL the decision which design is

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli; Fridmann, Marcos William; Arbo, Rodrigo Di Mare; Vieira, Jose Francisco; Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga da; Pires, Luiz Antonio Simoes; Abreu, Armando; Abreu, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing: a narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Matthew J Jordan,1 Per Aagaard,2 Walter Herzog1 1Human Performance Laboratory, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Muscle Research Cluster (SMRC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Denmark Abstract: The purpose of the present review was to: 1) provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in alpine ...

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC RECONSTRUCTION OF THE KNEE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kuznetsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article there were published diagnostic and surgery principles and the clinical results of arthroscopic single bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL reconstruction in patients with chronic PCL instability not responding to conservative treatment. There were treated 27 patients with PCL instability since 2006 till 2010. 10 of 27 patients were available for followup with an average elapsed time of 6,1 years between onset of injury and surgery and an average duration of 1,8 years between reconstruction and evaluation. Although there still is some controversy on the indication for treatment of PCL injury, we conclude on the basis of our findings that arthroscopic reconstruction of symptomatic chronic PCL instability can be greatly beneficial.

  10. "Anatomic" anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review of surgical techniques and reporting of surgical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Schreiber, Verena M.; Mejia, Hector A.; Samuelsson, Kristian; van Dijk, C. Niek; Karlsson, Jon; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate studies published on anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS: A systematic electronic search was performed by use of the Medline and Embase databases. Studies that were published from January 1995 to

  11. Reconstruction versus conservative treatment after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament: cost effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Mazda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decision whether to treat conservatively or reconstruct surgically a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is an ongoing subject of debate. The high prevalence and associated public health burden of torn ACL has led to continuous efforts to determine the best therapeutic approach. A critical evaluation of benefits and expenditures of both treatment options as in a cost effectiveness analysis seems well-suited to provide valuable information for treating physicians and healthcare policymakers. Methods A literature review identified four of 7410 searched articles providing sufficient outcome probabilities for the two treatment options for modeling. A transformation key based on the expert opinions of 25 orthopedic surgeons was used to derive utilities from available evidence. The cost data for both treatment strategies were based on average figures compiled by Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist and reinforced by Swiss national statistics. A decision tree was constructed to derive the cost-effectiveness of each strategy, which was then tested for robustness using Monte Carlo simulation. Results Decision tree analysis revealed a cost effectiveness of 16,038 USD/0.78 QALY for ACL reconstruction and 15,466 USD/0.66 QALY for conservative treatment, implying an incremental cost effectiveness of 4,890 USD/QALY for ACL reconstruction. Sensitivity analysis of utilities did not change the trend. Conclusion ACL reconstruction for reestablishment of knee stability seems cost effective in the Swiss setting based on currently available evidence. This, however, should be reinforced with randomized controlled trials comparing the two treatment strategies.

  12. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lohmander, S

    2015-01-01

    predicted by the motives for sports participation. Baseline motives achievement and fun and well-being predicted worse levels of pain and function 2 years after the injury, even after adjusting for age, gender, treatment and baseline scores. Psychological aspects, such as motives for participation in sport......Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical...... versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) study, a randomized controlled trial. At baseline, 121 patients recorded in an initial questionnaire that their motives for sports participation fell into four categories: achievement, health, social integration, or fun and well-being. These four categories were used...

  13. Comparison of paper and electronic surveys for measuring patient-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojcic, Jamie L; Sue, Valerie M; Huon, Tomy S; Maletis, Gregory B; Inacio, Maria C S

    2014-01-01

    This study compared response rates of paper and electronic versions of the Knee injury Osteoarthritis and Outcome Score questionnaire and examined the characteristics of patients who responded to each survey method. A total of 1486 patients registered by the Kaiser Permanente Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Registry between 2005 and 2010 were included in this study. Response rates by survey modality for the overall cohort, by the specific time periods, and by age and sex at time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were compared using χ(2) tests or the Fisher exact test when appropriate. Independent Student t tests were used to compare the Knee injury Osteoarthritis and Outcome Scores of survey respondents. The overall survey response rate was 42%. The 36% response rate in the electronic-survey group was significantly higher than the 22% response rate in the paper-survey group (p survey produced higher response rates, it is not sufficient alone to replace the traditional paper version among this Kaiser Permanente population.

  14. Broken Bioabsorbable Tibial Interference Screw after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction using a Semitendinosus-gracilis Graft: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang ME Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When a patient presents with knee pain and locking after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, a new meniscal injury or an osteochondral loose body are usually considered for differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 22-year-old female with just these complaints 6 months after ACL reconstruction surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee showed a broken screw tip which was later arthroscopically removed. At arthroscopy, an 11mm long broken bioabsorbable interference screw tip was found lying in the intercondylar notch; this resulted in a 0.5cm Outerbridge grade II chondral ulcer located at mid- patella. Both menisci and cruciate ligaments were intact and no other loose bodies were found in the knee joint.

  15. The transverse ligament as a landmark for tibial sagittal insertions of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongcharoensombat, Wirat; Ochi, Mitsuo; Abouheif, Mohamed; Adachi, Nobuo; Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Goki; Okuhara, Atushi; Shibuya, Hoyatoshi; Niimoto, Takuya; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Deie, Masataka

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between the position of the transverse ligament, the anterior edge of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial footprint, and the center of the ACL tibial insertion. We used arthroscopy for localization of the anatomic landmarks, followed by insertions of guide pins under direct visualization, and then the position of these guide pins was checked on plain lateral radiographs. The transverse ligament and the anterior aspect of the ACL tibial footprint were identified by arthroscopy in 20 unpaired cadaveric knees (10 left and 10 right). Guide pins were inserted with tibial ACL adapter drill guides under direct observation at the transverse ligament, the anterior aspect of the tibial footprint, and the center of tibial insertion of the ACL. Then, plain lateral radiographs of specimens were taken. The Amis and Jakob line was used to define the attachment of the ACL tibial insertion and the transverse ligament. A sagittal percentage of the location of the insertion point was determined and calculated from the anterior margin of the tibia in the anteroposterior direction. The transverse ligament averaged 21.20% ± 4.1%, the anterior edge of the ACL tibial insertion averaged 21.60% ± 4.0%, and the center of the ACL tibial insertion averaged 40.30% ± 4.8%. There were similar percent variations between the transverse ligament and the anterior edge of the ACL tibial insertion, with no significant difference between them (P = .38). Intraobserver and interobserver reliability was high, with small standard errors of measurement. This study shows that the transverse ligament coincides with the anterior edge of the ACL tibial footprint in the sagittal plane. The transverse ligament can be considered as a new landmark for tibial tunnel positioning during anatomic ACL reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Retention of the posterior cruciate ligament versus the posterior stabilized design in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-Scheek Inge

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic design for the use in primary total knee arthroplasty has evolved into designs that preserve the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL and those in which the ligament is routinely sacrificed (posterior stabilized. In patients with a functional PCL the decision which design is chosen depends largely on the favour and training of the surgeon. The objective of this study is to determine whether the patient's perceived outcome and speed of recovery differs between a posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients who are admitted for primary unilateral TKA due to primary osteoarthrosis are included when the following inclusion criteria are met: non-fixed fixed varus or valgus deformity less than 10 degrees, age between 55 and 85 years, body mass index less than 35 kg/m2 and ASA score (American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II. Patients are randomized in 2 groups. Patients in the posterior cruciate retaining group will receive a prosthesis with a posterior cut-out for the posterior cruciate ligament and relatively flat topography. In patients allocated to the posterior stabilized group, in which the posterior cruciate ligament is excised, the design may substitute for this function by an intercondylar tibial prominence that articulates with the femur in flexion. Measurements will take place preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. At all measurement points patient's perceived outcome will be assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life (SF-36 and physician reported functional status and range of motion as determined with the Knee Society Clinical Rating System (KSS. Discussion In the current practice both posterior cruciate retaining and posterior stabilized designs

  17. Mechanical stretch increases CCN2/CTGF expression in anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Yoshiaki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan); Furumatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: matino@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan); Kubota, Satoshi; Kawata, Kazumi [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan); Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan); Takigawa, Masaharu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama (Japan)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} CCN2/CTGF localizes to the ligament-to-bone interface, but is not to the midsubstance region of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). {yields} Mechanical stretch induces higher increase of CCN2/CTGF gene expression and protein secretion in ACL interface cells compared with ACL midsubstance cells. {yields} CCN2/CTGF treatment stimulates the proliferation of ACL interface cells. -- Abstract: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-to-bone interface serves to minimize the stress concentrations that would arise between two different tissues. Mechanical stretch plays an important role in maintaining cell-specific features by inducing CCN family 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF). We previously reported that cyclic tensile strain (CTS) stimulates {alpha}1(I) collagen (COL1A1) expression in human ACL-derived cells. However, the biological function and stress-related response of CCN2/CTGF were still unclear in ACL fibroblasts. In the present study, CCN2/CTGF was observed in ACL-to-bone interface, but was not in the midsubstance region by immunohistochemical analyses. CTS treatments induced higher increase of CCN2/CTGF expression and secretion in interface cells compared with midsubstance cells. COL1A1 expression was not influenced by CCN2/CTGF treatment in interface cells despite CCN2/CTGF stimulated COL1A1 expression in midsubstance cells. However, CCN2/CTGF stimulated the proliferation of interface cells. Our results suggest that distinct biological function of stretch-induced CCN2/CTGF might regulate region-specific phenotypes of ACL-derived cells.

  18. Mechanical stretch increases CCN2/CTGF expression in anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Yoshiaki; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kubota, Satoshi; Kawata, Kazumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → CCN2/CTGF localizes to the ligament-to-bone interface, but is not to the midsubstance region of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). → Mechanical stretch induces higher increase of CCN2/CTGF gene expression and protein secretion in ACL interface cells compared with ACL midsubstance cells. → CCN2/CTGF treatment stimulates the proliferation of ACL interface cells. -- Abstract: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-to-bone interface serves to minimize the stress concentrations that would arise between two different tissues. Mechanical stretch plays an important role in maintaining cell-specific features by inducing CCN family 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF). We previously reported that cyclic tensile strain (CTS) stimulates α1(I) collagen (COL1A1) expression in human ACL-derived cells. However, the biological function and stress-related response of CCN2/CTGF were still unclear in ACL fibroblasts. In the present study, CCN2/CTGF was observed in ACL-to-bone interface, but was not in the midsubstance region by immunohistochemical analyses. CTS treatments induced higher increase of CCN2/CTGF expression and secretion in interface cells compared with midsubstance cells. COL1A1 expression was not influenced by CCN2/CTGF treatment in interface cells despite CCN2/CTGF stimulated COL1A1 expression in midsubstance cells. However, CCN2/CTGF stimulated the proliferation of interface cells. Our results suggest that distinct biological function of stretch-induced CCN2/CTGF might regulate region-specific phenotypes of ACL-derived cells.

  19. Medio-lateral knee fluency in anterior cruciate ligament-injured athletes during dynamic movement trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panos, Joseph A; Hoffman, Joshua T; Wordeman, Samuel C; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-03-01

    Correction of neuromuscular impairments after anterior cruciate ligament injury is vital to successful return to sport. Frontal plane knee control during landing is a common measure of lower-extremity neuromuscular control and asymmetries in neuromuscular control of the knee can predispose injured athletes to additional injury and associated morbidities. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of anterior cruciate ligament injury on knee biomechanics during landing. Two-dimensional frontal plane video of single leg drop, cross over drop, and drop vertical jump dynamic movement trials was analyzed for twenty injured and reconstructed athletes. The position of the knee joint center was tracked in ImageJ software for 500 milliseconds after landing to calculate medio-lateral knee motion velocities and determine normal fluency, the number of times per second knee velocity changed direction. The inverse of this calculation, analytical fluency, was used to associate larger numerical values with fluent movement. Analytical fluency was decreased in involved limbs for single leg drop trials (P=0.0018). Importantly, analytical fluency for single leg drop differed compared to cross over drop trials for involved (Pinjury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Finite Element Modelling of a Novel Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repairing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Vairis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The knee anterior cruciate ligament which connects the femur to the tibia is often torn during sudden twisting motions resulting in knee instability with surgery being an effective treatment where the torn ligament is replaced with a graft. This study provides qualitative stress information on a restored knee which has been repaired using a novel device. This device has been designed to reduce graft damage and to minimize post-surgery complications. The device as well as the intact knee have been modelled in 3D and studied using finite elements to assess the mechanical behaviour of the device under different loads. Results are evaluated and compared to equivalent published works. They showed that high stresses appear where tendons wrap around objects like the securing pin of the knee ligament repair device, while the highest stresses are away from the repair device components indicating that the device design does not affect the graft. Developed stresses were within the tendon elastic range, and load case direction does not affect significantly the developed stresses on the circumference of tendons in the most stressed region.

  1. In-situ mechanical behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament at multiple knee flexion angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H.H.; Janssen, D.W.; Verkerke, G.J.; Diercks, R.L.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the in-situ tensile behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was evaluated at various knee flexion angles. In four cadaveric knees the ACL was released at the tibial insertion, after which it was re-connected to a tensiometer. After pre-tensioning (10 N) the ACL

  2. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT AND LIPSCOMB PROCEDURE - A FOLLOWUP STUDY OF 7 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamohan S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury has become more common and the demand by the patients to return to pre-injury level of activity has made reconstruction of the ligament very crucial. Though there are various techniques in reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament, in this study, we compare two most commonly used techniques to see whether there is any significant difference in the outcome. METHODS Study included 25 patients in the age group of 19-36 years, of which 23 were males. The patients were divided randomly into 2 groups, and 15 patients underwent Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone Graft and 10 patients had Hamstring graft. RESULTS Patients were followed up at regular intervals monthly for the first six months and then at three monthly intervals. Patients were assessed using Knee Scoring Scale of Lysholm and Gillquist and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC scoring system. In addition, activity level, harvest site pain, thigh atrophy, kneeling pain and hamstring pain were assessed. All patients were followed up for a minimum period of 2 years. 20% of both groups were able to return to strenuous activity level, and 67% of Patellar tendon group and 50% of the Hamstring tendon group were able to return to moderate level of activity. 55% of patients in the patellar tendon group and 20% of patients in the hamstring tendon group had donor site pain in the first 6 months. 73% of patients in the hamstring group had at least 10 mm of thigh wasting. Pain on kneeling was seen only in the patellar tendon group (35% while hamstring pain was found only in the hamstring group (20%. CONCLUSIONS Patients in the patellar tendon group had increased anterior stability and were able to return to strenuous occupation. The difference in thigh atrophy between the two groups was not significant. The hamstring group had lower graft harvest site morbidity. Lachman test was the single most accurate

  3. Reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments using patellar tendon ligament grafts: diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRI in a 2-year follow-up regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Schmitt, J.; Lubrich, J.; Hochmuth, K.; Diebold, T. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Del Tredici, K. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroanatomy, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Suedkamp, N. [Dept. of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    We analyzed prospectively the diagnostic efficacy of contrast-enhanced MRI following anterior cruciate neoligament (ACL) reconstruction. One hundred fifty-six MR examinations were performed 2, 12, 52, 76, and 104 weeks post-operatively on 68 patients with ACL transplants. Sagittal, parasagittal, and coronal images using unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences, and post-contrast images utilizing T1-weighted spin-echo and fat-saturated sequences, were acquired. Results were correlated with those of the pivot shift, Lachman, and a mechanical test. The MR examination criteria included morphological analysis, signal intensity, transplant contrast enhancement, secondary signs (e.g., elongation of normal ligaments), and comparison with clinically standardized test results. Two weeks post-operatively all neoligaments showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences indistinguishable from that of normal cruciate or patellar ligaments [contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) on T1:1.6], with a 9% percentile enhancement. At 12-52 weeks, signal intensity increased (C/N:6.7), with a mean 50% percentile enhancement. The 1-year follow-up allowed no definite assessment of the neoligament's course. At 76 and 104 weeks, significant decrements in signal intensity (C/N:3.0) and ligamentous percentile enhancement (25%) occurred. All patients tested displayed stable transplants 2 years post-operatively. Contrast-enhanced MRI allows accurate evaluation of morphology and function up to 3 months post-operatively and 1-2 years following ACL reconstructive surgery. (orig.)

  4. Tears of anterior cruciate ligament and associated injury in the knee joint: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Jin Whan; Yoon, Yup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the characteristic findings in tears of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and associated injury at MR imaging. We reviewed the findings of MR images and the corresponding arthroscopic results of 32 patients with ACL tears. We evaluated the signal intensity and contour of ACL surrounding bony structures, menisci and associated injury of the knee joint. Complete ACL tears were present in 25 patients and partial ACL tears were in 7 patients. Complete ACL tears showed heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of the ACL in 14 patients (56%) and without bulging or absence in 11 patients(44%). Most patients torn ACL with contour bulging(12/14) had bone bruise, but only one patient torn ACL without bulging contour had bone bruise. ACL with thin continuous low signal band surrounding heterogenously increased signal intensity suggests partial tear which was seen in three patients of seven proved partial ACL tears. Combined bone injury in ACL tear were in 23 patients (73%) and most of these(22/23) were at midportion of lateral notch of femur and/or posterior portion of lateral tibial plateu. Deepening of lateral notch of femur were noted in 17 patients(53%). Associated injuries of the other ligaments of knee joint were buckling of the posterior cruciate ligament(16/32, 50%) and tears of the medial collateral ligament(11/32, 34%). Posterior horns of menisci were more frequent site of combined injury within menisci in patients with ACL tear. Acute tearing of ACL in MRI is seen as heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of ACL and combined bone bruises. Patients with torn ACL frequently have various combined injury. In patient with knee injury, these associated or ancillary findings suggest that ACL tear is present

  5. Numerical analysis of variations in posterior cruciate ligament properties and balancing techniques on total knee arthroplasty loading.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; Heesterbeek, P.J.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a widely used and successful orthopaedic procedure. During TKA, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can either be retained or substituted by a post-cam mechanism. One of the main functions of the PCL is to facilitate femoral rollback during knee flexion. For

  6. Stump entrapment of the anterior cruciate ligament in late childhood and adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Laor, Tal; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Displacement of a portion of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) into the intercondylar notch can cause a focal fibrotic reaction similar to that seen following ACL reconstruction. This displacement, which can result in locking or limitation of knee extension, is termed stump entrapment and is described in adult MR imaging literature. We present a pictorial essay of the etiology and appearance of stump entrapment on MR imaging of the knee in an older child and adolescents and review the significance of this finding. (orig.)

  7. Factors associated with playing football after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in female football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fältström, A; Hägglund, M; Kvist, J

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated whether player-related factors (demographic, personality, or psychological factors) or the characteristics of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury were associated with the return to playing football in females after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). We also compared current knee function, knee related quality of life and readiness to return to sport between females who returned to football and those who had not returned. Females who sustained a primary ACL rupture while playing football and underwent ACLR 6-36 months ago were eligible. Of the 460 contacted, 274 (60%) completed a battery of questionnaires, and 182 were included a median of 18 months (IQR 13) after ACLR. Of these, 94 (52%) returned to football and were currently playing, and 88 (48%) had not returned. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two factors associated with returning to football: short time between injury and ACLR (0-3 months, OR 5.6; 3-12 months OR 4.7 vs reference group > 12 months) and high motivation. Current players showed higher ratings for current knee function, knee-related quality of life, and psychological readiness to return to sport (P football after ACLR. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  9. [Treatment of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture with rivet-assisted hollow nail:a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Fu; Ma, Gou-Ping; Xu, Wei-Xing; Guo, Qiao-Feng; Liu, Hong

    2017-04-25

    To retrospectively investigate the clinical effect of the rivet-assisted hollow screw in the treatment of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture. Total 49 patients with knee cruciate ligament avulsion fracture in the ending point of the ligament from January 2010 to December 2014 were divided into the treatment group and the control group. Thirty-one patients in treatment group were treated with rivet-assisted double cannulate nail, including 13 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 38 to 51 years old, with a mean of (40.6±5.1) years old; according to Meyers classification, 23 cases of type 2, 8 cases of type 3; 5 patients were caused by the low energy injury and 26 patients were caused by the high energy injury. Eighteen patients in control group were treated with double gold hollow screw fixation, including 5 males and 13 females, ranging in age from 36 to 52 years old, with an average age of (4.16±4.7) years old; according to Meyers classification, 14 cases of type 2 and 4 cases of type 3;2 patients were caused by the low energy injury and 16 patients were caused by the high energy injury. The operation time, postoperative complications, fracture healing time and the last AKS scoring system were compared between the two groups. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 12 to 24 months, with an average of 14.2 months. The patients in treatment group had no displacement of fracture fragments and internal fixation failure. The results of AKS score:pain was 48.1±1.5, activity was 21.3±2.7, stability was 20.9±2.5, walking ability was 47.3±1.9, under the stairs ability was 43.4±2.1, the total score was 190.7±2.9. There were 2 cases in control group had fracture fragment displacement and 1 patient had nail withdraw. The results of AKS score:pain was 40.1±2.2, activity was 20.1±0.2, stability was 18.1±3.2, walking ability was 46.3±1.7, under the stairs ability was 40.2 ±1.3, the total score was 180.2±1.4. Therefore, the

  10. Extension of knee immobilization delays recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Mutsuzaki,, Hirotaka; Nakajima,, Hiromi; Sakane,, Masataka

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the influence of knee immobilization period on recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits. This knowledge is important for determining the appropriate rehabilitation approach for patients with ligament injuries, fracture, disuse atrophy, and degenerative joint disease. [Materials and Methods] Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were divided equally into the remobilization and control groups...

  11. The fifty highest cited papers in anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielgut, Ines; Dauwe, Jan; Leithner, Andreas; Holzer, Lukas A

    2017-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common injured knee ligaments and at the same time, one of the most frequent injuries seen in the sport orthopaedic practice. Due to the clinical relevance of ACL injuries, numerous papers focussing on this topic including biomechanical-, basic science-, clinical- or animal studies, were published. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequently cited scientific articles which address this subject, establish a ranking of the 50 highest cited papers and analyse them according to their characteristics. The 50 highest cited articles related to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury were searched in Thomson ISI Web of Science® by the use of defined search terms. All types of scientific papers with reference to our topic were ranked according to the absolute number of citations and analyzed for the following characteristics: journal title, year of publication, number of citations, citation density, geographic origin, article type and level of evidence. The 50 highest cited articles had up to 1624 citations. The top ten papers on this topic were cited 600 times at least. Most papers were published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The publication years spanned from 1941 to 2007, with the 1990s and 2000s accounting for half of the articles (n = 25). Seven countries contributed to the top 50 list, with the USA having by far the most contribution (n = 40). The majority of articles could be attributed to the category "Clinical Science & Outcome". Most of them represent a high level of evidence. Scientific articles in the field of ACL injury are highly cited. The majority of these articles are clinical studies that have a high level of evidence. Although most of the articles were published between 1990 and 2007, the highest cited articles in absolute and relative numbers were published in the early 1980s. These articles contain well established scoring- or classification systems. The

  12. Benefits of sagittal-oblique MRI reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenezić, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: MRI examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee gives valuable information for conventional, physiatrist and/or arthroscopic microinvasiv treatment. three planar MRI examination and 3D reconstructions are highly precise in the analysis of the intra and periarticular structures, with exceptions of anterior cruciate ligament. Direct contact with the roof of the intercondilar fossa (in the full extension during the examination) and its specific orientation makes visualization of ACL diagnostically problematic. In a one year period precise protocol for MRI visualization of ACL was tested and applied as “Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction”. In short, it has been Angled biplanar reconstruction in the parasagital and paratransversal planes (patientrelated and arbitrary selected in full extension), on T2, 2mm slice and 0,2 mm gap. 153 MRI examinations of the patients with lesions of the ACL were included in the study in the Clinical Center of Montenegro during 2005 year. Beside standard Knee MRI protocol all patients had the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL and the Flexion MRI examination, to compare with. The Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL it is adapted to the concrete morphology of the patients ACL and it does not depend of the volume of the examined knee. In comparison with the Standard Knee MRI protocol and with the Flexion MRI examination, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL takes less time to perform, and the ligament is shown in fool length at three to five slices, which is more than with the both compared protocols. Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction of ACL is therefore patient dependable, orientated in shape of concrete ligament of the patient’s knee. In combination with age, occupation, physical activity and level of patients while to contribute in healing process, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL contribute to scholastic approach, as highest benefit to patients with

  13. Aquatic treadmill water level influence on pelvic limb kinematics in cranial cruciate ligament-deficient dogs with surgically stabilised stifles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, G; Smalley, C; Brown, N; Bialczak, K; Carroll, D

    2018-02-01

    To compare pelvic limb joint kinematics and temporal gait characteristics during land-based and aquatic-based treadmill walking in dogs that have undergone surgical stabilisation for cranial cruciate ligament deficiency. Client-owned dogs with surgically stabilised stifles following cranial cruciate ligament deficiency performed three walking trials consisting of three consecutive gait cycles on an aquatic treadmill under four water levels. Hip, stifle and hock range of motion; peak extension; and peak flexion were assessed for the affected limb at each water level. Gait cycle time and stance phase percentage were also determined. Ten client-owned dogs of varying breeds were evaluated at a mean of 55·2 days postoperatively. Aquatic treadmill water level influenced pelvic limb kinematics and temporal gait outcomes. Increased stifle joint flexion was observed as treadmill water level increased, peaking when the water level was at the hip. Similarly, hip flexion increased at the hip water level. Stifle range of motion was greatest at stifle and hip water levels. Stance phase percentage was significantly decreased when water level was at the hip. Aquatic treadmill walking has become a common rehabilitation modality following surgical stabilisation of cranial cruciate ligament deficiency. However, evidence-based best practice guidelines to enhance stifle kinematics do not exist. Our findings suggest that rehabilitation utilising a water level at or above the stifle will achieve the best stifle kinematics following surgical stifle stabilisation. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. Accuracy of a computer-assisted planning and placement system for anatomical femoral tunnel positioning in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, J.W.H.; Wymenga, A.B.; Blankevoort, L.; Eygendaal, D.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Femoral tunnel positioning is a difficult, but important factor in successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Computer navigation can improve the anatomical planning procedure besides the tunnel placement procedure. Methods The accuracy of the computer-assisted femoral

  15. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament mechanics and allow for new tissue regeneration. Key words: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), tissue engineering, cells, tensile, stress relaxation, polymer, allograft, xenograft. INTRODUCTION. The anterior cruciate ligament ...

  16. Total knee replacement with retention of both cruciate ligaments: a 22-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouret, P; Lavoie, F; Cloutier, J-M

    2013-07-01

    We report on the long-term results of 163 bicruciate-retaining Hermes 2C total knee replacements in 130 patients at a mean follow-up of 22.4 years (20.3 to 23.5). Even when the anterior cruciate ligament had a partially degenerative appearance it was preserved as long as the knee had a normal anterior drawer and Lachman's test pre-operatively. The description and surgical technique of this minimally constrained prosthesis were published in 1983 and the ten-year clinical results in 1999. A total of 12% of the knees (20 of 163) in this study were revised because of wear of the polyethylene tibial insert. Excellent stability was achieved and the incidence of aseptic component loosening was 4.3% (seven of 163). The survival rate using revision for any reason as the endpoint was 82% (95% confidence interval 76.2 to 88.0). Although this series included a relatively small number of replacements, it demonstrated that the anterior cruciate ligament, even when partially degenerated at the time of TKR, remained functional and provided adequate stability at a long-term follow-up.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Herrig, A.; Grebe, P.; Runkel, M.; Regentrop, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To categorise discrepancies in findings of the menisci and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) between arthroscopy and MRI. Materials and methods: The MRIs of 236 patients were retrospectively analysed by an experienced radiologist without knowledge of clinical and/for operative findings. Discrepancies in arthroscopic findings were reevaluated together with the arthroscopist to determine their cause of error. Results: The diagnostic accuracies for injuries of the medial and lateral meniscus and the ACL were 92.4%, 92.4%, and 94.1%. respectively. For the menisci, causes for discrepancies in findings (n=31) were: overinterpretation of central signal intensities with contact to the meniscal surface but without disturbance of the meniscal contour as a tear (n=12), insufficient arthroscopie evaluation of the knee joint (n=11), overlooked tears on MR imaging (n=6), misinterpretation of normal anatomic structures (n=1), ''magic angle'' phenomenon (n=1), and missed tears at MRI (n=1). Causes for discrepancies for the ACL (n=18) were: nearly complete versus complete rupture either at MRI or arthroscopy and vice versa (n=9), insufficient arthroscopic evaluation (n=6), insufficient MRI technique (n=2), and overlooked tear on MR imaging (n=1). Conclusions: Discrepant findings between MRI and arthroscopy may be also due to an insufficient arthroscopic evaluation in clinical routine. The close cooperation between surgeons and radiologists improves the understanding of the methods of each other. (orig.) [de

  18. The Effect of Kinesiotaping Implementation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, İbrahim Halil; Duymaz, Tomris; Özgönenel, Levent

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to measure effects of kinesiotaping on pain and range of motion in the conservative treatment of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) rupture. Material-Methods: A total of 26 patients(24 women, 2 men) who had unilateral ACL rupture 64.46±9.00 years old(46-81years), 13 had physiotherapy only(mean age 64.46±9.35 years),13 had physiotherapy and kinesiotape(mean age 64.46±9.01 years).The patients in both groups received physiotherapy program (ultrasound with 1 MHz, 1W/cm2 during 5minutes; CPM; strength exercise for quadriceps muscle and cold pack during 15 minute). Kinesiotape was applied to the knee and quadriceps of the patient’s leg using a prescribed application to facilitate muscle performance for the experimental group versus a only physiotherapy group.The patients were treated 20 times for four weeks. Socio-demographic variables (gender, age, body mass index, Kellgren-Lawrence system for classification of knee osteoarthritis, use of analgesic drug, pain during rest and activity (VAS=Visual Analog Scale), range of motion of knee flexion and extansion (universal goniometer), circumference measurements of the knee and the quadriceps muscle (up to 10 cm of patella) were measured at baseline, mid the treatment program and after the treatment program. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 22.0 for Windows.Frequency and percentage (average, standard deviation)were used as descriptive statistics of the study.The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the differences between before and after treatment measurements.The Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare groups.Significance was accepted as pKinesiotape Group Physiotherapy Group p VAS rest Pretreatment 2.07±2.49 2.38±2.72 0.705 Midtreatment 0.46±0.96 1.84±2.03 0.056 Posttreatment 0.07±0.27 2.07±2.36 0.008* p 0.017* 0.046* VAS activity Pretreatment 4.69±3.19 6.00±2.08 0.253 Midtreatment 0.84±0.80 4.30±1.70 0.000** Posttreatment 0.15±0.37 3.61±1.75 0

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament tear: comparison of MR features between complete and partial tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki Young; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yu Jin; Rho, Eun Jin; Kim, Young Hoon; Yi, Jeong Geun; Ahn, Joong Mo

    1997-01-01

    To determine the MRI features which distinguish complete and partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and to thus improve MRI interpretation. In 80 patients, we analyzed MR findings of direct and indirect signs of ACL tear (complete tear, 61 cases, partial tear, 19 cases) confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery, and compared the relative incidence of each sign in cases of complete and partial tear. Direct and indirect signs were found in 61 (100%) and 60 cases (98.4%), respectively, in complete tears, but in 16 (84.2%) and 15 cases (78.9%), respectively, in partial tears. Poor visualization, discontinuity and hyperintensity were seen in all complete tears but in only nine cases (47.4%) of partial tear. A wavy or abnormal contour was seen in 53 cases (86.9%) of complete tear and 14 (73.7%) of partial tear. A wavy contour without other direct signs was seen in only five cases (26.3%) of partial tear. Three cases (15.8%) of partial tear showed normal MR finding. Indirect signs, i.e. abnormal ACL angle, abnormal ACL-Blumensaat line angle, abnormal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) line, abnormal PCL angle, PCL buckling, anterior displacement of tibia, posterior displacement of lateral meniscus, bone bruise, Segond fracture, tear of collateral ligaments, PCL, and tear of meniscus were commoner in complete than in partial tears. Two cases of O'Donoghue's triad and two of popliteus injury were seen only in complete tears. Direct and indirect signs of ACL tear were more commonly noted in complete than in partial tears. The latter showed MR features varying from normal to almost complete tear. We suggest that a wavy contour without other direct signs is indicative of a partial tear, and that O'Donoghue's triad and popliteus muscle injury are indirect signs of a complete tear

  20. An osteogenesis/angiogenesis-stimulation artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Jinyan; Jiang, Jia; Lv, Fang; Chang, Jiang; Chen, Shiyi; Wu, Chengtie

    2017-05-01

    To solve the poor healing of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament in bone tunnel, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial ligaments were successfully prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It was hypothesized that Cu-BG coated PET (Cu-BG/PET) grafts could enhance the in vitro osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) and in vivo graft-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a goat model. Scanning electron microscope and EDS mapping analysis revealed that the prepared nanocoatings had uniform element distribution (Cu, Ca, Si and P) and nanostructure. The surface hydrophilicity of PET grafts was significantly improved after depositing Cu-BG nanocoatings. The in vitro study displayed that the Cu-BG/PET grafts supported the attachment and proliferation of rBMSCs, and significantly promoted the expression of HIF-1α gene, which up-regulated the osteogenesis-related genes (S100A10, BMP2, OCN) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGF) in comparison with PET or BG coated PET (BG/PET) grafts which do not contain Cu element. Meanwhile, Cu-BG/PET grafts promoted the bone regeneration at the graft-host bone interface and decreased graft-bone interface width, thus enhancing the bonding strength as well as angiogenesis (as indicated by CD31 expression) in the goat model as compared with BG/PET and pure PET grafts. The study demonstrates that the Cu-containing biomaterials significantly promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in the repair of bone defects of large animals and thus offering a promising method for ACL reconstruction by using Cu-containing nanobioglass modified PET grafts. It remains a significant challenge to develop an artificial graft with distinct osteogenetic/angiogenetic activity to enhance graft-bone healing for ligament reconstruction. To solve these problems, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial

  1. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF SPORTS ACTIVITIES ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER THE RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninković, Srđan; Avramov, Snežana; Harhaji, Vladimir; Obradović, Mirko; Vranješ, Miodrag; Milankov, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the nature and presence of influence of different levels of sports activity on the life quality of the patients a year after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament. The study included 185 patients operated at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina, who were followed for twelve months. Data were collected using the modified Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire which included the Lysholm scale. This study included 146 male and 39 female subjects. The reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament was equally successful in both gender groups. In relation to different types of sports activity, there were no differences in the overall life quality measured by the questionnaire and its subscales, regardless of the level (professional or recreational). However, regarding the level of sports activities, there were differences among the subjects engaged in sports activities at the national level as compared with those going in for sports activities at the recreational level, and particularly in comparison with physically inactive population. A significant correlation was not found by examining the aforementioned relationship between sports activities. This study has shown that the overall life quality a year after the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament does not differ in relation to either the gender of the subjects or the type of sports activity, while the level of sports activity does have some influence on the quality of life. Professional athletes have proved to train significantly more intensively after this reconstruction than those going in for sports recreationally.

  2. Diagnostic equivalence of conventional and fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Hilborn, M.D.; Vellet, A.D.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,; Romano, C.C.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,

    1997-01-01

    Many techniques and pulse sequences have been devised for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. The present study compares fast spin echo (FSE) imaging to conventional spin echo imaging at a field strength of 1.5 T in an effort to determine if these sequences are diagnostically equivalent. Where available, arthroscopy was also done. A total of 52 patients were imaged using both FSE and conventional spin echo sequences. Eight volunteers were used as controls. Arthroscopy was performed on 10 patients. The anterior cruciate ligament was assessed in a blinded fashion by three radiologists. The Kappa statistic was then used to determine the percentage agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging. Fast spin echo sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 94.8% and an accuracy of 96.3% when compared to arthroscopy. Conventional spin echo imaging and arthroscopy had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 84.6% and an accuracy of 88.9%. The remaining 34 patients who did not undergo arthroscopy were followed clinically because clinical and imaging findings were not suggestive of ACL tears. These demonstrated 72% agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging using the Kappa statistic, with regards to calling ACL normal or having only a low-grade partial tear. Fast spin echo imaging produces images of the anterior cruciate ligament that have similar diagnostic accuracy to conventional spin echo images (P<0.05) within a much shorter scan time. These results however, require further validation in a larger group, preferably with arthroscopic correlation. (author)

  3. Exercise Rehabilitation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun Ok An

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Exercise rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has changed dramatically in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent changes in exercise programs related to ACL rehabilitation. METHODS We conducted a literature review of recently published articles related exercise programs after ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The accelerated rehabilitation program, which allows patients to achieve full extension ofthe knee early in the postoperative period, is now a widely practiced rehabilitation program. A prospective study of rehabilitation programs after ACL reconstruction showed that early joint exercises do not interfere with the healing of grafts. Instead, they alleviate pain, thereby reducing the negative impact. Moreover, according to several biomechanical studies, open kinetic chain exercises are potentially disadvantageous to knee stability. There is no evidence that early weight bearing results in weakening of graft distraction or internal fixation compared with delayed weight bearing. CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, prevention of ACL injuries and rehabilitative exercise training can help to achieve optimal exercise performance while avoiding the risk of sports-related injury.

  4. How Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury was averted during Knee Collapse in a NBA Point Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilaty, Nathan D; Bates, Nathaniel A; Krych, Aaron J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-01-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur with rapid decelerations and pivoting. A recent injury to a high-level National Basketball Association (NBA) player demonstrated neuromuscular control and injury-sparing mechanisms that resulted in only minor ligament injury to the medial collateral ligament. We analyzed biomechanical mechanisms via publically available orthogonal 2-D video to demonstrate how this potential ACL injury was averted. Analysis of the knee injury mechanism demonstrated that the NBA player experienced low ground reaction force, high sagittal plane flexion, and maintenance of frontal plane stability with neuromuscular control. The outcome of these factors inhibited dynamic valgus collapse of the knee throughout the fall, avoiding ACL injury - a potentially career-altering injury. Many athletes, professional and recreational, will be subjected to similar mechanisms of injury and will have improved outcomes if they can successfully utilize preventive strategies of neuromuscular control to limit injury mechanisms.

  5. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING THE DOUBLE-BUNDLE TECHNIQUE – EVALUATION IN THE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

    OpenAIRE

    D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Castropil, Wagner; Garofo, Antônio Guilherme Padovani; Cantuária, Anita Lopes; Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Luques, Isabela Ugo; Duarte, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the methodology of knee rotation analysis using biomechanics laboratory instruments and to present the preliminary results from a comparative study on patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the double-bundle technique. Methods: The protocol currently used in our laboratory was described. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis was performed and knee rotation amplitude was measured on eight normal patient...

  6. Intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Michael D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, B.M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shotts, Ezekiel E. [NEA Baptist Clinic, Jonesboro, AR (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Unlike with anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about the prevalence of intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury in the knee. The objectives of this study were to characterize and identify the frequency of meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries in these patients, and to see if management might be affected. Altogether, 48 knee MRI exams with isolated PCL tears were evaluated for the presence of: grade and location of PCL tear, meniscal tear, articular chondral lesion, bone bruise, and fracture. Comparisons between PCL tear grade and location, as well as mechanism of injury when known, with the presence of various intra-articular pathologies, were made using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. In all, 69 % of isolated PCL tears occur in the midsubstance, 27 % proximally. Meniscal tears were seen in 25 % of knees, involving all segments of both menisci, except for the anterior horn medial meniscus. Altogether, 23 % had focal cartilage lesions, usually affecting the central third medial femoral condyle and medial trochlea, while 12.5 % of knees had fractures, and 48 % demonstrated bone bruises, usually involving the central to anterior tibiofemoral joint. The presence of a fracture (p = 0.0123) and proximal location of PCL tear (p = 0.0016) were both associated with the hyperextension mechanism of injury. There were no statistically significant associations between PCL tear grade and presence of intra-articular abnormality. Potentially treatable meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries are relatively prevalent, and demonstrable on MRI in patients with isolated acute PCL injury of the knee. (orig.)

  7. [ARTHROSCOPIC STUDY OF REMNANT-PRESERVED RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Yan, Shi; Dong, Feng; Lian, Yongyun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the value of ligament remnant preservation during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by observing the integrity, the tension, the synovial membrane covering, and the color of the reconstructed ligament under arthroscopy. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 122 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and arthroscopic internal fixation removal at 1 year after reconstruction were included in this study. Of these cases, 61 cases underwent ACL reconstruction using the remnant-preserved technique (preservation group); the other 61 cases underwent ACL reconstruction using non remnant-preserved technique (non preservation group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury side, body mass index, type of injury, the time from injury to reconstruction, and the result of KT-2000 examination between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The reconstructed ACL were observed under arthroscopy when internal fixation was removed, and the effectiveness was evaluated according to the criteria of AO Yingfang. In preservation group, the results were excellent in 34 cases, good in 22 cases, fair in 4 cases, and poor in 1 case; and in non preservation group, the results were excellent in 29 cases, good in 20 cases, fair in 10 cases, and poor in 2 cases; and there was no significant difference between 2 groups (Z= -1.320, P=0.187). In ACL reconstruction, the remnant-preserved technique is not obviously better than non remnant-preserved technique in the integrity, tension, membrane covering, and color.

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  9. Activity preferences, lifestyle modifications and re-injury fears influence longer-term quality of life in people with knee symptoms following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Filbay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Questions: How do people with knee symptoms describe their quality of life and experiences 5 to 20 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR? What factors impact upon the quality of life of these people? Design: Qualitative study. Participants: Seventeen people with knee symptoms 5 to 20 years after ACLR and high (n = 8 or low (n = 9 quality of life scores were recruited from a cross-sectional study. Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted and transcribed. The data obtained from the interventions underwent inductive coding and thematic analysis. Results: Four consistent themes emerged from the interviews as common determinants of quality of life following ACLR: physical activity preferences; lifestyle modifications; adaptation and acceptance; and fear of re-injury. All participants described the importance of maintaining a physically active lifestyle and the relationship between physical activity and quality of life. Participants who avoided sport or activity reported experiencing reduced quality of life. Participants who suppressed or overcame re-injury fears to continue sport participation described experiencing a satisfactory quality of life while taking part in sport despite knee symptoms. For some participants, resuming competitive sport resulted in subsequent knee trauma, anterior cruciate ligament re-rupture or progressive deterioration of knee function, with negative impacts on quality of life following sport cessation. Participants who enjoyed recreational exercise often adapted their lifestyle early after ACLR, while others described adapting their lifestyle at a later stage to accommodate knee impairments; this was associated with feelings of acceptance and satisfaction, irrespective of knee symptoms. Conclusion: Activity preferences, lifestyle modifications and fear of re-injury influenced quality of life in people with knee symptoms up to 20 years following ACLR. People with a preference

  10. Anterolateral ligament injuries in knees with an anterior cruciate ligament tear. Contribution of ultrasonography and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Constans, Olivia; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Sans, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Wytrykowski, Karine; Larbi, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    To describe the pathological appearance of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) on US and MRI in knees with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This prospective study included 30 patients who had a suspected acute ACL tear. Their injured and contralateral knees were evaluated with radiography, US and MRI. Two radiologists evaluated the ALL on the MRI and US examinations. Agreement between these examiners' findings was evaluated with Cohen's kappa. On US examination, the ALL was found to be injured in 63% of cases (19/30; k = 0.93). The enthesis was found to be torn in 50% of cases (15/30; k = 1), with the tear located at the tibial attachment in all instances. On the MRI exam, the ALL was found to be injured in 53% of cases (16/30; k = 0.93). The enthesis was found to be torn in 13% of cases (4/30; k = 0.76), with the tear located at the tibial attachment in all instances (k = 0.93). ALL injuries that occur with ACL tears are located at the tibial enthesis. They are often associated with bone avulsion at the enthesis and are better viewed on US. (orig.)

  11. Anterolateral ligament injuries in knees with an anterior cruciate ligament tear. Contribution of ultrasonography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Constans, Olivia; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Sans, Nicolas [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service de Radiologie, Toulouse (France); Cavaignac, Etienne; Wytrykowski, Karine [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service d' Orthopedie, Toulouse (France); Larbi, Ahmed [Hopital Universitaire Caremeau, Service de Radiologie, Nimes (France)

    2018-01-15

    To describe the pathological appearance of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) on US and MRI in knees with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This prospective study included 30 patients who had a suspected acute ACL tear. Their injured and contralateral knees were evaluated with radiography, US and MRI. Two radiologists evaluated the ALL on the MRI and US examinations. Agreement between these examiners' findings was evaluated with Cohen's kappa. On US examination, the ALL was found to be injured in 63% of cases (19/30; k = 0.93). The enthesis was found to be torn in 50% of cases (15/30; k = 1), with the tear located at the tibial attachment in all instances. On the MRI exam, the ALL was found to be injured in 53% of cases (16/30; k = 0.93). The enthesis was found to be torn in 13% of cases (4/30; k = 0.76), with the tear located at the tibial attachment in all instances (k = 0.93). ALL injuries that occur with ACL tears are located at the tibial enthesis. They are often associated with bone avulsion at the enthesis and are better viewed on US. (orig.)

  12. Partial and complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament. Direct and indirect MR signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.T.; Tu, H.Y.; Chen, R.C.; Shih, T.T.F.; Shau, W.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MR direct and indirect signs for knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) partial or complete tear. Material and Methods: According to documented MR direct and indirect signs for ACL tear, we retrospectively reviewed the incidence of those signs in 15 partial ACL tear and 17 complete ACL tear patients. The findings were also compared with duration of injury (less or more than 6 weeks, as acute or chronic stages). Results: A residual straight and tight ACL fiber in at least one pulse sequence was more frequently detected in partial ACL tears. The empty notch sign, a wavy contour of ACL, bone contusion at lateral compartment and lateral meniscus posterior horn tear were significantly more frequently seen in complete tear cases. The posterior cruciate ligament angle in chronic complete ACL tear cases (109 deg ±20 deg) had a tendency to be less than in chronic partial ACL tear cases (119 deg ±18 deg). Conclusion: The empty notch sign, a wavy ACL, bone contusion, and posterior horn of lateral meniscus tears are suggestive of a complete ACL tear. A residual straight and tight ACL fiber seen in at least one image section is a helpful sign to diagnosis of partial ACL tear. In the acute ACL injury stage, a focal increase of the ACL signal intensity is more suggestive of a partial ACL tear

  13. Femoral loosening of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: The effect of posterior cruciate ligament retention and bone quality reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van de Groes, S.A.W.; De Waal Malefijt, M.C.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    High-flexion total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be more sensitive to femoral loosening than conventional TKA as the knee joint force increases during deep flexion. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the probability of femoral loosening is equal in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)

  14. Asymmetry and Thigh Muscle Coactivity in Fatigued Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Elite Skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The acute effects of fatigue on functional interlimb asymmetry and quadriceps/hamstring muscle activity levels, including preparatory coactivation during squat jump takeoff and landing, were evaluated in elite alpine ski racers with/without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR......). METHODS: Twenty-two elite ski racers (ACLR, n = 11; control, n = 11) performed an 80-s repeated squat jump test (jump test) on a dual force plate system with simultaneous EMG recordings in vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris. Asymmetry index (AI) and jump height of body...

  15. Can MR appearance performed a few days after injury predict the morphological recovery of the anterior cruciate ligament treated by early protective motion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Kawano, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether early MRI after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can predict the morphological recovery of the torn ACL treated by early protective motion. Consecutive acute ruptures of the ACL in 35 patients (mean age; 27.2 years) who were allowed to be healed without surgery were evaluated by repeated MRI. MR images were compared for a few days after injury (initial MRI), approximately one month after treatment (second MRI), and at an average follow-up of 8.5 months (follow-up MRI). The average time from injury to the initial MRI was 7.3 days. The initial MR appearance of the torn ligament was classified into five types of visualized ligament contours. The emergence of restoration signs such as straight band and/or verticalization was examined in the second MRI. The follow-up MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. Relationships between the initial MRI and the follow-up MRI, the restoration signs on the second MRI and the follow-up MRI were analyzed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. As a result, the contour of the initial MRI was found to correlate with morphological recovery on the follow-up MRI (r s =0.565, p<0.001). There was no correlation between the emergence of restoration signs on the second MRI and morphological recovery on the follow-up MRI. (author)

  16. Optimization of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Paradigm : Novel Feedback Techniques to Enhance Motor Learning and Reduce Injury Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Dowling, Ariel V.; Faigenbaum, Avery; Ford, Kevin R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Onate, James A.; Otten, Bert; Myer, Gregory D.

    SYNOPSIS: Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs effectively reduce ACL injury risk in the short term. Despite these programs, ACL injury incidence-is still high, making it imperative to continue to improve current prevention strategies. A potential limitation of current

  17. In vitro cytoprotective effects of acetylsalicylic acid, carprofen, meloxicam, or robenacoxib against apoptosis induced by sodium nitroprusside in canine cruciate ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldherr, Katrin; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Spreng, David E; Forterre, Simone

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether incubation of cruciate ligament cells with acetylsalicylic acid, carprofen, meloxicam, or robenacoxib provides protection against apoptosis induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Explants of cranial (CCL) and caudal (CaCL) cruciate ligaments from eight 1-day-old Beagles. Primary cultures of CCL and CaCL cells were created via enzymatic dissociation of cruciate explants. Purified cell cultures were incubated for 2 hours without (controls) or with 1 of 3 concentrations of 1 of 4 NSAIDs (10, 100, or 200 μg of acetylsalicylic acid/mL; 0.1, 1, or 10 μg of carprofen/mL; 0.1, 1, or 10 μg of meloxicam/mL; or 0.1, 1, or 10 μg of robenacoxib/mL) and subsequently incubated for 18 hours with 1 of 3 concentrations of SNP in an attempt to induce mild, moderate, or severe cytotoxic effects. Cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed via a cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Prostaglandin E(2) concentrations were measured via an ELISA. Cytoprotective effects of NSAIDs were dependent on the extent of SNP-induced apoptosis and were greatest in CCL and CaCL cell cultures with moderate SNP-induced cytotoxic effects. Preincubation with an NSAID improved cell viability by 15% to 45% when CCL and CaCL cells were subsequently incubated with SNP. Carprofen (10 μg/mL) had the greatest cytoprotective effects for CCL and CaCL cells. Incubation with NSAIDs resulted in a nonsignificant decrease in PGE(2) production from SNP-damaged cells. Results indicated that carprofen, meloxicam, and robenacoxib may reduce apoptosis in cells originating from canine cruciate ligaments.

  18. Sports-specific differences in postsurgical infections after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutsch, Werner; Zellner, Johannes; Zeman, Florian; Nerlich, Michael; Koch, Matthias; Pfeifer, Christian; Angele, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Post-operative infection after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but severe complication, particularly for young and active patients. It is unclear whether the prevalence of knee infection is correlated with the type of sports or the level of performance. From 2008 to 2012, the internal single-centre ACL registry of the FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence Regensburg was retrospectively screened for sex, age, time between isolated primary ACL rupture and surgery, surgical technique, rate of infection after ACL reconstruction and the type of sports practised. In total, 4801 ACL reconstructions had been conducted over 5 years, 4579 in amateur and 221 in professional athletes. After application of the exclusion criteria, 1809 athletes with ACL reconstruction were analysed regarding postsurgical infection and the type of sports practised. Professionals and amateurs did not significantly differ with regard to infection rates (n.s.) but in the timing of ACL repair (p sports (n.s.). Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis were the predominant detected bacteria. All patients were hospitalised and successfully treated with arthroscopic lavage and antibiotic medication. ACL infections showed sports-related differences. Athletes practising summer outdoor sports such as football had a significantly higher risk of infection after ACL reconstruction than winter sports athletes. No difference was found between professional and amateur athletes. Relevant prevention strategies for postsurgical ACL infections should consider influencing patient factors such as the type of sports activity and attendant circumstances. III.

  19. [Evaluation of early physiotherapy in patients after surgical treatment of cruciate ligament injury by bone-tendon-bone method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupiński, Kamil; Krekora, Katarzyna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most important structures of the knee joint. It has a stabilizing function and causes sliding movement between the articular surfaces. Most frequently there comes to the anterior cruciate ligament injury during practicing sports such as skiing, football, sports which require sudden turns and those which are associated with jumps for height like basketball and volleyball. The aim of study was to evaluate of the outcomes of complex physiotherapy after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament by bone -tendon-bone (BTB) method. The study involved 41 patients, 8 women and 33 men, aged 20 to 45 years, body height 1.60-1.90 cm and body weight 50-100 kg. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I included 26 patients (3 women and 23 men) after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Group II--control-group included 15 patients (5 women and 10 men) after ACL injury but not subjected to the ligament reconstruction. The patients from both groups underwent rehabilitation according to the same rehabilitation program suggested by the Medical Magnus Clinic in Lodz, which consisted in performing daily exercises in open and closed kinetic chains. All group I and II patients were examined three times: after surgery (before the start of the rehabilitation), in the sixth week of rehabilitation and 12 weeks afterwards. The clinical examination included: measurement of the range of movement in the knee joint, the measurement of musculoskeletal strength with Lovett scale, knee pain assessment using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), transpatellar anthropometric measurement of the knee joint, linear measurements of the thigh and shin (at two points: 5 and 10 cm above the patellar apex and at two points: 5 and 10 cm below the patellar base). Introduction of early highly specialized physiotherapy has been demonstrated to contribute to the improvement of the rehabilitation outcomes and to the shortening of the therapy. A statistically significant

  20. Editorial Commentary: The All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Distal Femoral Approach: Sockets or Tunnels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Frank A

    2018-05-01

    I believe that the distal femoral approach for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete with 3 to 6 years of remaining growth is best performed with an all-inside, all-epiphyseal technique using sockets rather than an outside-in approach creating tunnels. A shorter socket rather than a longer tunnel exposes a smaller surface area of the lateral distal femoral physis to potential compromise and resultant valgus malalignment. In addition, exiting the lateral femoral aspect of the epiphysis with a full-diameter tunnel as compared with a smaller diameter drill hole used to prepare a socket places the posterior articular cartilage, the lateral collateral ligament and anterolateral ligament footprints, and the popliteus tendon insertion at risk. My preference for sockets is also related to my belief that they provide a superior biologic milieu for graft incorporation compared with a full-length tunnel with the attendant violation of the lateral femoral cortex of the epiphysis. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of sex and trauma impact on the rupture site of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesmueller, Sandra; Huf, Wolfgang; Rettl, Gregor; Dahm, Falko; Meznik, Alexander; Muschitz, Gabriela; Kitzinger, Hugo; Bukaty, Adam; Fialka, Christian; Vierhapper, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Although sex- and gender-specific analyses have been gaining more attention during the last years they have rarely been performed in orthopaedic literature. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether for injuries of the UCL the specific location of the rupture is influenced by sex. A secondary study question addressed the sex-independent effect of trauma intensity on the rupture site of the UCL. This study is a retrospective analysis of all patients with either a proximal or distal bony avulsion or with a mid-substance tear or ligament avulsion of the UCL treated surgically between 1992 and 2015 at two level-I trauma centres. Trauma mechanisms leading to the UCL injury were classified into the following categories: (1) blunt trauma (i.e., strains), (2) low-velocity injuries (e.g., fall from standing height, assaults), and (3) high-velocity injuries (e.g., sports injuries, motor vehicle accidents). After reviewing the surgical records, patients were divided into three groups, depending upon the ligament rupture site: (1) mid-substance tears, (2) proximal ligament or bony avulsions and (3) distal ligament or bony avulsions. Dependencies between the specific rupture site and the explanatory variables (sex, age, and trauma intensity) were evaluated using χ2 test and logistic regression analysis. In total, 1582 patients (1094 males, 488 females) met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 41 years (range: 9-90 years). Taking into account the effects of sex on trauma intensity (p<0.001) and of trauma intensity on rupture site (p<0.001), mid-substance tears occurred more frequently in women, whereas men were more prone to distal ligament or bony avulsions (p<0.001). In other words, sex and rupture site correlated due to the effects of sex on trauma intensity and of trauma intensity on rupture site, but taking into account those effects there still was a significant effect of sex on rupture site. The results of this study demonstrate that with regression

  2. Cryotherapy with dynamic intermittent compression for analgesia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgier, J; Cassard, X

    2014-05-01

    Cryotherapy is a useful adjunctive analgesic measure in patients with postoperative pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Either static permanent compression or dynamic intermittent compression can be added to increase the analgesic effect of cryotherapy. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of these two compression modalities combined with cryotherapy in relieving postoperative pain and restoring range of knee motion after ligament reconstruction surgery. When combined with cryotherapy, a dynamic and intermittent compression is associated with decreased analgesic drug requirements, less postoperative pain, and better range of knee motion compared to static compression. We conducted a case-control study of consecutive patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at a single institution over a 3-month period. Both groups received the same analgesic drug protocol. One group was managed with cryotherapy and dynamic intermittent compression (Game Ready(®)) and the other with cryotherapy and static compression (IceBand(®)). Of 39 patients, 20 received dynamic and 19 static compression. In the post-anaesthesia recovery unit, the mean visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was 2.4 (range, 0-6) with dynamic compression and 2.7 (0-7) with static compression (P=0.3); corresponding values were 1.85 (0-9) vs. 3 (0-8) (P=0.16) after 6 hours and 0.6 (0-3) vs. 1.14 (0-3) (P=0.12) at discharge. The cumulative mean tramadol dose per patient was 57.5mg (0-200mg) with dynamic compression and 128.6 mg (0-250 mg) with static compression (P=0.023); corresponding values for morphine were 0mg vs. 1.14 mg (0-8 mg) (Pcryotherapy decreases analgesic drug requirements after ACL reconstruction and improves the postoperative recovery of range of knee motion. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Estrogen inhibits lysyl oxidase and decreases mechanical function in engineered ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cassandra A; Lee-Barthel, Ann; Marquino, Louise; Sandoval, Natalie; Marcotte, George R; Baar, Keith

    2015-05-15

    Women are more likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture than men, and the incidence of ACL rupture in women rises with increasing estrogen levels. We used an engineered ligament model to determine how an acute rise in estrogen decreases the mechanical properties of ligaments. Using fibroblasts isolated from human ACLs from male or female donors, we engineered ligaments and determined that ligaments made from female ACL cells had more collagen and were equal in strength to those made from male ACL cells. We then treated engineered ligaments for 14 days with low (5 pg/ml), medium (50 pg/ml), or high (500 pg/ml) estrogen, corresponding to the range of in vivo serum estrogen concentrations and found that collagen within the grafts increased without a commensurate increase in mechanical strength. Mimicking the menstrual cycle, with 12 days of low estrogen followed by 2 days of physiologically high estrogen, resulted in a decrease in engineered ligament mechanical function with no change in the amount of collagen in the graft. The decrease in mechanical stiffness corresponded with a 61.7 and 76.9% decrease in the activity of collagen cross-linker lysyl oxidase with 24 and 48 h of high estrogen, respectively. Similarly, grafts treated with the lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) for 24 h showed a significant decrease in ligament mechanical strength [control (CON) = 1.58 ± 0.06 N; BAPN = 1.06 ± 0.13 N] and stiffness (CON = 7.7 ± 0.46 MPa; BAPN = 6.1 ± 0.71 MPa) without changing overall collagen levels (CON = 396 ± 11.5 μg; BAPN = 382 ± 11.6 μg). Together, these data suggest that the rise in estrogen during the follicular phase decreases lysyl oxidase activity in our engineered ligament model and if this occurs in vivo may decrease the stiffness of ligaments and contribute to the elevated rate of ACL rupture in women. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Biomechanics of an orthosis-managed cranial cruciate ligament-deficient canine stifle joint predicted by use of a computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, Gina E; Brown, Nathan P; Mich, Patrice M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of an orthosis on biomechanics of a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint by use of a 3-D quasistatic rigid-body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to investigate influences of orthosis hinge stiffness (durometer). SAMPLE A previously developed computer simulation model for a healthy 33-kg 5-year-old neutered Golden Retriever. PROCEDURES A custom stifle joint orthosis was implemented in the CrCL-deficient pelvic limb computer simulation model. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation in the orthosis-stabilized stifle joint (baseline scenario; high-durometer hinge]) were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of orthosis hinge stiffness on model outcome measures. RESULTS The orthosis decreased loads placed on the caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments and increased load placed on the medial collateral ligament, compared with loads for the CrCL-intact stifle joint. Ligament loads were decreased in the orthosis-managed CrCL-deficient stifle joint, compared with loads for the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial translation and rotation decreased but were not eliminated after orthosis management. Increased orthosis hinge stiffness reduced tibial translation and rotation, whereas decreased hinge stiffness increased internal tibial rotation, compared with values for the baseline scenario. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Stifle joint biomechanics were improved following orthosis implementation, compared with biomechanics of the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Orthosis hinge stiffness influenced stifle joint biomechanics. An orthosis may be a viable option to stabilize a CrCL-deficient canine stifle joint.

  5. In vitro characterization of self-assembled anterior cruciate ligament cell spheroids for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, M; Meier, C; Breier, A; Hahner, J; Heinrich, G; Drechsel, N; Meyer, M; Rentsch, C; Garbe, L-A; Ertel, W; Lohan, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) implant with functional enthesis requires site-directed seeding of different cell types on the same scaffold. Therefore, we studied the suitability of self-assembled three-dimensional spheroids generated by lapine ACL ligament fibroblasts for directed scaffold colonization. The spheroids were characterized in vitro during 14 days in static and 7 days in dynamic culture. Size maintenance of self-assembled spheroids, the vitality, the morphology and the expression pattern of the cells were monitored. Additionally, we analyzed the total sulfated glycosaminoglycan, collagen contents and the expression of the ligament components type I collagen, decorin and tenascin C on protein and for COL1A1, DCN and TNMD on gene level in the spheroids. Subsequently, the cell colonization of polylactide-co-caprolactone [P(LA-CL)] and polydioxanone (PDS) polymer scaffolds was assessed in response to a directed, spheroid-based seeding technique. ACL cells were able to self-assemble spheroids and survive over 14 days. The spheroids decreased in size but not in cellularity depending on the culture time and maintained or even increased their differentiation state. The area of P[LA-CL] scaffolds, colonized after 14 days by the cells of one spheroid, was in average 4.57 ± 2.3 mm(2). Scaffolds consisting of the polymer P[LA-CL] were more suitable for colonization by spheroids than PDS embroideries. We conclude that ACL cell spheroids are suitable as site-directed seeding strategy for scaffolds in ACL tissue engineering approaches and recommend the use of freshly assembled spheroids for scaffold colonization, due to their balanced proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of history taking and physical examination for assessing anterior cruciate ligament lesions of the knee in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemakers, H.P.; Luijsterburg, P.A.; Boks, S.S.; Heintjes, E.M.; Berger, M.Y.; Verhaar, J.A.; Koes, B.W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wagemakers HP, Luijsterburg PA, Boks SS, Heintjes EM, Berger MY, Verhaar JA, Koes BK, Bierma-Zeinstra SM. Diagnostic accuracy of history taking and physical examination for assessing anterior cruciate ligament lesions of the knee in primary care. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2010;91:1452-9. Objective: To

  7. Low Prevalence of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Patients With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Ramji, Alim F; Lyapustina, Tatyana A; Yost, Mary T; Ain, Michael C

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries and their subsequent reconstructions are common in the general population, but there has been no research regarding ACL or PCL injuries in patients with achondroplasia, the most common skeletal dysplasia. Our goals were to (1) evaluate the prevalence of ACL and PCL injuries in adolescents and adults with achondroplasia, (2) compare this prevalence with that reported for the general population, (3) determine how many patients with ACL or PCL injuries underwent ligament reconstruction as treatment, and (4) determine patient activity levels as they relate to the rate of ACL/PCL injuries and reconstructions. We reviewed medical records of 430 patients with achondroplasia seen in the senior author's clinic from 2002 through 2014. Demographic data were reviewed, as well as any documentation of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction. We called all 430 patients by telephone, and 148 agreed to participate in our survey, whereas 1 declined. We asked these patients about their history of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction, as well as current and past physical activity levels. No ACL or PCL injuries were found on chart review. One patient reached by telephone reported an ACL injury that did not require reconstruction. This yielded a theoretical prevalence of 3/430 (0.7%). Of the 148 patients surveyed, 43 (29%) reported low physical activity, 75 (51%) reported moderate physical activity, and 26 (17%) reported high physical activity. There was no significant difference in the rate of ACL injury when stratified by physical activity level (P=0.102). ACL and PCL injuries and reconstructions are extremely rare in patients with achondroplasia, which cannot be completely ascribed to a low level of physical activity. One possible explanation is that patients with achondroplasia, on an average, have a more anterior tibial slope compared with those without achondroplasia, which decreases the force generated

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone autograft in ACL deficient Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Kumar Karn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Injury to Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction has increased because of increased interest in sports. There are various grafts used for reconstruction of ACL, for example, Bone Patellar Tendon Bone, Hamstring etc. The study was conducted to evaluate the results of Bone Patellar Tendon Bone graft used for reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament.Materials & Methods: 40 patients with chronic ACL deficient knee presenting to Neuro Hospital from July 2011 to June 2013 were included in the study. The patients with intraarticular fracture of knee, severe OA knee, local active or suspected infection and systemic disease that might influence the study results were excluded from the study. Bone patellar tendon bone graft was harvested from ipsilateral knee in all the cases. The patient was followed till 2 year with specified programme of rehabilitation. The pain was assessed using VAS and the function of the knee was assessed using Modified WOMAC knee index.Results: The long term satisfactory results in terms of functional stability, symptom relief and return to preinjury level of activity was seen in 32 cases (80%. Two knees got infected out of which one required arthroscopic debridement. Mean visual analogue scale was 8 and modified WOMAC knee score was 3 at 2 year follow up.Conclusion: Bone patellar tendon bone graft is useful in high demand patients and cost effective option with high patient satisfaction rate for reconstruction of ACL.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:12-15.

  9. Comparing low volume saphenous-obturator block with placebo and femoral-obturator block for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, Katja; Jensen, Kenneth; Tanggaard, Katrine

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-RC) is often associated with moderate to severe postoperative pain even with a multimodal analgesic regimen. We aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy of low volume saphenous-obturator block with placebo and femoral- obturator block in p...

  10. Inertial sensors to quantify the pivot shift test in the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; LOPOMO, NICOLA; SIGNORELLI, CECILIA; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; BONANZINGA, TOMMASO; GRASSI, ALBERTO; RAGGI, FEDERICO; VISANI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article was to describe in detail, from the perspective of the clinical end user, a previously presented non-invasive methodology, applied in the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury, in which inertial sensors are used to quantify the pivot shift test. The outcomes obtained and relative considerations were compared with findings emerging from a review of the relevant updated literature. The detailed description here provided covers the system, the parameters...

  11. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period.

  12. Similar outcome after retention or sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, Wiebe C.; van den Boom, Lennard G. H.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Schoones, Jan W.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    Background and purpose - To retain or to sacrifice the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a matter of discussion. In this systematic review, we wanted to find differences in functional and clinical outcome between the 2 methods. Methods - We conducted a

  13. Tibial Slope Strongly Influences Knee Stability After Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Prospective 5- to 15-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinner, Clemens; Weiler, Andreas; Roider, Manoussos; Schaefer, Frederik M; Jung, Tobias M

    2017-02-01

    The reported failure rate after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction remains high. Previous studies have shown that the tibial slope (TS) influences sagittal plane laxity. Consequently, alterations of TS might have an effect on postoperative knee stability after PCL reconstruction. We hypothesized that flattening of TS is associated with increased posterior laxity after PCL reconstruction. Cohort study; Level of evidence 3. This study consisted of 48 patients who underwent PCL reconstruction in a single-surgeon series. Eight patients underwent an isolated PCL reconstruction, 27 patients underwent an additional posterolateral corner reconstruction, and 13 patients underwent a combined reconstruction of the PCL, anterior cruciate ligament, and posterolateral corner. Three blinded observers measured TS and the side-to-side difference (SSD) of posterior tibial translation (PTT) before and after PCL reconstruction using standardized stress radiographs. The minimum follow-up was 5 years. At a mean follow-up of 103 months (range, 65-187), the mean SSD of PTT was significantly reduced (10.9 ± 2.9 vs 4.9 ± 4.3 mm; P slope.

  14. Outcome of hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moghtadaei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this study was to evaluate, functional capacity of the knee in flexion and internal rotation after hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction.Methods: Fifty patients (male and 18-45 years old with isolated ACL injury, randomly allocated in two equal groups (in one group, ACL reconstruction was performed with Tibialis Posterior allograft and in another group with quadruple hamstring ligament auto graft and before and 6 months after surgery in both groups isokinetic flexion strength and isometric internal rotation strength of knee evaluated with Biodex System 4 dynamometer and rotational torque recorder, in order. Isokinetic flexion strength evaluated in sitting and prone position; the later position was performed for deep flexion strength evaluation. Also subjective and objective assessment of all patients pre operatively and 6 months post operatively was documented with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC questionnaire. In this study for first time, rotational torque strength of knee was recorded with new design measure, from isometric aspect and not isokinetic.Results: Although significant improvements in IKDC scores, flexion and internal rotation capacity of the knee were observed in both groups, post operatively in respect to pre operatively; there was no significant difference between 2 groups. (P<0.05 or more than 95% confidence Interval of the differenceConclusion: This study demonstrates that ACL reconstruction surgery, improves knee performance in flexion and internal rotation, regardless of hamstring tendon harvesting. Considering potential complications of allograft (for example: transfer of harmful diseases from donor to recipient, it is logical to use hamstring auto graft ligament for ACL reconstruction surgery. Because result of this study is not longstanding follow up and limited to male sex, for more worthfull conclusion, we suggest future study in both sex

  15. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  16. Characterization and role of the immune response during ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.

    Scar formation of ligaments after rupture remains a great challenge. Ligament healing involves a complex, coordinated series of events that form a neo-ligament, which is more disorganized and fibrotic in character than the native tissue. The repair process may extend from months to years, and the injured ligament never fully recovers its original mechanical properties. With little intrinsic healing potential, ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually reconstructed. The "healed" tissues, however, do not regenerate native tissues or recapitulate their mechanical function. ACL grafts often lengthen (incidents range from 40-100%) and their strength can drop by ˜50% after remodeling. Reconstructed knees are often less stable and fail to restore normal joint kinematics. Our overall goal is to improve healing, making ligaments more regenerative. The first 2 studies characterized ligament healing in a spatial and temporal manner over 28 days. The experiments demonstrated creeping substitution and the potential role of the immune system to control the repair and/or regenerative process. From these studies, macrophages were identified as significant players during healing. Macrophages paralleled creeping substitution, were abundant within the healing ligament, and potentially played a destructive role via matrix phagocytosis. The role of macrophages during early ligament healing was then evaluated using liposome-encapsulated clodronate to inhibit phagocytosing macrophages. Clodronate attenuated the early infiltration of macrophages, resulting in delayed structural and functional healing. Macrophage re-infiltration into the wound resulted in continued ligament healing. These results suggested that early inhibition of phagocytosing macrophages is detrimental to ligament healing. The final experiment evaluated the effects of interleukin-4 on ligament healing. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is reported to stimulate the Th2 lymphocyte/M2 macrophage pathway, reducing

  17. Pressurization rate effect on ligament rupture and burst pressures of cracked steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether ligament rupture pressure or unstable burst pressure may vary significantly with pressurization rate at room temperature arose from the results of pressure tests by industry on tubes with machined part-throughwall notches. Slow (quasi-static) and fast 14 MPa/s (2000 psi/s) pressurization rate tests on specimens with nominally the same notch geometry appeared to show a significant effect of the rate of pressurization on the unstable burst pressure. Unfortunately, the slow and fast loading rate tests were conducted following two different test procedures, which could confound the results. The current series of tests were conducted on a variety of specimen geometries using a consistent test procedure to better establish the effect of pressurization rate on ligament rupture and burst pressures. (author)

  18. Pressurization rate effect on ligament rupture and burst pressures of cracked steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Energy Division, Lemont, Illinois (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The question of whether ligament rupture pressure or unstable burst pressure may vary significantly with pressurization rate at room temperature arose from the results of pressure tests by industry on tubes with machined part-throughwall notches. Slow (quasi-static) and fast 14 MPa/s (2000 psi/s) pressurization rate tests on specimens with nominally the same notch geometry appeared to show a significant effect of the rate of pressurization on the unstable burst pressure. Unfortunately, the slow and fast loading rate tests were conducted following two different test procedures, which could confound the results. The current series of tests were conducted on a variety of specimen geometries using a consistent test procedure to better establish the effect of pressurization rate on ligament rupture and burst pressures. (author)

  19. The Gore-Tex prosthetic ligament as a salvage procedure in deficient knees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolker, W.; Patt, T. W.; van Dijk, C. N.; Vegter, M.; Marti, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of prosthetic ligament replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with the Gore-Tex polytetrafluorethyene prosthesis (W.L. Gore and Co., Flagstaff, Ariz. ) in 52 patients (54 knees). All patients

  20. Acute posterior cruciate ligament injuries: effect of location, severity, and associated injuries on surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Simeone, F Joseph; Palmer, William E; Chang, Connie Y

    2018-06-01

    To correlate MRI findings of patients with posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury and surgical management. A retrospective search yielded 79 acute PCL injuries (36 ± 16 years old, 21 F, 58 M). Two independent readers graded PCL tear location (proximal, middle, or distal third) and severity (low-grade or high-grade partial/complete) and evaluated injury of other knee structures. When available, operative reports were examined and the performed surgical procedure was compared with injury grade, location, and presence of associated injuries. The most commonly injured knee structures in acute PCL tears were posterolateral corner (58/79, 73%) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (48/79, 61%). Of the 64 patients with treatment information, 31/64 (48%) were managed surgically: 12/31 (39%) had PCL reconstruction, 13/31 (42%) had ACL reconstruction, 10/31 (32%) had posterolateral corner reconstruction, 9/31 (29%) had LCL reconstruction, 8/31 (26%) had meniscectomy, and 8/31 (26%) had fixation of a fracture. Proximal third PCL tear and multiligamentous injury were more commonly associated with surgical management (P < 0.05). Posterolateral and posteromedial corner, ACL, collateral ligament, meniscus, patellar retinaculum, and gastrocnemius muscle injury, and fracture were more likely to result in surgical management (P < 0.05). Patients with high-grade partial/complete PCL tear were more likely to have PCL reconstruction as a portion of surgical management (P < 0.05). Location of PCL tear and presence of other knee injuries were associated with surgical management while high-grade/complete PCL tear grade was associated with PCL reconstruction. MRI reporting of PCL tear location, severity, and of other knee structure injuries is important for guiding clinical management.

  1. Short-term Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in an Adolescent Population on 3D Knee Kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Laforest, Guillaume; Fuentes, Alexandre; Therrien, Marc; Grimard, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Gait analysis is a proven method for assessing knee biomechanical adaptations in anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) patients and to quantify the impact of the reconstructive surgery (ACLR). In an adult population, ACLR has shown partial kinematic correction, as they remain in internal tibial rotation, putting them at risk of rotational instability and develop osteoartitis. ACLD adolescents likely adopt similar gait changes to reduce knee instability, but may show quicker ...

  2. Assessment of the diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injuries of anterior cruciate ligament in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickert, S.; Niks, M.; Lehmann, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Center of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Mannheim (Germany); Dinter, D.J.; Hammer, M.; Weckbach, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Jochum, S. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard of reference for the non-invasive evaluation of ligament injuries of the knee. The development of dual-energy CT (DE-CT) made it possible to differentiate between tissues of different density by two simultaneous CT measurements with different tube voltages. This approach enables DE-CT to discriminate ligament structures without intra-articular contrast media injection. The aims of this study were on the one hand to determine the delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and on the other hand to assess the diagnostic value of DE-CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injury of the ACL in a porcine knee joint model. Twenty porcine hind legs, which were placed in a preformed cast in order to achieve a standardized position, were scanned using DE-CT. Thereafter, a 1.5-T MRI using a standard protocol was performed. The imaging procedures were repeated with the same parameters after inducing defined lesions (total or partial incision) on the ACL arthroscopically. After post-processing, two radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons first analyzed the delineation of the ACL and then, using a consensus approach, the iatrogenically induced lesions. The result of the arthrotomy was defined as the standard of reference. The ACL could be visualized both on DE-CT and MRI in 100% of the cases. As for the MRI, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting the cruciate ligament lesion respectively compared with the defined arthrotomy was 66.7% and 78.6% for intact cruciate ligaments, 100% and 75% in the case of a complete lesion, 33.3% and 78.6% for lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 0% and 100% for lesions of the posterolateral bundle. In comparison, DE-CT demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 71.4% in the case of intact cruciate ligaments, 75% and 68.8% in the case of completely discontinued ACLs, 0% and 92.9% in the case of lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 25% and 87.5% in the

  3. Feedback Techniques to Target Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction : Implications for Motor Control and Reduction of Second Injury Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following

  4. The stress-tenogram in the diagnosis of ruptures of the lateral ligament of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.A.; Frenyo, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The stress-tenogram is a radiological technique for the investigation of injuries to the lateral ligament of the ankle, and combines the information previously provided by inversion and anterior stress radiographs, and the peroneal tenogram. It is designed to differentiate between stable and unstable ankles, and between isolated ruptures of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined tears of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. A high degree of diagnostic accuracy has been confirmed at operative repair in a group of thirty-two patients. (author)

  5. Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Myung Chul; Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2018-03-20

    A case of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with meniscal repair in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient is reported. A 24-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1a suffered from a valgus extension injury resulting in tear of ACL and medial meniscus. She underwent an arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction and medial meniscus repair. Meniscal tear at the menisco-capsular junction of the posterior horn of medial meniscus was repaired with three absorbable sutures via inside-out technique. ACL reconstruction was then performed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. The patient was followed up for 1 year with intact ACL grafts and healed medial meniscus. This case report showed that successful ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair is possible in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient.Level of evidence V.

  6. Simulation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Dry Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Slade Shantz, Jesse; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Schachar, Rachel; Kulasegaram, K Mahan; Theodoropoulos, John; Greben, Rachel; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-01

    As the demand increases for demonstration of competence in surgical skill, the need for validated assessment tools also increases. The purpose of this study was to validate a dry knee model for the assessment of performance of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The hypothesis was that the combination of a checklist and a previously validated global rating scale would be a valid and reliable means of assessing ACLR when performed by residents in a dry model. Controlled laboratory study. All residents, sports medicine staff, and fellows were invited to perform a hamstring ACLR using anteromedial drilling and Endobutton fixation on a dry model of an anterior cruciate ligament. Previous exposure to knee arthroscopy and ACLR was recorded. A detailed surgical manuscript and technique video were sent to all participants before the study. Residents were evaluated by staff surgeons with task-specific checklists created by use of a modified Delphi procedure and the Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). Each procedure (hand movements and arthroscopic video) was recorded and scored by a fellow blinded to the year of training of each participant. A total of 29 residents, 5 fellows, and 6 staff surgeons (40 participants total) performed an ACLR on the dry model. The internal reliability (Cronbach alpha) of the test when using the total ASSET score was very high (>0.9). One-way analysis of variance for the total ASSET score and the total checklist score demonstrated a difference between participants based on year of training (P .05). A good correlation was seen between the total ASSET score and prior exposure to knee arthroscopy (0.73) and ACLR (0.65). The interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) between the examiner ratings and the blinded assessor ratings for the total ASSET score was very high (>0.8). The results of this study provide evidence that the performance of an ACLR in a dry model is a reliable method of assessing a

  7. Posterior cruciate ligament recruitment affects antero-posterior translation during flexion gap distraction in total knee replacement. An intraoperative study involving 50 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, P.J.C.; Keijsers, N.; Jacobs, W.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Wymenga, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Because of the oblique orientation of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), flexion gap distraction could lead to anterior movement of the tibia, which would influence the tibiofemoral contact point. This would affect the kinematics of the TKR. We assessed the flexion gap

  8. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ACCELERATED REHABILITATION IN ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranyakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION An ideal rehabilitation program post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction enables an individual to return to pre injury levels at a faster rate with minimal to no risk of reinjury to the graft. Rehabilitation protocols have changed considerably over time in the past. It has become “aggressive”, meaning an intensive rehabilitation which includes greater variety of exercises and sports related training. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of accelerated rehabilitation post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. METHODOLOGY 106 patients were operated by a single surgeon underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patella tendon bone graft and partial meniscectomy for associated meniscal tear. Patients were put on an accelerated rehabilitation protocol designed in our institute on first post-operative day, under the guidance of a physical therapist in consultation with the operated surgeon. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks, 6 months and 9 months, post onset of rehabilitation, patients were assessed using KT1000 Arthrometer and Lysholm knee scoring system. RESULTS Out of 106 patients, who were selected, 96(91% were males and 10(9% were females. The mean pre-operative Lysholm score was 55.09. Post operatively, while on accelerated rehabilitation program the Lysholm scores were 69.73 at 3 weeks, 89.13 at 6 months and 89.19 at 9 months. In our pre-operative evaluation mean KT 1000 arthrometer score was 10.53 and post-operative at six months was 3.49. At nine months 105 patients had excellent results whereas 1 patient had good result. CONCLUSION Accelerated rehabilitation protocol enables the patient to functionally recover faster to pre injury levels. A rehabilitation protocol for 6 months is sufficient in enabling a patient to get back to pre-injury levels. Functional outcome is the same with or without associated meniscal injuries.

  9. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  10. MR evaluation of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, K.M.; Gillogly, S.D.; Schaefer, R.A.; Yakes, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventy-five MR examinations were performed in 52 patients following ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autografts. MR imaging demonstrated a well-defined autograft in 63 of 70 clinically stable autografts. Of 5 clinically lax reconstructions, none appeared will defined on MR images. Compared with the clinical examination, MR imaging was 90.7% accurate. MR imaging demonstrated time-related healing of the patellar tendon donor site, with persistent thickening indicative of tendinitis. Positions of the femoral and tibial bone tunnels could be assessed. Knee joint effusions tended to resolve completely within 7 months after operations, with the presence and degree of effusion in the earlier postoperative interval being unrelated to the clinical outcome. Ancillary disorders in the knee, such as meniscal tears and osteochondral defects, could also be evaluated in this postoperative population

  11. Comparison of potentials between stem cells isolated from human anterior cruciate ligament and bone marrow for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Te; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Lee, Oscar K

    2010-07-01

    We have previously isolated and identified stem cells from human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation abilities between bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and ACL-derived stem cells (LSCs) from the same donors when cultured with different growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Ligament tissues and bone marrow aspirate were obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and ACL reconstruction surgeries. Proliferation, colony formation, and population doubling capacity as well as multilineage differentiation potentials of LSCs and BMSCs were compared. Gene expression and ECM production for ligament engineering were also evaluated. It was found that BMSCs possessed better osteogenic differentiation potential than LSCs, while similar adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation abilities were observed. Proliferation rates of both LSCs and BMSCs were enhanced by bFGF and TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 treatment significantly increased the expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin in LSCs, but TGF-beta1 only upregulated type I collagen and tenascin-c in BMSCs. Protein quantification further confirmed the results of differential gene expression and suggested that LSCs and BMSCs increase ECM production upon TGF-beta1 treatment. In summary, in comparison with BMSCs, LSCs proliferate faster and maintain an undifferentiated state with bFGF treatment, whereas under TGF-beta1 treatment, LSCs upregulate major tendinous gene expression and produce a robust amount of ligament ECM protein, making LSCs a potential cell source in future applications of ACL tissue engineering.

  12. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in adolescents. What to choose for anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ivanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose - to optimize the quality of perioperative management of adolescents with damage of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. Material and methods: Perioperative methods of anesthesia in 71 patients were estimated. Psycho-emotional status was evaluated on the basis of determining the level of reactive anxiety (Spielberg Hanin scale and intraoperative anesthesia (unilateral spinal anesthesia or combined has been chosen. Results: According to the results of lactate and glucose levels in the blood the efficacy of unilateral spinal anesthesia during surgery was demonstrated. Visual analog scale revealed the advantage of extended continuous iliofascial block over an isolated femoral nerve blockade for adequate analgesia for postoperative period. The advantages of the performing continuous iliofascial block under ultrasound were demonstrated.

  13. Evaluation of the relationship between anteroposterior translation of a posterior cruciate ligament-retaining total knee replacement and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, R B; Pang, H N; Lo, N N; Chong, H C; Chin, P L; Chia, S L; Yeo, S J

    2012-10-01

    The success of total knee replacement (TKR) depends on optimal soft-tissue balancing, among many other factors. The objective of this study is to correlate post-operative anteroposterior (AP) translation of a posterior cruciate ligament-retaining TKR with clinical outcome at two years. In total 100 patients were divided into three groups based on their AP translation as measured by the KT-1000 arthrometer. Group 1 patients had AP translation  10 mm. Outcome assessment included range of movement of the knee, the presence of flexion contractures, hyperextension, knee mechanical axes and functional outcome using the Knee Society score, Oxford knee score and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire. At two years, patients in Group 2 reported significantly better Oxford knee scores than the other groups (p = 0.045). A positive correlation between range of movement and AP translation was noted, with patients in group 3 having the greatest range of movement (mean flexion: 117.9° (106° to 130°)) (p 10° (p = 0.01). In this study, the best outcome for cruciate-ligament retaining TKR was achieved in patients with an AP translation of 5 mm to 10 mm.

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in the National Hockey League: Epidemiology and Performance Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, Robert; Leiter, Jeff; MacDonald, Peter

    2018-03-27

    To determine the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the National Hockey League (NHL) and to examine the effects of this injury on return-to-play status and performance. Case series; level of evidence, 4. This was a 2-phase study. Phase I used the NHL electronic injury surveillance system and Athlete Health Management System to collect data on ACL injuries and man games lost over 10 seasons (2006/2007-2015/2016). Data collected in phase I were received in deidentified form. Phase II examined the performance impact of an ACL injury. Players were identified through publically available sources, and performance-related statistics were analyzed. Data collected in phase II were not linked to data collected in phase I. A paired t test was used to determine any difference in the matching variables between controls and cases in the preinjury time period. A General linear model (mixed) was used to determine the performance impact. Phase I: 67 ACL injuries occurred over 10 seasons. The incidence for all players was 0.42/1000 player game hours (forward, 0.61; defenseman, 0.32, goalie, 0.08) and by game exposure was 0.2/1000 player game exposures (forward, 0.33; defenseman, 0.11; goalie, 0.07). Forwards had a greater incidence rate of ACL tears with both game hours and game exposures when compared with defensemen and goalies (P game (P game (0.001). Number of games and seasons played after an ACL injury did not differ compared with controls (P = 0.068, 0.122, respectively). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur infrequently, as it relates to other hockey injuries. Despite a high return to play, the performance after an ACL injury demonstrated a decrease in points and goals per game and per season.

  15. A Multisport Epidemiologic Comparison of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in High School Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Allan M.; Collins, Christy L.; Henke, Natalie M.; Yard, Ellen E.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Background: The knee joint is the second most commonly injured body site after the ankle and the leading cause of sport-related surgeries. Knee injuries, especially of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are among the most economically costly sport injuries, frequently requiring expensive surgery and rehabilitation. Objective: To investigate the epidemiology of ACL injuries among high school athletes by sport and sex. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Main Outcome Measure(s): Using an Internet-based data-collection tool, Reporting Information Online (RIO), certified athletic trainers from 100 nationally representative US high schools reported athlete-exposure and injury data for athletes from 9 sports during the 2007/08–2011/12 academic years. The outcome of interest in this study was ACL injuries. Results: During the study period, 617 ACL injuries were reported during 9 452 180 athlete exposures (AEs), for an injury rate of 6.5 per 100 000 AEs. Nationally, in the 9 sports studied, an estimated 215 628 ACL injuries occurred during the study period. The injury rate was higher in competition (17.6) than practice (2.4; rate ratio [RR] = 7.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.08, 8.68). Girls' soccer had the highest injury rate (12.2) followed by boys' football (11.1), with boys' basketball (2.3) and boys' baseball (0.7) having the lowest rates. In sex-comparable sports, girls had a higher rate (8.9) than boys (2.6; RR = 3.4, 95% CI = 2.64, 4.47). Overall, 76.6% of ACL injuries resulted in surgery. The most common mechanisms of injury were player-to-player contact (42.8%) and no contact (37.9%). Conclusions: Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates vary by sport, sex, and type of exposure. Recognizing such differences is important when evaluating the effectiveness of evidence-based, targeted prevention efforts. PMID:24143905

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cyclops lesion as a cause of persistent morbidity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Kharat; Sahil Garg; Amarjit Singh; Vilas Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Localized anterior arthrofibrosis (cyclops lesion) is having around 1-9.8% frequency rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. It has been reported to be a significant cause of loss of knee extension after reconstruction of the ACL of the knee. We present a case report of a patient with prior ACL reconstruction who presented with pain and loss of extension following surgery. MR imaging revealed the typical features of cyclops lesion. Repeat arthroscopy excision of the lesion...

  17. Kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eygendaal, D; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Jensen, Steen Lund

    2000-01-01

    In this study the kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow are investigated. After selective transection of the medial collateral ligament of 8 osteoligamentous intact elbow preparations was performed, 3-dimensional measurements of angular displacement......, increase in medial joint opening, and translation of the radial head were examined during application of relevant stress. Increase in joint opening was significant only after complete transection of the anterior part of the medial collateral ligament was performed. The joint opening was detected during...... valgus and internal rotatory stress only. After partial transection of the anterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament was performed, there was an elbow laxity to valgus and internal rotatory force, which became significant after transection of 100% of the anterior bundle of the medial collateral...

  18. Selective contribution of each hamstring muscle to anterior cruciate ligament protection and tibiofemoral joint stability in leg-extension exercise: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2013-09-01

    A biomechanical model was developed to simulate the selective effect of the co-contraction force provided by each hamstring muscle on the shear and compressive tibiofemoral joint reaction forces, during open kinetic-chain knee-extension exercises. This model accounts for instantaneous values of knee flexion angle [Formula: see text], angular velocity and acceleration, and for changes in magnitude, orientation, and application point of external resistance. The tibiofemoral shear force (TFSF) largely determines the tensile force on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Biceps femoris is the most effective hamstring muscle in decreasing the ACL-loading TFSF developed by quadriceps contractions for [Formula: see text]. In this range, the semimembranosus generates the dominant tibiofemoral compressive force, which enhances joint stability, opposes anterior/posterior tibial translations, and protects cruciate ligaments. The semitendinosus force provides the greatest decreasing gradient of ACL-loading TFSF for [Formula: see text], and the greatest increasing gradient of tibiofemoral compressive force for [Formula: see text]. However, semitendinosus efficacy is strongly limited by its small physiological section. Hamstring muscles behave as a unique muscle in enhancing the PCL-loading TFSF produced by quadriceps contractions for [Formula: see text]. The levels of hamstrings co-activation that suppress the ACL-loading TFSF considerably shift when the knee angular acceleration is changed while maintaining the same level of knee extensor torque by a concurrent adjustment in the magnitude of external resistance. The knowledge of the specific role and the optimal activation level of each hamstring muscle in ACL protection and tibiofemoral stability are fundamental for planning safe and effective rehabilitative knee-extension exercises.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction failure after tibial shaft malunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Russell M; Gorczyca, John T; Maloney, Michael D

    2012-02-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common, with >100,000 procedures performed each year in the United States. Several factors are associated with failure, including poor surgical technique, graft incorporation failure, overly aggressive rehabilitation, and trauma. Tibial shaft fracture is also common and frequently requires operative intervention. Failure to reestablish the anatomic alignment of the tibia may cause abnormal forces across adjacent joints, which can cause degenerative joint disease or attritional failure of the surrounding soft tissues. This article describes a case of ACL reconstruction failure after a tibial fracture that resulted in malunion. Excessive force across the graft from lower-extremity malalignment and improper tunnel placement likely contributed to the attritional failure of the graft. This patient required a staged procedure for corrective tibial osteotomy followed by revision ACL reconstruction. This article describes ACL reconstruction failure, tibial shaft malunions, their respective treatments, the technical details of each procedure, and the technical aspects that must be considered when these procedures are done in a staged manner by 2 surgeons. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. An unusual mechanism for injury of the anterior cruciate ligament in figure skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eugene K; Lahurd, Alexandra P; Wilckens, John H

    2012-03-01

    A 20-year-old competitive figure skater presented with an acute disabling knee injury that occurred in the overhead, non-weight-bearing knee during the performance of a Biellmann spin. Examination and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. To our knowledge, no previous cases of acute injury of the ACL sustained during the execution of a Biellmann spin have been reported. The ACL injury we report is unique because it occurred without the blade contacting the ice. The mechanism of injury has some features that are similar to those of other noncontact ACL injuries, with the addition of centrifugal force as a potential contributor to the injury.

  1. Identification of athletes at future risk of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures by neuromuscular screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Bencke, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Noninjured athletes with low knee flexor electromyography (EMG) preactivity and high knee extensor EMG preactivity during sidecutting are at increased risk of future ACL rupture. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: Fifty-five elite female athletes (team handball and soccer......: During the subsequent 2 match seasons, 5 athletes sustained a confirmed noncontact ACL rupture. Before injury, all 5 players displayed a neuromuscular pattern that differed from the noninjured players, characterized by reduced EMG preactivity for the semitendinosus (ST) and elevated EMG preactivity...... study, currently noninjured female athletes with reduced EMG preactivity of the ST and increased EMG preactivity of the VL during side cutting were at increased risk of future noncontact ACL rupture. Our data indicate that a high-risk zone can be used to identify noninjured players at high risk...

  2. Differences in the movement pattern of a forward lunge in two types of anterior cruciate ligament deficient patients: copers and non-copers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Simonsen, Erik B; Peter Magnusson, S Peter

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether differences in the knee joint movement pattern of a forward lunge could be quantified in healthy subjects and in anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects who were able to return to the same activity level as before their injury (copers) and in those who were not (non-copers)....

  3. Visibility of Anterolateral Ligament Tears in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees With Standard 1.5-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, David E; Carroll, Kevin W; Kosarek, Frank J; Piasecki, Dana P; Fleischli, James F; D'Alessandro, Donald F

    2016-10-01

    To attempt to visualize the ligament with standard 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-torn knee, and if it is visible, attempt to characterize it as torn or intact at its femoral, meniscal, and tibial attachment sites. This was a retrospective MRI study based on arthroscopic findings of a known ACL tear in 72 patients between the years 2006 and 2010. Patients all had hamstring ACL reconstructions, no concomitant lateral collateral ligament, or posterolateral corner injury based on imaging and physical examination, and had a preoperative 1.5-tesla MRI scan with standard sequences performed within 3 weeks of the injury. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative MRI for visualization of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) for concomitant tears. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was calculated. Learning effect was analyzed to determine if radiologists' agreement improved as reads progressed. Both radiologists were able to visualize the ALL in 100% of the scans. Overall, ALL tears were noted in 26% by radiologist 1 and in 62% by radiologist 2. The agreement between the ligament being torn or not had a kappa of 0.54 between radiologists. The agreements in torn or not torn between radiologists in the femoral, meniscal, and tibial sites were 0.14, 0.15, and 0.31. The intraobserver reliability by radiologist 1 for femoral, meniscal, and tibial tears was 0.04, 0.57, and 0.54 respectively. For radiologist 2, they were 0.75, 0.61, and 0.55. There was no learning effect noted. ALL tears are currently unable to be reliably identified as torn or intact on standard 1.5-tesla MRI sequences. Proper imaging sequences are of crucial importance to reliably follow these tears to determine their clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermographic and microscopic evaluation of LARS knee ligament tearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pătraşcu, Jenel Marian; Amarandei, Mihaela; Kun, Karla Noemy; Borugă, Ovidiu; Totorean, Alina; Andor, Bogdan; Florescu, Sorin

    2014-01-01

    Damage to knee articular ligaments causes important functional problems and adversely affects particularly the stability of the knee joint. Several methods were developed in order to repair damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which employ autografts, allografts, as well as synthetic ligaments. One such synthetic scaffold, the ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) synthetic ligament is made of non-absorbing polyethylene terephthalate fibers whose structure allow tissue ingrowths in the intra-articular part, improving the stability of the joint. The LARS ligament is nowadays widely used in modern knee surgery in the Europe, Canada, China or Japan. This paper evaluates LARS ligament from two perspectives. The first regards a study done by the Orthopedics Clinic II, Timisoara, Romania, which compared results obtained by employing two techniques of ACL repair - the Bone-Tendon-Bone (BTB) or LARS arthroscopic, intra-articular techniques. This study found that patients treated with the BTB technique presented with an IKDC score of 45.82±1.14 units preoperative, with increasing values in the first nine months after each implant post-surgical ligament restoration, reaching an average value of 75.92 ± 2.88 units postoperative. Patients treated with the LARS technique presented with an IKDC score of 43.64 ± 1.11 units preoperative, and a score of 77.32 ± 2.71 units postoperative. The second perspective describes the thermographic and microscopic analysis of an artificial knee ligament tearing or loosening. The objective of the study was to obtain information regarding the design of artificial ligaments in order to expand their lifespan and avoid complications such as recurring synovitis, osteoarthritis and trauma of the knee joint. Thermographic data has shown that tearing begins from the inside out, thus improving the inner design of the ligament would probably enhance its durability. An optical microscope was employed to obtain images of structural

  5. Substitution of the anterior cruciate ligament: a long-term histologic and biomechanical study with autogenous pedicled grafts of the iliotibial band in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rens, van T.J.G.; Berg, van den A.F.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Kuypers, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the experience with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) substitution by standardized pedicled strips of the iliotibial band, fixed to the tibia and femur with a bone-peg fixation technique. Thirty-two young adult (± one year old) Labrador dogs were used for the experiments (58

  6. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwinner, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet.The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months.Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation.Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18 years, who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%. Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9 points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%.All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for

  7. Limb Symmetry Indexes Can Overestimate Knee Function After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Failla, Mathew J; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-05-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort. Background The high risk of second anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries after return to sport highlights the importance of return-to-sport decision making. Objective return-to-sport criteria frequently use limb symmetry indexes (LSIs) to quantify quadriceps strength and hop scores. Whether using the uninvolved limb in LSIs is optimal is unknown. Objectives To evaluate the uninvolved limb as a reference standard for LSIs utilized in return-to-sport testing and its relationship with second ACL injury rates. Methods Seventy athletes completed quadriceps strength and 4 single-leg hop tests before anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and 6 months after ACLR. Limb symmetry indexes for each test compared involved-limb measures at 6 months to uninvolved-limb measures at 6 months. Estimated preinjury capacity (EPIC) levels for each test compared involved-limb measures at 6 months to uninvolved-limb measures before ACLR. Second ACL injuries were tracked for a minimum follow-up of 2 years after ACLR. Results Forty (57.1%) patients achieved 90% LSIs for quadriceps strength and all hop tests. Only 20 (28.6%) patients met 90% EPIC levels (comparing the involved limb at 6 months after ACLR to the uninvolved limb before ACLR) for quadriceps strength and all hop tests. Twenty-four (34.3%) patients who achieved 90% LSIs for all measures 6 months after ACLR did not achieve 90% EPIC levels for all measures. Estimated preinjury capacity levels were more sensitive than LSIs in predicting second ACL injuries (LSIs, 0.273; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.010, 0.566 and EPIC, 0.818; 95% CI: 0.523, 0.949). Conclusion Limb symmetry indexes frequently overestimate knee function after ACLR and may be related to second ACL injury risk. These findings raise concern about whether the variable ACL return-to-sport criteria utilized in current clinical practice are stringent enough to achieve safe and successful return to sport. Level of Evidence

  8. Regional fibrocartilage variations in human anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion: a histological three-dimensional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Guo, Lin; Yang, Liu; Wu, Yi; Gou, Jingyue; Li, Bangchun

    2015-02-01

    We studied anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion architecture in humans and investigated regional differences that could suggest unequal force transmission from ligament to bone. ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software for three-dimensional reconstruction. The uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF) layer was divided into three regions: lateral, medial and posterior according to the architecture. The UF zone was significantly thicker laterally than medially or posteriorly (p fibrocartilage (CF) thickness was significantly greater in the lateral part of the enthesis compared to the medial and posterior parts (p < 0.05). The UF quantity (more UF laterally) corresponding to the CF quantity (more CF laterally) at the ACL tibial insertion provides further evidence suggesting that the load transferred from the ACL to the tibia was greater laterally than medially and posteriorly.

  9. Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, M K; Bencke, J; Andersen, L L

    2011-01-01

    In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle...... function during match play. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by a simulated handball match on neuromuscular strategy during a functional sidecutting movement, associated with the incidence of ACL injury. Fourteen female team handball players were tested...

  10. The MR diagnosis and clinical significance of bone contusion of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Yang Jun; Shao Kangwei; Zhu Caisong; Zhu Ying; Zhai Lulan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI in the diagnosis of the bone contusion of the knee .joint and its clinical significance. Methods: Using special coil for knee joint, coronal, sagittal, axial and oblique sagittal plane scanning with fast spin-echo sequence(T 1 WI, T 2 WI, PDWI + FS) was performed on knee joint in 205 patients in three days after injury. According the distributing bone marrow edema and injury mechanism, bone contusion were classified five types as pivot shift injury, clip injury, dashboard injury, hyperextension injury and lateral patellar dislocation. Results: One hundred and forty-five cases of the 205 patients were found bone marrow edema without fracture on X-ray films. Among them, pivot shift injury was found in 43 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 30 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 12 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 8 cases; clip injury in 53 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 10 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 15 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 38 cases; dashboard injury 40 cases accompanied with posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 16 cases, hyperextension injury. 9 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 2 cases, posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 3 cases. No lateral patellar dislocation was found. Forty-eight of 145 patients had undergone arthroscopy, 43 cases (89.6%) of them were in accordance with Mill diagnosis. Bone contusion were defined as geographic regions of abnormal signal intensity, that is, low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted images and high signal intensity in PD-weighted or T 2 -weigeted images with fat saturation. Conclusion: MRI can accurately display the location and area of bone contusion of the knee joint as well as its adjunctive structure injury and deduce their injury mechanism. MRI should be used routinely for knee trauma. (authors)

  11. Time line for noncopers to pass return-to-sports criteria after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Erin H; Axe, Michael J; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2010-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Determine effective interventions for improving readiness to return to sports postoperatively in patients with complete, unilateral, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture who do not compensate well after the injury (noncopers). Specifically, we compared the effects of 2 preoperative interventions on quadriceps strength and functional outcomes. The percentage of athletes who return to sports after ACL reconstruction varies considerably, possibly due to differential responses after acute ACL rupture and different management. Prognostic data for noncopers following ACL reconstruction is absent in the literature. Forty noncopers were randomly assigned to receive either progressive quadriceps strength-training exercises (STR group) or perturbation training in conjunction with strength-training exercises (PERT group) for 10 preoperative rehabilitation sessions. Postoperative rehabilitation was similar between groups. Data on quadriceps strength indices [(involved limb/uninvolved limb force) x 100], 4 hop score indices, and 2 self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare functional differences between the groups. Chi-square tests were used to compare frequencies of passing functional criteria and reasons for differences in performance between groups postoperatively. Functional outcomes were not different between groups, except a greater number of patients in the PERT group achieved global rating scores (current knee function expressed as a percentage of overall knee function prior to injury) necessary to pass return-to-sports criteria 6 and 12 months after surgery. Mean scores for each functional outcome met return-to-sports criteria 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Frequency counts of individual data, however, indicated that 5% of noncopers passed RTS criteria at 3, 48% at 6, and 78% at 12 months after surgery. Functional outcomes suggest that a

  12. In vivo evaluation of electrospun polycaprolactone graft for anterior cruciate ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrigliano, Frank A; Arom, Gabriel A; Nazemi, Azadeh N; Yeranosian, Michael G; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2015-04-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is critical for the structural stability of the knee and its injury often requires surgical intervention. Because current reconstruction methods using autograft or allograft tissue suffer from donor-site morbidity and limited supply, there has been emerging interest in the use of bioengineered materials as a platform for ligament reconstruction. Here, we report the use of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds as a candidate platform for ACL reconstruction in an in vivo rodent model. Electrospun PCL was fabricated and laser cut to facilitate induction of cells and collagen deposition and used to reconstruct the rat ACL. Histological analysis at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postimplantation revealed biological integration, minimal immune response, and the gradual infiltration of collagen in both the bone tunnel and intra-articular regions of the scaffold. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL graft failure load and stiffness at 12 weeks postimplantation (13.27±4.20N, 15.98±5.03 N/mm) increased compared to time zero testing (3.95±0.33N, 1.95±0.35 N/mm). Taken together, these results suggest that electrospun PCL serves as a biocompatible graft for ACL reconstruction with the capacity to facilitate collagen deposition.

  13. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  14. The accuracy of MRI in assessing graft integrity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yoshihito; Shirai, Yasumasa; Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of MRI in assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft integrity, we compared MRI findings with arthroscopic findings in 52 patients who had undergone arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons augmented by woven polyester. MRI and arthroscopy were carried out 12 months after the operation. The MR appearance of ACL grafts was categorized into 3 types by signal intensity and continuity of the ligament according to Rak's method: well-defined type: the graft was visualized as a smoothly continuous band with low signal over the entire course; intermediate type: signal intensity increased and a low-signal band was visualized only in part of the graft; indiscernible type: the graft was not identified through the joint cavity due to markedly increased signal intensity. When the MR appearance of intermediate or indiscernible types was defined as torn, the grafts were presumed to be torn in 9 patients whose arthroscopic findings were 7 intact and 2 torn grafts. All cases with intact MRI findings were intact on arthroscopic examination. Thus, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI as an evaluative tool for ACL graft tears were 100%, 86% and 86.5%, respectively. (author)

  15. NTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION: WITH BRACE VS WITHOUT BRACE AFTER OPERATION A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH.A NAZEM

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruputer specially in athletics induces knee instability results in pateint disability. Surgical treatment consist of ACL reconstruction and repair. In this study the efficacy of surgical management with brace after operation was compaired to surgical management without brace.
    Methods. One hundred ACL ruptured pateints had reconstructed with BPB graft in two randomzed gruops (50 with brace afetr operation and 50 without brace. Study durated 4 year (1997-2000 in alzahra hospital (affiliated to IUMSHS. Patients had followed for 12 months after operation.
    Results. Knee range of motion after 1, 3, 6, 12 months follow up were the same in both groups (P > 0.05. Degree and duration of returning to sport, complications, need to reoperation, stair climbing, specific ACL tests, patelofemoral pain, pain in squatting, running and cutting and quadriceps atrophy, after 12 months follow up were the same in both groups (P > 0.05. Patients without brace returned to their job more sooner than another group (P < 0.05.
    Discussion. There are no significant differnce in cilinical results in tow groups and ACL reconstruction with BPB dose not require to routine bracing. Faster return to job in non bracing group is due to removal of liminting effect of brace wearing. Lesser rate of pain in patients that return to sport due to quadriceps strengthening.

  16. Regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Current strategies in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Thomas; Teuschl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of musculoskeletal tissue engineering have raised an increasing interest in the regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). It is the aim of this article to review the current research efforts and highlight promising tissue engineering strategies. The four main components of tissue engineering also apply in several ACL regeneration research efforts. Scaffolds from biological materials, biodegradable polymers and composite materials are used. The main cell sources are mesenchymal stem cells and ACL fibroblasts. In addition, growth factors and mechanical stimuli are applied. So far, the regenerated ACL constructs have been tested in a few animal studies and the results are encouraging. The different strategies, from in vitro ACL regeneration in bioreactor systems to bio-enhanced repair and regeneration, are under constant development. We expect considerable progress in the near future that will result in a realistic option for ACL surgery soon. PMID:25621217

  17. MR imaging of alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echigoya, Naoki; Harata, Seiko; Ueyama, Kazumasa (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine); Nakano, Keisuke

    1992-06-01

    Autopsy findings of ligaments of the upper cervical spine were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Ligaments were clearly shown as hypointensity on T1-weighted images and proton density images. Transverse images were useful in diagnosing alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries. When there is a bilateral difference in the alar ligaments, ruptured ligament is suspected. Transverse ligament rupture was shown on interrupted hypointensity and as hyperintensity. MRI was capable of diagnosing alar ligament rupture in 8 of 11 patients, and transverse ligament rupture in all 3 patients. In 2 patients having Jefferson's fracture and injuried atlanoaxial subluxation encountered in the clinical practice, transverse ligament rupture was similarly observed as that in autopsy cases on MR images. Hyperintensity in the transverse ligament rupture area was seen even one year after injury. Injured transverse ligament was seen as swollen hyperintensity on sagittal images; and the hyperintensity was gradually decreased with the process of healing. (N.K.).

  18. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKean, D.; Thomee, E.; Grant, D.; Teh, J.L.; Mansour, R. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Yoong, P. [Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading (United Kingdom); Yanny, S. [Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2 % (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20 %). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25 %) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75 %) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner. (orig.)

  19. Mechanisms for anterior cruciate ligament injuries in badminton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Tsukada, Harehiko; Toh, Satoshi

    2010-12-01

    A high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries related to sports activities has been reported; however, the injury situation of ACL injury in badminton has not been elucidated. This study investigated the mechanism of ACL injury in badminton using a questionnaire. Information on injury mechanism was gathered from interviews with six male and 15 female badminton players who received a non-contact ACL injury playing badminton and underwent ACL reconstruction. The most common injury mechanism (10 of 21 injuries) was single-leg landing after overhead stroke. Nine of 10 players had injured the knee opposite to the racket-hand side. The second most frequent injury mechanism (eight of 21 injuries) was plant-and-cut while side-stepping or backward stepping. All eight players injured the knee of the racket-hand side. Eleven injuries occurred in the rear court, and six of the 11 injuries occurred during single-leg landing after an overhead stroke. The knee opposite to the racket-hand side tended to sustain the ACL injuries during single-leg landing after a backhand overhead stroke, whereas the knee of the racket-hand side tended to be injured by plant-and-cut during side or backward stepping. These injury patterns appear to be due to specific movements during badminton.

  20. Synovialisation of the torn anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: comparison between magnetic resonance and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higueras Guerrero, V.; Torregrosa Andres, A.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Casillas, C.; Sanfeliu, M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of MR in the diagnosis of synovialisation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) compared with arthroscopy. One hundred and forty-nine patients were examined with MR imaging and arthroscopy of the knee. The MR sign used to consider a synovialised ACL consisted of hypointense fibrillar tracts, disrupted and wavily, in its expected course. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV), comparison of proportions (McNemar test) and Kappa values for agreement between MR imaging and arthroscopy were calculated. Of the 133 (89.3 %) ligaments without synovialisation at arthroscopy, 130 accorded with the MR results. Of the 16 (10.7 %) synovialised ligaments, 13 accorded with the MR results. Three false-positive and three false-negative MR diagnoses were identified. The agreement between both techniques was excellent (Kappa = 0.79; p = 0.000), without differences (McNemar test; p = 1). Sensitivity was 0.81, specificity 0.98, PPV 0.98 and NPV 0.81. Magnetic resonance imaging is highly reliability for synovialisation diagnosis. The imaging sign used to diagnose synovialised ACL (hypointense comma-like tracts in its expected course) is reliable. As this reparative process can simulate an intact ligament, knowledge of this sign is important in diagnosing synovialisation of ACL tears so as not to confuse it with normal ACL. (orig.)

  1. An anterior cruciate ligament injury does not affect the neuromuscular function of the non-injured leg except for dynamic balance and voluntary quadriceps activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zult, Tjerk; Gokeler, Alli; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Brouwer, Reinoud W.; Zijdewind, Inge; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    The function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patients' non-injured leg is relevant in light of the high incidence of secondary ACL injuries on the contralateral side. However, the non-injured leg's function has only been examined for a selected number of neuromuscular outcomes and often

  2. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-06-18

    To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: "Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft" with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age.

  3. Effect of gender and sports on the risk of full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees: a nationwide cohort study from Sweden and Norway of 15 783 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røtterud, Jan Harald; Sivertsen, Einar A; Forssblad, Magnus; Engebretsen, Lars; Årøen, Asbjørn

    2011-07-01

    The presence of an articular cartilage lesion in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees is considered a predictor of osteoarthritis. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk factors for full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees, in particular the role of gender and the sport causing the initial injury. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Primary unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions prospectively registered in the Swedish and the Norwegian National Knee Ligament Registry during 2005 through 2008 were included (N = 15 783). Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate risk factors for cartilage lesions. A total of 1012 patients (6.4%) had full-thickness cartilage lesions. The median time from injury to surgery was 9 months (range, 0 days-521 months). Male patients had an increased odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with females (odds ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.42). In males, team handball had an increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with soccer (odds ratio = 2.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-4.19). Among female patients, no sport investigated showed a significant decrease or increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions. The odds of a full-thickness cartilage lesion increased by 1.006 (95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.008) for each month elapsed from time of injury until anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction when all patients were considered, while time from injury to surgery did not affect the odds significantly in those patients reconstructed within 1 year of injury (odds ratio = 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.02). Previous surgery increased the odds of having a full-thickness cartilage lesion (odds ratio = 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.63). One year of increasing patient age also increased the odds (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.06). Male gender is associated with an

  4. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, T E; Lohmander, S; Roos, E M

    2015-06-01

    Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) study, a randomized controlled trial. At baseline, 121 patients recorded in an initial questionnaire that their motives for sports participation fell into four categories: achievement, health, social integration, or fun and well-being. These four categories were used as variables in the analyses. All 121 subjects completed the 2-year follow-up. The largest improvement was seen in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale sports and recreation function, with an effect size of 2.43. KOOS sports and recreation function was also the subscale score best predicted by the motives for sports participation. Baseline motives achievement and fun and well-being predicted worse levels of pain and function 2 years after the injury, even after adjusting for age, gender, treatment and baseline scores. Psychological aspects, such as motives for participation in sport, can be factors in predicting of patient-reported outcomes 2 years after injury. Evaluating motives for sports participation may help predict the outcome 2 years after ACL injury. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of Meniscal Mechanics and Proteoglycan Content in a Modified Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Coatney, Garrett A.; Haverkamp, John H.; Button, Keith D.; DeCamp, Charlie; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) develops as a result of traumatic loading that causes tears of the soft tissues in the knee. A modified transection model, where the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and both menisci were transected, was used on skeletally mature Flemish Giant rabbits. Gross morphological assessments, elastic moduli, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) coverage of the menisci were determined to quantify the amount of tissue damage 12 weeks post injury. This study is one of the first to monitor meniscal changes after inducing combined meniscal and ACL transections. A decrease in elastic moduli as well as a decrease in GAG coverage was seen. PMID:24749144

  6. Molecular changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Ya; Hayami Tadashi; Pickarski Maureen; Duong Le T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating, progressive joint disease. Methods Similar to the disease progression in humans, sequential events of early cartilage degradation, subchondral osteopenia followed by sclerosis, and late osteophyte formation were demonstrated in the anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) or ACLT with partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx) rat OA models. We describe a reliable and consistent method to examine the time dependent changes in the g...

  7. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  8. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Ikeda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of cyclops lesion as a cause of persistent morbidity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kharat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized anterior arthrofibrosis (cyclops lesion is having around 1-9.8% frequency rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. It has been reported to be a significant cause of loss of knee extension after reconstruction of the ACL of the knee. We present a case report of a patient with prior ACL reconstruction who presented with pain and loss of extension following surgery. MR imaging revealed the typical features of cyclops lesion. Repeat arthroscopy excision of the lesion is the only treatment to reduce the morbidity of the patient.

  10. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Frois Temponi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction and classical (anatomical reconstruction.

  11. Multiple half-second acquisition method of the moving knee joint. Kinematic MR imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Echigo, Junko; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to delineate the moving anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with multiple rapid magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Rapid gradient echo MR images with an one-shot acquisition time of a half-second were accomplished by short repetition time and phase encoding reduction. Using a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, half-second acquisitions were sequentially acquired during active, constant knee movement. Sixteen knees with intact ACLs and 27 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were examined. Normal ACLs were identified as moving linear low-intensities. The ligaments were readily identified as straight or minimally curved structures when the knee was in semi-flexion compared to the knee extension. Torn ACLs were demonstrated as moving fragments or an amorphous configuration. Intermittent appearances of joint fluid interrupted the ligamentous continuities. Compared to the static images, no significant superiority of the kinematic imaging was found in diagnosis of ACL tears. However, this instant kinematic imaging is feasible with a standard MR system and can provide morphological information for functional analysis of the knee. (author)

  12. Trends in primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction among National Basketball Association team physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Nathan A; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Azar, Frederick M; Traina, Steve M; Allen, Answorth A; Parker, Richard; Cole, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common in athletes. Techniques and methods of treatment for these injuries continue to vary among surgeons. Thirty National Basketball Association (NBA) team physicians were surveyed during the NBA Pre-Draft Combine. Survey questions involved current and previous practice methods of primary and revision ACL reconstruction, including technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and treatment of combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injuries. Descriptive parametric statistics, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used, and significance was set at α = 0.05. All 30 team physicians completed the survey. Eighty-seven percent indicated they use autograft (81% bone-patellar tendon-bone) for primary ACL reconstruction in NBA athletes, and 43% indicated they use autograft for revision cases. Fourteen surgeons (47%) indicated they use an anteromedial portal (AMP) for femoral tunnel drilling, whereas 5 years earlier only 4 (13%) used this technique. There was a significant (P = .009) positive correlation between fewer years in practice and AMP use. NBA team physicians' use of an AMP for femoral tunnel drilling has increased over the past 5 years.

  13. ETHIOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF INJURIES OF KNEE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT IN ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Bulatović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The examined group was composed of 60 patients with injuries of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL treated at the Clinical Center of Montenegro from 2006- 2010. Among general population the frequency is 1:3000, and around 70% of ACL injuries occur as a consequence of sports activity. These traumas represent 15-30% of all sports injuries. Normal kinematics of a knee joint means intact ligament. The purpose of our work was to determine the risk factors of injury, regarding training and competing process, daily activity and their connection with the mechanism of injury. In our inquiry, recreational athletes represented 70% of patients.The most common mechanism of injury is a non-contact, deceleration, valgus angulation with an external rotation as a consequence of landing, sudden change of direction, running rhythm, or fall. The largest number of injuries occurs in training, recreation, tournaments, and everyday activities. In diagnostics we employed clinical tests, ECHO finding, NMR and arthroscopy. Sports activity during which our patients obtained most of their injuries is soccer. Traumas were frequently followed by damages to their joint structures (meniscus, cartilage. Injuries of ACL are multifactorial etiologies, but through external and internal factors, adequate communication, and sports culture of partakers (athletes, trainers and physicians can be acted preventively on decreasing injury incidence and timely and adequate treatment

  14. Impact of Partial and complete rupture of anterior cruciate ligament on medial meniscus: A cadavaric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Similar to complete rupture, partial rupture of ACL can also trigger strain concentration on medial meniscus, especially posterior horn, which may be a more critical reason for meniscus injury associated with chronic ACL deficiency.

  15. Rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb ? a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Mandhkani; Rhemrev, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Skier?s thumb is a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. It is an often-encountered injury and can lead to chronic pain and instability when diagnosed incorrectly. Knowledge of the anatomy and accurate physical examination are essential in the evaluation of a patient with skier?s thumb. This article provides a review of the relevant anatomy, the correct method of physical examination and the options for additional imaging a...

  16. ACL Rupture in Collegiate Wrestler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay A. Palmer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To educate others on unique Anterior Cruciate Ligament tears and percentage of usage of the ACL in normal daily function. Background: Patient is an eighteen year old male participating in wrestling and football at the time of the injury. Patient now only participates in wrestling. No previous knee or chronic injuries were reported prior to this injury. Patient was playing football during the time of injury. The patient stated that he planted his foot down and was tackled at the same time when the injury occurred. The patient felt his knee twist and buckle. Patient complained of clicking inside the knee and had minimal swelling. He also complained of it being difficult to bear weight at the time. The patient did not seek further treatment until two months after the injury occurred when he received an MRI. His MRI showed a positive finding for an Anterior Cruciate Ligament rupture. His previous Athletic Trainer could not find a positive diagnosis for the patient prior to the MRI. Differential Diagnosis: Possible meniscal or ACL injury. Treatment: Doctors officially diagnosed the injury as a complete rupture of the ACL. The patient did not receive surgery immediately. Doctors have stated that he only uses about 50% of his ACL on a daily basis compared to a normal person who uses about 95% of their ACL daily. Because of this, the patient played on his rupture for seven months before receiving surgery. He played a whole season of high school football and a whole season of wrestling his senior year with the ACL ruptured. The patient only used a brace for better comfort during the seven months. The patient then received reconstructive surgery to repair the rupture. A hamstring tendon graft was used to repair the ruptured ACL. Because a tendon was taken from the hamstring, patient experienced a tight ACL and hamstring of the left leg post-surgery. The patient participated in Physical Therapy for five months to strengthen and stretch the new

  17. Satisfactory outcomes following combined unicompartmental knee replacement and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, S G; Meuffels, D E

    2017-03-31

    There exist limited options for treatment of patients with combined medial compartment arthritis and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. Ideal treatment is one that offers lasting relief of symptoms not compromising any future surgery. Unicompartmental knee replacement has shown consistently good results in the relatively young and active population, but there is a high reported incidence of failure up to 20%, if performed in ACL-deficient knees. One of the recognized treatment modality is combined ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental arthroplasty. A systematic review was conducted looking at the demographics, techniques, complications and outcome of combined ACL reconstruction with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. A systematic literature search within the online Medline, PubMed Database, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar was carried out until October 2016 to identify relevant articles. A study was defined eligible if it met the following inclusion criteria: the surgical procedure combined unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; patient's clinical and/or functional outcomes were reported; any complications intra-operatively and post-operatively were reported; and the full-text articles, written in English, German, Italian, Dutch or Spanish, were available. Quality and risk of bias assessments were done using standardized criteria set. A total of 8 studies met the inclusion criteria encompassing 186 patients who were treated with simultaneous ACL reconstruction and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. The mean age was 50.5 years (range from 44 to 56) with a mean follow-up of 37.6 months (range from 24 to 60). There was an improvement in mean Oxford Score from 27.5 to 36.8. Complications reported included tibial inlay dislocation (n = 3), conversion to a total knee arthroplasty (n = 1), infection requiring two-stage revision (n = 2), deep-vein thrombosis (n = 1), stiffness requiring

  18. “‘Doc’ do I need an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? What happens if I do not reconstruct the cruciate ligament?”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KS Dhillon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We are all aware that there has been a dramatic increase in the number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstructions that are carried out here in Malaysia as well as around the world. The numbers of ACL injuries have undoubtedly increased over the years with greater participation of young adults in sporting activities. However it is not certain whether the increase in the numbers of reconstructions can be accounted for by the increasing numbers of ACL injuries. Without doubt commercial interests as well the influence of the biomedical companies have a role to play. In the past the rationale for surgical treatment of an ACL tear was that the ACL is vital for knee function and that in the long term ACL deficiency will lead to more injuries of the meniscus and more degeneration of the joint. This belief was prevalent because the natural history of an ACL deficient knee and the ultimate outcome of reconstruction of the ACL were both not known. However in recent years a substantial amount of research has been published, which has elucidated the natural history of ACL deficient knees as well as the long term outcome of reconstruction of the ACL.

  19. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  20. Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Thomeé, Roland; Neeter, Camille

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructiv...

  1. Proteomic differences between native and tissue‐engineered tendon and ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Simon R.; Peffers, Mandy; Canty‐Laird, Elizabeth G.; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age‐related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the proteomic profile between native T/Ls and tissue engineered (TE) T/L constructs. The canine long digital extensor tendon and anterior cruciate ligament were analyzed along with 3D TE fibrin‐based constructs created from their cells. Native tendon and ligament differed in their content of key structural proteins, with the ligament being more abundant in fibrocartilaginous proteins. 3D T/L TE constructs contained less extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and had a greater proportion of cellular‐associated proteins than native tissue, corresponding to their low collagen and high DNA content. Constructs were able to recapitulate native T/L tissue characteristics particularly with regard to ECM proteins. However, 3D T/L TE constructs had similar ECM and cellular protein compositions indicating that cell source may not be an important factor for T/L tissue engineering. PMID:27080496

  2. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liederbach, Marijeanne; Dilgen, Faye E; Rose, Donald J

    2008-09-01

    Ballet and modern dance are jump-intensive activities, but little is known about the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers. Rigorous jump and balance training has been shown in some prospective studies to significantly reduce ACL injury rates among athletes. Dancers advance to the professional level only after having achieved virtuosic jump and balance technique. Therefore, dancers on the elite level may be at relatively low risk for ACL injury. Descriptive epidemiology study. Dance exposure, injuries, and injury conditions were systematically recorded at 4 dance organizations over 5 years. Select neuromuscular and psychometric variables were compared between and within ACL-injured and noninjured dancers. Of 298 dancers, 12 experienced an ACL injury over the 5-year period. The incidence of ACL injury was 0.009 per 1000 exposures. Landing from a jump onto 1 leg was the mechanism of injury in 92% of cases. Incidence was not statistically different between gender or dance groups, although women modern dancers had a 3 to 5 times greater relative risk than women ballet dancers and men dancers. No difference between ACL-injured and noninjured dancers emerged with regard to race, oral contraceptive use, or select musculoskeletal measures. Dancers suffer considerably fewer ACL injuries than athletes participating in team ball sports. The training dancers undertake to perfect lower extremity alignment, jump, and balance skills may serve to protect them against ACL injury. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened most often late in the day and season, suggesting an effect of fatigue.

  3. Large Intra-Articular Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ganglion Cyst, Presenting with Inability to Flex the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Sloane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of gradually worsening anterior knee pain, swelling and inability to flex the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a large intra-articular cystic swelling anterior to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, extending into the Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad. Following manipulation under anaesthesia and arthroscopic debridement of the cyst, the patient's symptoms were relieved with restoration of normal knee motion. ACL ganglion cysts are uncommon intra-articular pathological entities, which are usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally by MRI. This is the first reported case of an ACL cyst being so large as to cause a mechanical block to knee flexion.

  4. Sex Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Data From the Swedish Knee Ligament Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Forssblad, Magnus; Herbertsson, Pär

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female gender is a risk factor for sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, little is known about possible sex differences in patients with ACL injury/reconstruction. PURPOSE: To study sex differences in patient-reported outcomes before and at 1 and 2 years after ACL...... in KOOS and EQ-5D preoperatively, 1 and 2 years postoperatively, and over time. RESULTS: Preoperatively, female patients reported worse scores than male patients in 4 KOOS subscales (pain, symptoms, sport/recreation, quality of life) and EQ-5D, with the largest difference seen in KOOS sport....../recreation (mean difference, 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0-6.3). At 1 year postoperatively, female patients reported worse scores than male patients in KOOS pain (mean difference, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.4-2.4) and KOOS sport/recreation (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9-4.4) and at 2 years postoperatively in KOOS...

  5. Early tension loss in an anterior cruciate ligament graft. A cadaver study of four tibial fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Dustin M; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2005-02-01

    The tensile force applied to an anterior cruciate ligament graft determines the maximal anterior translation; however, it is unknown whether the tensile force is transferred to the intra-articular portion of the graft and whether the intra-articular tension and maximal anterior translation are maintained shortly after ligament reconstruction. Ten cadaveric knees were reconstructed with a double-looped tendon graft. The graft was looped through a femoral fixation transducer that measured the resultant force on the proximal end of the graft. A pneumatic cylinder applied a tensile force of 110 N to the graft exiting the tibial tunnel with the knee in full extension. The graft was fixed sequentially with four tibial fixation devices (a spiked metal washer, double staples, a bioabsorbable interference screw, and a WasherLoc). Three cyclic loading treatments designed to conservatively load the graft and its fixation were applied. The combined loss in intra-articular graft tension from friction, insertion of the tibial fixation device, and three cyclic loading treatments was 50% for the spiked washer (p = 0.0004), 100% for the double staples (p < 0.0001), 64% for the interference screw (p = 0.0001), and 56% for the WasherLoc (p < 0.0001). The tension loss caused an increase in the maximal anterior translation from that of the intact knee of 2.0 mm for the spiked washer (p = 0.005), 7.8 mm for the double staples (p < 0.0001), 2.7 mm for the interference screw (p = 0.001), and 2.1 mm for the WasherLoc (p < 0.0001). The tensile force applied to a soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament graft is not transferred intra-articularly and is not maintained during graft fixation. The loss in tension is caused by friction in the tibial tunnel and wrapping the graft around the shank of the screw of the spiked washer, insertion of the tibial fixation device, and cyclical loading of the knee. The amount of tension loss is sufficient to increase the maximal anterior translation.

  6. Features of Designing the Criterion-Based Rehabilitation Program for Patients after Arthroscopic Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Roy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an innovative criterion-based rehabilitation program for patients, who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The features of the program are described, methodological foundations to perform permissible exercises are presented for each periods of the program, which correspond to a specific motor mode. The degree of preparedness of the patient is determined by the criterion of performance of the test exercises that will permit him to the loads of a new, higher level of trainings. The effectiveness of the developed program is confirmed clinically.

  7. MR imaging in chronic rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Vasenius, J.

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown as the best radiologic method for verifying and classifying acute ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) ruptures of the thumb. Our aim was to analyse the usefulness of MR also in old ruptures and to establish the most useful sequences. Ten patients with an old UCL rupture of the thumb were preoperatively imaged using 1.5 T MR. Three radiologists blinded to the findings separately analysed the MR images of these patients and of 10 age-and sex-matched voluntary controls. MR findings of the patients were compared with those of surgery. The consensus diagnosis of an UCL rupture was accurate in all 10 patients. All controls were classified as having no UCL rupture. In 5 of the 7 patients with a surgically defined Stener or non-Stener lesion, the consensus diagnosis was the same as the operative diagnosis. Due to excessive scarring it was not possible to verify any Stener lesion intra-operatively in 3 patients. The most informative MR sequence was T2 TSE in the coronal plane, the second most informative was T1 SE with fat suppression in the coronal plane. An old UCL rupture is well verified by MR but typing of the lesion as either a Stener or non-Stener type is not always possible

  8. Return-to-Sport and Performance After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in National Basketball Association Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Erickson, Brandon J; Bach, Bernard R; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Forsythe, Brian; McCormick, Frank M; Gupta, Anil K; Cole, Brian J

    2013-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a significant injury in National Basketball Association (NBA) players. NBA players undergoing ACL reconstruction (ACLR) have high rates of return to sport (RTS), with RTS the season following surgery, no difference in performance between pre- and postsurgery, and no difference in RTS rate or performance between cases (ACLR) and controls (no ACL tear). Case-control. NBA players undergoing ACLR were evaluated. Matched controls for age, body mass index (BMI), position, and NBA experience were selected during the same years as those undergoing ACLR. RTS and performance were compared between cases and controls. Paired-sample Student t tests, chi-square, and linear regression analyses were performed for comparison of within- and between-group variables. Fifty-eight NBA players underwent ACLR while in the NBA. Mean player age was 25.7 ± 3.5 years. Forty percent of ACL tears occurred in the fourth quarter. Fifty players (86%) RTS in the NBA, and 7 players (12%) RTS in the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) or D-league. Ninety-eight percent of players RTS in the NBA the season following ACLR (11.6 ± 4.1 months from injury). Two players (3.1%) required revision ACLR. Career length following ACLR was 4.3 ± 3.4 years. Performance upon RTS following surgery declined significantly (P NBA following ACLR. Nearly all players RTS the season following surgery. Performance significantly declined from preinjury level; however, this was not significantly different from controls. ACL re-tear rate was low. There is a high RTS rate in the NBA after ACLR, with no difference in performance upon RTS compared with controls.

  9. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries among wakeboarders: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iizawa, Norishige; Takeda, Tomomichi; Hattori, Mikihiko; Ito, Hiromoto

    2004-02-01

    No previous cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries sustained during wake-boarding have been reported. We report on a case involving an ACL injury sustained during wakeboarding. A 27-year-old man sustained an injury while attempting a wakeboarding maneuver(a heel-side back roll, consisting of a jump and simultaneous roll toward the heel side). He failed to complete his roll before landing, striking the water with his right shoulder foremost, then plunging underwater. When his wakeboard struck the water, his left knee was sprained by the rotational force exerted by the board. The patient was diagnosed with an isolated ACL injury and underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery. The board used in wakeboarding is wider and subject to greater water resistance than that used in water skiing. The feet of the wakeboarder are firmly attached by binding boots to a board, laterally with respect to the direction of motion, impeding easy separation of the board from the feet in the event of a fall. Thus, wakeboarding conditions would appear to put wakeboarders at particular risk for ACL injuries. These conditions need be assessed from a medical perspective in order to devise ways to minimize the risk of such injuries.

  11. Performance-Based Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Professional Athletes Differ Between Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Harry T; Chun, Danielle S; Schneider, Andrew D; Erickson, Brandon J; Freshman, Ryan D; Kester, Benjamin; Verma, Nikhil N; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-08-01

    Excellent outcomes have been reported for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) in professional athletes in a number of different sports. However, no study has directly compared these outcomes between sports. To determine if differences in performance-based outcomes exist after ACLR between professional athletes of each sport. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Football League (NFL), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL), and Major League Baseball (MLB) athletes undergoing primary ACLR for an acute rupture were identified through an established protocol of injury reports and public archives. Sport-specific performance statistics were collected before and after surgery for each athlete. Return to play (RTP) was defined as a successful return to the active roster for at least 1 regular-season game after ACLR. Of 344 professional athletes who met the inclusion criteria, a total of 298 (86.6%) returned to play. NHL players had a significantly higher rate of RTP (95.8% vs 83.4%, respectively; P = .04) and a shorter recovery time (258 ± 110 days vs 367 ± 268 days, respectively; P NBA and NFL players showed decreased performance at season 1 after ACLR ( P ≤ .001). NFL players continued to have lower performance at seasons 2 and 3 ( P = .002), while NBA players recovered to baseline performance. The data indicate that NFL athletes fare the worst after ACLR with the lowest survival rate, shortest postoperative career length, and sustained decreases in performance. NHL athletes fare the best with the highest rates of RTP, highest survival rates, longest postoperative career lengths, and no significant changes in performance. The unique physical demand that each sport requires is likely one of the explanations for these differences in outcomes.

  12. Transportal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadrupled hamstring tendon graft: A prospective outcome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has been one of the most commonly performed procedures throughout the world. Unsatisfactory outcome with conventional ACL reconstruction has been attributed to nonanatomic graft placement. Researchers have advised placing the graft in the native footprint of ACL to avoid nonanatomic graft placement. The goal of this study was to analyze the outcome of anatomic single bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective outcome study conducted on 85 consecutive patients of ACL reconstruction of which 62 patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria and were analyzed for final results. All the patients underwent ACL reconstruction by quadrupled hamstring tendon graft using transportal technique and the accessory anteromedial (AAM portal for femoral tunnel creation. The graft was fixed with endobutton on femoral side and bioabsorbable screw on the tibial side. Patients were evaluated for range of motion, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score, and Lysholm scores at a minimum followup period of 2 years. The mean pre- and postoperative scores were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores improved significantly (P < 0.0001 from preoperative value. According to IKDC score, 90.3% (n = 56 were either normal or near normal at final followup. According to Lysholm score, 75.8% of patients had excellent and 13.3% had good results. Preoperatively, pivot shift was present in 85.5% (n = 53 of patients which reduced to 4.8% (n = 3 postoperatively. Infection and knee stiffness occurred in two patients, and femoral tunnel blowout and graft re-rupture occurred in one patient each. Conclusion: Anatomic ACL reconstruction by AAM portal is a reproducible technique which gives good clinical outcome at short-term followup.

  13. Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With a Free Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Todor, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction aims to restore the 2 functional bundles of the ACL in an attempt to better reproduce the native biomechanics of the injured knee and promote long-term knee health. However, this concept is not fully accepted and is not performed on a standard basis. In addition, the superiority of this technique over the conventional single-bundle technique has been questioned, especially the long-term clinical results. One of the down sides of the double-bundle reconstruction is the complexity of the procedure, with increased risks, operative time, and costs compared with the single-bundle procedure. Also, the revision procedure, if necessary, is more challenging. We propose a technique that has some advantages over the traditional double-bundle procedure, using a single femoral tunnel, 2 tibial tunnels, and a free quadriceps tendon autograft.

  14. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed ...

  15. Knee functional recovery and limb-to-limb symmetry restoration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and ACL reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawasreh, Zakariya Hussein

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sport injury of young athletes who participate in jumping, cutting, and pivoting activities. Although ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgery has the goal of enabling athletes to return to preinjury activity levels, treatment results often fall short of this goal. The outcomes after ACLR are variable and less than optimal with low rate of return to preinjury activity level and high risk for second ACL injury. Factors related to the knee functional limitations, strength deficits, and limb-to-limb movement asymmetry may be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. Additionally, the criteria that are used to determine a patient's readiness to return to the preinjury activity level are undefined which may also be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. The clinical decision-making to clear patients' for safe and successful return to high physical activities should be based on a universal comprehensive set of objective criteria that ensure normal knee function and limb-to-limb symmetry. A battery of return to activity criteria (RTAC) that emphases normal knee function and limb-to-limb movement symmetry has been constituted to better ensure safe and successful return to preinjury activity level. Yet, only variables related to patients' demographics, concomitant injuries, and treatment measures have been used to predict return to preinjury activity levels after ACLR. However, the ability of RTAC variables that ensure normal knee function and limb movement symmetry to predict the return to participate in the same preinjury activity level after ACLR has not been investigated. In light of this background, the first aim of the present study was to compare functional knee performance-based and patient-reported measures of those who PASS and who FAIL on RTAC at 6 months (6-M) following ACLR with those at 12 months (12-M) and 24 months (24-M) following ACLR and to determine how performance-based and patient-reported measures

  16. The anterior cruciate ligament-lateral meniscus complex: A histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Maehara, Ami; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus (LM) dives underneath the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although the distinct role of meniscal attachments has been investigated, the relationship between the LM anterior insertion (LMAI) and ACL tibial insertion (ACLTI) remains unclear. This study histologically analyzed the LMAI and ACLTI. Samples were divided into four regions in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Histological measurements of these insertion sites were performed using safranin O-stained coronal sections. Distribution and signal densities of type I and II collagen were quantified. The ACLTI and LMAI formed the ACL-LM complex via fiber connections. The anterior part of the ACLTI had a widespread attachment composed of dense fibers. Attachment fibers of the LMAI became dense and wide gradually at the middle-to-posterior region. The ACL-LM transition zone (ALTZ) was observed between the LMAI and the lateral border of the ACLTI at the middle part of the ACL tibial footprint. Type II collagen density of the LMAI was higher than that of the ACLTI and ALTZ. Our results can help create an accurate tibial bone tunnel within the dense ACL attachment during ACL reconstruction surgery.

  17. A-B Hourglass Technique in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuhamella, Tamer M.; Batterjee, Khaled A.

    2006-01-01

    Within a period of 2 years starting from April 2000 to November 2002, fifty (50) cases of torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated and followed up using our simple modified technique in a retrospective non-randomized study conducted in Saudi-German Hospital, Saudi Arabia. All of which had torn ACL either isolated or associated with meniscal tear. Some of our study group was subjected arthroscopic interference in the same knee before either in the form of ACL reconstruction using P-T-B graft or for menisectomy. During this study per-operative evaluation, intra-operative technique and post-operative follow-up were standardized, with maximum follow-up period of 19 months and minimum follow-up period of 9 month. The final outcome was graded according to Lyshom knee score (1982). The mean age at surgery was 26.5 (from 17 to 36 years). The study group included 11 isolated torn ACL, 29 torn ACL with tear in the medial meniscus, 4 torn ACL with lateral meniscus tear and 6 cases with torn ACL associated with tear in both menisci. All of the cases were treated using the same technique. (author)

  18. Three-Dimensional Anatomic Evaluation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament for Planning Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Hoshino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic study related to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction surgery has been developed in accordance with the progress of imaging technology. Advances in imaging techniques, especially the move from two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D image analysis, substantially contribute to anatomic understanding and its application to advanced ACL reconstruction surgery. This paper introduces previous research about image analysis of the ACL anatomy and its application to ACL reconstruction surgery. Crucial bony landmarks for the accurate placement of the ACL graft can be identified by 3D imaging technique. Additionally, 3D-CT analysis of the ACL insertion site anatomy provides better and more consistent evaluation than conventional “clock-face” reference and roentgenologic quadrant method. Since the human anatomy has a complex three-dimensional structure, further anatomic research using three-dimensional imaging analysis and its clinical application by navigation system or other technologies is warranted for the improvement of the ACL reconstruction.

  19. X-ray computed tomography of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom; Rawson, Shelley; Castro, Simon Joseph; Balint, Richard; Bradley, Robert Stephen; Lowe, Tristan; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lee, Peter David; Cartmell, Sarah Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Summary The effect of phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and iodine solution (IKI) staining was investigated as a method of enhancing contrast in the X-ray computed tomography of porcine anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) and patellar tendons (PT). We show that PTA enhanced surface contrast, but was ineffective at penetrating samples, whereas IKI penetrated more effectively and enhanced contrast after 70 hours of staining. Contrast enhancement was compared when using laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources. Using the laboratory source, PT fascicles were tracked and their alignment was measured. Individual ACL fascicles could not be identified, but identifiable features were evident that were tracked. Higher resolution scans of fascicle bundles from the PT and ACL were obtained using synchrotron imaging techniques. These scans exhibited greater contrast between the fascicles and matrix in the PT sample, facilitating the identification of the fascicle edges; however, it was still not possible to detect individual fascicles in the ACL. PMID:25332942

  20. Three-Dimensional Engineered Bone–Ligament–Bone Constructs for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinjin; Smietana, Michael J.; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a major stabilizer of the knee, is commonly injured. Because of its intrinsic poor healing ability, a torn ACL is usually reconstructed by a graft. We developed a multi-phasic, or bone–ligament–bone, tissue-engineered construct for ACL grafts using bone marrow stromal cells and sheep as a model system. After 6 months in vivo, the constructs increased in cross section and exhibited a well-organized microstructure, native bone integration, a functional enthesis, vascularization, innervation, increased collagen content, and structural alignment. The constructs increased in stiffness to 52% of the tangent modulus and 95% of the geometric stiffness of native ACL. The viscoelastic response of the explants was virtually indistinguishable from that of adult ACL. These results suggest that our constructs after implantation can obtain physiologically relevant structural and functional characteristics comparable to those of adult ACL. They present a viable option for ACL replacement. PMID:21902608

  1. The possibility of physiotherapy treatment after injury of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Korabiusz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Damage of ACL represents approximately 50% of all internal damages of knee joint after its injury. According to statistics, 1 person out of 1000 residents suffers from ACL injury. Approximately 3 thousand reconstructions of ACL are performed yearly therefore it is very important to work out an optimal post-operative rehabilitation. Through this, it is possible to reduce pain indispositions and restore a good joint stabilization and improved quality of life. Goal of dissertation: Goal of this dissertation is a review of literature about available physiotherapy methods used after injury of anterior cruciate ligament. Conclusion: There are many physiotherapy methods used after injury of ACL. Methods proposed in literature increase range of movement in knee joint,  reduce pain  and restore a good joint stabilization The most often used methods are: transdermal nerves stimulation TENS, criotherapy,  magnetic field, ultrasounds, LASER, electrostimulation, interferention, kinesitherapy and kinesiotaping, Rehabilitation significantly reduces pain indispositions and has a positive influence on quality of life of patients after ACL injuring.

  2. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  3. In vitro study on silk fibroin textile structure for anterior cruciate ligament regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farè, Silvia; Torricelli, Paola; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Bertoldi, Serena; Alessandrino, Antonio; Villa, Tomaso; Fini, Milena; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Freddi, Giuliano

    2013-10-01

    A novel hierarchical textile structure made of silk fibroin from Bombyx mori capable of matching the mechanical performance requirements of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and in vitro cell ingrowth is described. This sericin-free, Silk Fibroin Knitted Sheath with Braided Core (SF-KSBC) structure was fabricated using available textile technologies. Micro-CT analysis confirmed that the core was highly porous and had a higher degree of interconnectivity than that observed for the sheath. The in vivo cell colonization of the scaffolds is thus expected to penetrate even the internal parts of the structure. Tensile mechanical tests demonstrated a maximum load of 1212.4±56.4 N (under hydrated conditions), confirming the scaffold's suitability for ACL reconstruction. The absence of cytotoxic substances in the extracts of the SF-KSBC structure in culture medium was verified by in vitro tests with L929 fibroblasts. In terms of extracellular matrix production, Human Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts (HPdLFs) cultured in direct contact with SF-KSBC, compared to control samples, demonstrated an increased secretion of aggrecan (PG) and fibronectin (FBN) at 3 and 7 days of culture, and no change in IL-6 and TNF-α secretion. Altogether, the outcomes of this investigation confirm the significant utility of this novel scaffold for ACL tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sports. Part I: systematic review of risk factors in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Mendiguchía, Jurdan; Samuelsson, Kristian; Musahl, Volker; Karlsson, Jon; Cugat, Ramon; Myer, Gregory D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report a comprehensive literature review on the risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in male athletes. All abstracts were read and articles of potential interest were reviewed in detail to determine on inclusion status for systematic review. Information regarding risk factors for ACL injuries in male athletes was extracted from all included studies in systematic fashion and classified as environmental, anatomical, hormonal, neuromuscular, or biomechanical. Data extraction involved general characteristics of the included studies (type of study, characteristics of the sample, type of sport), methodological aspects (for quality assessment), and the principal results for each type of risk factor. The principal findings of this systematic review related to the risk factors for ACL injury in male athletes are: (1) most of the evidence is related to environmental and anatomical risk factors; (2) dry weather conditions may increase the risk of non-contact ACL injuries in male athletes; (3) artificial turf may increase the risk of non-contact ACL injuries in male athletes; (4) higher posterior tibial slope of the lateral tibial plateau may increase the risk of non-contact ACL injuries in male athletes. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in male athletes likely has a multi-factorial aetiology. There is a lack of evidence regarding neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in male athletes. Future research in male populations is warranted to provide adequate prevention strategies aimed to decrease the risk of this serious injury in these populations.

  5. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glabglay Prapakorn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of selective cox-2 inhibitors in postoperative pain reduction were usually compared with conventional non-selective conventional NSAIDs or other types of medicine. Previous studies also used selective cox-2 inhibitors as single postoperative dose, in continued mode, or in combination with other modalities. The purpose of this study was to compare analgesic efficacy of single preoperative administration of etoricoxib versus celecoxib for post-operative pain relief after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods One hundred and two patients diagnosed as anterior cruciate ligament injury were randomized into 3 groups using opaque envelope. Both patients and surgeon were blinded to the allocation. All of the patients were operated by one orthopaedic surgeon under regional anesthesia. Each group was given either etoricoxib 120 mg., celecoxib 400 mg., or placebo 1 hour prior to operative incision. Post-operative pain intensity, time to first dose of analgesic requirement and numbers of analgesic used for pain control and adverse events were recorded periodically to 48 hours after surgery. We analyzed the data according to intention to treat principle. Results Among 102 patients, 35 were in etoricoxib, 35 in celecoxib and 32 in placebo group. The mean age of the patients was 30 years and most of the injury came from sports injury. There were no significant differences in all demographic characteristics among groups. The etoricoxib group had significantly less pain intensity than the other two groups at recovery room and up to 8 hours period but no significance difference in all other evaluation point, while celecoxib showed no significantly difference from placebo at any time points. The time to first dose of analgesic medication, amount of analgesic used, patient's satisfaction with pain control and incidence of adverse events were also no significantly difference among three groups. Conclusions

  6. A rare presentation of ruptured interstitial ectopic pregnancy with broad ligament hematoma: A case report

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    Ahmed M. Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in the first trimester. Interstitial type is the most dangerous variety with a high risk of life-threatening internal hemorrhage. Obstetricians need a high index of suspicion to diagnose such rare type. We are reporting a rare case of ruptured interstitial ectopic pregnancy presented with a large broad ligament hematoma early in the first trimester. A 25-year-old woman was presented with gradual onset of increasing abdominal pain after 6 weeks of amenorrhea. She had a positive urinary pregnancy test. Abdominal ultrasound revealed bulky empty uterus and ill-defined mass at the right side of the uterus. On exploration, incision and drainage of broad ligament hematoma were performed in addition to right salpingectomy. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and frequently constitutes an obstetrical emergency. Its rupture early in the first trimester should be expected. Early diagnosis and proper management are the most important issues to avoid its catastrophic consequences.

  7. Effects of knee injury primary prevention programs on anterior cruciate ligament injury rates in female athletes in different sports: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelidis, Michael; Koumantakis, George A

    2014-08-01

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury is frequently encountered in sports. To analyze the effects of ACL injury prevention programs on injury rates in female athletes between different sports. A comprehensive literature search was performed in September 2012 using Pubmed Central, Science Direct, CINAHL, PEDro, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscus. The key words used were: 'anterior cruciate ligament', 'ACL', 'knee joint', 'knee injuries', 'female', 'athletes', 'neuromuscular', 'training', 'prevention'. The inclusion criteria applied were: (1) ACL injury prevention training programs for female athletes; (2) Athlete-exposure data reporting; (3) Effect of training on ACL incidence rates for female athletes. 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three training programs in soccer and one in handball led to reduced ACL injury incidence. In basketball no effective training intervention was found. In season training was more effective than preseason in ACL injury prevention. A combination of strength training, plyometrics, balance training, technique monitoring with feedback, produced the most favorable results. Comparing the main components of ACL injury prevention programs for female athletes, some sports-dependent training specificity issues may need addressing in future studies, related primarily to the individual biomechanics of each sport but also their most effective method of delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of kinesiotaping in shortening rehabilitation deadlines in sportsmen operated of anterior cruciate ligament : Randomized clinical trial, double blinded and multicentre

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Vargas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is not much scientific evidence available about this application of kinesiotaping (KNT) due to it being a new and recent technique of application in physiotherapy world. This study is pioneer in demonstrating the effectiveness of KNT in shortening deadlines of recuperation time after a cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Objectives: To demonstrate the capacity of KNT to recover the correct muscular tone in hamstrings and this make a reduction in recovery times after an ACL surg...

  9. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan KJ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Koji J Duncan, Jaclyn N Chopp-Hurley, Monica R Maly School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases were systematically searched using keywords encompassed within four primary key terms: knee, osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament, and exercise. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of an exercise treatment for ACL injuries on the development of knee OA in adult humans were included. The PEDro scale was used to critically assess the studies included in the review. Results: Eighteen studies were included in this review, with a median PEDro score of 6/11 (range, 2/11–9/11. Three studies provided statistical evidence that exercise following ACL injury lowered the risk for knee OA development. Nine studies demonstrated no benefit of exercise in preventing knee OA incidence relative to either operative treatment or the contralateral, unaffected knee. However, exercise resulted in higher knee instability. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in subjective or objective knee outcomes for early versus late ACL reconstruction. Limitations: This review was not registered through PROSPERO. Conclusion: The relationship between a rehabilitative exercise for ACL injuries and long-term knee OA prevalence is inconclusive. However, research suggests initial conservative treatment with optional late ACL reconstruction because this treatment strategy may reduce the risk of knee OA. More research, ideally randomized controlled trials or comparable designs, is required prior to establishing

  10. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  11. Novel anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation device reduces slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez MJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandi J Lopez,1 Allen Borne,2 W Todd Monroe,3 Prakash Bommala,1 Laura Kelly,1 Nan Zhang11Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 2Louisiana State University, New Orleans Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, 3Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAbstract: Clinically significant laxity occurs in 10%–30% of knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Graft slippage and tension loss at the hamstring graft tibial fixation site during and after reconstruction surgery contribute to postoperative joint laxity and are detrimental to long-term knee stability and graft properties. Limiting graft slippage will reduce associated complications. We sought to compare the in vitro mechanical properties and in vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use, and graft incorporation of the novel GraftGrab™ (GG device designed to reduce hamstring graft tibial fixation slippage with the commercially available bioabsorbable Bio-Post™ and spiked washer (BP. Mechanical testing was performed on canine tibia-hamstring graft constructs to quantify initial fixation properties. In vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use and graft incorporation of hamstring graft reconstructions were determined in a canine model. Outcomes included tibial translation and ground reaction forces preoperatively and 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three-dimensional graft and bone tunnel dimensions at the latter two time points, and graft-bone microstructure, as well as mechanical properties 8 weeks after implantation. Immediately after fixation, all grafts slipped from the BP constructs versus about 30% of GG constructs. In vivo limb use remained low, and tibial translation increased with time in the BP cohort. These results together

  12. Clinical evaluation of bone- patellar tendon- bone grafts for anterior cruciate ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    One thousand and thirty-eight cases of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) rupture were treated between January 2002 and November 2010. Eight hundred sixty-six cases (83.9%) were observed for at least six months. All cases were reconstructed with a bone to tendon to bone (BTB) graft from the patella. Much effort was made to return the patient to a competitive sports activity level within one year. The age at suffering from the initial injury ranged from 9 to 74 years old with a mean of 24.7 years old. There were 493 female (50.7%) and 427 male (49.3%) cases. The injured side was right in 408 cases and left in 458 cases. The mean postoperative observation period was 449.2 days. The number of patients who felt 80% or more certain that they could return to competitive sports activities was 538 (61.9%). From the MRI findings, continuity of the reconstructed graft was observed in 793 cases (98.5%). Arthroscopy after reconstruction was performed in 775 cases (89.5%). The reconstructed ACL was observed to be covered with an adequate synovium in 629 cases (81.2%). The medial meniscus and lateral meniscus showed no changes in 657 cases (84.8%) and 666 cases (85.9%) respectively. Reconstructions performed less than two weeks after injury showed no significant differences in terms of Range Of Motion (ROM), arthroscopic findings, or the number of patients who could return to competitive sports activities. Statistically significantly more patients who underwent their reconstruction at an age over forty experienced a loss motion of five degree in extension or ten degree in flexion and resumed a lower level of sports activities. Patients who underwent the reconstruction could return to exercises for muscle strengthening and ROMs within 2 weeks. Patients over forty years old who underwent their reconstruction could prevent their menisci from fraying, tearing, or undergoing osteoarthritic changes. (author)

  13. A tissue engineering approach to anterior cruciate ligament regeneration using novel shaped capillary channel polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kristofer D.

    2009-12-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are the most frequent of injuries to the knee due to its role in preventing anterior translation of the tibia. It is estimated that as many as 200,000 Americans per year will suffer from a ruptured ACL, resulting in management costs on the order of 5 billion dollars. Without treatment these patients are unable to return to normal activity, as a consequence of the joint instability found within the ACL deficient knee. Over the last thirty years, a variety of non-degradable, synthetic fibers have been evaluated for their use in ACL reconstruction; however, a widely accepted prosthesis has been unattainable due to differences in mechanical properties of the synthetic graft relative to the native tissue. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field charged with the task of developing therapeutic solutions for tissue and organ failure by enhancing the natural wound healing process through the use of cellular transplants, biomaterials, and the delivery of bioactive molecules. The capillary channel polymer (CC-P) fibers used in this research were fabricated by melt extrusion from polyethylene terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate. These fibers possess aligned micrometer scale surface channels that may serve as physical templates for tissue growth and regeneration. This inherent surface topography offers a unique and industrially viable approach for cellular contact guidance on three dimensional constructs. In this fundamental research the ability of these fiber channels to support the adhesion, alignment, and organization of fibroblasts was demonstrated and found to be superior to round fiber controls. The results demonstrated greater uniformity of seeding and accelerated formation of multi-layered three-dimensional biomass for the CC-P fibers relative to those with a circular cross-section. Furthermore, the CC-P geometry induced nuclear elongation consistent with that observed in native ACL tissue. Through the

  14. Proteomic differences between native and tissue-engineered tendon and ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaz, Yalda A; Tew, Simon R; Peffers, Mandy; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-05-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age-related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the proteomic profile between native T/Ls and tissue engineered (TE) T/L constructs. The canine long digital extensor tendon and anterior cruciate ligament were analyzed along with 3D TE fibrin-based constructs created from their cells. Native tendon and ligament differed in their content of key structural proteins, with the ligament being more abundant in fibrocartilaginous proteins. 3D T/L TE constructs contained less extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and had a greater proportion of cellular-associated proteins than native tissue, corresponding to their low collagen and high DNA content. Constructs were able to recapitulate native T/L tissue characteristics particularly with regard to ECM proteins. However, 3D T/L TE constructs had similar ECM and cellular protein compositions indicating that cell source may not be an important factor for T/L tissue engineering. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Correlation between bone contusion and ligament, menisci injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lijuan; Li Pei; Tu Changzhuo; Wu Guangren; Qi Yuliang; Yan Xiaoqun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between bone contusion and ligament, meniscus injury of knee joint with MR imaging. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute trauma of knee joint were studied retrospectively. All eases showed negative on X-ray and bone cont, -sion on MR imaging. Results: in all patients, ligament and meniscus injury were seen in 25 cases (71%), incorporate anterior cruciate ligament injury in 12 cases, posterior cruciate ligament in 6, tibial collateral ligament in 8 cases, fibular collateral ligament in 6 cases, medial meniscus tear in 4 cases, lateral meniscus tear in 5 cases, and hydrops in 29 cases. There were only 3 patients with ligament or meniscus injury but no bone contusion during the same period. Conclusion: It is necessary to check by MR for the patients with acute trauma of knee joint, who have clinical symptom such as ache, swelling, move un-freely showing bone contusion on MR Imaging but without any abnormality on X-ray in order to avoid failure in diagnosing injury of ligament and meniscus. (authors)

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament regeneration using braided biodegradable scaffolds: in vitro optimization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Helen H; Cooper, James A; Manuel, Sharron; Freeman, Joseph W; Attawia, Mohammed A; Ko, Frank K; Laurencin, Cato T

    2005-08-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured intra-articular ligament of the knee, and limitations in existing reconstruction grafts have prompted an interest in tissue engineered solutions. Previously, we reported on a tissue-engineered ACL scaffold fabricated using a novel, three-dimensional braiding technology. A critical factor in determining cellular response to such a graft is material selection. The objective of this in vitro study was to optimize the braided scaffold, focusing on material composition and the identification of an appropriate polymer. The selection criteria are based on cellular response, construct degradation, and the associated mechanical properties. Three compositions of poly-alpha-hydroxyester fibers, namely polyglycolic acid (PGA), poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), and polylactic-co-glycolic acid 82:18 (PLAGA) were examined. The effects of polymer composition on scaffold mechanical properties and degradation were evaluated in physiologically relevant solutions. Prior to culturing with primary rabbit ACL cells, scaffolds were pre-coated with fibronectin (Fn, PGA-Fn, PLAGA-Fn, PLLA-Fn), an important protein which is upregulated during ligament healing. Cell attachment and growth were examined as a function of time and polymer composition. While PGA scaffolds measured the highest tensile strength followed by PLLA and PLAGA, its rapid degradation in vitro resulted in matrix disruption and cell death over time. PLLA-based scaffolds maintained their structural integrity and exhibited superior mechanical properties over time. The response of ACL cells was found to be dependent on polymer composition, with the highest cell number measured on PLLA-Fn scaffolds. Surface modification of polymer scaffolds with Fn improved cell attachment efficiency and effected the long-term matrix production by ACL cells on PLLA and PLAGA scaffolds. Therefore based on the overall cellular response and its temporal mechanical and degradation properties

  17. In vitro comparison of human fibroblasts from intact and ruptured ACL for use in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Brune

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study compares fibroblasts extracted from intact and ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL for creation of a tissue engineered ACL-construct, made of porcine small intestinal submucosal extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM seeded with these ACL cells. The comparison is based on histological, immunohistochemical and RT-PCR analyses. Differences were observed between cells in a ruptured ACL (rACL and cells in an intact ACL (iACL, particularly with regard to the expression of integrin subunits and smooth muscle actin (SMA. Despite these differences in the cell source, both cell populations behaved similarly when seeded on an SIS-ECM scaffold, with similar cell morphology, connective tissue organization and composition, SMA and integrin expression. This study shows the usefulness of naturally occurring scaffolds such as SIS-ECM for the study of cell behaviour in vitro, and illustrates the possibility to use autologous cells extracted from ruptured ACL biopsies as a source for tissue engineered ACL constructs.

  18. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: wuh5@mcmaster.ca; Webber, C. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Fuentes, C.O. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Benson, R.; Beattie, K. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jabbari, F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Levy, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Sports Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine and Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  19. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.; Webber, C.; Fuentes, C.O.; Benson, R.; Beattie, K.; Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X.; Jabbari, F.; Levy, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft without implant on tibial side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skand Sinha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft could prevent potential problems of free graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction such as pull out before graft-tunnel healing or rupture before ligamentization. Different implants have been reportedly used for tibial side fixation with this technique. We investigated short-term outcome of ACL reconstruction (ACLR with tibial attachment sparing hamstring graft without implant on the tibial side by outside in technique. Materials and Methods: Seventy nine consecutive cases of ACL tear having age of 25.7 ± 6.8 years were included after Institutional Board Approval. All subjects were male. The mean time interval from injury to surgery was of 7.5 ± 6.4 months. Hamstring tendons were harvested with open tendon stripper leaving the tibial insertion intact. The free ends of the tendons were whip stitched, quadrupled, and whip stitched again over the insertion site of hamstring with fiber wire (Arthrex. Single bundle ACLR was done by outside in technique and the femoral tunnel was created with cannulated reamer. The graft was pulled up to the external aperture of femoral tunnel and fixed with interference screw (Arthrex. The scoring was done by Lysholm, Tegner, and KT 1000 by independent observers. All cases were followed up for 2 years. Results: The mean length of quadrupled graft attached to tibia was 127.65 ± 7.5 mm, and the mean width was 7.52 ± 0.78 mm. The mean preoperative Lysholm score of 47.15 ± 9.6, improved to 96.8 ± 2.4 at 1 year. All cases except two returned to the previous level of activity after ACLR. There was no significant difference statistically between preinjury (5.89 ± 0.68 and postoperative (5.87 ± 0.67 Tegner score. The anterior tibial translation (ATT (KT 1000 improved from 11.44 ± 1.93 mm to 3.59 ± 0.89 mm. The ATT of operated knee returned to nearly the similar value as of the opposite knee (3.47 ± 1.16 mm. The Pivot shift test was negative in

  1. Comparison of lateral fabellar suture and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy techniques for treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Evans, Wanda J; Griffon, Dominique J; Bubb, Carrie; Knap, Kim M; Sullivan, Meghan; Evans, Richard B

    2013-09-01

    To compare 1-year outcomes after lateral fabellar suture stabilization (LFS) and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for the treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease. Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial. 80 dogs with naturally occurring unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease. All dogs were randomly assigned to undergo LFS (n = 40) or TPLO (40). Clinical data collected included age, weight, body condition score, history information, stifle joint instability, radiographic findings, surgical findings, and complications. Outcome measures were determined prior to surgery and at 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months after surgery, including values of pressure platform gait analysis variables, Canine Brief Pain Inventory scores, owner satisfaction ratings, thigh circumference, and stifle joint goniometry values. Signalment and data for possible confounding variables were similar between groups. Peak vertical force of affected hind limbs at a walk and trot was 5% to 11% higher for dogs in the TPLO group versus those in the LFS group during the 12 months after surgery. Canine Brief Pain Inventory, goniometry, and thigh circumference results indicated dogs in both groups improved after surgery, but significant differences between groups were not detected. Owner satisfaction ratings at 12 months after surgery were significantly different between groups; 93% and 75% of owners of dogs in the TPLO and LFS groups indicated a satisfaction score ≥ 9 (scale, 1 to 10), respectively. Kinematic and owner satisfaction results indicated dogs that underwent TPLO had better outcomes than those that underwent LFS.

  2. Investigating the primary stability of the transversal support tibial plateau concept to retain both cruciate ligaments during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrej M; Stangel, Melanie; Grupp, Thomas M; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-09-27

    The important roles of the anterior cruciate ligament regarding knee stability, physiologic kinematics, and proprioception are unquestioned. Thus, various efforts have been made to retain the ACL during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Neither of the existing solutions to this problem, i.e. bicruciate retaining prostheses and implantation of two unicondylar prostheses, has been successful because of concept-specific problems as well as general difficulties with implant fixation. The new transversal support tibial plateau concept is a prosthesis of two individual joint surfaces reinforced beneath the articular line by joint surface supports and buttressed by a single transversal support. This configuration, which enables retention of both cruciate ligaments, should provide good bone fixation and ensure long-term alignment of the individual joint surfaces. In the current study, four prototypes based on this novel concept were developed and the resulting primary stability was analyzed using adapted load testing. The test set-up, with the model-loading of specially prepared Sawbones® and a sinusoidal oscillating load transmission with 25 000 cycles over 10 increasing load levels, achieved subsidence, which enabled comparison of the four different model variants regarding primary stability in view of bone anchoring. The model variant (TSmobile) that allowed transverse glide of the joint surface supports along the transversal support revealed the largest subsidence. A rigid attachment of the joint surface supports of the transversal support tibial plateau thus appears to offer increased primary stability regarding bone anchoring.

  3. Local delivery of controlled-release simvastatin to improve the biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peng Zhang,1,* Fei Han,2,* Yunxia Li,1 Jiwu Chen,1 Tianwu Chen,1 Yunlong Zhi,1 Jia Jiang,1 Chao Lin,2 Shiyi Chen,1 Peng Zhao2 1Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai East Hospital, The Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System has recently been widely used as the primary graft of choice in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. But the biological graft–bone healing still remains a problem. Previous studies have shown that simvastatin (SIM stimulates bone formation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether surface coating with collagen containing low-dose SIM microsphere could enhance the surface biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligaments to accelerate graft-to-bone healing. The in vitro studies demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells on the collagen-coated PET scaffolds (COL/PET and simvastatin/collagen-coated PET scaffolds (SIM/COL/PET proliferated vigorously. Compared with the PET group and the COL/PET group, SIM could induce bone marrow stromal cells’ osteoblastic differentiation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition, and more expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in the SIM/COL/PET group. In vivo, rabbits received ACL reconstruction with different scaffolds. Histological analysis demonstrated that graft–bone healing was significantly greater with angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the SIM/COL/PET group than the other groups. In addition, biomechanical testing at the eighth week demonstrated a significant increase in the ultimate failure load and stiffness in the SIM/COL/PET group. The low dose of SIM

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament tear induces a sustained loss of muscle fiber force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Enselman, Elizabeth R Sibilsky; Konja, Alexis C; Eckhardt, Logan R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2018-01-18

    Patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears have persistent quadriceps strength deficits that are thought to be due to altered neurophysiological function. Our goal was to determine the changes in muscle fiber contractility independent of the ability of motor neurons to activate fibers. We obtained quadriceps biopsies of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction, and additional biopsies 1, 2, and 6 months after surgery. Muscles fiber contractility was assessed in vitro, along with whole muscle strength testing. Compared with controls, patients had a 30% reduction in normalized muscle fiber force at the time of surgery. One month later, the force deficit was 41%, and at 6 months the deficit was 23%. Whole muscle strength testing demonstrated similar trends. While neurophysiological dysfunction contributes to whole muscle weakness, there is also a reduction in the force generating capacity of individual muscle cells independent of alpha motor neuron activation. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. The ESSKA paediatric anterior cruciate ligament monitoring initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moksnes, Håvard; Engebretsen, Lars; Seil, Romain

    2016-03-01

    To survey and describe the treatment of paediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries performed by orthopaedic surgeons affiliated with the European Society for Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy (ESSKA). A closed e-survey was submitted to all registered members and affiliates of ESSKA in July 2013. All recipients were invited to participate in the survey by answering 34 questions online. The list of potential respondents was extracted from the ESSKA office database. Invitation was sent to 2236 ESSKA members and affiliates, and received 491 (22%) unique responses. Among the respondents, 445 (91%) were orthopaedic surgeons, with 354 (72%) stating that they were involved in treatment of paediatric ACL injuries. The main findings were that there are substantial differences with regard to preferred treatment algorithms, surgical techniques and long-term follow-up procedures. The summed estimate of skeletally immature children with ACL injury seen by the responders in 2012 was minimum 1923 individuals, and a minimum of 102 clinically relevant post-operative growth disturbances were registered. The present survey documents that the incidences of paediatric ACL injuries and idiopathic growth disturbances may be higher than previously estimated. Treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are highly diverse, and consensus could not be identified. It is worrying that only half the surgeons reported to follow-up children until skeletal maturity after surgical treatment. The results of this survey highlight the importance of international multicentre studies on paediatric ACL treatment and the development of an outcome registry to enable prospective data collections. IV.

  7. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Motor coordination during gait after anterior cruciate ligament injury: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Leporace

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the state of art about motor coordination during gait in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. Searches were carried out, limited from 1980 to 2010, in various databases with keywords related to motor coordination, gait and ACL injury. From the analysis of titles and applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria 24 studies were initially selected and, after reading the abstract, eight studies remained in the final analysis. ACL deficient patients tend to have a more rigid and less variable gait, while injured patients with ACL reconstruction have less rigid and more variable gait with respect to healthy individuals. The overall results suggest the existence of differences in motor coordination between the segments with intact and those with injured knee, regardless of ligament reconstruction. ACL injured patients present aspects related to the impairment of the capability to adapt the gait pattern to different environmental conditions, possibly leading to premature knee degeneration. However, the techniques used for biomechanical gait data processing are limited with respect to obtaining information that leads to the development of intervention strategies aimed at the rehabilitation of that injury, since it is not possible to identify the location within the gait cycle where the differences could be explained.

  9. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament ... other during the application of strain, leading to viscous dissipation of stress at low ... low strains without straining the collagen molecules and plastically ..... anterior cruciate ligament: current and future concepts. New York:.

  10. Surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Belgium anno 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, Hans; Goubau, Laurent; Stuyts, Bart; Schepens, Alexander; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Anatomic ACL surgery, including double bundle ACL reconstruction, has been investigated widely. The purpose of this study was to gain insight in the currently used surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries amongst Belgian orthopaedic surgeons. A survey consisting of epidemiological questions, ACL surgery related questions and questions concerning rehabilitation was submitted to all members of the Belgian Knee Society. Anatomic single bundle ACL repair with transportal femoral tunnel drilling, using an autologous hamstring graft fixed with a cortical suspension system proximal and an interference screw distal is currently the most common technique. The surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia with a one-night stay in the hospital. Postoperatively a hinge brace is mostly used. Although much research concerning double bundle ACL surgery is performed, only few surgeons perform this technique. Most surgeons perform an anatomic single bundle repair. This is in accordance with the current knowledge regarding cost effective care. Performing this procedure in day care with the aid of loco-regional anesthesia and avoidance of a hinged brace can help to reduce the cost for the healthcare system without compromising the outcome.

  11. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for the internal derangement of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Noboru; Yamauchi, Kazunori; Ohyama, Naoki; Kura, Hideharu; Tokita, Fumio; Sasaki, Tetsuhito

    1990-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative diagnosis of internal derangement of the knee, MRI findings of 44 knees were reviewed. Definitive diagnoses were made by arthroscopy or arthrotomy: posterior cruciate ligament failure (8 knees), anterior cruciate ligament failure (21), inner meniscus injury (16), and outer meniscus injury (13). T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained by using a 1.5-T superconducting Signa MRI unit. The diagnostic accuracy was 100% for posterior cruciate ligament failure and anterior cruciate ligament failure, 89% for inner meniscus injury, and 93% for outer meniscus injury, suggesting the great potential of MRI in the preoperative diagnosis. For anterior cruciate ligament failure, the diagnostic accuracy was even more increased by combined use of T1-weighted sagittal imaging and T2-weighted coronal imaging. False positive findings for meniscus disorder included rupture of the posterior segment of meniscus, especially in the cnemis end. Longitudinal fissure of the posterior segment of the outer meniscus was misdiagnosed as lacuna of the popliteal muscle tendon. (N.K.)

  13. Radiographer led supplementary anterior cruciate ligament MRI sequences: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Paula J.; McCall, Iain; Kraus, Alexandra; Jones, Mary; Walley, Gayle; Gibson, Kathryn; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To compare different supplementary MRI sequences of the ACL to arthroscopy and determine the diagnostic performance of each sequence. To ascertain whether radiographers could identify patients requiring supplementary MRI sequences of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, without a supervising radiologist. Methods: The study had ethical approval and two hundred and thirty one consecutive prospective MRI patients with mechanical knee symptoms (77 females, 154 males, of mean age 43.5, range 18–82 years) gave written informed consent. They then had a knee arthroscopy within seven days of the MRI. This was a pragmatic study to see if the six general MRI radiographers, each with over four years experience, could evaluate the ACL on routine orthogonal sequences (sagittal T1, Gradient Echo T2, Coronal STIR and axial fat suppressed dual echo). If they identified no ACL, then two 3D volume sequences (Dual Echo Steady State and Fast Low Angle Shot) and 2D limited sagittal oblique T1 sequences were also performed. Patients requiring extra sequences, missed by the radiographers, were recalled. The MRI sequences were independently evaluated in a blinded fashion by two consultant radiologists and a specialist radiology registrar and compared to the subsequent knee arthroscopy, as the gold standard, to determine the diagnostic performance statistics. Results: The cohort was on the knee arthroscopy weighting list and comprised 205 patients with chronic, 20 acute and 6 acute on chronic mechanical knee symptoms. There were no posterior cruciate, medial, or lateral collateral ligament tears at arthroscopy, used as the gold standard. The arthroscopy was normal and the radiographers correctly did not scan the extra sequence in 140 patients (72%) who then had normal arthroscopies. The radiographers did perform additional ACL sequences in 63 patients (27%). Of these, 10 patients had a partial and 12 complete ACL tears. Only two patients (0.9%) were recalled for additional

  14. Iliotibial band friction syndrome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transfix device: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfort, Xavier; Monllau, Joan C; Puig, Lluís; Cáceres, Enric

    2006-06-01

    The use of hamstrings is increasing as a treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. There are a lot of new devices and techniques that try to fix the graft without causing further injury or increased morbidity. We report two cases in relation to the transfix device for reconstructing the ACL. The first case is a 38-year-old female who was treated with an autologous hamstring graft for chronic ACL instability brought on by a sport trauma. The patient developed iliotibial band friction syndrome 3 months after the operation. MRI showed incorrect positioning and a rupture of the femoral bio-absorbable cross-pin. The hamstring graft always had good fixation and did not produce instability of the knee. We removed the cross-pin fragment in a second surgery and the patient returned to her daily lifestyle after 3 weeks. The second case is a 52-year-old female with a painful and unstable knee due to a previous lateral meniscectomy and failure of an ACL reconstruction. We performed an ACL reconstruction with an autologous hamstring graft and a lateral meniscus transplantation. Some months after the procedure she also developed this syndrome. MRI showed the same features as shown in the first case and a second surgery was needed. To our knowledge this clinical and technical problem has not been previously described.

  15. Combined reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament associated with anterolateral tenodesis effectively controls the acceleration of the tibia during the pivot shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Casabianca, Laurent; Hardy, Edouard; Grimaud, Olivier; Meyer, Alain

    2017-04-01

    The pivot shift test is quantified subjectively during assessment of patients presenting with suspected Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears and has a low interobserver reproducibility. The Kinematic Rapid Assessment (KiRA) is a triaxial accelerometer that makes it possible to non-invasively quantify tibial acceleration during the pivot shift test. Abolishing pivot shift is considered to be a key element in surgical reconstruction but is incomplete in 25-38% of patients. Patients were included prospectively. Inclusion criteria were patients requiring ACL reconstruction associated with at least one of the following factors corresponding to the patient who have a high risk of rupture either by their sports activity, a failure case, or the notion of important rotational laxity: the patient practiced a competitive pivot-contact sport, revision ACL reconstruction (besides STG (semitendinosus-gracilis graft) repair), subjective explosive rotational laxity, Segond fracture, and TELOS value of >10 mm. Standardized pre- and postoperative pivot shift tests were immediately performed under anesthesia in both knees. Forty-three patients were included. Mean preoperative variations in tibial acceleration in the healthy and injured knees were 1.2 ± 0.1 and 2.7 ± 0.3 m/s 2 , respectively, p operated knees (n.s). Combined ACL reconstruction associated with anterolateral tenodesis suppress acute pathologic tibial acceleration in the pivot shift. III.

  16. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING THE DOUBLE-BUNDLE TECHNIQUE - EVALUATION IN THE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Castropil, Wagner; Garofo, Antônio Guilherme Padovani; Cantuária, Anita Lopes; Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Luques, Isabela Ugo; Duarte, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the methodology of knee rotation analysis using biomechanics laboratory instruments and to present the preliminary results from a comparative study on patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the double-bundle technique. The protocol currently used in our laboratory was described. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis was performed and knee rotation amplitude was measured on eight normal patients (control group) and 12 patients who were operated using the double-bundle technique, by means of three tasks in the biomechanics laboratory. No significant differences between operated and non-operated sides were shown in relation to the mean amplitudes of gait, gait with change in direction or gait with change in direction when going down stairs (p > 0.13). The preliminary results did not show any difference in the double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique in relation to the contralateral side and the control group.

  17. WITHDRAWN: Exercise for treating anterior cruciate ligament injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage of the knee in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Amanda H; Howe, Tracey E; Grant, Margaret; Gray, Heather G

    2011-05-11

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The ACL may be damaged in isolation but often other ligaments and menisci are implicated. The injury may be managed surgically or conservatively. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to alteration in muscle function. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred for rehabilitation. To present the best evidence for effectiveness of exercise used in the treatment of ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage to the knee in adults, on return to work and pre-injury levels of activity. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (October 2006), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1996 to October 2006), EMBASE (1980 to October 2006), other databases and reference lists of articles. We included randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials testing exercise programmes designed to treat adults with ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage. Included trials randomised participants to receive any combination of the following: no care, usual care, a single-exercise intervention, and multiple-exercise interventions. The primary outcome measures of interest were returning to work and return to pre-injury level of activity post treatment, at six months and one year. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Five trials (243 participants) evaluated different exercise programmes following ACL reconstruction and one trial (100 participants) compared supervised with self-monitored exercises as part of conservative treatment. No study compared the effect of exercise versus

  18. Presence of Bacteria in Spontaneous Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, Christer G; Fu, Sai-Chuen; Hopkins, Chelsea; Luan, Ju; Ip, Margaret; Yung, Shu-Hang; Friman, Göran; Qin, Ling; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2017-07-01

    The structural pathology of Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures resembles tendinopathy, but the causes remain unknown. Recently, a number of diseases were found to be attributed to bacterial infections, resulting in low-grade inflammation and progressive matrix disturbance. The authors speculate that spontaneous AT ruptures may also be influenced by the presence of bacteria. Bacteria are present in ruptured ATs but not in healthy tendons. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with spontaneous AT ruptures and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction were recruited for this study. During AT surgical repair, excised tendinopathic tissue was collected, and healthy tendon samples were obtained as controls from hamstring tendon grafts used in ACL reconstruction. Half of every sample was reserved for DNA extraction and the other half for histology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using 16S rRNA gene universal primers, and the PCR products were sequenced for the identification of bacterial species. A histological examination was performed to compare tendinopathic changes in the case and control samples. Five of 20 AT rupture samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA, while none of the 23 hamstring tendon samples were positive. Sterile operating and experimental conditions and tests on samples, controlling for harvesting and processing procedures, ruled out the chance of postoperative bacterial contamination. The species identified predominantly belonged to the Staphylococcus genus. AT rupture samples exhibited histopathological features characteristic of tendinopathy, and most healthy hamstring tendon samples displayed normal tendon features. There were no apparent differences in histopathology between the bacterial DNA-positive and bacterial DNA-negative AT rupture samples. The authors have demonstrated the presence of bacterial DNA in ruptured AT samples. It may suggest the potential involvement of bacteria

  19. Muscle reflexes during gait elicited by electrical stimulation of the posterior cruciate ligament in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Rasmussen, T; Krogsgaard, M R; Jensen, D B

    2002-01-01

    over the vastus medialis, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris caput longum, and semitendinosus muscles. The stimuli consisted of four pulses delivered at 200 Hz; the stimulus amplitude was two to three times the sensory threshold. The electrical stimulation of the PCL inhibited the ongoing......We investigated the influence of electrical stimulation of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) on the motoneuron pool of the thigh and calf muscle during gait. The study group comprised eight young men without any history of injury to the knee joints. Multistranded teflon-insulated stainless...... steel wires were inserted into the PCL guided by sonography and in four subjects also into the fat pad of the knee. The PCL was electrically stimulated during gait on a treadmill at heel strike and 100 ms after heel strike. Electromyographic signals were recorded with bipolar surface electrodes placed...

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament tears for the primary care sports physician: what to know on the field and in the office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Wendell M R; VanSice, Wade C; Savoie, Felix H

    2015-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are relatively common and can lead to knee dysfunction. The classic presentation is a non-contact twisting injury with an audible pop and the rapid onset of swelling. Prompt evaluation and diagnosis of ACL injuries are important. Acute treatment consists of cessation of the sporting activity, ice, compression, and elevation with evaluation by a physician familiar with ACL injuries and their management. The diagnosis is made with the use of patient history and physical examination as well as imaging studies. Radiographs may show evidence of a bony injury. MRI confirms the diagnosis and evaluates the knee for concomitant injuries to the cartilage, menisci and other knee ligaments. For active patients, operative treatment is often recommended while less-active patients may not require surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the diagnosis of an ACL injury and provide clear management strategies for the primary-care sports medicine physician.

  1. Basic principles of aggressive rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation after ACL (anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has drastically changed over the last decade, with the adoption of a more aggressive approach, right from the first day after surgery. Progress in the effectiveness of rehabilitation is based on improvements in operative techniques, as well as on the encouraging results of histological studies regarding graft healing. Despite a huge amount of research papers on this topic, a rehabilitation golden standard still has not been established, due to the complexity of this problem. In this review, we point out the basic principles of rehabilitation after arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction based on actual practices, as well as the importance of specific procedures for the prevention of complications during the postoperative period. The importance of range-of-motion exercises, early weight bearing, an appropriate gait scheme, patella mobilisation, pain and oedema control, as well as stretching and balance exercises is explained. The functional advantages of closed kinetic chain exercises, as well as their influence on the graft are also described, in comparison to open kinetic chain exercises. The fundamentals of returning to sports are revealed and the specific aspects of rehabilitation regarding graft choice are pointed out. While waiting for new clinical investigations, which are expected to enable the establishment of a rehabilitation golden standard, the outlined principles should be followed. The complexity of this injury requires treatment in highly specialised institutions.

  2. Is the posterior cruciate ligament destabilized after the tibial cut in a cruciate retaining total knee replacement? An anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabaud, Barthelemy; Patrick, David A; Geller, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Cruciate retaining total knee replacement has been shown to effectively improve pain and quality of life. Successful outcomes depend on many factors, including the maintenance of a competent posterior cruciate ligament. This study sought to anatomically analyze the percentage of PCL injured during a full transverse, tibial cut, thus altering normal function. One hundred and thirty five consecutive knee MRIs taken from 2006 to 2011 were selected from a single surgeon's database for this study. Only subjects with non-arthritic knees were considered for this study; the lack of degenerative joint disease (DJD) was confirmed via a radiological report. The optimal view of the PCL's tibial attachment was observed using the sagittal view of the knee, with a T1 signal. One hundred and twenty two usable images were viewed electronically, and measurements were made using the standardized transverse cut implant guidelines. The percentage of PCL remaining following the cut was categorized into five different groups: 0% (no PCL undermined), 1-49%, 50-74%, 75-99% and 100% (PCL undermined entirely). Overall only 9.0% (n=11) would have not endured any damage to the PCL with a transverse tibial saw cut, while 79.6% (n=98) would have had 50% or more of the PCL undermined. Of the 98 patients with more than 50% resected, 52.1% (n=51 patients) presented complete destabilization of the PCL. The percentage of PCL destabilized was not significant across age groups (p=0.280), gender (p=0.586), or operative side (p=0.460). Independent of age, gender, and operative side, a majority of PCLs are more than 50% destabilized following the standard transverse tibial cut. II. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament graft tensioning. Is the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirpara Kieran M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tensioning of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction grafts affects the clinical outcome of the procedure. As yet, no consensus has been reached regarding the optimum initial tension in an ACL graft. Most surgeons rely on the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique for graft tension. We aim to determine if this technique is reproducible from patient to patient. Findings We created a device to simulate ACL reconstruction surgery using Ilizarov components and porcine flexor tendons. Six experienced ACL reconstruction surgeons volunteered to tension porcine grafts using the device to see if they could produce a consistent tension. None of the surgeons involved were able to accurately reproduce graft tension over a series of repeat trials. Conclusions We conclude that the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique of ACL graft tensioning is not reproducible from trial to trial. We also conclude that the initial tension placed on an ACL graft varies from surgeon to surgeon.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament graft tensioning. Is the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique reproducible?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Barry J

    2011-07-20

    Abstract Background Tensioning of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction grafts affects the clinical outcome of the procedure. As yet, no consensus has been reached regarding the optimum initial tension in an ACL graft. Most surgeons rely on the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique for graft tension. We aim to determine if this technique is reproducible from patient to patient. Findings We created a device to simulate ACL reconstruction surgery using Ilizarov components and porcine flexor tendons. Six experienced ACL reconstruction surgeons volunteered to tension porcine grafts using the device to see if they could produce a consistent tension. None of the surgeons involved were able to accurately reproduce graft tension over a series of repeat trials. Conclusions We conclude that the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique of ACL graft tensioning is not reproducible from trial to trial. We also conclude that the initial tension placed on an ACL graft varies from surgeon to surgeon.

  5. Using ground reaction force to predict knee kinetic asymmetry following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, B; Butler, R J; Garrett, W E; Queen, R M

    2014-12-01

    Asymmetries in sagittal plane knee kinetics have been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury. Clinical tools are needed to identify the asymmetries. This study examined the relationships between knee kinetic asymmetries and ground reaction force (GRF) asymmetries during athletic tasks in adolescent patients following ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). Kinematic and GRF data were collected during a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task for 23 patients. Asymmetry indices between the surgical and non-surgical limbs were calculated for GRF and knee kinetic variables. For the stop-jump task, knee kinetics asymmetry indices were correlated with all GRF asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetry indices were correlated with the peak propulsion vertical GRF and vertical GRF impulse asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetries and therefore may assist in optimizing rehabilitation outcomes and minimizing re-injury rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Progression of stifle osteoarthrosis following reconstruction of the cranial cruciate ligament in 21 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, P.B.; Berry, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-one dogs that had intraarticular reconstruction of the cranial cruciate ligament were examined clinically and radiographically to assess limb function and determine if there had been progression of osteoarthrosis in the affected stifle joints. The interval between surgery and follow-up examination varied from 1 to 47 months, mean = 14.9 +/-12.9 months standard deviation. Clinical variables that were assessed included lameness, palpable joint instability, articular crepitus, and joint swelling. Radiographic features that were evaluated included soft-tissue swelling/joint effusion, subchondral sclerosis, periarticular osteophyte and enthesiophyte formation, remodeling of femoral and tibial condyles, and resorptive changes in the intercondyloid fossa. The owners of all 21 dogs believed that the operation had improved their dog's condition because the frequency of lameness had decreased. However, palpable instability, crepitus, and joint swelling were detected frequently during physical examinations. Radiographs documented progression of osteoarthrosis in the operated upon stifle joints of all 21 dogs

  7. Incidence and MRI characterization of the spectrum of posterolateral corner injuries occurring in association with ACL rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Honorio de Carvalho, Lucio Jr. [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Saithna, Adnan [Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals, Southport (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Department of Clinical Engineering, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Thaunat, Mathieu; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand [Centre Orthopedic Santy, FIFA Medical Center of Excellence, Ramsay-Generale de Sante, Hopital Prive Jean Mermoz, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the incidence and MRI characteristics of the spectrum of posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries occurring in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. We carried out a level IV, retrospective case series study. All patients clinically diagnosed with an ACL rupture between July 2015 and June 2016 who underwent MRI of the knee were included in the study. In addition to standard MRI knee reporting, emphasis was placed on identifying injury to the PLC and a description of involvement of these structures by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Association with PLC involvement was sought with concomitant injuries using correlation analysis and logistic regression. One hundred sixty-two patients with MRI following ACL rupture were evaluated. Thirty-two patients (19.7%) had an injury to at least one structure of the PLC, including the inferior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 28), arcuate ligament (n = 20), popliteus tendon (n = 20), superior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 18), lateral collateral ligament (n = 8), popliteofibular ligament (n = 7), biceps tendon (n = 4), iliotibial band (n = 3), and fabellofibular ligament (n = 1). Seventy-five percent of all patients with combined ACL and PLC injuries had bone contusions involving the lateral compartment of the knee. The presence of these contusions strongly correlated with superior popliteomeniscal fascicle lesions (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between injuries to other structures of the PLC and other intra-articular lesions. Missed injuries of the PLC lead to considerable morbidity. The relevance of this study is to highlight that these injuries occur more frequently than previously described and that an appropriate index of suspicion, clinical examination, and MRI are all required to reduce the risk of missed diagnoses. The results of this study support previous suggestions that the rate of concomitant PLC injury in the ACL-deficient knee is under-reported. The rate of combined injuries in

  8. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  9. [Case-control study on Chinese medicine fumigation and massage therapy for the treatment of knee stability and func tional recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Zhong-han; Zhou, Ying; Jing, Lin; Zhang, Hong-mei; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Wei-heng; Chen, Ping-quan

    2016-05-01

    To study clinical outcomes of Chinese medidine fumigation and massage therapy for the treatment of knee stability and functional recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction operation,and to explore the effect on tendon-bone healing. Total 50 patients were divided into two groups: the control group (normal rehabilitation therapy group),the treatment group (Chinese medicine fumigation and manipulation group). There were 25 patients in the control group, including 16 males and 9 females, who were treated with isometric muscle training, with the gradually enlarging amplitude of flexion and progressive loading of bearing training for knee recovery. There were 25 patients in the treatment group, including 15 males and 10 females,who were treated with the conventional rehabilitation therapy combined with Chinese medicine fumigation and massage therapy. The Chinese herbs named as Haitongpi decoction was steamed by a special equipment to fumigate the knee after operation; Based on the biomechanical parameters of the ligament reconstruction, the massage therapy was designed to control the degree of the knee flexion and release the adhesion for early recovery of knee functions. The Lysholm knee function evaluation system was used, and MRI examination was performed to measure the change in width of ligament tunnel in femur and tibia to evaluate the safety and stability of the treatment. Lysholm system showed that two groups both had improving results from the 1st month after operation to the 3rd month (treatment group, F=36.54, P0.05), indicating that Chinese rehabilitation therapy was a safety treatment without the influence on the loosing of tendon. Chinese medicine fumigation and massage therapy can early improve the knee function after the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction operation without the disturbance of the knee stability.

  10. Effects of sports injury prevention training on the biomechanical risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury in high school female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bee-Oh; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kim, Jin Goo; An, Keun Ok; Yoo, Jin; Kwon, Young Hoo

    2009-09-01

    Female athletes have a higher risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury than their male counterparts who play at similar levels in sports involving pivoting and landing. The competitive female basketball players who participated in a sports injury prevention training program would show better muscle strength and flexibility and improved biomechanical properties associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury than during the pretraining period and than posttraining parameters in a control group. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 22 high school female basketball players were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (the experimental group and the control group, 11 participants each). The experimental group was instructed in the 6 parts of the sports injury prevention training program and performed it during the first 20 minutes of team practice for the next 8 weeks, while the control group performed their regular training program. Both groups were tested with a rebound-jump task before and after the 8-week period. A total of 21 reflective markers were placed in preassigned positions. In this controlled laboratory study, a 2-way analysis of variance (2 x 2) experimental design was used for the statistical analysis (P training effects on all strength parameters (P = .004 to .043) and on knee flexion, which reflects increased flexibility (P = .022). The experimental group showed higher knee flexion angles (P = .024), greater interknee distances (P = .004), lower hamstring-quadriceps ratios (P = .023), and lower maximum knee extension torques (P = .043) after training. In the control group, no statistical differences were observed between pretraining and posttraining findings (P = .084 to .873). At pretraining, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups for any parameter (P = .067 to .784). However, a comparison of the 2 groups after training revealed that the experimental group had significantly higher knee flexion angles (P = .023

  11. An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Patterson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist.

  12. deal Rehabilitation Programme after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Review of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Nazir AHMAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knee injuries are the second most common musculoskeletal injuries in primary care, with anterior cruciate the most commonly injured ligament. It is caused by contact / non - contact and accelerating/decelerating twisting injury of the knee. Typical presentation includes trauma with pain and swellin g, with laxity of the knee joint. Management includes rehabilitation alone or surgery combined with rehabilitation. Pre - surgery rehabilitation with graded physiotherapy programme results in improved postoperative recovery, reduced pain, swelling, better s tability and improved range of movement. No consensus exists on an ideal rehabilitation programme, as various factors, including injury to other knee structures, choice of graft, type of surgery performed and patient preference exist. Rehabilitation includ es accelerated vs. conservative, closed vs. open kinetic chain and techniques involving bracing, neuromuscular training and cryotherapy. Ideal personalised rehabilitation plan should include educating athletes to improve adherence, providing realistic stra tegies and approximate time frame for a return to sport. Studies support accelerated rehabilitation before and after surgery, in a clinic and home setting, with combined kinetic exercises. Accelerated rehabilitation protocol involving exercises to increas e muscle strength, knee ROM and proprioception along with reducing pain, inflammation and swelling can lead to better knee stability and a less complicated rehabilitation course.

  13. Propriedades biomecânicas da fáscia lata e do ligamento cruzado cranial de cães Biomechanical properties of canine fascia lata and cranial cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Brendolan

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparações bilaterais do ligamento cruzado cranial e da fáscia lata de 15 cães foram testadas na máquina Instron, modelo 4482. Os animais, de ambos os sexos, idade entre um e quatro anos, pesavam em média 11,80 ± 1,99kg. Os retalhos de fáscia lata foram testados retilíneos e torcidos e o ligamento cruzado cranial foi testado mantendo um ângulo de 135° entre a tíbia e o fêmur e 0°, 15° de rotação externa e 15° de rotação interna da tíbia em relação ao fêmur. A velocidade dos testes de tração foi de 8,47mm por segundo. A força máxima dos retalhos de fáscia lata foi aproximadamente de 290 Newtons, e a tensão máxima, 28 Megapascal. A torção não influenciou na resistência dos retalhos de fáscia lata. A rotação externa e interna da tíbia de 15º também não influenciou na força máxima do ligamento cruzado cranial, que foi aproximadamente de 660 Newtons, nem na tensão máxima, que foi cerca de 75 Megapascal. Os retalhos de fáscia lata apresentaram 44% da força máxima e 37% da tensão máxima do ligamento, no entanto, os retalhos torcidos mostraram maior deformação do que os retalhos retilíneos, alcançando cerca de 70% da deformação do ligamento, sendo essa forma a mais indicada na substituição do ligamento cruzado cranial.Bilateral preparations of fascia lata and cranial cruciate ligament from 15 dogs were tested in Instron machine, model 4482. Dogs were from both sexes, between one and four years of age and weighing in average about 11.80 ± 1.99kg. Fascia lata strips were tested straight and twisted and the cranial cruciate ligaments were tested with an angle of 135° between the femur and tibia and 0°, 15° of external tibial rotation and 15° of internal tibial rotation in relation to femur. The traction test velocity was 8.47mm per second. The maximum force of fascia lata strips was of approximately 290 Newtons and the maximum stress, 28 Megapascal. Similar results of strength and stress

  14. A Preclinical Assessment of Early Continuous Passive Motion and Treadmill Therapeutic Exercises for Generating Chondroprotective Effects After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Lee, Kuan-Wei; Chu, Chih-Jou; Shie, Ming-You; Chou, Pei-Hsi; Lin, Chih-Chan; Liang, Peir-In

    2017-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a well-known risk factor for the development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). However, whether using continuous passive motion (CPM) with or without additional treadmill exercise (TRE) in early ACL injury might provide chondroprotective effects and further decrease the risk of PTOA has yet to be determined. CPM may offer an enhanced chondroprotective effect, but TRE may attenuate that effect due to the mechanical stress on the joint and inflammatory cytokines in the joint. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty adult New Zealand White male rabbits were randomly allocated to sedentary (SED), CPM, TRE, or CPM+TRE groups. Each rabbit underwent an ACL transection (ACLT) on the right knee, with the contralateral knee used as an internal control (sham). The 4 joint surfaces (ie, medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaus) were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery for gross appearance, histological characteristics, and quantitative osteoarthritis (OA) scores. Overall, at the end of testing, the CPM group experienced the best protective therapeutic effects in all compartments. In gross appearance, CPM resulted in normal articular surfaces, while the TRE and SED groups exhibited surface abrasion. Histological analysis showed significant differences in articular cartilage status. The CPM group had significantly better histological OA scores ( P CPM+TRE group displayed visible pathological changes in the superficial cartilage, indicating that early loading exercise may contribute to osteoarthritis. The sham treatment showed no difference in the changes in all compartments between groups. Immediate CPM therapy produces a superior in situ microenvironment for reducing the occurrence of PTOA after ACL injury without reconstruction in rabbits. These data suggest that immediate application of CPM therapy may be necessary to create a sound microenvironment in joints and possibly to decrease the risk of PTOA without or while

  15. The effects of levofloxacin on rabbit anterior cruciate ligament cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Yu; Chen, Biao; Qi, Yongjian; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liaobin

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage, epiphyseal growth plate and tendons have been recognized as targets of fluoroquinolone-induced connective tissue toxicity. The effects of fluoroquinolones on ligament tissues are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of levofloxacin, a typical fluoroquinolone antibiotic drug, on rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells in vitro. Rabbit ACL cells were treated with levofloxacin at different concentrations (0, 14, 28, 56, 112 and 224 μM) and were assessed to determine the possible cytotoxic effects of levofloxacin on ACL cells. Levofloxacin, with concentrations ranging from 28 to 224 μM, induced dose-dependent ACL cell apoptosis. Characteristic markers of programmed cell death and degenerative changes were identified by electron microscopy in the ACL cells treated with 28 μM of levofloxacin. Moreover, levofloxacin significantly increased the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13 and decreased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) in a concentration-dependent manner; TIMP-3 and collagen type I alpha 1 (Col1A1) mRNA expression was not affected. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that levofloxacin markedly increased the expression of active caspase-3 within a concentration range of 28 to 224 μM, whereas a clear-cut decrease in Col1A1 expression was found with levofloxacin treatment concentrations of 112 and 224 μM, compared to controls. Our data suggest that levofloxacin has cytotoxic effects on ACL cells characterized by enhanced apoptosis and decreased extracellular matrix, which suggest a potential adverse effect of fluoroquinolones. -- Highlights: ► Levofloxacin has cytotoxic effect on rabbit ACL cells in vitro. ► Levofloxacin induces apoptosis in ACL cells. ► It decreases extracellular matrix by upregulation of matrix degrading enzymes. ► ACL cells are more susceptible to cytotoxicity by fluoroquinolones. ► Our study suggests a potential

  16. A History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction at the National Football League Combine Results in Inferior Early National Football League Career Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Matthew T; Bradley, James P; Chahla, Jorge; Sanchez, Anthony; Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; Arner, Justin W; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Sanchez, George; Kennedy, Mitchell I; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cinque, Mark E; LaPrade, Robert F

    2018-05-19

    To evaluate whether players with a history of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) before the National Football League (NFL) Combine played or started fewer games and/or participated in fewer eligible snaps compared with NFL Combine participants without a history of knee injury or surgery. We performed a retrospective review of all players who participated in the NFL Combine between 2009 and 2015 and who had a history of an ACLR. NFL Combine participants were included if they had a previous ACLR or combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and nonoperatively managed medial collateral ligament injury. The number of games started, number of games played, draft number, overall draft pick, and snap percentage for each position were determined. The mean value of each outcome metric was compared between case and control players. We identified 110 players who had an ACL injury (n = 76) or a combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injury (n = 34). Players in the ACLR group had a significantly worse mean draft pick number (difference of 30.2, P = .002) and mean draft round (difference of 0.8, P = .019) versus controls. Compared with control players, players in the ACLR group started and played significantly fewer games in both season 1 (difference of 2.7 games started, P < .001; difference of 2.7 games played, P < .001) and season 2 (difference of 7.4 games started, P < .001; difference of 3.0 games played, P = .003) and had a significantly lower snap percentage in both season 1 (difference of 23.1%, P < .001) and season 2 (difference of 24.0%, P < .001). Athletes at the NFL Combine who previously underwent an ACLR had significantly lower early-career NFL player metrics, including fewer games started, fewer games played, and a lower snap percentage, than uninjured controls. Defensive linemen, defensive backs, and linebackers were the 3 most affected positions. Players with a prior ACLR and combined meniscal-chondral pathology had

  17. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Avoiding Injury to the Physis, Lateral Collateral Ligament, Anterolateral Ligament, and Popliteus-A 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Cannamela, Peter C; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Polousky, John D; Milewski, Matthew D; Anderson, Allen F; Ganley, Theodore J

    2018-01-25

    To investigate the relation of the at-risk structures (distal femoral physis, lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral ligament, popliteus, and articular cartilage) during all-epiphyseal femoral tunnel drilling. A second purpose was 2-fold: (1) to develop recommendations for tunnel placement and orientation that anatomically reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while minimizing the risk of injury to these at-risk structures, and (2) to allow for maximal tunnel length to increase the amount of graft in the socket to facilitate healing. Three-dimensional models of 6 skeletally immature knees (aged 7-11 years) were reconstructed from computed tomography and used to simulate all-epiphyseal femoral tunnels. Tunnels began within the ACL footprint and were directed laterally or anterolaterally, with the goal of avoiding injury to at-risk structures. The spatial relation between the ideal tunnel and these structures was evaluated. Full-length tunnels and partial length condyle sockets were simulated in the models using the same trajectories. An anterolateral tunnel could be placed to avoid direct injury to lateral structures. The safe zone on the anterolateral aspect of the femur was larger than that of a tunnel with a direct lateral trajectory (median 127 mm 2 vs 83 mm 2 , P = .028). Anterolateral tunnels were longer than direct lateral tunnels (median 30 mm vs 24 mm, P = .041). Safe angles for anterolateral tunnels were 34° to 40° from the posterior condylar axis; direct lateral tunnels were drilled 4° to 9° from the posterior condylar axis. Sockets could be placed without direct injury to structures at risk with either orientation. An all-epiphyseal ACL femoral tunnel can be placed without causing direct injury to at-risk structures. A tunnel angled anterolaterally from the ACL origin is longer and has a larger safe zone compared with the direct lateral tunnel. The largest safe zone for femoral all-epiphyseal ACL drilling was (1) anterior to

  18. Femoral Condyle Fracture during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Ozyurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,We have greatly enjoyed reading the case report entitled “‘Femoral Condyle Fracture during Revision of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Case Report and a Review of Literature in the issue of Arch Bone Jt Surg. 2015;3(2 with great interest. We would like to commend the authors for their detailed and valuable work. Although various case reports have described postoperative distal femur fracture at a range of time intervals (1,2 intraoperative intra-articular distal femur fracture is a unique entity.However, we believe that some important additional observations seem necessary to be contributed through this study. In this article, the authors stated that, to the best of their knowledge, there is no other case report in the literature introducing a femoral condyle fracture during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction or revision reconstruction. Nevertheless, we would like to call the attention of the readers to the fact that that the literature contains one additional case report re‌porting on intraoperative distal femoral coronal plane (Hoffa fracture during primary ACL reconstruction (2. Werner BC and Miller MD presented of case report of an intraoperative distal femoral coronal plane (Hoffa fracture that occurred during independent femoral tunnel drilling and dilation in a primary ACL reconstruction. As in the their case, this type of fracture can occur with appropriately placed femoral tunnels, but the risk can increase with larger graft diameters in patients with smaller lateral femoral condyles The patient was treated with open reduction and internal fixation, without compromise of graft stability and with good recovery of function. We believe that tailoring graft size to the size of the patient is important to prevent similar adverse events.

  19. Characteristics of elongated and ruptured anterior cruciate ligament grafts: An analysis of 21 consecutive revision cases

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    Kohei Iio

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The location of the original femoral tunnel was more proximal in patients with elongated grafts than in those with ruptured grafts. Different bone tunnel position from native ACL might lead to graft elongation.

  20. Movimento de gaveta em joelhos de cães submetidos à estabilização extracapsular após secção do ligamento cruzado cranial in vitro Drawer movement in canine knees undergoing extracapsular stabilization after cranial cruciate ligament rupture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Kemper

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A técnica TightRope, que procura aperfeiçoar a estabilização extra-capsular com sutura lateral, por meio da realização de mínimas incisões e criação de túneis ósseos em pontos isométricos, que permitem a inserção de mecanismo que anula o movimento de gaveta, além de reduzir a ocorrência de complicações graves. Dessa forma, objetivou-se avaliar a modificação da técnica TightRope em joelhos de cadáveres caninos com a finalidade de disponibilizar um procedimento simples e de custo reduzido para tratamento da Ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial (RLCCr. Experimentalmente, foram utilizados 20 membros pélvicos de dez cadáveres caninos, provenientes do setor de patologia da Universidade Norte do Paraná, os quais pesavam entre 6,3 e 24kg. Para estabilização do LCCr, rompido intencionalmente, foi adotada a técnica de TightRope modificada utilizando fio de poliamida, cavilha e emprego de um parafuso ortopédico para proporcionar a fixação óssea. Comparando os valores de deslocamento obtidos durante a realização do movimento de gaveta previamente à ruptura do LCCr e após a realização do procedimento cirúrgico, observou-se que a modificação da técnica TightRope promoveu estabilidade significativa para a maioria (12 de 20 dos joelhos testados (P=0,0033. Contudo, essa estabilidade foi inferior, quando comparada à estabilidade do ligamento intacto.The TightRope technique, that has been developed, aims to improve the extra-capsular stabilization with lateral suture through smaller incisions and creating isometric bone tunnels at points that allow the inclusion of a mechanism that overrides the movement of drawer and reduce the occurrence of serious complications. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate the TightRope modified technique in canine cadaver knees in order to provide a simple and cost effective treatment for cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCrLR. Experimentally; we used 20 pelvic limbs of ten canine

  1. Biomechanical Comparison of Five Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuelle, Clayton W; Milles, Jeffrey L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Stannard, James P; Smith, Patrick A; Kfuri, Mauricio; Cook, James L

    2017-07-01

    No surgical technique recreates native posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) biomechanics. We compared the biomechanics of five different PCL reconstruction techniques versus the native PCL. Cadaveric knees ( n  = 20) were randomly assigned to one of five reconstruction techniques: Single bundle all-inside arthroscopic inlay, single bundle all-inside suspensory fixation, single bundle arthroscopic-assisted open onlay (SB-ONL), double bundle arthroscopic-assisted open inlay (DB-INL), and double bundle all-inside suspensory fixation (DB-SUSP). Each specimen was potted and connected to a servo-hydraulic load frame for testing in three conditions: PCL intact, PCL deficient, and PCL reconstructed. Testing consisted of a posterior force up to 100 N at a rate of 1 N/s at four knee flexion angles: 10, 30, 60, and 90 degrees. Three material properties were measured under each condition: load to 5 mm displacement, maximal displacement, and stiffness. Data were normalized to the native PCL, compared across techniques, compared with all PCL-intact knees and to all PCL-deficient knees using one-way analysis of variance. For load to 5 mm displacement, intact knees required significantly ( p  < 0.03) more load at 30 degrees of flexion than all reconstructions except the DB-SUSP. At 60 degrees of flexion, intact required significantly ( p  < 0.01) more load than all others except the SB-ONL. At 90 degrees, intact, SB-ONL, DB-INL, and DB-SUSP required significantly more load ( p  < 0.05). Maximal displacement testing showed the intact to have significantly ( p  < 0.02) less laxity than all others except the DB-INL and DB-SUSP at 60 degrees. At 90 degrees the intact showed significantly ( p  < 0.01) less laxity than all others except the DB-SUSP. The intact was significantly stiffer than all others at 30 degrees ( p  < 0.03) and 60 degrees ( p  < 0.01). Finally, the intact was significantly ( p  < 0.05) stiffer than all others except the DB

  2. Importance of tibial slope for stability of the posterior cruciate ligament deficient knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, J Robert; Stabile, Kathryne J; Zantop, Thore; Vogrin, Tracy M; Woo, Savio L-Y; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that increasing tibial slope can shift the resting position of the tibia anteriorly. As a result, sagittal osteotomies that alter slope have recently been proposed for treatment of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries. Increasing tibial slope with an osteotomy shifts the resting position anteriorly in a PCL-deficient knee, thereby partially reducing the posterior tibial "sag" associated with PCL injury. This shift in resting position from the increased slope causes a decrease in posterior tibial translation compared with the PCL-deficient knee in response to posterior tibial and axial compressive loads. Controlled laboratory study. Three knee conditions were tested with a robotic universal force-moment sensor testing system: intact, PCL-deficient, and PCL-deficient with increased tibial slope. Tibial slope was increased via a 5-mm anterior opening wedge osteotomy. Three external loading conditions were applied to each knee condition at 0 degrees, 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees of knee flexion: (1) 134-N anterior-posterior (A-P) tibial load, (2) 200-N axial compressive load, and (3) combined 134-N A-P and 200-N axial loads. For each loading condition, kinematics of the intact knee were recorded for the remaining 5 degrees of freedom (ie, A-P, medial-lateral, and proximal-distal translations, internal-external and varus-valgus rotations). Posterior cruciate ligament deficiency resulted in a posterior shift of the tibial resting position to 8.4 +/- 2.6 mm at 90 degrees compared with the intact knee. After osteotomy, tibial slope increased from 9.2 degrees +/- 1.0 degrees in the intact knee to 13.8 degrees +/- 0.9 degrees. This increase in slope reduced the posterior sag of the PCL-deficient knee, shifting the resting position anteriorly to 4.0 +/- 2.0 mm at 90 degrees. Under a 200-N axial compressive load with the osteotomy, an additional increase in anterior tibial translation to 2.7 +/- 1.7 mm at 30 degrees was

  3. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Management and outcome

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    Vivek Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucoid degeneration (MD is a rare pathological affection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Mucinous material within the substance of ACL produces pain and limited motion in the knee. This series describes the clinicoradiological presentation of patients with mucoid ACL, partial arthroscopic debridement of ACL and outcomes. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 years, 11 patients were included based upon the clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, arthroscopic features and histopathologic confirmation of MD of ACL. Result: Six patients were male and five were female with median age of 40 years (range 21-59 years. All patients complained of knee pain with median duration of 5 months (range 1-24 months. All patients had painful deep flexion with 63.6% (N = 7 reporting trivial trauma before the onset of symptoms. MRI revealed MD of ACL in all with associated cyst in three patients. Partial debridement of ACL was done in ten and complete in one patient. None of them required notchplasty. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis in all of them. At the mean followup of 13.81 months (range 6-28 months, all patients regained complete flexion and none complained of instability. Conclusion: Prior knowledge of condition with high index of suspicion and careful interpretation of MRI can establish the diagnosis preoperatively. It responds well to partial debridement of ACL and mucinous material without development of instability.

  4. Biomechanical comparison of the four-strand cruciate and Strickland techniques in animal tendons

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    Raquel Bernardelli Iamaguchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare two four-strand techniques: the traditional Strickland and cruciate techniques. METHODS: Thirty-eight Achilles tendons were removed from 19 rabbits and were assigned to two groups based on suture technique (Group 1, Strickland suture; Group 2, cruciate repair. The sutured tendons were subjected to constant progressive distraction using a universal testing machine (Kratos®. Based on data from the instrument, which were synchronized with the visualized gap at the suture site and at the time of suture rupture, the following data were obtained: maximum load to rupture, maximum deformation or gap, time elapsed until failure, and stiffness. RESULTS: In the statistical analysis, the data were parametric and unpaired, and by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the sample distribution was normal. By Student's t-test, there was no significant difference in any of the data: the cruciate repair sutures had slightly better mean stiffness, and the Strickland sutures had longer time-elapsed suture ruptures and higher average maximum deformation. CONCLUSIONS: The cruciate and Strickland techniques for flexor tendon sutures have similar mechanical characteristics in vitro.

  5. Efficacy of an Intra-Operative Imaging Software System for Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

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    Xudong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An imaging software system was studied for improving the performance of anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction which requires identifying ACL insertion sites for bone tunnel placement. This software predicts and displays the insertion sites based on the literature data and patient-specific bony landmarks. Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed simulated arthroscopic ACL surgeries on 20 knee specimens, first without and then with the visual guidance by fluoroscopic imaging, and their tunnel entry positions were recorded. The native ACL insertion morphologies of individual specimens were quantified in relation to CT-based bone models and then used to evaluate the software-generated insertion locations. Results suggested that the system was effective in leading surgeons to predetermined locations while the application of averaged insertion morphological information in individual surgeries can be susceptible to inaccuracy and uncertainty. Implications on challenges associated with developing engineering solutions to aid in re-creating or recognizing anatomy in surgical care delivery are discussed.

  6. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING THE DOUBLE-BUNDLE TECHNIQUE – EVALUATION IN THE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Castropil, Wagner; Garofo, Antônio Guilherme Padovani; Cantuária, Anita Lopes; Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Luques, Isabela Ugo; Duarte, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the methodology of knee rotation analysis using biomechanics laboratory instruments and to present the preliminary results from a comparative study on patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the double-bundle technique. Methods: The protocol currently used in our laboratory was described. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis was performed and knee rotation amplitude was measured on eight normal patients (control group) and 12 patients who were operated using the double-bundle technique, by means of three tasks in the biomechanics laboratory. Results: No significant differences between operated and non-operated sides were shown in relation to the mean amplitudes of gait, gait with change in direction or gait with change in direction when going down stairs (p > 0.13). Conclusion: The preliminary results did not show any difference in the double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique in relation to the contralateral side and the control group. PMID:27027003

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a rabbit model using silk-collagen scaffold and comparison with autograft.

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    Fanggang Bi

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to perform an in vivo assessment of a novel silk-collagen scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. First, a silk-collagen scaffold was fabricated by combining sericin-extracted knitted silk fibroin mesh and type I collagen to mimic the components of the ligament. Scaffolds were electron-beam sterilized and rolled up to replace the ACL in 20 rabbits in the scaffold group, and autologous semitendinosus tendons were used to reconstruct the ACL in the autograft control group. At 4 and 16 weeks after surgery, grafts were retrieved and analyzed for neoligament regeneration and tendon-bone healing. To evaluate neoligament regeneration, H&E and immunohistochemical staining was performed, and to assess tendon-bone healing, micro-CT, biomechanical test, H&E and Russell-Movat pentachrome staining were performed. Cell infiltration increased over time in the scaffold group, and abundant fibroblast-like cells were found in the core of the scaffold graft at 16 weeks postoperatively. Tenascin-C was strongly positive in newly regenerated tissue at 4 and 16 weeks postoperatively in the scaffold group, similar to observations in the autograft group. Compared with the autograft group, tendon-bone healing was better in the scaffold group with trabecular bone growth into the scaffold. The results indicate that the silk-collagen scaffold has considerable potential for clinical application.

  8. Glycosaminoglycan loss from cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament rupture: influence of time since rupture and chondral injury Perda de glicosaminoglicanas da cartilagem após ruptura do ligamento cruzado anterior: influência do tempo de ruptura e da lesão condral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMG Mattiello-Rosa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs concentration in the synovial fluid (SF of knees with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture and to identify possible associations between GAG concentration in SF and the time elapsed since rupture and degree of chondral injury. METHOD: Fourteen adult male subjects with total unilateral ACL rupture, which had occurred between 5 and 144 months earlier, were assessed. All subjects underwent joint aspiration; it was possible to collect SF from ten individuals. The samples were quantified to determine the GAG concentration using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB staining. The degree of chondral injury was macroscopically evaluated using the modified Mankin histological scale. Spearman correlation test (OBJETIVO: Quantificar a concentração de glicosaminoglicanas sulfatadas (GAGs no líquido sinovial (LS de joelhos com ruptura crônica do ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA e identificar uma possível correlação entre a concentração de GAGs no LS e o tempo pós-ruptura e grau de lesão condral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 14 indivíduos adultos do sexo masculino com ruptura total unilateral do LCA, ocorrida entre cinco a 144 meses. Todos os sujeitos foram puncionados, sendo possível a coleta de LS em dez indivíduos. As amostras foram quantificadas para determinar a concentração de GAGs usando a coloração azul de dimetilmetileno, método descrito por Farndale21. O grau de lesão condral foi macroscopicamente avaliado pela escala histológica de Mankin modificada por Messner14. As correlações entre concentração de GAGs e lesão condral foram feitas pelo teste de correlação de Sperman (p< 0,05 e a concentração de GAGs e tempo pós-ruptura pelo teste de correlação de Pearson (p< 0,05. RESULTADOS: Concentração de GAGs no LS apresentou variação média de 73,84 ± 40,75µg/mL, sendo o tempo médio pós-ruptura de 40,4 + 40,3 meses. Não houve correla

  9. Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, E. W.; Rupani, A.; Foley, G. T.; Khan, W. S.; Cartmell, S.; Anand, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging discipline that combines the principle of science and engineering. It offers an unlimited source of natural tissue substitutes and by using appropriate cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and advanced bioreactors, it is possible that tissue engineering could be implemented in the repair and regeneration of tissue such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Whilst repair and regeneration of ligament tissue has been demonstrated in animal studies, further research ...

  10. Anatomic Double-bundle ACL Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, Verena M.; van Eck, Carola F.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most frequent forms of knee trauma. The traditional surgical treatment for ACL rupture is single-bundle reconstruction. However, during the past few years there has been a shift in interest toward double-bundle reconstruction to closely

  11. Altered movement patterns and muscular activity during single and double leg squats in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Anna; Miller, Michael; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Gummesson, Christina; Garwicz, Martin

    2015-02-13

    Individuals with Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury often show altered movement patterns, suggested to be partly due to impaired sensorimotor control. Here, we therefore aimed to assess muscular activity during movements often used in ACL-rehabilitation and to characterize associations between deviations in muscular activity and specific altered movement patterns, using and further exploring the previously developed Test for substitution Patterns (TSP). Sixteen participants (10 women) with unilateral ACL rupture performed Single and Double Leg Squats (SLS; DLS). Altered movement patterns were scored according to TSP, and Surface Electromyography (SEMG) was recorded bilaterally in six hip, thigh and shank muscles. To quantify deviations in muscular activity, SEMG ratios were calculated between homonymous muscles on injured and non-injured sides, and between antagonistic muscles on the same side. Correlations between deviations of injured/non-injured side SEMG ratios and specific altered movement patterns were calculated. Injured/non-injured ratios were low at transition from knee flexion to extension in quadriceps in SLS, and in quadriceps and hamstrings in DLS. On injured side, the quadriceps/hamstrings ratio prior to the beginning of DLS and end of DLS and SLS, and tibialis/gastrocnemius ratio at end of DLS were lower than on non-injured side. Correlations were found between specific altered movement patterns and deviating muscular activity at transition from knee flexion to extension in SLS, indicating that the more deviating the muscular activity on injured side, the more pronounced the altered movement pattern. "Knee medial to supporting foot" correlated to lower injured/non-injured ratios in gluteus medius (rs = -0.73, p = 0.001), "lateral displacement of hip-pelvis-region" to lower injured/non-injured ratios in quadriceps (rs = -0.54, p = 0.03) and "displacement of trunk" to higher injured/non-injured ratios in gluteus medius (rs = 0.62, p = 0

  12. The suitability of human adipose-derived stem cells for the engineering of ligament tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, Michael J; Zuk, Patricia A; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Bluth, Benjamin E; Brinkmann, Elyse J; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the one of the most common sports-related injuries. With its poor healing capacity, surgical reconstruction using either autografts or allografts is currently required to restore function. However, serious complications are associated with graft reconstructions and the number of such reconstructions has steadily risen over the years, necessitating the search for an alternative approach to ACL repair. Such an approach may likely be tissue engineering. Recent engineering approaches using ligament-derived fibroblasts have been promising, but the slow growth rate of such fibroblasts in vitro may limit their practical application. More promising results are being achieved using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) is often proposed as an alternative choice to the MSC and, as such, may be a suitable stem cell for ligament engineering. However, the use of ASCs in ligament engineering still remains relatively unexplored. Therefore, in this study, the potential use of human ASCs in ligament tissue engineering was initially explored by examining their ability to express several ligament markers under growth factor treatment. ASC populations treated for up to 4 weeks with TGFβ1 or IGF1 did not show any significant and consistent upregulation in the expression of collagen types 1 and 3, tenascin C and scleraxis. While treatment with EGF or bFGF resulted in increased tenascin C expression, increased expression of collagens 1 and 3 were never observed. Therefore, simple in vitro treatment of human ASC populations with growth factors may not stimulate their ligament differentiative potential. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Double-bundle depiction of the anterior cruciate ligament at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaensen, M.E.A.P.M. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Radiology, Heerlen (Netherlands); Hogan, B. [Sports Surgery Clinic, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Al-Bulushi, H.I.J. [Armed Forces Hospital, Department of Radiology, Muscat (Oman); Kavanagh, E.C. [Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging on 3 Tesla (3T MRI) with arthroscopic correlation has proven to adequately identify the anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) in cadaver knees. The purpose of this study was to describe the depiction of ACL bundle anatomy on 3T MRI in daily practice. In a retrospective cohort study, we included 50 consecutive patients who underwent standard 3T MRI of the knee and had an intact ACL. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed all scans for depiction of ACL bundle anatomy using standardized forms. Descriptive statistics were used. Twenty-three right knees (46%) and 27 left knees (54%) were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 35 years (range 12 to 68 years); 37 patients were male (74%). ACL bundle anatomy was best depicted in the axial plane in 44 knees (88%) and in the coronal plane in six knees (12%). Two bundles were seen in 47 knees (94%). The AMB was completely seen in 45 knees (90%). The PLB was completely seen in 40 knees (80%). Both bundles were completely seen in 37 knees (76%). The double-bundle anatomy of the ACL is visualized in 94% of patients on 3T MRI. Because of potentially associated clinical benefits, we advocate to report separately on the anteromedial bundle and posterolateral bundle in case of anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee. (orig.)

  14. Imaging features of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction graft insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Yao; Zhang Yue; Tian Chunyan; Zheng Zhuozhao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging features of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft insufficiency. Methods: X-Ray and MR imaging examinations in 24 consecutive patients who had ACL reconstructive graft insufficiency were retrospectively evaluated for tunnel position, osteoarthrosis and its related complications. Follow-up arthroscopy showed 16 graft tears and 8 graft laxities. Fisher exact test was used to compare tunnel malpositions, the proportion of graft tear on MRI and osteoarthrosis between graft tear group and graft laxity group. Results: Two malpositions of tibial tunnel and 3 malpositions of femoral tunnel were seen in graft tear group. Three-malpositions of tibial tunnel and 4 malpositions of femoral tunnel were seen in graft laxity group. The proportion of tibial or femoral malposition showed no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.289, P=0.167). In graft tear group, 15 complete graft tears were diagnosed correctly, 1 partial tear was misdiagnosed as normal on MRI. In graft laxity group, 4 grafts were diagnosed as normal and 4 were considered as graft tear on MRI. A significant difference was seen between the two groups (P=0.028) in the proportion of graft tear diagnosed on MRI. Fourteen osteoarthrosis were seen in graft tear group and 5 in graft laxity group. No significant difference was seen between the two groups (P= 0.289) in the proportion of osteoarthrosis. Conclusion: The proportions of tunnel malposition and osteoarthrosis showed no significant difference between the graft tear group and graft Laxity group. Most graft tears can be diagnosed accurately on MRI, but some cases of graft laxity may be misdiagnosed for graft tear. (authors)

  15. Comparision of treatment outcomes in isolated injuries of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and injuries of ACL connected with damages of menisci, conducted with use of KOOS scale

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    Piotr Piech

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Such trauma is caused by sudden hyperextension and internal rotation above physiological range of movement. It is most commonly diagnosed in young and physically active people. ACL injury is often accompanied by damages of menisci. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes in patients with isolated rupture of ACL and with both ACL and menisci damages Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study subjective opinions of 46 patients of Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic of SPSK4 in Lublin were evaluated. Subjects were 19-59 years old, 28 of them had isolated ACL injury, while 18 suffered also with menisci damages. The study was conducted using KOOS questionnaires. Complications, hospitalization time and reconstruction technique were also taken into account. Results: Maximum rating in KOOS scale is 100 points for each of the parameters. This rating characterizes the most favorable state. For pain average rating in isolated ACL injury was 82,31 while in ACL injury with meniscus damage it was 84,37. For other parameters results were respectively: quality of life – 63,59 and 61,81; remaining symptoms 74,57 and 74,09; daily activities 86.61 and 83.84;  sport 70.71 and 65.56. The data have been developed with the help of non-compliance test chi2. Conclusions: The results of the work show that there is a correlation between the type of injury and the assessment of the patient in three parameters: remaining symptoms, daily functioning and sport. The other two parameters (quality of life, pain were irrelevant.

  16. [Case-control study on two suturing methods for the repairing of complete rupture of the deltoid ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wan, Chun-you; Ma, Bao-tong; Xu, Wei-guo; Mei, Xiao-long; Jia, Peng; Liu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    To compare clinical outcomes between two suturing methods using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone and suturing anchors for the treatment of complete rupture of the deltoid ligament. From January 2009 to January 2013, 58 hospitalized patients with ankle fracture combined with complete rupture of the deltoid ligament were treated with suturing using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone or suturing anchors. There were 29 patients who received suturing treatments using non absorbable materials through drilling the bone (Group A), including 18 males and 11 females, with an average age of (39.76 +/- 11.81) years old. According to the Lauge-Hansen classification, 12 patients had supination external rotation (SER) injuries with IV degree, 5 patients had pronation external rotation (PER) injuries with III degree, 10 patients had PER injuries with IV degrss, and 2 patients had pronation abduction injuries with III degree. There were 29 patients who received treatments with suturing using anchors (Group B), including 14 males and 15 females, with an average age of (41.79 +/- 13.28) years old. According to the Lauge-Hansen classification,9 patients had SER injuries with IV degree, 6 patients had PER injuries with III degree,13 patients had PER injuries with IV degree, and 1 patient had pronation abduction injuries with III degree. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, as well as reconstruction of deltoid ligaments to restore the stability of the medial ankle structures. The clinical examination, imaging evaluation, American society for ankle surgery (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the clinical results after operation, and the results of the two groups were compared and analyzed statistically. The follow-up duration of the 58 patients ranged from 23 to 40 months,with an average of 27.3 months. All the patients had fracture union, and the mean healing time was 12

  17. A Systematic Summary of Systematic Reviews on the Topic of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael J.; Browning, William M.; Urband, Christopher E.; Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been a substantial increase in the amount of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose: To quantify the number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the ACL in the past decade and to provide an overall summary of this literature. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of all ACL-related systematic reviews and meta-analyses published between January 2004 and September 2014 was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database. Narrative reviews and non-English articles were excluded. Results: A total of 1031 articles were found, of which 240 met the inclusion criteria. Included articles were summarized and divided into 17 topics: anatomy, epidemiology, prevention, associated injuries, diagnosis, operative versus nonoperative management, graft choice, surgical technique, fixation methods, computer-assisted surgery, platelet-rich plasma, rehabilitation, return to play, outcomes assessment, arthritis, complications, and miscellaneous. Conclusion: A summary of systematic reviews on the ACL can supply the surgeon with a single source for the most up-to-date synthesis of the literature. PMID:27047983

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of vertically oriented lateral collateral ligament as an indirect sign of anterior cruciate ligament tear on magnetic resonance imaging

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    Palle, Lalitha; Reddy, Balaji; Reddy, Jagannath [Focus Diagnostics, Sai Baba Temple Lane, Dwarakapuri Colony, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the correlation between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and straightened, vertically oriented lateral collateral ligament (LCL). This study included 556 patients who underwent MRI of the knee and were divided into three subsets based on ACL morphology. Subset 1 included patients with unequivocal normal ACL. Subset 2 included patients with unequivocal ACL tears. Subset 3 included patients with doubtful ACL who underwent arthroscopy. MR images were reviewed and sensitivity and specificity of vertically oriented LCL as an indirect sign of ACL tear were calculated. The MRI results were as follows: subset 1, out of 282 patients, 270 had oblique LCL and 12 demonstrated vertical LCL; subset 2, out of 212 patients, 189 demonstrated vertical LCL and 23 revealed oblique LCL; subset 3, out of 62 patients, 28 patients with vertical orientation of LCL had a possible ACL tear. Patients with oblique LCL orientation (34) were reported as probably having normal ACL. On comparison with arthroscopy, in 28 patients who we reported as having possible ACL tears, there were 17 patients with torn ACL. The rest of the 11 patients revealed no ACL tears. In the group of 34 patients in whom we reported possible normal, arthroscopy-confirmed tear in 5 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of vertical LCL as an indirect sign of ACL tear was found to be 88% and the specificity 92.85%. Vertically oriented LCL is a useful indirect MRI sign of ACL tear and aids in making a diagnosis, when ACL appearance is equivocal. (orig.)

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of vertically oriented lateral collateral ligament as an indirect sign of anterior cruciate ligament tear on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palle, Lalitha; Reddy, Balaji; Reddy, Jagannath

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and straightened, vertically oriented lateral collateral ligament (LCL). This study included 556 patients who underwent MRI of the knee and were divided into three subsets based on ACL morphology. Subset 1 included patients with unequivocal normal ACL. Subset 2 included patients with unequivocal ACL tears. Subset 3 included patients with doubtful ACL who underwent arthroscopy. MR images were reviewed and sensitivity and specificity of vertically oriented LCL as an indirect sign of ACL tear were calculated. The MRI results were as follows: subset 1, out of 282 patients, 270 had oblique LCL and 12 demonstrated vertical LCL; subset 2, out of 212 patients, 189 demonstrated vertical LCL and 23 revealed oblique LCL; subset 3, out of 62 patients, 28 patients with vertical orientation of LCL had a possible ACL tear. Patients with oblique LCL orientation (34) were reported as probably having normal ACL. On comparison with arthroscopy, in 28 patients who we reported as having possible ACL tears, there were 17 patients with torn ACL. The rest of the 11 patients revealed no ACL tears. In the group of 34 patients in whom we reported possible normal, arthroscopy-confirmed tear in 5 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of vertical LCL as an indirect sign of ACL tear was found to be 88% and the specificity 92.85%. Vertically oriented LCL is a useful indirect MRI sign of ACL tear and aids in making a diagnosis, when ACL appearance is equivocal. (orig.)

  20. Cognitive Performance and Locomotor Adaptation in Persons With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda E; Roper, Jaimie A; Herman, Daniel C; Hass, Chris J

    2018-05-01

    Persons with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) show deficits in gait and neuromuscular control following rehabilitation. This altered behavior extends to locomotor adaptation and learning, however the contributing factors to this observed behavior have yet to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in locomotor adaptation and learning between ACLR and controls, and identify underlying contributors to motor adaptation in these individuals. Twenty ACLR individuals and 20 healthy controls (CON) agreed to participate in this study. Participants performed four cognitive and dexterity tasks (local version of Trail Making Test, reaction time test, electronic pursuit rotor test, and the Purdue pegboard). Three-dimensional kinematics were also collected while participants walked on a split-belt treadmill. ACLR individuals completed the local versions of Trails A and Trails B significantly faster than CON. During split-belt walking, ACLR individuals demonstrated smaller step length asymmetry during EARLY and LATE adaptation, smaller double support asymmetry during MID adaptation, and larger stance time asymmetry during DE-ADAPT compared with CON. ACLR individuals performed better during tasks that required visual attention and task switching and were less perturbed during split-belt walking compared to controls. Persons with ACLR may use different strategies than controls, cognitive or otherwise, to adapt locomotor patterns.

  1. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament repair with patellar and hamstring tendon autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, K.A.; Karjalainen, P.T.; Harilainen, A.; Sandelin, J.; Tallroth, K.; Soila, K.; Aronen, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Several MRI sequences were used to evaluate the 2-year postoperative appearance of asymptomatic knee with a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) and semitendinosus and gracilis (STG) tendon autografts.Design and patients. Two groups with successful repair of ACL tear with BTB (n=10) or STG (n=10) autografts were imaged at 1.5 T with sagittal and oblique coronal proton density-, T2-weighted and sagittal STIR sequences and plain and contrast-enhanced oblique coronal T1-weighted sequences. The appearance of the graft and periligamentous tissues was evaluated.Results. In all 20 cases, the ACL graft showed homogeneous, low signal intensity with periligamentous streaks of intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In 10 cases, localised areas of intermediate signal intensity were seen in the intra-articular segment of the graft on proton density- and T1-weighted images. The graft itself did not show enhancement in either of the two groups, but mild to moderate periligamentous enhancement was detected in 10 cases.Conclusion. The MRI appearance of ACL autograft is variable on proton density- and T1-weighted images. Periligamentous tissue showing contrast enhancement is a typical MRI finding after clinically successful ACL reconstruction. (orig.)

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer: Loading mechanisms, risk factors, and prevention programs

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    Boyi Dai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries are common in soccer. Understanding ACL loading mechanisms and risk factors for ACL injury is critical for designing effective prevention programs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the relevant literature on ACL loading mechanisms, ACL injury risk factors, and current ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players. Literature has shown that tibial anterior translation due to shear force at the proximal end of tibia is the primary ACL loading mechanism. No evidence has been found showing that knee valgus moment is the primary ACL loading mechanism. ACL loading mechanisms are largely ignored in previous studies on risk factors for ACL injury. Identified risk factors have little connections to ACL loading mechanisms. The results of studies on ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players are inconsistent. Current ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players are clinically ineffective due to low compliance. Future studies are urgently needed to identify risk factors for ACL injury in soccer that are connected to ACL loading mechanisms and have cause-and-effect relationships with injury rate, and to develop new prevention programs to improve compliance.

  3. Stereoscopic filming for investigating evasive side-stepping and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marcus J. C.; Bourke, Paul; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Lloyd, David G.; Lay, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are serious and debilitating, often resulting from the performance of evasive sides-stepping (Ssg) by team sport athletes. Previous laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg have used generic visual stimuli to simulate realistic time and space constraints that athletes experience in the preparation and execution of the manoeuvre. However, the use of unrealistic visual stimuli to impose these constraints may not be accurately identifying the relationship between the perceptual demands and ACL loading during Ssg in actual game environments. We propose that stereoscopically filmed footage featuring sport specific opposing defender/s simulating a tackle on the viewer, when used as visual stimuli, could improve the ecological validity of laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg. Due to the need for precision and not just the experience of viewing depth in these scenarios, a rigorous filming process built on key geometric considerations and equipment development to enable a separation of 6.5 cm between two commodity cameras had to be undertaken. Within safety limits, this could be an invaluable tool in enabling more accurate investigations of the associations between evasive Ssg and ACL injury risk.

  4. Knee Kinematics During Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury as Determined From Bone Bruise Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sophia Y; Spritzer, Charles E; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Toth, Alison P; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2015-10-01

    The motions causing noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remain unclear. Tibiofemoral bone bruises are believed to be the result of joint impact near the time of ACL rupture. The locations and frequencies of these bone bruises have been reported, but there are limited data quantifying knee position and orientation near the time of injury based on these contusions. Knee position and orientation near the time of noncontact ACL injury include extension and anterior tibial translation. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance images of 8 subjects with noncontact ACL injuries were acquired within 1 month of injury and were subsequently analyzed. All subjects exhibited bruises on both the femur and tibia in both medial and lateral compartments. The outer margins of bone and the bone bruise surfaces were outlined on each image to create a 3-dimensional model of each subject's knee in its position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI position). Numerical optimization was used to maximize overlap of the bone bruises on the femur and tibia and to predict the position of injury. Flexion angle, valgus orientation, internal tibial rotation, and anterior tibial translation were measured in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury. Differences in kinematics between the MRI position, which served as an unloaded reference, and the predicted position of injury were compared by use of paired t tests. Flexion angle was near full extension in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury (8° vs 12°; P = .2). Statistically significant increases in valgus orientation (5°; P = .003), internal tibial rotation (15°; P = .003), and anterior tibial translation (22 mm; P injury relative to the MRI position. These results suggest that for the bone bruise pattern studied, landing on an extended knee is a high risk for ACL injury. Extension was accompanied by increased anterior tibial translation (22 mm), internal tibial rotation (15

  5. The Functional Abilities and Maximal Vertical Jumping Height in Coper and Non-coper Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee

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    Amin Norouzi Fashkhami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the vertical jump task and the level of disability between the coper and non-coper athletes with an anterior cruciate ligament-minus knee. Methods: Thirty-four professional male athletes with isolated complete anterior cruciate ligament-tear (age 20-29 years and 6-12 months time past injury were recruited in this study. The subjects were allocated into the coper (n=17 and non-coper (n=17 groups according to their history of having giving way and feeling an instability in their injured knee. The maximum vertical jump height was recorded by a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system. The functional outcomes of the subjects were assessed with use of the Persian versions of the International Knee Documentation Committee, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Tegner Questionnaires. Results: The results revealed that the coper ACK-deficient knee subjects had a significantly higher International Knee Documentation Committee score as well as two subscales of the KOOS questionnaire including the sports (P=0.001 and the quality of life (P=0.016 than non-copers. However, the subscales of pain (P=0.0137, symptoms (P=0.353 and the activities of daily living (P=0.133 of the KOOS questionnaire did not show any significant differences between the coper and non-coper ACL-deficient knee subjects. In addition, the maximum jumping height was significantly higher in the copers too (P=0.008. Discussion: While the pain, symptoms and daily activities were not different between the two groups, a higher level of the functional abilities, sports activities, quality of life and the maximum jumping height were shown in the coper ACL-deficient knee subjects when compared to the non-copers. A deliberate evaluation of the functional abilities in ACL-deficient knee subjects might play a key role in distinguishing the coper and non-coper ACL-deficient knee subjects.

  6. Patients With Ligament Hiperlaxity With Rupture Of Previous Plastic For ACL. Reconstruction With Intra-articular And Extra-articular Combined Technics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astore, Ignacio; Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of patients with ligament hiperlaxity with rupture of ACL, the use of a BTB graft is recommended for its reconstruction. Our job consists of the clinical and functional assessment of a group of 10 patients with ligament laxaty according to Beighton scale, who, after surgery for ACL rupture with BTB technique, suffered a rupture of the plastic. For its reconstruction a combination of intra-articular and extra-articular techniques was used with a BTB graft in the contralateral knee, associated with a modified Lemaire technique. Methods: The series consists of 10 patients, male, average age of 24.2 years, amateur athletes, operated for a second time in March, 2011 and November, 2013, with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. They were evaluated before surgery and 24 months after surgery based on Lysholm scale, IKDC evaluation form and a physical exam (Lachman - Pivot Shift). Results: After surgery, the average in Lysholm scale was of 87.6 and 86.3 for the IKDC subjetive form. In the physical exam, 8 patients showed Lachman 1+, while none of the patients showed Pivot Shift positive. 7 patients were able to return to their usual sport activities. As a postoperative disadvantage, 6 patients reported pain in the external face of the knee in the first 6 months. And 4 patients reported a subjetive loss of full extension that did not interfere with their sport activities. Conclusion: Based on our experience and literature, we believe that the combination of both techniques, intra-articular (BTB) and extra-articular (Lemaire), is a good alternative for patients with ligament laxaty, providing positive clinical and functional results.

  7. Methods to diagnose acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture: a meta-analysis of instrumented knee laxity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Loopik, Miette; van den Bekerom, Michel P.; Fu, Freddie H.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this meta-analysis were to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the KT 1000 Arthrometer, Stryker Knee Laxity Tester and Genucom Knee Analysis System for ACL rupture. It was hypothesized that the KT 1000 test is the most sensitive and specific. Secondly, it was hypothesized that

  8. Early Results of Anatomic Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

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    Demet Pepele

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR is to restore the normal anatomic structure and function of the knee. In the significant proportion of patients after the traditional single-bundle ACLR, complaints of instability still continue. Anatomic double bundle ACLR may provide normal kinematics in knees, much closer to the natural anatomy. The aim of this study is to clinically assess the early outcomes of our anatomical double bundle ACLR. Material and Method: In our clinic between June 2009 and March 2010, performed the anatomic double bundle ACLR with autogenous hamstring grafts 20 patients were evaluated prospectively with Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm scores and in clinically for muscle strength and with Cybex II dynamometer. Results: The mean follow-up is 17.8 months (13-21 months. Patients%u2019 scores of Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm were respectively, preoperative 18.1, 39.3 and 39.8, while the post-op increased to 27.2, 76.3 and 86.3. In their last check, 17 percent of the patients according to IKDC scores (85% A (excellent and B (good group and 3 patients took place as C (adequate group. The power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups of patients who underwent surgery showed no significant difference compared with the intact knees. Discussion: Double-bundle ACL reconstruction is a satisfactory method. There is a need comparative, long-term studies in large numbers in order to determine improving clinical outcome, preventing degeneration and restoring the knee biomechanics better.

  9. Clinical, biomechanical and morphological assessment of anterior cruciate ligament Kevlar®-based artificial prosthesis in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza-Castro, Santiago; González-Rivera, Carlos E; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Barrera-Flores, Francisco J; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Soto-Dominguez, Adolfo; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos; Mendoza-Lemus, Oscar F

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of a Kevlar®-based prosthetic ligament as a synthetic graft of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in an experimental animal model in rabbits. A total of 27 knees of rabbits randomly divided into 3 groups (control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with a Kevlar® prosthesis) were analyzed using clinical, biomechanical and morphological tests at 6, 12 and 18 weeks postprocedure. The mean displacement in mechanical testing was 0.73 ± 0.06 mm, 1.58 ± 0.19 mm and 0.94 ± 0.20 mm for the control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with synthetic prosthesis groups, respectively. The results showed an improvement in the stability of the knee with the use of the Kevlar® synthetic prosthesis in the biomechanical testing (p0.05), between the replacement group and the control group. The histological study revealed a good morphological adaptation of the synthetic material to the knee. This study proposes a new animal model for the placement and evaluation of Kevlar®-based synthetic ACL implants. The studied prosthesis showed promising behavior in the clinical and biomechanical tests and in the histological analysis. This study lays the foundation for further basic and clinical studies of artificial ACL prostheses using this material.

  10. The effects of levofloxacin on rabbit anterior cruciate ligament cells in vitro

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    Deng, Yu; Chen, Biao; Qi, Yongjian [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Universite, Faculte de Medicine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Wang, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Chen, Liaobin, E-mail: lbchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2011-11-15

    Articular cartilage, epiphyseal growth plate and tendons have been recognized as targets of fluoroquinolone-induced connective tissue toxicity. The effects of fluoroquinolones on ligament tissues are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of levofloxacin, a typical fluoroquinolone antibiotic drug, on rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells in vitro. Rabbit ACL cells were treated with levofloxacin at different concentrations (0, 14, 28, 56, 112 and 224 {mu}M) and were assessed to determine the possible cytotoxic effects of levofloxacin on ACL cells. Levofloxacin, with concentrations ranging from 28 to 224 {mu}M, induced dose-dependent ACL cell apoptosis. Characteristic markers of programmed cell death and degenerative changes were identified by electron microscopy in the ACL cells treated with 28 {mu}M of levofloxacin. Moreover, levofloxacin significantly increased the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13 and decreased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) in a concentration-dependent manner; TIMP-3 and collagen type I alpha 1 (Col1A1) mRNA expression was not affected. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that levofloxacin markedly increased the expression of active caspase-3 within a concentration range of 28 to 224 {mu}M, whereas a clear-cut decrease in Col1A1 expression was found with levofloxacin treatment concentrations of 112 and 224 {mu}M, compared to controls. Our data suggest that levofloxacin has cytotoxic effects on ACL cells characterized by enhanced apoptosis and decreased extracellular matrix, which suggest a potential adverse effect of fluoroquinolones. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levofloxacin has cytotoxic effect on rabbit ACL cells in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levofloxacin induces apoptosis in ACL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It decreases extracellular matrix by upregulation of matrix degrading enzymes. Black

  11. Smaller Anterior Cruciate Ligament Diameter Is a Predictor of Subjects Prone to Ligament Injuries: An Ultrasound Study

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    Parag Suresh Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To test if diameter of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL can be measured by ultrasound (US, to see if there is a relationship between smaller ACL diameter and ACL injury, and to assess agreement between radiologists in measuring ACL diameter in cases and matched controls. Materials and Methods. In this ethics committee-approved study, maximum diameter of ACL near tibial insertion site was measured by static and dynamic US study in 25 normal contralateral knees of subjects who suffered noncontact ACL injury and in 25 matched control subjects. Results. ACL was visualized as a thick linear hypoechoic band inserted approximately 11 mm caudal to the tibial plateau and the intercondylar eminence. Maximum diameter of contralateral ACL near tibial insertion site among injured subjects was significantly smaller than in noninjured subjects (0.62 ± 0.07 cm versus 0.81 ± 0.06 cm; P<0.0001. In the regression analysis, the diameter of ACL near tibial insertion site was found significantly proportional to body weight and not significantly associated to height, gender, and age. Conclusion. Diameter of normal ACL near tibial insertion site can be measured by US and the maximum diameter is significantly smaller among subjects with noncontact ACL injury. US is a promising modality that can be used as an excellent screening test to detect subjects especially aspiring athletes prone to ACL injury. Very strong agreement was observed between radiologists in measuring ACL diameter.

  12. Influence of functional knee bracing on the isokinetic and functional tests of anterior cruciate ligament deficient patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyousha Mortaza

    Full Text Available Use of functional knee braces has been suggested to provide protection and to improve kinetic performance of the knee in Anterior cruciate ligament(ACL-injured patients. However, many athletes might refrain from wearing the braces because of the fear of performance hindrance in the playing field. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three functional knee brace/sleeves upon the isokinetic and functional performance of ACL-deficient and healthy subjects. Six anterior cruciate ligament deficient (29.0 ± 5.3 yrs., 175.2 ± 5.4 cm, and 73.0 ± 10.0 kg and six healthy male subjects (27.2 ± 3.7 yrs., 176.4 ± 6.4 cm, and 70.3 ± 6.9 kg were selected. The effect of a custom-made functional knee brace, and two neoprene knee sleeves, one with four metal supports and one without support were examined via the use of isokinetic and functional tests in four sets (non-braced,wearing functional knee brace,and wearing the sleeves. Cross-over hop and single leg vertical jump test were performed and jump height, and hop distance were recorded. Peak torque to body weight ratio and average power in two isokinetic velocities(60°.s(-1,180°.s(-1 were recorded and the brace/sleeves effect was calculated as the changes in peak torque measured in the brace/sleeves conditions, expressed as a percentage of peak torque measured in non-braced condition. Frequency content of the isokinetic torque-time curves was also analyzed. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the measured values in four test conditions within each control and ACL-deficient group,and Mann-Whitney U test was used for the comparison between the two groups. No significant differences in peak torque, average power, torque-time curve frequency content, vertical-jump and hop measurements were found within the experimental and the non-braced conditions (p>0.05. Although the examined functional knee brace/sleeves had no significant effect on the knee muscle performance, there have been

  13. WITHDRAWN: Exercise for treating isolated anterior cruciate ligament injuries in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Amanda H; Howe, Tracey E; Dixon, John; White, Lisa

    2011-05-11

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to the inability to fully activate the thigh muscles. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred for rehabilitation. To present the best evidence for effectiveness of exercise used in the rehabilitation of isolated ACL injuries in adults, on return to work and pre-injury levels of activity. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (Feb 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2005), MEDLINE (1996 to March 2005), EMBASE (1980 to March 2005), other databases and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials testing exercise programmes designed to rehabilitate adults with isolated ACL injuries. Trials where participants were randomised to receive any combination of the following: no care, usual care, a single-exercise intervention, and multiple-exercise interventions, were included. The primary outcome measures of interest were returning to work and return to pre-injury level of activity post treatment, at six months and one year. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Nine trials involving 391 participants were included. Only two trials, involving 76 participants, reported conservative rehabilitation and seven trials, involving 315 participants, evaluated rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction. Methodological quality scores varied considerably across the trials, with the nature of participant and assessor blinding poorly reported. Trial comparisons fell into six categories. Pooling of data was rarely possible due to lack of appropriate

  14. Acute Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Using Novel Canine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozynski, Chantelle C; Stannard, James P; Smith, Pat; Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron; Cook, Cristi; Cook, James L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare treatment options for acute management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries using preclinical models. Twenty-seven adult purpose-bred research hounds underwent knee surgery (sham control, exposed ACL, or partial-tear ACL) and were assessed over the following 8 weeks. Dogs were randomized into three treatment groups: standard of care (i.e., rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), washout, or leukoreduced platelet-rich plasma (PRP) so that a total of nine dogs received each treatment. Data from the two ACL-injury groups were pooled for each treatment ( n  = 6 per treatment group) and analyzed for treatment effects. The washout and PRP groups experienced less lameness, pain, and effusion, and greater function and comfortable range of motion compared with the NSAID group, with the PRP group showing most benefits. PRP was associated with the lowest severity of ACL pathology based on arthroscopic assessment. Measurable levels of inflammatory and degradative biomarkers were present in synovial fluid with significant differences noted over time. Based on these findings, washout had positive clinical effects compared with the standard-of-care group especially within the first week of treatment, but became less beneficial over time. A single injection of leukoreduced PRP was associated with favorable clinical results. However, no treatment was significantly "protective" against progression toward osteoarthritis after ACL injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION IN BRAZIL'S PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM

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    Thiago Jambo Alves Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Several studies have reported on the epidemiology of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLR in Europe and North America; however, there is currently no data relating to Brazil. Objective: To describe the incidence of ACLR in Brazil and investigate temporal trends and differences between age and sex groups. Methods: All reported ACLR cases in the public hospital system between January 2008 and December 2014 were extracted from the Information Technology Department of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in ACLR incidence in the overall population and among sex and age groups, hospitalization time, and health care costs. Results: A total of 48,241 ACLR were reported from 2008-2014 with an overall incidence of 3.49 per 100,000 persons/year. Males accounted for 82% of the procedures. The incidence of ACLR increased by 56% among males (p=0.01 and by 112% among females (p=0.001. The mean hospitalization time decreased from 2.4 days in 2008 to 1.8 day in 2014 (R2 = 0.883, p= 0.002. The total cost across all years was US$56 million, with a mean of US$1,145 per ACLR. Conclusion: Although the total incidence of ACLR in Brazil is lower compared to other countries, it has increased over the years, especially in females. The creation of an ACLR registry is necessary in the future, for more accurate control and new investigations.

  16. Nutrition of the anterior cruciate ligament. Effects of continuous passive motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyhar, M.J.; Danzig, L.A.; Hargens, A.R.; Akeson, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Twelve freshly killed mature male rabbits were used to study the effects of continuous passive motion (CPM) on regional and overall nonvascular nutritional pathways of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). One hundred fifty microcuries of 35 S-sulfate was injected intraarticularly into each knee joint. The right knee underwent CPM for 1 hour, while the left knee remained immobilized. Both knee joints were then isolated and immediately frozen. The ACLs were removed while still mostly frozen, and sectioned into anterior, middle, and posterior thirds for the six rabbits in Group 1, and proximal, middle, and distal thirds for the six rabbits in Group 2. In addition, quadriceps tendon samples were harvested from each limb of three rabbits. After appropriate processing, all samples were counted in a scintillation counter, and counts per minute per milligram of tissue were calculated. There was significantly higher uptake in rest extremity ACLs compared to CPM extremity ACLs (P = 0.0001). No significant difference was demonstrated in regional uptake comparing respective thirds of the ACL in either Group 1 or Group 2. Quadriceps tendon uptake trended higher in the limbs exposed to CPM compared to those maintained at rest (P = 0.14). The ACL uses diffusion as a primary nutrient pathway. CPM does not increase nutrient uptake by the ACL in this avascular model, but CPM may facilitate transport of metabolites out of the joint. No regional differences in uptake within the ACL occurred in either group

  17. Bioresorbable pins and interference screws for fixation of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Dirk; Casper, Dirk; Bauwens, Kai; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Wich, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradable cross-pins have been shown to provide higher failure loads than do screws for fixation of hamstring tendons under laboratory conditions. To compare the clinical results of biodegradable pins (RigidFix) and interference screws (BioCryl) for fixation of hamstring grafts in arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Study Design Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. To test the hypothesis of a difference of 1.0 +/- 1.2 mm in anterior knee laxity between the two fixation options, 54 patients were randomly assigned to groups via a block randomization scheme and sealed envelopes. All patients underwent standardized hamstring graft reconstruction and had similar postoperative aftercare by an accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Measures assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 years of follow-up included (1) the side-to-side difference in anterior laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), (2) Short Form 36 physical and mental component scores, and (3) the International Knee Documentation Committee form scores. After 1 and 2 years, 26 and 21 patients in the BioCryl group and 28 and 24 patients in the RigidFix group were available for follow-up examination. No significant difference was noted in instrumented anterior translation between BioCryl and RigidFix fixation: 1 year, 0.11 (95% CI, -0.60 to 0.82; P = .7537); 2 years, 0.33 (95% CI, -0.43 to 1.08 mm; P = .3849). Also, there were no significant differences in the mean physical and mental component scores and International Knee Documentation Committee form scores and in overall complication and surgical revision rates. A pin dislocation was classified as the sole procedure-specific serious adverse event. Bioresorbable pins do not provide better clinical results than do resorbable interference screws for hamstring graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

  18. Quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng-mao; Du, Xiang-ke; Huo, Tian-long; Li, Xu-bin; Quan, Guang-nan; Li, Tian-ran; Cheng, Jin; Zhang, Wei-tao

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative T2 mapping has been a widely used method for the evaluation of pathological cartilage properties, and the histological assessment system of osteoarthritis in the rabbit has been published recently. The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions of a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) osteoarthritis. Twenty New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were divided into ACLT surgical group and sham operated group equally. The anterior cruciate ligaments of the rabbits in ACLT group were transected, while the joints were closed intactly in sham operated group. Magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were performed on 3.0T MR unit at week 0, week 6, and week 12. T2 values were computed on GE ADW4.3 workstation. All rabbits were killed at week 13, and left knees were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin. Semiquantitative histological grading was obtained according to the osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology assessment system. Computerized image analysis was performed to quantitate the immunostained collagen type II. The average MR T2 value of whole left knee cartilage in ACLT surgical group ((29.05±12.01) ms) was significantly higher than that in sham operated group ((24.52±7.97) ms) (P=0.024) at week 6. The average T2 value increased to (32.18±12.79) ms in ACLT group at week 12, but remained near the baseline level ((27.66±8.08) ms) in the sham operated group (P=0.03). The cartilage lesion level of left knee in ACLT group was significantly increased at week 6 (P=0.005) and week 12 (PT2 values had positive correlation with histological grading scores, but inverse correlation with optical densities (OD) of type II collagen. This study demonstrated the reliability and practicability of quantitative T2 mapping for the cartilage injury of rabbit ACLT osteoarthritis model.

  19. Loading Patterns of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in the Healthy Knee: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Renate; Oberhofer, Katja; Fucentese, Sandro F.; Snedeker, Jess G.; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament of the knee, serving as one of the major passive stabilizers of the tibio-femoral joint. However, despite a number of experimental and modelling approaches to understand the kinematics and kinetics of the ligament, the normal loading conditions of the PCL and its functional bundles are still controversially discussed. Objectives This study aimed to generate science-based evidence for understanding the functional loading of the PCL, including the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles, in the healthy knee joint through systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Databases were searched for articles containing any numerical strain or force data on the healthy PCL and its functional bundles. Studied activities were as follows: passive flexion, flexion under 100N and 134N posterior tibial load, walking, stair ascent and descent, body-weight squatting and forward lunge. Method Statistical analysis was performed on the reported load data, which was weighted according to the number of knees tested to extract average strain and force trends of the PCL and identify deviations from the norms. Results From the 3577 articles retrieved by the initial electronic search, only 66 met all inclusion criteria. The results obtained by aggregating data reported in the eligible studies indicate that the loading patterns of the PCL vary with activity type, knee flexion angle, but importantly also the technique used for assessment. Moreover, different fibres of the PCL exhibit different strain patterns during knee flexion, with higher strain magnitudes reported in the anterolateral bundle. While during passive flexion the posteromedial bundle is either lax or very slightly elongated, it experiences higher strain levels during forward lunge and has a synergetic relationship with the anterolateral bundle. The strain

  20. Loading Patterns of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in the Healthy Knee: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S H Hosseini Nasab

    Full Text Available The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL is the strongest ligament of the knee, serving as one of the major passive stabilizers of the tibio-femoral joint. However, despite a number of experimental and modelling approaches to understand the kinematics and kinetics of the ligament, the normal loading conditions of the PCL and its functional bundles are still controversially discussed.This study aimed to generate science-based evidence for understanding the functional loading of the PCL, including the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles, in the healthy knee joint through systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature.MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL.Databases were searched for articles containing any numerical strain or force data on the healthy PCL and its functional bundles. Studied activities were as follows: passive flexion, flexion under 100N and 134N posterior tibial load, walking, stair ascent and descent, body-weight squatting and forward lunge.Statistical analysis was performed on the reported load data, which was weighted according to the number of knees tested to extract average strain and force trends of the PCL and identify deviations from the norms.From the 3577 articles retrieved by the initial electronic search, only 66 met all inclusion criteria. The results obtained by aggregating data reported in the eligible studies indicate that the loading patterns of the PCL vary with activity type, knee flexion angle, but importantly also the technique used for assessment. Moreover, different fibres of the PCL exhibit different strain patterns during knee flexion, with higher strain magnitudes reported in the anterolateral bundle. While during passive flexion the posteromedial bundle is either lax or very slightly elongated, it experiences higher strain levels during forward lunge and has a synergetic relationship with the anterolateral bundle. The strain patterns obtained for virtual fibres that connect the origin and insertion of

  1. Hydroxyapatite-doped polycaprolactone nanofiber membrane improves tendon-bone interface healing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yaying; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring tendon autograft is a routine graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, ways of improving the healing between the tendon and bone is often overlooked in clinical practice. This issue can be addressed by using a biomimetic scaffold. Herein, a biomimetic nanofiber membrane of polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHAp/Col) is fabricated that mimics the composition of native bone tissue for promoting tendon-bone healing. This membrane has good cytocompatibility, allowing for osteoblast cell adhesion and growth and bone formation. As a result, MC3T3 cells reveal a higher mineralization level in PCL/nHAp/Col membrane compared with PCL membrane alone. Further in vivo studies in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model shows that PCL/nHAp/Col-wrapped tendon may afford superior tissue integration to nonwrapped tendon in the interface between the tendon and host bone as well as improved mechanical strength. This study shows that PCL/nHAp/Col nanofiber membrane wrapping of autologous tendon is effective for improving tendon healing with host bone in ACL reconstruction.

  2. Valgus osteotomy of the tibia with a Puddu plate combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction