WorldWideScience

Sample records for cranial fossa repair

  1. Piezosurgery for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Aanand N; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the use of a piezosurgery medical device to perform a craniotomy and produce a split calvarial graft for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral hospital. Ten consecutive patients undergoing middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of meningoencephaloceles. Therapeutic. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, success rate as defined by the ability to fashion a split calvarial graft that achieves complete closure of the tegmen defect. As a secondary outcome measure, evidence of integration of the split calvarial bone graft with the adjacent skull base was assessed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. An appropriately sized calvarial bone graft was produced, and complete closure of the tegmen defect was achieved in all 10 cases. Computed tomography demonstrated evidence of integration of the bone graft in eight cases between 4 and 9 months after surgery. The piezosurgery medical device provides a safe and effective means by which the middle fossa craniotomy and split calvarial bone graft can be produced to repair defects of the middle fossa tegmen, with integration of the bone graft in the majority of cases.

  2. Temporal bone encephalocele and cerebrospinal fluid fistula repair utilizing the middle cranial fossa or combined mastoid-middle cranial fossa approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Copeland, William R; Driscoll, Colin L; Link, Michael J; Haynes, David S; Thompson, Reid C; Weaver, Kyle D; Wanna, George B

    2013-11-01

    The goals of this study were to report the clinical presentation, radiographic findings, operative strategy, and outcomes among patients with temporal bone encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (CSFFs) and to identify clinical variables associated with surgical outcome. A retrospective case series including all patients who underwent a middle fossa craniotomy or combined mastoid-middle cranial fossa repair of encephalocele and/or CSFF between 2000 and 2012 was accrued from 2 tertiary academic referral centers. Eighty-nine consecutive surgeries (86 patients, 59.3% women) were included. The mean age at time of surgery was 52.3 years, and the left side was affected in 53.9% of cases. The mean delay between symptom onset and diagnosis was 35.4 months, and the most common presenting symptoms were hearing loss (92.1%) and persistent ipsilateral otorrhea (73.0%). Few reported a history of intracranial infection (6.7%) or seizures (2.2%). Thirteen (14.6%) of 89 cases had a history of major head trauma, 23 (25.8%) were associated with chronic ear disease without prior operation, 17 (19.1%) occurred following tympanomastoidectomy, and 1 (1.1%) developed in a patient with a cerebral aqueduct cyst resulting in obstructive hydrocephalus. The remaining 35 cases (39.3%) were considered spontaneous. Among all patients, the mean body mass index (BMI) was 35.3 kg/m(2), and 46.4% exhibited empty sella syndrome. Patients with spontaneous lesions were statistically significantly older (p = 0.007) and were more commonly female (p = 0.048) compared with those with nonspontaneous pathology. Additionally, those with spontaneous lesions had a greater BMI than those with nonspontaneous disease (p = 0.102), although this difference did not achieve statistical significance. Thirty-two surgeries (36.0%) involved a middle fossa craniotomy alone, whereas 57 (64.0%) involved a combined mastoid-middle fossa repair. There were 7 recurrences (7.9%); 2 patients with recurrence developed

  3. Middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks to the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, Xabier; Navarro, Juan José; García, Leire; Ugarte, Ane; Thomas, Izaskun

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks to the middle ear due to tegmen tympani defects can result in hearing loss or hypoacusis and predispose to meningitis as well as other neurological complications. Surgical repair of the defect can be performed through a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach or a transmastoid approach. We conducted a retrospective study of the patients in our Department due to a spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear treated using a MCF approach during a 6-year period (2009-2014). Thirteen patients with spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear were treated with this approach. The primary and first symptom in all of them was conductive hearing loss. In all cases, the defect or defects were closed in a multilayer manner using muscle, temporalis fascia and cortical bone. Minimum follow-up in this series was 14 months, with successful closure in all but one patient (who required reintervention). We found no intra- or postoperative complications due to the craniotomy, and the audiometry improved and normalised in all cases except for the failed case. The MCF approach with a multilayer closure of the defect is an effective technique for repairing spontaneous CSF leaks to the middle ear and for restoring hearing in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  4. Middle cranial fossa approach to repair tegmen defects assisted by three-dimensionally printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameer; VanKoevering, Kyle K; Kline, Stephanie; Green, Glenn E; Arts, H Alexander

    2017-10-01

    To explore the perioperative utility of three-dimensionally (3D)-printed temporal bone models of patients undergoing repair of lateral skull base defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with the middle cranial fossa approach. Case series. 3D-printed temporal bone models-based on patient-specific, high-resolution computed tomographic imaging-were constructed using inexpensive polymer materials. Preoperatively, the models demonstrated the extent of temporal lobe retraction necessary to visualize the proposed defects in the lateral skull base. Also preoperatively, Silastic sheeting was arranged across the modeled tegmen, marked, and cut to cover all of the proposed defect sites. The Silastic sheeting was then sterilized and subsequently served as a precise intraoperative template for a synthetic dural replacement graft. Of note, these grafts were customized without needing to retract the temporal lobe. Five patients underwent the middle cranial fossa approach assisted by 3D-printed temporal bone models to repair tegmen defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. No complications were encountered. The prefabricated dural repair grafts were easily placed and fit precisely onto the middle fossa floor without any additional modifications. All defects were covered as predicted by the 3D temporal bone models. At their postoperative visits, all five patients maintained resolution of their spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Inexpensive 3D-printed temporal bone models of tegmen defects can serve as beneficial adjuncts during lateral skull base repair. The models provide a panoramic preoperative view of all tegmen defects and allow for custom templating of dural grafts without temporal lobe retraction. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:2347-2351, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Gliosarcoma of the posterior cranial fossa: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, H.; Hayase, H.; Moriyama, Y.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the MR findings of a biopsy-proven gliosarcoma of the posterior cranial fossa. Multiple homogeneously enhancing lesions had shaggy margins and broad-based dural attachments, which may reflect the gliomatous and sarcomatous element of this tumour. (orig.)

  6. Endoscopic transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Divitiis, Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi M; de Divitiis, Oreste; Esposito, Isabella

    2008-01-01

    The extended transnasal approach, a recent surgical advancements for the ventral skull base, allows excellent midline access to and visibility of the anterior cranial fossa, which was previously thought to be approachable only via a transcranial route. The extended transnasal approach allows early decompression of the optic canals, obviates the need for brain retraction, and reduces neurovascular manipulation. Between 2004 and 2007, 11 consecutive patients underwent transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas--4 olfactory groove (OGM) and 7 tuberculum sellae (TSM) meningiomas. Age at surgery, sex, symptoms, and imaging studies were reviewed. Tumor size and tumor extension were estimated, and the anteroposterior, vertical, and horizontal diameters were measred on MR images. Medical records, surgical complications, and outcomes of the patients were collected. A gross-total removal of the lesion was achieved in 10 patients (91%), and in 1 patient with a TSM only a near-total (> 90%) resection was possible. Four patients with preoperative visual function defect had a complete recovery, whereas 3 patients experienced a transient worsening of vision, fully recovered within few days. In 3 patients (2 with TSMs and 1 with an OGM), a postoperative CSF leak occurred, requiring a endoscopic surgery for skull base defect repair. Another patient (a case involving a TSM) developed transient diabetes insipidus. The operative time ranged from 6 to 10 hours in the OGM group and from 4.5 to 9 hours in the TSM group. The mean duration of the hospital stay was 13.5 and 10 days in the OGM and TSM groups, respectively. Six patients (3 with OGMs and 3 with TSMs) required a blood transfusion. Surgery-related death occurred in 1 patient with TSM, in whom the tumor was successfully removed. The technique offers a minimally invasive route to the midline anterior skull base, allowing the surgeon to avoid using brain retraction and reducing manipulation of the large vessels and

  7. Temporalis myofascial repair of traumatic defects of the anterior fossa. Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, R P; Shagets, F W; de los Reyes, R A

    1986-06-01

    Bilateral temporalis myofascial flaps in continuity with frontal periosteum can be used in repairing extensive dural and bone defects of the anterior cranial fossa floor. The technique of preserving and using this flap is described and offers an alternative to the use of frontal pericranial tissue for repair of anterior dural defects.

  8. Posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula with presenting as caroticocavernous fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H M; Shih, H C; Huang, Y C; Wang, Y H [Dept. of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2001-05-01

    We report cases of posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with presenting with exophthalmos, chemosis and tinnitus in 26- and 66-year-old men. The final diagnoses was vertebral artery AVF and AVF of the marginal sinus, respectively. The dominant venous drainage was the cause of the unusual presentation: both drained from the jugular bulb or marginal sinus, via the inferior petrosal and cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic vein. We used endovascular techniques, with coils and liquid adhesives to occlude the fistulae, with resolution of the symptoms and signs. (orig.)

  9. Posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula with presenting as caroticocavernous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.M.; Shih, H.C.; Huang, Y.C.; Wang, Y.H.

    2001-01-01

    We report cases of posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with presenting with exophthalmos, chemosis and tinnitus in 26- and 66-year-old men. The final diagnoses was vertebral artery AVF and AVF of the marginal sinus, respectively. The dominant venous drainage was the cause of the unusual presentation: both drained from the jugular bulb or marginal sinus, via the inferior petrosal and cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic vein. We used endovascular techniques, with coils and liquid adhesives to occlude the fistulae, with resolution of the symptoms and signs. (orig.)

  10. Ependymomas of the posterior cranial fossa: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortori-Donati, P.; Fondelli, M.P.; Cama, A.; Garre, M.L.; Rossi, A.; Andreussi, L.

    1995-01-01

    We studied nine children with posterior cranial fossa ependymomas to identify specific neuroradiological features. Patients were studied preoperatively with CT and MRI; T1-, T2- and proton-density (PD)-weighted images were obtained. All children underwent surgery and a definite histopathological diagnosis was made. All the tumours grew into the fourth ventricle and caused dilatation of its upper part, which resembled a cap. All but one were separated from the vermis by a cleavage plane. In eight cases there was desmoplastic development through the foramina of the fourth ventricle, and five were heterogeneous due to necrosis and cystic change; one had a haemorrhagic area. In most cases the solid portion was isointense with grey matter on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on PD weighting, and isointense on T2-weighted images. On CT the tumour was isodense in six cases and calcification was detected in four. The presence of both desmoplastic development and a tumour/vermis cleavage plane in a posterior cranial fossa tumour isodense on CT is highly suggestive of ependymoma. (orig.)

  11. Schwannoma of the facial nerve involving the middle cranial fossa:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAI Ke; CHEN Zhong-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Facial nerve schwannoma involving the middle cranial fossa is quite rare,and its accurate diagnosis is very difficult before SUrgery.Here we present a case of schwannoma of the facial nerve at the middle cranial fossa that was misdiagnosed previously at a local hospital and then cured in our hospital.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal schwannomas extending into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐启武; 车晓明; 胡杰; 杨伯捷

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal schwannomas (TSs) account for 0.1%-0.4% of all intracranial tumors and 1%-8% of intracranial schwannomas.1,2 Yoshida and Kawase3 classified TSs into 6 types according to their locations: M (TS involving the middle cranial fossa), P (TS involving the posterior cranial fossa), E (TS located at extracranial space), MP (TS involving both the middle and the posterior cranial fossa), ME (TS involving the middle cranial fossa and the extracranial space), and MPE (TS involving the the middle and the posterior cranial fossa and the extracranial space). Of these types, MP is the commonest, but is difficult to be totally removed. Between January 1984 and June 2003, we surgically treated 28 patients with TSs of type MP and obtained satisfactory results. To make a correct diagnosis of TS, to select appropriate surgical approach, and to improve surgical outcome of TS of type MP, we analysed the related clinical data and experiences.

  13. Posterior cranial fossa dimensions in the Chiari I malformation: relation to pathogenesis and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovner, L.J.; Bergan, U.; Nilsen, G.; Sjaastad, O.

    1993-01-01

    Skull dimensions were measured on lateral skull radiographs in 33 adult patients with MRI-verified Chiari I malformations and in 40 controls. The posterior cranial fossa was significantly smaller and shallower in patients than in controls. In the patients, there was a positive correlation between posterior fossa size and the degree of the cerebellar ectopia, which might indicate that a posterior cranial fossa which was originally too small had been expanded by the herniation of hindbrain structures at an early stage. No special clinical presentation was associated with a very small posterior cranial fossa, which may indicate that a small posterior cranial per se has little or no clinical significance, although it may be the primary developmental anomaly. (orig./GD)

  14. Dislocation of a mandibular condyle in the middle cranial fossa, diagnosed 54 years after trauma

    OpenAIRE

    De Mol, Antoni; Nicolielo, Laura; Ghekiere, Olivier; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma. We report the remarkable case of a 63-year-old patient in whom trauma 54 years prior to consultation resulted in intrusion of the right mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. The diagnosis was missed because of insufficient data provided by conventional radiographies. Failure of timely diagnosis and lack of appropriate treatment resulted in temporomandibular joi...

  15. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Clinical analysis of surgical treatment of traumatic hematomas of the posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhua; Zhou Youxin; Zhu Fengqing; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical features and surgical outcome of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa. Methods: Fifteen patients with traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa in authors' hospital during the period from 1995 to 1998 were reviewed. Results: Thirteen patients had an occipital skull fracture, 11 pure epidural hematomas among whom 4 had cerebellar contusion and hematomas 4 posterior cranial fossa hematoma with associated cerebral hematoma or contusion, and 5 acute hydrocephalus. Fifteen patients were treated by emergency surgery, 9 had good recovery and 1 had severe disability in GCS between 9 and 15 marking, 1 had good recovery, 1 had severe disability and 3 died in GCS between 3 and 8. Nine patients had good recovery in 11 patient having pure epidural hematoma of posterior cranial fossa. Conclusions: The clinical course of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa was acute and severe. The GCS value below 9 predicts the poor out-come for patients. Early diagnosis and appropriately and promptly treatment are crucial for achieving good results

  17. Chololesterol granuloma in the middle cranial fossa: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, T.; Fujii, K.; Nishio, S.; Hasuo, K.; Hisashi, K.; Miyagi, Y.; Nagata, S.; Fukui, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report two cases of cholesterol granuloma in the middle cranial fossa. On CT the lesions appeared as a nonspecific, nonenhancing soft-tissue mass with bone erosion. On MRI they were seen as areas of high signal intensity surrounded by a low-intensity peripheral zone on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Cholesterol granuloma is thought to occur when pneumatised cells in the temporal bone become obstructed. Although this lesion usually occurs in the petrous bone, it can extend to the middle cranial fossa. The diagnosis and surgical management are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Analysis on the diagnosis and treatment of the fractures of the anterior cranial fossa in the 26 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianjun; Xia Xiwei; Shi Yimin; Yang Yilin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the diagnosis and treatment of anterior cranial fossa fracture. Methods: The medical records of 26 patients treated were reviewed retrospectively. All cases were examined by CT imaging scans preoperatively. The total cases were divided into three types. The types of operation such as acute decompress, skull base reconstruction, dural repairement, optical canaldompress were performed. Results: Only one case developed postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage in the chronic period. After using repair operation, the patient recovered. Three cases visual impairement did not recover postoperativaly. Two patients died. Conclusion: Verification of the fracture types and initial necerological systemic impairments by means of CT scanning is important preoperatively. It is very effective to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage if the dura is repaired and the skull base recons-tructed in primury operation

  19. Tumors of the posterior cranial fossa; Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Politi, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Various types of brain tumor can occur in the region of the posterior fossa. Brain metastases in adults are the most common malignancies at this localization. Ependymomas, medulloblastomas and pilocytic astrocytomas occur mostly in children and only rarely in adults. Other tumors that occur in the posterior fossa are meningiomas, schwannomas, hemangioblastomas, brain stem gliomas and epidermoid tumors. Due to the fact that the various tumors of the posterior fossa have different treatment approaches and prognoses, an accurate and specific diagnosis is mandatory. This review discusses the imaging aspects by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the most frequent tumors of the posterior fossa. (orig.) [German] Im Bereich der hinteren Schaedelgrube treten verschiedene Typen von Hirntumoren auf, wobei Hirnmetastasen bei Erwachsenen die haeufigsten Malignitaeten in dieser Region darstellen. Ependymome, Medulloblastome und pilozytische Astrozytome kommen meistens bei Kindern und nur selten bei Erwachsenen vor. Weitere Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube sind Meningeome, Schwannome, Haemangioblastome, Hirnstammgliome und Epidermoide. Da die verschiedenen Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube unterschiedliche Behandlungsansaetze sowie Prognosen haben, ist eine genaue und spezifische Diagnose obligatorisch. Dieser Review diskutiert die bildgebenden CT- und MRT-Aspekte der haeufigsten Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube. (orig.)

  20. Posterior cranial fossa tumours in children at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The management of children with posterior fossa tumours is a challenge to health care professionals worldwide. Difficulties in diagnosis especially in children less than three years is well documented. Limited diagnostic modalities and lack of awareness of the symptoms and signs as well as societal perception ...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging textural evaluation of posterior cranial fossa tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joelson Alves dos; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lacerda, Maria Teresa Carvalho de; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Matsushita, Hamilton

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish healthy from pathological tissues in pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using calculated textural parameters from magnetic resonance images. Materials And Methods: We evaluated 14 pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using the software MaZda to define the texture parameters in selected regions of interest representing healthy and pathological tissues based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between normal and tumoral tissues as well as between supposedly normal tissues adjacent and distant from the tumoral lesion. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance textural evaluation is an useful tool for determining differences among various tissues, including tissues that appear apparently normal on visual analysis. (author)

  2. Facial Nerve Schwannoma Involving Middle Cranial Fossa: When the Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Guide to the Correct Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Dispenza, Francesco; Kulamarva, Gautham

    2011-01-01

    The Facial Nerve Schwannoma is a rare tumor and it seldom involved the middle cranial fossa. Facial nerve schwannoma has various manifestations, including facial palsy but unfortunately facial nerve is very resistant to compression and often facial nerve paralysis or a facial weakness are not present. We present a case of giant facial nerve schwannoma involved the middle cranial fossa without facial nerve paralysis. In these cases the unilateral hearing loss (if present) guide to a correct di...

  3. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F.; Meuli, R.

    2003-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  4. Subdural enhancement on postoperative spinal MRI after resection of posterior cranial fossa tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.; Solymosi, L. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, J. [Paediatric Oncology, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Krauss, J. [Paediatric Neurosurgery, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    In malignant brain tumours which may disseminate staging, usually by cranial and spinal MRI is necessary. If MRI is performed in the postoperative period pitfalls should be considered. Nonspecific subdural contrast enhancement on spinal staging MRI is rarely reported after resection of posterior fossa tumours, which may be mistaken for dissemination of malignancy. We investigated the frequency of spinal subdural enhancement after posterior cranial fossa neurosurgery in children. We reviewed 53 postoperative spinal MRI studies performed for staging of paediatric malignant brain tumours, mainly infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours 2-40 days after surgery. There was contrast enhancement in the spinal subdural space in seven cases. This was not seen in any of eight patients who had been operated upon for a supratentorial tumour. After resection of 45 posterior cranial fossa tumours the frequency of subdural enhancement was 15.5%. MRI showing subdural enhancement was obtained up to 25 days postoperatively. No patient with subdural enhancement had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations positive for tumour cells or developed dissemination of disease in the CSF. Because the characteristic appearances of subdural contrast enhancement, appropriate interpretation is possible; diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis should rarely be impeded. Because of the striking similarity to that in patients with a low CSF-pressure syndrome and in view of the fact that only resection of tumours of the posterior cranial fossa, usually associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, was followed by this type of enhancement one might suggest that rapid changes in CSF pressure are implicated, rather the effects of blood introduced into the spinal canal at surgery. (orig.)

  5. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  6. Subdural enhancement on postoperative spinal MRI after resection of posterior cranial fossa tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.; Solymosi, L.; Kuehl, J.; Krauss, J.

    2004-01-01

    In malignant brain tumours which may disseminate staging, usually by cranial and spinal MRI is necessary. If MRI is performed in the postoperative period pitfalls should be considered. Nonspecific subdural contrast enhancement on spinal staging MRI is rarely reported after resection of posterior fossa tumours, which may be mistaken for dissemination of malignancy. We investigated the frequency of spinal subdural enhancement after posterior cranial fossa neurosurgery in children. We reviewed 53 postoperative spinal MRI studies performed for staging of paediatric malignant brain tumours, mainly infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours 2-40 days after surgery. There was contrast enhancement in the spinal subdural space in seven cases. This was not seen in any of eight patients who had been operated upon for a supratentorial tumour. After resection of 45 posterior cranial fossa tumours the frequency of subdural enhancement was 15.5%. MRI showing subdural enhancement was obtained up to 25 days postoperatively. No patient with subdural enhancement had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations positive for tumour cells or developed dissemination of disease in the CSF. Because the characteristic appearances of subdural contrast enhancement, appropriate interpretation is possible; diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis should rarely be impeded. Because of the striking similarity to that in patients with a low CSF-pressure syndrome and in view of the fact that only resection of tumours of the posterior cranial fossa, usually associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, was followed by this type of enhancement one might suggest that rapid changes in CSF pressure are implicated, rather the effects of blood introduced into the spinal canal at surgery. (orig.)

  7. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Akimichi; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Matsumura, Kenichiro; Takeda, Norio; Ishii, Ryoji; Ito, Jusuke.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases with neurinomas of the facial nerve are reported, especially with regard to the computerized tomographic (CT) findings. All of them had a long history of facial-nerve dysfunction, associated with hearing loss over periods from several to twenty-five years. Intraoperative findings demonstrated that these tumors arose from the intrapetrous portion, the horizontal portion, or the geniculate portion of the facial nerve and that they were located in the middle cranial fossa. The histological diagnoses were neurinomas. CT scans of three cases demonstrated round and low-density masses with marginal high-density areas in the middle cranial fossa, in one associated with diffuse low-density areas in the left temporal and parietal lobes. The low-density areas on CT were thought to be cysts; this was confirmed by surgery. Enhanced CT scans showed irregular enhancement in one case and ring-like enhancement in two cases. High-resolution CT scans of the temporal bone in two cases revealed a soft tissue mass in the middle ear, a well-circumscribed irregular destruction of the anterior aspect of the petrous bone, and calcifications. These findings seemed to be significant features of the neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa. We emphasize that bone-window CT of the temporal bone is most useful in detecting a neurinoma of the facial nerve in its early stage in order to preserve the facial- and acoustic-nerve functions. (author)

  9. Tratamento cirúrgico da cisticircose da fossa craniana posterior Surgical treatment of cysticercosis in posterior cranial fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Garcia Lopes

    1971-03-01

    Full Text Available A cisticercose, um dos mais sérios problemas parasitológicos do sistema nervoso, apresenta, quando localizada na fossa posterior, um quadro clínico dramático, no qual predomina a hipertensão intracraniana. Foram estudados neste trabalho, 70 pacientes com cisticercose de fossa craniana posterior, atendidos no Serviço de Neurocirurgia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo de 1945 a 1968. Considerando-se a grande diversidade existente em torno das técnicas de tratamento cirúrgico, foi objetivo deste trabalho o estudo dos resultados obtidos nestes pacientes, nos quais várias técnicas foram empregadas. As cirurgias paliativas que derivam o trânsito do líquido cefalorraqueano para regiões extracranianas, quando comparadas aos outros tipos de cirurgias utilizados, foram as que proporcionaram maior índice de recuperação, exigiram menos reoperações, além de terem sido acompanhadas de menor número de complicações, bem como de menor mortalidade pós-operatória. Por outro lado, a neurocisticercose geralmente é um processo difuso, encontrando-se parasitas em várias regiões do encéfalo e/ou aracnoidite, conforme comprovou-se, também, entre os casos ora reunidos e que vieram a falecer. Baseando-se nestes fatos, não se justificam as derivações intracranianas e, a não ser eventualmente, a abordagem direta do parasita. Os casos estudados permitem cone- tatar, portanto, que as derivações extracranianas, por sua simplicidade e eficácia, apresentam-se, atualmente, como a terapêutica cirúrgica mais propriada à cisticercose de fossa craniana posterior.Cysticercosis is one of the most severe parasitic diseases of the nervous system. When located in the posterior fossa, it presents a dramatic picture of intracranial hypertension. Seventy patients of cysticercosis in posterior cranial fossa have been studied, all of them attended at the Neurosurgery Service of the University of São Paulo

  10. Endoscopic transpterygoidal repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with extensive osteoradionecrosis of the skull base: case report and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Y; Lim, E; Waran, V; Prepageran, N

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal techniques have recently become the method of choice in dealing with cerebrospinal fluid leak involving the anterior cranial fossa. However, most surgeons prefer an intracranial approach when leaks involve the middle cranial fossa. This case report illustrates the possibilities of using endoscopic techniques for cerebrospinal fluid leaks involving the middle fossa. A 37-year-old male patient presented with multiple areas of cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak due to osteoradionecrosis following radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma 4 years earlier. Clinical examination showed involvement of all cranial nerves except the IInd and XIth nerves on the left side. A prior attempt to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with craniotomy was not successful. This case demonstrates the successful endoscopic repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  11. Transzygomatic approach with intraoperative neuromonitoring for resection of middle cranial fossa tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Chul; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2012-02-01

    The authors reviewed the surgical experience and operative technique in a series of 11 patients with middle fossa tumors who underwent surgery using the transzygomatic approach and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) at a single institution. This approach was applied to trigeminal schwannomas (n = 3), cavernous angiomas (n = 3), sphenoid wing meningiomas (n = 3), a petroclival meningioma (n = 1), and a hemangiopericytoma (n = 1). An osteotomy of the zygoma, a low-positioned frontotemporal craniotomy, removal of the remaining squamous temporal bone, and extradural drilling of the sphenoid wing made a flat trajectory to the skull base. Total resection was achieved in 9 of 11 patients. Significant motor pathway damage can be avoided using a change in motor-evoked potentials as an early warning sign. Four patients experienced cranial nerve palsies postoperatively, even though free-running electromyography of cranial nerves showed normal responses during the surgical procedure. A simple transzygomatic approach provides a wide surgical corridor for accessing the cavernous sinus, petrous apex, and subtemporal regions. Knowledge of the middle fossa structures is essential for anatomic orientation and avoiding injuries to neurovascular structures, although a neuronavigation system and IOM helps orient neurosurgeons.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging textural evaluation of posterior cranial fossa tumors in childhood; Avaliacao textural por ressonancia magnetica dos tumores da fossa posterior em criancas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joelson Alves dos; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lacerda, Maria Teresa Carvalho de; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: joelson_alves@ig.com.br; Matsushita, Hamilton [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia

    2004-08-01

    Objective: To distinguish healthy from pathological tissues in pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using calculated textural parameters from magnetic resonance images. Materials And Methods: We evaluated 14 pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using the software MaZda to define the texture parameters in selected regions of interest representing healthy and pathological tissues based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between normal and tumoral tissues as well as between supposedly normal tissues adjacent and distant from the tumoral lesion. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance textural evaluation is an useful tool for determining differences among various tissues, including tissues that appear apparently normal on visual analysis. (author)

  13. Lumbar meningeal enhancement after surgery in the posterior cranial fossa: a normal finding in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampla, W.; Urban, M.; Newrkla, S.; Hruby, W.; Schatzer, R.; Knosp, E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal meningeal Gd-DTPA enhancement after cranial surgery is a known observation of a not well understood underlying mechanism. This paper demonstrates that this MRI finding is a normal meningeal reaction to subarachnoid hemorrhage, which should not be mistaken for metastatic spread. Material and methods: Three pediatric patients were examined by MRI for metastatic spread of malignant infratentorial tumors along the spinal canal two to nine days after the removal of the primary cerebral lesion. The findings were compared with a control group that underwent cranial surgery (cyst resection or fenestration of the posterior cranial fossa) without major bleeding into the subarachnoid space. Unenhanced and enhanced sequences were obtained to prove that the high singal within the CSF is caused by an abnormal Gd-DTPA uptake and not by methemoglobin. Results: Meningeal enhancement was observed in all patients with intraoperative bleeding resembling subarachnoid masses on enhanced T 1 -weighted images. This was not present in any patient of the control group. This finding lasts for approximately two weeks. Conclusion: The meningeal enhancement renders immediate postoperative studies inconclusive for the detection of metastatic spread. Consequently, the obligatory tumor staging along the spinal canal should ideally be done prior to the resection of a cerebral tumor. (orig.) [de

  14. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Nikaido, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuaki; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Taoka, Toshiaki.

    1996-01-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre-and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space. (author)

  15. Retrospective comparison of three-dimensional imaging sequences in the visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ors, Suna; Inci, Ercan; Turkay, Rustu; Kokurcan, Atilla; Hocaoglu, Elif

    2017-12-01

    To compare efficancy of three-dimentional SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions) and CISS (constructive interference in steady state) sequences in the imaging of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves V-XII. Temporal MRI scans from 50 patients (F:M ratio, 27:23; mean age, 44.5±15.9 years) admitted to our hospital with vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had both CISS and SPACE sequences. Quantitative analysis of SPACE and CISS sequences was performed by measuring the ventricle-to-parenchyma contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative analysis of differences in visualization capability, image quality, and severity of artifacts was also conducted. A score ranging 'no artefact' to 'severe artefacts and unreadable' was used for the assessment of artifacts and from 'not visualized' to 'completely visualized' for the assesment of image quality, respectively. The distribution of variables was controlled by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Samples t-test and McNemar's test were used to determine statistical significance. Rates of visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves in cases of complete visualization were as follows: nerve V (100% for both sequences), nerve VI (94% in SPACE, 86% in CISS sequences), nerves VII-VIII (100% for both sequences), IX-XI nerve complex (96%, 88%); nerve XII (58%, 46%) (p<0.05). SPACE sequences showed fewer artifacts than CISS sequences (p<0.002). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior Cranial Fossa Crowdedness Is Related to Age and Sex: an Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lirng, J.F.; Fuh, J.L.; Chen, Y.Y.; Wang, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To measure 3-dimensional (3D) posterior cranial fossa (PCF) crowdedness and to evaluate the effect of age, sex, and body height on PCF. Material and Methods: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (24 M and 28 F; mean age 55.4±17.2 years; range 24-82 years) were recruited. Using a semi-automated magnetic resonance technique, we calculated a PCF crowdedness index (CI) as the ratio of hindbrain (HB) volume to PCF volume x100% and correlated this index with age, sex, body height, and other crowdedness parameters. Results: The mean PCF CI was 93.7±2.7%. Women had a more crowded PCF than men (95.0±1.7% versus 92.1±2.7%; P <0.001). PCF CI declined with age for both men ( r = -0.61; P = 0.002) and women ( r = -0.68; P <0.001). The association with age - but not HB volume - was maintained after we controlled for sex and body height. On multiple regression, both age and sex accounted for 57.5% of the PCF CI variance. Conclusion: Our study shows that PCF CI is associated with age and sex, and can therefore be used as a surrogate to assess hindbrain atrophy in a cross-sectional sample. Moreover, sex- and age-specific normal ranges may be needed to evaluate the PCF CI in clinical practice

  17. Subtemporal-anterior transtentoral approach to middle cranial fossa microsurgical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiming; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yugong; Li, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to describe the topography of inferior and external dura mater of the middle cranial fossa through subtemporal-anterior transpetrosal approach and discuss the feasibility of improving the approach. Eight formalin-fixed adult cadaveric heads were studied, with the bones milled away in the lateral triangle region of the petrous bone, Kawase rhombus region, and inner triangle region of the petrous apex. The distances between the targets in these regions, as well as the angles after the dissection of zygomatic arch, were measured, and then the exposed petroclival and retrochiasmatic areas were observed under the microscope. There were significant variations in the distances between targets in the 3 milled regions among the specimens. After the dissection of zygomatic arch, the surgical view got an average increase of 12 degrees. The subtemporal anterior transpetrosal approach, as an improved subtemporal approach, can expose the lesions optimally, causing no injury to the hearing and reducing injuries to temporal lobe. On the other hand, the lateral bone of the petrous parts of the temporal bone is removed so as to improve the view to the retrochiasmatic area and expand the operative field.

  18. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Mehmet Ceylan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient’s vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient.

  19. Posterior Cranial Fossa Crowdedness Is Related to Age and Sex: an Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lirng, J.F.; Fuh, J.L.; Chen, Y.Y.; Wang, S.J. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Radiology and Neurological Inst.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To measure 3-dimensional (3D) posterior cranial fossa (PCF) crowdedness and to evaluate the effect of age, sex, and body height on PCF. Material and Methods: Fifty-two healthy volunteers (24 M and 28 F; mean age 55.4{+-}17.2 years; range 24-82 years) were recruited. Using a semi-automated magnetic resonance technique, we calculated a PCF crowdedness index (CI) as the ratio of hindbrain (HB) volume to PCF volume x100% and correlated this index with age, sex, body height, and other crowdedness parameters. Results: The mean PCF CI was 93.7{+-}2.7%. Women had a more crowded PCF than men (95.0{+-}1.7% versus 92.1{+-}2.7%; P <0.001). PCF CI declined with age for both men ( r = -0.61; P = 0.002) and women ( r = -0.68; P <0.001). The association with age - but not HB volume - was maintained after we controlled for sex and body height. On multiple regression, both age and sex accounted for 57.5% of the PCF CI variance. Conclusion: Our study shows that PCF CI is associated with age and sex, and can therefore be used as a surrogate to assess hindbrain atrophy in a cross-sectional sample. Moreover, sex- and age-specific normal ranges may be needed to evaluate the PCF CI in clinical practice.

  20. Imaging of lesions in the posterior cranial fossa using single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Michiro; Uesugi, Yasuo; Higashikawa, Masahiko; Ochi, Mari; Makimoto, Kazuo; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shin, Akinori; Utsunomiya, Keita; Akagi, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    Lesions in the posterior cranial fossa were visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123 I-IMP (N-isopropyl-p- 123 I-iodoamphetamine) and 99m Tc-HM-PAO ( 99m Tc-hexametylpropyleneamine oxime). It is generally held that these radiopharmaceuticals penetrate the walls of cerebral blood vessels and that their accumulations in the brain tissue may reflect the cerebral blood flow. Six patients with lesions in the central nervous system all showed wider areas of abnormality in SPECT than in X-ray CT, indicating a larger lesion of blood flow disturbance. In the next series of 11 patients with vertigo or dizziness of unknown etiology, eight had abnormal findings in the scan with 123 I-IMP as did four of the nine in the scan with 99m Tc-HM-PAO. Thus, most patients with dizziness of unknown etiology may have some vertebral blood flow disorder, which in some cases is not clearly diagnosed by conventional vestibular examinations or even by X-ray CT scan. The accuracy of the diagnostic measures for otoneurological problems awaits further studies of their sensitivity and specificity. (author)

  1. Retrospective analysis of the use of amniotic membranes and xenografts in spinal surgery and anterior cranial fossa operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafri Malim Abdullah

    1999-01-01

    To determine the suitability of amniotic membrane an bovine bone xenografts for the use in spinal surgery and anterior cranial for a generations. Fifteen patients with anterior cranial fossa defects and spinal bone fractures received bovine bone xenografts and 10 patients with meningomyeloceles received amniotic membranes (produced by the Malaysian National Tissue Bank) were analysed retrospectively. Clinical criterias like fever, signs of inflammation, breakdown of graft implant, non specific reaction to the nervous tissue were analysed haematological and radiologically. All patients who received the bovine grafts and amniotic membranes did not show any evidence of inflammation or fever. There were no graft implant breakdowns. There was no radiological or clinical evidence of specific or non specific reaction to the nervous tissue after 12-36 months followup Amniotic membranes and bovine xenografts may be used in the healing and reconstruction of spinal and cranial defects. Despite no evidence of rejection and infection after 36 months, a long term followup is still needed

  2. Curative analysis of different surgical treatments for non-solid hemangioblastoma in posterior cranial fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xiang MA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective  The article analyzed the curative effect of different surgical treatments for non-solid hemangioblastoma in posterior cranial fossa to explore reasonable operation method.  Methods  Clinical data of 61 patients with non-solid hemangioblastoma who underwent surgeries in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital during July 2007 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. According to surgical approaches and the situation of foramen magnum and atlas, these patients were divided into 5 groups: midline approach opening foramen magnum and atlas (Group A, midline approach without opening foramen magnum and atlas (Group B, paramedian approach opening foramen magnum and atlas (Group C, paramedian approach without opening foramen magnum and atlas (Group D, retrosigmoid approach (Group E. By collecting clinical symptoms, imaging findings, surgical records and postoperative complications, the surgical results and occurrence of postoperative complications were summarized and reasonable operation method was discussed.  Results  Among 61 patients, total resection was achieved in 56 cases (91.80%, and partial resection was achieved in 5 cases (8.20% . The postoperative remission rate of 43 cases with hydrocephalus was 79.07% (34/43. Intracranial infection was the most common postoperative complication, accounting for 22.95% (14/61. There was significant difference in occurrence rate of intracranial infection among 4 subgroups: opening or not opening the foramen magnum and atlas with or without restoring bone flap (Z = 16.269, P = 0.001. In the subgroup of not opening foramen magnum and atlas with restoring bone flap, the infection rate, which accounted for 6.90% (2/29, was the lowest.  Conclusions  The surgical treatment options for non-solid hemangioblastoma in posterior fossa should be done according to patients' condition, and performed by a professional group. If conditions allow, not to open the foramen magnum and atlas, as well as intraoperative

  3. Quantitative approach to the posterior cranial fossa and craniocervical junction in asymptomatic children with achondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; Panfili, Marco; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Pedicelli, Alessandro; Colosimo, Cesare; Zampino, Giuseppe; Pilato, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    We propose an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based quantitative morphovolumetric approach to the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) and craniocervical junction (CCJ) changes in achondroplastic patients investigating possible associations with ventriculomegaly and medullary compression. We analyzed MRI of 13 achondroplastic children not treated by surgery. 3D FSPGR T1-weighted images were used to analyze (1) PCF synchondroses; (2) PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV), PCFV/PCFBV ratio, cerebellar volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces volume, and IV ventricle volume; (3) PCF (clivus, supraocciput, exocciput lengths, tentorial angle) and CCJ (AP and LL diameters of foramen magnum (FM)) morphometry; (4) measurements of FM and jugular foramina (JF) areas; and (5) supratentorial ventricular volume. All patients showed synostosis of spheno-occipital synchondroses, eight showed synostosis of intra-occipital synchondroses, nine showed CCJ impingement on the cervical cord but only three had cervical myelopathy. Compared to controls, clivus and exocciput lengths, LL and AP diameters of FM, FM area and JF area were significantly reduced, supraocciput length, tentorial angle, PCFV, PCFBV, cerebellar volume, supratentorial ventricular system volume were significantly increased. A correlation was found between clivus length and supratentorial ventricular volume, premature closure of intra-occipital synchondroses and FM area while a trend was found between FM area and supraocciput length. Our analysis demonstrates a relationship between the shortening of the clivus and the ventriculomegaly. On the other hand the premature closure of PCF synchondroses, the shape, and the growth direction of supraocciput bone contribute to reduce the FM area, causing in some patients medullary compression. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative approach to the posterior cranial fossa and craniocervical junction in asymptomatic children with achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; Panfili, Marco; D' Apolito, Gabriella; Pedicelli, Alessandro; Colosimo, Cesare [Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Area Diagnostica per Immagini, Roma (Italy); Zampino, Giuseppe [Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Area Salute del Bambino, Roma (Italy); Pilato, Fabio [Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Area Neuroscienze, Roma (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    We propose an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based quantitative morphovolumetric approach to the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) and craniocervical junction (CCJ) changes in achondroplastic patients investigating possible associations with ventriculomegaly and medullary compression. We analyzed MRI of 13 achondroplastic children not treated by surgery. 3D FSPGR T1-weighted images were used to analyze (1) PCF synchondroses; (2) PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV), PCFV/PCFBV ratio, cerebellar volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces volume, and IV ventricle volume; (3) PCF (clivus, supraocciput, exocciput lengths, tentorial angle) and CCJ (AP and LL diameters of foramen magnum (FM)) morphometry; (4) measurements of FM and jugular foramina (JF) areas; and (5) supratentorial ventricular volume. All patients showed synostosis of spheno-occipital synchondroses, eight showed synostosis of intra-occipital synchondroses, nine showed CCJ impingement on the cervical cord but only three had cervical myelopathy. Compared to controls, clivus and exocciput lengths, LL and AP diameters of FM, FM area and JF area were significantly reduced, supraocciput length, tentorial angle, PCFV, PCFBV, cerebellar volume, supratentorial ventricular system volume were significantly increased. A correlation was found between clivus length and supratentorial ventricular volume, premature closure of intra-occipital synchondroses and FM area while a trend was found between FM area and supraocciput length. Our analysis demonstrates a relationship between the shortening of the clivus and the ventriculomegaly. On the other hand the premature closure of PCF synchondroses, the shape, and the growth direction of supraocciput bone contribute to reduce the FM area, causing in some patients medullary compression. (orig.)

  5. Venous hemodynamics of arteriovenous meningeal fistulas in the posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brainin, M.; Samec, P.

    1983-01-01

    The etiology of arteriovenous meningeal fistulas (AVMFs) of the posterior fossa often remains unclear. Analyses of three personal cases, however, suggest a change in venous hemodynamics due to a primary lesion, the cases being of sinus thrombosis, intracerebral abcess with oedema and arteriovenous malformation. It is suggested that increase of venous pressure in the posterior fossa leads to increased drainage and, consequently, to dilatation of infratentorial veins and of meningeal branches of the external carotid and vertebral artery. Clinical findings and anatomical facts underlying AVMF lesions tend to confirm the view that the concept of a congenital malformation decompensating with age cannot be upheld for all AVMFs, especially when located in the posterior fossa and when clinical symptoms arise in middle age. It is proposed that a pressure activated mechanism of growth results in widening of normally insignificantly small dural vessels. (orig.)

  6. Macroscopic Innervation of the Dura Mater Covering the Middle Cranial Fossa in Humans Correlated to Neurovascular Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Hyo; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Koh, Ki-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul; Han, Sang-Don

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminovascular system within the cranial dura mater is a possible cause of headaches. The aim of this study is to investigate macroscopically dural innervation around the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in the middle cranial fossa. Forty-four sides of the cranial dura overlying the skull base obtained from 24 human cadavers were stained using Sihler's method. Overall, the nervus spinosus (NS) from either the maxillary or mandibular trigeminal divisions ran along the lateral wall of the middle meningeal vein rather than that of the MMA. Distinct bundles of the NS running along the course of the frontal branches of the MMA were present in 81.8% of cases ( N = 36). Others did not form dominant nerve bundles, instead giving off free nerve endings along the course of the MMA or dural connective tissue. The distribution of these nerve endings was similar to that of the course of the frontal, parietal and petrosal branches of the MMA (11.4%). The others were not restricted to a perivascular plexus, crossing the dural connective tissues far from the MMA (6.8%). These findings indicate that the NS generally travels alongside the course of the frontal branches of the MMA and terminates in the vicinity of the pterion.

  7. Macroscopic Innervation of the Dura Mater Covering the Middle Cranial Fossa in Humans Correlated to Neurovascular Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hyo Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The trigeminovascular system within the cranial dura mater is a possible cause of headaches. The aim of this study is to investigate macroscopically dural innervation around the middle meningeal artery (MMA in the middle cranial fossa. Forty-four sides of the cranial dura overlying the skull base obtained from 24 human cadavers were stained using Sihler’s method. Overall, the nervus spinosus (NS from either the maxillary or mandibular trigeminal divisions ran along the lateral wall of the middle meningeal vein rather than that of the MMA. Distinct bundles of the NS running along the course of the frontal branches of the MMA were present in 81.8% of cases (N = 36. Others did not form dominant nerve bundles, instead giving off free nerve endings along the course of the MMA or dural connective tissue. The distribution of these nerve endings was similar to that of the course of the frontal, parietal and petrosal branches of the MMA (11.4%. The others were not restricted to a perivascular plexus, crossing the dural connective tissues far from the MMA (6.8%. These findings indicate that the NS generally travels alongside the course of the frontal branches of the MMA and terminates in the vicinity of the pterion.

  8. Cranial CT with 64-, 16-, 4- and single-slice CT systems-comparison of image quality and posterior fossa artifacts in routine brain imaging with standard protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Eftimov, Lara; Becker, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian [University of Munich, Grosshadern (Germany). Institute of Clinical Radiology; Blume, Jeffrey; Cormack, Jean [Brown University, Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Bruening, Roland; Brueckmann, Hartmut [University of Munich, Grosshadern (Germany). Department of Neuroradiology

    2008-08-15

    Posterior fossa artifacts constitute a characteristic limitation of cranial CT. To identify practical benefits and drawbacks of newer CT systems with reduced collimation in routine cranial imaging, we aimed to investigate image quality, posterior fossa artifacts and parenchymal delineation in non-enhanced CT (NECT) with 1-, 4-, 16- and 64-slice scanners using standard scan protocols. We prospectively enrolled 25 consecutive patients undergoing NECT on a 64-slice CT. Three groups with 25 patients having undergone NECT on 1-, 4- and 16-slice CT machines were matched regarding age and sex. Standard routine CT parameters were used on each CT system with helical acquisition in the posterior fossa; the parameters varied regarding collimation and radiation dose. Three blinded readers independently assessed the cases regarding image quality, infra- and supratentorial artifacts and delineation of brain parenchymal structures on a five-point ordinal scale. Reading orders were randomized. A proportional odds model that accounted for the correlated nature of the data was fit using generalized estimating equations. Posterior fossa artifacts were significantly reduced, and the delineation of infratentorial brain structures was significantly improved with the thinner collimation used for the newer CT systems (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed for midbrain structures (p>0.5). The thinner collimation available on modern CT systems leads to reduced posterior fossa artifacts and to a better delineation of brain parenchyma in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  9. Internal Occipital Crest Misalignment with Internal Occipital Protuberance: A Case Report of Posterior Cranial Fossa Anatomic Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Ha

    2016-01-01

    During gross anatomy head and neck laboratory session, one dissection group observed an abnormal anatomic variation in the posterior cranial fossa of a 94-year-old male cadaver. The internal occipital crest was not aligned with internal occipital protuberance and groove for superior sagittal sinus. It seemed that the internal occipital protuberance was shifted significantly to the right side. As a result the skull was overly stretched in order to connect with the internal occipital ridge. These internal skull variations of occipital bone landmarks can influence the location of adjacent dural venous sinuses and possibly influence cerebrospinal fluid flow. Similar anatomical anomalies have been attributed to presence of hydrocephalus and abnormalities in cisterna magna. PMID:27648322

  10. Human Foramen Magnum Area and Posterior Cranial Fossa Volume Growth in Relation to Cranial Base Synchondrosis Closure in the Course of Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Guillaume; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Di Rocco, Federico; Barthélémy, Isabelle; Garcier, Jean-Marc; De Schlichting, Emmanuel; Sakka, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    To date, no study has compared the evolution of the foramen magnum area (FMA) and the posterior cranial fossa volume (PCFV) with the degree of cranial base synchondrosis ossification. To illustrate these features in healthy children. The FMA, the PCFV, and the ossification of 12 synchondroses according to the Madeline and Elster scale were retrospectively analyzed in 235 healthy children using millimeter slices on a computed tomography scan. The mean FMA of 6.49 cm in girls was significantly inferior to the FMA of 7.67 cm in boys (P < .001). In both sexes, the growth evolved in a 2-phase process, with a phase of rapid growth from birth to 3.75 years old (yo) followed by a phase of stabilization. In girls, the first phase was shorter (ending at 2.6 yo) than in boys (ending at 4.33 yo) and proceeded at a higher rate. PCFV was smaller in girls (P < .001) and displayed a biphasic pattern in the whole population, with a phase of rapid growth from birth to 3.58 yo followed by a phase of slow growth until 16 yo. In girls, the first phase was more active and shorter (ending at 2.67 yo) than in boys (ending at 4.5 yo). The posterior interoccipital synchondroses close first, followed by the anterior interoccipital and occipitomastoidal synchondroses, the lambdoid sutures simultaneously, then the petro-occipital and spheno-occipital synchondroses simultaneously. The data provide a chronology of synchondrosis closure. We showed that FMA and PCFV are constitutionally smaller in girls at birth (P ≤ .02) and suggest that a sex-related difference in the FMA is related to earlier closure of anterior interoccipital synchondroses in girls (P = .01). AIOS, anterior interoccipital synchondrosesFMA, foramen magnum areaLS, lambdoid suturesOMS, occipitomastoidal synchondrosesPCFV, posterior cranial fossa volumePIOS, posterior interoccipital synchondrosesPOS, petro-occipital synchondrosesSOS, spheno-occipital synchondrosisyo, years old.

  11. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zi-Yi; Chen, Jing; Liang, Qi-Zhou; Liao, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Qiong-Yue; Fu, Shui-Xi; Chen, Cai-Xiang; Yu, Dan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of 3.0 T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa. In total, 20 nerves were investigated on MRI of 12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with the FSE sequences with 5 mm and 2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences acquired with a 3.0-T scanner. The MR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale. In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. Comparing FSE and GRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional (3D) pulse sequence. The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section. The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves. GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables 3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yi Guo; Jing Chen; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Qiong-Yue Cheng; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen; Dan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of3.0T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa.Methods:In total,20 nerves were investigated onMRI of12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with theFSE sequences with5 mm and2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo(GRE) sequences acquired with a3.0-T scanner.TheMR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale.Results:In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. ComparingFSE andGRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional(3D) pulse sequence.Conclusions:The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section.The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves.GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem.

  13. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  14. Trans-zygomatic middle cranial fossa approach to access lesions around the cavernous sinus and anterior parahippocampus: a minimally invasive skull base approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Itay; Tubbs, R Shane; Payner, Troy D; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-08-01

    Exposure of the cavernous sinus or anterior parahippocampus often involves a wide exposure of the temporal lobe and mobilization of the temporalis muscle associated with temporal lobe retraction. The authors present a cadaveric study to illustrate the feasibility, advantages and landmarks necessary to perform a trans-zygomatic middle fossa approach to lesions around the cavernous sinus and anterior parahippocampus. The authors performed bilateral trans-zygomatic middle fossae exposures to reach the cavernous sinus and parahippocampus in five cadavers (10 sides). We assessed the morbidity associated with this procedure and compared the indications, advantages, and disadvantages of this method versus more extensive skull base approaches. A vertical linear incision along the middle portion of the zygomatic arch was extended one finger breadth inferior to the inferior edge of the zygomatic arch. Careful dissection inferior to the arch allowed preservation of facial nerve branches. A zygomatic osteotomy was followed via a linear incision through the temporalis muscle and exposure of the middle cranial fossa floor. A craniotomy along the inferolateral temporal bone and middle fossa floor allowed extradural dissection along the middle fossa floor and exposure of the cavernous sinus including all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Intradural inspection demonstrated adequate exposure of the parahippocampus. Exposure of the latter required minimal or no retraction of the temporal lobe. The trans-zygomatic middle fossa approach is a simplified skull base exposure using a linear incision, which may avoid the invasivity of more extensive skull base approaches while providing an adequate corridor for resection of cavernous sinus and parahippocampus lesions. The advantages of this approach include its efficiency, ease, minimalism, preservation of the temporalis muscle, and minimal retraction of the temporal lobe.

  15. Immediate and Long-term Hearing Outcomes With the Middle Cranial Fossa Approach for Vestibular Schwannoma Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameer; Arts, H Alexander; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Basura, Gregory J; Thompson, B Gregory; Telian, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    To analyze the immediate postoperative and long-term hearing outcome data in patients who have undergone hearing preservation attempts with the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach for the resection of sporadic vestibular schwannoma. Retrospective review of a surgical patient cohort. Tertiary academic referral center. Adult patients with unilateral sporadic vestibular schwannoma. Surgical treatment with a MCF approach. Comparison of pre- and postoperative audiometric data in accordance with the 1995 and 2012 American Academy of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery guidelines on reporting hearing outcomes and with a word recognition score only scale. Long-term hearing outcome data were analyzed in the following postoperative groups: 3 to 5, 6 to 8, 9 to 11, and 12+ years after surgery. From 1999 to 2016, 174 patients underwent the MCF approach and 155 of them met inclusion criteria for analysis of hearing outcome data. Class A or B hearing was preserved in 70% of the entire cohort after recovery. Seventy-one patients with measurable hearing met criteria for long-term data analysis. The rate of American Academy of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery class A or B hearing preservation was 82% at 3 to 5 years and declined thereafter. The rate of word recognition score class I or II hearing preservation was 98% at 3 to 5 years and declined less rapidly thereafter. Patients with preoperative Class A hearing had significantly higher rates of successful hearing preservation at all postoperative intervals. Delayed hearing loss occurs in a progressively increasing fashion but speech understanding remains durable for a majority of patients whose hearing is initially preserved with the MCF approach.

  16. Skull-base foramina of the middle cranial fossa : assessment of normal variation with high-resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Suh, Jeong Soo; Choi, Hye Young; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To recognize foraminal variants of the foraminae of the skull base in the middle cranial fossa, and to thus understand and distinguish normal and potentially abnormal structures. We analysed 163 patients without intracranial disease who had undergone CT scanning. These comprised 82 men and 81 women with a mean age of 39 years (range, 4-73 years). HRCT was performed, using a GE 9800 scanner. All CT scans were obtained 6-7 slices at the base of the skull, with 1.5mm collimation at 1.5mm intervals parallel to the infraorbital line. We analysed the foraminae by closesly correlating imaging findings and established anatomic knowledge. In 45 cases (27.6%) the foramen ovale was 5-10mm in diameter and asymmetrical. Deficiency of the medial bony wall including persistent foramen lacerum medius was seen in five cases (3.1%). Confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen spinosum was seen in 13 cases (8%) and confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen of Vesalius in 23 (14.1%). Posterolateral groove for the accessory meningeal artery was observed in 36 cases (22%). The foramen spinosum was asymmetrical in 42 cases (25.8%). A small or absent foramen spinosum with a larger ipsilateral foramen ovale was observed in 11 cases (6.7%). Medial bony defect was seen in 16 cases (9.8%). The foramen spinosum was absent in four cases (2.5%). In 74 cases (45.4%), the foramen of Vesalius was absent; it was present unilaterally and bilaterally in 55 (33.7%) and 34 cases (20.9%), respectively. Five cases showed duplicated foramina. Canaliculus innominatus was seen in 14 cases (8.9%) and was present bilaterally in three (1.8%). HRCT clearly delineates bony structure and is well able to display the rich spectrum of anatomic variation found in the base of the skull. The recognition of these normal variants will result in a better understanding of skull base neurovascular anatomy and diminish speculation as to their true nature during the interpretation of CT images

  17. Avaliação textural por ressonância magnética dos tumores da fossa posterior em crianças Magnetic resonance imaging textural evaluation of posterior cranial fossa tumors in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelson Alves dos Santos

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Possibilitar a distinção entre tecidos sãos e patológicos em pacientes da faixa etária pediátrica portadores de tumores da fossa posterior, por meio da análise de parâmetros texturais calculados a partir de imagens de ressonância magnética. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 14 pacientes da faixa etária pediátrica, portadores de tumores da fossa posterior, através da definição dos valores texturais das regiões de interesse representando tecidos sãos e patológicos, com base em imagens de ressonância magnética pesadas em T2 pelo "software" MaZda. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os tecidos normal e tumoral, bem como entre os tecidos presumidamente normais adjacentes e distantes da lesão. Não foi possível a distinção entre edema e tumor. CONCLUSÃO: A avaliação textural por ressonância magnética é uma técnica útil para a determinação de diferenças entre diversos tipos de tecidos, inclusive entre áreas de tecidos presumidamente normais à análise visual.OBJECTIVE: To distinguish healthy from pathological tissues in pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using calculated textural parameters from magnetic resonance images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated 14 pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using the software MaZda to define the texture parameters in selected regions of interest representing healthy and pathological tissues based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between normal and tumoral tissues as well as between supposedly normal tissues adjacent and distant from the tumoral lesion. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance textural evaluation is an useful tool for determining differences among various tissues, including tissues that appear apparently normal on visual analysis.

  18. An unusual and spectacular case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the spinal cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Damien; Menei, Philippe; Fournier, Henri-Dominique

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe the first case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the upper cervical spinal canal and the posterior cranial fossa. Spindle cell lipoma is an extremely rare variant of benign lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary subcutaneous well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck or shoulders of adult men. Local aggressiveness is unusual. This 61-year-old man presented with an increased left cerebellar syndrome and headaches. He also had a posterior neck tumefaction, which had been known about for a long time. Computed tomography and MR imaging studies revealed a voluminous mass extending to the upper cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa and eroding the neighboring bones. The lesion was well delimited, and contrast enhancement was intense and heterogeneous. The tumor, which had initially developed under the muscles of the posterior neck, was totally resected. Histological assessment revealed numerous fat cells with spindle cells secreting collagen. The large size of the tumor and the submuscular location, bone erosion, and compression of the CNS were unusual in this rare subtype of benign adipose tumor. Its presentation could simulate a sarcoma.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the Kawase versus the modified Dolenc-Kawase approach for middle cranial fossa lesions with variable anteroposterior extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manjul; Deo, Rama Chandra; Suri, Ashish; Srivastav, Vinkle; Baby, Britty; Kumar, Subodh; Kalra, Prem; Banerjee, Subhashis; Prasad, Sanjiva; Paul, Kolin; Roy, Tara Sankar; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2015-07-01

    The surgical corridor to the upper third of the clivus and ventral brainstem is hindered by critical neurovascular structures, such as the cavernous sinus, petrous apex, and tentorium. The traditional Kawase approach provides a 10 × 5-mm fenestration at the petrous apex of the temporal bone between the 5th cranial nerve and internal auditory canal. Due to interindividual variability, sometimes this area proves to be insufficient as a corridor to the posterior cranial fossa. The authors describe a modification to the technique of the extradural anterior petrosectomy consisting of additional transcavernous exploration and medial mobilization of the cisternal component of the trigeminal nerve. This approach is termed the modified Dolenc-Kawase (MDK) approach. The authors describe a volumetric analysis of temporal bones with 3D laser scanning of dry and drilled bones for respective triangles and rhomboid areas, and they compare the difference of exposure with traditional versus modified approaches on cadaver dissection. Twelve dry temporal bones were laser scanned, and mesh-based volumetric analysis was done followed by drilling of the Kawase triangle and MDK rhomboid. Five cadaveric heads were drilled on alternate sides with both approaches for evaluation of the area exposed, surgical freedom, and angle of approach. The MDK approach provides an approximately 1.5 times larger area and 2.0 times greater volume of bone at the anterior petrous apex compared with the Kawase's approach. Cadaver dissection objectified the technical feasibility of the MDK approach, providing nearly 1.5-2 times larger fenestration with improved view and angulation to the posterior cranial fossa. Practical application in 6 patients with different lesions proves clinical applicability of the MDK approach. The larger fenestration at the petrous apex achieved with the MDK approach provides greater surgical freedom at the Dorello canal, gasserian ganglion, and prepontine area and better

  20. Evolution of posterior fossa and brain morphology after in utero repair of open neural tube defects assessed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethmann, Christin; Scheer, Ianina; Kellenberger, Christian Johannes [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, The Zurich Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy, Zurich (Switzerland); Children' s Research Center (CRC), Zurich (Switzerland); Meuli, Martin; Mazzone, Luca; Moehrlen, Ueli [University of Zurich, The Zurich Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy, Zurich (Switzerland); Children' s Research Center (CRC), Zurich (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    To describe characteristics of foetuses undergoing in utero repair of open neural tube defects (ONTD) and assess postoperative evolution of posterior fossa and brain morphology. Analysis of pre- and postoperative foetal as well as neonatal MRI of 27 foetuses who underwent in utero repair of ONTD. Type and level of ONTD, hindbrain configuration, posterior fossa and liquor space dimensions, and detection of associated findings were compared between MRI studies and to age-matched controls. Level of bony spinal defect was defined with exactness of ± one vertebral body. Of surgically confirmed 18 myelomeningoceles (MMC) and 9 myeloschisis (MS), 3 MMC were misdiagnosed as MS due to non-visualisation of a flat membrane on MRI. Hindbrain herniation was more severe in MS than MMC (p < 0.001). After repair, hindbrain herniation resolved in 25/27 cases at 4 weeks and liquor spaces increased. While posterior fossa remained small (p < 0.001), its configuration normalised. Lateral ventricle diameter indexed to cerebral width decreased in 48% and increased in 12% of cases, implying a low rate of progressive obstructive hydrocephalus. Neonatally evident subependymal heterotopias were detected in 33% at preoperative and 50% at postoperative foetal MRI. MRI demonstrates change of Chiari malformation type II (CM-II) features. (orig.)

  1. Evolution of posterior fossa and brain morphology after in utero repair of open neural tube defects assessed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethmann, Christin; Scheer, Ianina; Kellenberger, Christian Johannes; Meuli, Martin; Mazzone, Luca; Moehrlen, Ueli

    2017-01-01

    To describe characteristics of foetuses undergoing in utero repair of open neural tube defects (ONTD) and assess postoperative evolution of posterior fossa and brain morphology. Analysis of pre- and postoperative foetal as well as neonatal MRI of 27 foetuses who underwent in utero repair of ONTD. Type and level of ONTD, hindbrain configuration, posterior fossa and liquor space dimensions, and detection of associated findings were compared between MRI studies and to age-matched controls. Level of bony spinal defect was defined with exactness of ± one vertebral body. Of surgically confirmed 18 myelomeningoceles (MMC) and 9 myeloschisis (MS), 3 MMC were misdiagnosed as MS due to non-visualisation of a flat membrane on MRI. Hindbrain herniation was more severe in MS than MMC (p < 0.001). After repair, hindbrain herniation resolved in 25/27 cases at 4 weeks and liquor spaces increased. While posterior fossa remained small (p < 0.001), its configuration normalised. Lateral ventricle diameter indexed to cerebral width decreased in 48% and increased in 12% of cases, implying a low rate of progressive obstructive hydrocephalus. Neonatally evident subependymal heterotopias were detected in 33% at preoperative and 50% at postoperative foetal MRI. MRI demonstrates change of Chiari malformation type II (CM-II) features. (orig.)

  2. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  3. Cranial CT and MRI in diseases with DNA repair defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Kendall, B.E.; Kingsley, D.

    1992-01-01

    The CT and MRI appearances of 5 patients with Cockayne's syndrome, 5 with ataxia telangiectasia and 1 with Fanconi's anaemia are reported. These conditions, together with Bloom's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum are regarded as disorders of DNA repair. Characteristic CT and MRI features of Cockayne's syndrome include generalised atrophy, calcification in basal ganglia and dentate nuclei and white matter low density. Neuroradiological findings in the other DNA repair disorders are nonspecific. (orig.)

  4. Temporal lobe sulcal pattern and the bony impressions in the middle cranial fossa: the case of the el Sidrón (Spain) neandertal sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Peña-Melián, Angel; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; De La Rasilla, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Correspondence between temporal lobe sulcal pattern and bony impressions on the middle cranial fossae (MCF) was analyzed. MCF bone remains (SD-359, SD-315, and SD-1219) from the El Sidrón (Spain) neandertal site are analyzed in this context. Direct comparison of the soft and hard tissues from the same individual was studied by means of: 1) dissection of two human heads; 2) optic (white light) surface scans; 3) computed tomography and magnetic resonance of the same head. The inferior temporal sulcus and gyrus are the features most strongly influencing MCF bone surface. The Superior temporal sulcus and middle temporal and fusiform gyri also leave imprints. Temporal lobe form differs between Homo sapiens and neandertals. A wider and larger post-arcuate fossa (posterior limit of Brodmann area 20 and the anterior portion of area 37) is present in modern humans as compared to neandertals. However other traits of the MCF surface are similar in these two large-brained human groups. A conspicuous variation is appreciated in the more vertical location of the inferior temporal gyrus in H. sapiens. In parallel, structures of the lower surface of the temporal lobe are more sagittally orientated. Grooves accommodating the fusiform and the lower temporal sulci become grossly parallel to the temporal squama. These differences can be understood within the context of a supero-lateral deployment of the lobe in H. sapiens, a pattern previously identified (Bastir et al., Nat Commun 2 (2011) 588-595). Regarding dural sinus pattern, a higher incidence of petrosquamous sinus is detected in neandertal samples. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cranial CT and MRI in diseases with DNA repair defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Kendall, B.E.; Kingsley, D. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    The CT and MRI appearances of 5 patients with Cockayne's syndrome, 5 with ataxia telangiectasia and 1 with Fanconi's anaemia are reported. These conditions, together with Bloom's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum are regarded as disorders of DNA repair. Characteristic CT and MRI features of Cockayne's syndrome include generalised atrophy, calcification in basal ganglia and dentate nuclei and white matter low density. Neuroradiological findings in the other DNA repair disorders are nonspecific. (orig.).

  6. An Osteoinductive Polymer Composite for Cranial and Maxillofacial Bone Repair,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    a suitable level of anesthesia , a semi-lunar incision was made in the midline from the superior sagittal crest to the middle of the nasal bone. The...internal fixation of Fractures, and as intraosseous bone repair materials. A promising use for these polymers has been as carriers for osteogenic...acids. Oral Surg. 37:142, 1974. 7. Getter, L., Cutright, D.E., Bhaskar, S.N., and Augsburg, J.K. A biodegradable intraosseous apliance in the

  7. A prospective study on fetal posterior cranial fossa assessment for early detection of open spina bifida at 11-13 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Semir; Altunyurt, Sabahattin; Keskinoglu, Pembe

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test three measurements: brain stem (BS), intracranial translucency (IT) and brain stem to occipital bone distance (BSOB), as well as one landmark: cisterna magna (CM) visibility, for early diagnosis of open spina bifida (OSB) in a low risk population. A prospective observational study was undertaken in a university hospital. A sample of 1479 women consented to participate between 20 September 2013 and 30 June 2015. Measurements were performed from the mid-sagittal view, as is routinely used for nuchal thickness assessment. CM visibility was assessed qualitatively as the third anechoic band in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF). All pregnancies were screened with a combination of maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein and second trimester anomaly scan and followed until delivery. Predictive values were calculated for each marker. We were able to diagnose two OSB cases and highly suspect one Dandy-Walker malformation case at the first trimester scan by the observation of PCF. PCF characteristics of OSB cases were increased BS diameter, increased BS-BSOB ratio and non-visualization of the CM. All the markers demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity but CM visibility reached the highest positive predictive value. Due to relatively high false positive rates, PCF measurements could not reach a satisfactory performance to validate their clinical use as a single marker. CM visibility has the advantage of being a qualitative marker and reduces the need for sophisticated and time-consuming measurements. Intracranial translucency and BS-BSOB ratio measurements should be used when the CM visibility is absent or in doubt. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  8. Long-term functional outcome after surgical repair of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mölsä, Sari H; Hyytiäinen, Heli K; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi M

    2014-01-01

    Background Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is a very common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Few studies, using objective and validated outcome evaluation methods, have been published to evaluate long-term (>1 year) outcome after CCL repair. A group of 47 dogs with CCL rupture treated with intracapsular, extracapsular, and osteotomy techniques, and 21 healthy control dogs were enrolled in this study. To evaluate long-term surgical outcome, at a minimum of 1.5 years after unilate...

  9. Combined Endoscopic Transorbital and Endonasal Repair of High Flow Orbital Apex/Middle Fossa Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak with a Nasoseptal Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Mendez, Gustavo; Cua, David; Akins, Paul; Gillham, Haley; Ciporen, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    High flow orbital apex or middle fossa cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks can be life threatening and complex to repair. These leaks associated with large dural defects are most commonly repaired with an open temporalis muscle patch or free flaps, but these flaps do not always stop the leak. A 65-year-old patient presented two years after orbital exenteration and radiation for squamous cell carcinoma. He developed multi-organism meningitis and pneumocephalus secondary to a large high-flow orbital apex/middle fossa CSF leak. To repair the leak, a combined endoscopic transorbital/endonasal approach with pedicled nasospetal flap and dermis fat graft was used. We describe the unique endoscopic technique that was used to treat the life threatening high flow orbital apex/middle fossa CSF leak. The technique allowed the use of the transposed pedicled flap, which is an alternative to the free flap in controlling CSF leak. Cisternogram post-operatively and clinical exam confirmed resolution of CSF leak. Although a critically ill patient at admission with a modified Rankin scale (MRS) of 5, he was discharged home on continued IV antibiotic therapy with a MRS of 3. Endoscopic evaluation at three months after treatment showed the effectiveness of the flap and he continued to improve clinically. This is the first case to describe a combined endoscopic transorbital and endonasal repair of high flow orbital apex/middle fossa CSF leak with a pedicled nasoseptal flap. These techniques can be utilized during initial reconstruction after orbital exenteration or as a salvage flap.

  10. 经中颅底硬膜间入路切除中后颅窝哑铃型三叉神经鞘瘤%Middle cranial fossa interdural approach for dumbbell-shaped trigeminal schwannomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何升学; 刘宏毅; 邹元杰; 马骏; 张岩松; 黄庆玖; 陈永严; 章文斌; 刘永

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨经中颅底硬膜间入路切除中后颅窝哑铃型三叉神经鞘瘤的手术适应症及治疗效果.方法 回顾性分析2009年10月至2014年11月间南京医科大学附属脑科医院神经外科采用经中颅底硬膜间入路切除中后颅窝哑铃型三叉神经鞘瘤7例患者的临床及影像资料、手术疗效和术后并发症情况. 结果 7例患者中Mp型5例、MP型2例. 7例患者术后第1 d复查MRI显示肿瘤均全切,无手术死亡者;术后脑神经功能障碍较术前改善4例,无明显变化3例,无加重和出现新的脑神经麻痹;1例患者出现皮下积液和颅内感染,经腰穿置管脑脊液引流和抗生素治疗痊愈;1例出现颞肌萎缩. 术后7例患者均长期随访,随访时间12~60个月,无1例患者复发. 结论 中颅底硬膜间入路手术是切除Mp型和部分MP型三叉神经鞘瘤的一种有效治疗方法,主要在硬膜间进行手术操作,有利于脑组织、脑神经及血管的保护,手术损伤小、反应小、并发症少.%Objective To investigate the effect and indication of the middle cranial fossa interdural approach for dumbbell-shaped trigeminal schwannomas .Methods The clinical data of 7 patients with dumbbell-shaped trigeminal schwannomas underwent through middle cranial fossa interdural approach from October , 2009 to November , 2014 were analyzed retrospectively .Tumors were classified into three types based on their distribution over the petrous ridge ( Mp type,MP type and mP type ) .The middle cranial fossa interdural approach was selected for type Mp and MP .The extent of tumor resection , cranial nerve outcome , approach-related morbidities , and recurrence of the tumors were documented .Results Of 7 patients,5 were Mp and 2 MP.MRI of postoperative one day showed that total resection was achieved in all patients .There was no operative mortality or new permanent neurological deficits .Improvement of the preoperative cranial nerve dysfunction was observed

  11. Implante coclear via fossa craniana média: uma nova técnica para acesso ao giro basal da cóclea Cochlear implantation through the middle cranial fossa: a novel approach to access the basal turn of the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gomes Bittencourt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A técnica clássica para o implante coclear é realizada através de mastoidectomia e timpanotomia posterior. A abordagem pela fossa craniana média provou ser uma alternativa valiosa, embora venha sendo usada para o implante coclear apenas esporadicamente e sem normatização. OBJETIVO: Descrever uma nova abordagem para expor o giro basal da cóclea para o implante coclear através da fossa craniana média. MÉTODO: Cinquenta ossos temporais foram dissecados. A cocleostomia foi realizada através de uma abordagem via fossa craniana média, na parte mais superficial do giro basal da cóclea, usando o plano meatal e seio petroso superior como pontos de reparo. A parede lateral do meato acústico interno foi dissecada após o broqueamento e esqueletização do ápice petroso. A parede dissecada do meato acústico interno foi acompanhada longitudinalmente até a cocleostomia. Design: Estudo anatômico de osso temporal. RESULTADOS: Em todos os ossos temporais, apenas a parte superficial do giro basal da cóclea foi aberta. A exposição do giro basal da cóclea permitiu que as escalas timpânica e vestibular fossem visualizadas. Assim, não houve dificuldade na inserção do feixe de eletrodos através da escala timpânica. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica proposta é simples e permite exposição suficiente do giro basal da cóclea.The classic approach for cochlear implant surgery includes mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy. The middle cranial fossa approach is a proven alternative, but it has been used only sporadically and inconsistently in cochlear implantation. OBJECTIVE: To describe a new approach to expose the basal turn of the cochlea in cochlear implant surgery through the middle cranial fossa. METHOD: Fifty temporal bones were dissected in this anatomic study of the temporal bone. Cochleostomies were performed through the middle cranial fossa approach in the most superficial portion of the basal turn of the cochlea, using the meatal plane and

  12. Long-term functional outcome after surgical repair of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölsä, Sari H; Hyytiäinen, Heli K; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi M

    2014-11-19

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is a very common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Few studies, using objective and validated outcome evaluation methods, have been published to evaluate long-term (>1 year) outcome after CCL repair. A group of 47 dogs with CCL rupture treated with intracapsular, extracapsular, and osteotomy techniques, and 21 healthy control dogs were enrolled in this study. To evaluate long-term surgical outcome, at a minimum of 1.5 years after unilateral CCL surgery, force plate, orthopedic, radiographic, and physiotherapeutic examinations, including evaluation of active range of motion (AROM), symmetry of thrust from the ground, symmetry of muscle mass, and static weight bearing (SWB) of pelvic limbs, and goniometry of the stifle and tarsal joints, were done. At a mean of 2.8 ± 0.9 years after surgery, no significant differences were found in average ground reaction forces or SWB between the surgically treated and control dog limbs, when dogs with no other orthopedic findings were included (n = 21). However, in surgically treated limbs, approximately 30% of the dogs had decreased static or dynamic weight bearing when symmetry of weight bearing was evaluated, 40-50% of dogs showed limitations of AROM in sitting position, and two-thirds of dogs had weakness in thrust from the ground. The stifle joint extension angles were lower (P <0.001) and flexion angles higher (P <0.001) in surgically treated than in contralateral joints, when dogs with no contralateral stifle problems were included (n = 33). In dogs treated using the intracapsular technique, the distribution percentage per limb of peak vertical force (DPVF) in surgically treated limbs was significantly lower than in dogs treated with osteotomy techniques (P =0.044). The average long-term dynamic and static weight bearing of the surgically treated limbs returned to the level of healthy limbs. However, extension and flexion angles of the surgically treated stifles

  13. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Zhu, Shaobo; Wang, Mingbo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP 2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP 2 /PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP 2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP 2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP 2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. (paper)

  14. Are Homo sapiens nonsupranuchal fossa and Neanderthal suprainiac fossa convergent traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczewska, Wioletta

    2011-04-01

    The autapomorphic status of the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa was recently confirmed. This was a result of a detailed analysis of the internal bone composition in the area of the suprainiac depression on Neanderthal and Homo sapiens specimens. However, while anatomical differences between Neanderthal suprainiac fossa and the depression in the inion region of the occipital bone of fossil and recent Homo sapiens have been discussed in detail, the etiology of these structures has not been resolved. In this article, the hypothesis that the Homo sapiens non-supranuchal fossa and the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa both formed to maintain the optimal shape of the occipital plane (to minimize strain on the posterior cranial vault) is tested. First, the variation in the expression of the fossa above inion in the crania of recent Homo sapiens from European, African, and Australian samples was examined, and the degree of structural similarity between these depressions and the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa was assessed. Next, the relationship between the shape of the occipital squama in the midsagittal plane and two particular features (the degree of the occipital torus development and the occurrence of a depression in the inion region that is not the supranuchal fossa) were analyzed. Based on the results, it is suggested that the Homo sapiens non-supranuchal fossa and Neanderthal suprainiac fossa are convergent traits. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior Haematomata in the posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.Six cases of sub-tentorial haematomata (one chronic sub-dural, four intra-cerebellar, one extra-dural are reported. Emphasizing the relative rarity of haematomata in the posterior cranial fossa, the author claims the necessity of complementary examinations for proper diagnosis, indispensable for adequate surgical treatment.

  16. Calvarial Suture-Derived Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Cranial Bone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Doro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the natural turnover during life, the bones in the skeleton possess the ability to self-repair in response to injury or disease-related bone loss. Based on studies of bone defect models, both processes are largely supported by resident stem cells. In the long bones, the source of skeletal stem cells has been widely investigated over the years, where the major stem cell population is thought to reside in the perivascular niche of the bone marrow. In contrast, we have very limited knowledge about the stem cells contributing to the repair of calvarial bones. In fact, until recently, the presence of specific stem cells in adult craniofacial bones was uncertain. These flat bones are mainly formed via intramembranous rather than endochondral ossification and thus contain minimal bone marrow space. It has been previously proposed that the overlying periosteum and underlying dura mater provide osteoprogenitors for calvarial bone repair. Nonetheless, recent studies have identified a major stem cell population within the suture mesenchyme with multiple differentiation abilities and intrinsic reparative potential. Here we provide an updated review of calvarial stem cells and potential mechanisms of regulation in the context of skull injury repair.

  17. Estenose da fossa intercondilar após estabilização articular com retalho de fáscia lata em cães Intercondylar fossa stenosis after joint stabilization using a fascial strip in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Selmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinaram-se os índices de largura da fossa intercondilar (FI, após transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial em nove cães adultos submetidos à estabilização articular com retalho de fáscia lata. Os joelhos foram alocados em dois grupos, sendo o joelho direito (GI submetido à incisuroplastia troclear (ITR e posterior estabilização articular, e o joelho esquerdo submetido somente à substituição ligamentar (GC. Cada grupo foi dividido em três subgrupos correspondentes aos momentos de eutanásia aos 30, 90 e 180 dias de pós-operatório. Os índices de largura da FI foram determinados, macroscópica e radiograficamente, pela mensuração da abertura cranial da FI nos terços cranial, médio e caudal, e indexados em relação à largura epicondilar. Observou-se aumento significativo dos índices macroscópicos e radiográficos nas articulações do GI, sendo estes estatisticamente diferentes daqueles das articulações de GC. Não foi observada estenose intercondilar nos joelhos de GC após a estabilização articular. Conclui-se que a estabilização articular com retalho de fáscia lata preveniu a estenose da fossa intercondilar, e que a ITR promoveu o alargamento permanente dessa estrutura.Intercondylar fossa width indexes (IFWI were determined in nine adult dogs submitted to intercondylar notchplasty (IN after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL followed by a fascial strip stabilization. The right stifle was submitted to IN followed by fascial strip reconstruction of the CCL (GI while in the left stifle IN was not performed (GC. Each group was then divided into three subgroups which corresponded to time of euthanasia at 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery. IFWI were determined, both macroscopically and radiographically, by measuring the cranial outlet of the intercondylar fossa in relation to the epicondylar width. A significant increase was observed in indexes of GI following IN, and these differed from indexes of

  18. Comparison of ossification of demineralized bone, hydroxyapatite, Gelfoam, and bone wax in cranial defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Ahmed, O F; Neth, D; Reger, S; Zins, J

    1996-09-01

    Demineralized bone allografts in the repair of calvarial defects are compared with other common bone fillers. This study uses a video-digitizing radiographic analysis of calvarial defect ossification to determine calcification of bone defects and its relation to postoperative clinical examination and regional controls. The postoperative clinical results at 3 months demonstrated that bony healing was greatest in bur holes filled with demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite. Radiographic analysis demonstrated calcification of demineralized bone-filled defects compared to bone wax- and Gelfoam-filled regions. Hydroxyapatite granules are radiographically dense, thus not allowing accurate measurement of true bone healing. The results suggest that demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite provide better structural support via bone healing to defined calvarial defects than do Gelfoam and bone wax.

  19. "Repair of cranial bone defects using endochondral bone matrix gelatin in rat "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sobhani A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone matrix gelatin (BMG has been used for bone induction intramuscularly and subcutaneously by many investigators since 1965. More recently, some of the researchers have used BMG particles for bone repair and reported various results. In present study for evaluation of bone induction and new bone formation in parital defects, BMG particles were used in five groups of rats. The BMG was prepared as previously described using urist method. The defects wee produced with 5 –mm diameter in pariteal bones and filled by BMG particles. No BMG was used in control group.For evaluation of new bone formation and repair, the specimens were harvested on days 7 , 14 , 21 and 28 after operation. The samples were processed histologically, stained by H& E, alizarin red S staining, and Alcian blue, and studied by a light microscope.The results are as follows:In control group: Twenty-eight days after operation a narrow rim of new bone was detectable attached to the edge of defect.In BMG groups: At day 7 after operation young chondroblast cells appeared in whole area of defect. At 14th day after operation hypertrophic chondrocytes showed by Alcian blue staining and calcified cartilage were detectable by Alizarin red S staining. The numerous trabeculae spicules, early adult osteocytes and highly proliferated red bone marrow well developed on dayd 21 . finally typic bone trabeculae with regulated osteoblast cells and some osteoclast cells were detectable at day 28 after operation. In conclusion,BMG could stimulate bone induction and new bone formation in bony defects. So, it seems that BMG could be a godd biomaterial substance for new bone inducation in bone defects

  20. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  1. Radiographic imaging of the canine intercondylar fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, R.D.; Fitch, R.B.; Hathcock, J.T.; LaPrade, R.F.; Wilson, M.E.; Garrett, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    The intercondylar fossa is believed to play an important role in the pathology of cranial cruciate ligament rupture and therefore has received considerable attention in the last decade. Accurate radiographic imaging of the intercondylar fossa requires that the central x-ray beam pass through the center of the intercondylar “tunnel”. The anatomy of the canine intercondylar fossa is similar to humans, however, the orientations of the intercondylar fossa's differ. Consequently, the positioning techniques described for humans are not appropriate for the dog. To pass through the center of the dog, intercondylar fossa, the central x-ray beam should be 12° (S.D. 1.7°) caudal from the femoral diaphysis in the sagittal plane and obliqued caudolateral to craniomedial 7° (S.D. 0.60°) (caudo78°proximo7° lateralcraniodistomedial oblique). Cross table positioning was used with the hip flexed and the radiograph cassette placed on the cranial surface of the stifle. However, superimposition of the tuber ischii and soft tissues caudal to the femur made 15° to 20° the best angle obtainable. There was not a significant difference (p = 0.17) in the notch width index between a 12° versus 20° angle of the central x-ray beam caudal to the femoral diaphysis, both with 7° of external rotation of the stifle. The notch width index of 0.252 obtained from radiographic measurements was not significantly different from measurements obtained grossly of 0.254 (n = 26; p = 0.69). Failure to oblique the central x-ray beam caused a significant (p = 0.0008) decrease in the apparent fossa width radiographically

  2. Benign neurilemmoma in the infratemporal fossa involving maxillary sinus and pterygopalatine fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Jin Koo; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Chang Hyeon [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    Neurilemmoma is a benign tumor of the nerve sheath that arises on cranial and spinal nerve roots as well as along the course of peripheral nerves. A case of a neurilemmoma that arose in the left infratemporal fossa of a 29- year-old male was presented. Plain radiographs, enhanced computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large, well-circumscribed, heterogeneously enhanced mass with extension into the pterygopalatine fossa. Displaced by the large mass, bowing-in of the posterior maxillary antral wall was noted and a provisional diagnosis of a benign soft tissue tumor was made. The mass was completely excised and a diagnosis of neurilemmoma was confirmed.

  3. Instantaneous center of motion and velocity vector in stifle of dogs undergoing intercondylar notchplasty and articular repair following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selmi, A.L.; Padilha Filho, J.G.; Lins, B.T.; Mendes, G.M.; Eimantas, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    The instantaneous center of motion (ICM) and velocity vector (Vv), after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) followed by a fascial strip reconstruction in association with intercondylar notchplasty (IN), were studied in nine adult dogs. The right stifle was submitted to IN followed by fascial strip reconstruction of the CCL (GI) while in the left stifle IN was not performed (GC). Dogs were evaluated the day prior to surgery, immediately after surgery and at 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively (po), time at which a subgroup of three dogs were euthanatized. The ICM and resulting Vv were determined by radiographic examination of the stifle. All the stifles presented normally positioned ICM and Vv before surgery. No changes were observed in ICM or Vv in all stifles following intra-articular repair, in association or not with IN, throughout the evaluation period, despite the fact that three dogs in GC and two in GI presented a positive cranial drawer sign immediately following surgery, two dogs in GC and GI at 30 days po, and one single dog in each group thereafter until 180 days po. It is concluded that articular repair, in association with IN or not, did not alter stifle biomechanics, in respect to ICM and Vv [pt

  4. Radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation of the canine intercondylar fossa in normal stifles and after notchplasty in stable and unstable stifles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, R.B.; Hathcock, J.T.; Montgomery, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The role of the intercondylar fossa in cranial cruciate ligament injury has gained notable attention in humans and it's role is now being questioned in animals. Controversy exists regarding the accuracy of radiographs and computed tomography (CT) in evaluating the intercondylar fossa. This study compared radiographic and CT evaluation with gross evaluation of the intercondylar fossa. Six greyhounds were evaluated before notchplasty, immediately after notchplasty and 6 months after notchplasty in stable and unstable stifles. A fossa width index was used for comparison because it negates the effects of patient size and radiographic magnification. The fossa width index is calculated by dividing the width of the intercondylar fossa by the total condylar width. The fossa width indices of dogs determined from radiographs and CT were not significantly different before notchplasty except for the cranial fossa width indices which were more inconsistent and tended to underestimate the size when compared to gross measurements. At six months, both stable and unstable stifles had refilling of the notchplasty, but the unstable stifles had significantly greater refilling resulting in no significant enlargement in intercondylar fossa size as compared to the prenotchplasty size. Osteophytes that occurred within the intercondylar fossa were less radiopaque and more easily visualized by computed tomography. Computed tomography provided several advantages, including clearer visualization of the intercondylar fossa, avoiding superimposition of the intercondylar fossa by caudal thigh muscles or tuber ischii and the ability to analyze the cranial and caudal components of the intercondylar fossa separately

  5. Temporal fossa hemangiopericytoma: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Marc A; Waldron, James S; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T; Cheung, Steven W

    2009-10-01

    Review clinical experience with temporal fossa hemangiopericytomas (HPCs). Retrospective case series review. Tertiary referral center. Intracranial HPCs within the temporal fossa. Craniotomy for either subtotal or gross total tumor excision. Determination of clinical outcome (alive with no evidence of disease, alive with disease, and died of disease). Five cases of HPC involving the temporal fossa were treated at our tertiary referral center for the period from 1995 to 2008. All but 1 patient were men. The age of presentation ranged from 31 to 62 years, and duration of follow-up ranged from 8 to 153 months. Clinical presentation was protean; headache was the most common symptom. Gross total tumor excision was achieved in 2 patients, whereas subtotal tumor excision was achieved in 3 patients. Reasons for subtotal resection included excessive intraoperative blood loss and inextricable tumor. Histologically, all tumors were composed of tightly packed, randomly oriented (jumbled-up) tumor cells with little intervening collagen. CD34 staining mostly highlighted the vascular background. One patient died of disease, 2 patients were alive with disease, and 2 patients had no evidence of disease. Management of temporal fossa HPC is challenging because clinical presentation is often late, and extent of tumor excision is constrained by vital structures in the cranial base and intracranial contents. A multidisciplinary approach with neurosurgery and neurotology undertaken to achieve the most complete tumor resection possible, whereas minimizing morbidity are likely to confer a longer period of symptom-free survival and improves curability of these difficult lesions.

  6. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Luken, M.G. III

    1983-01-01

    CT demonstrated posterior fossa epidural hematoma in three patients with head trauma in whom this diagnosis was not clinically apparent. No patient was in stupor or coma and no patient experienced a lucid interval. Only one patient had signs referable to the posterior fossa. Two patients had occipital skull fracture disclosed by plain radiographs. CT revealed a unilateral biconvex hematoma in two cases, and a bilateral hematoma with supratentorial extension in the third. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy and recovered. Therapeutic success in these cases was facilitated by early CT and the rapid disclosure of the unsuspected posterior fossa lesions. CT showing contiguous hematoma below and above the tentorium cerebelli after posterior head trauma is highly suggestive of epidural hematoma arising from the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial nerves in the posterior fossa: a comparative study of t2-weighted spin-echo sequences at 1.5 and 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, F; Müller, M; Bruhn, H

    2008-04-01

    High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 Tesla (T) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance. Whether doubling of the field strength of 1.5T and the subsequent increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leads to a significant improvement of image quality is not automatically given. To evaluate the depiction of fine anatomic detail in the posterior fossa, focusing on brain nerves, on T2-weighted imaging, and to define the potential advantage of imaging at 3.0T versus 1.5T. In total, 10 brainstem nerve pairs of 12 volunteers were identified on T2-weighted MR images of 2- and 5-mm section thickness acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T. The MR images were compared for each subject at both field strengths by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast by using a rating scale. In general, MR images at 3.0T were considered more conspicuous and less noisy than images at 1.5T. The SNR value measured was almost doubled. With respect to structural identification and contrast according to the rating scale, observer scores were significantly improved both for standard imaging with 5-mm sections and high-resolution imaging with 2-mm sections at 3.0T. Direct comparison revealed a significant increase for evaluated image quality criteria and the number of nerves detected. The comparison revealed a clear advantage in favor of T2-weighted MRI at 3.0T vs. 1.5T in depicting the roots and course of brain nerves in the posterior fossa.

  8. The intercondylar fossa of the normal canine stifle: an anatomic and radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, Randall B.; Montgomery, Ronald D.; Milton, James L.; Garrett, Phillip D.; Kincaid, Steven A.; Wright, James C.; Terry, Glenn C.

    1995-01-01

    The intercondylar fossa (ICF) in dogs consists of a cranial outlet, intercondylar shelf, caudal arch, caudal outlet, a medial wall, and a lateral wall. The normal cranial outlet is bell-shape and, in mixed-breed dogs (mean body weight 19.2 kg, N = 21), measured 5.8 mm cranially, 8.1 mm centrally, and 10.3 mm caudally. The ICF is oriented 12 degree from the dorsal plane of the femoral diaphysis and obliqued 7 degree , proximolateral to distomedial, in the sagittal plane. To adjust for dog size, a fossa width index (FWI) was calculated by dividing the cranial outlet width by the distance between epicondyles. The normal FWI as determined in this study was 0.18 cranially, 0.25 centrally, and 0.32 caudally. The fossa height index was 0.31. Contact between the ICF and the cranial cruciate ligament began at about 115 degree of extension. The contact area moved cranially in the intercondylar fossa as the stifle was extended. Evaluation of the ICF can be performed radiographically but positioning is critical

  9. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-03-06

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  10. Teratoma of the posterior fossa CT and MR aspects A case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, J.I.; Feijoo, R.; Lasierra, R.; Medrano, J.; Benito, J.L. de

    1994-01-01

    The CT and MR findings are reported for a patient diagnosed as having teratoma of the posterior fossa with onset in the form of intracranial hypertension. The objective of this article is to report the detection of the lesion, as well as its origin in the closure defect of the cranial cavity with the formation of a cutaneous fistula, and review the recent literature

  11. CRANIAL OSTEOLOGY OF CYCLARHIS GUJANENSIS (AVES: VIREONIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIEGO MATIUSSI PREVIATTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The small passerine Cyclaris gujanensis can tear into small pieces large or heavy-bodied preys that could not be swallowed whole such as frogs, snakes, bats and birds. However there are few studies on the cranial anatomy of this species. Thus, we focused on the description of the cranial osteology to contribute to the anatomical knowledge of this species and to make some assumptions about functional anatomy. The fossa temporalis is shallow but broad and the fossa of os palatinum is deepened. The os quadratum processes are long and thick. The os pterygoideum is enlarged and the upper jaw is strongly inclined ventrally (140° with reference to the skull. The rostral extremity of rhamphotheca is hooked with ventral concavity to fit the mandible (pincer form. The mandible fossae are deepened and broad and its bulky medial process probably provides mandible stability and strong support to the muscles attached on it. All these peculiar characteristics probably indicate a considerable force in the C. gujanensis jaws and partially explain its distinctive feeding habit compared with the other Vireonidae. Nevertheless, new studies with functional approaches to analysis the forces of the muscle fibers and the cranial kinesis are needed to prove the hypotheses mentioned above.

  12. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  13. Medusae Fossae Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  14. Sinonasal metallic foreign body penetration of the anterior cranial fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine B. Samuelson

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Intracranial metallic foreign bodies may have significant potential morbidity. Recent advances in endonasal techniques for anterior skull base access may enhance outcomes through reduced morbidity and mortality, improved speed and precision, shorter hospital stays, and lower post-operative pain [1,2,4]. Technical nuances of these approaches and medical decision-making in the context of various neurosurgical considerations are discussed.

  15. Middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst presenting with obsessive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brain containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). From an etiological point of ... mass effect on either the temporal or frontal lobes and the lateral ventricle (Figure 1). ... cortex) resulting in problems with visual scanning and mental flexibility, which is ...

  16. Uncommon posterior cranial fossa anomalies: MRI with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Kendall, B.E. [Lysholm Radiological Dept., National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Wilms, G. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Halpin, S.F.S. [Lysholm Radiological Dept., National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Casaer, P. [Dept. of Paediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Baert, A.L. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1995-01-01

    The clinical and MRI findings in two cases of rhombencephalosynapsis (RS) and two of tectocerebellar dysraphia (TCD) with an associated occipital encephalocele were studied to elucidate the clinical picture and embryogenesis of these rare anomalies. To our knowledge, only one case of TCD [1] and four of RS [2, 3] examined by MRI during life have been reported. The clinical picture in the cases of RS was rather constant and there were similarities with TCD. Consideration of the embryogenesis of the neural tube suggests a temporal proximity of the abnormalities, with TCD arising at a slightly earlier time. (orig.)

  17. Posterior cranial fossa tumours in children at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Difficulties in diagnosis especially in children less than three years is well documented. Limited diagnostic modalities and lack of awareness of the symptoms and signs as well as societal perception of children's complaints contributes to late presentation. Kenyatta National Hospital Neurosurgical unit is the only specialized ...

  18. Epidural hematomas of posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Danilo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior fossa epidural hematomas represent 7-14% of all traumatic intracranial epidural hematomas. They are most frequently encountered posttraumatic mass lesions in the posterior fossa. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could lead to the early diagnosis of posterior fossa epidural hematoma. Methods. Between 1980 and 2002, 28 patients with epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa were operated on at the Institute for Neurosurgery, Belgrade. Clinical course neuroradiological investigations, and the results of surgical treatment of the patients with posterior fossa epidural hematomas were analyzed retrospectively. Results. Almost two thirds of patients were younger than 16 years of age. In 20 cases injury was caused by a fall, in 6 cases by a traffic accident, and in 2 by the assault. Clinical course was subacute or chronic in two thirds of the patients. On the admission Glasgow Coma Scale was 7 or less in 9 injured, 8-14 in 14 injured, and 15 in 5 injured patients. Linear fracture of the occipital bone was radiographically evident in 19 patients, but was intraoperatively encountered in all the patients except for a 4-year old child. In 25 patients the diagnosis was established by computer assisted tomography (CAT and in 3 by vertebral angiography. All the patients were operated on via suboccipital craniotomy. Four injured patients who were preoperatively comatose were with lethal outcome. Postoperatively, 24 patients were with sufficient neurologic recovery. Conclusion. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma should be suspected in cases of occipital injury, consciousness disturbances, and occipital bone fracture. In such cases urgent CAT-scan is recommended. Early recognition early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are crucial for good neurological recovery after surgery.

  19. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  20. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Chul Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  1. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Choi, Hyuck; Hur, Sung-Woong; Kim, Jung-Woo; Oh, Sin-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Song, Soo-Chang; Lee, Keun-Bae; Park, Kwang-Bum; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP) with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP)) was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  2. Assessment of growth dynamics of human cranium middle fossa in foetal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomra, Andrzej; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof; Bogacz, Wiesław

    2014-01-01

    Available literature analysis demonstrated smallness of studies of cranial base. The goal of the study was to analyse the medial fossa of the human cranium in the foetal period against other fossae. Survey material consisted of 110 human foetuses at a morphological age of 16-28 weeks of foetal life, CRL 98-220 mm. Anthropological, preparation method, reverse method and statistical analysis were utilized. The survey incorporated the following computer programmes: Renishaw, TraceSurf, AutoCAD, CATIA. The reverse method seems especially interesting (impression with polysiloxane (silicone elastomer of high adhesive power used in dentistry) with 18 D 4823 activator. Elicited impression accurately reflected complex shape of cranium base. On assessing the relative rate of cranium medial fossa, the rate was found to be stable (linear model) for the whole of the analysed period and is 0.19%/week, which stands for the gradual and steady growth of the middle fossa in relation to the whole of the cranium base. At the same time, from the 16th till 28th week of foetal life, relative volume of the cranium middle fossa increases more intensively than cranium anterior fossa, whereas the cranium middle fossa volume as compared with the cranium posterior fossa is definitely slower. In the analysed period, the growth rate of the cranium base middle fossa was bigger in the 4th and 5th weeks than in the 6th and 7th weeks of foetal life. The investigations revealed cranium base asymmetry of the left side. Furthermore, the anterior fossae volume on the left side is significantly bigger than the one of the fossae on the right side. Volume growth rate is more intensive in the 4th and 5th than in the 6th and 7th weeks of foetal life. In the examined period, the relative growth rate of cranium base middle fossa is 0.19%/week and it is stable - linear model. The study revealed correlations in the form of mathematical models, which enabled foetuses age assessment.

  3. Endoscopic approach to the infratemporal fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Youssef

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid approach is considered one of the most useful surgical solutions to manage selected tumors that involve the infratemporal fossa. A good understanding of the endoscopic anatomy of infratemporal fossa allows safe and complete resection of lesions arising or extending to infratemporal fossa.

  4. Lateral angle and cranial base sexual dimorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duquesnel Mana, Mathilde; Adalian, Pascal; Lynnerup, Niels

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY: Previous studies have yielded very different results in sex estimation based on measurements of the lateral angle (LA) of the temporal bone. The purpose of this study was to, first, investigate if the bad results obtained by the LA method could be due to the methodology and then, second......, and by use of a new method, using a "virtual cast". The cranial base was quantified by placing 12 landmarks in the posterior fossa. Procrustes analysis, principal component analysis, discriminant analysis and cross-validation test were performed. The "cast method" was found to be less accurate than...

  5. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  6. Diseases of the optic fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, S.; Banno, T.

    1983-01-01

    By using a whole body CT unit for coronal tomography, it is possible to observe the extraocular muscles at the same time. Diseases of the optic fossa that can be investigated by CT include muscular hypertrophy due to toxic goiter, calcification of the sclera in hyperparathyroidismus, foreign bodies, inflammatory pseudotumor, retrobulbar tumor, tumor of the retina, tumor of the choroidea, and tumor of the sclera

  7. Normal computed tomographic anatomy of the cisterns and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manelfe, C.; Bonafe, A.

    1980-01-01

    This study, based on the normal CT anatomy of the cisterns investigated with Metrizamide, aims at attempting to find out with accuracy which plane of section is the most suitable for the investigation of each group of cisterns (posterior fossa, mesencephalon, suprasellar). Moreover we felt it necessary to include our study the normal appearance of the cranial nerves as their normal CT anatymy - optic nerves expected - is not well known yet. (orig./AJ) [de

  8. Traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yamakawa, Kazuomi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Tsuji, Yukihide

    1981-01-01

    In this paper three acute cases and two subacute cases are reported. CT findings in acute cases show two different types. ''Type I'' shows crescent or lenticular high density area which is not enhanced after contrast infusion. ''Type II'' shows lenticular low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side after contrast infusion. In subacute cases plain CT scan shows lenticular iso or low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side. Forty five cases of posterior fossa epidural hematoma in the review of literature of this country are discussed. Disturbances of the consciousness are the most predominant symptoms in acute cases, while in subacute cases cerebellar signs, vomiting, headache and choked disc are noted. Angiographical examinations may not always be valuable in collecting the direct information of the existence of the epidural hematoma. Liquor cavity in the posterior fossa which is thought to serve as a buffer action of hematoma is about 20 ml, so we discuss about the volume of hematoma, especially of 20 ml, associated with clinical course and prognosis. Volume of epidural hematoma is one of the most important factors affecting clinical course and prognosis. In summary of these our experiences, we again emphasize the value of CT scan as the rapid, noninvasive, accurate radiological examination in the diagnosis of traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma. (author)

  9. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.

  10. Cisternography of the posterior fossa with metrizamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, N.; Saito, Y.; Miyashita, T.; Tajika, Y.

    1981-12-01

    Nine patients underwent metrizamide cisternography of the posterior fossa. Excellent opacification of the fourth ventricle resulted when the patient's head was suitably positioned and the contrast material was introduced via a C1-2 puncture. With this technique, a benign aqueductal stenosis can be readily identified and the posterior fossa and fourth ventricle can be studied easily.

  11. Pattern of recurrence in children with midline posterior fossa malignant neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton-Gorges, S.L.; Foreman, N.K.; Albano, E.A.; Dertina, D.M.; Nein, P.K.; Shukert, B.; Cesario, K.B.; Gage, S.; Rumack, C.M.; Strain, J.D. [Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Denver, CO (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Background. Surveillance imaging of the brain and spinal neuraxis in patients with posterior fossa malignant tumors is commonly performed, with the assumption that early detection of tumor recurrence will improve outcome. However, the benefit of this imaging has not been proven. To evaluate the usefulness of spinal surveillance imaging in children with nonmetastatic (at diagnosis, M0) posterior fossa ependymoma and medulloblastoma. Materials and methods. This retrospective study included 65 children (3 months to 16 years, mean 5.7 years) treated between 1985 and 1997 for ependymoma (22) and medulloblastoma (43). Medical records were reviewed for pathology and treatment data. Serial imaging of the head and spine was reviewed for evidence of tumor recurrence. Results. Twenty-four patients (37 %) had tumor recurrence, including 13 with ependymoma and 11 with medulloblastoma. Of the 17/24 recurrent patients initially diagnosed as M0 (6 medulloblastoma and 11 ependymoma), 13 (76 %) had a cranial recurrence only, and 4 (24 %) presented with concomitant cranial and spinal recurrence. No M0 patient presented solely with spinal metastases at recurrence. Conclusion. This study suggests that spinal surveillance imaging in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma or medulloblastoma initially staged as M0 may not be useful, as these patients initially recur intracranially. Thus, until an intracranial recurrence is detected, these patients may be spared the time, expense and sedation risk necessary for spinal imaging. (orig.)

  12. Pattern of recurrence in children with midline posterior fossa malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton-Gorges, S.L.; Foreman, N.K.; Albano, E.A.; Dertina, D.M.; Nein, P.K.; Shukert, B.; Cesario, K.B.; Gage, S.; Rumack, C.M.; Strain, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Surveillance imaging of the brain and spinal neuraxis in patients with posterior fossa malignant tumors is commonly performed, with the assumption that early detection of tumor recurrence will improve outcome. However, the benefit of this imaging has not been proven. To evaluate the usefulness of spinal surveillance imaging in children with nonmetastatic (at diagnosis, M0) posterior fossa ependymoma and medulloblastoma. Materials and methods. This retrospective study included 65 children (3 months to 16 years, mean 5.7 years) treated between 1985 and 1997 for ependymoma (22) and medulloblastoma (43). Medical records were reviewed for pathology and treatment data. Serial imaging of the head and spine was reviewed for evidence of tumor recurrence. Results. Twenty-four patients (37 %) had tumor recurrence, including 13 with ependymoma and 11 with medulloblastoma. Of the 17/24 recurrent patients initially diagnosed as M0 (6 medulloblastoma and 11 ependymoma), 13 (76 %) had a cranial recurrence only, and 4 (24 %) presented with concomitant cranial and spinal recurrence. No M0 patient presented solely with spinal metastases at recurrence. Conclusion. This study suggests that spinal surveillance imaging in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma or medulloblastoma initially staged as M0 may not be useful, as these patients initially recur intracranially. Thus, until an intracranial recurrence is detected, these patients may be spared the time, expense and sedation risk necessary for spinal imaging. (orig.)

  13. Fratura proximal de tíbia após cirurgia extracapsular para correção de ruptura de ligamento cruzado cranial em cão Tibial fracture caused by complications after an extracapsular suture for the repair of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline França dos Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ruptura de ligamento cruzado cranial (RLCCr é a afecção ortopédica mais frequente no joelho de cães e a sutura fabelo-tibial é frequentemente utilizada na sua correção. Essa técnica pode estar associada com complicações incisionais, lesão tardia de menisco, edema associado ao material de sutura e infecção. O objetivo desta nota foi relatar a ocorrência de fratura proximal de tíbia em um cão, causada por complicação em sutura fabelo-tibial para correção de RLCCr. Um canino atendido em outro serviço foi submetido à osteossíntese com placa 2,0mm para correção de complicação em técnica extra-capsular, na qual houve fratura da tíbia na região do orifício criado para confecção da sutura fabelo-tibial. Houve falha dos implantes e a placa foi removida. A fratura foi estabilizada com fixador esquelético externo circular, sendo constatada, após 120 dias, consolidação.Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR is one of the most common orthopedic diseases in dogs and extracapsular suture with nylon is often used for its correction. This technique may be associated with incisional complications, post-surgical meniscus injury, swelling associated with suture material and infection. The objective of this study is to report a tibial fracture in a dog, caused by complications after an extracapsular suture for the repair of CCLR. An adult dog, which suffered a tibial fracture after an extracapsular fixation for a CCLR, underwent surgery for the fixation of the fracture with a 2.0mm plate, by a referring veterinarian, but the implant failed. The plate was removed and the fracture was stabilized with a circular fixator. Bone consolidation was observed after 120 days.

  14. Treatment implications of posterior fossa ependymoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-11-15

    Posterior fossa ependymoma comprises two distinct molecular entities, ependymoma_posterior fossa A (EPN_PFA) and ependymoma_posterior fossa B (EPN_PFB), with differentiable gene expression profiles. As yet, the response of the two entities to treatment is unclear. To determine the relationship between the two molecular subgroups of posterior fossa ependymoma and treatment, we studied a cohort of 820 patients with molecularly profiled, clinically annotated posterior fossa ependymomas. We found that the strongest predictor of poor outcome in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma across the entire age spectrum was molecular subgroup EPN_PFA, which was recently reported in the paper entitled "Therapeutic impact of cytoreductive surgery and irradiation of posterior fossa ependymoma in the molecular era: a retrospective multicohort analysis" in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients with incompletely resected EPN_PFA tumors had a very poor outcome despite receiving adjuvant radiation therapy, whereas a substantial proportion of patients with EPN_PFB tumors can be cured with surgery alone.

  15. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. RSNA, 2015

  17. Posterior Fossa Tumors and Intellectual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cerebellar damage on intellectual function in 76 children treated surgically for malignant posterior fossa tumor was investigated at the Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, and the Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Necker Hospital, Paris, France.

  18. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  19. Direct sagittal CT scanning in the diagnosis of pituitary fossa tumours and posterior fossa pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlas, H.

    1981-01-01

    Two independent methods are presented for multidirectional CT scanning of the brain using the Philips Tomoscan 300. The advantages in scanning pituitary fossa tumours and pathology of the posterior fossa are discussed. No additional software or modifications are required. Direct sagittal scanning is particularly advantageous for accurate assessment of the size of pituitary tumours and intrasellar lesions requiring surgical intervention or radiation therapy. (Auth.)

  20. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  1. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  2. Delayed effect of radiation therapy on extracerebral cavernous angioma in the middle fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shobu; Mori, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    This is a report of a case with extracerebral cavernous angioma in the middle fossa which had received radiation therapy. Follow-up study with serial computed tomography during and after irradiation were presented. A 62-year-old housewife complained of vertigo. CT scan revealed a slightly high density area in the left middle cranial fossa which was markedly enhanced with contrast media. Left carotid angiography demonstrated a large avascular mass in the left middle fossa and no feeding artery or draining vein was visualized except a faint irregular stain in the venous phase. Irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy was delivered. At the end of radiation, CT scan revealed a slight decrease in size and CT number of the tumor. Follow-up CT scans 5 months later showed 50 % regression of the tumor and 19 months later were negative for tumor. It is concluded that in case of an extracerebral cavernous angioma with massive hemorrhage, radiation of up to 30 - 50 Gy was a method of choice. The treatment results in the possibility of eliminating surgery and the benefit of irradiation may not become evident until the first year. (author)

  3. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the skull. This is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Causes may include: Brain aneurysm Infections Abnormal blood vessels (vascular malformations) Sinus thrombosis Tissue damage from loss of blood flow (infarction) Trauma (from ...

  4. Dose estimation for paediatric cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curci Daros, K.A.; Bitelli Medeiros, R.; Curci Daros, K.A.; Oliveira Echeimberg, J. de

    2006-01-01

    In the last ten years, the number of paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans have increased worldwide, contributing to higher population radiation dose. Technique diversification in paediatrics and different CT equipment technologies have led to various exposure levels complicating precise evaluation of doses and operational conditions necessary for good quality images. The objective of this study was to establish a quantitative relationship between absorbed dose and cranial region in children up to 6 years old undergoing CT exams. Methods: X-ray was measured on the cranial surface of 64 patients undergoing CT using thermoluminescent (T.L.) dosimeters. Forty T.L.D.100 thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.) were evenly distributed on each patients skin surface along the sagittal axis. Measurements were performed in facial regions exposed to scatter radiation and in the supratentorial and posterior fossa regions, submitted to primary radiation. T.L.D. were calibrated for 120 kV X-ray over the acrylic phantom. T.L. measurements were made with a Harshaw 4000 system. Patient mean T.L. readings were determined for position, pi, of T.L.D. and normalized to the maximum supratentorial reading. From integrating the linear T.L. density function (?) resulting from radiation distribution in each of the three exposed regions, dose fraction was determined in the region of interest, along with total dose under the technical conditions used in that specific exam protocol. For each T.L.D. position along the patient cranium, there were n T.L. measurements with 2% uncertainty due to T.L. reader, and 5% due to thermal treatment of dosimeters. Also, mean T.L. readings and their uncertainties were calculated for each patient at each position, p. Results: Mean linear T.L. density for the region exposed to secondary radiation defined by position, 0.3≤p≤6 cm, was ρ((p)=7.9(4)x10 -2 +7(5)x10 -5 p 4.5(4) cm -1 ; exposed to primary X-ray for the posterior fossa region defined by position

  5. Dose estimation for paediatric cranial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curci Daros, K.A.; Bitelli Medeiros, R. [Sao Paulo Univ. Federal (Brazil); Curci Daros, K.A.; Oliveira Echeimberg, J. de [Centro Univ. Sao Camilo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In the last ten years, the number of paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans have increased worldwide, contributing to higher population radiation dose. Technique diversification in paediatrics and different CT equipment technologies have led to various exposure levels complicating precise evaluation of doses and operational conditions necessary for good quality images. The objective of this study was to establish a quantitative relationship between absorbed dose and cranial region in children up to 6 years old undergoing CT exams. Methods: X-ray was measured on the cranial surface of 64 patients undergoing CT using thermoluminescent (T.L.) dosimeters. Forty T.L.D.100 thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.) were evenly distributed on each patients skin surface along the sagittal axis. Measurements were performed in facial regions exposed to scatter radiation and in the supratentorial and posterior fossa regions, submitted to primary radiation. T.L.D. were calibrated for 120 kV X-ray over the acrylic phantom. T.L. measurements were made with a Harshaw 4000 system. Patient mean T.L. readings were determined for position, pi, of T.L.D. and normalized to the maximum supratentorial reading. From integrating the linear T.L. density function (?) resulting from radiation distribution in each of the three exposed regions, dose fraction was determined in the region of interest, along with total dose under the technical conditions used in that specific exam protocol. For each T.L.D. position along the patient cranium, there were n T.L. measurements with 2% uncertainty due to T.L. reader, and 5% due to thermal treatment of dosimeters. Also, mean T.L. readings and their uncertainties were calculated for each patient at each position, p. Results: Mean linear T.L. density for the region exposed to secondary radiation defined by position, 0.3{<=}p{<=}6 cm, was {rho}((p)=7.9(4)x10{sup -2}+7(5)x10{sup -5}p{sup 4.5(4)} cm{sup -1}; exposed to primary X-ray for the posterior fossa

  6. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  7. A method of posterior fossa dural incision to minimize hemorrhage from the occipital sinus: the "mosquito" method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Ryu, Seul Ki; Lim, Jang Mi; Chong, Sangjoon; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2016-12-01

    The posterior fossa dural opening requires the ligation of the occipital sinus to gain successful exposure. However, there could be a prominent occipital sinus which is functioning as the main drainage route and is harboring the risk of unpredictable massive hemorrhage during the dural opening. We introduce a safe method of posterior fossa dural incision to minimize hemorrhage from the occipital sinus using four curved hemostat clamps. For the dural incision at the midline part of the posterior cranial fossa, we used four curved hemostat clamps to occlude the prominent occipital sinus: one pair of clamps at the proximal part and the other pair at the distal part to occlude the occipital sinus. Dural incision was made between the two pairs of the curved hemostat clamps. By clamping of the sinus, it allows observation of possible brain swelling after occlusion of the occipital sinus as well as minimizes hemorrhage during incision of the midline dura of the posterior fossa. This method allows observation of brain swelling after occipital sinus occlusion and is an easy and safe incision of the midline dura minimizing hemorrhage in selected cases with a prominent occipital sinus.

  8. Contribution of sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy in the diagnosis of tumours of posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergent, Aline.

    1976-01-01

    The present work concerns 38 posterior cranial fossa tumour cases subjected to sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy between May 1974 and June 1976. 33 of these patients have undergone an anatomical check while for the remaining 5, the existence of a posterior fossa tumour is established from the conjunction of clinical signs and other paraclinical examinations. The procedure was the same for all these 38 patients: after a 300 μC/kg injection of tracer, an immediate angioscintigraphic period, an early set of pictures (half an hour after the tracer injection) then delayed set (4 to 5 hours later) taken from 4 angles: front, back and two profiles. The examination was performed with an OHIO NUCLEAR SIEMENS gamma camera and sometimes a conventional scanner as well (the latter giving no better a diagnosis than the former). In 75% of the cases a hyperfixation of the injected tracer was observed and its site located quite accurately in the posterior fossa tumour. The etiology of the lesion could be diagnosed in 'most probable' or 'least probable' terms. Examination of work by other authors, who obtained similar results, leads to the conclusion that this method is very helpful in the diagnosis of posterior fossa tumours when used as a means of early detection, before the undertaking of more complex neuroradiological explorations [fr

  9. Herniographic appearance of the lateral inguinal fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, O.; Kesek, P.

    1987-01-01

    Herniography frequently reveals clinically undetected groin hernia. Thereby herniography contributes to the clinical work-up in patients with obscure groin pain. However, the distinction between clinically important and unimportant abnormalities within the lateral inguinal fossa can be difficult. This study was therefore designed in order to elucidate the herniographic appearance of the lateral inguinal fossa in patients with obscure groin pain. Herniographic findings were compared with laterality of the patients' symptoms. The lateral umbilical fold was visible in only 47% of the groins. A triangular shaped outpouching from the lateral inguinal fossa and a patent processus vaginalis were found with equal frequency on the left and right side. They were five times as frequent in men as in women. Their presence did not correlate with laterality of the patients' symptoms. Indirect hernias were almost twice as common on the symptomatic side as compared with the asymptomatic side. On the left side they were found twice as often in men as in women while there was no significant sex difference on the right side. Our results show that neither a patent processus vaginalis nor a triangular outpouching from the lateral inguinal fossa correlate with the laterality of the patients' symptoms while true indirect hernias do. (orig.)

  10. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Pyriform Fossa Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Many endoscopists do not inspect the gastrointestinal tract superior to the cricopharyngeus, despite the fact that gastrointestinal symptoms (dysphagia, odynophagia and chest pain can be produced by glottic and supraglottic lesions. A case of incoordinate swallowing secondary to a right-sided pyriform fossa lymphoma diagnosed at gastroscopy is presented.

  11. Extensive Supratentorial Hemorrhages Following Posterior Fossa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote supratentorial hematoma soon after posterior fossa surgery for the removal of a space-occupying lesion is a rare but dramatic and dreaded complication, carrying significant morbidity and mortality. A 47-year-old woman presented with headache of 1-year duration that worsened over last 2 months, progressive ...

  12. Posterior fossa meningioma (surgical experiences) | Moussa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptoms included headache (75%), cerebellar manifestations (60%), cranial nerve affection (40%) and hearing disturbances (15%). Most of the cases (50%) were cerebellopontine angle meningioma while the least (5%) were foramen magnum meningioma. Surgical approaches used included retrosigmoid approach ...

  13. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  14. Surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with lateral extension to the infratemporal fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masato; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Tokumaru, Takao; Aoyagi, Masaru; Kawano, Yoshihisa; Yano, Tomoyuki; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    The study aimed to assess the usefulness of skull base surgery for large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) with lateral extension to the infratemporal fossa. Eleven cases were enrolled for this study, and the mean age was 17.7 years old (range: 8-32). Six out of 11 cases underwent surgery as an initial treatment, and the other five underwent secondary surgery after initial surgery or radiotherapy in other institutions. The range of extension of tumor, feeding arteries, surgical approach, and treatment outcome were estimated. All tumors originated from the sphenopalatine foramen. Based on the imaging study, there was extension to the cavernous sinus observed in eight cases, as well as to the middle cranial fossa (8), orbit (4), and anterior cranial fossa (1). These tumors were diagnosed as Andrews' Stage IVa (3) and IVb (8). However, infiltration into the cavernous sinus was observed in one case only during surgery. Ten tumors were separated carefully from the cavernous sinus or dura and were accurately diagnosed as Stage IIIb. In all cases, the main arterial feeders of the JNAs were branches of the external carotid artery, which were embolized prior to surgery. However, 10 cases were also fed by branches of the internal carotid artery (branches of the ophthalmic artery), in which these arteries could not be embolized. Coronal skin incision (1) and a facial dismasking flap (9) were used, and in one case, wide lateral skin incision with temporary incision of the facial nerve was applied. The orbito-zygomatic approach and its modification was applied to all the cases. Fronto-lateral craniotomy was applied in four cases and lateral craniotomy in seven cases. Total resection was achieved in 10 cases and subtotal resection in one case. No mortality was noted in this series. Temporal trismus was observed in all cases which subsided gradually. Cheek numbness and facial palsy were observed in three and two cases, respectively. Coupled with craniotomy, tumor removal

  15. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  16. Vermian agenesis without posterior fossa cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, C.; Moreau, V.; Bulteau, C.; Burstyn, J.; Lair Milan, F.; Kalifa, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report 11 cases of vermian partial agenesis without posterior fossa cyst or hemispheric abnormalities. Characteristic MR signs were: absence of the posterior lobe, hypoplasia of the anterior lobe, a narrow sagittal cleft separating the hemispheres (''buttocks sign'') and fourth ventricle deformity. The main clinical signs were complex oculomotor dysfunction and developmental delay. None of the patients had respiratory symptoms. Consideration is given to the relationship between Joubert syndrome and this entity as well as to embroyological data. (orig.)

  17. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma of popliteal fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, C.; Camnasio, F.; Fontana, F.; Fraschini, G.; Rizzo, N.; De Cobelli, F.; Peretti, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mammary-type myofibroblastoma is a very rare, benign, spindle cell lesion, arising mainly in the inguinal region. This clinical entity strictly duplicates the features of its breast counterpart. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this particular lesion occurring in the popliteal fossa. We discuss the clinical, radiological and histopathological features of this case, emphasizing the role of incisional biopsy in such an unusual neoplasia. (orig.)

  18. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  19. Computed tomography of lacrimal fossa tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Young Goo; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1985-01-01

    The lacrimal fossa can be involved by a wide spectrum of orbital pathology. The correct diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary procedure and to do appropriate management. 14 patients with mass lesions in the lacrimal fossa were evaluated with computed tomography (CT) and clinical findings. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnosis of 14 cases with lacrimal fossa tumors was pleomorphic adenoma in 3 cases, adenoid cystic carcinoma in 1 case, pseudotumor in 5 cases, lymphoma in 2 cases, neurofibroma in 1 case, chloroma in 1 case and metastatic adenocarcinoma in 1 case. 2. The duration of symptoms of pleomorphic adenoma was more than 1 year and characteristic CT findings were globular masses with pressure erosion of the adjacent bone. Patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma had a short history of symptoms. CT showed a fusiform mass but intracranial extension with frank destruction of sphenoid bone. 3. Patients with pseudotumor and lymphoma had symptoms for less than 1 year. The CT findings were ill-defined infiltrative patterns with scleral thickening and the differential diagnosis of them was difficult. 4. The margins of neurofibroma and chloroma were well defined while that of the metastic adenocarcinoma was ill-defined. 5. The degree and the extent of the contrast enhancement gave no benefit in the differential diagnosis of each disease entities and even of the benign and malignant lesions

  20. Pituitary fossa: a correlative anatomic and MR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, L.; Pech, P.; Daniels, D.; Charles, C.; Williams, A.; Haughton, V.

    1984-01-01

    This study characterizes the normal appearance of the pituitary fossa in partial saturation magnetic resonance (MR) images. In sagittal images, the pituitary fossa appears inhomogeneous. Correlation of sagittal MR images in normal subjects with sagittal cryomicrotomic images in cadavers suggests that the highest intensity signal from the posterior-inferior pituitary fossa is due to a fat pad. This conclusion was supported by MR images and postmortem cryotome sections obtained in normal subhuman primates

  1. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  2. Preoperative irradiation of an extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shobu; Kurihara, Masaki; Mori, Kazuo; Amamoto, Yuhei.

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of case with the extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa in which total removal was carried out after radiotherapy. Follow-up study with computed tomography during and after irradiation are presented. A 44-year-old house-wife complained of a decreased vision of the both eyes and paresis of the left upper and lower limbs. CT scan revealed a slightly high density area in the right middle cranial fossa which was markedly enhanced with contrast media. Right carotid angio-graphy demonstrated a large avascular mass in the right middle fossa and no feeding artery or draining vein was visualized except a faint irregular stain in the venous phase. An attempt to total removal of the tumor had failed to success because of extensive hemorrhage from the tumor. Histological examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma. Irradiation with a total dose of 5000 rads was delivered. After irradiation. CT scan revealed a marked decrease of size and EMI number of the tumor. At this stage, hypervascular mass lesion with feeding arteries was noted in conventional angiography. Tumor stain in prolonged injection angiography was also visualized. In the second operation, removal of the tumor was performed without any difficulty and hemorrhage was controlled easily by electrocoagulation. Histology revealed a marked narrowing of vessels with an increase in the connective tissues. In the central part of specimen, there noted findings of coagulation necrosis, intraluminal thrombus formations and so on, which were attributed to the influence of radiation. It is concluded that in case of a extracerebral cavernous hemangioma with massive hemorrhage, radiation of up to 3000 - 5000 rads was a method of choice. The treatment results in an increase of probability of total removal of the tumor. (author)

  3. Posterior fossa abnormalities in high-risk term infants: comparison of ultrasound and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steggerda, S.J.; Smits-Wintjens, V.E.H.J.; Verbon, P.; Walther, F.J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Bruine, F.T. de [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wezel-Meijler, G. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Isala Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    We aimed to assess the characteristics of posterior fossa (PF) abnormalities in a cohort of high-risk term neonates, as well as the diagnostic performance of cranial ultrasound (CUS) with additional mastoid fontanelle (MF) views for the detection of these abnormalities, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the reference standard. In this retrospective study, 113 term neonates with CUS and subsequent MRI were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of routine CUS and CUS with MF views were calculated. Posterior fossa abnormalities were diagnosed on CUS in 46 of 113 infants. MRI confirmed these findings in 43 and showed additional abnormalities in 32 infants. The sensitivity and specificity of anterior fontanelle views for major PF abnormalities as seen on MRI were 16 % and 99 %. Adding MF views increased the sensitivity of US to 82 %. The sensitivity and specificity of MF views for the detection of any (major or minor) PF abnormality were 57 % and 95 %. Especially acute hypoxic-ischemic injury and small subdural and punctate cerebellar haemorrhage remained undetected by CUS. PF abnormalities are frequent in high-risk term infants. MF-CUS enables early diagnosis of major PF abnormalities. We therefore advocate to perform MF-CUS in high-risk term neonates. (orig.)

  4. Posterior fossa abnormalities in high-risk term infants: comparison of ultrasound and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steggerda, S.J.; Smits-Wintjens, V.E.H.J.; Verbon, P.; Walther, F.J.; Bruine, F.T. de; Wezel-Meijler, G. van

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the characteristics of posterior fossa (PF) abnormalities in a cohort of high-risk term neonates, as well as the diagnostic performance of cranial ultrasound (CUS) with additional mastoid fontanelle (MF) views for the detection of these abnormalities, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the reference standard. In this retrospective study, 113 term neonates with CUS and subsequent MRI were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of routine CUS and CUS with MF views were calculated. Posterior fossa abnormalities were diagnosed on CUS in 46 of 113 infants. MRI confirmed these findings in 43 and showed additional abnormalities in 32 infants. The sensitivity and specificity of anterior fontanelle views for major PF abnormalities as seen on MRI were 16 % and 99 %. Adding MF views increased the sensitivity of US to 82 %. The sensitivity and specificity of MF views for the detection of any (major or minor) PF abnormality were 57 % and 95 %. Especially acute hypoxic-ischemic injury and small subdural and punctate cerebellar haemorrhage remained undetected by CUS. PF abnormalities are frequent in high-risk term infants. MF-CUS enables early diagnosis of major PF abnormalities. We therefore advocate to perform MF-CUS in high-risk term neonates. (orig.)

  5. A morphometric CT study of Down's syndrome showing small posterior fossa and calcification of basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieshima, A.; Yoshino, K.; Takashima, S.; Takeshita, K.; Kisa, T.

    1984-01-01

    We report characteristic and morphometric changes of cranial computed tomography (CT) with increasing age in 56 patients with Down's syndrome aged from 0 month to 37 years. Patients were compared with 142 normal controls aged 0 to 59 years. Width of ventricles, Sylvian fissures, posterior fossa, pons and cisterna magna were measured on CT. The incidences of the cavum septi pellucidi, cavum vergae and cavum veli interpositi and high density in the basal ganglia were examined. There was high incidence (10.7%) of bilateral calcification of basal ganglia in Down's syndrome, although that of pineal body and choroid plexus calcification was similar in Down's syndrome and controls. Basal ganglia calcification is more frequently seen in young Down's syndrome and may be related to the premature aging characteristic of Down's syndrome. The CT in Down's syndrome showed relatively small posterior fossa, small cerebellum, small brain stem and relatively large Sylvian fissures in those under one year of age. There was a high frequency of midline cava and large cisterna magna. There were no significant atrophic changes on CT except after the fifth decade comparing with controls. (orig.)

  6. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2011-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  7. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2012-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  8. A comparative study of cranial, blunt trauma fractures as seen at medicolegal autopsy and by Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Christina; Bech, Birthe H; Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become a widely used supplement to medico legal autopsies at several forensic institutes. Amongst other things, it has proven to be very valuable in visualising fractures of the cranium. Also CT scan data are being used to create head models for biomechanical trauma analysis by Finite Element Analysis. If CT scan data are to be used for creating individual head models for retrograde trauma analysis in the future we need to ascertain how well cranial fractures are captured by CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic agreement between CT and autopsy regarding cranial fractures and especially the precision with which cranial fractures are recorded. The autopsy fracture diagnosis was compared to the diagnosis of two CT readings (reconstructed with Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions) by registering the fractures on schematic drawings. The extent of the fractures was quantified by merging 3-dimensional datasets from both the autopsy as input by 3D digitizer tracing and CT scan. The results showed a good diagnostic agreement regarding fractures localised in the posterior fossa, while the fracture diagnosis in the medial and anterior fossa was difficult at the first CT scan reading. The fracture diagnosis improved during the second CT scan reading. Thus using two different CT reconstructions improved diagnosis in the medial fossa and at the impact points in the cranial vault. However, fracture diagnosis in the anterior and medial fossa and of hairline fractures in general still remained difficult. The study showed that the forensically important fracture systems to a large extent were diagnosed on CT images using Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions. Difficulties remained in the minute diagnosis of hairline fractures. These inconsistencies need to be resolved in order to use CT scan data of victims for individual head modelling and trauma analysis

  9. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  10. Acute Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute posterior fossa subdural hematomas are rare and most of them are trauma-related. Non-traumatic ones have been reported in patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or those who had been receiving anticoagulant therapy. We report on the case of 57-year-old Iranian man who developed sudden severe occipital headache, drowsiness, repeated vomiting, and instability of stance and gait. He was neither hypertensive nor diabetic. No history of head trauma was obtained and he denied illicit drug or alcohol ingestion. A preliminary diagnosis of acute intra-cerebellar hemorrhage was made. His CT brain scan revealed an acute right-sided, extra-axial, crescent-shaped hyperdense area at the posterior fossa. His routine blood tests, platelets count, bleeding time, and coagulation profile were unremarkable. The patient had spontaneous acute infratentorial subdural hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged home well after 5 days. Since then, we could not follow-up him, clinically and radiologically because he went back to Iran. Our patient’s presentation, clinical course, and imaging study have called for conservative management, as the overall presentation was relatively benign. Unless the diagnosis is entertained and the CT brain scan is well-interpreted, the diagnosis may easily escape detection.

  11. MRI diagnosis of posterior fossa tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Sakamoto, Yuuji; Kojima, Ryutarou; Bussaka, Hiromasa; Korogi, Yukunori

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 58 patients with posterior fossa tumors were compared with computed tomography (CT). Spin echo (SE) technique and inversion recovery (IR) technique were obtained using 0.22 tesla resistive magnetic resonance unit. MRI was superior to CT in detecting the lesions and showing internal archtecture, hemorrhage, edema of the tumor and displacement of the normal brain. CT was superior to MRI in demonstrating calcification. MRI and CT were comparable in detecting erosions of the skull base, while MRI was superior to CT in showing erosions of the clivus. Most tumors showed hypointensity on T1 weighted images and hyperintensity on T2 weighted images. Meningioma showed equal or almost equal intensity to cerebral gray matter on both SE images. The boundary of intra-axial tumors was unclear in many cases without contrast enhancement using Gd-DTPA, while most extra-axial tumors showed clear margin surrounded by a thin band (rim). In 81.8 % of acoustic neurinomas, signal void rims were demonstrated on both SE images, and they were considered to be vessels around the tumor. The rims of meningioma, on the other hand, were hypointense on T1 weighted images and hyperintense on T2 weighted images. They were considered to be cerebrospinal fluid or capsule around the tumor. It has been concluded that MRI is the most important technique for diagnosis of posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  12. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  13. 3D CBCT anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Jianu, Adelina Maria; Păduraru, Dumitru

    2013-03-01

    The anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa keeps a traditional level and is viewed as constant, even though a series of structures neighboring the fossa are known to present individual variations. We aimed to evaluate on 3D volume renderizations the anatomical variables of the pterygopalatine fossa, as related to the variable pneumatization patterns of the bones surrounding the fossa. The study was performed retrospectively on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of 100 patients. The pterygopalatine fossa was divided into an upper (orbital) and a lower (pterygomaxillary) floor; the medial compartment of the orbital floor lodges the pterygopalatine ganglion. The pneumatization patterns of the pterygopalatine fossa orbital floor walls were variable: (a) the posterior wall pneumatization pattern was determined in 89.5 % by recesses of the sphenoidal sinus related to the maxillary nerve and pterygoid canals; (b) the upper continuation of the pterygopalatine fossa with the orbital apex was narrowed in 79.5 % by ethmoid air cells and/or a maxillary recess of the sphenoidal sinus; (c) according to its pneumatization pattern, the anterior wall of the pterygopalatine fossa was a maxillary (40.5 %), maxillo-ethmoidal (46.5 %), or maxillo-sphenoidal (13 %) wall. The logistic regression models showed that the maxillo-ethmoidal type of pterygopalatine fossa anterior wall was significantly associated with a sphenoidal sinus only expanded above the pterygoid canal and a spheno-ethmoidal upper wall. The pterygopalatine fossa viewed as an intersinus space is related to variable pneumatization patterns which can be accurately identified by CBCT and 3DVR studies, for anatomic and preoperatory purposes.

  14. Normal development and growth of the human neurocranium and cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, H

    1981-01-01

    The literature on normal development and growth of certain areas of the human head is reviewed, starting with the early induction of the desmal neurocranium. the development of the brain capsule with its dural reinforcement bands and their connection with the basicranium is discussed, as is the primordial chondrocranium, including its bone replacement. Growth of the calvaria and the three cranial fossae is also analysed. Special interest is focused on the anterior fossa, as knowledge of the growth in this area is very important for an understanding of pathogenesis and possibilities of treating premature craniosynostosis. Finally it is stressed that close observation of the effects of treatment on this pathology may increase our knowledge of normal growth.

  15. Macrostructure of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the River Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dehghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe autonomic nervous system consists of a vast range of nerves and ganglions. Anatomical studies have demonstrated that the sympathetic innervations of the head and neck are affected by the neurons that ramify from the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG. The CCG is the end of the sympathetic cervical trunk, which runs with the vagal nerve during its cervical course. In this study sixteen adult (2 - 5 year river buffalo of both sexes (eight male, eight female weighing around 250 - 450 kg were dissected to investigate the weight, situation and arrangement of nerve branches of the cranial cervical ganglion bilaterally. The ganglions showed a fusiform shape and reddish in color. The cranial cervical ganglion covered by the digastricus muscle. It lies in dorsal region of the base of epiglottic cartilage, ventromedial to tympanic bulla and ventrally to atlantic fossa, and medial of the occipital artery. This study showed that the cranial cervical ganglions in river buffalo were well-developed structure. The main branches of cranial cervical ganglion included the internal carotid, external carotid and jugular nerves.

  16. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and posterior fossa tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Federico; Jucá, Carlos Eduardo; Zerah, Michel; Sainte-Rose, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The management of hydrocephalus associated with a posterior fossa tumor is debated. Some authors emphasize the advantages of an immediate tumor removal that may normalize the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. However, in clinical practice, the mere excision of the lesion has been demonstrated to be accompanied by a persisting hydrocephalus in about one third of the cases. Preoperative endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) offers several advantages. It may control the intracranial pressure (ICP), avoid the necessity of an emergency procedure, allow appropriate scheduling of the operation for tumor removal, and eliminate the risks related to the presence of an external drainage. The procedure also reduces the incidence of postoperative hydrocephalus. A final advantage, more difficult to weight, but obvious to the neurosurgeon, is the possibility to remove the lesion with a relaxed brain and normal ICP. In the postoperative phase, ETV can be used in case of persisting hydrocephalus, both in patients who underwent only the excision of the tumor and in those whose preoperative ETV failed as a consequence of intraventricular bleeding with secondary closure of the stoma (redoETV). The main advantage of postoperative ETV is that the procedure is carried out only in case of persisting hydrocephalus; its use is consequently more selective than preoperative ETV. The disadvantage consists in the common use of an external CSF drainage in the first few postoperative days, which is necessary to control the pressure and for ruling out those cases that reach a spontaneous cure of the hydrocephalus. The authors review the criteria for patient selection and the results of ETV performed in case of hydrocephalus secondary to a posterior fossa tumor. Preoperative ETV constitutes an effective procedure for controlling the hydrocephalus associated with posterior fossa tumors. It might lower the rate of persistent postoperative hydrocephalus and result in a short hospital stay. Low

  17. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  18. Direct fabrication through electron beam melting technology of custom cranial implants designed in a PHANToM-based haptic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzoli, Alida; Germani, Michele; Raffaeli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Repairing critical human skull injuries requires the production and use of customized cranial implants and involves the integration of computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD and CAM). The main causes for large cranial defects are trauma, cranial tumors, infected craniotomy bone flaps and external neurosurgical decompression. The success of reconstructive cranial surgery depends upon: the preoperative evaluation of the defect, the design and manufacturing of the implant, and the skill of the operating surgeon. Cranial implant design is usually carried out manually using CAD although this process is very time-consuming and the quality of the end product depends wholly upon the skill of the operator. This paper presents an alternative automated method for the design of custom-made cranial plates in a PHANToM ® -based haptic environment, and their direct fabrication in biocompatible metal using electron beam melting (EBM) technology.

  19. Lymphopenia caused by cranial irradiation in children receiving craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harisiadis, L.; Kopelson, G.; Chang, C.H.

    1977-01-01

    The peripheral blood changes were studied in 67 children who received craniospinal irradiation for posterior fossa tumors. At the completion of a cranial dose of about 3500 rad to the whole brain port, the lymphocytes were reduced to 858/mm 3 from 3084/mm 3 preoperatively. The counts of the remaining leukocytes stayed at a level somewhat higher than preoperatively; the eosinophils rose to 288/mm 3 from 125/mm 3 . With the initiation of the spinal field irradiation, which included a large proportion of the total bone marrow, the numbers of all the leukocytes decreased rapidly; the observed leukopenia was mainly secondary to neutropenia. A mechanism that was operating to restore the number of leukocytes became manifest immediately after the completion of radiotherapy, though the number of lymphocytes had not been totally restored to the preoperative level 6 years later. Irradiation of the lymphocytes that circulate through the vascular bed can explain the lymphopenia observed during cranial radiotherapy. Mild leukopenia observed in patients receiving radiotherapy through a relatively small port may be secondary to lymphopenia, and this does not necessarily indicate impaired bone marrow reserves

  20. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  1. Incisuroplastia troclear e estabilização articular após transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial: Estudo clínico e radiográfico em cães Intercondylar notchplasty and fascial strip repair following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament: Clinical and radiographic aspects in the dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Selmi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as alterações clínicas e radiográficas em nove cães adultos, após a transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial (LCCr seguida da substituição ligamentar por retalho de fáscia lata, associada ou não à incisuroplastia troclear (ITR. O joelho direito (GI foi submetido à ITR e posterior estabilização articular, e o esquerdo somente à substituição ligamentar (GC. Os animais foram avaliados nos períodos pré-operatório, pós-operatório (po imediato e aos 30, 90 e 180 dias de po, período coincidente com o momento de eutanásia de subgrupos de três cães. A instabilidade articular e o grau de claudicação diminuíram significativamente durante o período de avaliação, apesar da instabilidade persistir durante a flexão articular. Observou-se decréscimo significativo do perímetro muscular da coxa aos 30 e 90 dias p.o. em ambos os grupos. Não foram evidenciadas alterações nos graus de extensão e flexão articulares, na rotação interna da tíbia, na amplitude de movimento articular ou de doença articular degenerativa (DAD durante o período de avaliação em ambos os grupos. Conclui-se que a ITR, associada à técnica de estabilização articular, não produz alterações em nenhuma das variáveis estudadas em cães, quando comparada à estabilização intra-articular, isoladamente.Clinical and radiographic changes associated with intercondylar notchplasty (IN after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL followed by a fascial strip reconstruction were studied in nine adult dogs. The right stifle was submitted to IN followed by fascial strip reconstruction of the CCL (GI while in the left IN was not performed (GC. Dogs were evaluated the day prior to surgery, on the immediate postoperative day and at 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery, time at which a subgroup of three dogs were euthanatized. Instability and lameness significantly decreased throughout the evaluation period, although instability was

  2. Infratemporal and temporal fossa abscess complicating dental extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Diacono, M S; Wass, A R

    1998-01-01

    Abscess formation in the infratemporal and temporal fossae is rare. Their presentation to accident and emergency departments is unusual and consequently may cause problems with diagnosis. Once diagnosed, treatment should be aggressive with intravenous antibiotics and surgical drainage.

  3. Extra-skeletal Ewing's sarcoma of the nasal fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S; Ironside, J W

    1990-07-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma is rarely found arising in the head and neck region. An unusual case arising in the nasal fossa in a young child is reported and the differential diagnosis, pathology and treatment discussed.

  4. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  5. EVALUATION OF RIGHT ILIAC FOSSA MASS-A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Raja Billy Graham; Vijayabhasker

    2016-01-01

    Mass in right iliac fossa is one of the common clinical surgical entity with varied etiologies, involving intra peritoneal organs like vermiform appendix, caucus, ileum, retroperitoneal structures like kidneys, blood vessels etc., and abdominal wall masses like desmoids tumor. To know the etiology and the various pattern of presentation of right iliac fossa mass in our institution a retrospective study was designed including all adult patients diagnosed to have a mass in right ili...

  6. Evaluation of the Predictive Value of Intraoperative Changes in Motor-Evoked Potentials of Caudal Cranial Nerves for the Postoperative Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Marcel; Tatagiba, Marcos; Liebsch, Marina; Feigl, Guenther C

    2016-11-01

    The predictive value of changes in intraoperatively acquired motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) IX-X (glossopharyngeal-vagus nerve) and CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) on operative outcomes was investigated. MEPs of CN IX-X and CN XII were recorded intraoperatively in 63 patients undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. We correlated the changes of the MEPs with postoperative nerve function. For CN IX-X, we found a correlation between the amplitude of the MEP ratio and uvula deviation (P = 0.028) and the amplitude duration of the MEP and gag reflex function (P = 0.027). Patients with an MEP ratio of the glossopharyngeal-vagus amplitude ≤1.47 μV had a 3.4 times increased risk of developing a uvula deviation. Patients with a final MEP duration of the CN IX-X ≤11.6 milliseconds had a 3.6 times increased risk for their gag reflex to become extinct. Our study greatly contributes to the current knowledge of intraoperative MEPs as a predictor for postoperative cranial nerve function. We were able to extent previous findings on MEP values of the facial nerve on postoperative nerve function to 3 additional cranial nerves. Finding reliable predictors for postoperative nerve function is of great importance to the overall quality of life for a patient undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma of the sino-nasal region penetrating to the orbit and cranial cavity; Chloniak nieziarniczy zatok przynosowych wnikajacy do oczodolu i jamy czaszki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, E.; Piotrowski, S.; Grono, L.; Zalewska-Rzezniczak, I. [Szpital Morski im. PCK, Gdynia-Redlowo (Poland)]|[Szpital Miejski im. J. Brudzinskiego, Gdynia (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In case presented in this report non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma occupied the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses with penetrating to the orbit and middle cranial fossa. The patient suffered from ophthalmic symptoms like ptosis, exophthalmus and diplopia. Chemotherapy in COP - pattern and MV radiotherapy in total dose 4600 cGy were applied. Full remission was achieved. The patient is alive after more than 2 years without recurrence of the disease. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig.

  8. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  9. MRI of the fetal posterior fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamsbaum, Catherine; Andre, Christine; Merzoug, Valerie; Ferey, Solene [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Moutard, Marie Laure [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Paris (France); Quere, Marie Pierre [CHU, Department of Radiology, Nantes (France); Lewin, Fanny [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Maternity Department, Paris (France); Fallet-Bianco, Catherine [Ste Anne Hospital, Department of Neuropathology, Paris (France)

    2005-02-01

    MRI is a useful tool to complement US for imaging of the fetal posterior fossa (PF). In France, the discovery of a PF malformation in the fetus frequently leads to termination of pregnancy (80% in a personal series). However, despite improved accuracy in the diagnosis of PF abnormalities, prognosis remains uncertain. The first objective of this review is to document the normal MRI landmarks of the developing fetal PF. Because of their thinness, the visibility of the cerebellar fissures is dramatically delayed on MRI compared to macroscopic data. An important landmark is identification of the primary fissure of the vermis, normally seen at around 25-26 weeks' gestation (WG) on the sagittal slice, separating the larger posterior lobe from the anterior lobe (volume ratio around 2:1). The prepyramidal and secondary fissures are usually only identifiable after 32 WG and the hemispheric fissures are difficult to see until the end of pregnancy. Considering the signal changes, high signal on T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences is seen from 25 WG in the posterior part of the brain stem (tegmentum and ascending sensory tracts) related to myelination. The low signal intensities seen within the cerebellum on T2-W images correspond to high cellularity of grey matter (deep nuclei), as there is no myelination within the white matter before 38 WG. The second objective is to highlight the signs highly predictive of a poor neurological prognosis. Lack of pontine curvature or vermian agenesis without a PF cyst (small volume of PF) is greatly associated with poor neurological status. The third objective is to propose a diagnostic strategy in difficult cases where prognosis is important, e.g. the Dandy Walker continuum. (orig.)

  10. MRI of the fetal posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, Catherine; Andre, Christine; Merzoug, Valerie; Ferey, Solene; Moutard, Marie Laure; Quere, Marie Pierre; Lewin, Fanny; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    MRI is a useful tool to complement US for imaging of the fetal posterior fossa (PF). In France, the discovery of a PF malformation in the fetus frequently leads to termination of pregnancy (80% in a personal series). However, despite improved accuracy in the diagnosis of PF abnormalities, prognosis remains uncertain. The first objective of this review is to document the normal MRI landmarks of the developing fetal PF. Because of their thinness, the visibility of the cerebellar fissures is dramatically delayed on MRI compared to macroscopic data. An important landmark is identification of the primary fissure of the vermis, normally seen at around 25-26 weeks' gestation (WG) on the sagittal slice, separating the larger posterior lobe from the anterior lobe (volume ratio around 2:1). The prepyramidal and secondary fissures are usually only identifiable after 32 WG and the hemispheric fissures are difficult to see until the end of pregnancy. Considering the signal changes, high signal on T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences is seen from 25 WG in the posterior part of the brain stem (tegmentum and ascending sensory tracts) related to myelination. The low signal intensities seen within the cerebellum on T2-W images correspond to high cellularity of grey matter (deep nuclei), as there is no myelination within the white matter before 38 WG. The second objective is to highlight the signs highly predictive of a poor neurological prognosis. Lack of pontine curvature or vermian agenesis without a PF cyst (small volume of PF) is greatly associated with poor neurological status. The third objective is to propose a diagnostic strategy in difficult cases where prognosis is important, e.g. the Dandy Walker continuum. (orig.)

  11. CT findings of posterior fossa venous angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Nishimoto, Ken.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of posterior fossa venous angiomas were reported, with some comments on the CT findings. Case 1: A 53-year-old woman was admitted for the further examination of a viral meningitis which had appeared three months before. Neurological examination revealed no abnormality. Vertebral angiography, however, demonstrated numerous fine medullary veins, with an enlarged intraparenchymal draining vein, in the right cerebellum; they drained into the petrosal vein, which was characteristic of venous angioma. On the plain CT, part of the draining vein was identified as a slightly high-density node. A curvilinear draining vein was demonstrated by the enhanced CT. Case 2: A 29-year-old man was admitted complaining of headache, vomiting, and atxia. Neurological examination disclosed truncal ataxia. The enhanced CT demonstrated two distinct nodules on the anterior border of the hematoma in the deep median cerebellum, probably corresponding to the draining veins. On the angiogram, a venous angioma was found in the bilateral cerebellum; it drained into the precentral cerebellar veins and ultimately joined the straight sinus via the precentro-vermo-rectal vein. Case 3: A 4-year-old boy was admitted suffering from headache, vomiting, and ataxia. Neurological examination disclosed a co-ordination disturbance of the left side. The enhanced CT demonstrated a curvilinear structure inside the hematoma. Angiography showed a venous angioma in the left cerebellum which drained into the petrosal vein. Computerized angiotomography delineated the characteristic venous structure on the angiogram as many fine, high-density lines (medullary veins) converging to a large intraparenchymal linear structure (central medullary vein) and then to a superficial cortical vein. In all cases, large intraparenchymal draining veins were identified by the conventional CT. (J.P.N.)

  12. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  13. Preoperative irradiation of an extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa. Follow-up study with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, S; Kurihara, M; Mori, K [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Amamoto, Y

    1981-02-01

    This is a report of case with the extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa in which total removal was carried out after radiotherapy. Follow-up study with computed tomography during and after irradiation are presented. A 44-year-old house-wife complained of a decreased vision of the both eyes and paresis of the left upper and lower limbs. CT scan revealed a slightly high density area in the right middle cranial fossa which was markedly enhanced with contrast media. Right carotid angio-graphy demonstrated a large avascular mass in the right middle fossa and no feeding artery or draining vein was visualized except a faint irregular stain in the venous phase. An attempt to total removal of the tumor had failed to succeed because of extensive hemorrhage from the tumor. Histological examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma. Irradiation with a total dose of 5000 rads was delivered. After irradiation CT scan revealed a marked decrease of size and EMI number of the tumor. At this stage, hypervascular mass lesion with feeding arteries was noted in conventional angiography. Tumor stain in prolonged injection angiography was also visualized. In the second operation, removal of the tumor was performed without any difficulty and hemorrhage was controlled easily by electrocoagulation. Histology revealed a marked narrowing of vessels with an increase in the connective tissues. In the central part of specimen, there noted findings of coagulation necrosis, intraluminal thrombus formations and so on, which were attributed to the influence of radiation. It is concluded that in case of an extracerebral cavernous hemangioma with massive hemorrhage, radiation of up to 3000 - 5000 rads was a method of choice. The treatment results in an increase of probability of total removal of the tumor.

  14. Appearance of the fetal posterior fossa at 11 + 3 to 13 + 6 gestational weeks on transabdominal ultrasound examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egle, D; Strobl, I; Weiskopf-Schwendinger, V; Grubinger, E; Kraxner, F; Mutz-Dehbalaie, I S; Strasak, A; Scheier, M

    2011-12-01

    To describe the sonographic appearance of the structures of the posterior cranial fossa in fetuses at 11 + 3 to 13 + 6 weeks of pregnancy and to determine whether abnormal findings of the brain and spine can be detected by sonography at this time. This was a prospective study including 692 fetuses whose mothers attended Innsbruck Medical University Hospital for first-trimester sonography. In 3% (n = 21) of cases, measurement was prevented by fetal position. Of the remaining 671 cases, in 604 there was either a normal anomaly scan at 20 weeks or delivery of a healthy child and in these cases the transcerebellar diameter (TCD) and the anteroposterior diameter of the cisterna magna (CM), measured at 11 + 3 to 13 + 6 weeks, were analyzed. In 502 fetuses, the anteroposterior diameter of the fourth ventricle (4V) was also measured. In 25 fetuses, intra- and interobserver repeatability was calculated. We observed a linear correlation between crown-rump length (CRL) and CM (CM = 0.0536 × CRL - 1.4701; R2 = 0.688), TCD (TCD = 0.1482 × CRL - 1.2083; R2 = 0.701) and 4V (4V = 0.0181 × CRL + 0.9186; R2 = 0.118). In three patients with posterior fossa cysts, measurements significantly exceeded the reference values. One fetus with spina bifida had an obliterated CM and the posterior border of the 4V could not be visualized. Transabdominal sonographic assessment of the posterior fossa is feasible in the first trimester. Measurements of the 4V, the CM and the TCD performed at this time are reliable. The established reference values assist in detecting fetal anomalies. However, findings must be interpreted carefully, as some supposed malformations might be merely delayed development of brain structures. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland(United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Div. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed.

  16. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  17. CT measurements of cranial growth: microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Torkelson, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) head scans were measured to determine the cranial dimensions of four children with microcephaly. These measurements were compared with cranial dimensions of normal children. CT proved to be useful in determining the developmental status of children with neurologic problems relative to their normal counterparts on the basis on cranial dimensions

  18. Subarachnoid pouches of the posterior fossa with syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B [Midland Centre for Neurosurgery and Neurology, Smethwick (UK)

    1979-01-01

    Three men are presented, all of whom were born with difficulty and later developed severe syringomyelia with collapsing cords on air myelography. Each had hydrocephalus and a sizable subarachnoid pouch in the posterior fossa. The clinical features and investigations are presented with a discussion of the aetiology and possible mechanisms concerned in pathogenesis and treatment. All three men had posterior fossa exploration over fifty years after birth, and the first two were also treated by valved ventriculo-atrial shunts. Each patient has improved a little since operation, but no certainly that this was due to surgery has been proved in any case; none has progressed since the last operation.

  19. MRI findings in cranial eumycetoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Munawwar; Sureka, Jyoti; Chacko, Geeta; Eapen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cranial eumycetoma (CE) due to direct inoculation of Madurella grisea into the scalp is extremely rare. We describe a case of CE caused by direct inoculation of M. grisea with the characteristic MRI findings of the “dot-in-circle” sign and a conglomeration of multiple, extremely hypointense “dots.”

  20. Invasive cranial mycosis our experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumbhkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause serious cranial infections in immunocompromised and diabetic patients. Common pathogens mainly include Aspergillus and Mucor. These organisms cause tissue invasion and destruction of adjacent structures (e.g. orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxillary & cavernous sinuses. Mortality and morbidity rate is high despite combined surgical, antifungal and antidiabetic treatment. We present our experience of six cases with such infection.

  1. Supra-orbital keyhole removal of anterior fossa and parasellar meningiomas Minicraniotomia supra-orbitária superciliar no tratamento de meningiomas na fossa craniana anterior e para-selares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Antonio de Paiva-Neto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of surgical techniques as well as the introduction of new surgical instruments promoted the use of keyhole craniotomies in neurosurgery. We evaluated the technical aspects of the supra-orbital keyhole approach considering the indications, limitations, and complications of this approach to treat anterior cranial fossa and parasellar meningiomas. Twenty-four patients (21 females; mean age, 53±8.6 years operated on between 2002 and 2006 through a supra-orbital eyebrow approach were studied. Maximal tumor diameter ranged from 1.6 to 6 cm. Gross total resection was done in 20 (83.3%. All tumors were histologically benign. Two patients (8% experienced CSF rinorhea and another two patients suffered transitory diabetes insipidus (8%. One patient experienced transitory hemiparesis. There was one case of meningitis and one mortality. Follow-up ranged between 6 to 66 months (mean 31.5±20.1 months, with no recurrence. The supra-orbital keyhole craniotomy is a useful minimally invasive approach to treat selected anterior fossa and parasellar meningiomas.A evolução técnica e a introdução de instrumentais cirúrgicos mais delicados proporcionaram o uso de craniotomias menores no tratamento de patologias intracranianas. Avaliamos os aspectos técnicos da minicraniotomia supra-orbitária superciliar, considerando as indicações, limitações e complicações no tratamento de meningiomas na fossa craniana anterior e para-selares. Vinte e quarto pacientes (21 mulheres; idade média, 53±8,6 anos operados entre 2002 e 2006 foram estudados. O diâmetro tumoral máximo variou de 1,6 a 6 cm. Ressecção total foi obtida em 20 (83,3%. Todos os tumores eram histologicamente benignos. Dois pacientes (8% apresentaram fistula liquórica pós-operatória e outros dois diabetes insipido transitórioa (8%. Um paciente evoluiu com hemiparesia transitória. Houve um caso de meningite e um de evolução fatal. O seguimento variou de 6 a 66 meses (m

  2. Cranial nerves neuropraxia after shoulder arthroscopy in beach chair position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, A; Boyer, P; Soubeyrand, M; Hamida, F Ben; Vannier, J-L; Massin, P

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of neuropraxia of the 9th, 10th and 12th cranial nerve pairs after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the beach chair position. The elements in the medical file seem to exclude an intracranial cause of the lesions and support a mechanical, extracranial cause due to intubation and/or the beach chair position. This clinical case report shows the neurological risks of the beach chair position during arthroscopic shoulder surgery and presents the essential safety measures to prevent these risks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Packing of Renal Fossa: Useful Technique for Intractable Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no documented study to indicate the role of prolonged packing of renal fossa (24 to 48 hours) to control bleeding in life threating haemorrhage following open pyelolithotomy without compromise in the renal functions. On the contrary emergency nephrectomy was performed for intractable bleeding during renal stone ...

  4. Endoscopic endonasal approach for mass resection of the pterygopalatine fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Plzák

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Access to the pterygopalatine fossa is very difficult due to its complex anatomy. Therefore, an open approach is traditionally used, but morbidity is unavoidable. To overcome this problem, an endoscopic endonasal approach was developed as a minimally invasive procedure. The surgical aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of the endoscopic endonasal approach for the management of both benign and malignant tumors of the pterygopalatine fossa. METHOD: We report our experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach for the management of both benign and malignant tumors and summarize recent recommendations. A total of 13 patients underwent surgery via the endoscopic endonasal approach for pterygopalatine fossa masses from 2014 to 2016. This case group consisted of 12 benign tumors (10 juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas and two schwannomas and one malignant tumor. RESULTS: No recurrent tumor developed during the follow-up period. One residual tumor (juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma that remained in the cavernous sinus was stable. There were no significant complications. Typical sequelae included hypesthesia of the maxillary nerve, trismus, and dry eye syndrome. CONCLUSION: The low frequency of complications together with the high efficacy of resection support the use of the endoscopic endonasal approach as a feasible, safe, and beneficial technique for the management of masses in the pterygopalatine fossa.

  5. Endoscopic endonasal approach for mass resection of the pterygopalatine fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plzák, Jan; Kratochvil, Vít; Kešner, Adam; Šurda, Pavol; Vlasák, Aleš; Zvěřina, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Access to the pterygopalatine fossa is very difficult due to its complex anatomy. Therefore, an open approach is traditionally used, but morbidity is unavoidable. To overcome this problem, an endoscopic endonasal approach was developed as a minimally invasive procedure. The surgical aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of the endoscopic endonasal approach for the management of both benign and malignant tumors of the pterygopalatine fossa. METHOD: We report our experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach for the management of both benign and malignant tumors and summarize recent recommendations. A total of 13 patients underwent surgery via the endoscopic endonasal approach for pterygopalatine fossa masses from 2014 to 2016. This case group consisted of 12 benign tumors (10 juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas and two schwannomas) and one malignant tumor. RESULTS: No recurrent tumor developed during the follow-up period. One residual tumor (juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma) that remained in the cavernous sinus was stable. There were no significant complications. Typical sequelae included hypesthesia of the maxillary nerve, trismus, and dry eye syndrome. CONCLUSION: The low frequency of complications together with the high efficacy of resection support the use of the endoscopic endonasal approach as a feasible, safe, and beneficial technique for the management of masses in the pterygopalatine fossa. PMID:29069259

  6. Transpterygoid Approach to a Dermoid Cyst in Pterygopalatine Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordones, Alexandre Beraldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe a case of dermoid cyst arising from the pterygopalatine fossa and review the literature. Methods We report a case of a 23-year-old man who suffered a car accident 2 years before otolaryngologic attendance. He had one episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizure and developed a reduction of visual acuity of the left side after the accident. Neurologic investigation was performed and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an incidental finding of a heterogeneous ovoid lesion in the pterygopalatine fossa, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Results Endoscopic sinus surgery with transpterygoid approach was performed. The ovoid lesion was noted in the pterygopalatine fossa. Puncture for intraoperative evaluation showed a transparent thick fluid. Surprisingly, hair and sebaceous glands were found inside the cyst capsule. The cyst was excised completely. Histologic examination revealed a dermoid cyst. The patient currently has no evidence of recurrence at 1 year postoperatively. Conclusion This unique case is a rare report of a dermoid cyst incidentally diagnosed. An endoscopic transnasal transpterygoid approach may be performed to treat successfully this kind of lesion. Although rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of expansive lesions in the pterygopalatine fossa, including schwannoma, angiofibroma, esthesioneuroblastoma, osteochondroma, cholesterol granuloma, hemangioma, lymphoma, and osteoma.

  7. Quantitative imaging analysis of posterior fossa ependymoma location in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Noah D; Merchant, Thomas E; Li, Xingyu; Li, Yimei; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A; Ellison, David W; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Imaging descriptions of posterior fossa ependymoma in children have focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal and local anatomic relationships with imaging location only recently used to classify these neoplasms. We developed a quantitative method for analyzing the location of ependymoma in the posterior fossa, tested its effectiveness in distinguishing groups of tumors, and examined potential associations of distinct tumor groups with treatment and prognostic factors. Pre-operative MRI examinations of the brain for 38 children with histopathologically proven posterior fossa ependymoma were analyzed. Tumor margin contours and anatomic landmarks were manually marked and used to calculate the centroid of each tumor. Landmarks were used to calculate a transformation to align, scale, and rotate each patient's image coordinates to a common coordinate space. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the location and morphological variables was performed to detect multivariate patterns in tumor characteristics. The ependymomas were also characterized as "central" or "lateral" based on published radiological criteria. Therapeutic details and demographic, recurrence, and survival information were obtained from medical records and analyzed with the tumor location and morphology to identify prognostic tumor characteristics. Cluster analysis yielded two distinct tumor groups based on centroid location The cluster groups were associated with differences in PFS (p = .044), "central" vs. "lateral" radiological designation (p = .035), and marginally associated with multiple operative interventions (p = .064). Posterior fossa ependymoma can be objectively classified based on quantitative analysis of tumor location, and these classifications are associated with prognostic and treatment factors.

  8. Epidemiological approach to emergent cranial surgery of cranial traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülagü Kaptan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: In this study, we aim to define the emergent cranial surgery of cranial trauma cases in terms of the reason of occurance, diagnosis, prognostic factors and results. Methods: 153 cases hospitalized in our clinic during a four year period were statistically analysed in accordance with trauma etiology, age, gender, application GCS (Glascow Coma Score mortality rate, location and established patology.

    Results: 76% (116 of the 153 cases were male. The most frequent etiological reasons were, in descending order, traffic accident 52% (n = 80, fall 34% (n = 53, direct trauma to the head 14(n =20. 45% (n = 69 were diagnosed epidural haematomas, 26% (n = 40 were diagnosed depression fractures and 3% (n = 5 were diagnosed intracerebral haematomas. A meaningful statistical difference was found in the comparison of the diagnosis regarding gender (p=0,012 age group (p=0,0282 and GCS (p=0,0001.

    Conclusions: In order to prevent cranial traumas, studies aimed at minimizing traffic accidents should be undertaken. The most essential action after the accident has occured is triage, and this is of great importance in order to establish communication among the health institutions.

  9. STUDY OF POSTERIOR FOSSA TUMORS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Hari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the imaging modality used for the assessment of infratentorial neoplasms. Although Computed Tomography (CT provides better demonstration of small or subtle calcifications within tumors. OBJECTIVES Study is done to assess the potential of MRI in characterisation of different tumors in posterior fossa by evaluating various unenhanced and gadolinium enhanced sequences and to compare high resolution FSE MRI sequences with routine FSE MRI sequences in diagnosing posterior fossa brain tumors. Also correlate findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Pathological diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 52 patients were diagnosed by CT brain as having posterior fossa brain for a year of 2 years were included in the study. In all studies MR imaging was performed with a clinical 1.5 T system (General electrical medical systems. A dedicated phased-array coil was used. RESULTS The age group ranged from 1 year to 60 years, majority were between 1 to 20 years (39%. Slight male preponderance was seen (males 29, females 23. Commonest tumor encountered in our study was vestibular schwannoma. DWI alone can differentiate different pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors. One case of pilocytic astrocytoma showed solid lesion instead of typical cystic lesion with mural nodule. One case AT-RT showed 2 lesions one in cerebrum, one in CP angle. Common feature being intra-axial lesion involving cerebellum. MRI was able to predict diagnosis in 50 of the 52 tumors. CONCLUSION Magnetic Resonance Imaging was found to be a highly sensitive imaging procedure and method of choice for posterior fossa brain tumors.

  10. Diagnosis and management of cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis in four horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, José M; Jenei, Thomas; Chope, Kate; Bubeck, Kirstin A

    2010-10-01

    4 horses with a history of neck pain, abnormal head carriage, and related inability to perform were examined. Cranial nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in 2 horses, and caudal nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in the other 2. All 4 horses had prominent swelling in the region between the frontal bone and temporal fossa (ie, the poll) and abnormal head carriage. Ultrasonographic examination revealed fluid distention and synovial thickening of the cranial or caudal nuchal bursa in all 4 horses. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration of the affected region was performed successfully in 3 horses. Radiography revealed bony remodeling and mineralization over the dorsal aspect of the atlas in 1 horse and a radiolucency at the axis in another. Nuclear scintigraphy revealed an increase in radioisotope uptake at the level of C2 in 1 horse. Although a septic process was considered among the differential diagnoses in all horses, a septic process could only be confirmed in 1 horse. All horses were refractory to conservative management consisting of intrabursal injection of anti-inflammatory medications. Bursoscopic debridement and lavage of the affected bursae resulted in resolution of the clinical signs in all horses, and they all returned to their intended use. Cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis, of nonseptic or septic origin, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with head and neck pain. Horses undergoing surgical intervention consisting of nuchal bursoscopy have the opportunity to return to their original degree of exercise.

  11. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  12. Cranial neuronavigation with functional monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, V.; Oberle, J.; Kretschmer, T.; Richter, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    Minimise the risks is an essential objective of neurosurgery. The technological progress achieved in the last few years, especially regarding imaging methods and image processing capabilities, offers the tools to manage the risks. The authors explain initial experience obtained with microscope-based cranial neuronavigation systems combined with direct cortical monitoring methods and give an outlook on expected devlopments in the future. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels, I. [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  14. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G.; Casteels, I.

    2002-01-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  15. White matter and information processing speed following treatment with cranial-spinal radiation for pediatric brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantlebury, Nadia; Bouffet, Eric; Laughlin, Suzanne; Strother, Douglas; McConnell, Dina; Hukin, Juliette; Fryer, Christopher; Laperriere, Normand; Montour-Proulx, Isabelle; Keene, Daniel; Fleming, Adam; Jabado, Nada; Liu, Fang; Riggs, Lily; Law, Nicole; Mabbott, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    We compared the structure of specific white matter tracts and information processing speed between children treated for posterior fossa tumors with cranial-spinal radiation (n = 30), or with surgery +/- focal radiation (n = 29), and healthy children (n = 37). Probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to delineate the inferior longitudinal fasciculi, optic radiation, inferior frontal occipital fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi bilaterally. Information processing speed was measured using the coding and symbol search subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, and visual matching, pair cancellation, and rapid picture naming subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Test of Cognitive Ability, 3rd revision. We examined group differences using repeated measures MANOVAs and path analyses were used to test the relations between treatment, white matter structure of the tracts, and information processing speed. DTI indices of the optic radiations, the inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi differed between children treated with cranial-spinal radiation and children treated with surgery +/- focal radiation, and healthy controls (p = .045). Children treated with cranial-spinal radiation also exhibited lower processing speed scores relative to healthy control subjects (p = .002). Notably, we observed that group differences in information processing speed were related to the structure of the right optic radiation (p = .002). We show that cranial-spinal radiation may have a negative impact on information processing speed via insult to the right optic radiations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  17. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives  Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method  A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results  In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion  The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  18. Malignant Transformation of Endometriosis in the Ischioanal Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan S. Klebanoff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 28-year-old nulliparous female with malignant transformation of an ectopic focus of endometriosis in the right ischioanal fossa. A 28-year-old nulliparous patient with a past medical history of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS was diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma in her right ischioanal fossa. Initially, patient presented to an emergency department and underwent a CT scan of the appendix to rule out appendicitis. A multiloculated cystic lesion adjacent to the right obturator internus muscle was found. She underwent surgical resection of the mass, which confirmed FIGO grade 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, followed by localized radiation therapy. Malignancy arising in endometriosis is rare, and the influence of PCOS on the rate of malignant transformation is not well established.

  19. Children's vomiting following posterior fossa surgery: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dundon Belinda

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nausea and vomiting is a problem for children after neurosurgery and those requiring posterior fossa procedures appear to have a high incidence. This clinical observation has not been quantified nor have risk factors unique to this group of children been elucidated. Methods A six year retrospective chart audit at two Canadian children's hospitals was conducted. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was extracted. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression was used to quantify risk and protective factors at 120 hours after surgery and early vs. late vomiting. Results The incidence of vomiting over a ten day postoperative period was 76.7%. Documented vomiting ranged from single events to greater than 20 over the same period. In the final multivariable model: adolescents (age 12 to Conclusion The incidence of vomiting in children after posterior fossa surgery is sufficient to consider all children requiring these procedures to be at high risk for POV. Nausea requires better assessment and documentation.

  20. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  1. Venous anomalies and abnormalities of the posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulao, A.; Alvarez, H.; Garcia Monaco, R.; Pruvost, P.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a series of 16 patients with venous anomalies or abnormalities of the posterior fossa studied by angiography, CT and/or MRI. We believe that so-called 'venous angioma' are extreme anatomic variants that drain normal territories, and we prefer to call them developmental venous anomalies (DVA). Posterior fossa DVA, like the supra-tentorial ones are classified according to their drainage into deep and superficial type. They are exclusively located in the cerebellum or tectum. In 4 cases DVA was an incidental finding, in 3 an associated cerebral venous malformation (CVM) was found and felt to be the cause of the symptoms and only in one (Trigeminal pain) was a link between both suspected. Cavernous venous malformation (CVM) were found in frequent association with DVA (27%). 4 cases were single and 2 multiple. 5 CVM were located in the brain stem and 3 in the cerebellum. The clinical and radiological files were reviewed and a direct relationship between symptoms and localization was found in all patients with CVM. In 2 cases venous dysplasia was found: 1 Sturge-Weber and 1 First branchial arch syndrome. Both posterior fossa venous abnormalities were incidental findings. (orig.)

  2. Antecubital Fossa Solitary Osteochondroma with Associated Bicipitoradial Bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecubital fossa lesions are uncommon conditions that present to the orthopaedic clinic. Furthermore, the radius bone is an uncommonly reported location for an osteochondroma, especially when presenting with a concurrent reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. Osteochondromas are a type of developmental lesion rather than a true neoplasm. They constitute up to 15% of all bone tumours and up to 50% of benign bone tumours. They may occur as solitary or multiple lesions. Multiple lesions are usually associated with a syndrome known as hereditary multiple exostoses (HME. Malignant transformation is known to occur but is rare. Bicipitoradial bursitis is a condition which can occur as primary or secondary (reactive pathology. In our case, the radius bone osteochondroma caused reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. The differential diagnosis of such antecubital fossa masses is vast but may be narrowed down through a targeted history, stepwise radiological investigations, and histological confirmation. Our aim is to ensure that orthopaedic clinicians keep a wide differential in mind when dealing with antecubital fossa mass lesions.

  3. CT and MRI diagnosis of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bolang; Zhang Ming; Luo Lin; Wang Shijie; Zhu Liping

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT and MRI features of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma. Methods: Sixteen cases of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma proved by surgery and pathology had CT and (or) MRI scanning. There were 11 males and 5 females. The age ranged from 17 to 46 (mean, 31.2). Twelve cases ranged from 20 to 40 years old. the main symptoms of all cases were dizziness, unsteady walking and vomiting. Results: The locations of all cases were cerebellum (12 cases), vermis (3 cases) and cerebellopontile angle (1 cases). Fifteen cases were solid with multiple cystic changes and 1 case in the cerebellopontile angle was cystic. The tumor was usually close to the surface of cerebellum with rather extensive connection with dura mater or tentorium. Calcifications were shown in 3 cases. The tumors revealed inhomogeneous density on CT scan and inhomogeneous intensity on MRI. Mild inhomogeneous enhancement was shown in most cases, while intense irregular enhancement in the others. Conclusions: The characteristic findings of the posterior fossa atypical ependymoma ependymoma were cerebellar intraparenchymatous multiple small cystic changes within solid tumor in most cases and inhomogeneous density and intensity on CT and MRI. The differential diagnosis is meningioma, metastasis and acoustic schwannoma

  4. Progression of stifle osteoarthrosis following reconstruction of the cranial cruciate ligament in 21 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, P.B.; Berry, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-one dogs that had intraarticular reconstruction of the cranial cruciate ligament were examined clinically and radiographically to assess limb function and determine if there had been progression of osteoarthrosis in the affected stifle joints. The interval between surgery and follow-up examination varied from 1 to 47 months, mean = 14.9 +/-12.9 months standard deviation. Clinical variables that were assessed included lameness, palpable joint instability, articular crepitus, and joint swelling. Radiographic features that were evaluated included soft-tissue swelling/joint effusion, subchondral sclerosis, periarticular osteophyte and enthesiophyte formation, remodeling of femoral and tibial condyles, and resorptive changes in the intercondyloid fossa. The owners of all 21 dogs believed that the operation had improved their dog's condition because the frequency of lameness had decreased. However, palpable instability, crepitus, and joint swelling were detected frequently during physical examinations. Radiographs documented progression of osteoarthrosis in the operated upon stifle joints of all 21 dogs

  5. Nonprojectile penetrating iron rod from the oral cavity to the posterior cranial fossa: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan ZG

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhi Gang Lan,1 Seidu A Richard,1–3 Jin Li,1 Chaohua Yang1 1Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Immunology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Surgery, Volta Regional Hospital, Ho, Ghana, West Africa Introduction: Nonprojectile penetrating skull base injuries as a result of falls have rarely been confronted in normal neurosurgery although a few nonmissile injuries have been reported. These kinds of injuries represent a life-threatening emergency. Case presentation: We present an unusual case of a 25-year-old male construction worker who suffered an accidental penetrating skull base injury when he fell on a metal rod while he was walking on a 2-meter-high platform. He was clinically stable at presentation. Skull radiograph showed a solid metallic bar, 30 cm long, that penetrated through the right anguli oris eminence and was lodged low in the right occipital bone. Conclusion: Penetrating injury to the head is considered a form of severe traumatic brain injury. Although case of penetrating head injuries as a result of fall from heights are very rare, we anticipate the construction works on high-rise buildings are at maximum risk. We advise that removal of this kind of foreign bodies be done in the theater and not outside because of risk of involvement of larger vessels leading to fatal hemorrhage. We further suggest that patients with nonprojectile injuries should undergo a preoperative computed tomography-angiography to rule out any vascular injury. Keywords: nonprojectile, fall, hemorrhage, skull, penetrating injury, construction

  6. [Positional damage of the sciatic nerve during neurosurgical intervention into the posterior cranial fossa in the sitting position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N; Lubnin, A Iu; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Kolycheva, M V; Ogurtsova, A A; Grigorian, A A

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a rare case of severe, but reversible bilateral damage to the sciatic nerve (compression neuropathy) in a patient with Blumenbach's clivus meningioma developing during 12-hour operation removing the tumor in the patient's sitting position on the operating table. The etiology and prevention of this complication are discussed.

  7. [Cranial trepanation in primitive cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    A review is presented on cranial trepanations performed by primitive cultures. The scientific interest in this topic began after the discovery in 1965 by Ephraim G. Squier of a pre-Columbian trepanated skull, and studied by Paul Broca in Paris. Pseudotrepanation and other types of cranial manipulation are reviewed. The techniques, technology, and instruments for every type of trepanation are well known. There are a surprisingly high percentage of cases showing signs of post-trepanation survival. Indications for trepanation are speculative, perhaps magic. Although trepanation in primitive cultures is widespread around the world, and throughout time, the main fields of interest are the Neolithic Period in Europe, the pre-Columbian Period in Andean South America, and some contemporaneous Pacific and African tribes. This particular trepanation procedure has no relationship with modern Neurosurgery, or with trepanations with therapeutic purposes performed since the Greco-Roman period in Europe, and afterwards around the world. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  9. Traumatic acute posterior fossa subdural hematoma – A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Manish

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic subdural hematomas of the posterior fossa are rare but dangerous neurosurgical emergencies that require prompt diagnosis and management to avoid the uniformly poor outcome. We present a case of a teenager with severe TBI and acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa that deteriorated rapidly before surgery but eventually made a good recovery. We also the review the literature concerning traumatic posterior fossa subdural hematomas [PFSDH].

  10. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  11. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  12. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  13. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1989-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  14. Posterior Fossa Decompression with Duraplasty in Chiari-1 Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, L.; Akbar, H.; Bokhari, I.; Babar, A. K.; Hahim, A. S. M.; Arain, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic outcome after PFD (Posterior Fossa Decompression) with duraplasty in Chiari-1 malformations. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, JPMC, Karachi, from July 2008 to September 2012. Methodology: This included 21 patients of Chiari 1 malformations admitted in department through OPD with clinical features of headache, neck pain, numbness, neurological deficit, and syringomyelia. Diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. PFD followed by C1 laminectomy with duraplasty was done in all cases and symptomatic outcome was assessed in follow-up clinic. Results: Among 21 patients, 13 were females and 8 were males. Age ranged from 18 to 40 years. All the patients had neck pain and numbness in hands. Only 3 patients had weakness of all four limbs and 12 with weakness of hands. Symptoms evolved over a mean of 12 months. Syringomyelia was present in all cases. All patients underwent posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty with an additional C1 laminectomy and in 2 cases C2 laminectomy was done. Syringo-subarachnoid shunt was placed in one patient and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was placed in 2 patients. Pain was relieved in all cases. Weakness was improved in all cases and numbness was improved in 19 cases. Syringomyelia was improved in all cases. Postoperative complications included CSF leak in 2 patients and wound infection in one patient. However, there was no mortality. Conclusion: Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty is the best treatment option for Chiari-1 malformations because of symptomatic improvement and less chances of complications. (author)

  15. Tratamento cirúrgico da cisticircose da fossa craniana posterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Garcia Lopes

    1971-03-01

    Full Text Available A cisticercose, um dos mais sérios problemas parasitológicos do sistema nervoso, apresenta, quando localizada na fossa posterior, um quadro clínico dramático, no qual predomina a hipertensão intracraniana. Foram estudados neste trabalho, 70 pacientes com cisticercose de fossa craniana posterior, atendidos no Serviço de Neurocirurgia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo de 1945 a 1968. Considerando-se a grande diversidade existente em torno das técnicas de tratamento cirúrgico, foi objetivo deste trabalho o estudo dos resultados obtidos nestes pacientes, nos quais várias técnicas foram empregadas. As cirurgias paliativas que derivam o trânsito do líquido cefalorraqueano para regiões extracranianas, quando comparadas aos outros tipos de cirurgias utilizados, foram as que proporcionaram maior índice de recuperação, exigiram menos reoperações, além de terem sido acompanhadas de menor número de complicações, bem como de menor mortalidade pós-operatória. Por outro lado, a neurocisticercose geralmente é um processo difuso, encontrando-se parasitas em várias regiões do encéfalo e/ou aracnoidite, conforme comprovou-se, também, entre os casos ora reunidos e que vieram a falecer. Baseando-se nestes fatos, não se justificam as derivações intracranianas e, a não ser eventualmente, a abordagem direta do parasita. Os casos estudados permitem cone- tatar, portanto, que as derivações extracranianas, por sua simplicidade e eficácia, apresentam-se, atualmente, como a terapêutica cirúrgica mais propriada à cisticercose de fossa craniana posterior.

  16. Large intradiploic growing skull fracture of the posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamcioglu, M. Kemal; Hicdonmez, Tufan; Kilincer, Cumhur; Cobanoglu, Sebahattin

    2006-01-01

    Growing skull fractures (GSFs) are rare complications of head injury and mostly occur in infancy and early childhood. Location in the posterior fossa and intradiploic development of a GSF is very uncommon. We report a 7-year-old boy with a large, 9 x 7 x 4-cm, occipital intradiploic GSF. The lesion developed progressively over a period of 5 years following a documented occipital linear fracture. This case of a GSF developing from a known occipital linear fracture demonstrates that a GSF may reach a considerable size and, although uncommon, intradiploic development and occipital localization of a GSF is possible. (orig.)

  17. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  18. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  19. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  20. Incidence of Clavicular Rhomboid Fossa in Northeastern Thais: An Anthropological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailadda Kaewma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rhomboid fossa of clavicle is used to determine the age and sex in anthropology and forensic sciences. The variant types of rhomboid fossa on inferior surface have been reported in many races except in Thais. This study therefore was aimed at classifying the types of the rhomboid fossa in Northeastern Thais. The identified 476 Northeastern Thais dried clavicles (270 males and 206 females were observed and recorded for the types of rhomboid fossa. The results showed that Thai-rhomboid fossa could be classified into 4 types: Type 1: smooth; Type 2: flat; Type 3: elevated; and Type 4: depressed, respectively. The incidences of rhomboid fossa were as follows: Type 1: 0.21%; Type 2: 19.75%; Type 3: 76.26%; and Type 4: 3.78%, respectively. Additionally, it was found that the percentage of Type 4 (11.84% was much greater than that of female (1.94% compared to other types. This incidence of rhomboid fossa types especially Type 4 may be a basic knowledge to be used in sex identification. The high incidence of rhomboid fossa in both sexes of Northeastern Thai clavicles was Type 3 (elevated type.

  1. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Other Complications After Surgery in the Posterior Fossa in Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Morten; Rochat, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) is rarely described in adults; however, data on self-assessed linguistic complications after posterior fossa surgery do not exist. METHODS: Through a prospective single-center study, data on 59 tumor operations in the posterior fossa were collected pre...

  2. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented

  3. Preauricular infratemporal fossa approach for advanced malignant parotid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, John P; Benscoter, Brent J; Marzo, Sam J; Borrowdale, Richard W; Pontikis, George C

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate the surgical technique involved in the preauricular infratemporal fossa (ITF) approach, outline the clinical indications for use of this technique, and present the results in using this approach in 159 patients with malignant parotid tumors. At the conclusion of this article, the reader should be able to understand the utility of the preauricular infratemporal fossa approach in the management of patients with advanced malignant parotid tumors. This was a retrospective chart review of 159 patients treated at a tertiary care academic medical center following institutional review board approval. A comprehensive medical records review was performed for all patients with malignant parotid tumors who underwent a preauricular ITF approach between July 1988 and July 2010. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and trismus, whereas the presence of a parotid mass and facial paralysis were the most common clinical signs. Mucoepidermoid and adenoid cystic carcinoma accounted for 63% of the tumors, and perineural invasion was found in nearly 71% of the patients. Despite negative surgical margins in 92% of the patients, local or regional tumor recurrence was found in 17% of the cases. The mean follow-up time was 12.8 years. The preauricular ITF approach should be used in the surgical extirpation of advanced malignant parotid neoplasms. This technique provides proximal facial nerve identification, internal carotid artery protection, and negative tumor margins at the skull base. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. [A pediatric case of hydatid cyst in the infratemporal fossa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroual, A; Elbouihi, M; Fawzi, S; Lahmiti, S; Aimmadeddine, S; Mansouri-Hattab, N

    2014-06-01

    Hydatid cyst or disease is an anthropozoonosis due to the development of the larval form of the taenia Echinococcus granulosus in humans. It is endemic in Morocco. The location of a hydatid cyst in the infratemporal fossa (ITF) is extremely rare. The authors report a pediatric case. An 11 year old child was admitted to hospital with a history of left latero-facial swelling gradually increasing in volume for 2 months, CT scan of the face revealed a cystic formation of 7 cm diameter sitting at the left ITF, hydatid serology was negative. A transzygomatic approach allowed the excision of the cyst. The histopathological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. The location at the infratemporal fossa of an expansive process such as hydatid cyst in children may have a particular impact on adjacent structures and a more meaningful clinical expression. The rate of growth of hydatid cysts is highly variable and ranges from 1 to 5 cm a year. Hydatid serology is often negative. CT examination is the gold-standard radiological examination. Surgical removal of the hydatid cyst is the most effective treatment. The transzygomatic approach allowed a sufficient access to the cyst and a good quality of excision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Partial maxillectomy for ameloblastoma of the maxilla with infratemporal fossa involvement: A combined endoscopic endonasal and transoral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A; Hart, L; Polachova, H; Chovanec, M; Schalek, P

    2018-02-21

    Ameloblastoma represents the most common epithelial odontogenic tumor. Because of the proximity of the maxillary tumors to the orbit and skull base, it should be managed as radically as possible. Maxillectomy, mainly via the transfacial or transoral approach, represents the most common type of surgical procedure. Drawback of these approaches is limited control of the superiomedial extent of the tumour in the paranasal area. We report the use of a combined endoscopic endonasal and transoral approach to manage maxillary plexiform ameloblastoma in a 48-year-old male patient. A combined endoscopic endonasal and transoral approach enabled the radical removal of tumour with a 1.5cm margin of radiographically intact bone with good control from both intrasinusal and intraoral aspects. Adequate visualization of the extent of the lesion (e.g. orbit, infratemporal fossa, anterior cranial base) had been achieved. Non-complicated healing was achieved. This technique of partial maxillectomy led to very good aesthetic and functional results. No recurrence had been noted during review appointments. The combination of endoscopic endonasal and transoral approach for a partial maxillectomy allows sufficient reduction of the defect, thus eliminating the necessity for reconstruction and reducing the morbidity associated with it. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Hearing preservation and facial nerve function after microsurgery for intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas: comparison of middle fossa and retrosigmoid approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noudel, R; Gomis, P; Duntze, J; Marnet, D; Bazin, A; Roche, P H

    2009-08-01

    Therapeutic options for vestibular schwannomas (VS) include microsurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery and conservative management. Early treatment of intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IVS) may be advisable because their spontaneous course will show hearing loss in most cases. Advanced microsurgical techniques and continuous intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves may allow hearing preservation (HP) without facial nerve damage. However, there are still controversies about the definition of hearing preservation, and the best surgical approach that should be used. In this study, we reviewed the main data from the recent literature on IVS surgery and compared hearing, facial function and complication rates after the retrosigmoid (RS) and middle fossa (MF) approaches, respectively. The results showed that the average HP rate after IVS surgery ranged from 58% (RS) to 62% (MF). HP varied widely depending on the audiometric criteria that were used for definition of serviceable hearing. There was a trend to show that the MF approach offered a better quality of postoperative hearing (not statistically significant), whereas the RS approach offered a better facial nerve preservation and fewer complications (not statistically significant). We believe that the timing of treatment in the course of the disease and selection between radiosurgical versus microsurgical procedure are key issues in the management of IVS. Preservation of hearing and good facial nerve function in surgery for VS is a reasonable goal for many patients with intracanalicular tumors and serviceable hearing. Once open surgery has been decided, selection of the approach mainly depends on individual anatomical considerations and experience of the surgeon.

  7. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  8. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  9. Cranial MR finding of reversible eclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Seok Ho; Hwang, Mi Young; Kim, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Seon Goo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Joo, Yang Goo; Suh, Soo Ji [College of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in diagnosis and for follow-up of reversible eclampsia. Cranial MRI was performed on four consecutive pregnant patients(ante-partum 3 cases, postpartum 1 cases), who had generalized tonic-clonic seizure caused by eclampsia. One of the four patients underwent follow-up MRI. Cranial MRI typically demonstrated bilateral hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images and iso-to hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images. MRI abnormalities were most commonly located in the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery circulation and were associated with symptoms of visual disturbance. Most cranial lesions of eclampsia demonstrated in MRI were reversible. MRI with its capability to detect even subtle abnormalities in the brain that are not visible on CT, and may be the technique of choice for evaluating the cerebral the pathology of pregnant women with eclampsia.

  10. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, E.; Atahan, I.L.; Akyol, F.H.; Guerkaynak, M.; Zorlu, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1989, 23 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients presenting with cranial nerve involvement (CNI) of one or more nerves at the time of diagnosis were treated and followed-up in our department. All patients were irradiated with curative intent, and total doses of 50 to 70 Gy (median 65 Gy) were delivered to the nasopharynx. Cranial nerves VI, III, V, IV, IX, and XII were the most commonly involved nerves. The total response rate of cranial nerves was 74% in a median follow-up time of 2 years, with the highest rate observed in the third and sixth cranial nerves. All complete responses except two were observed in the first month after radiotherapy. (author)

  11. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence

  12. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Dozorova; A. S. Kotov; E. V. Mukhina

    2018-01-01

    Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN) is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and ...

  13. Epidermoid cyst of the posterior fossa: a case report Cisto epidermoide da fossa posterior: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cambruzzi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts of the central nervous system are uncommon conditions, which are frequently located in the cerebellopontine angle and around the pons. They are covered with keratinized squamous epithelium and keratin lamella, which give its contents a soft, white-pearly appearance. Epidermoid cysts are mostly originated from malformations, presumably associated with surface elements of the nervous system ectoderm during the closure of the neural groove or formation of secondary cerebral vesicles. The authors describe a case of epidermoid cyst in the posterior fossa causing hydrocephalus and review morphologic and diagnostic criteria of this lesion.Os cistos epidermoides do sistema nervoso central (SNC são condições incomuns, estando localizados mais frequentemente no ângulo pontocerebelar e ao redor da ponte. Eles são revestidos por epitélio escamoso queratinizado e lamelas de queratina, tornando seu conteúdo branco-perolado e pastoso. Os cistos epidermoides são, na maioria das vezes, originados de malformações, possivelmente associados ao entremeio de elementos superficiais do ectoderma do SNC durante o fechamento da placa neural, ou formação das vesículas cerebrais secundárias. Os autores descrevem um caso de cisto epidermoide da fossa posterior determinando hidrocefalia e revisam critérios morfológicos e diagnósticos dessa lesão.

  14. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.B.; Elsas, L.J.; Wyly, J.B.; Pasquali, M.

    1994-01-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a specific bone dysplasia manifested by hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, frontal bossing, large head, hypoplastic maxilla, palate anomalies, chronic otitis media, hearing deficits, nasal obstruction, and neurological changes of deafness, facial palsy, ophthalmoplegia, and mental retardation. We will review the clinical and radiologic findings in a new patient from birth to 20 years; this is believed to be the thirty-fifth patient reported. OS-CS is 2.5 times more common in females and occurs as an autosomal dominant condition or a sporadic dominant mutation with patients presenting for evaluation from the newborn period to the fifth decade. Skeletal abnormalities are distinctive including sclerosis of the skull base and calvarium, linear striated densities in the long bones and pelvis, and poor development of the mastoid and sinus air cells. Radionuclide bone scans with SPECT indicated in our patient increased bone turnover which was supported by biochemical findings of increased pyridinoline excretion. The major complications are due to constriction of essential foramina at the skull base. The condition is not life-threatening but can produce disability. (orig.)

  15. Cranial trepanation in The Egyptian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2014-09-01

    Medicine and literature have been linked from ancient times; proof of this shown by the many doctors who have made contributions to literature and the many writers who have described medical activities and illnesses in their works. An example is The Egyptian, the book by Mika Waltari that provides a masterly narration of the protagonist's medical activity and describes the trepanation technique. The present work begins with the analysis of trepanations since prehistory and illustrates the practice of the trepanation in The Egyptian. The book mentions trepanation frequently and illustrates how to practice it and which instruments are required to perform it. Trepanation is one of the oldest surgical interventions carried out as treatment for cranial trauma and neurological diseases, but it also had the magical and religious purpose of expelling the evil spirits which caused the mental illness, epilepsy, or migraine symptoms. Trepanation is a surgical practice that has been carried out since prehistory to treat post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric illness. The Egyptian is a book that illustrates the trepan, the trepanation technique, and the required set of instruments in full detail. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior fossa malformations: main features and limits in prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Posterior fossa (PF) malformations are commonly observed during prenatal screening. Their understanding requires knowledge of the main steps of PF development and knowledge of normal patterns in US and MR imaging. The vast majority of PF malformations can be strongly suspected by acquiring a midline sagittal slice and a transverse slice and by systematically scrutinizing the elements of the PF: cerebellar vermis, hemispheres, brainstem, fourth ventricle, PF fluid spaces and tentorium. Analysis of cerebellar echogenicity and biometry is also useful. This review explains how to approach the diagnosis of the main PF malformations by performing these two slices and answering six key questions about the elements of the PF. The main imaging characteristics of PF malformations are also reviewed. (orig.)

  17. The topographic relations of the high jugular fossa to the inner ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadin, K.; Wilbrand, H.

    1986-01-01

    The radioanatomy of high jugular fossae and their topographic relations to the inner ear structures were investigated in 245 unselected temporal bones. One hundred and fifty specimens were submitted to multidirectional and 10 to computed tomography. After careful chemical and fermentative maceration plastic casts were made, using polyester resin and silicone rubber. With the use of vacuum, even minute structures became filled with the casting material. The specimens offered a three-dimensional view of the jugular fossae and surrounding structures. Fifty-eight (24%) of the total 245 specimens had high jugular fossae at a level above the lower border of the round window. Five casts showed a dehiscence of the peripheral portion of the vestibular aqueduct caused by the high jugular fossa. In 2 casts the proximal portion of the cochlear aqueduct was affected. In some casts the posterior semicircular canal, the facial canal, the stapedial muscle and the round window lay so close to the fossa that a dehiscence could not be excluded. In a clinical material of 102 high fossae the radiographic findings were in accordance with the experimental results. High jugular fossae were predominantly found in pyramids with low-grade mastoid bone pneumatization and sparse or no perilabyrinthine air cells. (orig.)

  18. The role of ovarian fossa evaluation in patients with ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco Nardone, Carlo; Terranova, Corrado; Plotti, Francesco; Ricciardi, Roberto; Capriglione, Stella; Luvero, Daniela; Caserta, Donatella; Moscarini, Massimo; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Angioli, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate prospectively the presence of endometriosis in the peritoneum of the ovarian fossa of patients affected by endometriomas and its correlation with the adhesion between this peritoneum and endometrioma. Patients presenting ovarian endometriomas and candidate to laparoscopy were considered for inclusion in the study. Patients underwent laparoscopic excision of endometriomas. The presence of adherence of the ovarian fossa to endometrioma was investigated. In all patients, the removal of a peritoneum fragment from the ovarian fossa of the affected ovary was carried out. 68 patients were enrolled in the study. 48 patients presented adhesions to the ovarian fossa. Histopathologic examination of the peritoneum of the ovarian fossa revealed the presence of endometriosis in 87 % of patients presenting adhesions of the endometriomas with ovarian fossa; surprisingly it was present only in 15 % of patients not presenting this condition (p endometriosis on the peritoneal surface of the fossa. This condition significantly correlates with pain symptoms and may predict endometrioma recurrence. The removal of this peritoneum in case of adherent endometrioma may potentially reduce the incidence of recurrence.

  19. Effects of a high jugular fossa and jugular bulb diverticulum on the inner ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadin, K.; Thomander, L.; Wilbrand, H.; Uppsala Univ.

    1986-01-01

    From a series of patients undergoing routine radiographic examination, 112 temporal bones with a high jugular fossa were selected. Among these, 43 jugular bulb diverticula were found. The structures affected by a high fossa or diverticulum were recorded and correlated to the clinical symptoms of the patient. The vestibule was suspected to be affected in five patients. Two of these patients had tinnitus and vertigo, and three had hearing loss. In one of the latter the hearing loss was most marked in the supine position. The cochlea was close to the fossa in three patients, all of whom had tinnitus. Four patients had a defect of the posterior semicircular canal. One of them lost his hearing after a severe fit of coughing, became unsteady and showed signs of a fistula. The internal acoustic meatus and the mastoid portion of the facial canal were affected in two and four patients, respectively, who had no recorded symptoms. Twelve of 34 patients with Meniere's disease and a high jugular fossa on the side of the diseased ear had a dehiscence of the vestibular aqueduct caused by the fossa or diverticulum, compared with nine of 58 patients in the unselected material. For comparison and demonstration of topographic relationships, 58 casts of unselected radiograhed temporal bone specimens with high jugular fossae or diverticula were investigated. In patients with a high jugular fossa or jugular bulb diverticulum, tomographic assessment may be of value. (orig.)

  20. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartman Steve E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little hope that any direct clinical effect will ever be shown. In spite of almost uniformly negative research findings, "cranial" methods remain popular with many practitioners and patients. Summary Until outcome studies show that these techniques produce a direct and positive clinical effect, they should be dropped from all academic curricula; insurance companies should stop paying for them; and patients should invest their time, money, and health elsewhere.

  1. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-04-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa.

  2. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aydin, Kubilay; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  3. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  4. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  5. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Hye; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  6. Decreased Sudomotor Function is Involved in the Formation of Atopic Eczema in the Cubital Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Takahashi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that decreased sweating is a major source of water in the stratum corneum, and decreased sudomotor function may be involved in both the cause and aggravation of representative atopic eczema in the cubital fossa.

  7. Factors affecting outcome in posterior fossa EDH: an analytical study at tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Pateriya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posterior fossa extradural hematomas (PFEDHs are uncommon as compared to supratentorial EDH and these patients can deteriorate very rapidly due to compression over brainstem. Thus early identification and intervention can save the lives of these patients.

  8. Effect of Rapid Maxillary Expansion on Glenoid Fossa and Condyle-Fossa Relationship in Growing Patients (MEGP): Study Protocol for a Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoussoub, Mona Sayegh; Rifai, Khaldoun; Garcia, Robert; Sleilaty, Ghassan

    2018-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is an orthodontic nonsurgical procedure aiming at increasing the width of the maxilla by opening mainly the intermaxillary suture in patients presenting a transverse maxillary skeletal deficiency. The objectives of the current prospective controlled clinical and radiographic study are to evaluate the hypothesis that RME in growing patients will result in radiographic changes at the level of interglenoid fossa distance, condyle-fossa relationship, and nasal cavity widths compared to the group who received no treatment initially and served as untreated control. Materials and Methods: In this prospective controlled clinical and radiographic study, forty healthy growing patients selected from a school-based population following a large screening campaign, ranging in age between 8 and 13 years, presenting a maxillary constriction with bilateral crossbite, and candidates for RME are being recruited. The first group will include participants willing to undergo treatment (n = 25) and the other group will include those inclined to postpone (n = 15). Results: The primary outcome is to compare radiologically the interglenoid fossa distance and the condyle-fossa relationship; nasal cavity width will be a secondary outcome. A multivariable analysis of Covariance model will be used, with the assessment of the time by group interaction, using age as covariate. The project protocol was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Lebanese University, National Institute in Lebanon (CUEMB process number 31/04/2015). The study is funded by the Lebanese University and Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Lebanon (Number: 652 on 14/04/2016). Conclusion: This prospective controlled clinical trial will give information about the effect of RME on the glenoid fossa and condyle-fossa relationship and its impact on the nasal cavity width. Trial Registration: Retrospectively registered in BioMed Central (DOI10.1186/ISRCTN

  9. Radiological imaging detection of tumors localized in fossa cranii posterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin; Ahmetgjekaj, Ilir; Gashi, Sanije; Fazliu, Ilir; Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Shala, Nexhmedin

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial tumors are characterized by a variety imaging aspects and their detection is always a challenge. Clinical application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computerized Tomography has provided an earlier detection and treatment of many CNS pathologies. The aim of this study is to estimate the role of CT and MRI in the determination of posterior fossa tumors. During period 2000-2005 in UCCK-Prishtina, 368 patients were diagnosed with intracranial tumors. Fifty-nine of them were found to have tumor localized in fossa crani posterior (FCP) without any significant difference between genders (50.8% female vs. 49.2% male, chi2 test=0.02 p=0.896). The average age of patients with FCP tumors was 33.1 (SD +/- 22.5, rank 1-70). The most of these patients were registered in 2003 (20.3%) whereas the least in 2000 (11.9%). The most affected age-group was 0-9 (25.4%) and 50-59 (23.7%) whereas the incidences was between 30-39 years of age (3.4%). Tumor types that more often were found in young's individuals were: Astrocytomas with a peak incidence in teenagers (average age was 12-year-old SD +/- 7.5, rank 3-23), next was Medulloblastomas (average age was 11-years-old, SD +/- 2.9, rank 6-16 years) and ependymomas (average age was 6.8-years-old, SD +/- 4.6, rank 1-12). Patients with osseous tumors are characterized by older age than median (61.0, SD +/- 4.2, rank 58-64), then metastases (53.0, SD +/- 5.3, rank 45-60) and meningiomas (50.8, SD +/- 7.7, rank 38-63). The overall average mortality was 0.41 cases per 100,000 inhabitants with variations through years from 0.30-0.50/100,000 inhabitants. Comparing with other countries, for some types of FCP tumors, lower morbidity is shown in Kosova, with mean incidence 0.41/100,000. The most frequent tumors in children were medulloblastomas, brainstem gliomas, astrocytomas and ependymomas whereas meningiomas and metastasis were most often found in adults. For FCP tumors detection, MRI had 100% sensitivity, specificity and

  10. Supratentorial Neurometabolic Alterations in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M., E-mail: rueckriegel.s@nch.uni-wuerzburg.de [Pediatric Neurooncology Program, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Driever, Pablo Hernaiz [Pediatric Neurooncology Program, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Bruhn, Harald [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiology, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Erlanger (Germany)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Therapy and tumor-related effects such as hypoperfusion, internal hydrocephalus, chemotherapy, and irradiation lead to significant motor and cognitive sequelae in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors. A distinct proportion of those factors related to the resulting late effects is hitherto poorly understood. This study aimed at separating the effects of neurotoxic factors on central nervous system metabolism by using H-1 MR spectroscopy to quantify cerebral metabolite concentrations in these patients in comparison to those in age-matched healthy peers. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with World Health Organization (WHO) I pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated by resection only, 24 patients with WHO IV medulloblastoma (MB), who additionally received chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation, and 43 healthy peers were investigated using single-volume H-1 MR spectroscopy of parietal white matter and gray matter. Results: Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were significantly decreased in white matter (p < 0.0001) and gray matter (p < 0.0001) of MB patients and in gray matter (p = 0.005) of PA patients, compared to healthy peers. Decreased creatine concentrations in parietal gray matter correlated significantly with older age at diagnosis in both patient groups (MB patients, p = 0.009, r = 0.52; PA patients, p = 0.006, r = 0.7). Longer time periods since diagnosis were associated with lower NAA levels in white matter of PA patients (p = 0.008, r = 0.66). Conclusions: Differently decreased NAA concentrations were observed in both PA and MB groups of posterior fossa tumor patients. We conclude that this reflects a disturbance of the neurometabolic steady state of normal-appearing brain tissue due to the tumor itself and to the impact of surgery in both patient groups. Further incremental decreases of metabolite concentrations in MB patients may point to additional harm caused by irradiation and chemotherapy. The stronger decrease of NAA in MB

  11. MRI tight posterior fossa sign for prenatal diagnosis of Chiari type II malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Kumiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Ogawa, Masayo; Takada, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hirota, Shozo [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Shakudo, Miyuki [Osaka City General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Gynecology, Nishinomiya (Japan); Minagawa, Kyoko [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Chiari type II malformation (CMII) is one of three hindbrain malformations that display hydrocephalus. We have observed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal in the posterior fossa, which is always apparent on normal fetal MR images, is not visible in a fetus with CMII. We use the term 'tight posterior fossa' for this MR imaging finding, and evaluate the diagnostic value of this finding on fetal MR images. Included in the study were 21 fetuses which underwent brain MR imaging at 1.5 T using two-dimensional balanced turbo-field-echo (2-D balanced-TFE) in the axial and sagittal planes. Postnatal diagnoses were CMII (n=5), CNS abnormalities other than CMII (n=8), and no abnormality (n=8). A tight posterior fossa was defined as an absent or slit-like water signal space around the hindbrain in the posterior fossa on both sagittal and axial MR images. All CMII fetuses displayed a tight posterior fossa on MR images. Hydrocephalus was visualized in all CMII fetuses and myelomeningocele in four fetuses, but hindbrain herniation was visualized only in two of five fetuses. The CSF signal surrounding the hindbrain was clearly visible in all the other 16 fetuses, including five with hydrocephalus not associated with CMII, although it was slightly narrower in a fetus with a cloverleaf skull than in the normal fetuses. Tight posterior fossa in the presence of hydrocephalus is a useful and characteristic finding of CMII on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  12. MRI tight posterior fossa sign for prenatal diagnosis of Chiari type II malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Kumiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Ogawa, Masayo; Takada, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hirota, Shozo; Shakudo, Miyuki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Minagawa, Kyoko

    2007-01-01

    Chiari type II malformation (CMII) is one of three hindbrain malformations that display hydrocephalus. We have observed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal in the posterior fossa, which is always apparent on normal fetal MR images, is not visible in a fetus with CMII. We use the term 'tight posterior fossa' for this MR imaging finding, and evaluate the diagnostic value of this finding on fetal MR images. Included in the study were 21 fetuses which underwent brain MR imaging at 1.5 T using two-dimensional balanced turbo-field-echo (2-D balanced-TFE) in the axial and sagittal planes. Postnatal diagnoses were CMII (n=5), CNS abnormalities other than CMII (n=8), and no abnormality (n=8). A tight posterior fossa was defined as an absent or slit-like water signal space around the hindbrain in the posterior fossa on both sagittal and axial MR images. All CMII fetuses displayed a tight posterior fossa on MR images. Hydrocephalus was visualized in all CMII fetuses and myelomeningocele in four fetuses, but hindbrain herniation was visualized only in two of five fetuses. The CSF signal surrounding the hindbrain was clearly visible in all the other 16 fetuses, including five with hydrocephalus not associated with CMII, although it was slightly narrower in a fetus with a cloverleaf skull than in the normal fetuses. Tight posterior fossa in the presence of hydrocephalus is a useful and characteristic finding of CMII on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  13. Glenoid fossa position in Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Cristina; Giuntini, Veronica; Defraia, Efisio; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-04-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the position of the glenoid fossa in subjects with Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion to better clarify the role of this craniofacial component in Class III skeletal disharmony. A sample of 30 subjects, aged 8 years +/- 6 months, with skeletal and dental Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion, normal skeletal vertical relationships, and normal mandibular dimensions, was compared with a control group of 33 subjects with skeletal and dental Class I relationships. The comparisons between the Class III group and the control group on the cephalometric measures for the assessment of glenoid fossa position were performed with the Mann-Whitney U test at P <0.05. Subjects with Class III malocclusion had a significantly more mesial position of the glenoid fossa, when compared with the control group as measured with 3 parameters. An anterior position of the glenoid fossa is a possible diagnostic anatomic feature of Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion. An effective measurement to evaluate glenoid fossa position in craniofacial relationships is the cephalometric distance from the glenoid fossa to the frontomaxillary-nasal suture.

  14. Glenoid fossa position in Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Veronica; De Toffol, Laura; Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-09-01

    To assess the position of the glenoid fossa in subjects with Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion and normal mandibular size in the mixed dentition. A sample of 30 subjects (16 male, 14 female), age 9 years +/- 6 months, with skeletal and dental Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion, normal skeletal vertical relationships, and normal mandibular dimensions, was compared with a matched group of 37 subjects (18 male, 19 female) with skeletal and dental Class I relationships. The comparisons between the Class II group and the control group on the cephalometric measures for the assessment of glenoid fossa position were performed by means of a nonparametric test for independent samples (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < .05). Subjects with Class II malocclusion presented with a significantly more distal position of the glenoid fossa, when compared with the control group as measured by means of three parameters (GF-S on FH, GF-Ptm on FH, and GF-FMN). A posteriorly displaced glenoid fossa is a possible diagnostic feature of Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion. An effective cephalometric measurement to evaluate glenoid fossa position is the distance from the glenoid fossa to the frontomaxillonasal suture (GF-FMN).

  15. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  16. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  17. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunction caused by neurosarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, Rivkah G. J.; van Tongeren, Joost; Derks, Wynia

    2012-01-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a rare identity and occurs in only 5% to 15% of patients with sarcoidosis. It can manifest in many different ways, and therefore, diagnosis may be complicated. We report a case presented in a very unusual manner with involvement of 3 cranial nerves; anosmia (NI), facial palsy

  18. Quality of life in children survivors of posterior fossa tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Climent, J.A.; Castel Sanchez, V.; Esquembre Menor, C.; Ferris Tortajada, J.; Verdeguer Miralles, A.

    1994-01-01

    We have created a numerical scale in order to measure the Quality of Life in children survivors of posterior fossa tumors. We evaluated the long-term sequelae in 39 patients seen during a 20 year period, with a medium follow-up of 9 years. They were 25 Cerebelar Astrocytoma (CA), 6 Medulloblastoma (MDB), 5 Brain-Stem Glioma (BSG) and 3 Ependymoma of IV ventricle (EPD). Sixty-six per cent of children showed neurologic and/or visual sequelae (Bloom's levels I-II in 66%). Psychointellectual dysfunctions were identified in 44%, with an IQ<90 in 39%. Endocrine disorders were found in 26%. Quality of Life (QL) was measured with our Scale, finding that 19 patients (49%) have a good or acceptable QL, eight (20%) a moderate QL that can be acceptable with adequate rehabilitation, and the remaining 12 (36%) a bad QL that can be improved slightly. Unfavorable outcomes were related to age less than 4 years at diagnosis, type of tumor (MDB, EPD, BSG), incomplete tumoral resection, and use of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. We consider that our scale is complete and adequate to measure the QL of children survivors of CNS tumors. (Author) 55 refs

  19. Comparison of posterior fossa and tumor bed boost in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A C; Saw, C B; Wen, B C

    2000-10-01

    To quantify the difference between the area of brain irradiated using the posterior fossa boost (PFB) and tumor bed boost (TBB) in medulloblastoma, we studied 15 simulation radiographs of patients treated in our institution from 1990 and 1999. The PFB was compared with the TBB, which was defined as the tumor bed plus 2-cm margin as demonstrated by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The PFB field treated a mean area of 9.43 cm2 more brain than the TBB. In 3 patients (20%), the area of the brain in the TBB was larger than the PFB. In 11 patients (73.3%), the PFB field had more than 10% more brain than the TBB. The cochlea was in the PFB and TBB field in all patients. In more than two thirds of patients, the area of brain irradiated with the PFB was at least 10% greater than the TBB. Future studies are needed to determine whether the TBB can replace the PFB in patients with medulloblastoma.

  20. The management of right iliac fossa pain - is timing everything?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCartan, D P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Right iliac fossa (RIF) pain remains the commonest clinical dilemma encountered by general surgeons. We prospectively audited the management of acute RIF pain, examining the relationship between symptom duration, use of pre-operative radiological imaging and patient outcome. METHODS: Over a six-month period, 302 patients, median age 18 years, 59% female, were admitted with RIF pain. Symptoms, clinical findings and laboratory results were documented. Patient management, timing of radiological investigations and operations, and outcome were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Non-specific abdominal pain (26%), gynaecological (22%) and miscellaneous causes (14%) accounted for most admissions. Ultimately, 119 patients (39%) had appendicitis. Anorexia, tachycardia or rebound tenderness in the RIF significantly predicted a final diagnosis of appendicitis. Patients with perforated appendicitis (n = 29) had a longer duration of pre-hospital symptoms (median 50h) compared to those with simple appendicitis (median 17 h) (p<0.001). The use of pre-operative imaging resulted in an increased time to surgery but was not associated with increased post-operative morbidity or perforated appendicitis. CONCLUSION: The majority of patients presenting to hospital with RIF pain did not have appendicitis. Increased duration of pre-hospital symptoms was the main factor associated with perforated appendicitis. However, increased in-hospital time to theatre was not associated with perforated appendicitis or post-operative morbidity.

  1. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia).

  2. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia: Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Benoit

    Full Text Available Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma, has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism, its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia.

  3. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele ... is covered by a sterile dressing. Your child may then be transferred to a neonatal intensive ...

  4. High-resolution cranial ultrasound in the shaken-baby syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Chin, S.C.; Lee, C.C.; Lee, K.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defence Medical Centre, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Huang, C.C. [Dept. of Paediatrics, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan (Taiwan); Zimmerman, R.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yuh, Y.S.; Chen, S.J. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defence Medical Centre, Neihu, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2001-08-01

    With limited near-field resolution and accessible acoustic windows, sonography has not been advocated for assessing central nervous system injuries in the shaken-baby syndrome. Our purpose was to correlate high-resolution ultrasonographic characteristics of central nervous system injuries in whiplash injuries and the shaken-baby-syndrome with MRI and CT. Ultrasonographic images of 13 infants, aged 2-12 months, with whiplash or shaking cranial trauma were reviewed and compared with MRI in 10 and CT in 10. Five patients had serial ultrasonography and MRI or CT follow-up from 1 to 4 months after the initial injury. With ultrasonography we identified 20 subdural haematomas. MRI and CT in 15 of these showed that four were hyperechoic in the acute stage, three were mildly echogenic in the subacute stage, and that one subacute and seven chronic lesions were echo-free. Five patients had acute focal or diffuse echogenic cortical oedema which evolved into subacute subcortical hyperechoic haemorrhage in four, and well-defined chronic sonolucent cystic or noncystic encephalomalacia was seen at follow-up in two. Using ultrasonography we were unable to detect two posterior cranial fossa subdural haematomas or subarachnoid haemorrhage in the basal cisterns in three cases, but did show blood in the interhemispheric cistern and convexity sulci in two. Ultrasonography has limitations in demonstrating abnormalities remote from the high cerebral convexities but may be a useful adjunct to CT and MRI in monitoring the progression of central nervous system injuries in infants receiving intensive care. (orig.)

  5. High-resolution cranial ultrasound in the shaken-baby syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Chin, S.C.; Lee, C.C.; Lee, K.W.; Huang, C.C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Yuh, Y.S.; Chen, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    With limited near-field resolution and accessible acoustic windows, sonography has not been advocated for assessing central nervous system injuries in the shaken-baby syndrome. Our purpose was to correlate high-resolution ultrasonographic characteristics of central nervous system injuries in whiplash injuries and the shaken-baby-syndrome with MRI and CT. Ultrasonographic images of 13 infants, aged 2-12 months, with whiplash or shaking cranial trauma were reviewed and compared with MRI in 10 and CT in 10. Five patients had serial ultrasonography and MRI or CT follow-up from 1 to 4 months after the initial injury. With ultrasonography we identified 20 subdural haematomas. MRI and CT in 15 of these showed that four were hyperechoic in the acute stage, three were mildly echogenic in the subacute stage, and that one subacute and seven chronic lesions were echo-free. Five patients had acute focal or diffuse echogenic cortical oedema which evolved into subacute subcortical hyperechoic haemorrhage in four, and well-defined chronic sonolucent cystic or noncystic encephalomalacia was seen at follow-up in two. Using ultrasonography we were unable to detect two posterior cranial fossa subdural haematomas or subarachnoid haemorrhage in the basal cisterns in three cases, but did show blood in the interhemispheric cistern and convexity sulci in two. Ultrasonography has limitations in demonstrating abnormalities remote from the high cerebral convexities but may be a useful adjunct to CT and MRI in monitoring the progression of central nervous system injuries in infants receiving intensive care. (orig.)

  6. Temporalis myofascial flap for primary cranial base reconstruction after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaly, Ahmed; Magdy, Emad A; Nour, Yasser A; Gaafar, Alaa H

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the use of the temporalis myofascial flap in primary cranial base reconstruction following surgical tumor ablation and to explain technical issues, potential complications, and donor site consequences along with their management. Retrospective case series. Tertiary referral center. Forty-one consecutive patients receiving primary temporalis myofascial flap reconstructions following cranial base tumor resections in a 4-year period. Flap survival, postoperative complications, and donor site morbidity. Patients included 37 males and 4 females ranging in age from 10 to 65 years. Two patients received preoperative and 18 postoperative radiation therapy. Patient follow-up ranged from 4 to 39 months. The whole temporalis muscle was used in 26 patients (63.4%) and only part of a coronally split muscle was used in 15 patients (36.6%). Nine patients had primary donor site reconstruction using a Medpor((R)) (Porex Surgical, Inc., Newnan, GA) temporal fossa implant; these had excellent aesthetic results. There were no cases of complete flap loss. Partial flap dehiscence was seen in six patients (14.6%); only two required surgical débridement. None of the patients developed cerebrospinal leaks or meningitis. One patient was left with complete paralysis of the temporal branch of the facial nerve. Three patients (all had received postoperative irradiation) developed permanent trismus. The temporalis myofascial flap was found to be an excellent reconstructive alternative for a wide variety of skull base defects following tumor ablation. It is a very reliable, versatile flap that is usually available in the operative field with relatively low donor site aesthetic and functional morbidity.

  7. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  8. Cranial Anatomy and Palaeoneurology of the Archosaur Riojasuchus tenuisceps from the Los Colorados Formation, La Rioja, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Belen von Baczko

    Full Text Available Riojasuchus tenuisceps Bonaparte 1967 is currently known from four specimens, including two complete skulls, collected in the late 1960s from the upper levels of the Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, La Rioja, Argentina. Computed tomography (CT scans of the skulls of the holotype and a referred specimen of Riojasuchus tenuisceps and the repreparation of the latter allows recognition of new features for a detailed analysis of its cranial anatomy and its comparison with a wide variety of other archosauriform taxa. The diagnosis of Riojasuchus tenuisceps is emended and two autapomorphies are identified on the skull: (1 a deep antorbital fossa with its anterior and ventral edges almost coinciding with the same edges of the maxilla itself and (2 a suborbital fenestra equal in size to the palatine-pterygoid fenestra. Also, the first digital 3D reconstruction of the encephalon of Riojasuchus tenuisceps was carried out to study its neuroanatomy, showing a shape and cranial nerve disposition consistent to that of other pseudosuchians.

  9. A road map to the internal carotid artery in expanded endoscopic endonasal approaches to the ventral cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Mohamed A; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo; Kerr, Edward E; Naudy, Cristian; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Corsten, Martin; Kassam, Amin

    2014-09-01

    Injuring the internal carotid artery (ICA) is a feared complication of endoscopic endonasal approaches. To introduce a comprehensive ICA classification scheme pertinent to safe endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery. Anatomic dissections were performed in 33 cadaveric specimens (bilateral). Anatomic correlations were analyzed. Based on anatomic correlations, the ICA may be described as 6 distinct segments: (1) parapharyngeal (common carotid bifurcation to ICA foramen); (2) petrous (carotid canal to posterolateral aspect of foramen lacerum); (3) paraclival (posterolateral foramen lacerum to the superomedial aspect of the petrous apex); (4) parasellar (superomedial petrous apex to the proximal dural ring); (5) paraclinoid (from the proximal to the distal dural rings); and (6) intradural (distal ring to ICA bifurcation). Corresponding surgical landmarks included the Eustachian tube, the fossa of Rosenmüller, and levator veli palatini for the parapharyngeal segment; the vidian canal and V3 for the petrous segment; the fibrocartilage of foramen lacerum, foramen rotundum, maxillary strut, lingular process of the sphenoid bone, and paraclival protuberance for the paraclival segment; the sellar floor and petrous apex for the parasellar segment; and the medial and lateral opticocarotid and lateral tubercular recesses, as well as the distal osseous arch of the carotid sulcus for the paraclinoid segment. The proposed endoscopic classification outlines key anatomic reference points independent of the vessel's geometry or the sinonasal pneumatization, thus serving as (1) a practical guide to navigate the ventral cranial base while avoiding injury to the ICA and (2) further foundation for a modular access system.

  10. Metrics and textural features of MRI diffusion to improve classification of pediatric posterior fossa tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Gutierrez, D; Awwad, A; Meijer, L; Manita, M; Jaspan, T; Dineen, R A; Grundy, R G; Auer, D P

    2014-05-01

    Qualitative radiologic MR imaging review affords limited differentiation among types of pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors and cannot detect histologic or molecular subtypes, which could help to stratify treatment. This study aimed to improve current posterior fossa discrimination of histologic tumor type by using support vector machine classifiers on quantitative MR imaging features. This retrospective study included preoperative MRI in 40 children with posterior fossa tumors (17 medulloblastomas, 16 pilocytic astrocytomas, and 7 ependymomas). Shape, histogram, and textural features were computed from contrast-enhanced T2WI and T1WI and diffusivity (ADC) maps. Combinations of features were used to train tumor-type-specific classifiers for medulloblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and ependymoma types in separation and as a joint posterior fossa classifier. A tumor-subtype classifier was also produced for classic medulloblastoma. The performance of different classifiers was assessed and compared by using randomly selected subsets of training and test data. ADC histogram features (25th and 75th percentiles and skewness) yielded the best classification of tumor type (on average >95.8% of medulloblastomas, >96.9% of pilocytic astrocytomas, and >94.3% of ependymomas by using 8 training samples). The resulting joint posterior fossa classifier correctly assigned >91.4% of the posterior fossa tumors. For subtype classification, 89.4% of classic medulloblastomas were correctly classified on the basis of ADC texture features extracted from the Gray-Level Co-Occurence Matrix. Support vector machine-based classifiers using ADC histogram features yielded very good discrimination among pediatric posterior fossa tumor types, and ADC textural features show promise for further subtype discrimination. These findings suggest an added diagnostic value of quantitative feature analysis of diffusion MR imaging in pediatric neuro-oncology. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. The enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal: a new CT finding of facial nerve canal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ruozhen; Li Yuhua; Gong Wuxian; Wu Lebin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the value of enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in the diagnosis of facial nerve canal fracture. Methods: Thirty patients with facial nerve canal fracture underwent axial and coronal CT scan. The correlation between the fracture and the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was analyzed. The ability of showing the fracture and enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal in axial and coronal imaging were compared. Results: Fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was found in the operation in 30 patients, while the fracture was detected in CT in 18 patients. Enlargement of geniculate ganglion of facial nerve was detected in 30 patients in the operation, while the enlargement of fossa was found in CT in 28 cases. Enlargement and fracture of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal were both detected in CT images in 18 patients. Only the enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was shown in 12 patients in CT. Conclusion: Enlargement of geniculate fossa of facial nerve canal was a useful finding in the diagnosis of fracture of geniculate fossa in patients with facial paralysis, even no fracture line was shown on CT images. (authors)

  12. A Percutaneous Transtubular Middle Fossa Approach for Intracanalicular Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio; Evins, Alexander I; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Stieg, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    In cases of small intracanalicular tumors (≤ 1.5 cm), the middle fossa approach (MFA) provides the ability for adequate tumor removal with preservation of existing auditory function. Application of a minimally invasive tubular retractor in this approach may help mitigate the risk of postoperative seizures, aphasia, and venous complications by minimizing intraoperative retraction of the temporal lobe. We propose a minimally invasive microscopic and/or endoscopic percutaneous transtubular MFA for the management of intracanalicular tumors. Subtemporal keyhole craniectomies were performed on 5 preserved cadaveric heads (10 sides), with 6 sides previously injected with a synthetic tumor model. A ViewSite Brain Access System tubular retractor (Vycor Medical, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida, USA) was used to provide minimal temporal retraction and protection of the surrounding anatomy. An extradural dissection of the internal auditory canal was performed under microscopic and endoscopic visualization with a minimally invasive surgical drill and tube shaft instruments, the intracanalicular tumors were removed, and degree of resection was assessed. All 10 approaches were completed successfully through the tubular retractor with minimal retraction of the temporal lobe. Excellent visualization of the structures within the internal auditory canal was achieved with both the microscope and 3-dimensional endoscope. On the 6 synthetic intracanalicular tumors resected, 5 gross total (Grade I) and 1 near total (Grade II) resections were achieved. A percutaneous transtubular MFA is a feasible minimally invasive option for resection of small intracanalicular tumors with potential preservation of auditory function, reduced temporal retraction, and enhanced protection of surrounding structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  14. Intrapopulational body size variation and cranial capacity variation in Middle Pleistocene humans: the Sima de los Huesos sample (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, C; Carretero, J M; Arsuaga, J L; Gracia, A; Martínez, I

    1998-05-01

    A sexual dimorphism more marked than in living humans has been claimed for European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals and prehistoric modern humans. In this paper, body size and cranial capacity variation are studied in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene sample. This is the largest sample of non-modern humans found to date from one single site, and with all skeletal elements represented. Since the techniques available to estimate the degree of sexual dimorphism in small palaeontological samples are all unsatisfactory, we have used the bootstraping method to asses the magnitude of the variation in the Sima de los Huesos sample compared to modern human intrapopulational variation. We analyze size variation without attempting to sex the specimens a priori. Anatomical regions investigated are scapular glenoid fossa; acetabulum; humeral proximal and distal epiphyses; ulnar proximal epiphysis; radial neck; proximal femur; humeral, femoral, ulnar and tibial shaft; lumbosacral joint; patella; calcaneum; and talar trochlea. In the Sima de los Huesos sample only the humeral midshaft perimeter shows an unusual high variation (only when it is expressed by the maximum ratio, not by the coefficient of variation). In spite of that the cranial capacity range at Sima de los Huesos almost spans the rest of the European and African Middle Pleistocene range. The maximum ratio is in the central part of the distribution of modern human samples. Thus, the hypothesis of a greater sexual dimorphism in Middle Pleistocene populations than in modern populations is not supported by either cranial or postcranial evidence from Sima de los Huesos.

  15. Complicated Pseudomeningocele Repair After Chiari Decompression: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, Claudio; Bond, Aaron E

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomeningocele is a recognised complication after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation. Its management can be challenging and treatment options vary in literature. A difficult-to-treat case of a pseudomeningocele after posterior fossa decompression for a Chiari I malformation is presented. A 34-year-old woman underwent an initial decompression followed by multiple revision surgeries after the development of a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and a low-grade infection. Complications associated with standard treatment modalities, including lumbar drainage and dural repair, are discussed. A review of the existing literature is presented. The reported case ultimately required complete removal of all dural repair materials to eliminate the patient's low-grade infection, a muscular flap, and placement of a ventricular-peritoneal shunt for definitive treatment after a trial of a lumbar drain led to herniation and development of a syrinx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cranial x-ray CT and MRI in congenital muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Konishi, Toshihiko; Konagaya, Masaaki; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya

    1988-01-01

    The involvements of central nervous system in those cases of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), especially in Fukuyama type CMD, have been observed both radiologically and pathologically. The recent development of MRI made it easier to detect fine structural changes in brain matter than the X-ray CT. Then, we tried to evaluate the central nervous system abnormalities of six cases of CMD by both X-ray CT and MRI. In one case, X-ray CT revealed diffuse hypodensity of cerebral white matter, and MRI showed high intensity on long spin-echo image and low intensity on inversion-recovery image. In another case, X-ray CT showed no abnormal findings, but long spin-echo image revealed two high intensity spots in cerebral white matter. In other four cases, brain atrophy was demonstrated by X-ray CT and/or MRI, one case of these patients had bilateral congenital arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa and hypogenesis of temporal lobes. Although we could not demonstrate polymicrogyria and agyria in all cases by MRI, white matter changes and structural changes were revealed more clearly than X-ray CT. The combination of X-ray CT and MRI seems to make a noteworthy contribution to estimate the central nervous system abnormalities in CMD. (author)

  17. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  18. On the roentgenomorphological correlations of cranial sutures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoglyadova, T.P.; Koval', G.Yu.; Shuaa, T.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors explain the essence of the zone of excessive transparence along the cranial sutures visualized on the X-ray pictures during the first year of life by presence of large number of rough-fiber bone in the marginal regions. The zone of ''physiological sclerosis'' is postulated as a result of summation of the bone margin shadows consisting of compact substance (osteones). Microscopic examination of skull in brain tumors revealed a delay in the formation of bone margins in the suture region with an excessive amount of connective and osteoid tissue while in craniostenosis closure of cranial sutures being with intensive bone formation as well as by closure of the bone margins by newly formed bone tissue around the vessels of the connective layer of the suture

  19. Imaging characteristics of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wai-Yung; Saunders, Dawn E.; Brock, Penelope

    2005-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma accounts for 10-15% of all childhood malignant bone tumours and is second in prevalence to osteosarcoma. The skull bones are an unusual site of origin of primary Ewing sarcoma in children. Previous reports concentrate on the neurosurgical aspects and relatively good outcome compared to other bone tumours of the calvarium. Reported cases mainly describe the imaging characteristics on CT. To describe the MRI and CT features of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma. The neuroimaging of three cases of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma are reviewed. Our three cases show an extra-axial mass that is high attenuation on CT and low signal on T2-weighted MRI. Haemorrhagic components, dural extension and contrast enhancement are also characteristic features. CT attenuation and magnetic resonance signal characteristics reflect sheets of densely packed cells seen in Ewing sarcoma. (orig.)

  20. Sandwich wound closure reduces the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leaks in posterior fossa surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Heymanns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8% in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark, Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy. The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature.

  1. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2018-02-01

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  2. Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia and mastoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz Mosaad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cholesteatoma may be expected in abnormally developed ear, it may cause bony erosion of the middle ear cleft and extend to the infratemporal fossa. We present the first case of congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in a patient with congenital aural atresia that has been complicated with acute mastoiditis. Case presentation A sixteen year old Egyptian male patient presented with congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia complicated with acute mastoiditis. Two weeks earlier, the patient suffered pain necessitating hospital admission, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a soft tissue mass in the right infratemporal fossa. On presentation to our institute, Computerized tomography was done as a routine, it proved the diagnosis of mastoiditis, pure tone audiometry showed an air-bone gap of 60 dB. Cortical mastoidectomy was done for treatment of mastoiditis, removal of congenital cholesteatoma was carried out with reconstruction of external auditory canal. Follow-up of the patient for 2 years and 3 months showed a patent, infection free external auditory canal with an air-bone gap has been reduced to 35db. One year after the operation; MRI was done and it showed no residual or recurrent cholesteatoma. Conclusions Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in cases of congenital aural atresia can be managed safely even if it was associated with mastoiditis. It is an original case report of interest to the speciality of otolaryngology.

  3. [Acute palsy of twelfth cranial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz del Castillo, F; Molina Nieto, T; De la Riva Aguilar, A; Triviño Tarradas, F; Bravo-Rodríguez, F; Ramos Jurado, A

    2005-01-01

    The hypoglossal nerve or Twelfth-nerve palsy is a rare damage with different causes: tumors or metastases in skull base, cervicals tumors, schwannoma, dissection or aneurysm carotid arteries, stroke, trauma, idiopathic cause, radiation, infections (mononucleosis) or multiple cranial neuropathy. Tumors were responsible for nearly half of the cases in different studies. We studied a female with hypoglossal nerve acute palsy. We made a differential diagnostic with others causes and a review of the literature.

  4. Cranial computed tomography of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Koshi; Imakita, Satoru; Kawai, Ryuji; Mitomo, Masanori; Miura, Takashi; Mimaki, Takashi; Satoh, Kenji

    1986-01-01

    Brain CTs of 15 patients with complementation group A xeroderma pigmentosum were reviewed. The CT findings were cerebral atrophy and brain stem atrophy, and were more prominent in the older patients. Cranial bone change (microcephaly, calvarial thickening and so on) secondary to brain atrophy becomes overt in the patients older than 8 years. Cerebellar atrophy was not detected with CT in any case. There were neither intracranial calcification nor space occupying lesion. (author)

  5. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Pradeep P.; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  6. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Pradeep P; Kalita, Jayantee [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Misra, Usha K. [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)], E-mail: drukmisra@rediffmail.com

    2009-06-15

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  7. MR imaging of cranial nerve schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Peyster, R.; Cross, R.R.; Charles, J.; Murtagh, R.; Shapiro, R.; Chyatte, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major advantages of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over other imaging modalities is direct visualization of the cranial nerves. This is best accomplished with thin-section, contiguous T1-weighted images. They report a series of 75 cranial nerve neuromas, including 47 of the eighth nerve and a mixture of schwannomas involving all other cranial nerves (excluding the fourth). All tumors demonstrated at least some area of increased signal (equal to or greater than that of cerebrospinal fluid) on T2-weighted images. This fact enabled them to differentiate schwannomas from neoplasms (lymphoma, meningioma, sarcoma) that may be isointense on T2-weighted pulse sequences. Many of the lesions had areas of low signal intermixed with predominantly high signal (on T2-weighted images). The pathologic evaluation of these areas of decreased signal revealed predominant fibrosis. In addition, some of the neuromas had a cystic component. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging may permit detection when the nerve is still normal in size

  8. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  9. Intensive care unit course of infants and children after cranial vault reconstruction for craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen David A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniosynostosis (CSS results from the premature closure of one or more cranial sutures, leading to deformed calvaria at birth. It is a common finding in children with an incidence of one in 2000 births. Surgery is required in order to release the synostotic constraint and promote normal calvaria growth. Cranial vault remodeling is the surgical approach to CSS repair at our institution and it involves excision of the frontal, parietal, and occipital bones. The purpose of this article is to describe the post-operative course of infants and children admitted to our PICU after undergoing cranial vault remodeling for primary CSS. Findings Complete data was available for analyses in only 82 patients, 44 males (M and 38 females (F; M: F ratio was 1:1.2. Patients (pts age in months (mo ranged from 2 mo to 132 mo, mean 18.2 ±-24.9 mo and weights (wt ranged from 4.7 kg to 31.4 kg, mean 10.24 ± 5.5 Kg.. Duration of surgery (DOS ranged from 70 minutes to 573 minutes mean 331.6 ± 89.0 minutes. No significant correlation exist between duration of surgery, suture category, patient's age or use of blood products (P > 0.05. IOP blood loss was higher in older pts (P 3 days in 32%. Pts with fever had prolonged LOS (P Conclusions Post-op morbidities from increased use of blood products can be minimized if cranial vault remodeling is done at a younger age in patients with primary CSS. PICU length of stay is determined in part by post-op pyrexia and it can be reduced if extensive evaluations of post-op fever are avoided.

  10. Use of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis for Cranial Expansion in Syndromic Craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataru Sunaga, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis often require a large amount of cranial expansion to avoid intracranial hypertension, but the surgical procedure remains controversial. A patient of severe syndromic craniosynostosis with multiple bony defects and anomalous venous drainage at the occipital region was treated by multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO at the age of 8 months. Distraction started 5 days after surgery and ceased on postoperative day 16. The distraction devices were removed 27 days after completing distraction. After device removal, the increase of intracranial volume was 155 ml and the cephalic index was improved from 115.5 to 100.5. The resultant cranial shape was well maintained with minimal relapse at postoperative 9 months. In cases of syndromic craniosynostosis with multiple bony defects and/or anomalous venous drainage at the occipital region, expansion of the anterior cranium by MCDO is a viable alternative to conventional methods.

  11. Clival osteomyelitis resulting from spread of infection through the fossa navicularis magna in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Zinkus, Timothy; Cheng, Alan G.; Rahbar, Reza

    2009-01-01

    The fossa navicularis is a notch-like bone defect in the basiocciput that has been hitherto considered as an anatomical variant of the clivus and not previously described as a potential source of clival or skull base pathology. We report the imaging findings in a 5-year-old child who presented acutely with a retropharyngeal abscess and osteomyelitis of the clivus. Imaging after treatment revealed a ''notch-like'' defect in the anterior clivus consistent with a fossa navicularis. Based on these appearances, we postulate that the lymphoid tissue of the pharyngeal tonsil residing in the fossa navicularis served as a route through which infection spread and subsequently developed into clival osteomyelitis, which is a rare diagnosis. This case is unique, and we believe that the presence of this variant in young children may be important and is not merely an anatomical curiosity. (orig.)

  12. Ependymoma of the pituitary fossa. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhida, Karim; Asa, Sylvia; Gentili, Fred; Shannon, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    The authors describe a case of pituitary fossa ependymoma and discuss its immunohistochemical and ultrastructural characteristics. A 43-year-old man presented with decreased libido and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a well-demarcated enhancing lesion of the pituitary fossa that was completely resected via a transsphenoidal approach. Ependymomas rarely occur in the pituitary fossa, and have been reported in this location only three times in humans and once in a horse. This is the first study in which investigators examined the appearance of a pituitary ependymoma by using electron microscopy. Theories of the origin and treatment of these rare tumors are discussed as they relate to other articles on intracranial ependymomas.

  13. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  14. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, John T.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Peters, Lester J.; Ang, K. Kian

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a concomitant boost fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for treating patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Patients and Methods: Between December 1983 and November 1992, 83 patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsil were treated with concomitant boost fractionation. The distribution of American Joint Committee on Cancer T stages was TX-4, T1-5, T2-29, T3-41, T4-4; N stages were NX-1, N0-26, N1-13, N2-31, N3-12. Patients were treated with standard large fields to 54 Gy in 6 weeks. The boost treatment consisted of a second daily 1.5 Gy fraction for 10-12 fractions, usually delivered during the final phase of treatment. The tumor dose was 69-72 Gy, given over 6 weeks. Twenty-one patients, who all had N2 or N3 regional disease, underwent neck dissections, either before (13 patients) or 6 weeks after radiotherapy (8 patients); the other patients were treated with radiotherapy alone. Results: The 5-year actuarial disease-specific survival and overall survival rates were 71 and 60%, respectively. Patients with T2 and T3 primary tumors had 5-year actuarial local control rates of 96 and 78%, respectively. Patients with T3 disease who received the final-phase boost had a 5-year actuarial local control rate of 82%. Actuarial 5-year regional disease control rates were N0, 92%; N1, 76%; N2, 89%; and N3, 89%. The 21 patients who had neck dissections all had their disease regionally controlled. Patients presenting with nodal disease or after a node excision who were treated with radiation alone had a 5-year actuarial regional disease control rate of 79%. All but five patients had confluent Grade 4 mucositis during treatment. Severe late complications attributable to radiation included mandibular necrosis, in-field osteosarcoma, and chronic dysphagia for solid foods. Conclusions: High rates of local and regional disease control were achieved with the concomitant boost fractionation schedule, with few cases of severe late

  15. The Radiological Spectrum of Orbital Pathologies that Involve the Lacrimal Gland and the Lacrimal Fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Sang; Ahn, Kook Jin; Park, Mi Ra; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tai [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    CT and MRI are utilized to differentiate between different types of masses and to determine the extent of lesions involving the lacrimal gland and the fossa. In lacrimal gland epithelial tumors, benign pleomorphic adenomas are seen most commonly with a well defined benign appearance, and a malignant adenoid cystic carcinoma is seen with a typical invasive malignant appearance. However, a malignant myoepithelial carcinoma is seen with a benign looking appearance. Lymphomatous lesions of the lacrimal gland include a broad spectrum ranging from reactive hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. These lesions can be very difficult to differentiate both radiologically and pathologically. Generally, lymphomas tend to occur in older patients. The developmental cystic lesions found in the lacrimal fossa such as dermoid and epidermoid cysts can be diagnosed when the cyst involves the superior temporal quadrant of the orbit and manifests as a nonenhancing cystic mass and, in case of a lipoma, it is diagnosed as a total fatty mass. However, masses of granulocytic sarcoma and xanthogranuloma, as well as vascular masses, such as a hemangiopericytoma, are difficult to diagnose correctly on the basis of preoperative imaging findings alone. Clinically, the lesions of the lacrimal gland and fossa are found as palpable masses in the superior lateral aspect of the orbit, and these lesions constitute about 5-13% of all of the orbital masses confirmed by biopsy. Many different pathological entities arise from the lacrimal gland and fossa, and as each of them requires a different therapeutic approach, the radiological characterization of each lesion is important. Approximately, half of the lacrimal gland masses are tumors of epithelial origin and the rest are lesions that arise from lymphoid or inflammatory diseases. Pseudotumors, metastatic masses and developmental cysts may also occur in the lacrimal fossa. This paper aims to discuss the radiologic findings of the lesions that are found in

  16. The Radiological Spectrum of Orbital Pathologies that Involve the Lacrimal Gland and the Lacrimal Fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won Sang; Ahn, Kook Jin; Park, Mi Ra; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tai

    2007-01-01

    CT and MRI are utilized to differentiate between different types of masses and to determine the extent of lesions involving the lacrimal gland and the fossa. In lacrimal gland epithelial tumors, benign pleomorphic adenomas are seen most commonly with a well defined benign appearance, and a malignant adenoid cystic carcinoma is seen with a typical invasive malignant appearance. However, a malignant myoepithelial carcinoma is seen with a benign looking appearance. Lymphomatous lesions of the lacrimal gland include a broad spectrum ranging from reactive hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. These lesions can be very difficult to differentiate both radiologically and pathologically. Generally, lymphomas tend to occur in older patients. The developmental cystic lesions found in the lacrimal fossa such as dermoid and epidermoid cysts can be diagnosed when the cyst involves the superior temporal quadrant of the orbit and manifests as a nonenhancing cystic mass and, in case of a lipoma, it is diagnosed as a total fatty mass. However, masses of granulocytic sarcoma and xanthogranuloma, as well as vascular masses, such as a hemangiopericytoma, are difficult to diagnose correctly on the basis of preoperative imaging findings alone. Clinically, the lesions of the lacrimal gland and fossa are found as palpable masses in the superior lateral aspect of the orbit, and these lesions constitute about 5-13% of all of the orbital masses confirmed by biopsy. Many different pathological entities arise from the lacrimal gland and fossa, and as each of them requires a different therapeutic approach, the radiological characterization of each lesion is important. Approximately, half of the lacrimal gland masses are tumors of epithelial origin and the rest are lesions that arise from lymphoid or inflammatory diseases. Pseudotumors, metastatic masses and developmental cysts may also occur in the lacrimal fossa. This paper aims to discuss the radiologic findings of the lesions that are found in

  17. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  19. Remote Supratentorial Hemorrhage After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Brief Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The supratentorial hemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery is an unusual but delicate complication that carries high mortality and morbidity. A 50 year old woman presented vertigo 6 months of evolution, which worsened in the last 2 months accompanied by ataxia. She showed left cerebellar signs, had no focal motor or sensory deficits. A brain MRI identified cerebellopontine angle lesion with mass effect. The patient was treated on suboccipital craniectomy and resection of right posterior fossa tumor, the histopathological diagnosis was consistent with typical meningioma. (WHO Class I.

  20. [Morphometric evaluation of the lateral fossa during the pre-gyrus period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlam, H; Macovei, G N; Antohe, D St

    2002-09-01

    During edification of neocortex, the lateral fossa is involved in the process of development of cerebral hemispheres. It changes its shape and, from a shallow depression at the end of the 3rd month, it becomes a triangular surface with marked borders. Finally, in the same time with the appearance of circumvolutions the opercles that limit it come closer and give rise to the lateral sulcus. The evolution of the lateral fossa can be analysed by linear and surface parameters. Morphometric and statistic analyse of these parameters, compared with those of the cerebral hemisphere, allowed us to establish some original criteria for appreciating the growth of the foetal brain.

  1. Relationship between external and histologic features of progressive stages of caries in the occlusal fossa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K R; Kuzmina, I; Bjørndal, L

    1995-01-01

    highly correlated (rs = 0.90). Dentinal changes were also highly correlated with enamel changes (rs = 0.85). The histologic classifications in conjunction with the macroscopical observations made it possible to demonstrate a clear relationship between the external degree of caries progression......) and 8 (M) classification criteria, ranging from 'sound' to 'cavitation with dentine involvement'. Six radiographic scores were used in the classification. Sections 250 microns in thickness were cut in buccolingual direction through the central fossa, and the fossa section with the most extensive...

  2. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    OpenAIRE

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the ...

  3. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  4. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  5. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Subrat Kumar Nanda; Sita Jayalakshmi; Devashish Ruikar; Mohandas Surath

    2013-01-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is...

  6. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat Kumar Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth. Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  7. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.F.; Kasprian, G.; Nemec, U.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies. (orig.) [de

  10. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Chaudhary, N.; Fareedi, S.; Woo, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality

  11. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  12. Secular trends in Cherokee cranial morphology: Eastern vs Western bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, Rebecca; Ross, Ann H; Jantz, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The research objective was to examine if secular trends can be identified for cranial data commissioned by Boas in 1892, specifically for cranial breadth and cranial length of the Eastern and Western band Cherokee who experienced environmental hardships. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the degree of relationship between each of the cranial measures: cranial length, cranial breadth and cephalic index, along with predictor variables (year-of-birth, location, sex, admixture); the model revealed a significant difference for all craniometric variables. Additional regression analysis was performed with smoothing Loess plots to observe cranial length and cranial breadth change over time (year-of-birth) separately for Eastern and Western Cherokee band females and males born between 1783-1874. This revealed the Western and Eastern bands show a decrease in cranial length over time. Eastern band individuals maintain a relatively constant head breadth, while Western Band individuals show a sharp decline beginning around 1860. These findings support negative secular trend occurring for both Cherokee bands where the environment made a detrimental impact; this is especially marked with the Western Cherokee band.

  13. Intermittent cranial lung herniation in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Carlo; De Simone, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Diana, Alessia

    2007-01-01

    Two aged dogs with chronic obstructive airway disease were evaluated because of intermittent swelling of the ventral cervical region. Radiographs made at expiration and caudal positioning of the forelimbs allowed identification of intermittent cervical lung herniation of the left and right cranial lung lobe in both dogs. Pulmonary hyperinflation, increased expiratory effort, and chronic coughing were considered responsible for the lung herniation. Cervical lung hernia should be included in the differential diagnoses of intermittent cervical swelling in dogs with chronic respiratory disorders associated with increased expiratory effort and chronic coughing.

  14. Posterior fossa syndrome in a patient with an ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedermeijer, S. C M; Van Den Hout, J.; Geleijns, C.; De Klerk, H.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) is a well-known clinical entity and mainly occurs in children. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTC) is the most common urea cycle disorder, which occurs in an estimated 1 per 50.000 live births in Japan. Symptoms are mostly due to hyperammonemia and include

  15. 3DCRT for posterior fossa: Sparing of surrounding organs at risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Radiotherapy of the posterior fossa is routinely delivered using 3DCRT parallel-opposed lateral fields. However high incidence of sensorineural hearing loss, hypothalamic– pituitary dysfunction, thyroid and gonadal dysfunction during radiotherapy makes the need for treatment plan which provides adequate ...

  16. Cysts of the fossa of Rosenmüller: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Simon K W; Di Cuffa, Riccardo A; Seymour, Felicity K; Savy, Lloyd E; Grant, Henry R

    2010-08-01

    Cystic lesions of the nasopharynx are rare. Two cases of mucous retention cysts originating from the fossa of Rosenmüller are described, together with their characteristic radiologic appearance, which allows differentiation from other types of lesions in this region. The differential diagnosis and treatment options are discussed.

  17. Is bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa a factor in post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, J. C.; Georgalas, C.; Kyi, M.; Ghufoor, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify if there is a link between bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa and post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective non-interventional study of 105 patients who underwent tonsillectomy during a seven-month period. The study took place in a

  18. Traumatic acute subdural haematomas of the posterior fossa: clinicoradiological analysis of 24 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, D. d'; Conti, A.; Cardali, S.; Tomasello, F.; Servadei, F.; Scerrati, M.; Tomei, G.; Brambilla, G.; Massaro, F.; Stefini, R.; Cristofori, L.

    2003-01-01

    We report 24 patients with a traumatic acute subdural haematoma of the posterior fossa managed between 1997 and 1999 at 8 Italian neurosurgical centres. Each centre provided data about patients clinico-radiological findings, management, and outcomes, which were retrospectively reviewed. A poor result occurred in 14 patients (58.3 %). Ten patients (41.7 %) had favourable results. Patients were divided into two groups according to their admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. In Group 1 (12/24 cases; GCS score, 8), the outcome was favourable in 75 % of cases. In Group 2 (12/12 cases; GCS score, <8), the outcome was poor in 91.6 % of cases. Nineteen patients underwent posterior fossa surgery. Factors correlating to outcome were GCS score, status of the basal cisterns and the fourth ventricle, and the presence of supratentorial hydrocephalus. Multivariate analysis showed significant independent prognostic effect only for GCS score (P < 0.05). Acute posterior fossa subdural haematomas can be divided into two distinct groups: those patients admitted in a comatose state and those with a moderate/mild head injury on admission. Comatose patients present usually with signs of posterior fossa mass effect and have a high percentage of bad outcomes. On the contrary, patients admitted with a GCS of 8 or higher are expected to recover. In these patients the thickness of the haematoma (< 1 cm) seems to be a guide to indicate surgical evacuation of the haematoma. (author)

  19. Posterior fossa midline cryptococcoma in a patient with idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is a rare disorder which is often diagnosed as HIV-negative AIDS in the light of poor immunity and AIDS-defining illnesses. We present a case of a 50-year-old male who presented with a midline posterior fossa tumour with ICL diagnosed as cerebellar cryptococcoma.

  20. Infraorbital Foramen and Pterygopalatine Fossa Location in Dry Skulls: Anatomical Guidelines for Local Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Masabni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to locate the infraorbital foramen (IOF in relation to the infraorbital margin (IOM for proper injections of local anesthetics in skull specimens. Another aim was to determine the depth of needle penetration into pterygopalatine fossa through the greater palatine canal (GPC. Materials and Methods. 102 skull halves were used to measure the distances between (1 IOF and IOM and (2 IOF and alveolar ridge of maxilla at second premolar. Needles were inserted and bent at a 45° angle, passing through the GPC at the level of hard palate. The depth of the tip of needle emerging out of GPC into pterygopalatine fossa was measured. Results. The mean distance between IOF and IOM was 6.46±1.57 mm on the right side and 6.74±1.72 mm on the left. The mean distance between IOF and alveolar bone process of the maxilla at second premolar was 29.07±3.58 mm on the right side and 29.39±3.78 mm on the left. The mean depth of penetration of the needle into the pterygopalatine fossa was similar on both sides. Conclusions. Proper identification of IOF and pterygopalatine fossa is of great significance during local anesthesia injections, due to their close proximity to vital anatomic structures.

  1. 3DCRT for posterior fossa: Sparing of surrounding organs at risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-25

    Jun 25, 2013 ... including non-posterior fossa brain, pituitary, cochlea, eyes, optic nerves, optic chiasm, ... grams; Rt.C, right cochlea; Lt. C, left cochlea; Non P.F, non posterior ... child's cognitive function and quality of life.6 Although the.

  2. Infratemporal fossa extension of primary parotid squamous cell carcinoma: a rare entity with diagnosis dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaf, J.H.; Gendeh, B.S.; Yunus, M.R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of parotid gland is rare but it is an aggressive neoplasm that can have extension into the infratemporal fossa. We report a 60-year-old female presenting with toothache over left lower molar causing a diagnostic dilemma. (author)

  3. [Acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa caused by forehead impact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S; Furukawa, K; Endo, S; Hoshi, S; Kanaya, H

    1988-03-01

    A rare case of acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa caused by forehead impact is reported. This 36-year-old man fell from a truck and hit his face. He was conscious and was brought to our center 30 minutes after the injury. On admission, a contused wound of the right forehead was noticed. He was restless and had severe pain in the neck and upper extremities. Skull X-ray showed a linear fracture of the frontal bone and computed tomography (CT) scan was normal. He continued to be restless and sudden respiratory arrest and pupillary dilation occurred 10 hours after the admission. A CT scan revealed a lenticular high density area in the left posterior fossa which extended to the supratentorial region. The 4th ventricle was compressed and displaced to the right and also the quadrigeminal and ambient cisterns were not visualized at all. Immediate surgery disclosed a 30 g epidural hematoma of the left posterior fossa and the supratentorium and the clot was completely evacuated. The source of bleeding could not be identified. Opening of the dura revealed contusion in the occipital lobe. He died on the 17th postoperative day. The possible mechanism in the production of the posterior fossa hematoma in this case is discussed.

  4. PAEDIATRIC POSTERIOR FOSSA TUMORS: A CLIN ICO - PATHOLOGICAL STUDY I N A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sekhar Kennedy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tumors of the Central Nervous S ystem , are the second commonest childhood tumors and are the most common solid paediatric tumors comprising 40% - 50% of all tumors . 1 2 Posterior fossa brain tumors are one of the most devastating forms of human illnesses wh ich are more common in children. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To study the incidence, clinicopathological features and management of paediatric posterior fossa tumors. MATERIALS AND METHOD S : This is a prospective study done in the Department of Neurosurgery, Ranga raya Medical College, Government General Hospital, Kakinada from 2012 to 2015. It is a Tertiary Care Hospital. A total of 25 paediatric patients ranging from infants to 15 years were included in the study. DISCUSSION AND CONCL USION: Posterior fossa tumors are the commonest solid brain tumors of children with a rate of 2.4 per lakh of children at risk per year. The predominant symptoms are headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar symptoms (gait disturbances. Posterior fossa tumors are predominantly seen in children with peak incidence in first decade. Commonest presenting symptoms are due to raised intracranial pressure with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar symptoms. Meticulous microsurgical techniques are to be followed in removing these tum ors. The incidence of recurrence is very less after gross total excision. Prognosis is good in patients with total excision

  5. Pontine encephalocele and abnormalities of the posterior fossa following transclival endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Filho, Francisco Vaz Guimaraes; Costacou, Tina; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H; Rothfus, William E; Gardner, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Transclival endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) has recently been used for the treatment of posterior fossa tumors. The optimal method of reconstruction of large clival defects following EES has not been established. A morphometric analysis of the posterior fossa was performed in patients who underwent transclival EES to compare those with observed postoperative anatomical changes (study group) to 50 normal individuals (anatomical control group) and 41 matched transclival cases with preserved posterior fossa anatomy (case-control group) using the same parameters. Given the absence of clival bone following transclival EES, the authors used the line between the anterior commissure and the basion as an equivalent to the clival plane to evaluate the location of the pons. Four parameters were studied and compared in the two populations: the pontine location/displacement, the maximum anteroposterior (AP) diameter of the pons, the maximum AP diameter of the fourth ventricle, and the cervicomedullary angle (CMA). All measurements were performed on midsagittal 3-month postoperative MR images in the study group. Among 103 posterior fossa tumors treated with transclival EES, 14 cases (13.6%) with postoperative posterior fossa anatomy changes were identified. The most significant change was anterior displacement of the pons (transclival pontine encephalocele) compared with the normal location in the anatomical control group (p 50% of the clivus) and dura. Nine (64.3%) of the 14 patients were overweight (body mass index [BMI] > 25 kg/m(2)). An association between BMI and the degree of pontine encephalocele was observed, but did not reach statistical significance. The use of a fat graft as part of the reconstruction technique following transclival EES with dural opening was the single significant factor that prevented pontine displacement (p = 0.02), associated with 91% lower odds of pontine encephalocele (OR = 0.09, 95% CI 0.01-0.77). The effect of fat graft reconstruction was

  6. Problems of cranial computer-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, D [Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Abt.

    1979-07-01

    The author discusses the problems that have cropped up since the introduction of computerized tomography 5 years ago. To begin with, problems of contrast and object resolution are discussed with a special view to the importance of amipague imaging of cisterns, in particular in the detection of basal growing and displacing, intracranial processes. After this, the tasks of computerized tomography in neurological and neurosurgical emergencies, cerebrocranial injuries, cerebral circulation disturbances, inflammatory diseases of the central nervous systems, epileptic seizures, and chronical headaches are reviewed. Special regard is given to the problem of recurrent examinations and course control, especially in cerebral tumours and aresorptive hydrocephalus. Another paragraph deals with the correlation between CT findings, clinical symptoms, and clinical findings. The importance of cranial CT for neurological diagnoses is illustrated by the change of indications for conventional methods of examination. The limits of the method are shown and it is pointed out that cranial CT is not a search technique but that it requires previous examinations by a neurologist, neurosurgeon, or neuropaediatrician.

  7. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvik, G.; Alberius, P.; Fahlman, M.

    1986-01-01

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease

  8. Problems of cranial computer-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, D.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the problems that have cropped up since the introduction of computerized tomography 5 years ago. To begin with, problems of contrast and object resolution are discussed with a special view to the importance of amipague imaging of cisterns, in particular in the detection of basal growing and displacing, intracranial processes. After this, the tasks of computerized tomography in neurological and neurosurgical emergencies, cerebrocranial injuries, cerebral circulation disturbances, inflammatory diseases of the central nervous systems, epileptic seizures, and chronical headaches are reviewed. Special regard is given to the problem of recurrent examinations and course control, especially in cerebral tumours and aresorptive hydrocephalus. Another paragraph deals with the correlation between CT findings, clinical symptoms, and clinical findings. The importance of cranial CT for neurological diagnoses is illustrated by the change of indications for conventional methods of examination. The limits of the method are shown and it is pointed out that cranial CT is not a search technique but that it requires previous examinations by a neurologist, neurosurgeon, or neuropaediatrician. (orig.) [de

  9. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Dozorova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and treatment of this disease is still controversial, the issue of the appointment of corticosteroids, calcium channel blockers and β-blockers, methods of surgical correction of strabismus and botulin therapy.The article describes OCN in an 11-year-old boy. In the clinical picture headache attacks were observed. These attacks were with signs of selective lesions of the oculomotor nerve on one side. These functional changes are recurrent, and fully regress between attacks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations revealed no pathology that could cause this symptom, including myasthenia. The described case demonstrates the classical picture of OCN with a favorable course and the partial damage of the oculomotor nerve on one side.

  10. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  11. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  12. Vasculopathic Cranial Ocular Motor Neuropathy Following Sudden Emotional Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purvin, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    We describe three patients who experienced onset of a microvascular ocular motor nerve palsy in the setting of sudden emotional stress. Such emotional states are accompanied by a marked increase in sympathetic tone in some individuals. Mechanisms by which these autonomic changes might produce an ischemic cranial nerve palsy include intra-cranial vasoconstriction and transient systemic hypotension due to alterations in cardiac function.

  13. Mapping genetic variants for cranial vault shape in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roosenboom, Jasmien; Lee, Myoung Keun; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2018-01-01

    The shape of the cranial vault, a region comprising interlocking flat bones surrounding the cerebral cortex, varies considerably in humans. Strongly influenced by brain size and shape, cranial vault morphology has both clinical and evolutionary relevance. However, little is known about the geneti...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power...

  15. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Antonio; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L.

    2002-01-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities

  16. Effects of a high jugular fossa and jugular bulb diverticulum on the inner ear. A clinical and radiologic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadin, K.; Thomander, L.; Wilbrand, H.

    From a series of patients undergoing routine radiographic examination, 112 temporal bones with a high jugular fossa were selected. Among these, 43 jugular bulb diverticula were found. The structures affected by a high fossa or diverticulum were recorded and correlated to the clinical symptoms of the patient. The vestibule was suspected to be affected in five patients. Two of these patients had tinnitus and vertigo, and three had hearing loss. In one of the latter the hearing loss was most marked in the supine position. The cochlea was close to the fossa in three patients, all of whom had tinnitus. Four patients had a defect of the posterior semicircular canal. One of them lost his hearing after a severe fit of coughing, became unsteady and showed signs of a fistula. The internal acoustic meatus and the mastoid portion of the facial canal were affected in two and four patients, respectively, who had no recorded symptoms. Twelve of 34 patients with Meniere's disease and a high jugular fossa on the side of the diseased ear had a dehiscence of the vestibular aqueduct caused by the fossa or diverticulum, compared with nine of 58 patients in the unselected material. For comparison and demonstration of topographic relationships, 58 casts of unselected radiograhed temporal bone specimens with high jugular fossae or diverticula were investigated. In patients with a high jugular fossa or jugular bulb diverticulum, tomographic assessment may be of value.

  17. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  18. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  19. Cranial joint histology in the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos): new insights on avian cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of avian cranial kinesis is a phenomenon in part responsible for the remarkable diversity of avian feeding adaptations observable today. Although osteological, developmental and behavioral features of the feeding system are frequently studied, comparatively little is known about cranial joint skeletal tissue composition and morphology from a microscopic perspective. These data are key to understanding the developmental, biomechanical and evolutionary underpinnings of kinesis. Therefore, here we investigated joint microstructure in juvenile and adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos; Anseriformes). Ducks belong to a diverse clade of galloanseriform birds, have derived adaptations for herbivory and kinesis, and are model organisms in developmental biology. Thus, new insights into their cranial functional morphology will refine our understanding of avian cranial evolution. A total of five specimens (two ducklings and three adults) were histologically sampled, and two additional specimens (a duckling and an adult) were subjected to micro-computed tomographic scanning. Five intracranial joints were sampled: the jaw joint (quadrate-articular); otic joint (quadrate-squamosal); palatobasal joint (parasphenoid-pterygoid); the mandibular symphysis (dentary-dentary); and the craniofacial hinge (a complex flexion zone involving four different pairs of skeletal elements). In both the ducklings and adults, the jaw, otic and palatobasal joints are all synovial, with a synovial cavity and articular cartilage on each surface (i.e. bichondral joints) ensheathed in a fibrous capsule. The craniofacial hinge begins as an ensemble of patent sutures in the duckling, but in the adult it becomes more complex: laterally it is synovial; whereas medially, it is synostosed by a bridge of chondroid bone. We hypothesize that it is chondroid bone that provides some of the flexible properties of this joint. The heavily innervated mandibular symphysis is already fused in the

  20. Laparoscopic Radical Extended Right Hemicolectomy Using a Caudal-to-Cranial Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liaonan; Xiong, Wenjun; Mo, Delong; He, Yaobin; Li, Hongming; Tan, Ping; Wang, Wei; Wan, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Due to the emphasis of oncologic principle, a medial-to-lateral approach for laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was recommended.1 (,) 2 This approach, however, is technically challenging and involves several limitations with overweight patients, whose mesocolon may be too thick for identification of the vessel landmarks. Moreover, it is difficult for inexperienced surgeons to enter the retroperitoneum space accurately. This report describes a caudal-to-cranial approach for laparoscopic radical extended right hemicolectomy. First, a "yellow-white borderline" between the right mesostenium and retroperitoneum in the right iliac fossa is dissected as the entry for separation of the fusion fascial space between the visceral and parietal peritoneum.3 The right Toldt's fascia is dissected and expanded medial to the periphery of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), cranial to the pancreas head, and lateral to the ascending colon. The posterior paries of ileocolic vessels (ICVs), right colic vessels (RCVs), and Henle's trunk are exposed. Second, the mesocolon between the ICV and SMV is dissected safely, and the ICV, RCV, and right gastroepiploic vessels as well as the right branch of the middle colic vessel are divided and ligated easily because of the separated retroperitoneal space. The lymph nodes along the SMV are dissected using a caudal-to-cranial approach. Third, the greater omental is dissected for full mobilization of the mesocolon containing 10 cm of normal colon distal to the lesion followed by complete mobilization of the lateral attachments of the ascending colon. In this study, 10 men and 8 women with hepatic flexure cancer underwent laparoscopic extended right hemicolectomy using a caudal-to-cranial approach. No conversion was recorded. The overall complication rate was 11.2 %, including one case of pulmonary infection and one case of urinary tract infection, both of which were cured with conservative measures. The mean age of the patients was 61.3 ± 12.7

  1. Microanatomical and immunohistochemical study of the human lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of forearm at the antecubital fossa and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, S Chakravarthy; Kumar, Pramod; Dhalapathy, S; Prasad, Keerthana; Marx, C Anitha

    2010-09-01

    Changes in the intraneural anatomy with age can cause poor prognosis of nerve repair in patients after nerve injury. The occurrence of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome-Type II, secondary to peripheral nerve injury, is common. The purpose of this study is to asses changes in cross-sectional anatomy of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of forearm (LCNF) at the antecubital fossa in the fascicular, nonfascicular components (adipose and nonadipose tissue), and sympathetic fibers area with respect to age. For the purpose of the study, 32 human (37-88 years) fresh cadaveric LCNF were collected from left-antecubital fossae and processed for histological, morphometric analysis [total cross-sectional (Asc), fascicular (Af), and nonfascicular area (Anonf)], and immunohistochemical method (tyrosine hydroxylase) for sympathetic fibers. The LCNF's average total cross-sectional area was 3.024 mm(2), and fascicular area was 0.582 mm(2). The average number of fascicles per mm(2) was 3.09. The cross-sectional area in the nerve was mainly occupied by nonfascicular connective tissue (80.75%). There was increased adipose tissue deposition (48.48% of Asc) and decreased collagen fibers (32.24% of Asc) in interfascicular domains without any definite relationship with age. The average sympathetic fiber area was 0.026 mm(2) within the nerve fascicular area without any correlation with age. In LCNF, there was more adipose tissue and less collagen fibers deposition in the interfascicular domains of all age cases, and this may act as an obstacle for nerve fiber regeneration on using LCNF as an interpositional nerve graft.

  2. Teleradiology for emergency cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranzinger, E.; Treumann, T.C.; Dreier, D.; Allgayer, B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We report our experience with the teleradiologic service provided by a center hospital (CH) for emergency cranial computed tomography (CCT) in two regional hospitals (RH) during a 12-month period. The clinical and economic impact of teleradiology will be discussed as well as the acceptance by the clinicians of the regional hospitals. Material and Methods: In 2001, 213 CT-scans in 202 patients were performed and reported using teleradiology. Teleradiologic and final medical diagnosis were analysed by the medical reports. The transferral of the patients to a CH and their further treatment were checked. The referring physicians in the RH were questionnaired about the teleradiological support. Results: 18 (9%) patients had to be urgently transferred to a CH based on the CT findings in the teleradiological reports. 24 patients (11%) were transferred to a center hospital during further treatment. 80% of patients were treated in the RH. (orig.) [de

  3. An unusual orbito-cranial foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Madhumati

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The rarity of orbito-cranial gun shot injury in both war and civilian practice has been reported. In a large series of 351 missile head injuries in the Vietnam war, orbital penetration was noted in 0.6% cases only. Review of literature shows that orbital injury was ipsilateral to the cerebral injury in most reported cases. We have previously reported a rare case of left parieto-occipital lobe injury due to gun shot wound of the contralateral (right orbit. The case reported here sustained a bullet injury to the left frontal bone but the missile was located below the contralateral (right optic canal. The rarity of the case prompted this report.

  4. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alexandra P; Grant, Ronald; Gupta, Abha A; Hodgson, David C; Nathan, Paul C

    2012-12-15

    Children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM RMS) and cranial nerve palsy (CNP) are at risk for permanent neurologic dysfunction. Clinicians often consider the use of emergent therapies such as expedited radiation and/or corticosteroids; however, there is a paucity of information describing the natural history of CNP in PM RMS. We sought to describe the clinical features of patients with PM RMS plus associated CNP and to evaluate the patient, disease, and treatment-related factors that impacted neurologic recovery. We conducted a retrospective review of PM RMS cases treated at the Hospital for Sick Children between 1985 and 2010. Thirty-five children were treated for PM RMS, 19 (54%) of whom presented with CNP. Children with CNP were nine times more likely to have other high-risk features (cranial base bony erosion and/or intracranial extension) at the time of presentation than children without CNP (OR 9.6, 95% CI 1.69, 54.79, P = 0.013). In addition to commencing chemotherapy, 13 patients (68%) received expedited RT and corticosteroids, four (21%) corticosteroids alone, and two (11%) received only standard chemotherapy and RT. At last follow up of the 11 survivors, neurologic recovery was complete in five (45%), partial in five (45%), and absent in one (9%). In our cohort, recovery of PM RMS associated CNP was often incomplete despite multi-modal therapy. A larger cohort of patients is required to determine the utility of emergent initiation of radiation or corticosteroids. This study will facilitate the counseling of future families on the long-term neurologic recovery CNP in PM RMS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cranial modularity and sequence heterochrony in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Anjali

    2007-01-01

    Heterochrony, the temporal shifting of developmental events relative to each other, requires a degree of autonomy among those processes or structures. Modularity, the division of larger structures or processes into autonomous sets of internally integrated units, is often discussed in relation to the concept of heterochrony. However, the relationship between the developmental modules derived from studies of heterochrony and evolutionary modules, which should be of adaptive importance and relate to the genotype-phenotype map, has not been explicitly studied. I analyzed a series of sectioned and whole cleared-and-stained embryological and neonatal specimens, supplemented with published ontogenetic data, to test the hypothesis that bones within the same phenotypic modules, as determined by morphometric analysis, are developmentally integrated and will display coordinated heterochronic shifts across taxa. Modularity was analyzed in cranial bone ossification sequences of 12 therian mammals. A dataset of 12-18 developmental events was used to assess if modularity in developmental sequences corresponds to six phenotypic modules, derived from a recent morphometric analysis of cranial modularity in mammals. Kendall's tau was used to measure rank correlations, with randomization tests for significance. If modularity in developmental sequences corresponds to observed phenotypic modules, bones within a single phenotypic module should show integration of developmental timing, maintaining the same timing of ossification relative to each other, despite differences in overall ossification sequences across taxa. Analyses did not find any significant conservation of developmental timing within the six phenotypic modules, meaning that bones that are highly integrated in adult morphology are not significantly integrated in developmental timing.

  6. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  7. Literature review of cranial nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Vijaynagar, B; Singh, P; Hamilton, G

    2007-01-01

    In the recent prospective randomised trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), the incidence of cranial nerve injuries (CNI) are reported to be higher than in previously published studies. The objective of this study is to review the incidence of post CEA cranial nerve injury and to discover whether it has changed in the last 25 years after many innovations in vascular surgery. Generic terms including carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve injuries, post CEA complications and cranial nerve deficit after neck surgery were used to search a variety of electronic databases. Based on selection criteria, decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion of primary studies were made. The incidence of CNI before and after 1995 was compared. We found 31 eligible studies from the literature. Patients who underwent CEA through any approach were included in the study. All patients had cranial nerves examined both before and after surgery. The total number of patients who had CEA before 1995 was 3521 with 10.6% CNI (352 patients) and after 1995, 7324 patients underwent CEA with 8.3% CNI (614 patients). Cranial nerves XII, X and VII were most commonly involved (rarely IX and XI). Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of CNI has decreased (X(2) = 5.89 + 0.74 = 6.63 => p-value = 0.0100). CNI is still a significant postoperative complication of carotid endarterectomy. Despite increasing use of CEA, the incidence of CNI has decreased probably because of increased awareness of the possibility of cranial nerve damage.

  8. Robo signaling regulates the production of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Tan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Guang; Chuai, Manli; Münsterberg, Andrea; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-12-01

    Slit/Robo signaling plays an important role in the guidance of developing neurons in developing embryos. However, it remains obscure whether and how Slit/Robo signaling is involved in the production of cranial neural crest cells. In this study, we examined Robo1 deficient mice to reveal developmental defects of mouse cranial frontal and parietal bones, which are derivatives of cranial neural crest cells. Therefore, we determined the production of HNK1 + cranial neural crest cells in early chick embryo development after knock-down (KD) of Robo1 expression. Detection of markers for pre-migratory and migratory neural crest cells, PAX7 and AP-2α, showed that production of both was affected by Robo1 KD. In addition, we found that the transcription factor slug is responsible for the aberrant delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells induced by Robo1 KD, which also led to elevated expression of E- and N-Cadherin. N-Cadherin expression was enhanced when blocking FGF signaling with dominant-negative FGFR1 in half of the neural tube. Taken together, we show that Slit/Robo signaling influences the delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells, which is required for cranial bone development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Maioli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery

  10. Effect of Osteopathic Cranial Manipulative Medicine on Visual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhouse, Mark E; Shechtman, Diana; Fecho, Gregory; Timoshkin, Elena M

    2016-11-01

    The effects of osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine (OCMM) on visual function have been poorly characterized in the literature. Based on a pilot study conducted by their research group, the authors conducted a study that examined whether OCMM produced a measurable change in visual function in adults with cranial asymmetry. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. The intervention and control (sham therapy) were applied during 8 weekly visits, and participants in both groups received 8 weekly follow-up visits. Adult volunteers aged between 18 and 35 years with unremarkable systemic or ocular history were recruited. Inclusion criteria were refractive error between 6 diopters of myopia and 5 diopters of hyperopia, regular astigmatism of any amount, and cranial somatic dysfunction. All participants were evaluated for cranial asymmetry and randomly assigned to the treatment or sham therapy group. The treatment group received OCMM to correct cranial dysfunctions, and the sham therapy group received light pressure applied to the cranium. Preintervention and postintervention ophthalmic examinations consisted of distance visual acuity testing, accommodative system testing, local stereoacuity testing, pupillary size measurements, and vergence system testing. A χ2 analysis was performed to determine participant masking. Analysis of variance was performed for all ophthalmic measures. Eighty-nine participants completed the trial, with 47 in the treatment group and 42 in the sham therapy group. A hierarchical analysis of variance revealed statistically significant within-groups effects (Psize under bright light in the left eye and in near point of convergence break. Osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine may affect visual function in adults with cranial asymmetry. Active motion testing of the cranium for somatic dysfunction may affect the cranial system to a measurable level and explain interrater reliability issues in cranial studies. (Clinical

  11. Is there a dural wall between the cavernous sinus and the pituitary fossa? Anatomical and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Diniz, R.; Reis, M. Jr.; Neugroschl, C.; Vinclair, L.; Maillot, C.

    1998-01-01

    We compared MRI studies of the sellar area and embryological and adult histological studies of the cavernous sinuses and pituitary fossa. MRI studies were performed in 50 normal subjects with coronal sections using a fast inversion-recovery sequence to demonstrate the dural walls of the cavernous sinus and pituitary fossa. With this sequence, dura mater appears as a high-signal linear structure. The lateral and superior walls of the cavernous sinus was easily identified on all studies, but demonstration of a dural wall separating the cavernous sinus from the pituitary fossa was not possible. These results correlated well with embryological and adult histological studies obtained from 14 specimens. The absence of a strong separation between the pituitary fossa and the cavernous sinus explains the high incidence of extension of pituitary tumours to the cavernous sinuses and vice versa. (orig.) (orig.)

  12. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  13. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  14. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament

  15. Influence of occlusal splints on TMJ condyle-fossa relationship and disc shape

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Barbara Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background. Occlusal splints are nowadays commonly used in dentistry to treat symptoms of myoarthropathies of the masticatory system, but also to treat simple occlusal parafunctions. Still, the exact mechanism by which the treatment works is unknown. The aim of this study was to find out the answers to following questions: 1. is there an immediate change of the minimum condyle-fossa distance and accompanying disc thickness by inserting a Michigan splint and 2. is it possible to displace the m...

  16. A nomenclature for vertebral fossae in sauropods and other saurischian dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The axial skeleton of extinct saurischian dinosaurs (i.e., theropods, sauropodomorphs, like living birds, was pneumatized by epithelial outpocketings of the respiratory system. Pneumatic signatures in the vertebral column of fossil saurischians include complex branching chambers within the bone (internal pneumaticity and large chambers visible externally that are bounded by neural arch laminae (external pneumaticity. Although general aspects of internal pneumaticity are synapomorphic for saurischian subgroups, the individual internal pneumatic spaces cannot be homologized across species or even along the vertebral column, due to their variability and absence of topographical landmarks. External pneumatic structures, in contrast, are defined by ready topological landmarks (vertebral laminae, but no consistent nomenclatural system exists. This deficiency has fostered confusion and limited their use as character data in phylogenetic analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a simple system for naming external neural arch fossae that parallels the one developed for the vertebral laminae that bound them. The nomenclatural system identifies fossae by pointing to reference landmarks (e.g., neural spine, centrum, costal articulations, zygapophyses. We standardize the naming process by creating tripartite names from "primary landmarks," which form the zygodiapophyseal table, "secondary landmarks," which orient with respect to that table, and "tertiary landmarks," which further delineate a given fossa. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed nomenclatural system for lamina-bounded fossae adds clarity to descriptions of complex vertebrae and allows these structures to be sourced as character data for phylogenetic analyses. These anatomical terms denote potentially homologous pneumatic structures within Saurischia, but they could be applied to any vertebrate with vertebral laminae that enclose spaces, regardless of their developmental

  17. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy restricted to the posterior fossa in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes; Lamb, Leslie; Del Carpio-O' Donovan, Raquel, E-mail: goncalves.neuroradio@gmail.com [McGill University Health Center Montreal General Hospital (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a neurological infectious disease caused by the John Cunningham polyoma virus (JCV), an opportunistic agent with worldwide distribution. This disease is frequently seen in immunosuppressed patients and rarely associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. In the central nervous system PML demyelinating lesions occur in the supratentorial compartment. The authors describe a rare case of PML secondary to SLE treatment with atypical presentation restricted to the posterior fossa (author)

  18. Branchial fistula arising from pyriform fossa: CT diagnosis of a case and discussion of radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Sharma, Yash Paul; Bhagra, Tilak; Sud, Bindu

    2012-01-01

    Anomalies of third or fourth branchial apparatus origin are very uncommon and present as recurrent neck infections or thyroiditis with a predominant left-sided involvement. Radiological diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and is critical for initiation of proper treatment. We describe a case of branchial sinus of pyriform fossa with external fistulization that presented in adulthood and was diagnosed on computed tomographic scan. The radiological features of this rare anomaly are revisited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary hydatid disease of the infratemporal fossa and the parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, I.; Levett, J.; Vlahos, I.; Papavasiliou, C.; Ioannovits, I.

    1985-01-01

    Hydatid disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions causing swelling of the parotid area or exophthalmos in patients originating from countries where the incidence of the disease is high. An unusual case of hydatid disease located in the infratemporal fossa and the anterior parotid region is presented. Computed Tomography is a valuable tool for establishment of the diagnosis, before any surgical approach to the lesion is initiated and for postoperative follow-up and evaluation. (orig.) [de

  20. Primary hydatid disease of the infratemporal fossa and the parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, I.; Levett, J.; Vlahos, I.; Papavasiliou, C.; Ioannovits, I.

    1985-05-01

    Hydatid disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions causing swelling of the parotid area or exophthalmos in patients originating from countries where the incidence of the disease is high. An unusual case of hydatid disease located in the infratemporal fossa and the anterior parotid region is presented. Computed Tomography is a valuable tool for establishment of the diagnosis, before any surgical approach to the lesion is initiated and for postoperative follow-up and evaluation.

  1. Imaging techniques in evaluation of juvenile angiofibroma with lateral extension in the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanska, A.; Pietura, R.; Drelich-Zbroja, A.; Trojanowski, P.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is a benign tumour arising in the nasopharynx and penetrating laterally into the pterygopalatine fossa, infratemporal fossa and orbit. Precise preoperative evaluation of the presence and extension of its lateral spread is crucial for choosing the best surgical approach and performing radical operation. The aim of the study was to assess usefulness of imaging methods in diagnosis and evaluation of lateral extension of juvenile angiofibroma. In a group of 39 patients operated on from 1973 to 2002 due to juvenile angiofibroma in 21 (54%) cases a lateral extension of the tumor was diagnosed. All patients underwent carotid angiography (CA) and lateral plain skull X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 18,and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients. In all cases the extension of the tumor and its lateral spread was verified during surgery. A widening of the pterygopalatine fossa on lateral plain X-ray was present in 13 (62%) patients. CT and MRI demonstrated the presence of lateral extension in all patients diagnosed with these methods. In 9 cases, lateral CA revealed dislodgement of the internal maxillary artery by the tumor in the pterygopalatine fossa. The presence of big lateral extension of the juvenile angiofibroma is demonstrated on lateral plain X-ray as anterior bowing of the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus (Holman-Miller sign). MRI shows better than CT the extent and margins of the tumor in soft tissues. Lateral CA shows dislodgement of the internal maxillary artery and its course in relation to the lateral extension of the tumor, which is important for surgical planning. (author)

  2. A systematic review of neuropsychological outcomes following posterior fossa tumor surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlik, Emily; Woodrome, Stacey E; Abdel-Baki, Mohamed; Geller, Thomas J; Elbabaa, Samer K

    2015-10-01

    Central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumors in the pediatric population. As children with central nervous system (CNS) tumors are surviving into adolescence and adulthood, more research is being focused on the long-term cognitive outcomes of the survivors. This review examines the literature on different cognitive outcomes of survivors of different childhood posterior fossa CNS tumor types. The authors reviewed the literature for articles published from 2000 to 2012 about long-term neuropsychological outcomes of children diagnosed with posterior fossa brain tumors before the age of 18, which distinguished between histological tumor types, and had a minimum follow-up of 3 years. The literature search returned 13 articles, and a descriptive analysis was performed comparing intelligence quotient (IQ), attention/executive function, and memory components of 456 survivors of childhood posterior fossa tumors. Four articles directly compared astrocytoma and medulloblastoma survivors and showed medulloblastoma survivors fared worse in IQ, attention/executive function, and memory measurements. Five articles reporting medulloblastomas found IQ, attention, and memory scores to be significantly below the standardized means. Articles examining astrocytoma survivors found IQ scores within the normal range for the population. Survivors of ependymomas reported 2/23 survivors impaired on IQ scores, while a second study reported a significant number of ependymoma survivors lower than the expected population norm. Tumor histopathology and the type of postoperative adjuvant therapy seem to have a significant impact on the long-term neuropsychological complications of pediatric posterior fossa CNS tumor survivors. Age at diagnosis and treatment factors are important variables that affect the outcomes of the survivors.

  3. Lateral posterior fossa encephalocele with associated migrational disorder of the cerebellum in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kimberly M; Wiens, Andrea L; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2011-11-01

    Encephaloceles are acquired or congenital defects in which intracranial contents protrude through a defect in the calvaria. The embryogenesis of these lesions is incompletely understood. The vast majority of lesions occur at or near the anatomical midline. The authors present an extremely rare case of a laterally oriented, pathologically proven encephalocele associated with a posterior fossa cyst and cerebellar migrational defect in an infant. The authors review past and current theories of encephalocele formation as it relates to this case.

  4. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy restricted to the posterior fossa in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes; Lamb, Leslie; Del Carpio-O'Donovan, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a neurological infectious disease caused by the John Cunningham polyoma virus (JCV), an opportunistic agent with worldwide distribution. This disease is frequently seen in immunosuppressed patients and rarely associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. In the central nervous system PML demyelinating lesions occur in the supratentorial compartment. The authors describe a rare case of PML secondary to SLE treatment with atypical presentation restricted to the posterior fossa (author)

  5. Cerebellar mutism syndrome in children with brain tumours of the posterior fossa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Morten; Cappelen, Johan; Castor, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    , the clinical course and strategies for prevention and treatment are yet to be determined.Methods: This observational, prospective, multicentre study will include 500 children with posterior fossa tumours. It opened late 2014 with participation from 20 Nordic and Baltic centres. From 2016, five British centres...... for and the clinical course of CMS - with the ultimate goal of defining strategies for prevention and treatment of this severely disabling condition....

  6. The Lost City Hydrothermal Field: A Spectroscopic and Astrobiological Analogue for Nili Fossae, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Elena S; Bandfield, Joshua L; Brazelton, William J; Kelley, Deborah

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature serpentinization is a critical process with respect to Earth's habitability and the Solar System. Exothermic serpentinization reactions commonly produce hydrogen as a direct by-product and typically produce short-chained organic compounds indirectly. Here, we present the spectral and mineralogical variability in rocks from the serpentine-driven Lost City Hydrothermal Field on Earth and the olivine-rich region of Nili Fossae on Mars. Near- and thermal-infrared spectral measurements were made from a suite of Lost City rocks at wavelengths similar to those for instruments collecting measurements of the martian surface. Results from Lost City show a spectrally distinguishable suite of Mg-rich serpentine, Ca carbonates, talc, and amphibole minerals. Aggregated detections of low-grade metamorphic minerals in rocks from Nili Fossae were mapped and yielded a previously undetected serpentine exposure in the region. Direct comparison of the two spectral suites indicates similar mineralogy at both Lost City and in the Noachian (4-3.7 Ga) bedrock of Nili Fossae, Mars. Based on mapping of these spectral phases, the implied mineralogical suite appears to be extensive across the region. These results suggest that serpentinization was once an active process, indicating that water and energy sources were available, as well as a means for prebiotic chemistry during a time period when life was first emerging on Earth. Although the mineralogical assemblages identified on Mars are unlikely to be directly analogous to rocks that underlie the Lost City Hydrothermal Field, related geochemical processes (and associated sources of biologically accessible energy) were once present in the subsurface, making Nili Fossae a compelling candidate for a once-habitable environment on Mars. Key Words: Mars-Habitability-Serpentinization-Analogue. Astrobiology 17, 1138-1160.

  7. Mortality Rates After Emergent Posterior Fossa Decompression for Ischemic or Hemorrhagic Stroke in Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Graffeo, Christopher; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar stroke causes major morbidity in the aging population. Guidelines from the American Stroke Association recommend emergent decompression in patients who have brainstem compression, hydrocephalus, or clinical deterioration. The objective of this study was to determine 30-day and 1-year mortality rates in patients >60 years old undergoing emergent posterior fossa decompression. Surgical records identified all patients >60 years old who underwent emergent posterior fossa decompression. Mortality rates were calculated at 30 days and 1 year postoperatively, and these rates were compared with patient and procedure characteristics. During 2000-2014, 34 emergent posterior fossa decompressions were performed in patients >60 years old. Mortality rates at 30 days were 0%, 33%, and 25% for age deciles 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and ≥80 years. Increasing age (alive at 30 days 75.2 years ± 1.7 vs. deceased 81.1 years ± 1.7, P = 0.01) and smaller craniectomy dimensions were associated with 30-day mortality. Mortality rates at 1 year were 0%, 50%, and 67% for age deciles 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and ≥80 years. Increasing age was significantly associated with mortality at 1 year (alive at 1 year 72.3 years ± 2.0 vs. deceased 81.1 years ± 1.2, P mortality. Age was independent of admission Glasgow Coma Scale score as a predictor of mortality at 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year postoperatively. Increasing age and smaller craniectomy size were significantly associated with mortality in patients undergoing emergent posterior fossa decompression. Among patients ≥80 years old, one-quarter were dead within 1 month of the operation, and more than two-thirds were dead within 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactive web-based programs to teach functional anatomy: the pterygopalatine fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinav, Ahmet; Ambron, Richard

    2004-07-01

    Certain areas of the body contain structures that are difficult to envision in their proper spatial orientations and whose functions are complex and difficult to grasp. This is especially true in the head, where many structures are relatively small and inaccessible. To address this problem, we are designing Web-based programs that consist of high-resolution interactive bitmap illustrations, prepared using Adobe Photoshop, and vector-based animations, prepared via Macromedia Flash. Flash action script language is used for the animations. We have used this approach to prepare a program on the pterygopalatine fossa, an important neurovascular junction in the deep face that is especially difficult to approach by dissection and to depict in static images in an atlas. The program can be viewed online at http://cds.osr.columbia.edu/anatomy/ppfossa/. A table of contents simplifies navigation through the program and a menu enables the user to identify each of the vascular and neuronal components and either to insert or to remove each from its position in the fossa. The functional anatomy of the nerves in the fossa is animated. For example, users can activate and subsequently follow action potentials as they course along axons to their targets. This high degree of interactivity helps promote learning.

  9. Pressure Sore at an Unusual Site- the Bilateral Popliteal Fossa: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Kataria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sore is tissue ulceration due to unrelieved pressure, altered sensory perception, and exposure to moisture. Geriatric patients with organic problems and patients with spinal cord injuries are the high-risk groups. Soft tissues over bony prominences are the common sites for ulcer development. About 95% of pressure ulcers occur in the lower part of the body. Ischial tuberosity, greater trochanter, sacrum and heel are common sites. In addition to these, pressure sores at unusual sites like nasal alae, malar eminences, cervical region and medial side of knee have also been described. Only 1.6% of the patients present with sores in areas outside the pelvis and lower extremity. In a paraplegic patient, pressure sores are usually over extensor surface of knee and heel but pressure ulcer over popliteal fossa are extremely rare. We herein report a case of a 36-years-old diabetic and paraplegic male, who presented with multiple bed sores involving the sacral area, heels and bilateral popliteal fossa. Popliteal fossa is an unusual site for pressure sores. Only one similar case has been previously reported in the literature.

  10. Effect of Incremental Endoscopic Maxillectomy on Surgical Exposure of the Pterygopalatine and Infratemporal Fossae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Smita; Dolci, Ricardo L L; Buohliqah, Lamia; Fiore, Mariano E; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Prevedello, Daniel M; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2016-02-01

    Objective Access to the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae presents a significant surgical challenge, owing to their deep-seated location and complex neurovascular anatomy. This study elucidates the benefits of incremental medial maxillectomies to access this region. We compared access to the medial aspect of the infratemporal fossa provided by medial maxillectomy, anteriorly extended medial maxillectomy, endoscopic Denker approach (i.e., Sturmann-Canfield approach), contralateral transseptal approach, and the sublabial anterior maxillotomy (SAM). Methods We studied 10 cadaveric specimens (20 sides) dissecting the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae bilaterally. Radius of access was calculated using a navigation probe aligned with the endoscopic line of sight. Area of exposure was calculated as the area removed from the posterior wall of maxillary sinus. Surgical freedom was calculated by computing the working area at the proximal end of the instrument with the distal end fixed at a target. Results The endoscopic Denker approach offered a superior area of exposure (8.46 ± 1.56 cm(2)) and superior surgical freedom. Degree of lateral access with the SAM approach was similar to that of the Denker. Conclusion Our study suggests that an anterior extension of the medial maxillectomy or a cross-court approach increases both the area of exposure and surgical freedom. Further increases can be seen upon progression to a Denker approach.

  11. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrawan K Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods : The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results : Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions : Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising.

  13. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shrawan K.; Agrawal, Santosh K.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods: The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results: Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions: Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising. PMID:22022062

  14. Pressure Sore at an Unusual Site- the Bilateral Popliteal Fossa: A Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Kamal; Sagar, Sushma; Singhal, Manish; Yadav, Rajni

    2012-01-01

    Pressure sore is tissue ulceration due to unrelieved pressure, altered sensory perception, and exposure to moisture. Geriatric patients with organic problems and patients with spinal cord injuries are the high-risk groups. Soft tissues over bony prominences are the common sites for ulcer development. About 95% of pressure ulcers occur in the lower part of the body. Ischial tuberosity, greater trochanter, sacrum and heel are common sites. In addition to these, pressure sores at unusual sites like nasal alae, malar eminences, cervical region and medial side of knee have also been described. Only 1.6% of the patients present with sores in areas outside the pelvis and lower extremity. In a paraplegic patient, pressure sores are usually over extensor surface of knee and heel but pressure ulcer over popliteal fossa are extremely rare. We herein report a case of a 36-years-old diabetic and paraplegic male, who presented with multiple bed sores involving the sacral area, heels and bilateral popliteal fossa. Popliteal fossa is an unusual site for pressure sores. Only one similar case has been previously reported in the literature. PMID:29181131

  15. Packing of renal fossa: Useful technique for intractable bleeding after open pyelolithotomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohinder Kumar Malhotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no documented study to indicate the role of prolonged packing of renal fossa (24 to 48 hours to control bleeding in life threating haemorrhage following open pyelolithotomy without compromise in the renal functions. On the contrary emergency nephrectomy was performed for intractable bleeding during renal stone surgery in peripheral hospitals. Several studies have shown the usefulness of temporary packing to control bleeding in liver injuries and following open heart operations. Packing of the renal fossa with laparotomy pads in unstable patients, and transferring the patient to the surgical intensive care unit (ICU is also described in trauma but not in controlling bleeding after open pyelolithotomy .This study comprises of three such patients whose kidneys were salvaged by a simple procedure of temporary packing of renal fossa for period of 24-48 hours who had developed life threatening haemorrhage after open pyelolithotomy. This technique is simple and worth trying especially for surgeons who are contemplating nephrectomy as prolonged packing has not lead to any compromise in renal functions. The aim of this manuscript is very limited and clear. Packing is not a licence to carry out open pyelolithotomy without proper expertise and local backup or resources. Principles of safe and ethical surgical practice should never be violated as it can lead to medico legal complications.

  16. 3D Super-Resolution Motion-Corrected MRI: Validation of Fetal Posterior Fossa Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Danielle B; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Clancy, Sean; Kapur, Kush; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2016-09-01

    Current diagnosis of fetal posterior fossa anomalies by sonography and conventional MRI is limited by fetal position, motion, and by two-dimensional (2D), rather than three-dimensional (3D), representation. In this study, we aimed to validate the use of a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, 3D super-resolution motion-corrected MRI, to image the fetal posterior fossa. From a database of pregnant women who received fetal MRIs at our institution, images of 49 normal fetal brains were reconstructed. Six measurements of the cerebellum, vermis, and pons were obtained for all cases on 2D conventional and 3D reconstructed MRI, and the agreement between the two methods was determined using concordance correlation coefficients. Concordance of axial and coronal measurements of the transcerebellar diameter was also assessed within each method. Between the two methods, the concordance of measurements was high for all six structures (P fetal motion and orthogonal slice acquisition. This technique will facilitate further study of fetal abnormalities of the posterior fossa. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. The use of wavelet filters for reducing noise in posterior fossa Computed Tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pita-Machado, Reinado; Perez-Diaz, Marlen; Lorenzo-Ginori, Juan V.; Bravo-Pino, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    Wavelet transform based de-noising like wavelet shrinkage, gives the good results in CT. This procedure affects very little the spatial resolution. Some applications are reconstruction methods, while others are a posteriori de-noising methods. De-noising after reconstruction is very difficult because the noise is non-stationary and has unknown distribution. Therefore, methods which work on the sinogram-space don’t have this problem, because they always work over a known noise distribution at this point. On the other hand, the posterior fossa in a head CT is a very complex region for physicians, because it is commonly affected by artifacts and noise which are not eliminated during the reconstruction procedure. This can leads to some false positive evaluations. The purpose of our present work is to compare different wavelet shrinkage de-noising filters to reduce noise, particularly in images of the posterior fossa within CT scans in the sinogram-space. This work describes an experimental search for the best wavelets, to reduce Poisson noise in Computed Tomography (CT) scans. Results showed that de-noising with wavelet filters improved the quality of posterior fossa region in terms of an increased CNR, without noticeable structural distortions

  18. Bare spot of the glenoid fossa in children: incidence and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Emery, Kathleen H. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Centers for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The bare spot of the glenoid fossa is a normal cartilage defect seen frequently in adults. It has been used on arthroscopy as a landmark for the center of the glenoid fossa. There are no reports of this variant in children, but we have noted it on some pediatric clinical shoulder MRI studies. Our main purpose is to evaluate the incidence of the bare spot in children and define location and MRI features. Shoulder MRI studies (total 570) from 2004 to 2008 were reviewed. Children were divided into two age groups: group 1, 0-10 years (n=200), group 2, 11-20 years (n=370). A total of 12 bare spots (2.1%) were identified; all were seen in group 2. Eight (67%) were central and four were eccentric in the glenoid fossa. All showed a well-marginated focal cartilage defect containing hyperintense joint fluid or contrast agent. Three also had air. The bare spot is seen in children. The absence in children younger than 10 years and the low incidence in the second decade support the proposed acquired nature. Familiarity with this finding is important so as not to misinterpret it as a pathologic condition. (orig.)

  19. Chronic Expanding Hematoma in the Popliteal Fossa after Pseudoaneurysm Surgery because of Nail Puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematomas caused by surgery or trauma that persist and expand slowly for more than a month are defined as chronic expanding hematomas (CEH. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is useful for the diagnosis. Total excision with the pseudocapsule is the treatment method. Pseudoaneurysms result from arterial wall disruptions and can be mistaken for CEH. We present a rare case report of a 45-year-old man with a large, painful swelling in his left popliteal fossa. He had a puncture wound by a nail 11 years ago and a gradually expanding mass occurred in his popliteal fossa. A pseudoaneurysm was detected and operated a year later. After surgery, a gradually expanding mass recurred in his popliteal fossa. On the arteriography, the popliteal artery was occluded and the blood flow was maintained with collateral vessels. On MRI, an enormous swelling of 115 × 107 × 196 cm in diameter was seen. It was diagnosed as CEH and was excised completely protecting the collateral vessels and there was no recurrence after a year from the surgery.

  20. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D 2  - D 98 /D 50 ) as well as median and maximum dose (D 2% ) to Plan_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 99.9% ) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 98% ) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean D min dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural

  1. Cranial computerized tomography in children suffering from acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, O.

    1981-01-01

    Cranial computerized (axial) tomography permits a more complete neurologic supervision of children with acute leukemia and a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of cerebral complications in leukemia. Endocranial complications in acute leukemia are essentially infiltrative, hemorrhagic, infectious or iatrogenic. Cranial computerized tomography can demonstrate cerebral changes in meningeal leukemia, hemorrhages, calcifications, brain atrophy or leukencephalopathy. The preliminary results of cranial computerized tomography in childhood leukemia suggest that the iatrogenic main lesion of the brain due to combined radiation-chemotherapy is atrophy whereas that of the intrathecal cytostatic therapy is demyelination. Accurate diagnostics and control of possible cerebral complications in therapy of leukemia is essentially for appropriate therapeutic management. For that cranial computerized tomography is the best method to a effective supervision of the brain. (author)

  2. Accounting for cranial vault growth in experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B; Holdsworth, David W

    2014-05-01

    Earlier studies have not accounted for continued growth when using the rat calvarial defect model to evaluate bone healing in vivo. The purpose of this study was: 1) to calculate rat cranial vault growth over time; and 2) to determine the effects of accounting for growth on defect healing. Bilateral parietal defects were created in 10 adult Wistar rats. Serial microscopic computerized tomography scans were performed. Bone mineral content (BMC) measured according to standard technique and repeated accounting for cranial growth over time was compared with the use of parametric and nonparametric tests. Cranial vault growth continued through 22 weeks of age, increasing 7.5% in width and 9.1% in length, and calvarial defects expanded proportionately. BMC was greater within defects accounting for growth 2-12 weeks postoperatively (P accounting for cranial growth given advances in serial imaging techniques. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  4. Prevalence of and risk factors for cranial ultrasound abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weight (LBW), gestational age (GA), prematurity, lack of antenatal ... To assess how many very low birth weight (VLBW) infants had cranial ultrasound screening at .... large number of infants who were ≤750 g and who had not undergone.

  5. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings; Evaluacion de las compresiones neurovasculares intracraneales: hallazgos en TC y RM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge [Instituto Gamma, Rosario (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  6. Positive pressure ventilation and cranial volume in newborn infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, D W

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between changes in airways pressure, pleural pressure, and cranial volume was studied in a group of sick newborn infants requiring ventilatory assistance. Cranial volume increased appreciably only when lung compliance was such that more than 20% of the applied airways pressure was transmitted to the pleural space, or if the absolute pleural pressure was greater than 4 cmH2O above atmospheric pressure. The findings stress the need for more-critical monitoring during periods of...

  7. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  8. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  9. Dataset of TWIST1-regulated genes in the cranial mesoderm and a transcriptome comparison of cranial mesoderm and cranial neural crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Bildsoe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Transcriptional targets of TWIST1 in the cranial mesoderm regulate cell-matrix interactions and mesenchyme maintenance” by Bildsoe et al. (2016 [1]. The data presented here are derived from: (1 a microarray-based comparison of sorted cranial mesoderm (CM and cranial neural crest (CNC cells from E9.5 mouse embryos; (2 comparisons of transcription profiles of head tissues from mouse embryos with a CM-specific loss-of-function of Twist1 and control mouse embryos collected at E8.5 and E9.5; (3 ChIP-seq using a TWIST1-specific monoclonal antibody with chromatin extracts from TWIST1-expressing MDCK cells, a model for a TWIST1-dependent mesenchymal state.

  10. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  11. Cranial thickness changes in early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajawelli, Niharika; Deoni, Sean; Shi, Jie; Dirks, Holly; Linguraru, Marius George; Nelson, Marvin D.; Wang, Yalin; Lepore, Natasha

    2017-11-01

    The neurocranium changes rapidly in early childhood to accommodate the developing brain. However, developmental disorders may cause abnormal growth of the neurocranium, the most common one being craniosynostosis, affecting about 1 in 2000 children. It is important to understand how the brain and neurocranium develop together to understand the role of the neurocranium in neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, the neurocranium is not as well studied as the human brain in early childhood, due to a lack of imaging data. CT is typically employed to investigate the cranium, but, due to ionizing radiation, may only be used for clinical cases. However, the neurocranium is also visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we used a large dataset of MRI images from healthy children in the age range of 1 to 2 years old and extracted the neurocranium. A conformal geometry based analysis pipeline is implemented to determine a set of statistical atlases of the neurocranium. A growth model of the neurocranium will help us understand cranial bone and suture development with respect to the brain, which will in turn inform better treatment strategies for neurocranial disorders.

  12. Cranial computed tomography in infantile spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howitz, P.; Neergaard, K.; Pedersen, H.

    1990-01-01

    Out of 109 children with infantile spasms (IS), prospectively tested during the years 1976 to 1979 in Denmark, 52 children were examined by cranial computed tomography (CT). The classification of IS into cryptogenic (CR), symptomatic (SY) and doubtful (DO) was done clinically without considering the CT-finding. Sixty per cent of the scannings were abnormal. Only 6/30 (20%) of the children in ACTH treatment were found to develop cerebral atrophy which means that this finding is not an obligatory side-effect of ACTH treatment of children with IS. Normal CT-findings were found in 50% of the CR and 50% of the SY + DO-groups, and could not be used as a prognostic tool for estimating the mental development. This was also the case for children with cerebral atrophy. Abnormal CT-findings (minus atrophy) were highly correlated to the group with clinical symptoms and indicate an extremely unsatisfying long-term mental prognosis. CT-scanning is a valuable tool for the examination of clearing children with infantile spasms. (authors)

  13. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.S.; Bataini, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  14. Mandibular fossa morphology during therapy with a fixed functional orthodontic appliance : A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzinger, Gero Stefan Michael; Hourfar, Jan; Kober, Cornelia; Lisson, Jörg Alexander

    2018-03-01

    During therapy of distoclusion entailing a rigid, fixed orthodontic appliance, the mandibular fossa and condyle are ideally remodeled, while dentoalveolar effects occur through adaptive mechanisms. Adaptive processes, especially in the fossa region, have not been adequately investigated. Our magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation aimed to assess the effects of therapy with a functional mandibular advancer (FMA) on mandibular fossa morphology. We monitored via MRI the therapeutic course of 25 patients at three time points. Visual findings and metric assessments were carried out in the sagittal plane. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the joint structure of two exemplary patients were also made. Visual examinations of the MRI slices at the three time points revealed no changes in fossa shape in any of the 50 temporomandibular joints. Lateral comparisons showed that the morphology of the fossae of all 25 patients was identical. Metric analysis demonstrated no significant alterations in width, depth, or in their ratio, not even laterally. Nine measurements of the distances between the porion, mandibular fossa, and articular eminence revealed no significant changes in total or on the left and right sides, or intralaterally. The visual findings and metric analyses of parasagittal MRI slices did not indicate any morphological changes in the mandibular fossa or articular eminence in patients with distoclusion treated via a rigid, fixed orthodontic appliance. However, special reworking of the MRI data facilitated reconstruction of the surfaces of joint structures in 3D. This new method makes it possible to depict more accurately and noninvasively the adaptive mechanisms not ascertainable via metric methods and to assess them as 3D structures.

  15. Estudo artroscópico da articulação do joelho em cães portadores de lesão do ligamento cruzado cranial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Cecilia Tatarunas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to report intra articular changes observed by means of arthroscopic in dogs bearing cranial cruciate ligament injuries. Sixty-three dogs (sixty-five knee joints with naturally occurring cranial cruciate injury were used. The arthroscopy was carried out before the ligament repair and the observed changes were both recorded and reported. According to the results obtained from this research it is significant to mention the presence of plicae on suprapatelar joint pouch; roughness, neovascularization and osteophytes in patella. The lateral meniscus presented axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and complete laceration. The medial meniscus showed bucket handle tear, complete laceration, axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and mineralization. The cranial cruciate ligament was completely ruptured, partially ruptured, interstitially ruptured and linked to the structures of the intercondylar notch. The caudal cruciate ligament showed vertical splits, besides fibrillation and partial rupture. Arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in dogs. It permits improved diagnostic capability when evaluating cartilage and sinovial changes, meniscus and ligaments tears.

  16. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel ePan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The Hedgehog family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, Indian Hedgehog (IHH, and Desert Hedgehog (DHH, of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH. Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly, hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development.

  17. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  18. Cranial MR findings in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Topcu, M.; Baltaoglu, F.F.; Koese, G.; Yalaz, K.; Renda, Y.; Besim, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To define various cranial MR appearances in Wilson's disease (WD). Material and Methods: MR examinations of 30 patients (9-44 years old) with WD were retrospectively reviewed. Six patients were asymptomatic siblings. Three other patients had isolated hepatic involvement, one with no symptoms. The remaining 21 patients had neurological involvement, 7 of whom had the mixed form of the disease. Nine patients had hepatic dysfunction, the 3 with isolated hepatic involvement and 6 of the 7 with the mixed form. Results: All symptomatic patients (n=23) had abnormal MR examinations. Atrophy was present in the majority of them. The most frequently involved sites were putamen (18/21) and pons (18/21) in patients with neurological abnormality. The putaminal lesions showed a consistent pattern of symmetric, bilateral, concentric-laminar T2 hyperintensity. Putaminal lesions were lacking in only 3 patients with neurological involvement, all of whom were relatively old and had had the disease for a longer duration. Most of the patients with hepatic dysfunction (8/9) had increased T1 signal intensity in the basal ganglia, particularly in the globus pallidus. Pontine involvement always included the dorsal aspect of the pons, however, in some cases the central portion of pons was also affected but ventrolateral longitudinal fibers were spared. Midbrain (16/21), thalamic (10/21) and caudate nucleus lesions (9/21) were also encountered. In a few patients cortical and subcortical white matter lesions were present with a predilection to the frontal lobe, particularly the precentral region. In one patient, a hemorrhagic focus was identified within the white matter lesion. (orig./VHE)

  19. The cranial MRI in severe cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Itoh, Masahiro; Fueki, Noboru; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Kurata, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Morimatsu, Yoshio; Yagishita, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic resonance examination was performed in 38 patients with severe cerebral palsy (CP; 15 males and 23 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move anywhere) and mental retardation (I.Q. or D.Q. below 30). Neuroimaging findings were compared with the CP type, etiology, and grade of understanding of language. Cranial magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) in CP were divided into five types. In type 1, nine predominantly showed cyst-liked ventricles and periventricular hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted imaging (PVH) and only scarred basal ganglia and thalamus were visible. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was rigospastic tetraplegia (RST). In type 2, eleven predominantly showed PVH and hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted (HT2) in basal ganglia and thalamus. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was RST or rigospastic diplegia. In type 3, five showed PVH and three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was spastic diplegia. In type 4, four predominantly showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia. The clinical type was athetotic CP (ATH). In type 5, nine predominantly showed HT2 in globus pallidus. Four had cortical atrophy and two had hippocampal atrophy. All suffered from neonatal jaundice and the clinical type was ATH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and spastic CP had MRI in PVH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and ATH showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Almost patients who suffered from neonatal jaundice and ATH showed HT2 in globus pallidus. With athetotic CP, cases with atrophy of the cerebral cortex and/or hippocampus were lower grade of understanding of language than no atrophy of both. The results of studies of MRI are in agreement with neuropathological findings. (author)

  20. Use of an extracapsular stabilization technique to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in two avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Spodnick, Gary; Degernes, Laurel; DeVoe, Ryan S; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2009-12-01

    An extracapsular stabilization technique was used to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in a trumpeter hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) and an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus). The hornbill demonstrated cranial drawer motion and severe rotational instability of the stifle from ruptures of the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments and stifle joint capsule. The luxation was reduced, and the fibula was cranially transposed, in relation to the tibiotarsus, and anchored with 2 positive profile threaded acrylic pins. A lateral extracapsular stabilization was then performed. The African grey parrot had a traumatic stifle luxation, and an open reduction and a lateral extracapsular stabilization were performed. Both birds regained function of the affected leg by 1 month after surgery. Extracapsular stabilization allows motion of the stifle joint to be maintained during the postoperative recovery period, an advantage over rigid stabilization. Maintaining motion in the stifle joint facilitates physical therapy and can aid in full recovery after avian stifle injuries.

  1. Presentation and management of lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apra, Caroline; Kotbi, Owais; Turc, Guillaume; Corns, Robert; Pagès, Mélanie; Souillard-Scémama, Raphaëlle; Dezamis, Edouard; Parraga, Eduardo; Meder, Jean-François; Sauvageon, Xavier; Devaux, Bertrand; Oppenheim, Catherine; Pallud, Johan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There are no guidelines for the management of postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery. Introducing treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy during the immediate postoperative period increases the risk of intracranial bleeding. This study assessed the incidence of and risk factors associated with postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis and the complications related to thrombosis and/or anticoagulation. METHODS This study was a retrospective monocentric analysis of adult patients who underwent surgical removal of a posterior fossa space-occupying lesion with available postoperative imaging. Postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis was defined as a T2 * hypointensity within the venous sinus and/or a filling defect on postcontrast MRI or CT scan. RESULTS Among 180 patients, 12 (6.7%; 95% CI 3.0-10.4) were found to have lateral sinus thrombosis on postoperative imaging, none of whom were symptomatic. Unadjusted risk factors for postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis were a history of deep venous thrombosis (p = 0.016), oral contraceptive pill (p = 0.004), midline surgical approach (p = 0.035), and surgical exposure of the sinus (p < 0.001). Seven of the patients (58.3%) with a postoperative lateral sinus thrombosis received immediate treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy. Lateral sinus recanalization occurred radiologically at a mean time of 272 ± 23 days in 85.7% of patients (6 of 7) undergoing treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy and in 20% of patients (1 of 5) not receiving treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy. Postoperative complications occurred in 56.2% of patients (9 of 16) who received treatment-dose curative anticoagulant therapy and in 27% of patients (45 of 164) who did not. CONCLUSIONS Incidental radiological lateral sinus thrombosis following posterior fossa surgery has an incidence of 6.7%. To further define the benefit-to-risk ratio of a treatment-dose anticoagulant therapy, a prospective trial should be considered.

  2. Condyle-fossa modifications and muscle interactions during herbst treatment, part 1. New technological methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, John C; Woodside, Donald G; Altuna, Gurkan; Kuftinec, Mladen M; Angelopoulos, Gerassimos; Bourque, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    Changes in the condyle, the glenoid fossa, and the muscles of mastication were investigated in subjects undergoing continuous orthopedic advancement of the mandible with a Herbst-block appliance. The total sample consisted of 56 subjects and included 15 nonhuman primates (in the middle mixed, early permanent, and permanent dentitions), 17 human Herbst patients in the early permanent dentition, and 24 human controls from the Burlington Growth Center. The 8 nonhuman primates in the middle mixed dentition were the focus of this study. Mandibular advancement was obtained progressively in 5 animals by adding stops to the telescopic arms of fixed functional Herbst appliances with occlusal coverage; activations of 5.0 mm, 7.0 mm, and 8.0 mm were achieved. Two primates served as controls, and the third was a sham control. Two experimental animals and the 2 controls also wore surgically implanted electromyographic electrodes in the superior and inferior heads of the lateral pterygoid muscles and in the superficial masseter and anterior digastric muscles. Changes in condylar growth direction and amount were assessed with the Björk method from measurements made on serial cephalometric tracings superimposed on metallic implants. Undecalcified sections, treated with intravenous tetracycline vital staining, were viewed with fluorescence microscopy to examine histologic changes in the condyle and the glenoid fossa. New bone formation in the fossa associated with continuous mandibular protrusion was quantified by using computerized histomorphometric analysis of decalcified histological sections and polarized light. The unique combination of permanently implanted electromyographic electrodes, tetracycline vital staining, and histomorphometry represents a significant technological advancement in methods and materials. Together, they demonstrated different muscle-bone interaction results for functional appliances than those reported in previous studies. In Part 1 of this study, we

  3. Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: incidence, imaging, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreld, J H; Mohammed, N; Goldsberry, G; Li, X; Li, Y; Boop, F; Patay, Z

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MR imaging or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated the incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors, and time course of these collections after posterior fossa tumor resection. Retrospective review of postoperative spine MRI in 243 children (5.5 ± 4.6 years of age) from our clinical data base postresection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994 to August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0 ± 4.8 years of age) subjects positive for postoperative intraspinal subdural collections. Their extent and signal properties were recorded for postoperative (37/37), preoperative (15/37), and follow-up spine (35/37) MRI. Risk factors were compared with age-matched internal controls (n = 37, 5.9 ± 4.5 years of age). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, and postoperative intracranial subdural collections with postoperative intraspinal subdural collections were assessed by the Fisher exact test or χ(2) test. The association between preoperative tumor volume and postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The overall incidence of postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days postoperatively (36%); 97% were seen 0-41 days postoperatively (12.9 ± 11.0 days). They were T2 hyperintense and isointense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced, and resolved on follow-up MR imaging (35/35). None were symptomatic. They were associated with intracranial subdural collections (P = .0011) and preoperative tonsillar herniation (P = .0228). Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections are infrequent and clinically silent, resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Preoperative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MR imaging by 4 weeks

  4. FGF9 can induce endochondral ossification in cranial mesenchyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Paul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flat bones of the skull (i.e., the frontal and parietal bones normally form through intramembranous ossification. At these sites cranial mesenchymal cells directly differentiate into osteoblasts without the formation of a cartilage intermediate. This type of ossification is distinct from endochondral ossification, a process that involves initial formation of cartilage and later replacement by bone. Results We have analyzed a line of transgenic mice that expresses FGF9, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family (FGF, in cranial mesenchymal cells. The parietal bones in these mice show a switch from intramembranous to endochondral ossification. Cranial cartilage precursors are induced to proliferate, then hypertrophy and are later replaced by bone. These changes are accompanied by upregulation of Sox9, Ihh, Col2a1, Col10a1 and downregulation of CbfaI and Osteocalcin. Fate mapping studies show that the cranial mesenchymal cells in the parietal region that show a switch in cell fate are likely to be derived from the mesoderm. Conclusion These results demonstrate that FGF9 expression is sufficient to convert the differentiation program of (at least a subset of mesoderm-derived cranial mesenchyme cells from intramembranous to endochondral ossification.

  5. Infant Positioning, Baby Gear Use, and Cranial Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachry, Anne H; Nolan, Vikki G; Hand, Sarah B; Klemm, Susan A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives This study aimed to identify predictors of cranial asymmetry. We hypothesize that among infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry in the sampled region, there is an association between exposure to more time in baby gear and less awake time in prone and side-lying than in infants who do not present with this condition. Methods The study employed a cross sectional survey of caregivers of typically developing infants and infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry. Results A mutivariable model reveals that caregivers of children who are diagnosed with cranial asymmetry report their children spending significantly less time in prone play than those children without a diagnosis of cranial asymmetry. Side-lying and time spent in baby gear did not attain statistical significance. Conclusions for Practice Occupational therapists, physical therapists, pediatricians, nurses and other health care professionals must provide parents with early education about the importance of varying positions and prone play in infancy and address fears and concerns that may serve as barriers to providing prone playtime.

  6. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  7. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Akinori [Saitama Medical Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Moroyama, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  8. ModFossa: A library for modeling ion channels using Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferneyhough, Gareth B; Thibealut, Corey M; Dascalu, Sergiu M; Harris, Frederick C

    2016-06-01

    The creation and simulation of ion channel models using continuous-time Markov processes is a powerful and well-used tool in the field of electrophysiology and ion channel research. While several software packages exist for the purpose of ion channel modeling, most are GUI based, and none are available as a Python library. In an attempt to provide an easy-to-use, yet powerful Markov model-based ion channel simulator, we have developed ModFossa, a Python library supporting easy model creation and stimulus definition, complete with a fast numerical solver, and attractive vector graphics plotting.

  9. Congenital piriform fossa sinus tract presenting as an asymptomatic neck mass in an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, David A.; Adler, Brent H.; Forsythe, Robert C.; Mutabagani, Khaled; Teich, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A 5-month-old girl with an asymptomatic left-sided neck mass was demonstrated by ultrasound and upper gastrointestinal series (UGI), and confirmed at surgery, to have a congenital piriform fossa sinus tract (CPFST) that communicated with an intrathyroidal cyst. To demonstrate a case of CPFST presenting as an asymptomatic neck mass. Nearly all cases of CPFST present with infection or pain, making this case unique. Case report and review of the literature. CPFST with an associated cyst should be added to the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic cystic neck masses in infants, especially if the cyst is intrathyroidal by ultrasound. (orig.)

  10. Visible and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Hephaestus Fossae Cratered Cones, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapremont, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Hephaestus Fossae are a system of sub-parallel fractures on Mars (> 500 km long) interpreted as near-surface tensional cracks [1]. Images of the Martian surface from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have revealed cratered cones within the Hephaestus Fossae region. A volcanic origin (cinder/tuff cones) has been proposed for these features based on morphometric measurements and fine-scale surface characteristics [2]. In an effort to further constrain the origin of these cones as the products of igneous or sedimentary volcanism, we use data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). We take advantage of CRISM's S (0.4 - 1.0 microns) and L (1.0 - 3.9 microns) detector wavelength ranges to investigate the presence or absence of spectral signatures consistent with previous identifications of igneous and mud volcanism products on Mars [3,4]. Hephaestus Fossae cratered cone rims exhibit a consistent nanophase ferric oxide signature. We also identify ferrous phases and 3-micron absorptions (attributed to fundamental vibrational stretch frequencies in H2O) on the crater rims of several cones. Mafic signatures on cratered cone rims support an igneous provenance for these features. The 3-micron absorptions are consistent with the presence of structurally bound or adsorbed water. Our CRISM observations are similar to those of small edifice features in Chryse Planitia, which were interpreted as mud volcanism products based on their enrichment of nanophase ferric minerals and 3-micron absorptions on summit crater rims [3]. Hydrothermal activity was invoked for a Coprates Chasma pitted cone (scoria/tuff cone) based on CRISM identification of partially dehydrated opaline silica, which we do not observe in Hephaestus Fossae [4]. Our spectral observations are more consistent with mud volcanism, but we do not definitively rule out an igneous volcanic origin for the cones in our study region. We demonstrate that VNIR spectroscopy is a valuable

  11. Superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle into the temporal fossa: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divashree; Khasgiwala, Ankit; Maheshwari, Bharat; Singh, Charanpreet; Shakya, Neelam

    2017-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint dislocation refers to the dislodgement of mandibular condyle from the glenoid fossa. Anterior and anteromedial dislocations of the mandibular condyle are frequently reported in the literature, but superolateral dislocation is a rare presentation. This report outlines a case of superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle that occurred in conjunction with an ipsilateral mandibular parasymphysis fracture. A review of the clinical features of superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle and the possible techniques of its reduction ranging from the most conservative means to extensive surgical interventions is presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  13. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  14. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines Problems breathing You may not recover full vision. ... detachments can be repaired. Failure to repair the retina always results in loss of vision to some degree. After surgery, the quality of ...

  15. Posterior fossa reconstruction using titanium plate for the treatment of cerebellar ptosis after decompression for Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Vikram; Holly, Langston T; Chow, Daniel; Batzdorf, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe our use of a perforated titanium plate to perform a partial posterior fossa cranioplasty in the treatment of cerebellar ptosis and dural ectasia after posterior fossa decompression (PFD). Twelve patients who had undergone PFD underwent posterior fossa reconstruction using a titanium plate. Symptoms were related to either descent of the cerebellum into the decompression or to dural ectasia into the craniectomy defect. Twelve patients who had undergone large suboccipital craniectomies and who presented with persistent headaches and some with neurological symptoms related to syringomyelia, underwent reoperation with placement of a small titanium plate. Ten of 12 patients showed symptomatic improvement after reoperation. Placement of a titanium plate appears to be an effective method of treatment of cerebellar ptosis and dural ectasia after PFD for Chiari malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2018-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  17. X-ray appearance of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid osteodystuophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuzyak, M.M.; Tsarikovskaya, K.G.; Tkach, F.S.; David'yants, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Craniographic data on 58 patients with hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy weere analyzed. Cranial changes revealed in 52 patients. Some data on the nature apd frequency of X-ray signs of cranial lesion in hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy are presented. The most frequent and typical X-ray signs of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy, are granular osteoporosis of the facial tectum and bones, the blurred contour of the internal tectum plate, foci of osteoclasia, osteoporosis of the elements of the Turkish saddle, resorption of the closing plates of the dental cavities, alterration of the thickness of the vault bones, symmetrical thinning, irregularity and obscurity of the external tectum plate, subperiosteal resorption of the cortical layer of the mandible (34.5%), partial resorption of the alveolar process of the jaw and epulis of the mandible

  18. The Biomechanics of Cranial Forces During Figure Skating Spinning Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David H; Kostyun, Regina O; Solomito, Matthew J

    2015-03-01

    Several facets of figure skating, such as the forces associated with jumping and landing, have been evaluated, but a comprehensive biomechanical understanding of the cranial forces associated with spinning has yet to be explored. The purpose of this case study was to quantify the cranial rotational acceleration forces generated during spinning elements. This case report was an observational, biomechanical analysis of a healthy, senior-level, female figure skating athlete who is part of an on-going study. A triaxial accelerometer recorded the gravitational forces (G) during seven different spinning elements. Our results found that the layback spin generated significant cranial force and these forces were greater than any of the other spin elements recorded. These forces led to physical findings of ruptured capillaries, dizziness, and headaches in our participant.

  19. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

  20. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  2. Cranial shape variation in adult howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Luca; Bruner, Emiliano

    2018-01-01

    Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) display a distinctive cranial architecture characterized by airorhynchy (or retroflexion of the facial skeleton on the cranial base), a small braincase, and a posteriorly oriented foramen magnum. This configuration has been associated with distinct factors including a high folivory diet, locomotion, and the presence of a specialized vocal tract characterized by large hyoid bone. However, the morphological relationships between the facial and neurocranial blocks in Alouatta have been scarcely investigated. In this study we quantitatively analyzed the cranial shape variation in Alouatta seniculus, to evaluate possible influences and constraints in face and braincase associated with airorhynchy. We also considered the structural role of the pteric area within the cranial functional matrix. We applied landmark-based analysis and multivariate statistics to 31 adult crania, computing shape analyses based on 3D coordinates registration as well as the analysis of the Euclidean distance matrix to investigate patterns of intraspecific morphological variability. Our results suggest that allometry is the main source of variation involved in shaping cranial morphology in howlers, influencing the degree of facial proportions and braincase flattening, and generating the main sexual differences. Larger individuals are characterized by a higher degree of airorhynchy, neurocranial flattening, and expansion of the zygomatic arch. Allometric variations influence the skull as a whole, without distinct patterns for face and braincase, which behave as an integrated morphological unit. A preliminary survey on the pteric pattern suggests that the morphology of this area may be the result of variations in the vertical growth rates between face and braincase. Future studies should be dedicated to the ontogenetic series and focus on airorhynchy in terms of differential growth among distinct cranial districts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Involvement of cranial pairs as manifestation of prostatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa Saldias, L M; Ayuso Blanco, T; Delpon Pérez, E; Sarria Octavio de Toledo, L

    1994-10-01

    Two cases of prostate cancer (PC) which presented clinically with affectation of the cranial pairs due to skull base metastasis. In both cases, existence of intraparenchimatous brain metastasis was excluded. Initial improvement with hormonal therapy was followed by clinical, analytical and radiological relapse due to spread of process until death, at 11 and 36 months from diagnosis. Although PC's bone metastasis are frequent, their location at the skull base is uncommon. Even more rare are the cases which present with changes in the cranial pairs in the absence of signs and symptoms of prostatism.

  4. Cranial computed tomography in patients with Bourneville-Pringle phacomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Minoru; Kurata, Yukio; Hirone, Takae

    1987-01-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was undertaken in 17 patients (0 - 38 years) with Bourneville-Pringle phacomatosis, some of whom presented with epilepsy episodes and mental retardation. Intracranial calcification was seen on CT in 10 patients (59 %), including a 2-month-old baby. This suggests the potential of CT in the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis for infants, which has been considered difficult by conventional roentgenography. The most frequent site of calcilfication was ventricular wall. High incidences of eye lesions (67 %), psycho-neurologic symptoms (80 %), and abnormal EEG (50 %) were found in patients with cranial calficication on CT, in contrast to patients without it (0 %, 0 %, and 40 %, respectively). (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Triptans and CGRP blockade - impact on the cranial vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benemei, Silvia; Cortese, Francesca; Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    and vascular tone. Thirty years after discovery of agonists for serotonin 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors (triptans) and less than fifteen after the proof of concept of the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists, we are still a long way from understanding their precise site and mode of action in migraine....... The effect on cranial vasculature is relevant, because all specific anti-migraine drugs and migraine pharmacological triggers may act in perivascular space. This review reports the effects of triptans and CGRP blocking molecules on cranial vasculature in humans, focusing on their specific relevance...

  6. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Nichols, Francine

    2013-03-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation is a prescriptive medical device that delivers a mild form of electrical stimulation to the brain for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. It is supported by more than 40 years of research demonstrating its effectiveness in several mechanistic studies and greater than 100 clinical studies. Adverse effects are rare (<1%), mild, and self-limiting, consisting mainly of skin irritation under the electrodes and headaches. Often used as a stand-alone therapy, because results are usually seen from the first treatment, cranial electrotherapy stimulation may also be used as an adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Cranial nerve damage after neuroaxial methods of anesthesia in puerperas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floka, S E; Shifman, E M

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes cranial nerve damage, a rare complication of neuroaxial anesthesia in obstetric care. In the literature, there are summarized data on 17 cases of neurological deficit developing after subarachnoidal or epidural anesthesia in puerperas. The etiological and pathogenetic factors of the above complications may be suggested to be the high disposition of a local anesthetic, arterial hypotension due to neuroaxial anesthetics, the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after pachymeningeal puncture (including after unintended puncture during epidural anesthesia), and ischemic injury after the blood packing performed to relieve postpuncture headache. Closer consideration of these risk factors seems to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve damage in puerperas.

  8. Intramedullary femoral nailing through the trochanteric fossa versus greater trochanter tip : a randomized controlled study with in-depth functional outcome results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moein, C. M. Ansari; ten Duis, H. J.; Oey, P. L.; de Kort, G. A. P.; van der Meulen, W.; van der Werken, Chr

    2011-01-01

    In a level 1 university trauma center, an explorative randomized controlled study was performed to compare soft tissue damage and functional outcome after antegrade femoral nailing through a trochanteric fossa (also known as piriform fossa) entry point to a greater trochanter entry point in patients

  9. Fetal MRI for characterising a variety of posterior fossa anomalies suspected on 3rd trimester ultrasound examination – a short series of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaresh Indravadan Ranchod

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to more accurately assess abnormalities detected on screening ultrasound. This procedure is more pertinent when the initial ultrasound is done late in the third trimester and when the abnormality involves the posterior fossa of the brain. Four cases with a variety of unusual posterior fossa anomalies are presented.

  10. MR image analysis of cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌脑神经受累的MR影像分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴刚毅; 王仁生; 覃玉桃; 马姗姗; 肖帅; 黄国军; 孙丕云

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨鼻咽癌MR脑神经受累的常见部位和诊断标准.方法:回顾性分析23例有脑神经症状的初治鼻咽癌脑神经受累的MR 表现和部位.结果:20例海绵窦受累(双侧受累13例),Meckel腔受累8例(双侧受累1例),14例圆孔扩大,20例卵圆孔扩大,10例翼腭窝脂肪间隙消失,12例翼内肌和翼外肌之间脂肪间歇受累,6例眶上裂增宽,11例眶下裂增宽,8例舌下神经孔肿块占位,1例颈静脉孔肿块占位.结论:MR可显示鼻咽癌脑神经受累,有助于准确分期、精确勾画靶区.%OBJECTIVE:To evaluate MR of nasopharyngeal carcinoma common site of cranial nerve involvement and diagnostic criteria. METHODS: Retrospective analysis the MR performance and position of cranial nerve involvement in 23 cases with cranial nerve symptoms who were first diagnosed as nasopharyngeal carcinoma was performed. RESULTS: Totally 20 patients with cavernous sinus invasion (13 cases with bilateral invasion), Meckel cavity invasion in 8 cases(1 case with bilateral invasion), foramen rotundum expansion in 14 cases and foramen ovale expansion in 20 cases, 10 cases of disappearance of fat space pterygopalatine fossa, 12 cases of involvement of fat space between musculi pterygoideus internus and musculi pterygoideus, 6 cases of fissurae orbitalis superior widened, 11 cases of fissurae orbitalis inferior widened, 8 cases of mass occupying the hypoglossal nerve, one case of jugular foramen mass occupying. CONCLUSION: MR can show nasopharyngeal cranial nerve involvement, and help us accurate staging and precise outline target.

  11. Long-term outcomes of gamma knife surgery for posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The long-term outcomes of gamma knife surgery (GKS) in patients with posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were retrospectively analyzed in 82 patients followed up for more than 5 years to evaluate the efficacy and safety. The median AVM volume at GKS was 0.95 cm 3 . The prescribed dose to the AVM margin was median 18 Gy with 1-18 isocenters. The actual complete AVM obliteration rate was 58.5% at 3 years and 78.0% at 5 years. The significant factors for higher complete obliteration rate were younger patient age and smaller maximum/minimum nidus diameter ratio. Two patients experienced hemorrhage caused by residual AVM rupture at 4 and 49 months. Twenty patients developed peri-nidal edema as an adverse radiation-induced reaction at median 13 months. One patient developed radiation-induced necrosis at 6.8 years. Neurological complication was observed in 12 patients and 6 patients remained with neurological dysfunction permanently. Larger nidus volume and location adjacent to an eloquent area significantly increased the risk of neurological complication. Pittsburgh radiosurgery-based AVM grading scale was significantly correlated with the outcome of neurological symptoms after GKS. GKS achieved acceptable and complete obliteration rate for posterior fossa AVM with relatively low risk of morbidity on neuroimaging and neurological symptoms for the long-term period after treatment. We recommend conformable and selective treatment planning to achieve both obliteration of the AVM nidus and preservation of neurological function. (author)

  12. Branchial sinus of the piriform fossa: reappraisal of third and fourth branchial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrian; Stewart, Craig; Warrick, Paul; Tzifa, Constance; Forte, Vito

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to review clinical and embryologic aspects of third and fourth branchial anomalies. Retrospective study. We reviewed the institutional and departmental databases at our institution to identify all cases of third and fourth branchial anomalies encountered from 1992 to 2006. All patient records were examined with respect to demographics, clinical history, and radiologic and pathologic reports. We identified 17 cases of third and fourth branchial anomalies, the largest series of its kind reported to date. The lesions were predominantly left sided, all presenting with neck infection. Fistula formation was iatrogenic, secondary to incision and drainage. Preoperative direct laryngoscopy always revealed a pit within the apex of the piriform fossa. Surgical excision involved ipsilateral thyroidectomy as the lesion passed through the thyroid gland. No lesions following the classical course of a either a third or fourth branchial anomaly were identified. The clinical presentation of branchial sinuses arising from the piriform fossa is more in keeping with derivation from the thymopharyngeal duct (of the third pouch) than the hypothetical course of third and fourth branchial fistulae.

  13. Pathology, treatment and management of posterior fossa brain tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, K.; Siegel, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common childhood malignancy. Between 1975 and 1985, 462 newly diagnosed patients were treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; 207 (45%) tumors arose in the posterior fossa and 255 (55%) appeared supratentorially. A wide variety of histological subtypes were seen, each requiring tumor-specific treatment approaches. These included primitive neuroectodermal tumor (n = 86, 19%), astrocytoma (n = 135, 30%), brainstem glioma (n = 47, 10%), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 32, 7%), and ependymoma (n = 30, 6%). Because of advances in diagnostic abilities, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, between 60% and 70% of these patients are alive today. Diagnostic tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging allow for better perioperative management and follow-up, while the operating microscope, CO 2 laser, cavitron ultrasonic aspirator and neurosurgical microinstrumentation allow for more extensive and safer surgery. Disease specific treatment protocols, utilizing radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, have made survival common in tumors such as medulloblastoma. As survival rates increase, cognitive, endocrinologic and psychologic sequelae become increasingly important. The optimal management of children with brain tumors demands a multidisciplinary approach, best facilitated by a neuro-oncology team composed of multiple subspecialists. This article addresses incidence, classification and histology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pre-, intra- and postoperative management, long-term effects and the team approach in posterior fossa tumors in childhood. Management of specific tumor types is included as well. 57 references

  14. Expansion of Chiari I-associated syringomyelia after posterior-fossa decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Z; Rao, S; Constantini, S

    2000-09-01

    Chiari I malformation (CMI) is an abnormality that involves caudal herniation of the cerebellar tonsils into the foramen magnum. CMI has been shown to be closely associated with the development of syringomyelia (SM). Several theories have emerged to explain the apparent correlation between the existence of CMI with subsequent development of SM. However, the exact mechanism of the evolution of SM is still subject to controversy. We report here the case of a 12-year-old girl admitted to hospital with headache, vomiting, ataxia, and moderate pyramidal signs. Radiological evaluation revealed the presence of CMI, accompanied by a small SM. The patient underwent posterior fossa decompression and improved significantly. She was re-admitted 6 months later with clinical evidence of progressive spinal cord dysfunction. MR revealed gross expansion of the syrinx. This case raises questions regarding the pathophysiology of CMI and its association with SM. The case indicates the need for neurological and radiological follow-up for patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression due to CMI, even for those without an initial syrinx. This is the first report known to us of expansion of a syrinx following decompression of an associated CMI.

  15. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings in Schistosomiasis mansoni: expanded gallbladder fossa and fatty hilum signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina dos Santos Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is no study relating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to ultrasound (US findings in patients with Schistosomiasis mansoni. Our aim was to describe MRI findings inpatients with schistosomal liver disease identified by US. METHODS: Fifty-four patients (mean age 41.6±13.5years from an area endemic for Schistosomiasis mansoni were selected for this study.All had US indicating liver schistosomal fibrosis and were evaluated with MRI performed witha 1.5-T superconducting magnet unit (Sigma. RESULTS: Forty-seven (87% of the 54 patientsshowing signs of periportal fibrosis identified through US investigation had confirmed diagnosesby MRI. In the seven discordant cases (13%, MRI revealed fat tissue filling in the hilar periportalspace where US indicated isolated thickening around the main portal vein at its point of entryto the liver. We named this the fatty hilum sign. One of the 47 patients with MRI evidence ofperiportal fibrosis had had his gallbladder removed previously. Thirty-five (76.1% of the other46 patients had an expanded gallbladder fossa filled with fat tissue, whereas MRI of the remainingeleven showed pericholecystic signs of fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: Echogenic thickening of thegallbladder wall and of the main portal vein wall heretofore attributed to fibrosis were frequentlyidentified as fat tissue in MRI. However, the gallbladder wall thickening shown in US (expandedgallbladder fossa in MRI is probably secondary to combined hepatic morphologic changes inschistosomiasis, representing severe liver involvement.

  16. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma Presenting as a Solitary Mass in the Intracranial Posterior Fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Poureisa, Masoud; Shimia, Mohammad; Mazaheri-Khamene, Ramin; Daghighi, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    A patient with a 3-month history of headache refractory to pain medication was admitted. The CT scan and MRI showed evidence of a posterior fossa mass. This was pathologically confirmed as an extra medullary plasmacytoma (EMP). He had a pathologic fracture of the left humerus 7 years ago while the radiologist was unaware at the time of diagnosis. A solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) was the cause of the pathologic fracture. This report includes the first description of MRI findings in a patient with a rare-incidence intracranial solitary extra medullary plasmacytoma (SEP) in Iran. There is a striking similarity between the features of intracranial SEP and meningiomas. Intracranial SEP, although rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors in areas where meningiomas commonly arise. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis of plasmacytoma are reviewed. Before this case report, only few cases have been reported in the literature. Nonetheless, this is the first report of posterior fossa EMP from Iran

  17. Muscular Variation In The Neck Region With Narrowing Of The Minor And Major Supraclavicular Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Ferreira Arquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sternocleidomastoideus muscle is the most prominent landmarks of the surface anatomy of the neck, separates the anterior part of the neck (anterior triangle from the posterior part of the neck (posterior triangle. An accessory head of sternocleidomastoideus muscle may cause complications while trying to access vital neurovascular structures that are located in the minor and major supraclavicular fossa. The purpose of this study is to describe an anatomical variation of the sternocleidomastoideus muscle and clinical impact. Methods and Findings: The anatomical variations described were found during routine dissection conducted in the laboratory of Morphology of the University of Pamplona in two male cadavers of 47 and 75 years respectively. Measurements were taken using a Vernier caliper. Topographic details of the variations were examined, recorded and photographed. The morphological variations in the number of heads (three and four of origin of sternocleidomastoideus muscle was found in two male subjects in right and left neck, bilaterally.  The posterior cervical triangle was diminished. The bilateral narrowing of the minor and major supraclavicular fossa minimizing space needed for potential surgical access. The branching patterns of the spinal accessory nerve and arterial patterns were normal. Conclusions: The Knowledge of the presence of additional heads of sternocleidomastoideus muscle it might cause difficulties in subclavian or external jugular vein catheterization, and in surgical interventions involving structures lying under the sternocleidomastoideus muscle. These variations must be kept in mind while approaching the region to avoid complications as the classical anatomical landmarks might be misinterpreted and confuse.

  18. Late effects of treatment on the intelligence of children with posterior fossa tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffner, P.K.; Cohen, M.E.; Thomas, P.

    1983-01-01

    This retrospective pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the late effects of treatment on intelligence in a population of children with posterior fossa tumors. Ten children with posterior fossa tumors treated with radiation and chemotherapy received intellectual evaluations at least one year following diagnosis. Six children had medulloblastomas, one child had a fourth ventricular ependymoma, two children had brainstem gliomas, and one child had a recurrent cerebellar astrocytoma. Children with supratentorial tumors were specifically excluded from the study in order to eliminate the possible influence of the tumor on intellectual functioning. Four children had had intelligence testing in school prior to treatment of their tumor. In each case results following treatment revealed a deterioration of full scale IQ of at least 25 points. Six children did not have prior testing; of these, two had IQ's less than 20. Overall, 50% of the patients had IQ's of less than 80 and 20% had IQ's of greater than 100. Furthermore, four children with normal intelligence (IQ greater than 80) have learning problems requiring special classes. Thus, of the ten children evaluated, all have either dementia, learning disabilities, or evidence of intellectual retardation. This study suggests that aggressive treatment of children with brain tumors may improve survivals but may be associated with significant long-term disabilities

  19. High precision locations of long-period events at La Fossa Crater (Vulcano Island, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rapisarda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the last eruption in 1888-90, the volcanic activity on Vulcano Island (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy has been limited to fumarolic degassing. Fumaroles are mainly concentred at the active cone of La Fossa in the northern sector of the island and are periodically characterized by increases in temperature as well as in the amount of both CO2 and He. Seismic background activity at Vulcano is dominated by micro-seismicity originating at shallow depth (<1-1.5 km under La Fossa cone. This seismicity is related to geothermal system processes and comprises long period (LP events. LPs are generally considered as the resonance of a fluid-filled volume in response to a trigger. We analyzed LP events recorded during an anomalous degassing period (August-October 2006 applying a high precision technique to define the shape of the trigger source. Absolute and high precision locations suggest that LP events recorded at Vulcano during 2006 were produced by a shallow focal zone ca. 200 m long, 40 m wide and N30-40E oriented. Their occurrence is linked to magmatic fluid inputs that by modifying the hydrothermal system cause excitation of a fluid-filled cavity.

  20. Clinical and cranial computed tomography scan findings in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Headache was the most common clinical variable followed by dizziness and aphasia. The most common CT characteristic was extra cerebral haemorrhage followed by brain oedema and raised Intra-cranial pressure (ICP). Intra-cerebral haemorrhage was commonest in the frontal lobe followed by parietal lobe. Conclusion: ...

  1. Cranial nerve functional neurosurgery : Evaluation of surgical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Guerinel, C.; Sindou, M.; Auque, J.; Blondet, E.; Brassier, G.; Chazal, J.; Cuny, E.; Devaux, B.; Fontaine, D.; Finiels, P. -J.; Fuentes, J. -M.; D'Haens, J.; Massager, N.; Mercier, Ph.; Mooij, J.; Nuti, C.; Rousseaux, P.; Serrie, A.; Stecken, J.; de Waele, L.; Keravel, Y.

    We report the results of an investigation carried out on the activity of functional neurosurgery of the cranial nerves in the French-speaking countries, based on the analysis of a questionnaire addressed to all the members of the SNCLF Eighteen centers responded to this questionnaire., which showed

  2. Retinoic acid modulates chondrogenesis in the developing mouse cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Jong-Min; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Lee, Min-Jung; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2011-12-15

    The retinoic acid (RA) signaling pathway is known to play important roles during craniofacial development and skeletogenesis. However, the specific mechanism involving RA in cranial base development has not yet been clearly described. This study investigated how RA modulates endochondral bone development of the cranial base by monitoring the RA receptor RARγ, BMP4, and markers of proliferation, programmed cell death, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. We first examined the dynamic morphological and molecular changes in the sphenooccipital synchondrosis-forming region in the mouse embryo cranial bases at E12-E16. In vitro organ cultures employing beads soaked in RA and retinoid-signaling inhibitor citral were compared. In the RA study, the sphenooccipital synchondrosis showed reduced cartilage matrix and lower BMP4 expression while hypertrophic chondrocytes were replaced with proliferating chondrocytes. Retardation of chondrocyte hypertrophy was exhibited in citral-treated specimens, while BMP4 expression was slightly increased and programmed cell death was induced within the sphenooccipital synchondrosis. Our results demonstrate that RA modulates chondrocytes to proliferate, differentiate, or undergo programmed cell death during endochondral bone formation in the developing cranial base. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  3. Clinical and cranial computed tomography scan findings in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Seventy seven percent of the respondents were between 18- 39 years. ... cerebral haemorrhage followed by brain oedema and raised Intra-cranial pressure (ICP). ... like advocacy and education of the population on safe and responsible road usage ... studies were done over ten years ago, could the pattern of head ...

  4. Development of Cranial Bone Surrogate Structures Using Stereolithographic Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Additive Manufacturing by Jared M Gardner and Thomas A Plaisted Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Laboratory Development of Cranial Bone Surrogate Structures Using Stereolithographic Additive Manufacturing by Thomas A Plaisted Weapons...Structures Using Stereolithographic Additive Manufacturing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jared

  5. Zuigelingen met een scheef hoofd [Babies with cranial deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, M.M.; Claessens, E.A.; Dovens, A.J.; Vles, J.S.; van der Hulst, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet

  6. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, M.F. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia); Probert, J.C. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zwi, L.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Medicine and Surgery

    1995-02-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Association of fetal cranial shape with shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfort, M. A.; White, G. L.; Vermeulen, F. M.

    Objective To evaluate whether fetal cranial shape is related to shoulder dystocia. Methods We compared shoulder dystocia cases (n = 18) with controls (normal vaginal deliveries, n = 18) in a retrospective matched- pairs observational study. Subjects were matched for known maternal and fetal risk

  8. Routine Cranial Computed Tomography before Lumbar Puncture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Current international guidelines recommend that a cranial computed tomography (CT) be performed on all HIV-positive patients presenting with new onset seizures, before a lumbar puncture (LP) is performed. In the South African setting, however this delay could be life threatening. The present study sought to ...

  9. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.F.; Probert, J.C.; Zwi, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  10. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavotinek, J.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombal, Manuel A; Megías, Manuel

    2018-04-16

    Lampreys, together with hagfishes, are the only extant representatives of the oldest branch of vertebrates, the agnathans, which are the sister group of gnathostomes; therefore, studies on these animals are of great evolutionary significance. Lampreys exhibit a particular life cycle with remarkable changes in their behavior, concomitant, in part, with important modifications in the head and its musculature, which might influence the development of the cranial nerves. In this context, some cranial nerves such as the optic nerve and the ocular motor nerves, which develop slowly during an extremely long larval period lasting more than five years, have been more thoroughly investigated; however, much less experimental information is available about others, such as the facial or the hypoglossal nerves. In addition, the possible existence of a "true" accessory nerve in these animals is still a matter of conjecture. Although growing in last decades, investigations on the physiology of the lamprey cranial nerves is scanty. This review focuses on past and recent findings that have contributed to characterize the anatomical organization of the cranial nerves in lampreys, including their components and nuclei, and their relations in the brain; in addition, comments on their development and functional role are also included. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  13. Postnatal cranial ultrasonographic findings in feto-fetal transfusion syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breysem, L.; Naulaers, G.; Deprest, J.; Schoubroeck, D.V.; Daniels, H.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Smet, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was a retrospective evaluation of cranial US in survivors of twin pregnancy with feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), with knowledge of prenatal treatment and neonatal/postnatal clinical data. In 18 pregnancies with FFTS (January 1996 to May 2000), pregnancy management and outcome,

  14. Ocular cranial nerve palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiman El Mograbi; Ethan Soudry

    2017-01-01

    Objective:The clinical presentation of sphenoid sinusitis can be highly variable.Rarely,sphenoid sinusitis may present with cranial nerve complications due to the proximity of these structures to the sphenoid sinus.Method:A case series from Rabin Medical Center and all cases of cranial nerves palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis that have been reported in the literature were reviewed.Results:Seventeen patients were identified.The abducent nerve was the most common cranial nerve affected (76%),followed by the oculomotor nerve (18%).One patient had combined oculomotor,trochlear and abducent palsies.The most common pathology was isolated purulent sphenoid sinusitis in 64% followed by allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) in 18%,and fungal infection in 18%.94% had an acute presentation.The majority (85%) received a combined intravenous antibiotics and surgical treatment.The remainder received conservative treatment alone.Complete recovery of cranial nerve palsy was noted in 82% during follow up.Conclusion:Sphenoid sinusitis presenting as diplopia and headaches is rare.A neoplastic process must be ruled out and early surgical intervention with intravenous antimicrobial therapy carry an excellent outcome with complete resolution of symptoms.

  15. Testing the cranial evolutionary allometric 'rule' in Galliformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde-Medina, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent comparative studies have indicated the existence of a common cranial evolutionary allometric (CREA) pattern in mammals and birds, in which smaller species have relatively smaller faces and bigger braincases than larger species. In these studies, cranial allometry was tested using a multivariate regression between shape (described using landmarks coordinates) and size (i.e. centroid size), after accounting for phylogenetic relatedness. Alternatively, cranial allometry can be determined by comparing the sizes of two anatomical parts using a bivariate regression analysis. In this analysis, a slope higher or lower than one indicates the existence of positive or negative allometry, respectively. Thus, in those species that support the CREA 'rule', positive allometry is expected for the association between face size and braincase size, which would indicate that larger species have disproportionally larger faces. In this study, I applied these two approaches to explore cranial allometry in 83 Galliformes (Aves, Galloanserae), ranging in mean body weight from 30 g to 2.5 kg. The multivariate regression between shape and centroid size revealed the existence of a significant allometric pattern resembling CREA, whereas the second analysis revealed a negative allometry for beak size and braincase size (i.e. contrary to the CREA 'rule', larger galliform species have disproportionally shorter beaks than smaller galliform species). This study suggests that the presence of CREA may be overestimated when using cranium size as the standard measurement. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint A. Boyd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001. Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with

  17. Dexamethasone minimizes the risk of cranial nerve injury during CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Guido; Angiletta, Domenico; Impedovo, Giovanni; De Robertis, Giovanni; Fiorella, Marialuisa; Carratu', Maria Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) ranges from less than 7.6% to more than 50%. Lesions are mainly due to surgical maneuvers such as traction, compression, tissue electrocoagulation, clamping, and extensive dissections. The use of dexamethasone (DEX) and its beneficial effects in spinal cord injuries have already been described. We investigated whether DEX could also be beneficial to minimize the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during CEA. To evaluate whether dexamethasone is able to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve injuries. From March 1999 through April 2006, 1126 patients undergoing CEA because of high-grade carotid stenosis were enrolled and randomized by predetermined randomization tables into two groups. The first group, "A", included 586 patients that all received an intravenous administration of dexamethasone following a therapeutic scheme. The second group, "B", included 540 control subjects that received the standard pre- and postoperative therapy. All patients were submitted to a deep cervical plexus block, eversion carotid endarterectomy, and selective shunting. Three days after the operation, an independent neurologist and otorhinolaryngologist evaluated the presence of cranial nerve deficits. All patients (group A and group B) showing nerve injuries continued the treatment (8 mg of dexamethasone once in the morning) for 7 days and were re-evaluated after 2 weeks, 30 days, and every 3 months for 1 year. Recovery time took from 2 weeks to 12 months, with a mean time of 3.6 months. The chi(2) test was used to compare the two groups and to check for statistical significance. The incidence of cranial nerve dysfunction was higher in group B and the statistical analysis showed a significant effect of dexamethasone in preventing the neurological damage (P = .0081). The incidence of temporary lesions was lower in group A and the chi(2) test yielded a P value of .006. No statistically

  18. Cranial pole nephrectomy in the pig model: anatomic analysis of arterial injuries in tridimensional endocasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Henry, Robert W; Favorito, Luciano A; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2012-06-01

    To assess the intrarenal arteries injuries after cranial pole nephrectomy in a pig model to compare these findings with those in humans. Polyester resin was injected through the ureter and the renal artery to make three-dimensional casts of 61 pig kidneys. The cranial pole of the kidneys was sectioned at four different sites before the solidification of the resin, and the casts were examined for arterial damage. Section performed through the hilus (15 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in two (13.33%) cases, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (86.7%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 11 (73.34%) cases. Section at 0.5 cm cranial to the hilus (16 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 1 (6.25%) case, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 14 (87.5%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (81.25%) cases. Section at 1.0 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): The ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in five (33.33%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was injured in five (33.33%) cases. Section at 1.5 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): No lesions were found in the main arteries, only in the interlobular branches. As previously demonstrated in humans, sections at 1.0 cm or more cranially to the hilus in pigs also showed a significant decrease in damage to the major intrarenal arteries. Therefore, as regards arterial damage, the pig kidney is a useful model for partial nephrectomy in the cranial (upper) pole.

  19. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M.; Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Myological variability in a decoupled skeletal system: batoid cranial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N; Grubbs, R Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial musculature of an abbreviated phylogenetic representation of batoid fishes, including skates, guitarfishes and with a particular focus on stingrays. We identified homologous muscle groups across these taxa and describe changes in gross morphology across developmental and functional muscle groups, with the goal of exploring how decoupling of the jaws from the skull has effected muscular arrangement. In particular, we focus on the cranial anatomy of durophagous and nondurophagous batoids, as the former display marked differences in morphology compared to the latter. Durophagous stingrays are characterized by hypertrophied jaw adductors, reliance on pennate versus fusiform muscle fiber architecture, tendinous rather than aponeurotic muscle insertions, and an overall reduction in mandibular kinesis. Nondurophagous stingrays have muscles that rely on aponeurotic insertions onto the skeletal structure, and display musculoskeletal specialization for jaw protrusion and independent lower jaw kinesis, relative to durophagous stingrays. We find that among extant chondrichthyans, considerable variation exists in the hyoid and mandibular muscles, slightly less so in hypaxial muscles, whereas branchial muscles are overwhelmingly conserved. As chondrichthyans occupy a position sister to all other living gnathostomes, our understanding of the structure and function of early vertebrate feeding systems rests heavily on understanding chondrichthyan cranial anatomy. Our findings highlight the incredible variation in muscular complexity across chondrichthyans in general and batoids in particular. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. MR-Guided Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of the Infratemporal Fossa and Orbit in Malignant Chondrosarcoma via a Modified Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G.; Straub, Ralf; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    A 76-year-old patient presented with a recurrent mass of a malignant chondrosarcoma in the right infratemporal fossa and in the left maxillary sinus with orbital invasion. The patient was treated with a palliative intention with MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy using a modified applicator technique. Following treatment clinical symptoms improved and MRI revealed complete laser-induced tumor necrosis

  3. Bone changes in the condylar head and mandibular fossa in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Helical CT observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimahara, Satoru; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Shimahara, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether bone changes are present in sites impossible to observe by panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination, namely the medial of the condylar head and mandibular fossa, in patients with type IV temporomandibular joint disorders. We observed the articular fossa using computed tomography, which is able to obtain detailed 3-dimensional information, in patients with type IV temporomandibular disorders. We examined 120 joints of 60 patiens who visited the Department of Oral Surgery, Osaka Medical College Hospital. Each condylar head was clearly visualized in panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination findings, and shown to have possible changes unilaterally. Each joint was diagnosed as type IV, according to the diagnostic guidelines set by Japanese Society for Temporomandibular Joint, and further examined using helical CT. Changes in condylar head; We concluded that bone changes were present with considerable probability in the medial of condylar head in a manner similar to those found in the lateral and center of joints with type IV temporomandibular disorders. Changes in mandibular fossa; The bone changes occurred in various locations of the mandibular fossa, while they appeared significantly more frequently in the condylar head. We think that our finding will contribute to development of treatment strategies for temporomandibular disorders, as they clarify bone changes in sites previously unreported. (author)

  4. Role of Cerebellum in Fine Speech Control in Childhood: Persistent Dysarthria after Surgical Treatment for Posterior Fossa Tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A. T.; Liegeois, F.; Liederkerke, C.; Vogel, A. P.; Hayward, R.; Harkness, W.; Chong, K.; Vargha-Khadem, F.

    2011-01-01

    Dysarthria following surgical resection of childhood posterior fossa tumour (PFT) is most commonly documented in a select group of participants with mutism in the acute recovery phase, thus limiting knowledge of post-operative prognosis for this population of children as a whole. Here we report on the speech characteristics of 13 cases seen…

  5. An investigation into the regulation of intra-cranial pressure and its influence upon the surrounding cranial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study is to present a rational coherent hypothesis to explain the palpable involuntary movements of the cranium. The arterial and venous anatomy inside and around the skull and spinal column presents a complete vascular system with the capacity to regulate intra-cranial pressure to a level of equilibrium slightly higher than atmospheric pressure. Variations in cerebrospinal fluid (csf) pressure control the volume of blood draining through the cavernous sinus and hence into the inter-vertebral venous plexus in relation to the jugular vein. Stable intra-cranial pressure is maintained by a controlled release of venous blood through the inter-vertebral venous plexus (slow) and the jugular vein (fast) in the cavernous sinus. Any distortion of the skull from its healthy state will lead to reduced intra-cranial volume. The process of release from the state of compression has been interpreted as "cranial rhythm" but may be a mechanical adjustment increasing the internal volume of the skull, aided by the continual maintenance of stable intracranial pressure. This involuntary movement is capable of being assisted manually.

  6. Correlation of Acute and Late Brainstem Toxicities With Dose-Volume Data for Pediatric Patients With Posterior Fossa Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Ronica H., E-mail: rhazari@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Ganju, Rohit G.; Schreibmann, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Jegadeesh, Naresh; Cassidy, Richard; Deng, Claudia; Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced brainstem toxicity after treatment of pediatric posterior fossa malignancies is incompletely understood, especially in the era of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The rates of, and predictive factors for, brainstem toxicity after photon RT for posterior fossa tumors were examined. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval, 60 pediatric patients treated at our institution for nonmetastatic infratentorial ependymoma and medulloblastoma with IMRT were included in the present analysis. Dosimetric variables, including the mean and maximum dose to the brainstem, the dose to 10% to 90% of the brainstem (in 10% increments), and the volume of the brainstem receiving 40, 45, 50, and 55 Gy were recorded for each patient. Acute (onset within 3 months) and late (>3 months of RT completion) RT-induced brainstem toxicities with clinical and radiographic correlates were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: Patients aged 1.4 to 21.8 years underwent IMRT or volumetric arc therapy postoperatively to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. At a median clinical follow-up period of 2.8 years, 14 patients had developed symptomatic brainstem toxicity (crude incidence 23.3%). No correlation was found between the dosimetric variables examined and brainstem toxicity. Vascular injury or ischemia showed a strong trend toward predicting brainstem toxicity (P=.054). Patients with grade 3 to 5 brainstem toxicity had undergone treatment to significant volumes of the posterior fossa. Conclusion: The results of the present series demonstrate a low, but not negligible, risk of brainstem radiation necrosis for pediatric patients with posterior fossa malignancies treated with IMRT. No specific dose-volume correlations were identified; however, modern treatment volumes might help limit the incidence of severe toxicity. Additional work investigating inherent biologic sensitivity might also provide

  7. Silent internal sinus of the pyriform fossa: a rare adult manifestation of a branchial anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Jung; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Lee, Jin-Chin

    2003-03-01

    Branchial anomalies present with a wide range of pathologic characteristics, including cysts, fistulas, and sinuses of the head and neck region. Branchial cysts are most commonly diagnosed during the second through fourth decades of life, while branchial sinuses and fistulas are diagnosed almost exclusively in children with infection episodes. Only rarely has an internal sinus of a third or fourth branchial anomaly manifested in adults as a noninfectious swelling in the neck during swallowing. In this report, we describe our experience treating a 21-year-old man with a left-sided swallowing-induced neck protrusion of 10 years' duration. Findings of physical examination, videolaryngoscopy, and a pharyngoesophagogram confirmed the diagnosis of internal sinus of the pyriform fossa, with uncertain origin of a third or fourth branchial anomaly. The patient underwent regular follow-up as an outpatient and experienced no further infectious episodes.

  8. A branchial cyst of the pyriform fossa transoral laser resection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Hesham Mostafa; Ahmed, Mohammed Elrabie; Ahmed, Mona El-Rabie; Ahmed, Mohamed Abd El-Kader; Moussa, Abd-Elmateen

    2016-02-01

    Pyriform sinus malformations represent rare third and fourth branchial anomalies. Fistulae at the latter site were initially described and make up less than 1 % of all brachial anomalies. They may be discovered incidentally, or may present as a neck mass with recurrent infection, dysphagia, or airway compromise, and can be an unusual cause of dysphonia in infant and children. Here, we present a case of third branchial cyst located in pharyngeal wall of the left pyriform sinus which presented with dysphonia since birth in a 6-year-old girl. Transoral CO2 laser excision was carried out successfully with no communicating tract. The patient's dysphonia showed progressive regression at 1-year follow-up. Third branchial cyst in the left pyriform sinus (Bailey's type IV) is an unusual cause of dysphonia in pediatric. Our present case report is the first brachial cyst to be reported in the pyriform fossa and the second branchial anomalies to be excised transorally with CO2 laser.

  9. Acoustic neurinoma and posterior fossa meningioma - clinical and CT radiologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catz, A.; Reider-Groswasser, I.; Ichilov Hospital, Tel Aviv; Tel Aviv Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and computed tomography (CT) findings of twenty-three patients with acoustig neurinoma (AN) and eleven patients with posterior fossa meningioma (PFM) are described. AN frequently (94%) presents with the complaint of hearing loss, while PFM often (60%) presents with non-specific pains in the head or neck. The CT characteristics of AN and PFM in this series were similar to those found in most previous publications. The maximal measured mean diamter of PFM (40.2 mm) was significantly larger than that of AN (26.4 mm). Hydrocephalus was apparently influenced by tumor location rather than by its size. It is concluded that diagnostic ability has been improved in cases of CPA tumors, but not in those of non-CPA PFM, probably because of the earlier clinical presentation of the former. Clinical efforts are still necessary to detect the smaller tumors. (orig.)

  10. Giant posterior fossa arachnoid cyst causing tonsillar herniation and cervical syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay P Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired cerebellar tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia associated with posterior fossa mass lesions is an exception rather than the rule. In the present article, we describe the neuroimaging findings in a case of 28-year-old female patient presented with a history of paraesthesia involving right upper limb of 8-month duration. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant retrocerebellar arachnoid causing tonsillar herniation with cervical syringomyelia. The findings in the present case supports that the one of the primary mechanism for the development of syringomyelia may be the obstruction to the flow of cerebrospinal fluid causing alterations in the passage of extracellular fluid in the spinal cord and leading to syringomyelia.

  11. Infraorbital nerve block within the Pterygopalatine fossa of the horse: anatomical landmarks defined by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, S.; Hagen, G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide anaesthesia of the equine maxillary cheek teeth, a local nerve block of the infraorbital nerve in the pterygopalatine fossa had been proposed, which is referred to as the 'Palatine Bone Insertion' (PBI). As several complications with this method were reported, our study was designed to recommend a modified injection technique which avoids the risk of puncturing of relevant anatomical structures. Five cadaver heads and two living horses were examined by contrast medium injections and subsequent computed tomography (CT). Spinal needles were inserted using two different insertion techniques: The above mentioned (PBI), and a modification called 'Extraperiorbital Fat Body Insertion' (EFBI). Both techniques (PBI and EFBI) provide a consistent distribution of contrast medium around the infraorbital nerve. However, only the EFBI technique is appropriate to minimize the risk of complications. This study is an example for the permanent challenge of anatomists to supply a basis for clinical and surgical procedures

  12. Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty in Chiari surgery: A technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ferreira Sabba

    Full Text Available Summary Chiari malformation (CM is the most common and prevalent symptomatic congenital craniocervical malformation. Radiological diagnosis is established when the cerebellar tonsils are located 5 mm or more below the level of the foramen magnum on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical treatment is indicated whenever there is symptomatic tonsillar herniation or syringomyelia/hydrocephalus. The main surgical treatment for CM without craniocervical instability (such as atlantoaxial luxation is posterior fossa decompression, with or without duraplasty. The authors describe in details and in a stepwise fashion the surgical approach of patients with CM as performed at the State University of Campinas, emphasizing technical nuances for minimizing the risks of the procedure and potentially improving patient outcome.

  13. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  14. Life-threatening macroglossia after posterior fossa surgery: a surgical positioning problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, G; Menovsky, T; De Ridder, D; De Bodt, M; Saldien, V; Van de Heyning, P

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was operated in the lateral park bench position with significant neck flexion and oral packing. Macroglossia was noticed immediately postoperatively after endotracheal extubation. The patient was reintubated for 13 days and subsequently required a tracheostoma. After the placement of the tracheostoma and the removal of the endotracheal tube, the congestion of the tongue decreased markedly within 24 hours. Macroglossia is a rare complication following posterior fossa procedures with few cases reported so far. It can cause airway obstruction, which could be a life-threatening complication, and it therefore requires prompt treatment. The aetiology of postoperative macroglossia remains uncertain and has been attributed to arterial, venous and lymphatic compression, mechanical compression, or neurogenic causes. This article describes new insights into aetiology and also describes preventive measures and possible treatment.

  15. Treatment and diagnosis of middle fossa arachnoid cyst. Ventriculofiberscopy and cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamikawa, Shuji; Kuwamura, Keiichi [Hyogo Prefectural Awaji Hospital, Sumoto (Japan); Tamaki, Norihiko

    1998-07-01

    The treatment of intracranial arachnoid cysts is controversial regarding its surgical indication and operative procedures. Conventional surgical approaches such as fenestration, membranectomy, and shunting operation are invasive. Also CT cisternography and/or RI cisternography are invasive, when it has been performed to evaluate the possible CSF communications between the arachnoid cyst and subarachnoid space. Between July 1994 and February 1997, 10 patients with intracranial middle fossa arachnoid cysts were treated with a newly developed ventriculofiberscope which is characterized by splendid mechanical flexibility and high resolution. The cine-MRI, which is a non-invasive diagnostic tool, is used to evaluate the CSF circulation around the cyst fenestration. The patients` ages ranged from 4 months to 10 years, with a mean of 4.46 years. The cyst locations were left middle fossa (9), and right (1). Eight patients presented with macrocrania, 4 with developmental delay, three with seizure, two with headache, and one with subdural hematoma. The patients were preoperatively evaluated by means of MRI and cine-MR images. In all patients ventriculofiberscopic procedures including cyst fenestration, membranous dissection, cyst puncture and shriveling were successfully performed. Postoperative MR and cine-MR studies have shown reduction of the cyst size and appropriate CSF circulation. Neuroendoscopic procedures seem to be the first choice for children with arachnoid cysts and the ventriculofiberscope proved to be very useful not only for cyst fenestration but also for cyst dissection. In addition, the non-invasive cine-MR studies are useful for long follow-up at OPD. (author)

  16. Topographical anatomy of superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, and arteries at venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuni, Yuko; Chiba, Shoji; Tonosaki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated correlations among the superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, arteries, and venous valves in 128 cadaveric arms in order to choose safe venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa. The running patterns of the superficial veins were classified into four types (I-IV) and two subtypes (a and b). In types I and II, the median cubital vein (MCV) was connected obliquely between the cephalic and basilic veins in an N-shape, while the median antebrachial vein (MAV) opened into the MCV in type I and into the basilic vein in type II. In type III, the MCV did not exist. In type IV, additional superficial veins above the cephalic and basilic veins were developed around the cubital fossa. In types Ib-IVb, the accessory cephalic vein was developed under the same conditions as seen in types Ia-IVa, respectively. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended deeply along the cephalic vein in 124 cases (97 %), while the medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended superficially along the basilic vein in 94 (73 %). A superficial brachial artery was found in 27 cases (21 %) and passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV. A median superficial antebrachial artery was found in 1 case (1 %), which passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV and ran along the MAV. Venous valves were found at 239 points in 28 cases with superficial veins, with a single valve seen at 79 points (33 %) and double valves at 160 points (67 %). At the time of intravenous injection, caution is needed regarding the locations of cutaneous nerves, brachial and superficial brachial arteries, and venous valves. The area ranging from the middle segment of the MCV to the confluence between the MCV and cephalic vein appears to be a relatively safe venipuncture site.

  17. 'Regular' and 'emergency' repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on the combined action of radiation and a DNA inhibitor using Crepis roots and on split-dose irradiation of human lymphocytes lead to the conclusion that there are two types of repair. The 'regular' repair takes place twice in each mitotic cycle and ensures the maintenance of genetic stability. The 'emergency' repair is induced at all stages of the mitotic cycle by high levels of injury. (author)

  18. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  19. Congenital multiple cranial neuropathies: Relevance of orofacial electromyography in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Francis; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Baudon, Jean-Jacques; Vazquez, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diagnoses and outcomes of infants with 2 or more cranial neuropathies identified using orofacial electromyography (EMG). This retrospective study involved 90 patients. Diagnoses took into account clinical, radiological, and genetic data. EMG examined the orbicularis oculi, genioglossus, and levator veli palatini muscles, and blink responses. To evaluate outcome, neurological disability, respiratory complications, and feeding difficulties were recorded. The patients had malformation syndromes (59), encephalopathies (29), or no underlying disorders (2). Neurogenic EMG signs were detected in a mean of 4 muscles, reflecting a mean of 3 affected nerves. EMG identified a higher number of neuropathies than clinical examination alone (82 vs. 31, facial; 56 vs. 2, pharyngeal; 25 vs. 3, hypoglossal). Poor outcome and death were more frequent when EMG identified ≥4 affected nerves (P = 0.02). EMG highlights multiple cranial neuropathies that can be clinically silent in infants with malformation syndromes or encephalopathies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ioversol 350: clinical experience in cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, J.; Paugam, J.P.; Courtheoux, P.

    1991-01-01

    A single, open trial was conducted in 40 patients to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy and safety, in cranial computed tomography, of ioversol (350 mgl/ml), a new nonionic, monomeric, low-osmolality contrast medium. Ioversol is characterized by a hydrophilicity which is not only the highest of all nonionic agents available to date, but also evenly distributed among the various sides of the benzene ring. Diagnosis was possible in 100 % of cases with a mean degree of certainty of 90.8 %. Six minor adverse reactions requiring no treatment we recorded, of which two were observed by the investigator and four reported by the patients. No pain sensation was found and heat sensations were of minor intensity. Ioversol 350, which showed good diagnostic efficacy and proved to be well tolerated, is therefore suitable for cranial computed tomography at a mean dose of 1 ml/kg

  1. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  2. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child

  3. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  4. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  5. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Suyash S Kulkarni; Nitin S Shetty; Tejas P Dharia; Ashwin M Polnaya

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head ...

  6. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The cranial-spinal junction in medulloblastoma: does it matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, Ashwatha; Jeswani, Sam; Paulino, Arnold C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Late effects of treatment in children and young adults with medulloblastoma can be influenced by the technique employed in radiating the craniospinal axis. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the placement of the cranial-spinal junction has an impact on dose to the cervical spinal cord and surrounding organs. Methods and Materials: Five patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation in the prone position for craniospinal irradiation. A dose of 36 Gy was prescribed to the entire neuraxis. The doses to the cervical spinal cord and surrounding organs were calculated using a cranial-spinal junction at the C1-C2 vertebral interspace (high junction) or at the lowest point in the neck, with exclusion of the shoulders in the lateral cranial fields (low junction).The volume of critical organs at risk, as well as dose to these structures using the cranial and spinal field(s) were outlined and calculated using the CMS FOCUS 3-dimensional treatment planning system. Results: The average dose to the cervical spinal cord was 11.9% higher than the prescribed dose with the low junction, and 6.7% higher with the high junction. However, doses to the thyroid gland, mandible, pharynx, and larynx were increased by an average of 29.6%, 75.8%, 70.6%, and 227.7%, respectively, by the use of the high junction compared to the low junction. Conclusion: A higher dose to the cervical spinal cord can be minimized by using a high junction. However, this would be at the cost of substantially increased doses to surrounding organs such as the thyroid gland, mandible, pharynx, and larynx. This can be critical in children and young adults, where hypothyroidism, mandibular hypoplasia, and development of second malignancies may be a late sequela of radiation therapy

  8. Development and Tissue Origins of the Mammalian Cranial Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, S.; Bamforth, S. D.; Olsen, B. R.; Morriss-Kay, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate cranial base is a complex structure composed of bone, cartilage and other connective tissues underlying the brain; it is intimately connected with development of the face and cranial vault. Despite its central importance in craniofacial development, morphogenesis and tissue origins of the cranial base have not been studied in detail in the mouse, an important model organism. We describe here the location and time of appearance of the cartilages of the chondrocranium. We also examine the tissue origins of the mouse cranial base using a neural crest cell lineage cell marker, Wnt1-Cre/R26R, and a mesoderm lineage cell marker, Mesp1-Cre/R26R. The chondrocranium develops between E11 and E16 in the mouse, beginning with development of the caudal (occipital) chondrocranium, followed by chondrogenesis rostrally to form the nasal capsule, and finally fusion of these two parts via the midline central stem and the lateral struts of the vault cartilages. X-Gal staining of transgenic mice from E8.0 to 10 days post-natal showed that neural crest cells contribute to all of the cartilages that form the ethmoid, presphenoid, and basisphenoid bones with the exception of the hypochiasmatic cartilages. The basioccipital bone and non-squamous parts of the temporal bones are mesoderm derived. Therefore the prechordal head is mostly composed of neural crest-derived tissues, as predicted by the New Head Hypothesis. However, the anterior location of the mesoderm-derived hypochiasmatic cartilages, which are closely linked with the extra-ocular muscles, suggests that some tissues associated with the visual apparatus may have evolved independently of the rest of the “New Head”. PMID:18680740

  9. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  10. Surgical pitfalls with custom-made porous hydroxyapatite cranial implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zanotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cranioplasty implants are used primarily in cases of surgical cranial decompression following pathological elevations of intracranial pressure. Available bone substitutes include porous hydroxyapatite (HA and polymethylmethacrylate. Whichever material is used, however, prosthetic cranial implants are susceptible to intra- and postsurgical complications and even failure. The aim of this study was to investigate such occurrences in HA cranioplasty implants, seeking not only to determine the likely causes (whether correlated or not with the device itself but also, where possible, to suggest countermeasures. Methods: We analyzed information regarding failures or complications reported in postmarketing surveillance and clinical studies of patients treated worldwide with custom-made HA cranial implants (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica Faenza, Italy in the period 1997-2013. Results: The two most common complications were implant fractures (84 cases, 2.9% of the total fitted and infections (51 cases, 1.77%. Conclusion: Although cranioplasties are superficial and not difficult types of surgery, and use of custom-made implants are often considered the "easy" option from a surgical perspective, these procedures are nonetheless plagued by potential pitfalls. If performed well they yield more than satisfactory results from the points of view of both the patient and surgeon, but lack of appropriate care can open the door to numerous potential sources of failure, which can compromise-even irreparably-the ability to heal.

  11. Robotic Stereotaxy in Cranial Neurosurgery: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Anton; Serletis, Demitre

    2017-12-14

    Modern-day stereotactic techniques have evolved to tackle the neurosurgical challenge of accurately and reproducibly accessing specific brain targets. Neurosurgical advances have been made in synergy with sophisticated technological developments and engineering innovations such as automated robotic platforms. Robotic systems offer a unique combination of dexterity, durability, indefatigability, and precision. To perform a systematic review of robotic integration for cranial stereotactic guidance in neurosurgery. Specifically, we comprehensively analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a spectrum of robotic technologies, past and present, including details pertaining to each system's kinematic specifications and targeting accuracy profiles. Eligible articles on human clinical applications of cranial robotic-guided stereotactic systems between 1985 and 2017 were extracted from several electronic databases, with a focus on stereotactic biopsy procedures, stereoelectroencephalography, and deep brain stimulation electrode insertion. Cranial robotic stereotactic systems feature serial or parallel architectures with 4 to 7 degrees of freedom, and frame-based or frameless registration. Indications for robotic assistance are diversifying, and include stereotactic biopsy, deep brain stimulation and stereoelectroencephalography electrode placement, ventriculostomy, and ablation procedures. Complication rates are low, and mainly consist of hemorrhage. Newer systems benefit from increasing targeting accuracy, intraoperative imaging ability, improved safety profiles, and reduced operating times. We highlight emerging future directions pertaining to the integration of robotic technologies into future neurosurgical procedures. Notably, a trend toward miniaturization, cost-effectiveness, frameless registration, and increasing safety and accuracy characterize successful stereotactic robotic technologies. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  12. Phylogeny, diet, and cranial integration in australodelphian marsupials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Goswami

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials.

  13. Tay-Sachs disease with conspicuous cranial computerized tomographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kishichiro; Mukawa, Akio; Muto, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Jiro; Takahashi, Shigeko.

    1985-01-01

    An autopsy case of a 3-year-old female infant with Tay-Sachs disease was presented. A cherry red spot in the fundus and a deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase A in the white blood cells were revealed soon after admission at the age of one year. Her parents and sister were found to be healthy carriers. The patient showed a typical clinical course with marked cranial swelling. In addition to the marked ballooning of neurons on light microscope, membranous cytoplasmic body (MCB) on electron microscope and abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex by thin layer chromatography were confirmed in the autopsy specimens. In the late stage of her clinical course, the cranial computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated symmetric and deep-wavy hyperdense cerebral cortical zones, diffuse hypodensity and diminished volume of cerebral white matter, mild to moderate ventricular dilatation, and a small cerebellum and brainstem. These conspicuous appearances of the cranial CT seem to be characteristic of Tay-Sachs disease in the late stage, and they are derived from abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex, and diffuse intense demyelination (dysmyelinating demyelination) of the cerebral white matter. (author)

  14. Preoperative percutaneous cranial nerve mapping in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung I

    2003-01-01

    To identify and map the course of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerve preoperatively and percutaneously. Prospective study. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping performed prior to the operation under deep sedation or general anesthesia without muscle paralysis. Private office surgery suite, freestanding surgery center, and regional medical centers. A total of 142 patients undergoing head and neck surgery and facial plastic surgery between August 1994 and July 1999. Monopolar probe was used for nerve stimulation. Electromyographic reading was done through intramuscular bipolar recording electrodes. The equipment used was a nerve monitor. The mandibular divisions were tested in 142 cases, the frontal division in 60 cases, the accessory nerve in 12 cases, and the hypoglossal nerve in 3 cases. Satisfactory mappings were obtained in 115 cases of the mandibular division, 49 cases of the frontal division, 8 cases of the accessory division, and 1 case of the hypoglossal nerve. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping is a new method of identifying the location of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerves. Identifying and mapping the course of peripheral branches of the cranial nerves safely assists the head and neck surgeon in the placement of incisions in a favorable location and in the dissection of the area involving the nerves. Mapping alerts the surgeon to an area containing a nerve and allows the surgeon to avoid just the specific area where a nerve is present, preventing large-scale abandonment of unmapped areas for fear of potential nerve damage.

  15. Latitudinal variation in cranial dimorphism in Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    This study examines latitudinal and insular variation in the expression of sexual dimorphism in cranial length in three geographical groupings of Macaca fascicularis. In addition, the relationship between cranial length dimorphism (CLD) and sex-specific size is examined. The results of the study identified a significant relationship between CLD and latitude for only one of the three geographic groupings. Sex-specific relationships between cranial length and CLD were detected. The pattern of these relationships varied by geographic grouping. This study is important because it demonstrates that despite very similar levels of CLD in a single primate species, there exists important geographic variability in the correlates of that dimorphism. I suggest that geographically varying ecological factors may influence sex-specific natural selection and the intensity of CLD in M. fascicularis. Gaining a better understanding of this geographical variability will require that future research examines morphological variation, including CLD, within its corresponding ecological and social contexts. Such research should be comparative, and incorporate multiple geographically separated populations with disparate environmental settings.

  16. Traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome: assessment of cranial nerve recovery in 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Wang, Theresa Y; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Huang, Faye; Lai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-07-01

    Superior orbital fissure syndrome is a rare complication that occurs in association with craniofacial trauma. The characteristics of superior orbital fissure syndrome are attributable to a constellation of cranial nerve III, IV, and VI palsies. This is the largest series describing traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome that assesses the recovery of individual cranial nerve function after treatment. In a review from 1988 to 2002, 33 patients with superior orbital fissure syndrome were identified from 11,284 patients (0.3 percent) with skull and facial fractures. Severity of cranial nerve injury and functional recovery were evaluated by extraocular muscle movement. Patients were evaluated on average 6 days after initial injury, and average follow-up was 11.8 months. There were 23 male patients. The average age was 31 years. The major mechanism of injury was motorcycle accident (67 percent). Twenty-two received conservative treatment, five were treated with steroids, and six patients underwent surgical decompression of the superior orbital fissure. After initial injury, cranial nerve VI suffered the most damage, whereas cranial nerve IV sustained the least. In the first 3 months, recovery was greatest in cranial nerve VI. At 9 months, function was lowest in cranial nerve VI and highest in cranial nerve IV. Eight patients (24 percent) had complete recovery of all cranial nerves. Functional recovery of all cranial nerves reached a plateau at 6 months after trauma. Cranial nerve IV suffered the least injury, whereas cranial nerve VI experienced the most neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve palsies improved to their final recovery endpoints by 6 months. Surgical decompression is considered when there is evidence of bony compression of the superior orbital fissure.

  17. Differential radiodiagnosis of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid and deforming asteodystrophy, fibrous osteoplasia, multiple myeloma and tumor metastases to the cranial bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuzyak, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an analysis of craniographic findings were provided for 58 patients with primary hyperparathyrosis, 12 with fibrous osteodysplasia, 6 with deforming osteodystrophy, 14 with multiple myeloma and 16 with tumor metastases to the cranial bones. A study was made of some features of roentgenological semiotics (changes in the structure thickness and shapes of the cranial bones) of cranial bone lesions in the above diseases. Differential radiodiagnosis of cranial lesions in hypeparathyroid and deforming osteodystrophy, fibrous osteodysplasia, multiple myeloma and metastatic lesions of the cranial bones should be based not on single signs but on the symptom-complex (x-ray syndrome). For each of the analysed diseases x-ray syndromes were described

  18. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  19. Cranioplasty as the return-to-work factor - 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Ormezowska, Elżbieta; Jaskólski, Dariusz

    2017-07-14

    The number of craniectomies and the consequent reconstructive procedures has grown during the past decades. Cranial defects and methods of their repair could have some influence on work capability of the patients and their employability. The authors analyzed a group of 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz, Poland, in the course of the katamnestic period longer than 6 months after reconstructive operation, and observed them between February 2008 and February 2015. Their work capability and employment were compared, all the patients were interviewed concerning the reasons for not working according to the Social Insurance Institution predication procedure. Before the cranioplasty, all the patients were capable of working without limitations according to biological criteria and 89 of them were employed. Twenty-three not working people consisted of 6 pupils, 7 retired and 10 not working for other reasons. During the period between the craniectomy and the cranioplasty, 88 patients were capable of working and only 2 were employed. After the reconstruction, 93 were capable of working without limitations and 16 - with limitations. Forty-seven were employed during the period of the follow-up, the rest of patients consisted of 2 pupils, 13 retired and 50 not working for various reasons. Cranioplasty is a very important factor contributing to return to work. This outcome may be seen as having a great social value and be added to the functions of cranial repair as protective, esthetic and normalizing the intracranial pressure previously described in the literature. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):803-809. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  20. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in a patient with cerebellar mutism after operation in posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Kara Gedik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar mutism is a transient period of speechlessness that evolves after posterior fossa surgery in children. Although direct cerebellar and brain stem injury and supratentorial dysfunction have been implicated in the mediation of mutism, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the evolution of this kind of mutism remain unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dentatothalamocortical tract injuries and single photon emission computed tomography showed cerebellar and cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with cerebellar mutism. However, findings with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT in this group of patients have not been documented previously. In this clinical case, we report a patient who experienced cerebellar mutism after undergoing a posterior fossa surgery. Right cerebellar and left frontal lobe hypometabolism was shown using FDG PET/CT. The FDG metabolism of both the cerebellum and the frontal lobe returned to normal levels after the resolution of the mutism symptoms.