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Sample records for cowpea viruses effect

  1. VIRUS IN COWPEA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea breeding lines were infected with cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by mechanical inoculation to investigate seed transmission rates for this virus. Transmission rates ranging from 0% to 6% were scored by symptom assessment. However, when cowpeas grown from seeds of infected mother plants were tested by.

  2. Cowpea viruses: Effect of single and mixed infections on symptomatology and virus concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nsa Imade Y

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural multiple viral infections of cultivated cowpeas have been reported in Nigeria. In this study, three Nigerian commercial cowpea cultivars ("Olo 11", "Oloyin" and "White" and two lines from the IITA (IT86D- 719 and TVU 76 were mechanically inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, Bean southern mosaic virus (SBMV and Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV singly, as well as in all possible combinations at 10, 20 and 30 days after planting (DAP. Samples of leaves or stems were collected at 10, 20 and 30 days after inoculation (DAI and analyzed for relative virus concentration by Enzyme-Linked Immunosrbent Assay. All the cultivars and lines {CVS/L} were susceptible to the viruses but the commercial CVS showed more severe symptoms and had relatively higher viral concentration. In single virus infections, CABMV which induced the most severe symptoms had absorbance values (at 405 nm of 0.11 to 0.46 while SBMV and CMeV which induced moderate symptoms had virus titre of 0.74 to 1.99 and 0.11 to 0.90 respectively. Plants inoculated 10 DAP had significantly higher virus concentration than those inoculated 30 DAP. In mixed infections involving CABMV (10 DAP apical necrosis and death were observed in commercial cultivars "Olo 11" and "White". Enhancement of CMeV titers were observed in plants infected with CMeV + CABMV. Multiple viral infections of cowpeas may result in complete yield loss, hence, the availability of seeds of cultivars with a high level of multiple virus resistance is recommended as a means of control.

  3. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imade Yolanda Nsa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar White and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu76. The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV, genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV, genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple at 10, 20 and 30 days after planting (DAP. The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar White was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods and seeds. CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures.

  4. Identification of cowpea mosaic virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, H.O.

    1964-01-01

    Five isolates of the beetle-transmitted cowpea mosaic virus were studied. The symptoms produced by each on a number of hosts were described. The occurrence of amorphous inclusion bodies in the epidermal cells of infected cowpea and pea plants was reported. A purification procedure was described.

  5. field performance of cowpea genotypes grown under virus pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    viral diseases, particularly Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (BlCMV), can be a limiting factor in cowpea production. We evaluated under virus pressure the performance of four PI's (441917,. 441919, 612607, 180014) and a commercial cultivar (Coronet), in Puerto Rico during 2007-2008.

  6. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from cowpea mosaic virus-infected cowpea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorssers, L.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was the purification and identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase engaged in replicating viral RNA in cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV)- infected cowpea leaves.

    Previously, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase produced upon infection of

  7. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsa, Imade Y; Kareem, Kehinde T

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar "White" and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar "White" was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures.

  8. survey of the symptoms and viruses associated with cowpea (vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-10-29

    Oct 29, 2012 ... Key words: Survey, Agroecology, Cowpea, Virus, Symptoms, ACP-ELISA. Introduction. Cowpea ... Table 1 Location and elevation of survey site. S/No. Town. Longitude/Latitude. Elevation (m). Agroecology. 1. Iloffa. 80 05I32.12II N 50 09I 55.44II E. 551.4 ..... sustainable food security and poverty eradication.

  9. Characterization of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and its assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduin, B.J.M.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis decribes the conditions for isolation of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), its ribonucleic acid (RNA) and the coat protein, the characterization of the virus and its constituents (chapter 3, 4 and 5) and the dissociation and assembly behaviour of the virus (chapter 6 and

  10. Survey of the Symptoms and Viruses Associated with Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15.6%), necrotic spots (8.2%) and other symptoms (14.5%). The result of the laboratory assay to detect the viruses present in the leaf samples revealed the presence of four (4) different viruses. The viruses identified were, Cowpea Aphid Borne ...

  11. Effect of Agaricus brasiliensis and Lentinula edodes mushrooms on the infection of passionflower with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Marcelo Di Piero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protection of passion fruit plants against CABMV by using preparations from Agaricus brasiliensis and Lentinula edodes mushrooms. In experiments carried out in the greenhouse, the fruiting body extracts from some of the isolates of both mushrooms significantly reduced CABMV incidence in passion fruit plants. This protective effect occurred when the plant leaves, pre-treated with extracts, were later inoculated mechanically with the virus. However, the extracts did not protect the plants in experiments involving CABMV transmission by aphid vectors. An inhibitory effect of mushroom extracts on the virus particles was also demonstrated on Chenopodium quinoa, a CABMV local lesion host, by inoculating the plants with a mixture of extracts and virus suspension. Still in C. quinoa, the mushroom extracts from some isolates induced systemic resistance against the virus. These results showed that aqueous extracts from A. brasiliensis and L. edodes fruiting bodies had CABMV infectivity inhibitors, but that was not enough to control the viral disease on passion fruit plants at all, considering they were infected through a vector.O endurecimento dos frutos do maracujazeiro, causado pelo Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, é um dos problemas mais sérios que atingem a cultura. Tentativas de se obter plantas resistentes ao vírus ou estirpes fracas premunizantes não apresentaram sucesso até o momento. O objetivo do presente estudo foi o de avaliar a proteção das plantas de maracujá contra o CABMV, utilizando preparações dos cogumelos Lentinula edodes e Agaricus blazei, através da indução de resistência. Em experimentos conduzidos no interior de casa de vegetação, os extratos de basidiocarpos de ambos os cogumelos reduziram significativamente a incidência da virose em plantas de maracujá que tiveram as folhas pré-tratadas com esses extratos e que foram posteriormente inoculadas

  12. Spectroscopy on the assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruese, J.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) by using spectroscopic techniques. In chapter one and two the main properties of CCMV, which belongs to the bromoviruses, are summarized. The application of spectroscopic techniques in the study of other viruses is

  13. Prevalence of viruses infecting cowpea in Uganda and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main areas for cowpea cultivation in Uganda were surveyed in June and October 2006 for viruses affecting the crop. Seed and leaf samples from symptomatic and asymptomatic plants were collected from farmers' fields and analysed for infecting viruses using double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent ...

  14. Recent characterization of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Woodiness disease is the most important disorder of passion fruit worldwide. The causal agent in Brazil is the Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), and despite the economic relevance of passion fruit for agriculture there have been recently very few studies about this virus in Brazil and worldwide. This work reveals ...

  15. Field performance of cowpea genotypes grown under virus pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cultivar Coronet attained midbloom and maturity earlier than the other genotypes. These results confirm previous studies which showed that PI 441917 is an excellent yielder when plants are grown under virus pressure. This accession should be useful in cowpea breeding programmes to help control yield loses by ...

  16. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF COWPEA VARIETY, DOSE AND EXPOSURE TIME ON. BRUCHID .... of cowpea variety as well as its interactive effect with exposure .... RESULTS. Seed morphometrics and characteristics. Table. 1 shows seed morphometrics and characteristics of the cowpea varieties used for this study. KDV.

  17. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata with a Full-Length DNA Copy of Cowpea Mosaic Virus M-RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1987-01-01

    A full-length DNA copy of the M-RNA of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), supplied with either the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the nopaline synthase promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, was introduced into the T-DNA region of a Ti-plasmid-derived gene vector and transferred to

  18. Genetic effects and potential parents in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Tiago Cunha Dias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Six cowpea genotypes and their F2 hybrid combinations were evaluated for general and specific combining ability. The Griffing’s diallel cross design, Method 2, and mixed model B were used. The genotypes and hybrids differed statistically (p <0.01 for the 10 studied traits. With regard to the general and specific combining ability, there were statistical differences at 1% probability for all traits. The presence of additive and non-additive gene effects paves the way for breeding new hybrid cultivars. However, additive gene effects were predominant in the trait expression. Genotypes CE-542, CE-954 and CE-796 were identified as the most promising of the test group for inclusion in cowpea breeding programs.

  19. The helper component-proteinase of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic potyvirus causes severe yield losses in cowpea, an important legume crop in semi-arid regions of Africa. We have elucidated the genomic sequence of the virus and subsequently focused our attention on the so-called helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro), a

  20. Mechanisms underlying Cowpea mosaic virus systemic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos Silva, M.

    2004-01-01

    Systemic virus infection of plants involves; intracellularreplication, cell-to-cell movement within the inoculated leaf, and subsequently, long-distance spread to other plant parts via the vasculature (vascular movement).Cell-to-cell movement

  1. Effect Of Cowpea Planting Density On Growth, Yield And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted at the research farm of the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI), Umudike (07° 33΄ E, 05° 29΄ N) in 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 cropping seasons to determine the effect of cowpea planting density on growth, yield and productivity of component crops in cowpea/cassava intercropping ...

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on moisture sorption isotherms of cowpeas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on moisture sorption isotherms of cowpeas was investigated The nonirradiated and irradiated cowpeas exhibited the typical three stage sigmoidal curve found in most foods. There was also a concomitant increase in the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) as relative humidity increased for ...

  3. Endothelial targeting of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV via surface vimentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J Koudelka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV is a plant comovirus in the picornavirus superfamily, and is used for a wide variety of biomedical and material science applications. Although its replication is restricted to plants, CPMV binds to and enters mammalian cells, including endothelial cells and particularly tumor neovascular endothelium in vivo. This natural capacity has lead to the use of CPMV as a sensor for intravital imaging of vascular development. Binding of CPMV to endothelial cells occurs via interaction with a 54 kD cell-surface protein, but this protein has not previously been identified. Here we identify the CPMV binding protein as a cell-surface form of the intermediate filament vimentin. The CPMV-vimentin interaction was established using proteomic screens and confirmed by direct interaction of CPMV with purified vimentin, as well as inhibition in a vimentin-knockout cell line. Vimentin and CPMV were also co-localized in vascular endothelium of mouse and rat in vivo. Together these studies indicate that surface vimentin mediates binding and may lead to internalization of CPMV in vivo, establishing surface vimentin as an important vascular endothelial ligand for nanoparticle targeting to tumors. These results also establish vimentin as a ligand for picornaviruses in both the plant and animal kingdoms of life. Since bacterial pathogens and several other classes of viruses also bind to surface vimentin, these studies suggest a common role for surface vimentin in pathogen transmission.

  4. Molecular interactions during the assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus studied by magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, G.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of 1 H- and 13 C- NMR, EPR, ST-EPR and calculational methods to study cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. This virus consists of RNA encapsidated by 180 identical protein subunits, arranged icosahedrally. The

  5. Structure, morphogenesis and function of tubular structures induced by cowpea mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteel, D.T.J.

    1999-01-01

    During systemic plant infection, viruses move from the initially infected cells through plasmodesmata to neighbouring cells. Different mechanisms have been proposed for this cell-to-cell movement. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) employs one of the major movement mechanisms, i.e. tubule-guided

  6. EFFECTS OF COWPEA FORTIFICATION, DEHYDRATION METHOD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Cowpea fortification, dehydration method, storability, traditional weaning foods, chemical and functional properties. Effets de l'enrichissement avec du niébé, la méthode de déshydratation et la durée de conservation sur certaines caractéristiques qualitatives des aliments de sevrage traditionnels à base de maïs

  7. Two viral proteins involved in the proteolytic processing of the cowpea mosaic virus polyproteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.; Verver, J.; Jaegle, M.; Wellink, J.; Kammen, van A.; Goldbach, R.

    1988-01-01

    A series of specific deletion mutants derived from a full-length cDNA clone of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) B RNA was constructed with the aim to study the role of viral proteins in the proteolytic processing of the primary translation products. For the same purpose cDNA clones were constructed having

  8. The NTP-binding motif in cowpea mosaic virus B polyprotein is essential for viral replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S A; Verver, J; Nollen, E A; van Lent, J W; Wellink, J; van Kammen, A

    1994-01-01

    We have assessed the functional importance of the NTP-binding motif (NTBM) in the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) B-RNA-encoded 58K domain by changing two conserved amino acids within the consensus A and B sites (GKSRTGK500S and MDD545, respectively). Both Lys-500 to Thr and Asp-545 to Pro substitutions

  9. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals. Mutagenic effectiveness ...

  10. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals.

  11. Effects of carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides on cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of two insecticides, Lannate (n carbamate) and karate (a pyrethoid) on nitrogen fix::.tion by c:owpeas { Jligna ungtticulata) were evaluated after establishing the toxic effects of these insecticides on the microsymbiont bradyrihobia itl vitro. In this (in vitro) experiment conducted in modified Le.onard jars (LJ), ...

  12. Effects of Feeding High Level of Cowpea Husk on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted at Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, to find out the effect of feeding high levels of cowpea husk on the haematological parameters and Blood urea nitrogen of Uda lambs. Fifteen (15) weeks feeding trial (including three (3) weeks digestibility trial) was conducted using sixteen (16) growing Uda ...

  13. Effect of supplementing fungi degraded cowpea seedhull in broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of inclusion of fungi degraded cowpea seedhull was investigated in a broiler study that lasted for eight weeks. The degraded seedhull was included at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% levels in a Completely Randomized Design experiment. The performance characteristics and heamatological parameters were evaluated.

  14. Effect of Spatial Arrangement on Growth and Yield of Cowpea in a Cowpea-maize Intercrop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocaya, CP.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea growth and yield performance when intercropped with maize was studied for 3 consecutive seasons under three spatial arrangements, i. e., maize planted at 90 x 30, 100 x 27, and 120 x 22.5 cm, with 2 rows of cowpea between the maize rows. Growth and yield of cowpea was improved significantly by widening maize intra-row distances as compared to the 90 x 30 cm spacing. Hence, intercropped cowpea needs to be sown where maize rows are wide apart, but the maize rows should not be too wide as this would lower the grain yield of maize.

  15. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  16. Presence and Effects of Chemical Toxin on Feeding of Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp is one of the most important grain legumes produced in Nigeria. It is mostly grown as a mixed crop with cereals in a traditional cereal/legume farming system. Cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch is the main aphid pest of cowpea. In view of the importance and serious damage caused ...

  17. Cowpea mosaic virus-based systems for the expression of antigens and antibodies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank; Liu, Li; Lomonossoff, George P

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Cowpea mosaic virus-based vectors for the production of foreign proteins such as antigens and antibodies in plants. The systems include vectors based on both full-length and deleted versions of RNA-2. In both cases, the modified RNA-2 is replicated by coinoculation with RNA-1. The constructs based on full-length RNA-2 retain the ability to spread systemically throughout an inoculated plant and the infection can be passaged. The vector based on a deleted version of RNA-2 can stably incorporate larger inserts but lacks the ability to move systemically. However, it has the added advantage of biocontainment. In both cases, vector constructs modified to contain a foreign gene of interest can be delivered by agroinfiltration to obtain transient expression of the foreign protein. If required, the same constructs can also be used for stable nuclear transformation. Both types of vector have proved effective for the production in plants of a diverse range of proteins including antigens and antibodies.

  18. Comparative effect of ridge furrow and zero tillage on cowpea at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trials were carried out to compare effect of different seedbeds on cowpea at Abeokuta and Akure in different microclimates of Nigeria. The values of selected soil physical properties, plant nutrient status and growth and yield of cowpea given by zero tillage, manual clearing, ridge top, ridge side, ridge base, and furrow were ...

  19. Effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was conducted at the Rivers State University of Science and Technology Research and Training farm Port Harcourt to test the effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control. The cultivars of cowpea used were Dan Kano, Bornu local and Sokoto local while the oil palm sludge levels applied ...

  20. Expression and silencing of cowpea mosaic virus transgenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijen, T.

    1997-01-01

    Plant viruses are interesting pathogens because they can not exist without their hosts and exploit the plant machinery for their multiplication. Fundamental knowledge on viral processes is of great importance to understand, prevent and control virus infections which can cause drastic losses

  1. Viral protein synthesis in cowpea mosaic virus infected protoplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, P.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to the situation concerning bacterial and, to a lesser extent, animal RNA viruses, little is known about the biochemical processes occurring in plant cells due to plant RNA virus infection. Such processes are difficult to study using intact plants or leaves. Great effort has

  2. The use of tobacco mosaic virus and cowpea mosaic virus for the production of novel metal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Andrew J; Makarov, Valentine; Yaminsky, Igor; Kalinina, Natalia O; Taliansky, Michael E

    2014-01-20

    Due to the nanoscale size and the strictly controlled and consistent morphologies of viruses, there has been a recent interest in utilizing them in nanotechnology. The structure, surface chemistries and physical properties of many viruses have been well elucidated, which have allowed identification of regions of their capsids which can be modified either chemically or genetically for nanotechnological uses. In this review we focus on the use of such modifications for the functionalization and production of viruses and empty viral capsids that can be readily decorated with metals in a highly tuned manner. In particular, we discuss the use of two plant viruses (Cowpea mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus) which have been extensively used for production of novel metal nanoparticles (<100nm), composites and building blocks for 2D and 3D materials, and illustrate their applications. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Death by desiccation: Effects of hermetic storage on cowpea bruchids

    KAUST Repository

    Murdock, Larry L.

    2012-04-01

    When cowpea grain is stored in airtight containers, destructive populations of the cowpea bruchid (. Callosobruchus maculatus) don\\'t develop even though the grain put into the store is already infested with sufficient . C. maculatus to destroy the entire store within a few months. The surprising effectiveness of hermetic storage for preserving grain against insect pests has long been linked with the depletion of oxygen in the hermetic container and with the parallel rise in carbon dioxide. With . C. maculatus, low oxygen (hypoxia) leads to cessation of larval feeding activity, whereas elevated levels of carbon dioxide (hypercarbia) have little or no effect on feeding. Cessation of feeding arrests the growth of the insects, which don\\'t mature and don\\'t reproduce. As a result, population growth ceases and damaging infestations don\\'t develop. . C. maculatus eggs, larvae, and pupae subjected to hypoxia eventually die after exposures of various duration. The cause of death is desiccation resulting from an inadequate supply of water. We demonstrate that blocking the supply of oxygen interdicts the main supply of water for . C. maculatus. This leads to inactivity, cessation of population growth, desiccation and eventual death. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Recent characterization of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Romário

    2015-03-04

    Mar 4, 2015 ... Plant Dis. 90(8):1026-1030. Webster CG, Coutts BA, Jones RAC, Jones MGK, Wylie SJ (2007). Virus impact at the interface of an ancient ecosystem and a recent agroecosystem: studies on three legume-infecting potyviruses in the. Southwest Australian floristic region. Plant Pathology 56:729-742. Wylie SJ ...

  5. serological detection of seed borne viruses in cowpea regenerated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    mosaic virus genus Potyvirus, which is of great economic importance in germplasm conservation and exchange between ... onto hormone free medium composed of 4.43 g MS basal salt, 30 g sucrose and 8 g of agar. ... la conservation du germoplasme et l'échange entre les pays eu égard aux pertes qu'il entraîne.

  6. Serological detection of seed borne viruses in cowpea regenerated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... conservation and exchange between countries as it causes great loss. Southern bean mosaic virus was not detected in any of the accessions evaluated. Seeds were harvested from the infected mother plants at maturity and the embryos excised in vitro onto hormone free medium composed of 4.43 g MS basal salt, 30 g ...

  7. Versatile post-functionalization of the external shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus by using click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommersom, C.A.; Matt, B.D.; van der Ham, A.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Katsonis, Nathalie Hélène

    2014-01-01

    We present the modification of the outer protein shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) with linear and strained alkyne groups. These functionalized protein capsids constitute valuable platforms for post-functionalization via click chemistry. After modification, the integrity of the capsid

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of full-length DNA copies of the genomic RNAs of cowpea mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments described in this thesis were designed to unravel various aspects of the mechanism of gene expression of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). For this purpose full-length DNA copies of both genomic RNAs of CPMV were constructed. Using powerful invitro

  9. Cowpea mosaic virus 32- and 60-kilodalton replication proteins target and change the morphology of endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.; Lent, van J.; MacFarlance, S.A.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2002-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) replicates in close association with small membranous vesicles that are formed by rearrangements of intracellular membranes. To determine which of the viral proteins are responsible for the rearrangements of membranes and the attachment of the replication complex, we have

  10. Effect of variety mixtures on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jokonya

    Journal of Food Science 1983; 48: 1252-1254. 14. Kabululu MS, Ojiewo C, Oluoch M and BL Maass Cowpea cultivar mixtures for stable and optimal leaf and seed yields in a maize intercropping system. International Journal of Vegetable Science, 2013; 20(3). DOI: 10.1080/19315260.2013.813889. 15. Malidadi C Cowpea ...

  11. Obtenção de plantas de feijão-caupi resistentes ao Cowpea severe mosaic virus e ao Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislanne Brito Barros

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os vírus que infectam o feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. destacam-se, respectivamente, pela severidade e ampla ocorrência o Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV e o Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV. Portanto, objetivaram-se, no presente trabalho, obter e avaliar plantas de feijão-caupi com resistência ao CPSMV e ao CABMV, visando ao desenvolvimento de cultivares essencialmente derivadas e novas cultivares. Realizaram-se oito cruzamentos seguidos de retrocruzamentos, utilizando a linhagem TE 97-309G-9 e a cultivar Patativa como genitores resistentes, e as cultivares BR3-Tracuateua, BRS-Urubuquara, BRS-Novaera, BRS-Guariba e Pretinho como genitores suscetíveis. As gerações F2 e F2RC1 foram desafiadas quanto à resistência por meio de inoculação mecânica com isolados do CPSMV e do CABMV. Nas gerações F2RC1, além da resistência foram avaliados os caracteres: número de dias para o início da floração, comprimento das vagens, número de grãos. vagem-1, peso de cem grãos e produção de grãos.planta-1. Todos os indivíduos F2 e F2RC1 foram analisados pelo teste χ² e se ajustaram à frequência esperada de 15 plantas suscetíveis 1 planta resistente a ambos os vírus. As médias das plantas F2RC1 resistentes, de cada retrocruzamento, foram comparadas com a média do seu respectivo genitor recorrente pelo teste 't' e as médias dos retrocruzamentos foram comparadas pelo teste de Scott-Knott. Foi detectada variabilidade genética entre os retrocruzamentos para todos os caracteres. Todos os retrocruzamentos foram considerados promissores para produção de cultivares essencialmente derivadas resistentes ao CPSMV e ao CABMV e as plantas selecionadas possuem características que possibilitam a seleção de linhagens com grãos de bom padrão comercial e altamente produtivas.

  12. Screening Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (l) walp) lines for infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-three cowpea varieties were screened in a screen-house in Ibadan, Nigeria for responses to four cowpea viruses; namely, Bean common mosaic potyvirus - blackeye cowpea strain (BCMV-BlC), Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic potyvirus (CABMV), Cowpea Mottle Carmovirus (CMeV) and Southern bean mosaic ...

  13. Effects of cowpea fortification and the level of ripeness of plantain on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cowpea fortification and the level of ripeness of plantain on the nutritive value of plantain based snack foods. AN Etsey, E Sakyi-Dawson, S Sefa-Dedeh, EO Afoakwa, K Tano-Debrah, GA Annor ...

  14. Aktivitas Antivirus Beberapa Ekstrak Tanaman terhadap Bean Common Mosaic Virus strain Black Eye Cowpea (BCMV-BIC pada Kacang Panjang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Asmira Damayanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antivirus actitivity of several plant extracts against Bean common mosaic virus strain Black eye cowpea (BCMV-BlC on Yard long bean.  Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV is an important virus on yard long bean and it is difficult to control. One of control effort way by utilizing antiviral substances of plant origin. The research was done to select and test the effectiveness of plant extracts in suppressing BCMV infection on yard long bean. Twenty two plant extracts were selected by (1 spraying the crude extract to Chenopodium amaranticolor leaves, then plant inoculated by BCMV 1 hour after spraying, and (2 mixturing the crude extract with sap containing BCMV, then inoculated mechanically to C. amaranticolor.  Local necrotic lesion  number and inhibition percentage are measured. All plant extract treatments were able to reduce Necrotic lokal lesion  formation significantly  compared to untreatment control. Further, fifteen plant extracts were selected to test their effectiveness in controlling BCMV on yard long bean in green house trial. The results showed that except geranium and red ginger treatment, other extract treatments were able to reduce significantly the disease incidence and severity, symptoms, and  BCMV titer, respectively. Among tested extracts, Bougainvillea spectabilis, Mirabilis jalapa, and Celosia cristata are the most effective crude extracts in suppressing BCMV infection.

  15. Biological stability of a strain of Cowpea severe mosaic virus over 20 years Estabilidade biológica de uma estirpe do Cowpea severe mosaic virus ao longo de 20 anos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albersio Araujo Lima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata is an important crop of the traditional agriculture system in the Northeast of Brazil. It can be infected by more than 20 virus species and Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV is one of the most important pathogens that naturally infect cowpea in Brazil. Several CPSMV isolates were obtained and characterized in the Plant Virus Laboratory at the Federal University of Ceará: CPSMV-CE - the first characterized isolate of the virus obtained from cowpea in the State of Ceará; CPSMV-AL - isolated from cowpea in Alagoas; CPSMV-PE - isolated from cowpea in Pernambuco; CPSMV-PR - obtained from soybean (Glycine max in Paraná and CPSMV-CROT - isolated from Crotalaria paulinea, in Maranhão. An isolate of CPSMV with the property to infect the cv. Macaibo, a cowpea cultivar immune to most of CPSMV isolates was also biologically and serologically characterized as a new strain of the virus (CPSMV-MC. The CPSMV-MC was isolated in January 1990 and has been evaluated over 20 years by host range studies and maintenance in vivo by periodical mechanical inoculations in cowpea. The results of this periodical evaluation revealed that the biological integrity and the serological properties of CPSMV-MC were preserved over 20 years, indicating that the genetic preservation of a virus strain could occur over the years. Molecular studies involving part of the coat protein (CP gene of CPSMV-MC and five other Brazilian CPSMV isolates indicated a high degree of conservation, with 92-100% nucleotide sequence identity among the isolates.O feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata é uma cultura do sistema tradicional do Nordeste do Brasil, que pode ser infetada por mais de 20 espécies de vírus, sendo o vírus do mosaico severo do caupi (Cowpea severe mosaic virus, CPSMV um dos mais importantes patógenos que infeta naturalmente essa leguminosa no Brasil. Vários isolados do CPSMV foram obtidos e caracterizados no Laboratório de Virologia Vegetal da UFC

  16. Effects of irradiation on physical and sensory characteristics of cowpea seed cultivars (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocloo, F.C.K., E-mail: fidelis_ocloo@yahoo.com [Radiation Technology Centre, Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. P.O. Box LG 80, Legon (Ghana); Darfour, B.; Ofosu, D.O. [Radiation Technology Centre, Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. P.O. Box LG 80, Legon (Ghana); Wilson, D.D. [Department of Zoology, University of Ghana, Legon (Ghana)

    2012-01-15

    Cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) are leguminous seeds widely produced and consumed in most developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa where they are a good source of affordable proteins, minerals and vitamins to the mainly carbohydrate-based diet of sub-Saharan Africa. At storage cowpea may be attacked by insects that cause severe damage to the seeds. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on some physical and sensory characteristics of cowpea seed cultivars. Four cowpea cultivars were irradiated with gamma radiation at dose levels of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy. Moisture content, thousand grain weight and bulk densities were determined as well as the amount of water absorbed during soaking and some sensory characteristics were equally determined. All the physical parameters studied were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by the radiation. There was no significant (p>0.05) effect of the radiation on the sensory attributes like flavour, taste, texture, softness and colour of the cowpea seeds. Similarly, the radiation did not affect significantly (p>0.05) the acceptability of the treated cowpea cultivars. - Highlights: > We investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on some physical and sensory characteristics of cowpea seed cultivars. > Four cowpea cultivars were irradiated at dose levels of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy. > Physical parameters were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by the radiation. > Sensory attributes considered were not significantly influenced by the radiation doses used.

  17. Imunogenicidade de proteínas do capsídeo do Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV Capsid protein immunogenicity of Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evando Aguiar Beserra Júnior

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A análise SDS-PAGE do Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV purificado revelou a migração de três frações protéicas estimadas em 43, 23 e 21 kDa, correspondentes às proteínas do capsídeo: denominadas proteína maior (43 kDa e menor (23 kDa; intacta e 21 kDa; clivada. As proteínas do capsídeo, na sua forma nativa, foram utilizadas na imunização de camundongos pelas vias oral e nasal, durante 10 dias consecutivos. As frações protéicas de 43 e 23 kDa, em sua forma desnaturada, foram utilizadas para imunização subcutânea. A resposta imunológica da mucosa foi avaliada pela proliferação celular das placas de Peyer de camundongos imunizados pela via oral com o CPSMV purificado. Ficou demonstrado que o CPSMV induz resposta imunológica, evidenciada pela síntese de anticorpos séricos, quando administrado na sua forma nativa pelas vias oral e nasal ou através de suas proteínas do capsídeo desnaturadas, pela via subcutânea. Não foi necessário o uso de adjuvantes, quer por via oral quer por via nasal. As frações protéicas de 43 e 23 kDa mostraram-se responsáveis pela imunogenicidade do vírus, como foi evidenciado pela síntese de anticorpos específicos detectados por ELISA. A análise da proliferação celular da placas de Peyer revelou um aumento (r=0,88 do número de leucócitos ao longo de 42 dias após a imunização. Esses resultados reforçam a possibilidade do uso do CPSMV como vetor seguro de antígenos de doenças humanas/animais pouco imunogênicos para produção de vacinas.SDS-PAGE analysis of purified Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV revealed the migration of three protein fractions of 43, 23 and 21 kDa, corresponding to the capsid protein called large protein (43 kDa and small protein (23 kDa; intact and 21 kDa; cleaved. The capsid proteins, in their native form, were used to immunize mice through oral and nasal routes for ten consecutive days. The denatured form of the 43 and 23 kDa protein fractions were

  18. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  19. Effects of organic manure and cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (l.) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design of a split plot fashion in three replications with the varieties of cowpea on the main plots while the organic manures and a control (no-treatment) plot constituted the subplots. The organic manure was incorporated into the soil by pulverizing the manure ...

  20. Effect of variety mixtures on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jokonya

    provide cheap sources of protein, micronutrients and mineral elements that can ... determine the crude protein content and iron concentration of open-air dried leaf ..... African Journal of. Food Agriculture Nutrition and Development 2007; 7(3): 631-632. 3. Nielsen SS, Ohler TA and TA Mitchell Cowpea leaves for human.

  1. Effect of high plant (cowpeas) and animal (casein) proteins on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Others were not significant. Conclusion: This study has clearly shown that the intake of a high plant protein, cowpeas leads to mild increase in NAG and microalbumin in urine. On the other hand, an intake of high casein diet, an animal protein, resulted in a marked increase in urinary NAG and mild increase in microalbumin.

  2. Effect of radio frequency treatments on cowpea weevil adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dried pulses (chickpeas, lentils and dried peas) are valuable export commodities in the US Pacific Northwest. Postharvest infestation by stored product insect pests such as the cowpea weevil may cause importing countries to require phytosanitary treatments before shipment. Typically, chemical fumiga...

  3. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespenheide, B M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Jacobs, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Thorpe, M F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Effects of effluent water on the abundance of cowpea insect pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiroesele, Bamphitlhi; Sitwane, Monametsi; Obopile, M; Ullah, Muhammad Irfan; Ali, Sajjad

    2017-10-03

    Botswana experiences low and unreliable rainfall. Thus, the use of effluent water in agriculture is increasingly important. Insect damage is the major constraint for cowpea grain production in the most cowpea-producing lands. We investigated the effects of effluent water on insect pest abundance on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) under field conditions. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 100, 75, 50, and 25% of effluent water and 0% (control-clean tap water) treatments. Treatments with 100% effluent water resulted in a significant increase in insect pest populations as compared with the control. These results show that the use of effluent water to irrigate crops may increase incidence, abundance, and damage caused by insect pests possibly by decreasing plant vigor. The use of effluent water in agriculture should be addressed in a wise way.

  5. Effects of light quality on pod elongation in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Seiya; Ario, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Andressa Camila Seiko; Tomita, Yuki; Murayama, Naoki; Taniguchi, Takatoshi; Hamaoka, Norimitsu; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2017-06-03

    Soybean pods are located at the nodes, where they are in the shadow, whereas cowpea pods are located outside of the leaves and are exposed to sunlight. To compare the effects of light quality on pod growth in soybean and cowpea, we measured the length of pods treated with white, blue, red or far-red light. In both species, pods elongated faster during the dark period than during the light period in all light treatments except red light treatment in cowpea. Red light significantly suppressed pod elongation in soybean during the dark and light periods. On the other hand, the elongation of cowpea pods treated with red light markedly promoted during the light period. These results suggested that the difference in the pod set sites between soybean and cowpea might account for the difference in their red light responses for pod growth.

  6. Effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... Training farm Port Harcourt to test the effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed ... functional root nodules during both seasons and in all the cultivars ..... (1985) also indicated that long term effect of oil in soil.

  7. Effects of feeding different levels of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2.0 + 0.8t a,) + | )*. 2.2#. 1 . 7 # l 0 o. I Significantly different by Student's / test, p < 0.0 I. # Significantty different by chi-square test, p < 0.05 n - No. of pigs. Table 5 Summary of components measured in faecal extractsa from growing pigs fed different levels of raw cowpea during the first 7 d postweaningo'c. Dietary treatment.

  8. Effect of soaking and microwave pre-treatment of cowpea seeds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of soaking and microwave energy pre-treatments on the cooking time, anti-nutritional factors and proximate composition of cowpea seeds. Seeds were soaked (6 h) and exposed to microwaves for 2 and 5 min followed by oven-drying (48 ± 2 o C) to obtain a uniform moisture ...

  9. Effect of weeding frequency on the growth and yield of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal Polytechnic, Mubi, Adamawa State between July and September, 2012, to assess the effect of weeding frequency on the growth and yield of cowpea. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with four treatments (zero weeding, weeding once, ...

  10. The effect of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) flour as an extender on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in search of meat extenders/filler, which would minimize excessive bulging (swelling at the centre) of beef and hamburgers so as to enhance their use in sandwiches. The potential of dehulled cowpea flour was evaluated in beef and hamburgers, to determine its effects on the sensory, physical and ...

  11. Effect of phospho-compost on growth and yield of cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of phospho-compost on the growth and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) was studied at Juaboso in the Western Region of Ghana. It was a factorial experiment arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Phospho-compost, prepared from phosphate rock, cocoa pod husk, sawdust ...

  12. Effect of paraquat as post emergence herbicide on yield of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment reported herein was undertaken to determine the toxicological effect of paraquat as post emergence herbicide on yield of cowpea. Two rates of paraquat 0.50 kg ai/ha and 1.00kg ai/ha were applied as post emergence herbicide in pot experiment with fallow weed population; which examined the ...

  13. Effects of irradiation on the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculates F. and moisture sorption isotherm of cowpea seed (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Darfour

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cowpeas during storage may be attacked by a number of biological agents (microorganisms, rodents, and insects which results in losses in the quality and quantity of the stored seeds. One of the means of reducing these losses is through the application of radiation processing. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on a major storage insect pest, Callosobruchus maculatus F. and on moisture sorption isotherms of cowpea seeds in storage. The cowpeas were infested with adults C. maculatus and then irradiated at doses of 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 (kGy at a dose rate of 1.074 kGyhr-1. Samples were stored for 1 month under controlled temperature (27.3-30 oC and humidity (70-85 % during which counting of the insects was done every 48 hours and those alive or dead noted. Moisture sorption isotherms of the cowpea samples were equally determined by establishing equilibrium relative humidity (ERH of 55, 65, 75, 85 and 95 % using a formulation of glycerol-water mixture at temperature of 30+-1 and the weight (loss or gain of the samples was determined every 2 days. Irradiation at a dose of 0.25 kGy killed the C. maculatus within eight days and therefore 0.25 kGy would be economically beneficial as a control dose. There was significant difference (p is less than 0.05 in the percent mortality between the irradiated and the non-irradiated weevils, and the percent mortality increased with increase in the radiation dose. At moisture content of 14 % the irradiated cowpea samples were safely stored for one month at an equilibrium relative humidity of 60-75 % at a temperature of 29+-2 oC.

  14. Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein gene of cowpea aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) is a potyvirus that infects cowpea causing significant yield reduction. However, there is no durable natural resistance to the virus within the crop and genetic engineering for virus resistance was not possible because of a lack of an efficient, reliable and reproducible cowpea ...

  15. Molecular modeling of the RNA binding N-terminal part of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus coat protein in solution with phosphate ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, D.; Feenstra, K.A; Hemminga, M.A.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The RNA-binding N-terminal arm of the coat protein of cowpea ch[orotic mottle virus has been studied with five molecular dynamics simulations of 2.0 ns each. This 25-residue peptide (pep25) is highly charged: it contains six Arg and three Lys residues. An alpha-helical fraction of the sequence is

  16. Conformation of the RNA-binding N-terminus of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus : a nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this thesis was to obtain information about protein-RNA interactions in cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). CCMV consists of RNA and a protective protein coat, composed of 180 identical coat proteins. The positively charged N-terminal arm of the

  17. Effects of drying of cowpea grains on consumer acceptability of moin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A drying test was conducted on wet de-hulled cowpea grains to ascertain the effects of drying at 60oC, 70oC, 80oC, and 90oC on the physico-chemical properties and sensory evaluation (consumer acceptability) of moin-moin from different flours. Chemical analyses were conducted on the flour to ascertain the effect of ...

  18. Infection of cowpea protoplasts with sonchus yellow net virus and festuca leaf streak virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van N.A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of protoplast systems for plant virus research have been frequently reviewed (Zaitlin & Beachy, 1974; Takebe, 1975; Muhlbach, 1982; Sander & Mertens, 1984). Relatively little attention has been given to the limitations of such a system.

    Protoplasts do not

  19. Infection of cowpea protoplasts with sonchus yellow net virus and festuca leaf streak virus

    OpenAIRE

    Beek, van, N.A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of protoplast systems for plant virus research have been frequently reviewed (Zaitlin & Beachy, 1974; Takebe, 1975; Muhlbach, 1982; Sander & Mertens, 1984). Relatively little attention has been given to the limitations of such a system.

    Protoplasts do not exist under natural conditions. They lack a rigid cell wall and cell-to-cell connections are absent. Protoplasts are maintained in media that differ from the milieu in plant tissue with respect to nu...

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation and cooking on cowpea bean grains (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Cople Lima, Keila dos, E-mail: keila@ime.eb.br [Nuclear Engineering Department, Military Institute of Engineering, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, Praca General Tiburcio, 80, CEP 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro/RJ (Brazil); Boher e Souza, Luciana [Nuclear Engineering Department, Military Institute of Engineering, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, Praca General Tiburcio, 80, CEP 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro/RJ (Brazil); Oliveira Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de [Technological Center, Embrapa Food Agroindustry, Av. das Americas, 29501, CEP 23020-470 Rio de Janeiro/RJ (Brazil); Costa Franca, Tanos Celmar; Santos Lima, Antonio Luis dos [Chemical Engineering Department, Military Institute of Engineering, Praca General Tiburcio, 80, CEP 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro/RJ (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Leguminous plants are important sources of proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, fibers and minerals. However, some of their non-nutritive elements can present undesirable side effects like flatulence provoked by the anaerobic fermentation of oligosaccharides, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the gut. A way to avoid this inconvenience, without any change in the nutritional value and post-harvesting losses, is an irradiation process. Here, we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation on the amino acids, thiamine and oligosaccharide contents and on the fungi and their toxin percentages in cowpea bean (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) samples. For irradiation doses of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy the results showed no significant differences in content for the uncooked samples. However, the combination of irradiation and cooking processes reduced the non-nutritive factors responsible for flatulence. Irradiation also significantly reduced the presence of Aspergillus, Penicilium, Rhizopus and Fusarium fungi and was shown to be efficient in grain conservation for a storage time of 6 months. - Highlights: > In this study we evaluated cowpea beans subjected to different doses of gamma irradiation > Cowpea bean grains represent an important source of vegetal protein for Brazilian population. > Non-nutritive factors were reduced by irradiation and cooking. > Several genera of fungus were reduced by irradiation without affecting the nutritional content. > Irradiation helps the cooking process preserving thermosensible nutrients.

  1. Structural transitions and energy landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid mechanics from nanomanipulation in vitro and in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Brasch, Melanie; Cornelissen, Jeroen; Dima, Ruxandra I; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Virus shells can have applications as nanocontainers and delivery vehicles in biotechnology and medicine. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on sub-second timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsid show that the capsid's physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Surprisingly, under large deformations the CCMV capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state dH = 11.5 - 12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending, and the entropy change TdS = 5.1 - 5.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of pr...

  2. Productivity of cocoyam/ cowpea intercropas influenced by cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cocoyam was grown with vegetable cowpea in sole cropping and in intercropping to examine the effects of four contrasting vegetable cowpea growth habits on the productivity of the component crops in Umudike, southeastern Nigeria. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three ...

  3. Foliar symptoms recovery: developing scoring technique for assessment of soybean resistance to CPMMV (Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zubaidah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a commodity that has an important role as the source of protein, but its production is affected by various factors including disease. CpMMV (Cowpea mild mottle virus is one of the most damaging viruses that cause soybean disease. CpMMVs belong to the group of Carlavirus that are transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci. The use of CpMMV resistant plants as biological control can prevent viral diseases. Indonesia has many soybean germplasm from many regions and introduction from other countries that need to be evaluated for CpMMV. The assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV is not available yet, but it is still based on other virus diseases. The specific assessment of plant resistance is important because some diseases can cause certain symptoms, depends on the resistance and the kinds of plants that are infected. This paper presents the assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV infection, which can be used for various purposes and studies. One of the benefits is to find out soybean resistance to CpMMV or other objectives. This resistance assessment is not only based on leaves symptoms, but also based on the phenomenon of foliar symptoms recovery. Keywords: CpMMV, foliar symptoms recovery, scoring technique, soybean resistance.

  4. Effects of gamma-irradiation on cotyledon cell separation and pectin solubilisation in hard-to-cook cowpeas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jombo, Talknice Z; Minnaar, Amanda; Taylor, John Rn

    2017-08-31

    Cowpeas stored under high temperature and humidity develop the hard-to-cook defect (HTC). This defect greatly increases cooking times and energy costs. To better understand the mechanisms involved in the HTC defect development, the effects of gamma-irradiation on cotyledon cellular structure and pectin solubility in two cowpea cultivars with different susceptibility to HTC defect were investigated. Gamma-irradiation decreased cotyledon cell wall thickness, increased cell size, and intercellular spaces in both cowpea cultivars and reduced cooking time of the less HTC susceptible cultivar. However, it did not reverse the HTC defect in the susceptible cultivar. Gamma-irradiation also increased the levels of cold water- and hot water-soluble pectin. The irradiation effects were thus mainly due to hydrolysis of pectin fractions in the cell walls. However, chelator-soluble pectin (CSP) solubility was not affected. As the cell wall changes brought about by gamma-irradiation were associated with pectin solubilisation, this supports the phytate-phytase-pectin theory as a major cause of the HTC defect. However, the non-reversal of the defect in HTC susceptible cowpeas and the absence of an effect on CSP indicate that other mechanisms are involved in HTC defect development in cowpeas, possibly the formation of alkali-soluble, ester bonded pectins. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Effects of single and mixed infections of blackeye cowpea mosaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ACP-ELISA). One hundred percent infection was obtained at two weeks post inoculation regardless of the virus combination. CABMV and BlCMV+CABMV elicited the highest symptom score of 4 while ...

  6. Relationship between yield and some yield components in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bean common mosaic virus–blackeye cowpea strain (BCMV-BlC) and cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) belonging to the genus potyvirus are cosmopolitan and economically important pathogens of cowpea. This study analysed the linear relationship between yield and some yield related characters (numbers of ...

  7. Detrimental effects of electron beam irradiation on the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Wen; Speakmon, Mickey; Zhou, Lan; Wang, Yu; Lei, Chaoliang; Pillai, Suresh D; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-04-01

    Electron beam (eBeam) irradiation technology is an environmentally friendly, chemical-free alternative for disinfesting insect pests of stored grains. The underlying hypothesis is that specific doses of eBeam will have defined detrimental effects on the different life stages. We evaluated the effects of eBeam exposure in a range of doses (0.03-0.12 kGy) on the development of the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) at various stages of its life cycle. Differential radiosensitivity was detected during egg development. Early and intermediate stages of eggs never hatched after exposure to a dose of 0.03 kGy, whereas a substantial portion of black-headed (i.e. late) eggs survived irradiation even at 0.12 kGy. However, further development of the hatched larvae was inhibited. Although midgut protein digestion remained intact, irradiated larvae (0.06 kGy or higher) failed to develop into normal living adults; rather, they died as pupae or abnormally eclosed adults, suggesting a detrimental effect of eBeam on metamorphosis. Emerged irradiated pupae had shorter longevity and were unable to produce any eggs at 0.06 kGy or higher. At this dose range, eggs laid by irradiated adults were not viable. eBeam treatment shortened adult longevity in a dose-dependent manner. Reciprocal crosses indicated that females were more sensitive to eBeam exposure than their male counterparts. Dissection of the female reproductive system revealed that eBeam treatment prevented formation of oocytes. eBeam irradiation has very defined effects on cowpea bruchid development and reproduction. A dose of 0.06 kGy could successfully impede cowpea burchid population expansion. This information can be exploited for post-harvest insect control of stored grains. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Immunocapture RT-PCR detection of Bean common mosaic virus and strain blackeye cowpea mosaic in common bean and black gram in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayashankar, A.C.; Nayaka, S. Chandra; Niranjana, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    The strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic (BICM), genus Potyvirus, were detected from 25 common bean and 14 black gram seeds among 142 seed samples collected from different legume-growing regions of India. The samples were subjected to a growing-on test, an indicator...... plant test, an electron microscopic observations, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and an immunocapture RT-PCR. The incidence of the two tested viruses in common bean and black gram seed samples was 1–6% and 0.5–3.5%, respectively in growing-on test evaluations. Electron microscopic observations...

  9. Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein gene of cowpea aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) is a potyvirus that infects cowpea causing significant yield reduction. However, there is no durable natural resistance to the virus within the crop and genetic engineering for virus resistance was not possible because of a lack of an efficient, reliable and.

  10. Effects of compost amendment and the biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea on the development of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) on cowpea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a destructive pathogen causing charcoal rot of cowpea and other crops in the semi- arid areas of the Sahel (north-west Africa). Chemical management is not feasible in conditions of subsistence farming, and the plurivorous nature of the fungus limits the effectiveness of

  11. Effects of feeding different levels of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contain ANFs such as trypsin inhibitors, lectins and tannins which decrease protein digestibility (Bressani, 1985). These. ANFs are known to have a variety of effects, including mor- phological changes and enzyme inhibition along the intestinal mucosa (Etheridge et al., 1984; Erickson et al., 1985; Kik,. 1991). These effects ...

  12. Effect of high plant protein cowpeas ( Vigna unguculata ) and animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent trends in weight loss diets have been formulated that led to a substantial increase in protein intake. It has however been established that high protein intake impacts negatively on already compromised kidney, while its effect on a healthy kidney remains unclear. Our aim therefore was to study the effect of animal ...

  13. Effects of high plant cowpeas ( Vigna unguculata ) and animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been reported that high dietary protein affects GFR is paucity of both acute and chronic increases in protein consumption elevating GFR. However, there are very few literature on the effect of high protein diet on serum and urinary electrolytes. It is therefore the aim of this study, to determine the effect of the intake of ...

  14. Field evaluation of improved cowpea lines for resistance to bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... resistance to bacterial blight, virus and striga under natural infestation in the West ... Key words: Bacterial blight, cowpea, virus, striga, grain yield, West Africa Savanna. INTRODUCTION. Cowpea [Vigna .... The data recorded were analysed using computer program GenStat. Discovery Edtion2 and Least ...

  15. CONFORMATION OF A PENTACOSAPEPTIDE REPRESENTING THE RNA-BINDING N-TERMINUS OF COWPEA CHLOROTIC MOTTLE VIRUS COAT PROTEIN IN THE PRESENCE OF OLIGOPHOSPHATES - A 2-DIMENSIONAL PROTON NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE AND DISTANCE GEOMETRY STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGRAAF, M; SCHEEK, RM; VANDERLINDEN, CC; HEMMINGA, MA

    1992-01-01

    Conformational studies were performed on a synthetic pentacosapeptide representing the RNA-binding N-terminal region of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. Two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on the highly positively charged peptide containing six arginines and three

  16. Enhancing utilization of cowpeas through gamma irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several techniques including the use of gamma irradiation are available to Food Scientists in this respect. Gamma irradiation has the potential to modify the functional properties of cowpeas mainly through its effects on inherent protein and starch components. The effects of γ-irradiation on the functional properties of cowpea ...

  17. performance of cowpea grown as an intercrop with maize of different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    satisfying the protein content of their meals. Interaction between maize population and cowpea cultivar may help to .... adjusted to 12% moisture content using Farmex. MT-16 grain moisture tester. For cowpea, number of branches ..... Effect of cowpea planting date and density on performance of a maize- cowpea intercrop.

  18. Cowpea viruses: Quantitative and qualitative effects of single and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (CABMV+ CMeV, CABMV+ SBMV, CMeV+SBMV, and CABMV+ CMeV+SBMV) at 10 and 28 days after planting (DAP) on the growth, yield and nutritive content of seeds from infected plants were evaluated. The age of the plants at time of infection and the different viral treatments significantly affected the different parameters ...

  19. Nutrient composition of cowpeas infested with Callosobruchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpeas infested with Callosobruchus maculatus, in Zaria were analysed using standard biochemical methods. The analysis was to determine the effect of Callosobruchus maculatus on cowpeas at various stages of infestation. Four varieties “Kannanado”, Local brown, “Dan Borno” and IAR-48 were used. Results show ...

  20. Antagonistic regulation, yet synergistic defense: effect of bergapten and protease inhibitor on development of cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguang Guo

    Full Text Available The furanocoumarin compound bergapten is a plant secondary metabolite that has anti-insect function. When incorporated into artificial diet, it retarded cowpea bruchid development, decreased fecundity, and caused mortality at a sufficient dose. cDNA microarray analysis indicated that cowpea bruchid altered expression of 543 midgut genes in response to dietary bergapten. Among these bergapten-regulated genes, 225 have known functions; for instance, those encoding proteins related to nutrient transport and metabolism, development, detoxification, defense and various cellular functions. Such differential gene regulation presumably facilitates the bruchids' countering the negative effect of dietary bergapten. Many genes did not have homology (E-value cutoff 10(-6 with known genes in a BlastX search (206, or had homology only with genes of unknown function (112. Interestingly, when compared with the transcriptomic profile of cowpea bruchids treated with dietary soybean cysteine protease inhibitor N (scN, 195 out of 200 coregulated midgut genes are oppositely regulated by the two compounds. Simultaneous administration of bergapten and scN attenuated magnitude of change in selected oppositely-regulated genes, as well as led to synergistic delay in insect development. Therefore, targeting insect vulnerable sites that may compromise each other's counter-defensive response has the potential to increase the efficacy of the anti-insect molecules.

  1. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bamphitlhi Tiroesele; Kesegofetse Thomas; Seipati Seketeme

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for al...

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation and cooking on cowpea bean grains ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; Souza, Luciana Boher e.; Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Lima, Antônio Luís dos Santos

    2011-09-01

    Leguminous plants are important sources of proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, fibers and minerals. However, some of their non-nutritive elements can present undesirable side effects like flatulence provoked by the anaerobic fermentation of oligosaccharides, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the gut. A way to avoid this inconvenience, without any change in the nutritional value and post-harvesting losses, is an irradiation process. Here, we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation on the amino acids, thiamine and oligosaccharide contents and on the fungi and their toxin percentages in cowpea bean ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) samples. For irradiation doses of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy the results showed no significant differences in content for the uncooked samples. However, the combination of irradiation and cooking processes reduced the non-nutritive factors responsible for flatulence. Irradiation also significantly reduced the presence of Aspergillus, Penicilium, Rhizopus and Fusarium fungi and was shown to be efficient in grain conservation for a storage time of 6 months.

  3. Toxic effects of low concentrations of Cu on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopittke, Peter M. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: p.kopittke@uq.edu.au; Dart, Peter J. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Menzies, Neal W. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Although Cu is phytotoxic at Cu{sup 2+} activities as low as 1-2 {mu}M, the effect of Cu{sup 2+} on the nodulation of legumes has received little attention. The effect of Cu{sup 2+} on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Caloona) was examined in a dilute solution culture system utilising a cation exchange resin to buffer solution Cu{sup 2+}. The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu{sup 2+} activities than both shoot and root growth; whilst a Cu{sup 2+} activity of 1.0 {mu}M corresponded to a 10% reduction in the relative yield of the shoots and roots, a Cu{sup 2+} activity of 0.2 {mu}M corresponded to a 10% reduction in nodulation. This reduction in nodulation with increasing Cu{sup 2+} activity was associated with an inhibition of root hair formation in treatments containing {>=}0.77 {mu}M Cu{sup 2+}, rather than to a reduction in the size of the Rhizobium population. - The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu{sup 2+} activities than either shoot or root growth.

  4. Effect of Urea, Yashil and Nitragin Fertilizers on Yield and its Components of Cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Agaalipour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the application of biofertilizers, instead of chemical fertilizer, for optimal cowpea nutrition. It was performed in a factorial experiment based on Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications at Agricultural Research Center of West Azarbaijan, Iran during growing season of 2008-2009. Experimental treatments consisted of 4 rates of biofertilizers (without fertilizer , Yashil chemical fertilizer, Nitragine biofertilizer, Yashil+Nitragine as factor A and 4 rates of nitrogenous chemical fertilizer( 0, 26.25, 52.5 and 75 kg/ha urea as factor B. Analysis of the results showed that there were significant differences between rates of factor A (Nitragin biofertilizers + Yashil chemical fertilizer and rates of chemical fertilizers and interaction between different levels of factor(A and B for grain yield, number of grain per pod, number of grain per plant, number of pod per plant, 1000- grain weight and harvest index at 5% level of probability. It was also revealed that the effect of Yashil+Nitragine treatment was highly positive. The results showed that application 52.5 kg/ha urea highly increased on traits. The results obtained from interaction of different levels of factor AÍB indicated that application of 52.5 kg/ha urea and Yashil+ Nitragin combination had the highest effects on all traits. With regard to this results, it can be said that application of biofertilizers with chemical fertilizers had maximum increase in all traits under study.

  5. Effect of organic fertilizer and its residual on cowpea and soybean in acid soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Kuntyastuty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of planting areas on acid soils is one of the strategies to achieve Indonesian self-sufficiency program on food. Acidic soil has low pH that causes contents of Al, Fe, and Mn are high. In addition, acidic soil also only has low microbial population. These conditions make soybean growth is not optimal. This research consisted of two phases i.e., the first and second planting. The first planting was aimed to study the effectiveness of fertilizer treatment, with three replications, using cowpea commodity. The second planting was done without additional fertilizer that consisted of three replicates (continued from the first planting using soybean. This research that was carried out at Iletri’s greenhouse Malang in 2014 was arranged in a randomized block design consisting of eight treatments, namely: (a control/without fertilizer; (B 300 kg/ha (15% N, 15% P2O5, 15% K2O, 10% S; (C 1500 kg/ha cow manure; (D 3000 kg/ha cow manure; (E 5000 kg/ha cow manure; (F 1500 kg/ha fermented chicken + cow manures; (G 3000 kg/ha fermented chicken + cow manures; and (H 5000 kg/ha fermented chicken + cow manures. The results showed that organic fertilizer (cow manure 5000 kg/ha had higher yields both in the first planting and second planting compared to inorganic fertilizer 300 kg/ha (15% N, 15% P2O5, 15% K2O, 10% S

  6. Reactions of Improved Cowpea Genotypes to Some Major Diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to investigate the susceptibilities of some improved cowpea genotypes to infection and damage due to bacterial blight, smut and cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus CABMV in a sorghum-based cropping system during 1999 and 2000 at Minjibir, Kano, Nigeria. Treatments consisted of six (6) ...

  7. Preparation of nanoporous polyimide thin films via layer-by-layer self-assembly of cowpea mosaic virus and poly(amic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Bo; Wu Guojun; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wang Qian [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208 (United States); Su Zhaohui, E-mail: zhsu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China)

    2011-09-01

    Low dielectric (low-{kappa}) materials are of key importance for the performance of microchips. In this study, we show that nanosized cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles can be assembled with poly(amic acid) (PAA) in aqueous solutions via the layer-by-layer technique. Then, upon thermal treatment CPMV particles are removed and PAA is converted into polyimide in one step, resulting in a porous low-{kappa} polyimide film. The multilayer self-assembly process was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Imidization and the removal of the CPMV template was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy respectively. The dielectric constant of the nanoporous polyimide film thus prepared was 2.32 compared to 3.40 for the corresponding neat polyimide. This work affords a facile approach to fabrication of low-{kappa} polyimide ultrathin films with tunable thickness and dielectric constant.

  8. Effect of four plant extracts on the infestation of cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... were conducted on cowpea variety 87-9TDK, planted at 60 x 30cm spacing at the Teaching and Research farm of College of Crop and Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, in the rain forest ecological zone of Nigeria during the 2001 cropping season.

  9. Effect of solar drying on the biological parameters of the cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-12-29

    Dec 29, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: Callosobruchus maculatus Fab. (Coleoptera: Bruchinae) is a major pest of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) in the Sahelian zone. The grain infestation by this insect pest starts in the field at the beginning of fructification of the plant and continues in storage where the ...

  10. Effect of solar drying on the biological parameters of the cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Callosobruchus maculatus Fab. (Coleoptera: Bruchinae) is a major pest of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) in the Sahelian zone. The grain infestation by this insect pest starts in the field at the beginning of fructification of the plant and continues in storage where the damage can be significant if no ...

  11. The Effect of Feeding Gmelina (g. Arborea) Leaf Meal in Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in cowpea shell base complete diet for red Sokoto buck. Four red Sokoto goats of average weight 13.4kg were used for the study to measure the feed intake, digestibility and nitrogen balance involving four dietary treatment T1, T2, T3 and T4 ...

  12. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiroesele, Bamphitlhi; Thomas, Kesegofetse; Seketeme, Seipati

    2014-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F₁ progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils' damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions.

  13. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae, Using Natural Plant Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamphitlhi Tiroesele

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F1 progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils’ damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions.

  14. Effects of Cropping System and Cowpea Variety on Symbiotic Potential and Yields of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp and Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. in the Sudano-Sahelian Zone of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoumana Kouyaté

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cowpea varieties (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp have been proposed by research in Mali. None of these varieties were investigated for their symbiotic potential in terms of root nodulation and mycorrhizal infection. An experiment was conducted at Cinzana Research Station, from 2007 to 2009 with an objective to identify a cowpea variety with high symbiotic potential which may improve millet/cowpea cropping global production. Randomized complete block (RCBD design with a factorial combination of 3 cowpea varieties (IT89KD-374, CZ1-94-23-1, and CZ11-94-5C and 2 cropping systems (millet/cowpea intercropping and cowpea-millet rotation was used. On farm test was conducted to evaluate CZ11-94-5C and IT89KD-374 nodulation performance. Cowpea variety CZ11-94-5-C had the highest nodule number and nodule weight. Millet/cowpea alternate rows intercropping (1/1, only, had a significant influence on cowpea root infection rates by mycorrhizae, on the 45th day after emergence. IT89KD-374 gave the best cowpea grain yield (1540 kg ha−1 in sole crop. The highest millet grain yield (1650 kg ha−1 was obtained under CZ11-94-5C-millet rotation. Farmers' fields assessments results confirmed CZ11-94-5C performance on research station. The CZ11-94-5C cowpea variety needs to be more characterized.

  15. Participatory variety selection to enhance cowpea variety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Participatory variety selection trials involving farmers in northern Uganda were conducted in order to assess and select cowpea lines with desirable attributes and tolerance to virus infection. The trials were set up on-farm in farmers' field in the districts of Apac, Lira and Pader in two seasons of 2009A and 2009B. In 2009A ...

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Combined Effects of Different Water and Phosphate Levels on Growth and Biological Nitrogen Fixation of Nine Cowpea Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jemo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and phosphate (Pi deficiency adversely affect growth and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF of legume crops. In this study, we examined the impact of interaction between soil water conditions and available soil-Pi levels on growth, nodule development and BNF potential of nine cowpea varieties grown on dry savanna soils. In our experimental design, soils with different available soil-Pi levels, i.e., low, moderate, and high soil-Pi levels, collected from various farming fields were used to grow nine cowpea varieties under well-watered and water-deficit conditions. Significant and severe water deficit-damaging effects on BNF, nodulation, growth, levels of plant-nitrogen (N and -phosphorus (P, as well as shoot relative water content and chlorophyll content of cowpea plants were observed. Under well-watered and high available soil-Pi conditions, cowpea varieties IT07K-304-9 and Dan'Ila exhibited significantly higher BNF potential and dry biomass, as well as plant-N and -P contents compared with other tested ones. Significant genotypic variations among the cowpeas were recorded under low available soil-Pi and water-deficit conditions in terms of the BNF potential. Principal component (PC analysis revealed that varieties IT04K-339-1, IT07K-188-49, IT07K-304-9, and IT04K-405-5 were associated with PC1, which was better explained by performance for nodulation, plant biomass, plant-N, plant-P, and BNF potential under the combined stress of water deficit and Pi deficiency, thereby offering prospects for development of varieties with high growth and BNF traits that are adaptive to such stress conditions in the region. On another hand, variety Dan'Ila was significantly related to PC2 that was highly explained by the plant shoot/root ratio and chlorophyll content, suggesting the existence of physiological and morphological adjustments to cope with water deficit and Pi deficiency for this particular variety. Additionally, increases in soil

  17. Toxic effects of Pb{sup 2+} on growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopittke, Peter M. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: p.kopittke@uq.edu.au; Asher, Colin J. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Kopittke, Rosemary A. [Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, 80 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, Queensland 4068 (Australia); Menzies, Neal W. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2007-11-15

    A concentration as low as 1 {mu}M lead (Pb) is highly toxic to plants, but previous studies have typically related plant growth to the total amount of Pb added to a solution. In the present experiment, the relative fresh mass of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) was reduced by 10% at a Pb{sup 2+} activity of 0.2 {mu}M for the shoots and at a Pb{sup 2+} activity of 0.06 {mu}M for the roots. The primary site of Pb{sup 2+} toxicity was the root, causing severe reductions in root growth, loss of apical dominance (shown by an increase in branching per unit root length), the formation of localized swellings behind the root tips (due to the initiation of lateral roots), and the bending of some root tips. In the root, Pb was found to accumulate primarily within the cell walls and intercellular spaces. - The Pb{sup 2+} ion reduced the growth of cowpea by 10% at a solution activity of 0.2 {mu}M for the shoots and 0.06 {mu}M for the roots.

  18. Structures of the native and swollen forms of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Jeffrey A; Munshi, Sanjeev; Wang, Guoji; Baker, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA–protein interactions stabilize many viruses and also the nucleoprotein cores of enveloped animal viruses (e.g. retroviruses). The nucleoprotein particles are frequently pleomorphic and generally unstable due to the lack of strong protein–protein interactions in their capsids. Principles governing their structures are unknown because crystals of such nucleoprotein particles that diffract to high resolution have not previously been produced. Cowpea chlorotic mottle virions (CCMV) are typical of particles stabilized by RNA–protein interactions and it has been found that crystals that diffract beyond 4.5Å resolution are difficult to grow. However, we report here the purification of CCMV with an exceptionally mild procedure and the growth of crystals that diffract X-rays to 3.2 Å resolution. Results The 3.2 Å X-ray structure of native CCMV, an icosahedral (T=3) RNA plant virus, shows novel quaternary structure interactions based on interwoven carboxyterminal polypeptides that extend from canonical capsid β-barrel subunits. Additional particle stability is provided by intercapsomere contacts between metal ion mediated carboxyl cages and by protein interactions with regions of ordered RNA. The structure of a metal-free, swollen form of the virus was determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Modeling of this structure with the X-ray coordinates of the native subunits shows that the 29 Å radial expansion is due to electrostatic repulsion at the carboxyl cages and is stopped short of complete disassembly by preservation of interwoven carboxyl termini and protein–RNA contacts. Conclusions The CCMV capsid displays quaternary structural interactions that are unique compared with previously determined RNA virus structures. The loosely coupled hexamer and pentamer morphological units readily explain their versatile reassembly properties and the pH and metal ion dependent polymorphism observed in the virions. Association of

  19. The effects of gamma radiation on the reproduction of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera - Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghogomu, TR.

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus F. was carried out to study its effects on reproduction. Complete sterility of males and females is obtained when treated as adults with 10 krad. At lower doses the female is more susceptible than the male. The fecundity is affected and at doses above 100 krad death occurs before the female lays all her mature eggs. The sterility induced is observed in the reduction in percentage of egg hatch, but mortality after hatching is negligible. When females are exposed to substerilizing doses as pupae or adults, the fertility on the first day of oviposition is significantly reduced and those treated as adults are the most affected. On the second day there is improvement in fertility.

  20. Influence of diets containing raw or heat processed cowpea on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ); T2 (20% of raw cowpea) and T3 (20% of roasted cowpea). The results ... Data suggest that 20% of raw Mozambican cowpeas can be incorporated into broiler starter diets with no negative effects on growth or feed conversion. Key words: ...

  1. Efficacy of plant extracts against the cowpea beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Barnaud, B.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Kossou, D.K.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally used African plant powders, with a known effect against the cowpea beetle Callosobruchus maculatus in stored cowpea, were extracted with water. The extracts, 13 volatile oils, 2 non-volatile oils and 8 slurries, were evaluated for their toxic and repellent effects against the beetle.

  2. Structural Transitions and Energy Landscape for Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Mechanics from Nanomanipulation in Vitro and in Silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kononova, O.; Snijder, S.; Brasch, M.; Cornelissen, J.; Dima, R.I.; Marx, K.A.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Roos, W.H.; Barsegov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on subsecond timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of

  3. Structural transitions and energy landscape for cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid mechanics from nanoindentation in vitro and in silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kononova, O.; Snijder, J.; Brasch, M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Dima, R.I.; Marx, K.A.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Roos, W.H.; Barsegova, V.

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on subsecond timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of

  4. Response of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties to leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Botswana, cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) is not only grown for grain but also the leaves are harvested and used as vegetable. The effect of leaf harvesting on grain yield under Botswana conditions is not known. This study was, therefore, undertaken to assess the response of four cowpea varieties namely Tswana, ...

  5. influence of cowpea genotype and sorghum-cropping system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    accounting for the low annual harvest of this important grain ... mainly by the harmful side effects and high costs of insecticides and their ..... the performance of mixed sorghum and cowpea. Journal of ... different management practices in eastern Uganda. African Crop ... cowpea in Africa: Their lifecycle, economic importance ...

  6. Técnicas de cultivo in vitro e microenxertia ex vitro visando a eliminação do Cowpea Aphid-Borne Mosaic virus em Maracujazeiro-Azedo

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Leonardo Monteiro

    2006-01-01

    O maracujazeiro-azedo (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg.) é uma das principais frutíferas brasileiras e seu cultivo apresenta boas perspectivas de expansão. O desenvolvimento da cultura tem sido dificultado por doenças, especialmente a doença do endurecimento dos frutos, causada pelo Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV). A eliminação de vírus pela cultura de tecidos tem sido uma alternativa viável para muitas espécies e pode contribuir para a propagação vegetativa de genótipos supe...

  7. Effect of different home-cooking methods on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron in conventionally bred cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp consumed in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenilda J. Pereira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Wap. is an excellent source of iron and zinc. However, iron from plant sources is poorly absorbed compared with iron from animal sources. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate iron and zinc bioaccessibility in cowpea cultivars after processing. Methods: Zinc and iron bioaccessibilities in cowpea samples were determined based on an in vitro method involving simulated gastrointestinal digestion with suitable modifications. Results: When water-soaked beans were cooked in a regular pan, the highest percentage of bioaccessible iron obtained was 8.92%, whereas when they were cooked in a pressure cooker without previous soaking, the highest percentage was 44.33%. Also, the percentage of bioaccessible zinc was 52.78% when they were cooked in a regular pan without prior soaking. Higher percentages of bioaccessible iron were found when cooking was done in a pressure cooker compared with regular pan cooking. In all cultivars, cooking of cowpea beans in both pressure cooker and in a regular pan yielded higher percentages of bioaccessible zinc compared with availability of bioaccessible iron. Conclusions: Iron bioaccessibility values suggest that cooking in a regular pan did not have a good effect on iron availability, since the percentage of bioaccessible iron was lower than that of zinc. The determination of iron and zinc bioaccessibility makes it possible to find out the actual percentage of absorption of such minerals and allows the development of efficient strategies for low-income groups to access foods with high levels of these micronutrients.

  8. Reactions of improved cowpea genotypes to some major diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B.S. Wudil

    to infection and damage due to bacterial blight, smut and cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus CABMV in a sorghum-based cropping system ... factors, but diseases such as leaf virus, bacterial blight and smut remain major constraints to ..... disposed to viral attack as leaves are the major sites of infection (Jackai and Singh, ...

  9. Molecular and biochemical studies on the effect of gamma rays on lead toxicity in cowpea (Vigna sinensis) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Heba Ibrahim

    2011-12-01

    The effect of lead acetate in the presence or absence of cowpea seeds irradiated with gamma rays on morphological criteria, protein electrophoresis, isozymes, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) of leaves was investigated. A highly significant decrease in shoot and root length was observed upon lead acetate exposure (300 and 600 μM). On the other hand, in seeds irradiated with gamma rays (2, 5, and 8 krad), these morphological parameters were increased after lead acetate treatments. Meanwhile, all treatments (lead acetate and gamma rays) caused variations in number, intensity, and/or density of SDS electrophoretic bands of proteins. In addition, electrophoretic studies of esterase, acid phosphatase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase isozyme activities were increased with increasing the concentrations of lead acetate and gamma ray doses. The variation in DNA profile in response to lead acetate and gamma irradiation treatments was detected by RAPD-PCR technique. The result of RAPD analysis using the five primers indicated the appearance and disappearance of DNA polymorphic bands at all treatments (gamma rays and lead stress). The relatively high concentrations of lead acetate (600 μM) induced more changes in genomic DNA pattern.

  10. Intercropping kenaf and cowpea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-17

    Dec 17, 2007 ... Although Cuba 108 had the highest percentage moisture per plant, it was not significantly different from that of Ifeken 400, indicating that the two varieties could be suitable for only wet season forage production. Therefore, Ifeken 100 is recommended for intercropping with cowpea while Ifeken 400 is only ...

  11. Chemical composition and physical characteristics of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    The main aim of this research was to determine the effect of variety on physical and chemical characteristics of straws of long season cowpeas and also to determine if haulms of varieties that retain greenness longer will have a better nutritional value than those that dry early. Materials and Methods. Sixteen forages used in ...

  12. Effect of Bambara nut and cowpea intercropped with maize at different times on nutritive quality of maize for ruminant feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanite, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Bambara nut and cowpea planted with maize at different times on nutritive quality of maize forage were investigated. The study was laid out in a Completely Randomized Design and the treatments were combination of crop types (Bambara nut-maize (MB and Cowpea-maize (MC and planting times of legumes (2 wks before planting maize, 2WBPM and 2 wks after planting maize, 2WAPM, and sole maize (as control. An experimental field measuring 19 m � 11 m was divided into 3 replicates; each replicate was sub-divided into 5 plots of dimension 3 m2 each, with 1 m and 2 m inter-plots and inter-blocks spacing respectively. Maize forage samples were harvested on each plot at 10 wks after planting, oven-dried, milled and analyzed to evaluate the chemical composition, mineral composition, in vitro gas production and post-incubation characteristics. Results revealed significant differences (P<0.05 among treatments with the highest (95.00% and least DM (92.12% values were recorded for MB 2WBPM and MC 2WAPM, respectively. CP values ranged from 10.36% in MB 2WBPM to 15.67% in MC 2WBPM but not significantly different from 14.19 % recorded for sole maize. Ash ranged from 7.00% in MB 2WAPM to 10.00% in sole maize. MC 2WBPM and sole maize had the highest (50.63% and least (38.40% in ADF content (P<0.05. ADL value (7.25% observed in MB 2WBPM was the highest, compared to the least (5.00% in sole maize. Sole maize recorded the least (40.40% and highest (25.91% cellulose and hemicellulose contents, respectively while MC 2WAPM had the highest (50.88% and lowest (15.80% values for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively. Ca content (4.55g/kg of MB 2WAPM was lower than the other treatments. P content ranged from 3.54 g/kg in MB 2WAPM to 12.02 g/kg in MC 2WAPM. Gas production rates only varied (P<0.05 at the 3rd, 6th, 24th and 48th hours of incubation. MB 2WBPM yielded highest values of short chain fatty acids (0.09 �mol and metabolizable energy (3.08 MJ/kg while MB

  13. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  14. Partial Molecular Characterization Of Cowpea Stunt Isolates Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partial molecular characterization of the coat protein of the cowpea stunt-causing isolates of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) from Arkansas and Georgia revealed that both isolates of CMV belong to CMV subgroup I and differ at eight nucleotides positions, resulting in two amino acids difference. There was only one amino ...

  15. partial molecular characterization of cowpea stunt isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2University of Arkansas, Department of Plant Pathology, 217 PTSC Bldg, Fayetteville, ARKANSAS (USA) 72701. ... I and differ at eight nucleotides positions, resulting in two amino acids difference. There was only one amino acid difference for the Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus (BlCMV) isolates from both locations.

  16. Effect of garlic extraction on injury by cowpea, Curculio Chalcodermes aenus Boheman (Coleoptera: Cucurlionidae), and other pests, to cowpea, Vigna unguiculata L. Walp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlic-based oils and extract formulations have been used as insecticides against various insects on numerous crops, but there are contradictions among findings on the insecticidal or repellent properties of garlic-based products. In a field plot test, the effects of garlic extract on control of th...

  17. Effect of Osmopriming Duration on Germination, Emergence, and Early Growth of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. in the Sudan Savanna of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed osmopriming could be a sustainable method to increase crop establishment, uniform emergence, and growth of plant on the field. Laboratory and field studies were carried out in 2010 cropping season at Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, to study the effect of seed osmopriming duration on the germination, emergence, and growth of cowpea seeds. Treatments consisted of three osmopriming duration (soaking in 1% KNO3 salt for 6, 8, and 10 hrs, one hydroprimed control (10 hr, and an unprimed control. These five treatments were laid out in a completely randomized design (CRD replicated four times. The results showed that osmopriming with KNO3 for different durations was at par but was superior to unprimed treatments in terms of seed germination, emergence, plant height, and dry matter accumulation at 3 weeks after sowing. From this study, it can therefore be concluded that seeds of cowpea could be primed (both hydro and osmopriming for increased performance. However, osmopriming with KNO3 salt (soaked in 1% KNO3 salt solution and dried before sowing for 6 hours could result in greater seed germination and seedling height than hydropriming.

  18. Evaluation of ecophysiological characteristics of intercropping of millet (Panicum miliaceum L. and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghanbari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate millet (Panicum miliaceum L. and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. intercropping, an experiment was conducted during 2008-2009 at Agriculture Research Center of Zabol University, Iran. The experiment was as randomized complete block design with three replications. Treatment s consisted of sole crop of millet, sole crop of cowpea, 25% millet + 100% cowpea, 50% millet + 50% cowpea, 75% millet + 100% cowpea and 100% millet + 100% cowpea. The results showed that intercropping treatments had significant effect (P < 1% on millet and bean seed yield, LER, dry matter of weeds, PAR, temperature and (P < 5% on soil moisture content. The highest seed yield of millet and cowpea obtained from treatments of sole crops. The LER for most intercrops was greater than one which indicated that intercropping had advantage over sole crop. For weeds management and control the results indicated that weed suppressing effects in intercropping treatments is better than sole crops treatment, so that the lowest dry matter of weeds obtained from 100% millet + 100% cowpea treatment. PAR in all of stages showed that the highest PAR interception obtained from intercropping treatments specially 100% millet + 100% cowpea treatment. In addition to the lowest of soil moisture content and temperature obtained from this treatment.

  19. Side-effects of cowpea treatment with botanical insecticides on two parasitoids of Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Sinzogan, A.A.C.; Almeida, de R.P.; Boer, de P.W.M.; Jeong, G.S.; Kossou, D.K.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies on the protective effect of botanical products against pest insects have infrequently been extended to side-effects on natural enemies. Indirect effects of botanicals on the storability of seeds could occur through their possible negative impact on biological control agents. Four plant

  20. Farmers' agronomic and social evaluation of productivity yield and N2-fixation in different cowpea varieties and their subsequent residual N effects on a succeeding maize crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjei-Nsiah, S.; Kuyper, T.W.; Leeuwis, C.; Abekoe, M.K.; Cobbinah, J.; Sakyi-Dawson, O.; Giller, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cowpea-maize rotations form an important component of the farming systems of smallholder farmers in the forest/savannah transitional agro-ecological zone of Ghana. We evaluated five cowpea varieties for grain yield, N-2-fixation, biomass production, and contribution to productivity of subsequent

  1. Effect of composts on microbial dynamics and activity, dry root rot severity and seed yield of cowpea in the Indian arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu BAREJA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient-deficient sandy soil, having poor moisture retention, favors  Macrophomina phaseolina, a soil-borne plant pathogen, occurring in severe form on many important crops grown in the Indian arid region. In a 2-year field experiment, five composts (4 ton/ha prepared from residues of Calotropis procera, Prosopis juliflora, Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, and on-farm weeds were tested on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata to determine their effectiveness in limiting the  severity of charcoal rot caused by M. phaseolina in relation to the microbial population dynamics, microbial activity and the seed yield of cowpea.  In general, compost-amended plots retained 8.9% higher moisture than unamended plots. The microbial population increased in amended plots during the crop season. Populations of total fungi and actinomycetes were heighest in Calotropis compost-amended soil, while total bacteria were maximum in weed- compost amended soil. Microbial activity in amended plots was  26.3% higher than in unamended plots. Among trace elements,  uptake of Zn, Mn, Fe and Cu was  heighest  in plants grown in weed-compost amended soil followed by A. nilotica compost-amended soil. Soil amendment with the composts significantly reduced  plant mortality due to charcoal rot. The lowest mortality was recorded in plants amended with A. nilotica compost (5.5% followed by P. juliflora compost (5.8, while the  highest plant mortality (11.5% from charcoal rot occurred in the unamended control on the basis of the pooled average of two years. There was a significant inverse correlation between microbial activity and charcoal rot incidence in cowpea at 20 days after planting. Composts also had a beneficial effect on yield, with a 28.3% increase in seed yield in P. juliflora compost-amended plots. These results suggest that in resource-deficient farming , certain on-farm wastes can be effectively utilized for managing soil-borne pathogens, as well as  for

  2. Cowpea Vicilins: Fractionation of Urea Denatured Sub-Units and Effects on Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Chagas Mota

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicilins (7S storage globulins isolated from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. seeds which were susceptible (S and resistant (R to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae were denatured by urea and fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. Isolated fractions were incorporated in artificial seeds for assessment of their toxicity to C. maculatus. The most acidic fractions of both susceptible (CE-31 cultivar and resistant (IT81D-1045 line seeds were shown to affect development and survival of the bruchid. Results indicated that vicilin polypeptides of toxic nature were expressed in both types of storage globulins although at different levels.Vicilinas (globulinas de reserva 7S isoladas de sementes de feijão-de-corda (Vigna unguiculata L., susceptíveis (S e resistentes (R ao caruncho/gorgulho (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae foram desnaturadas por uréia e fracionadas por cromatografia de troca iônica. As frações isoladas foram incorporadas em sementes artificiais para avaliação de sua toxicidade a C. maculatus. As fracões mais ácidas de ambas vicilinas afetaram o desenvolvimento e a sobrevivência do bruquídeo. Sugerimos que polipeptídeos de vicilinas de natureza tóxica são expressos em ambos tipos de globulinas de reserva, embora em níveis diferentes.

  3. Utilization of graded levels of corn cobs and cowpea husk on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corncob (CC) and cowpea husk (CH) are by – products of maize and cowpea production respectively. They can be used as alternative feed resources for ruminants especially during the dry season. A 70d study was conducted to determine the effects of CC and CH based diets on performance of WAD rams. Sixteen ewes ...

  4. Bio-active composts from rice straw enriched with rock phosphate and their effect on the phosphorous nutrition and microbial community in rhizosphere of cowpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Gaber; Abdel-Motaal, Heba

    2005-05-01

    Composts were produced from rice straw enriched with rock phosphate and inoculated with Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride and/or farmyard manure (FYM). The resulting composts were evaluated as organic phosphate fertilizers for cowpea plants in pot experiments. The results showed that the maximum amount of soluble phosphorous (1000 ppm) was produced in composts inoculated with A. niger+T. viride with or without FYM. Any of the produced composts was much better than superphosphate fertilizer in providing the growing cowpea plants with phosphorous. Fertilization of the cowpea plants with the compost inoculated with FYM+A. niger+T. viride resulted in maximum amount of phosphorous uptake (295 ppm). The highest phosphate dissolving fungi numbers in rhizosphere soils of cowpea plants were obtained after fertilization with composts which received A. niger and T. viride treatments, while the highest phosphate dissolving bacterial numbers were found after fertilization with composts which received FYM treatments.

  5. Advantage of Sesame and Cowpea Intercrops in Different Fertilizer Application Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Aminifar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of different fertilizer applications and sesame/cowpea intercropping systems on soil fertility, a split plot experiment based on randomized complete block design was conducted in Fasa, Fars province, during 2014. The main plots were five fertilizer levels consisted of: using chemical fertilizers nitrogen+phosphorous (F1, organic fertilizers (F2, biofertilizers (F3, 50% chemical fertilizer + 50% organic fertilizer (F4 and 50% chemical fertilizer + 50% biofertilizer (F5, and sub plots consisted of: sole cropping of sesame (M1, sole cropping of cowpea (M2, 50:50 sesame-cowpea intercropping (M3, 75:25 sesame-cowpea intercropping (M4 and 25:75 sesame-cowpea intercropping (M5. The results showed that soil fertility and cropping systems affected the yield and yield components of sesame and cowpea significantly. The highest yield of sesame (1292.6 kg.ha-1, and cowpea (3772.4 kg.ha-1 were obtained from their sole croppings. Among the applications of fertilizer, the highest yield of sesame (950.49 kg.ha-1 and cowpea (2582.50 kg.ha-1 belonged to bioorganic and biofertilizer treatments, respectively. In spite of these results, the highest land equivalent ratio (LER belonged to F4 (1.24 and M3 (1.03 treatments. In general, according to the results, it seems that 50:50 sesame-cowpea intercropping (M3 and application of 30 kg.ha-1 N + 50 kg.ha-1 P + 150 kg.ha-1 bio-organic fertilizer (F4, may reduce application of chemical fertilizers and be beneficial to sesame-cowpea intercropping system.

  6. Pengendalian Aphis craccivora Koch. dengan kitosan dan pengaruhnya terhadap penularan Bean common mosaic virus strain Black eye cowpea (BCMV-BlC pada kacang panjang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Megasari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aphis craccivora is one of the important pests on yard long bean. It causes direct damage and also has an indirect effect as insect vector of the Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV. The research was done to test the effectiveness of chitosan in suppressing aphid population growth, feeding preference and its ability in transmiting BCMV. Chitosan with concentration ranging of 0.1–1.0% were applied on leaves using spraying method at 1 day before BCMV transmission. BCMV was transmitted by using 3 individuals of viruliferous aphids on each plant. Results show that chitosan treatments on leaves or plants significantly suppressed the population and feeding preferences of A. craccivora. Further, treated plants showed lower disease incidence, severity and BCMV titre significantly compared with untreated control plants. The positive effects of chitosan in suppressing population growth as feeding preferences and BCMV transmission might be due to the anti-feedant effect of chitosan on A. craccivora. Based on the result, chitosan at concentration 0.9% is the most effective concentration in suppressing BCMV and its vector A. craccivora.

  7. Compatibility of Intercropping Stem Borer Resistant Sorghum Sorghum bicolor Moench Genotypes with Cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L Walp and its Effect on Flower Thrips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampong-Nyarko, K.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The compatibility of sorghum Sorghum bicolor Moench genotypes with varying levels of resistance to stem borers for intercropping was studied in field experiments for two cropping seasons at the ICIPE in Kenya. Sorghum genotypes IS-18520, IS-1044, IS-2269, ICS 3, ICS 4, LRB6, 2Kx17and Gaddam El Hamam were grown both as monocrops and as intercrops with cowpea. Intercropping reduced the Chilo partellus population density but there was no significant genotype x intercropping interaction. Intercropping significantly reduced the number of flower thrips Megalurothrips sjostedti in cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L Walp. The stem borer resistance level of sorghum genotypes tested was not affected by intercropping. There were, however, differences in agronomic productivity. Grain yield of intercropped sorghum was positively correlated with the number of tillers per harvestable head. Sorghum genotypes with high tillering capacity, of intermediate plant height and intermediate leaf area were considered compatible for intercropping with cowpea.

  8. Increased heavy metal tolerance of cowpea plants by dual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through biological inoculation technology, the bacterial-mycorrhizal-legume tripartite symbiosis in artificially heavy metal polluted soil was documented and the effects of dual inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus and Rhizobium (N-fixing bacteria, NFB) on the host plant cowpea (Vigna sinensis) in pot ...

  9. Quixotic coupling between irrigation system and maize-cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at the Research and Experimental Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University at Shalakan, Kalubia Governorate, Egypt, to evaluate the effect of two irrigation systems (trickle and modified furrow irrigation) and five maize (M)-cowpea (C) intercropping patterns (sole M-30, sole M-15, ridge ...

  10. Influence of cowpea and soybean intercropping pattern and time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiment was conducted at Mechara Agricultural Research Center during 2013; to determine the effect of cowpea and soybean intercropping pattern on Land Equivalent Ratio (LER) and Gross Monetary Value (GMV) on ... The experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with three replications.

  11. Efficacy of two plant powders as cowpea grain protectants against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was carried out to study insecticidal effect of powders from Chenopodium ambrosioides leaves and Aframomum melegueta seeds on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus. Methodology and Results: 5g of both powders of A. melegueta and C. ambrosioides were used in the proportions of C.

  12. inhibition of germination and growth behavior of some cowpea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... neem (Azadiracta indica) on germination and growth behavior of some cowpea varieties (receptor). Experiments were set on sterilized ... Keywords: Neem, Allelopathic effect, Leaf extract, Germination, Growth behavior. INTRODUCTION. Allelopathy has ..... solving global problems. National Academy. Press ...

  13. Response of cowpea, okra and tomato sawdust ash manure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted at Akure and Obaile in Southwest Nigeria to test effect of sawdust ash manure treatments on cowpea (var. 1T82D – 716), okra (var. NAAe – 47 – 4) and Roma variety of tomato. The nutrient analysis of leaf and pod of okra given by different sawdust ash manure treatments was done.

  14. New Sources of Resistance in Cowpea to the Cowpea Aphid (Aphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-two advanced breeding genotypes of cowpea were evaluated for their responses to infes-tation by the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch. The aim of the study was to identify geno-type(s) of cowpea resistant to A. craccivora to be used as breeding line(s). Seedling screening technique and aphid growth and ...

  15. Host finding by Uscana lariophaga (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) in stored cowpea : the effect of distance, time interval, host patch size and spatial orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.; Ghimire, M.N.; Souquié, S.; Werf, van der W.; Huis, van A.

    2005-01-01

    Host finding and parasitization by Uscana lariophaga Steffan, a potential biocontrol agent of the storage pest Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius), were investigated in stored cowpea. Host finding was shown to be a function of distance, time, host patch size and the spatial position of U.

  16. Aflatoxins, discolouration and insect damage in dried cowpea and pigeon pea in Malawi and the effectiveness of flotation/washing operation in eliminating the aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matumba, Limbikani; Singano, Lazarus; Pungulani, Lawrent; Mvula, Naomi; Matumba, Annie; Singano, Charles; Matita, Grey

    2017-05-01

    Aflatoxin contamination and biodeterioration were examined in 302 samples of dry cowpeas and pigeon peas that were randomly purchased from 9 districts of the Southern Region of Malawi during July and November 2015. Further, the impact of flotation/washing on aflatoxin levels on the pulses was elucidated. Aflatoxin analyses involved immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up and HPLC quantification with fluorescence detection (FLD) while legume biodeterioration assessments were done by visual inspection. Aflatoxins were frequently detected in cowpea (24%, max., 66 μg/kg) and pigeon pea (22%, max., 80 μg/kg) samples that were collected in the month of July. Lower aflatoxin incidence of 15% in cowpeas (max., 470 μg/kg) and 14% in pigeon peas (max., 377 μg/kg) was recorded in the November collection. Overall, aflatoxin levels were significantly higher in the pulses that were collected in November. However, there were no significant differences in the total aflatoxin (aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) + AFB2 + AFG1 + AFG2) levels between the two types of pulses. Remarkably, in 76.2% of the aflatoxin positive cowpea and in 41.7% of the aflatoxin positive pigeon pea samples, aflatoxin G1 concentration exceeded aflatoxin B1. Insect damage percentage averaged at 18.1 ± 18.2% (mean ± SD) in the cowpeas and 16.1 ± 19.4% in pigeon peas. Mean discolouration percentage (number of pulses) of the cowpeas and pigeon peas was found to be at 6.7 ± 4.9 and 8.7 ± 6.2%, respectively. Washing and discarding the buoyant fraction was highly efficient in reducing aflatoxin levels; only 5.2 ± 11.1% of the initial aflatoxin level was found in the cleaned samples. In conclusion, cowpeas and pigeon peas sold on the local market in Malawi may constitute a hazard especially if floatation/washing step is skipped.

  17. De zuivering en de eigenschappen van de replicatieve vorm van het RNA van cowpea-mozaiekvirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Purified infectious preparations of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) consist of three centrifugal components with sedimentation coefficients of 58, 95 and 115 S . These are referred to as top (T), middle (M) and bottom (B) component and contain 0, 24 and 33% RNA respectively (Van Kammen, 1967).

  18. A novel method for conserving cowpea germplasm and breeding stocks using solar disinfestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntoukam, G.; Kitch, L.W.; Shade, R.E.; Murdock, L.L. [Purdue Univ., Entomology Dept., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Experiments conducted in Maroua, Cameroon, demonstrated that a large 50-kg-capacity solar heater can be used to successfully eradicate infestations of Callosobruchus maculatus from cowpea seeds kept in small, transparent Minigrip zip lock plastic bags. Temperatures produced inside the heater were sufficient to kill all developing insects living within infested cowpea seeds. Small, transparent ziplock plastic bags are useful seed storage containers for short-term cowpea germplasm collections and are easily inspected during storage following solar disinfestation. Published reports indicate that temperatures of up to 85{sup o}C do not adversely affect seed germination, germination rates, or seeding viability. These temperature and biological experiments provide evidence that the solar heater technique can serve as an effective and practical means to improve the short-term storage of cowpea seeds in developing country national agricultural research programs. (author)

  19. Influence of cowpea genotype and sorghum-cropping system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of cowpea genotype and sorghum-cropping system on cowpea infestation by some insect pests in the sudan savannah of Nigeria. ... seasons to investigate the influence of cowpea genotypes and sorghum cropping system on cowpea damage by legume pod borer, Maruca testulalis (Fabricius), bean flower thrips,

  20. (AJST) INFLUENCE OF FERMENTATION AND COWPEA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    2: December, 2001. African Journal of Science and Technology (AJST). Science and Engineering Series Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 71-80. INFLUENCE OF FERMENTATION AND COWPEA STEAMING ON SOME. QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF MAIZE-COWPEA BLENDS. S. Sefa-Dedeh,Y. Kluvitse and E.O. Afoakwa*.

  1. Compensatory and Susceptive Responses of Cowpea Genotypes...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    turing genotypes of cowpea. Control of aphid's infestation in early maturing cowpea genotypes should not be delayed up to two weeks after infestation (28 days after planting) to avoid yield loss. Aphid infestation period for studies in susceptive response in medium to late matur- ing genotypes should go beyond 28 days after.

  2. Isolation of cowpea genes conferring drought tolerance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this study was to identify and isolate the genes conferring drought tolerance in cowpea. A cDNA library enriched for cowpea genes expressed specifically during responses to drought was constructed. A procedure called suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was successfully employed to obtain ...

  3. Compensatory and Susceptive Responses of Cowpea Genotypes...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    the seedlings of cowpea and causes direct dam- age on the crop by sucking ... Description of the 10 genotypes of cowpea by parentage or source. Genotype. Description. APAGBAALA. Prima/TVu. 4552/California. Blackeye. No.5//7977. Cultivar, released in ... genotypes started showing symptoms of dam- age. When the ...

  4. The resistance of seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xavier Filho

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata seeds are heavily damaged during storage by the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Seeds of some Nigerian varieties showed a strong resistance to this bruchid. By utilizing biochemical and entomological techniques we were able to rule out the paticipation of proteolytic enzyme (trypsin, chimotrypsin, subtilisin and papain inhibitors, lectins, and tannins in the resistance mechanisms. Fractionation of the seed meal of a resistant variety suggests that the factor(s responsible for the effect is (are concentrate in the globulin fraction.

  5. Regulatory considerations surrounding the deployment of Bt-expressing cowpea in Africa: report of the deliberations of an expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesing, Joseph; Romeis, Jörg; Ellstrand, Norman; Raybould, Alan; Hellmich, Richard; Wolt, Jeff; Ehlers, Jeff; Dabiré, Clémentine; Fatokun, Christian; Hokanson, Karen; Ishiyaku, Mohammad F; Margam, Venu; Obokoh, Nompumelelo; Mignouna, Jacob; Nangayo, Francis; Ouedraogo, Jeremy; Pasquet, Rémy; Pittendrigh, Barry; Schaal, Barbara; Stein, Jeff; Tamò, Manuele; Murdock, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata spp unguiculata) is adapted to the drier agro-ecological zones of West Africa where it is a major source of dietary protein and widely used as a fodder crop. Improving the productivity of cowpea can enhance food availability and security in West Africa. Insect predation--predominately from the legume pod borer (Maruca vitrata), flower thrips (Megalurothrips sjostedti) and a complex of pod-sucking bugs (e.g., Clavigralla spp)--is a major yield-limiting factor in West African cowpea production. Dramatic increases in yield are shown when M. vitrata is controlled with insecticides. However, availability, costs, and safety considerations limit pesticides as a viable option for boosting cowpea production. Development of Bt-cowpea through genetic modification (GM) to control the legume pod borer is a promising approach to cowpea improvement. Cowpea expressing the lepidopteran-active Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis is being developed as a first generation Bt-cowpea crop for West Africa. Appropriate stewardship of Bt-cowpea to assure its sustainability under West African conditions is critical to its successful development. A first step in this process is an environmental risk assessment to determine the likelihood and magnitude of adverse effects of the Cry1Ab protein on key environmental protection goals in West Africa. Here we describe the results of an expert panel convened in 2009 to develop the problem formulation phase for Bt-cowpea and to address specific issues around gene flow, non-target arthropods, and insect resistance management.

  6. Effect of preparation practices and the cowpea cultivar Vigna unguiculata L.Walp on the quality and content of myo-inositol phosphate in akara (fried bean paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walison Fabio Rogério

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Akara is one of Brazil's national treasures prepared from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.Walp, grated onions and salt and deep-fried in crude palm oil. The results of this study on akara preparation methods showed that, in general, cowpeas were soaked for up 3 hours at room temperature, and the seed coats were then removed. The akara makers preferred the olho de pombo cultivar, because of its cream hue, or the macassar cultivar because it produces a crispier paste. The seeds purchased from street markets had lower ranges of InsP6, InsP5, and InsP4 (1.03-7.62 ∝mol.g- 1; 0.14-1.31 ∝mol.g- 1; and 0.0-0.10 ∝mol.g- 1, respectively than both the paste and akara (6.72-19.24 ∝mol.g- 1; 1.29-4.57 ∝mol.g- 1; 0.0-0.76 ∝mol.g- 1; 3.31-13.71 ∝mol.g- 1; 0.0-4.48 ∝mol.g- 1; and 0.0-1.32 ∝mol.g- 1. These results suggest that other beans or cowpea varieties have been used in the preparation of akara and that the phytate levels do not affect its nutritional quality.

  7. Isolation and purification of a papain inhibitor from Egyptian genotypes of barley seeds and its in vitro and in vivo effects on the cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Latif, Ashraf Oukasha

    2015-02-01

    The cysteine inhibitors that are known as cystatin have been identified and characterized from several plant species. In the current study, 44 barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes including 3 varieties and 41 promising lines were screened for their potential as protease inhibitors. The barley genotypes showed low inhibitory activity against trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes with a mean of 4.15 TIU/mg protein and 4.40 CIU/mg protein. The barley variety, Giza 123, showed strong papain inhibitory activity of 97.09 PIU/mg proteins and was subjected for further purification studies using ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Barley purified proteins showed two bands on SDS-PAGE corresponding to a molecular mass of 12.4-54.8 kDa. The purified barley PI was found to be stable at a temperature below 80 °C and at a wide range of pH from 2 to 12. Barley PI was found to have higher potential inhibitory activity against papain enzyme compared to the standard papain inhibitor, E-64 with an IC50 value of 21.04 µg/ml and 25.62 µg/ml for barley PI and E-64, respectively. The kinetic analysis revealed a non-competitive type of inhibition with a Ki value of 1.95 × 10(-3 )µM. The antimetabolic effect of barley PI was evaluated against C. maculatus by incorporating the F30-60 protein of the purified inhibitor into the artificial diet using artificial seeds. Barley PI significantly prolonged the development of C. maculatus in proportion to PI concentration. Barley PI significantly increased the mortality of C. maculatus and caused a significant reduction in its fecundity. On the other hand, barley PI seemed to have non-significant effects on the adult longevity and the adult dry weight. The in vitro and in vivo results proved the efficiency of the papain inhibitory protein isolated from barley as a tool for managing the cowpea bruchid, C. maculatus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomics Data for Cowpea Pests in Africa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This dataset contains the complete mitochondrial genome of Anoplocnemis curvipes F. (Coreinea, Coreidae, Heteroptera), a pest of fresh cowpea pods. To get to the...

  9. Influence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus on the Life History Traits and Feeding Preference of Its Vector, Thrips palmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimei, Guisuibou; Raina, Harpreet Singh; Devi, Pukhrambam Pushpa; Saurav, Gunjan Kumar; Renukadevi, Perumal; Malathi, Varagur Ganesan; Senthilraja, Chinnaiah; Mandal, Bikash; Rajagopal, Raman

    2017-11-01

    The effect of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) infection on the life history traits of its vector, Thrips palmi, and its feeding preference on GBNV-infected plants were studied. A significant difference was observed in the developmental period (first instar to adult) between the GBNV-infected and healthy thrips, wherein the developmental period of GBNV-infected thrips was decreased. However, there was no effect on the other parameters such as preadult mortality, adult longevity, and fecundity. Further investigation on a settling and feeding choice assay of T. palmi to GBNV-infected and healthy plants showed that T. palmi preferred GBNV-infected cowpea plants more than the healthy cowpea plants. This preference was also noticed for leaf disks from GBNV-infected cowpea, groundnut, and tomato plants.

  10. Whole cowpea meal fortified with NaFeEDTA reduces iron deficiency among Ghanaian school children in a malaria endemic area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abizari, A.R.; Moretti, D.; Schuth, S.; Zimmerman, M.B.; Armar-Klemesu, M.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2012-01-01

    Cowpeas, like other legumes, contain high amounts of native iron but are rich in phytic acid (PA) and polyphenols (PP) that inhibit iron absorption. NaFeEDTA may overcome the combined inhibitory effect of PA and PP. Our objective was to test the efficacy of NaFeEDTA-fortified cowpea meal in

  11. Investigation on seed transmission of cucumber mosaic virus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea breeding lines were infected with cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by mechanical inoculation to investigate seed transmission rates for this virus. Transmission rates ranging from 0% to 6% were scored by symptom assessment. However, when cowpeas grown from seeds of infected mother plants were tested by ...

  12. Insect mediated outcrossing and geneflow in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... Among the insects observed, only honey and bumble bees were found with cowpea pollen dusts on their legs and abdomens, and were responsible for the observed level of outcrossing. Key words: Cowpea varieties, geneflow, insect pollinators, out-crossing. INTRODUCTION. Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata ...

  13. Consumer preference for cowpea in Kwara State, Nigeria | Ayinde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study therefore examined the consumer preferences for cowpea, described the pattern of cowpea price overtime; and determined the factors responsible for variation in price of cowpea. analytical techniques used in this study include descriptive statistics, and least significant difference (LSD). The primary data were ...

  14. Differential responses of 15 cowpea genotypes to three Striga hot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Striga gesnerioides (Wild.) Vatke is the main biotic factor restricting yield of cowpea in Sub-Saharan. Africa (SSA) in general and particularly in Niger. To date, seven different races infesting cowpea have been identified in Africa based on differential responses of cowpea varieties. It was desirable to verify whether there.

  15. Inheritanceof seed coat colour pattern in cowpea [ Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inheritanceof seed coat colour pattern in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata) (L) Walp.] Y Mustapha. Abstract. Hybridization experiments were conducted in the screen house to study the inheritance of seed colour pattern in cowpea. Cowpea varieties of varying seed coat colour were used as parents for the investigation. Parental ...

  16. Nature of resistance of cowpea Alectra vogelii infestation | Mbwando ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alectra vogelii (benth) is parasitic weed which causes significant yield reductions in cowpea (Vigna unguiculataWalp) in Africa. The objective of this study was to identify the type of gene action controlling the trait for resistance to Alectra vogelii in cowpea and estimate the heritability of the trait. Seven genotypes of cowpea ...

  17. Influence of fermentation and cowpea steaming on some quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation and cowpea steaming can be used to improve the protein quality and quantity of fermented maize dough. In the production of maize-cowpea blends, it is important that the quality characteristics are evaluated to determine their functionality in the products. A 5x4x2x2 factorial experiment with cowpea level, ...

  18. Studies on the nutritive value of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mixed diets for animal feed in South Africa. A better know- ledge of the nutritional value of cowpeas for monogastric animals may increase the demand and therefore the production of cowpeas for the animal feed market. Cowpeas could make a valuable contribution to the supply of proteins for animal feed in South Africa ...

  19. Intercropping kenaf and cowpea | Raji | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiment was conducted at Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Nigeria, to assess the compatibility of kenaf with cowpea in kenaf/cowpea mixtures. There were eight treatments. Each treatment was replicated four times in a randomized complete block design. Agronomic assessment indicated that kenaf and cowpea were ...

  20. Insect pests associated with cowpea – sorghum intercropping system by considering the phenological stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana González Aguiar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to determine the main insect pest populations and their behavior in the combination cowpea - sorghum. This work took into account the phenology of each crop. The study was conducted on a Cambisol soil from the Basic Unit of Cooperative Production “Día y Noche”, which belongs to the Basic Unit of Cooperative Production “28 de Octubre”, Santa Clara municipality, Villa Clara province, Cuba. The experimental design was a random blocks included four treatments and four repetitions. The first arrangement consisted of two rows of cowpea for each row of sorghum; the second one included three rows of cowpea and one row of sorghum. The other treatments were the monocultures of cowpea and sorghum. The methodology included visual observations of plants with a weekly frequency until crop harvest to detect the presence of the insects. Also, the phenology of each crop was considered. The phytophagous insects quantified in the cowpea crop belong to the families Chrysomelidae, Pyralidae, Cicadellidae, while in the sorghum crop, these insects belong to the families Noctuidae and Aphididae. Finally, the results showed the positive effects of both spatial arrangements with a smaller incidence of insect pest populations.

  1. Production and characterization of cowpea protein hydrolysate with optimum nitrogen solubility by enzymatic hydrolysis using pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune Mune, Martin Alain; Minka, Samuel René

    2017-06-01

    Cowpea is a source of low-cost and good nutritional quality protein for utilization in food formulations in replacement of animal proteins. Therefore it is necessary that cowpea protein exhibits good functionality, particularly protein solubility which affects the other functional properties. The objective of this study was to produce cowpea protein hydrolysate exhibiting optimum solubility by the adequate combination of hydrolysis parameters, namely time, solid/liquid ratio (SLR) and enzyme/substrate ratio (ESR), and to determine its functional properties and molecular characteristics. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used for the experiments, and a second-order polynomial to model the effects of hydrolysis time, SLR and ESR on the degree of hydrolysis and nitrogen solubility index. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of time 208.61 min, SLR 1/15 (w/w) and ESR 2.25% (w/w) yielded a nitrogen solubility of 75.71%. Protein breakdown and the peptide profile following enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography. Cowpea protein hydrolysate showed higher oil absorption capacity, emulsifying activity and foaming ability compared with the concentrate. The solubility of cowpea protein hydrolysate was adequately optimized by response surface methodology, and the hydrolysate showed adequate functionality for use in food. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Short communication. Growth and nodulation of cowpea after 5 years of consecutive composted tannery sludge amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. L. Miranda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tannery industry releases high amounts of tannery sludge which are currently composted and used in agricultural soils. The consecutive amendment of such composted tannery sludge (CTS may affect soil microrganisms, such as rhizobia. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 5-year repeated CTS amendment on growth, nodulation, and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. CTS was applied in different amounts (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 Mg/ha to a sandy soil. Amendment of CTS increased soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC, sodium and chromium content. Plant growth, nodulation, N accumulation, and cowpea yield increased up to 10 Mg/ha; however, above this rate, these variables decreased. After 5 years of CTS amendment, the increase in soil chemical properties, particularly EC and Na content, exerted negative effects on the growth, nodulation, and yield of cowpea.

  3. Antinutrients and digestibility (in vitro) of soaked, dehulled and germinated cowpeas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, K; Punia, D

    2000-01-01

    Phytic acid, polyphenols, protein and starch digestibility (in vitro) in two varieties, namely CS-46 and CS-88, of soaked, dehulled and germinated cowpeas were determined. Soaking for 12 hours, dehulling of soaked seeds and germination for different time periods (24, 36 and 48 h) contributed significantly in reducing the phytic acid and polyphenol content of cowpeas. Removal of seed coat (dehulling) of soaked cowpeas reduced the polyphenols by 70-71%. Soaking (12 h) brought about an improvement in protein and starch digestibility which further increased after dehulling. Progressive increase in digestibility (protein and starch) was noticed, with an increase in germination period. Dehulling of soaked seeds was most effective in reducing the polyphenolic content, and germination in enhancing protein and starch digestibility.

  4. Cowpea and Groundnut Haulms Fodder Trading and Its Lessons for Multidimensional Cowpea Improvement for Mixed Crop Livestock Systems in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samireddypalle, Anandan; Boukar, Ousmane; Grings, Elaine; Fatokun, Christian A; Kodukula, Prasad; Devulapalli, Ravi; Okike, Iheanacho; Blümmel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea is an important legume crop in Africa, valued highly for its grain and also haulms, which are a tradable commodity in fodder markets. Fodder market surveys in Northern Nigeria showed that groundnut haulms were priced higher than cowpea haulms, probably because of their superior nutritive value. The economic value of haulms has prompted cowpea breeders and livestock nutritionists to explore haulm fodder traits as additional selection and breeding criteria. Fifty cowpea genotypes cultivated across five locations in Nigeria in 2013 and 2014 were evaluated for food fodder traits. Significant (P livestock nutrition traits, although location and year had significant effects. Trade-offs between grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits were largely absent and haulm acid detergent lignin and grain yield were even inversely correlated (r = -0.28, P = 0.05), that is high grain yielders had decreased haulm lignin. However, haulm N and grain yield also tended to be negatively associated (r = -0.26, P = 0.07). Haulm fodder quality traits and haulm yield were mostly positively correlated (P livestock systems.

  5. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COWPEA PRODUCTION IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba M. Wakili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employs a stochastic frontier production function analysis to examine the productivity and technical efficiency of cowpea production in Adamawa State, Nigeria and also to identify the factors affecting the technical inefficiency using farm level survey data collected from 150 cowpea farmers selected using multi stage sampling technique. Findings from the analysis show that cowpea farmers operated on a very small scale and are profitable. The productivity analysis shows that agro chemicals, fertilizer, farm size and labor were all positively and significantly related to the technical efficiency. The return to scale (RTS of 0.9904 shows that cowpea production was in the rational stage of the production surface. The technical efficiency varies from 0.1094 to 0.9568 with a mean technical efficiency of 0.6649, indicating that farmers were operating below the efficiency frontier. Thus, in the short run, there is a scope to increase output by 34%. The inefficiency model revealed that education of the farmers; extension visits and access to credit are the main factors that affect technical efficiency of the farmers.

  6. Physiological Responses of Some Drought Resistant Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    saharan Africa One of the first physiological responses to water stress in crops is the functioning of the leaf. The aim of the present study is to determine leaf physiological responses of cowpea to water stress. The study was conducted at ...

  7. (coleoptera:bruchidae) attack in cowpea.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. Ethanolic crude extract, volatile oil and the peel powder of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) were evaluated for their efficacy against the bean weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus Fab.). The peel powder was evaluated at concentrations of 5.0 g, 7.5 g, and 10.0 g /50 g of cowpea seeds. Etha- nolic crude extract and ...

  8. Factors Constraining Farmers Use of Improved Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that land and labour problems, marketing problems, poor technical information, cultural incompatibility, high cost of farm inputs and unavailability of necessary inputs were the major factors constraining the use of improved cowpea technologies in the area. These findings suggest that there is an urgent ...

  9. Common bean and cowpea improvement in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2014 and 2015, the Instituto de Investigação Agronómica (IIA) evaluated the performance of common bean (Phaselolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines and improved cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) varieties. The field experiments were planted in the lowlands at Mazozo and in the highlands at Chian...

  10. Determination of phosphorus requirements of Cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the phosphorus requirement of cowpea in two locations in southeastern Nigeria (Bende and Umudike) using sorption isotherm. The method used involved equilibrating 3g of soil in 30mls of 0.01m CaCl2 containing various levels of phosphorus at room temperature for 5 days.

  11. Comparative Germination Responses of Cowpea and Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iya beji

    Key words: Soil moisture content, crop species germination, cowpea and maize. INTRODUCTION: The importance of crop establishment in crop productivity can not be over emphasized. Of all factors controlling productivity, seed germination and vigour are pre- requisites for the success of stand establishment in crop plants ...

  12. Genomic heterogeneity within cowpea bradyrhizobia isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic heterogeneity within cowpea bradyrhizobia isolated from Ghanaian soils. JO Fening, A Sessitsch, SK Offei, SKA Danso. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/wajae.v6i1.45605.

  13. First Report of Cowpea Mild Mottle Carlavirus on Yardlong Bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgloris Marys

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis plants with virus-like systemic mottling and leaf distortion were observed in both experimental and commercial fields in Aragua State, Venezuela. Symptomatic leaves were shown to contain carlavirus-like particles. RT-PCR analysis with carlavirus-specific primers was positive in all tested samples. Nucleotide sequences of the obtained amplicons showed 84%–74% similarity to corresponding sequences of Cowpea mild mottle virus (CPMMV isolates deposited in the GenBank database. This is the first report of CPMMV in Venezuela and is thought to be the first report of CPMMV infecting yardlong bean.

  14. Efeito de extratos vegetais no controle de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tracheiphilum em sementes de caupi Effect of naturals extracts on the control of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tracheiphilum in cowpea seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandiê Araújo da Silva

    2009-04-01

    environment. The present work had the objective to compare the effect of natural extracts on the control of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tracheiphlum, originated from seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L, compared to chemical fungicide effect. Extracts of Allium sativum, Anadenanthera colubrine, and Ocimum basilicum were used alone or in combination with Mancozeb. A 50 µL aliquot of each treatment was added in a hole (6 mm of diameter made in the center of Petri dishes with BDA and a fungus mycelia disk was inoculated on it. Evaluations were done during seven days, measuring the pathogen mycelial growth. Seeds of cowpea were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite, sowed in plastic bags with autoclaved soil. Eight days after germination, wounds were made on the basal part of the plantlets, and fungus spore suspension (1.4 x 10-5 con/mL was applied on it. Evaluations of the disease severity were accomplished daily during 30 days after inoculation, using a disease index. Combination of extracts of A. sativum + Ocimum basilicum and Anadenanthera colubrina + Ocimum basilicum did not reduce fungus mycelial growth, whereas Ocimum basilicum extract alone showed minor mycelial growth, indicating fungicide action of this treatment on F. oxysporum f. sp tracheipphlum under the conditions studied. Combination of Mancozeb + Anadenanthera colubrina was responsible for lower average of severity on the evaluated plants.

  15. Novel in situ evaluation of the role minerals play in the development of the hard-to-cook (HTC) defect of cowpeas and its effect on the in vitro mineral bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Johanita; Minnis-Ndimba, Roya; Mtshali, Christopher; Minnaar, Amanda

    2015-05-01

    Cowpea is a nutritionally important drought-resistant legume in sub-Saharan Africa. It is, however, underutilised, in part due to the hard-to-cook (HTC) defect caused by adverse storage conditions resulting in seeds not softening during cooking. This study introduced a novel evaluation of the potential role that minerals play in the development of the HTC defect. The mineral distribution in the cotyledons of normal and HTC cowpeas were analysed by Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The phytate, tannin and total phenolic contents were analysed together with in vitro mineral bioaccessibility. In HTC cowpeas, Ca and Mg were more concentrated in the cell wall-middle lamella area of the parenchyma cells. This, together with the reduction in phytate content, confirmed the 'phytase-phytate-mineral' hypothesis as a mechanism for development of the HTC defect. Despite the phytate reduction in stored cowpeas, the HTC defect decreased the bioaccessibility of Ca, Fe and Zn in cowpeas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Land use and vegetation cover on native symbionts and interactions with cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz C. F. Rocha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia are important components of agroecosystems and they respond to human interference. The objective of this study was to investigate native communities of those microorganisms in soil collected under the native forest, four pastures (Brachiaria brizantha, Panicum maximum, Arachis pintoi and Stylosanthes guianensis and a fallow soil after maize cultivation, in interaction with cowpea (Vigna unguculata. The cowpea grew in a greenhouse until flowering. They were randomly distributed depending on soil, in five replications. The lowest mycorrhizal fungi sporulation and mycorrhizal root colonization occurred under the Panicum and forest soil. In the soils under forest and Stylosanthes, the cowpea did not exhibit nodules and grew less. Among the anthropized areas, the effect was variable, with stimulus to the multiplication and symbiosis of these microorganisms, except in areas of Panicum and Stylosanthes. When the native vegetation is substituted by pasture or farming, the mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia proliferation predominate. However, the effect and its magnitude depends on the grown plant species, with reflects on the plant species in succession, such as the cowpea.

  17. Comparative Profitability of Managing Meloidogyne incognita on Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata Using Carbofuran and Pulverized Aloe keayi Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tanimola, A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost-benefit of managing Meloidogyne incognita on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata using leaves of Aloe keayi and carbofuran was evaluated in two field experiments at the University of Ibadan in Southwest Nigeria with the aim of selecting the more profitable management option. The experiments were laid out in a randomized complete block design and the treatments were: A. keayi at 80 kg/ha, carbofuran at 2 kg a.i./ha, untreated-infected control and uninfected control. Two-week old Ife Brown cowpea seedlings were inoculated with 10,000 eggs of M. incognita (except uninfected control. Air-dried milled leaves of A. keayi and carbofuran were applied one week after inoculation (WAI. Data collected at 10 WAI were: growth, yield, gall index (root damage, and Meloidogyne numbers. The costs and benefits of treatments were calculated. Treatment of M. incognita-infected cowpea with A. keayi and carbofuran improved vegetative growth by 201.6 % and 183.5%, respectively compared to untreated-infected cowpea. Root damage was reduced by 62.5% and 68.8% by A. keayi and carbofuran, respectively. A. keayi compared effectively with carbofuran in reduction of nematode population. Treated cowpea with A. keayi improved grain yield by 219.9% that translated to a gross margin (GM of US$ 798.1 per hectare; whereas carbofuran gave a yield increase of 200.5% that translated into a GM of US$ 692.3 per hectare. Cost:benefit (CB analysis showed positive return per hectare when cowpea was treated with A. keayi and carbofuran. Management of M. incognita on cowpea with A. keayi (CB=0.61 is more profitable than carbofuran (CB=0.74.

  18. Biological and physicochemical properties of cowpea severe mosaic comovirus isolated from soybean in the State of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula V. Bertacini

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean plants with symptoms of bud blight were growing close to cowpea with severe symptoms of mosaic associated with blisters in the leaves. A group of plants of both species were collected and used for etiological studies. This kind of symptom in soybeans was common in certain areas of the State of Paraná, induced by tobacco streak ilarvirus. Host range, serological reaction, particle morphology and size, protein and nucleic acid analysis, and transmission by beetles from species Cerotoma arcuata Oliv. showed that the virus involved was cowpea severe mosaic comovirus. This is the first report on the occurrence of this virus in soybean plants in the State of Paraná. Results using indirect ELISA showed that in cowpea the relative virus concentration was higher in green leaf areas than in chlorotic ones. Also, virus concentration, determined through indirect ELISA was much higher in plants kept at diurnal regime of 25º C x 23º C (12 x 12 h than at 30º C x 28º C.

  19. Genetic architecture of delayed senescence, biomass, and grain yield under drought stress in cowpea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Muchero

    Full Text Available The stay-green phenomenon is a key plant trait with wide usage in managing crop production under limited water conditions. This trait enhances delayed senescence, biomass, and grain yield under drought stress. In this study we sought to identify QTLs in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata consistent across experiments conducted in Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Senegal, and the United States of America under limited water conditions. A panel of 383 diverse cowpea accessions and a recombinant inbred line population (RIL were SNP genotyped using an Illumina 1536 GoldenGate assay. Phenotypic data from thirteen experiments conducted across the four countries were used to identify SNP-trait associations based on linkage disequilibrium association mapping, with bi-parental QTL mapping as a complementary strategy. We identified seven loci, five of which exhibited evidence suggesting pleiotropic effects (stay-green between delayed senescence, biomass, and grain yield. Further, we provide evidence suggesting the existence of positive pleiotropy in cowpea based on positively correlated mean phenotypic values (0.34< r <0.87 and allele effects (0.07< r <0.86 for delayed senescence and grain yield across three African environments. Three of the five putative stay-green QTLs, Dro-1, 3, and 7 were identified in both RILs and diverse germplasm with resolutions of 3.2 cM or less for each of the three loci, suggesting that these may be valuable targets for marker-assisted breeding in cowpea. Also, the co-location of early vegetative delayed senescence with biomass and grain yield QTLs suggests the possibility of using delayed senescence at the seedling stage as a rapid screening tool for post-flowering drought tolerance in cowpea breeding. BLAST analysis using EST sequences harboring SNPs with the highest associations provided a genomic context for loci identified in this study in closely related common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and soybean (Glycine max reference genomes.

  20. Cheese bread enriched with biofortified cowpea flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Barbosa Monteiro Cavalcante

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The development and enrichment of food are of great importance not only for the industry but also to improve the population's nutrition, where you can create new products or optimize existing ones. The consumption of fortified products in the diet is an option for the control of deficiency diseases. This study aimed to develop enriched cheese bread with whole biofortified cowpea flour and evaluate their acceptance and chemical composition. Two formulations, F1 and F2, were prepared containing 5.6 and 8% of cowpea flour as a substitute for starch, respectively. To check acceptance, three sensory tests were used (Hedonic Scale, Purchase Intent, and Paired Comparison, F1 being sensory viable according to assessors, being chemically analyzed. Minerals were determined by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma source. The moisture was determined by drying at 105 °C, ash by calcination in muffle at 550 °C, proteins by the macro-Kjeldahl method, and lipids by hot extraction in a Soxhlet extractor. Carbohydrates were obtained by difference and the calories were calculated. The addition of cowpea increased the amounts of copper, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, as well as protein and carbohydrate values. On the other hand, there was a reduction of the moisture concerning lipids and the total caloric value compared to the standard formulation. It was concluded , therefore, that the cowpea, a regional raw material in market expansion is presented as an option for the enrichment of baked foods that do not contain gluten, such as cheese bread.

  1. Health risk assessment of pesticides residue in maize and cowpea from Ejura, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoto, O; Andoh, H; Darko, G; Eshun, K; Osei-Fosu, P

    2013-06-01

    Low productivity in agriculture due to damage cause by pests has led to the application of pesticides to control pest infestation. Residues of pesticides applied on crops are often found in the food which can cause chronic effect on the health of humans who consume such products. The aim of this study is to measure pesticides residues in maize and cowpea and compare the values with stablished safety limits. A total of 37 pesticides comprising 15 organochlorines, 13 organophosphorus and 9 pyrethroids pesticides were identified in maize and cowpea samples obtained from farms in Ejura. Analytical methods included solvent extraction of the pesticide residues and their subsequent quantification using gas chromatograph equipped with Electron Capture Detector and Pulse Flame Photometric Detector after clean-up on alumina/activated charcoal column. The results showed that the mean concentration of pesticides in maize ranged from 0.001 to 0.103 mg kg(-1) for organochlorine pesticides, 0.002-0.019 mg kg(-1) for organophosphorus pesticides and 0.002-0.028 mg kg(-1) for pyrethroids pesticides. In cowpea the mean concentration ranged from 0.001 to 0.108 mg kg(-1) for organochlorine pesticides, 0.002-0.015 mg kg(-1) for organophosphorus pesticides and 0.001-0.039 mg kg(-1) for pyrethroids pesticides. Maximum Residue Limits for β-HCH, β-endosulfan, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were exceeded in both maize and cowpea samples. Health risk estimation revealed that residues of heptachlor, dieldrin, endrin, β-endosulfna, γ-chlordane and chlorfenvinphos found in maize exceeded the Acceptable Daily Intake. Similarly the levels of heptachlor and p,p'-DDD found in cowpea also exceeded the Acceptable Daily Intake. This suggests a great potential for chronic toxicity to consumers of these food items. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physical and cooking characteristics of two cowpea cultivars grown in temperate Indian climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two local cowpea cultivars (Red cowpea and Black cowpea were studied for various physical, cooking and textural properties. The moisture, crude protein, fat, ash and carbohydrate content of seeds ranged from 10.0% to 10.1%, 21.29–23.90%, 0.49–1.94%, 19.8–2.81%, and 60.53–62.45%, respectively. Sphericity, 1000-seed weight and surface area were significantly higher for Red cowpea than Black cowpea. However bulk density was found significantly higher for Black cowpea than Red cowpea. Black cowpea had significantly shorter cooking time (29.77 min than Red cowpea (64.67 min. Water uptake ratio, hydration capacity and swelling capacity were significantly higher for Red cowpea than Black cowpea. Hardness was higher for soaked Red cowpea seeds (16.37 kg than soaked Black cowpea (7.62 kg. Adhesiveness values were observed significantly higher for soaked Black cowpea seeds (1.26 kg s than soaked Red cowpea (0.004 kg s. Chewiness was also significantly higher for Red cowpea. Cooked seeds did not show a significant difference for the textural parameters between the two cultivars.

  3. Field evaluation of Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that varietal resistance to insect pests in cowpea varied with growth stages and seasonal changes. Five major insect pests (Aphis craccivora, Megalurothrips sjostedti, Maruca vitrata, Riptortus dentipes and Clavigralla tomentosicollis) were observed at the various stages of growth of cowpea plant. Results ...

  4. essential oil extract from moringa oleifera roots as cowpea seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ESSENTIAL OIL EXTRACT FROM MORINGA OLEIFERA ROOTS AS COWPEA. SEED PROTECTANT AGAINST COWPEA BEETLE. O.Y. ALABI and M.M. ADEWOLE. Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Corresponding author: alabi.jummy@gmail.com, jmkalabi@yahoo.

  5. Needs assessment of cowpea production practices, constraints and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... originating from the decay of its leaf litter, roots and root nodules (Okereke et al., 2006). Research and production of cowpea have been neglected in South Africa in the last three decades. Research and production of cowpea have been neglected in South Africa in the last three decades. Lack of improved ...

  6. Cowpea seed coat chemical analysis in relation to storage seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field emergence of stored cowpea seeds in the tropical environment is a major limitation to its production, particularly in cultivars with unpigmented seed coats. To determine the storage potential of cowpea, seeds of five cultivars comprising two pigmented and three unpigmented ones were subjected to controlled ...

  7. cowpea as an alternative protein source in broiler diets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VOTA NÃO À REGIONALIZAÇÃO! SIM AO REFORÇO DO MUNICIPALISMO!

    nutrients compared with soybeans and canola. Keywords: Cowpeas, chemical composition, amino acid digestibility, poultry. # Corresponding author. E-mail: ndiafhi@univen.ac.za. Introduction. The cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is an important grain legume in tropical and subtropical regions where a shortage of animal ...

  8. Nutrient composition of climbing and prostrate vegetable cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... The study evaluated the nutrient content of different accessions of two vegetable cowpea genotypes. The mineral content of the vegetable cowpea accessions were high. Potassium content of the accessions of the climbing genotype “Akidi enu” ranged from 1.25 to 1.52% with a mean value of 1.43 ±.

  9. Bioactive metabolites in improved cowpea seeds | Ameen | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 8 cowpea cultivars were extracted with ethanol, and partitioned into chloroform and water-soluble fractions, the water-soluble fraction was further extracted with ethyl acetate. Residues from ethanol, chloroform and ethyl acetate soluble fractions for each of the 8 cowpea cultivars were screened against brine shrimp larvae.

  10. Intercropping maize with cassava or cowpea in Ghana | Ennin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize/cassava and maize/cowpea intercrops were evaluated in southern Ghana, over a 5-year period to determine the optimum combination of component crop varieties and component plant population densities to optimize productivity of maize-based intercropping systems. Results indicated that some cowpea varieties ...

  11. Microbiology of natural fermentation of cowpea and groundnut for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditionally, locustbean is fermented naturally for dawadawa production. Scarcity of locustbean indicated a need for using other legumes as substitutes for producing dawadawa. The feasibility of using cowpea and groundnut was therefore investigated. The microorganisms associated with natural fermentation of cowpea ...

  12. Inheritance of pod colour in cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (l.) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inheritance of pod colour in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (l.) Walp). Y Mustapha, B.B Singh. Abstract. Hybridization experiments were conducted in the screen house to study the pattern of inheritance of pod and pod tip pigmentation in cowpea. Segregating F2 populations were raised along with F1 and parental lines while F3 ...

  13. Needs assessment of cowpea production practices, constraints and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... derive food protein (Bressani, 1985), animal feed. (Tarawali et ... discouraging poor marginal returns to farmers further worsen the .... crop maturity (whether early or late), growth habit, cowpea ... young farmers or graduates. Most of .... conjunction with the fourth world cowpea congress, University of. Pretoria ...

  14. Nutrient composition of climbing and prostrate vegetable cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated the nutrient content of different accessions of two vegetable cowpea genotypes. The mineral content of the vegetable cowpea accessions were high. Potassium content of the accessions of the climbing genotype “Akidi enu” ranged from 1.25 to 1.52% with a mean value of 1.43 ± 0.13% while in the ...

  15. Nutritional quality and utilization of local and improved cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpeas are grown for their leaves and grains both of which are used as relish or side dishes together with the staple food. Little information is available on the nutritional quality of local and improved cowpea varieties grown in Tanzania as well as the recipes in which they are ingredients. This study was done to investigate ...

  16. Epidemiology Of Soft Stem Rot Disease In Cowpeas Grown In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The field was rain fed throughout the duration of the experiment. Observations were made on soil temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, soil moisture, incidence of soft stem rot disease on the cowpea seedlings, number of cowpea seedlings having symptoms of soft stem rot disease, disease lesion diameter in the affected ...

  17. Genomic tools in cowpea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane eBoukar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS, promises an increase in the number of

  18. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  19. Comparison of micellar extraction combined with ionic liquid based vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method for the determination of difenoconazole in cowpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaochu; Bian, Yanli; Liu, Fengmao; Teng, Peipei; Sun, Pan

    2017-10-06

    Two simple sample pretreatment for the determination of difenoconazole in cowpea was developed including micellar extraction combined with ionic liquid based vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (ME-IL-VALLME) prior to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method (QuEChERS) coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. In ME-IL-VALLME method, the target analyte was extracted by surfactant Tween 20 micellar solution, then the supernatant was diluted with 3mL water to decrease the solubility of micellar solution. Subsequently, the vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) procedure was performed in the diluted extraction solution by using the ionic liquid of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM]PF6) as the extraction solvent and Tween 20 as an emulsifier to enhance the dispersion of the water-immiscible ionic liquid into the aqueous phase. Parameters that affect the extraction have been investigated in both methods Under the optimum conditions, the limits of quantitation were 0.10 and 0.05mgkg(-1), respectively. And good linearity was achieved with the correlation coefficient higher than 0.9941. The relative recoveries ranged from 78.6 to 94.8% and 92.0 to 118.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 7.9-9.6% and 1.2-3.2%, respectively. Both methods were quick, simple and inexpensive. However, the ME-IL-VALLME method provides higher enrichment factor compared with conventional QuEChERS method. The ME-IL-VALLME method has a strong potential for the determination of difenoconazole in complex vegetable matrices with HPLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...... demonstrate for the first time that recombinant plant viruses have potential as mucosal vaccines without the requirement for adjuvant and that the nasal route is most effective for the delivery of these nonreplicating particles.......The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone...... to generate antibody at distant mucosal sites. IgG2a and TgG2b were the dominant IgG subclasses in sera to both CPMV and FnBP, demonstrating a bias in the response toward the T helper 1 type. The sera completely inhibited the binding of human fibronectin to the S. aureus FnBP. Oral immunization of the CVPs...

  1. N2O Emission and Mineral N Release in a Tropical Acrisol Incorporated with Mixed Cowpea and Maize Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Baggs

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory microcosm incubation was conducted to study the influence of mixed cowpea-maize residues on N2O emission and N mineralization in a tropical acrisol. The soils were incorporated with different ratios of cowpea:maize mixtures on weight basis: 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100, and a control treatment in which there was no residue incorporation. The results show that N2O and CO2 emissions were higher in the sole cowpea treatment (100:0 than the sole maize treatment (0:100 and the control. However, cowpea-maize residue mixtures increased the proportion of N lost as N2O compared to the sole treatments. This interactive effect was highest in the 75:25 treatment. The 50:50 treatment showed moderate N2O emission compared to the 100:0, 75:25 and 25:75 treatments but with corresponding steady N mineralization and appreciable mineral N concentration. It is concluded that mixing cowpea-maize residues might increase the proportion of N lost as N2O in a tropical acrisol. However, compared to the other residue mixture treatments, mixing cowpea-maize residues in equal proportions on weight basis might offer a path to reducing N2O emissions while maintaining a steady N mineralization without risking good N supply in acrisols. The study therefore offers potential for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions while maintaining soil fertility in tropical acrisols. However, further studies under both laboratory and field conditions will be required to verify and validate this claim.

  2. Influence of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Peptides on Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Uruakpa FO

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecules from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) can be beneficial in the reduction of hyperglycemia and strengthening the antioxidant status of individuals with diabetes. L6 rat skeletal muscles were exposed to various doses of cowpea peptides (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ng) for 20 hours or insulin (100 nM) for 30 minutes. Proteins were isolated from the treated cells and analyzed by Western blot for the phosphorylation of Akt (a form of protein kinase B; PKB). Study findings show that the cowpea peptid...

  3. Organic fertiliser and the use of mulch in cowpea production under semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Santos Lima Azevedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe reduction on crop production observed in semiarid conditions is closely linked to soils degradation in their physical, microbiological and fertility aspects. Based on this premise, the effects of different types of organic fertilizers associated to the use of mulching in the production of cowpea grown in Paraíba state, Brazil, under semiarid conditions, was studied. The research was conducted under field conditions in the municipality of Casserengue, PB, from April to July 2010. The statistical design in randomized block design with five treatments and five replicates was used, totaling 25 experimental units. Treatments consisted on application of cattle manure or biofertilizer on presence or absence of mulch, plus a control treatment, without fertilization or mulching. It was found that cowpea plants grown under the interaction between manure and mulch had higher phytomass and grain production.

  4. Toxicity and repellence of African plants traditionally used for the protection of stored cowpea against Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Baumgart, I.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.; Kossou, D.K.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for botanical products to control the main insect pest of stored cowpea, Callosobruchus maculatus, 33 traditionally used African plants were tested in the laboratory for their toxic and repellent effects against this beetle. Toxicity was evaluated measuring life history parameters in a

  5. Acetyl substitution patterns of amylose and amylopectin populations in cowpea starch modified with acetic anhydride and vinyl acetate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Schols, H.A.; Klaver, R.; Jin, Z.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effect of reagent type on the distribution pattern of acetyl groups in acetylated cowpea starch, amylose and amylopectin populations were isolated from the starch granules after modification to a low degree of substitution (DS <0.1) with acetic anhydride and vinyl acetate,

  6. Performance of triple bagging hermetic technology for postharvest storage of cowpea grain in Niger

    KAUST Repository

    Baoua, Ibrahim B.

    2012-10-01

    Triple bagging technology for protecting postharvest cowpea grain from losses to the bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) is currently being adopted on a fairly large scale in ten West and Central African countries, including Niger. The triple bag consists of two inner high-density polyethylene bags acting as oxygen barriers, which in turn are encased in an outer woven polypropylene bag that serves primarily for mechanical strength. These hermetic bags, available in either 50 or 100 kg capacity, are called Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) bags. Adoption of PICS technology in West and Central Africa has been driven by its effectiveness, simplicity, low cost, durability, and manufacture within the region. From surveys on adoption we discovered that farmers have begun to re-use bags they had used the previous year or even the previous two years. In the present study, we compared the performance of three different types of PICS bags: (1) new 50 kg (2) new 100 kg bags and (3) once-used 50 kg bags, all filled with naturally infested untreated cowpeas. In these PICS bags the O 2 levels within the bags initially fell to about 3 percent (v/v) while the CO 2 rose to nearly 5 percent (v/v). After five months of storage, new and used 50 kg bags and new 100 kg bags preserved the grain equally well. There were greatly reduced numbers of adults and larvae in the PICS bags versus the controls, which consisted of grain stored in single layer woven bags. The proportion of grain having C. maculatus emergence holes after five months of storage in PICS bags was little changed from that found when the grain was first put into the bags. The PICS technology is practical and useful in Sahelian conditions and can contribute to improved farmers\\' incomes as well as increase availability of high quality, insecticide-free cowpea grain as food. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Toxicological and histopathological effects of cheese wood, Alstonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicological and histopathological effects of cheese wood, Alstonia boonei de wild stem bark powder used as cowpea protectant against cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatu (Fab.) [coleoptera: chrysomelidae] on albino rats.

  8. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Cowpea Landraces (Vigna unguiculata from Western Cameroon Using Qualitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toscani NGOMPE-DEFFO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the genetic diversity and analysis of the genetic relationship between accessions of a crop species is a key step in breeding superior cultivars. The main objective of the hereby study was to determine the genetic variation between 30 cowpea accessions collected throughout the eight divisions of the Western Region of Cameroon using qualitative traits. Phenotypic variation of these accessions was evaluated using diversity indices and cluster analyses. A total of twenty qualitative traits were used for the study. Fifteen of them (75% were polymorphic, displaying each at least two phenotypic classes. The monomorphic characters were growth pattern, leaf color, leaf hairiness, plant hairiness and pod hairiness, each with only one phenotypic class. Results showed a relatively significant level of genetic diversity among the studied cowpea accessions. Overall, the average of the observed and effective number of phenotypic classes per qualitative trait were Na = 2.350 and Ne = 1.828 respectively. The Nei’s genetic diversity and the Shannon weaver diversity index were He = 0.369, ranging from zero (monomorphic trait to 0.655 (growth habit and H’ = 0.609, ranging from zero (monomorphic trait to 0.996 (seed crowding, respectively. The dendrogram constructed from the twenty qualitative traits revealed 05 accessions clusters with the number of accessions in each cluster varying from one to eleven. Information obtained from this study is likely be useful for future cowpea breeding program.

  9. The Use of Moringa Leaves Extract as a Plant Growth Hormone on Cowpea (Vigna Anguiculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Maishanu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Moringa oleifera leaves extract as plant growth hormone on cowpea plant (Vigna unguiculata has been studied at the biological garden of Usmanu Danfodiyo university, Sokoto. An extract was made by grinding young moringa leaves and diluted with water at the ratio of 1:30 25 mls, three blocks were made labelled M, F and D, with three replications each, the extract prepared was applied on block ‘M’ only, while a small pinch of synthetic fertilizer (Urea was applied in block ‘F’ and a control treatment was set up using distilled water, which applied to each plant in hill D. results indicates that in the 3rd week of observation the cowpea plants treated with moringa extract have the highest mean of stems, number of leaves and branches, length of leaves and branches, and thickness of stem. Then followed by those treated fertilizer mean and finally those treated with distilled water this result shows that moringa leaves extract has an improving effects on the growth of cowpea. Moringa leaf extract (MLE is rich with numerous growth hormones, particularly zeatin that has been reported to increase the crops yield in the range of 10-45 %. Moringa leaf juice also contains micronutrients in sufficient quantities and suitable proportions that increase the growth, yield components and yield of a variety of crops.

  10. Induced mutations in cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (Leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G.C. Odeigah

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp varieties, IT84E-124 and Vita 7 of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, were exposed to varying doses of chemical and physical mutagens. Optimum doses of 10mM EMS for 6hr and 0.1mM and 1.0mM NaN3 for 2hr, determined from seeding growth tests and 100R and 200R gamma radiations were applied to 2000 seed samples of each genotype. Screening of the M2 generation revealed that the mutagenic treatments induced morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in the genotypes. A spectrum of mutations which included variants with respect to anthocyanin pigmentation, leaf morphology, maturity date, male sterility and insect pest resistance qualities were observed. Lines with significant increases in yield parameters such as number of seeds per pod, peduncles per plant, 100 seed weight and seed storage proteins were selected.

  11. Enhancing the digestibility of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) by traditional processing and fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madode, Y.E.; Nout, M.J.R.; Bakker, E.J.; Linnemann, A.R.; Hounhouigan, D.J.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Flatulence is an important drawback for the consumption of legumes. Therefore, the ability of traditional processing (dehulling, boiling, soaking) and fermentation (bacterial, fungal or yeast) of cowpeas to reduce flatulence was investigated. Raw and processed cowpeas were assessed for their

  12. CONSUMER PREFERENCES FOR QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS ALONG THE COWPEA VALUE CHAIN IN NIGERIA, GHANA AND MALI

    OpenAIRE

    Fulgence Joseph Mishili; Joan Fulton; Mustafa Jamal; J Lowenberg-DeBoer; Musa Shehu; Saket Kushwaha; Kofi Marfo; Alpha Chergna

    2007-01-01

    The production and trade of cowpea (Vigna Uniculata), called “blackeyed peas” in the US, are a growing business for farmers and merchants serving the rapidly expanding urban areas of West and Central Africa. Cowpea fits the needs of the urban poor. It is an inexpensive source of protein that does not require refrigeration. A better understanding of consumer preferences for cowpea is essential to market development. The main objective of the study was to determine the cowpea grain quality char...

  13. Stability, biophysical properties and effect of ultracentrifugation and diafiltration on measles virus and mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviben, Dora; Forčić, Dubravko; Kurtović, Tihana; Halassy, Beata; Brgles, Marija

    2016-06-01

    Measles virus and mumps virus (MeV and MuV) are enveloped RNA viruses used for production of live attenuated vaccines for prophylaxis of measles and mumps disease, respectively. For biotechnological production of and basic research on these viruses, the preparation of highly purified and infectious viruses is a prerequisite, and to meet that aim, knowledge of their stability and biophysical properties is crucial. Our goal was to carry out a detailed investigation of the stability of MeV and MuV under various pH, temperature, shear stress, filtration and storage conditions, as well as to evaluate two commonly used purification techniques, ultracentrifugation and diafiltration, with regard to their efficiency and effect on virus properties. Virus titers were estimated by CCID50 assay, particle size and concentration were measured by Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) measurements, and the host cell protein content was determined by ELISA. The results demonstrated the stability of MuV and MeV at pH 9. Storage without stabilizer did not result in structural changes, but the reduction in infectivity after 24 hours was significant at +37 °C. Vortexing of the viruses resulted in significant particle degradation, leading to lower virus titers, whereas pipetting had much less impact on virus viability. Diafiltration resulted in higher recovery of both total and infectious virus particles than ultracentrifugation. These results provide important data for research on all upstream and downstream processes on these two viruses regarding biotechnological production and basic research.

  14. A socio-economic assessment of cowpea diversity on the Ghanaian market: implications for breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaye, W.; Adofo, K.; Buckman, E.S.; Frempong, G.; Jongerden, J.P.; Ruivenkamp, G.T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of cowpea [Vignaunguiculata(L)Walp] in fighting malnutrition and poverty, a socio-economic assessment of cowpea diversity found on the Ghanaian market was conducted. The objective was to investigate emerging consumer preference for cowpea and make recommendations for the

  15. Association mapping of aphid resistance in USDA cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) core collection using SNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea aphid (CPA; Aphis craccivora) is a destructive insect pest of cowpea, as well as other legume crops including alfalfa, beans, chickpea, lentils, lupins and peanuts. The utilization of aphid resistance in cowpea breeding is one of the most efficient and environmental friendly methods to contro...

  16. Wild tomato leaf extracts for spider mite and cowpea aphid control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F; Kamminga, Katherine; Snyder, John C

    2014-01-01

    Glandular trichomes on the leaves of wild tomato, L. hirsutum f. hirsutum Mull, also known as Solanum habrochaites (Solanaceae), synthesize and accumulate high levels of methyl ketones (MKs). L. hirsutum accession LA 407, having high concentration of MKs, was grown from seeds under greenhouse conditions. Four MKs (2-undecanone, 2-dodecanone, 2-tridecanone, and 2-pentadecanone) were screened for their toxicity to spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch and cowpea aphids, Aphis craccivora Koch. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) develop a bioassay for testing MKs on spider mite and cowpea aphid mortality and (2) compare the efficacies of wild tomato leaf crude extracts and pure standard materials of MKs against spider mite and cowpea aphid mortality. Our results revealed that spider mites are most sensitive to 2-tridecanone (LC50 = 0.08 μmole cm(-2) of treated leaf surface) and least sensitive to 2-undecanone (LC50 = 1.5 μmole cm(-2) of treated leaf surface) 4 h after treatment. Similarly, 2-tridecanone caused greatest mortality (LC50 = 0.2 μmole cm(-2) of treated leaf surface), whereas 2-undecanone caused the lowest morality (LC50 = 0.48 μmole cm(-2) of treated surface) of cowpea aphid. We concluded that all MKs tested in this investigation are toxic to spider mites and aphids. 2-Tridecanone is more effective in killing mites and aphids compared to other MKs. Toxicity of crude extracts, prepared from the leaves of L. hirsutum accession LA 407, to spider mites and cowpea aphids revealed greater mortality compared to a combined mixture of MKs standard material (used at the same concentration as found on LA 407 leaves). This indicates that in addition to MKs, other unidentified compounds in LA 407 leaf extract also have pesticidal properties. Accordingly, leaf extracts of LA 407 could be explored in crop protection, and they might open a new area of MK formulations and discovery of biorational alternatives for pest control in agricultural fields.

  17. Effect of soy supplementation on the physicochemical and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of supplementation on the physiochemical properties of cowpea flour and the sensory qualities of its akara balls were investigated. Akara is a deep-fat-fried product prepared from cowpea (Vignia unguinculata) flour or paste consumed in some parts of West and East Africa. Cowpea flour was supplemented with Soy ...

  18. Effects of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae) seed coat on the embryonic and larval development of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Leonardo Figueira Reis; Wermelinger, Tierry Torres; Ribeiro, Elane da Silva; Gravina, Geraldo de Amaral; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Xavier-Filho, José; Venancio, Thiago Motta; Rezende, Gustavo Lazzaro; Oliveira, Antonia Elenir Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Bruchid beetles infest various seeds. The seed coat is the first protective barrier against bruchid infestation. Although non-host seed coats often impair the oviposition, eclosion and survival of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus larvae, morphological and biochemical aspects of this phenomenon remain unclear. Here we show that Phaseolus vulgaris (non-host) seed coat reduced C. maculatus female oviposition about 48%, increased 83% the seed penetration time, reduced larval mass and survival about 62 % and 40 % respectively. Interestingly, we found no visible effect on the major events of insect embryogenesis, namely the formation of the cellular blastoderm, germ band extension/retraction, embryo segmentation, appendage formation and dorsal closure. Larvae fed on P. vulgaris seed coat have greater FITC fluorescence signal in the midgut than in the feces, as opposed to what is observed in control larvae fed on Vigna unguiculata. Cysteine protease, α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities were reduced in larvae fed on P. vulgaris natural seed coat. Taken together, our results suggest that although P. vulgaris seed coat does not interfere with C. maculatus embryonic development, food digestion was clearly compromised, impacting larval fitness (e.g. body mass and survivability). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Dry Heat Pre-Treatment (Toasting) on the Cooking Time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four cowpea varieties (Brown beans, Oloka beans, IAR48 and IT89KD-288) were toasted at 105oC, and used to study the effect of dry heat treatment on the cooking time and nutrient composition of cowpea seeds and also its effect on the functional properties of resultant flour of the cowpea seed varieties. Toasting reduced ...

  20. Effect of repeated Ribavirin treatment on grapevine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komínek, P; Komínková, M; Jandová, B

    The effect of Ribavirin treatment for the chemotherapy of several grapevine viruses was evaluated. Four grapevine cultivars were repeatedly treated with Ribavirin in two different concentrations and with three different lengths of treatment. Repeating the Ribavirin treatment always had a significant effect on the number of healthy grapevine plants obtained. Ribavirin concentration and length of exposure showed a significant difference in sanitation of the Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus. During sanitation of the Grapevine Pinot gris virus and Grapevine fleck virus, those two factors did not show significant differences in the elimination of grapevine viruses.

  1. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Virus hybrids as nanomaterials for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Carissa M; Ratna, Banahalli R

    2010-08-01

    The current review describes advances in the field of bionanotechnology in which viruses are used to fabricate nanomaterials. Viruses are introduced as protein cages, scaffolds, and templates for the production of biohybrid nanostructured materials where organic and inorganic molecules are incorporated in a precise and a controlled fashion. Genetic engineering enables the insertion or replacement of selected amino acids on virus capsids for uses from bioconjugation to crystal growth. The variety of nanomaterials generated in rod-like and spherical viruses is highlighted for tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), M13 bacteriophage, cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). Functional biohybrid nanomaterials find applications in biosensing, memory devices, nanocircuits, light-harvesting systems, and nanobatteries. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Characterization of cowpea genotype resistance to Callosobruchus maculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Jesus Passos de Castro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the resistance of 50 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata genotypes to Callosobruchus maculatus. A completely randomized design with five replicates per treatment (genotype was used. No-choice tests were performed using the 50 cowpea genotypes to evaluate the preference for oviposition and the development of the weevil. The genotypes IT85 F-2687, MN05-841 B-49, MNC99-508-1, MNC99-510-8, TVu 1593, Canapuzinho-1-2, and Sanzi Sambili show non-preference-type resistance (oviposition and feeding. IT81 D-1045 Ereto and IT81 D-1045 Enramador exhibit antibiosis against C. maculatus and descend from resistant genitors, which grants them potential to be used in future crossings to obtain cowpea varieties with higher levels of resistance.

  4. Effects of electrolytes on virus inactivation by acidic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishide, Mitsunori; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Ikeda, Keiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Acidic pH is frequently used to inactivate viruses. We have previously shown that arginine synergizes with low pH in enhancing virus inactivation. Considering a potential application of the acid inactivation of viruses for the prevention and treatment of superficial virus infection at body surfaces and fixtures, herein we have examined the effects of various electrolytes on the acid-induced inactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), the influenza A virus (IAV) and the poliovirus upon their incubation at 30˚C for 5 min. Eight electrolytes, i.e., phosphate, NaCl, glutamate, aspartate, pyrrolidone carboxylate, citrate, malate and acetate were tested. No detectable inactivation of the poliovirus was observed under the conditions examined, reflecting its acid-resistance. HSV-1 and HSV-2 responded similarly to the acid-treatment and electrolytes. Some electrolytes showed a stronger virus inactivation than others at a given pH and concentration. The effects of the electrolytes were virus-dependent, as IAV responded differently from HSV-1 and HSV-2 to these electrolytes, indicating that certain combinations of the electrolytes and a low pH can exert a more effective virus inactivation than other combinations and that their effects are virus-specific. These results should be useful in designing acidic solvents for the inactivation of viruses at various surfaces.

  5. BIOCONTROL POTENTIAL OF Rhizoctonia solani OF COWPEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iêda Alana Leite de Sousa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential of nine isolates of Trichoderma spp. was evaluated for the in vitro biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani, the etiological agent of the thread blight in cowpea. The pathogen and the antagonists were challenged in Petri dishes (Ø = 90 mm containing the PDA culture medium. The mycelial growth of both antagonist and pathogen was measured daily and the Mycelial Growth Rate Index (MGRI and the Mean Radial Growth Inhibition Percentage (MRGI of R. solani colony was determined in comparison to the control treatment. The experimental design was completely randomized, with ten treatments, including the control, in five replicates. Data were submitted to analysis of variance using the F-test (p-value≤0.05 and the Scott-Knott test (p-value≤0.05, using the SISVAR program, version 5.6. The results showed that 33% of the isolates of Trichoderma spp. (T41, T51 and T63 showed greater potential for in vitro control of R. solani, reducing the MGRI of the pathogen colony by 40%. The isolate T41 obtained a higher average of PICR and T41, T51 and T63 caused the highest MRGI on the first day of evaluation. The isolate T41 caused the lowest MGRI and the highest mean of daily MGRI, thus considered as a potential biocontrol agent of R. solani. Keywords: Web blight; Antagonism; Trichoderma spp.; Vigna unguiculate.

  6. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira......A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity...... (top component) of cowpea mosaic virus from those of the intact middle and bottom-upper components separated by means of a caesium chloride density gradient, the ROA spectrum of the viral RNA was obtained, which revealed that the RNA takes up an A-type single-stranded helical conformation...... and that the RNA conformations in the middle and bottom-upper components are very similar. This information is not available from the X-ray crystal structure of cowpea mosaic virus since no nucleic acid is visible....

  7. effect of pre-sowing hardening treatments using various plant growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    of cowpea seeds in IAA and GA3 could significantly enhance their germination and seedling growth. This suggested that hormone treated cowpea seed have the potential of overcoming adverse effect of water stress in tropical Savannah. Keywords: Plant growth substances, Cowpea, Germination, Seedling Establishment.

  8. Physiological and biochemical responses of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp to ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warin Pimpa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate physiological and biochemical responses of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp to ozone. There were two main factors of the experiment; level of ozone concentration at 40 and 70 ppb and plant ages at 7 and 21 days. Plants were grown in fumigation chambers in which inlet air was filtered by a charcoal filter. Additional ozone was given 8 hours/day for 7 days in ozone fumigating chambers. The ozone concentration in the control chambers was less than 10 ppb. The results showed the biomass of ozone-fumigated plants was significantly lower and leaf injury of ozone fumigated plants was significantly greater compared to the control group. The major visible-injury symptom appeared as chlorosis on the upper surface of the leaves. Antioxidant levels in the charcoal filtered (CF plants and ozoned plants had significant differences because of their detoxification role in removing ozone and its derivatives. The ozone treatment of 7-day-old plants showed superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and ascorbate peroxidase (APX levels significantly higher than in 21-day-old plants and total ascorbate concentrations significantly lower than 21-day-old plants. These results showed that different ozone concentrations exhibit different effects on antioxidant production. Analysis of antioxidants daily for 7 days found that antioxidant levels rapidly changed. Notably, SOD and total ascorbate could be selected as indicators for ozone-effect monitoring in plants. This indicates that cowpea is sensitive to ozone and may be usable as an ozone bioindicator. In conclusion, plant age, ozone concentration and the duration to exposure to ozone were the main physiological or biochemical responses of cowpea. An efficient defense system was generated from a combination of antioxidants.

  9. An Automatic Unpacking Method for Computer Virus Effective in the Virus Filter Based on Paul Graham's Bayesian Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengfeng; Nakaya, Naoshi; Koui, Yuuji; Yoshida, Hitoaki

    Recently, the appearance frequency of computer virus variants has increased. Updates to virus information using the normal pattern matching method are increasingly unable to keep up with the speed at which viruses occur, since it takes time to extract the characteristic patterns for each virus. Therefore, a rapid, automatic virus detection algorithm using static code analysis is necessary. However, recent computer viruses are almost always compressed and obfuscated. It is difficult to determine the characteristics of the binary code from the obfuscated computer viruses. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that unpacks compressed computer viruses automatically independent of the compression format. The proposed method unpacks the common compression formats accurately 80% of the time, while unknown compression formats can also be unpacked. The proposed method is effective against unknown viruses by combining it with the existing known virus detection system like Paul Graham's Bayesian Virus Filter etc.

  10. CULTIVARS INFECTED WITH BLACKEYE COWPEA MOSAIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IBUKUN

    The virus is transmitted, mostly by aphids in a non-persistent manner. ... Seed borne infection of the virus has been detected with incidences as high as 50 % in .... nonabsorbent cotton. The infected leaves were used for subsequent inoculation of the evaluated cultivars. Field Establishment, Management and Inoculations.

  11. Molecular detection, distribution and Pathogenesis of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... School of Agricultural Sciences, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda. Accepted 7 ... CABMV were later confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of the viruses ... Key words: Vigna unguiculata, disease incidence, seed-borne viruses, ELISA, (RT-PCR).

  12. Genetic linkage map of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have a great influence on mapping research studies: for faster development of new varieties of crops due to its abundance and high number of polymorphism. Thus, this research work aimed at constructing genetic linkage map of cowpea using SNP markers. This will facilitate ...

  13. Genetic linkage map of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR.ADETUNMBI

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have a great influence on mapping research studies: for faster development of new varieties of crops due to its abundance and high number of polymorphism. Thus, this research work aimed at constructing genetic linkage map of cowpea using SNP markers.

  14. Climate change impacts on cowpea productivity in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If a climate signal could be detected at state or regional level, it would be useful to policy planners, agricultural authority and farmers to prepare for climate change. This study, therefore, employed a statistical model to investigate the relationship between the yield of cowpea and temperature (in centigrade) and precipitation ...

  15. Decomposition of Cassava and Vegetable Cowpea leaf litters under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two related studies using three leaf residue types' cassava and vegetable cowpea leaves were carried out in the field and under controlled laboratory conditions to determine the rate of their decomposition using litter bag technique. The carbon dioxide evolution by the three leaf residues namely, Oven dry leaf litter, fresh ...

  16. CRY 1AB trangenic cowpea obtained by nodal electroporation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electroporation-mediated genetic transformation was used to introduce Cry 1 Ab insecticidal gene into cowpea. Nodal buds were electroporated in planta with a plasmid carrying the Cry 1Ab and antibiotic resistance npt II genes driven by a 35S CaMV promoter. T1 seeds derived from electroporated branches were selected ...

  17. Sensory Properties of 'Akara' and 'Moimoi' Prepared from Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3/2.5μl/g neem-moringa oils was significantly (p<0.05) higher in the panelists' acceptance of aroma, sponginess, sogginess, taste and overall acceptability than 'akara' prepared from other treated cowpea samples and control. 'Akara' prepared ...

  18. Susceptibility Of Five Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata ) Varieties To ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each variety was placed in a plastic bag and kept in a freezer at -5oC for 24 hours to eliminate C. maculatus infestations coming from the field. Two hundred grammes of each cowpea variety was placed in a glass container and each infested with a male and female C. maculatus that were reared in the laboratory. The set up ...

  19. Improving growth and yield of cowpea by foliar application of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water stress impaired cowpea plant growth and decreased ion percentage and chlorophyll and carbohydrate concentration in the shoot as well as yield and its quality. Foliar-applied chitosan, in particular 250 mg/l, increased plant growth, yield and its quality as well as physiological constituents in plant shoot under stressed ...

  20. Evaluation of susceptibility of some elite cowpea cultivars to attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen elite cowpea cultivars were evaluated for their susceptibility to attack and damage by the most destructive storage pest, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), based on the number of eggs laid, total developmental time, percentage adult emergence, seed weight loss, and growth index. Significantly, more eggs were laid on ...

  1. Response of Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) to Nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds and leaves are an important item in the diet of most farmers in the tropics. The tender and succulent leaves are generally plucked and used as green vegetables until about flowering, when leaf plucking stops. Defoliation may adversely affect seed yield due to reduction in photosynthetic ...

  2. Growth and yield responses of cowpea genotypes to soluble and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield responses of cowpea genotypes to soluble and rock P fertilizers on acid, highly weathered soil from humid tropical West Africa. Grace ADUSEI 1*, Thomas GAISER 1, Ousmane BOUKAR 2 and Christian FATOKUN 3. 1University of Bonn, Inst. Crop Sci. and Res. Conserv. (INRES), Katzenburgweg 5.

  3. Management of foliar and soilborne pathogens of cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... Key words: Pink and white garlic, fungal pathogens, conventional fungicide, cowpea varieties, germination, phytotoxicity, control. INTRODUCTION. The use of synthetic agro-chemicals in developing coun- tries to reduce pests and diseases present serious envi- ronmental problems to growers especially ...

  4. Microbiology of natural fermentation of cowpea and groundnut for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactobacillus casei and L. fermentum were responsible for the fermentation of cowpea. Corynebacteria equi, C. xerosis and Mycobacteria segmeatis were identified as the most predominant microorganisms during groundnut fermentation. A significant increase (P<0.05) in titratable acidity from 1.05 mg/g to 6.80mg/g and ...

  5. Growth and Yield Responses of Vegetable Cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted in the teaching and research farm of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike during 2006 and 2007 cropping seasons to determine the growth and yield responses of three vegetable cowpea varieties, IT93K-915 (white seeded and climbing vines), IT86D-880 (brown seeded ...

  6. Controlling bruchid pests of stored cowpea seeds with dried leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insecticidal activities of dried Artemisia annua L. leaves were evaluated against bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus F.) pests in comparison with those of Azadirachta indica, Ocimum gratissimum and a conventional grain storage insecticide, Actellic® 2% dust. Each treatment was added to a mixture of 250 g cowpea seeds ...

  7. Assessment of Genetic diversity in mutant cowpea lines using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FKOLADE

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... for crop improvement, hence the need to broaden the genetic base of any crop. This study was done in order to further enhance this in cowpea. While assessing diversity and phylogenetic relationship with other mutants and their parents, each unique mutant was also characterized. Randomly amplified ...

  8. Quality Evaluation of Maize Chips ( Kokoro ) Fortified with Cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality evaluation of “kokoro” fortified with cowpea flour (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 %) was studied. The blends were reconstituted into a thick paste, manually moulded into kokoro stick and deep fried in hot vegetable oil at about 1700C for 5 minutes. These flour blends were analyzed for pasting, proximate and functional ...

  9. Characterization of mutant cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogenetic relationship and polymorphism was detected in 10 cowpea lines comprising of leaf, flower and stem mutants, their putative parents and an exotic accession using 10 random ... Genetic distance ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 based on AFLP markers, while it ranged between 0.13 and 0.44 for RAPD markers. Cluster ...

  10. Cowpea growth and yield performance as influenced by phosphorus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the optimum level of phosphorus for better growth and yield of cowpea. The experiment was conducted at the Teaching and Research farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin. Five levels of phosphorus fertilizers (0kgP/ha, 30kgP/ha, 60kgP/ha, 90kgP/ha, ...

  11. response of cowpea lines to inoculation with four seed transmitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Tarawali, S. A., B. B. Singh, S. C. Gupta, R. Tabo, F. Harris, S. Nokoe, S. Fernandez – Rivero, A. Bationa, V. M. Manyong, K. Makinde and E. C. Odion., 2002. Cowpea as a key factor for a new approach to integrated crop – livestock systems research in the dry savannas of West Africa. In: Challenges and Opportunities for ...

  12. Response of cowpea genotypes to Alectra vogelii parasitism in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jakakah

    2013-11-20

    Nov 20, 2013 ... Tarawali SA, Singh BB, Gupta SC, Tabo R, Harris F, Nokoe S,. Fernández-Rivera S, Bationo A, Manyong VM, Makinde K, Odion EC. (2002). Cowpea as a key factor for a new approach to integrated crop–livestock systems research in the dry savannas of West Africa. In: Fatokun CA, Tarawali SA, Singh BB, ...

  13. CRY 1AB trangenic cowpea obtained by nodal electroporation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... sulfate (sigma) according to Zapata et al. (1999). This was ... Four hundred and sixty six T1 seeds were produced and screened for nptII gene ...... opportunities for enhancing sustainable cowpea production. Proceedings of the ...

  14. Breeding drought tolerant cowpea: constraints, accomplishments, and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbicodo, A.C.M.E.; Fatokun, C.A.; Muranaka, S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Linden, van der C.G.

    2009-01-01

    This review presents an overview of accomplishments on different aspects of cowpea breeding for drought tolerance. Furthermore it provides options to enhance the genetic potential of the crop by minimizing yield loss due to drought stress. Recent efforts have focused on the genetic dissection of

  15. Genetic variability in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    early flowering might be attributed to inherent genetic variation as well as prevailing environmental factors, such as altitude, temperature and soil conditions. Time to flowering varies significantly among cowpea cultivars and is influenced by environmental factors prevailing during the growth and development period, particu-.

  16. Compensatory and susceptive responses of cowpea genotypes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cowpea seedlings of the second trial were infested with five four-day-old aphids per seedling two weeks after planting. The aphids were allowed to form colonies and fed on the seedlings until symptoms of damage were observed. When the susceptible seedlings became stunted with distorted leaves and yellowing of ...

  17. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study evaluated the resistance of 7 varieties of the broad bean Vicia faba L. to cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, 1854. These landraces from the region of Biskra (in the south of Algeria) were selected in an initial field trial and subjected to further testing in the greenhouse. Landrace V51 proved to be the ...

  18. Comparative study of steam and solar heat treated cowpea seeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allotey

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... have reduced weight, poor germinating ability and are unfit for human consumption, due to loss of vital ... cowpea seeds is a useful pest management strategy that can be used to prevent C. maculatus infestation of ..... Rice Research Institute, Cuttack – 753006, India, 2003; 281pp. 14. Allotey J and JA ...

  19. Water Balance and Proximate Composition in Cowpea ( vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studying the water balance and proximate composition in plants subjected to these stresses compared the influence of drought and flooding on cowpea seedlings. In drought plants the leaf water potential, its components and the proximate composition were markedly reduced by the end of the experimental period.

  20. Yields and protein content of two cowpea varieties grown under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... global warming, drought, rising agricultural input costs and the apparent global decline in food production. An access to such vital information will constitute an essen- tial impetus towards .... The same is also true of un-pruned cowpea plants relative to pruned plants. In 2006/07, cropping system however ...

  1. Evaluation of four Mozambican cowpea landraces for drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The southern part of Mozambique is vulnerable to drought, affecting the country's food production, and thus requires more drought-tolerant crops. Four local cowpea landraces, Massava nhassenje, Timbawene moteado, Namarua and Tete-2, which are currently widely used by local Mozambican farmers, were evaluated for ...

  2. Adaptations of cowpea varieties ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was realized in the context of farmer management of genotype by environment interaction. The objective was to determine the agronomic and morphological characteristics commonly used by farmers to assess farmer named cowpea varieties through a joint farmer researcher characterization. The trial design was ...

  3. Generation mean analysis of dual purpose traits in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fadiji

    2012-06-07

    Jun 7, 2012 ... suggesting that the fodder yielding genes were dispersed among the parents. ... urban consumers. Cowpea grain contains about 25% protein and 64% carbohydrate (Bressani 1985) and therefore has a tremendous potential to contribute .... fodder yielding parents in the various populations as class range.

  4. Studies on the nutritive value of cowpeas ( Vigna unguiculata ) | Nell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stoombehandeling het 'n betekenisvolle (P < 0.05) verbetering in verteerbare energie by varke en ware metaboliseerbare energie by pluimvee tot gevolg gehad. Keywords: Amino acid availability, cowpea meal, digestible energy, pigs, poultry, rats, relative nutritive value, true metabolizable energy, true protein digestibility.

  5. Ethics and quality assessment of cowpea grains sold in southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Tropical Agriculture and Food Systems ... Good grains in each bag had the financial value of seven thousand, four hundred and twenty Naira, while the bad grains had the financial estimate of three thousand and seventy ... price of ten thousand five hundred Naira per bag of Iron white cowpea grain.

  6. Response of cowpea genotypes to Alectra vogelii parasitism in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jakakah

    2013-11-20

    Nov 20, 2013 ... Cowpea is popular in Eastern Kenya where it is attractive to farmers because of its high economic value and the belief that it does not require many external inputs. Farmers are however discouraged to grow the crop in this region due to massive attack by a parasitic weed Alectra vogelii (Benth).

  7. Numerical and RAPD Analysis of Eight Cowpea Genotypes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp is one of the world's main legumes and is an important source of plant protein in human diet as well as a good cover crop. ... Hence, numerical tools such as single linkage cluster analysis (SLCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) have been used to determine the extent of ...

  8. inheritance of seed coat colour pattern in cowpea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    (1985) showed that anthocyanin and a melanin-like substance are responsible for colour in cowpea and the expression of any pigment on the plant is the result of the interaction between several pigment genes and a general colour factor. The melanin-like pigment is found only in the seed coat and is responsible for a pale ...

  9. Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.) Performance and yield as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatments consisted of 0, 20, 40 and 60 kgP ha-1 arranged in randomized complete block design with three replicates. The results indicated that P application significantly influenced growth of cowpea with maximum vine length, number of branches, number of leaves, number of nodules and dry matter yield of 97.4cm, ...

  10. Response of vegetable cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (l.) Walp. Sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two factorial experiments were conducted in a randomized block design (RCBD) with three replications to study the responses of vegetable cowpea (Vigna unguiculata subspecies unguiculata) to different plant dates (May, June and July in 1998 and April, May, June and July in 1999) and various nitrogen fertilizer levels (0, ...

  11. genetic diversity within ghanaian cowpea germplasm based on sds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    60 Ghanaian cowpea germplasm on the basis of stored seed protein banding patterns by the sodium dodecyl sulphate—polyacrylamide gel ..... Bean arcelin 2. Genetic variation, inheritance and linkage relationships of a novel seed protein of Phaseolus vulgaris L. Theor. Appl. Genet. 71:847—855. Pusztai, A., Grant, G., ...

  12. Levels of organochlorine insecticide residues in cowpea grains and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the insecticides after clean-up on silica gel adsorbent were carried out using Gas Chromatography equipped with Electron Capture Detector (GC-ECD). Organochlorine insecticide residues were detected in all the samples of cowpea and dried yam chips analysed with highest mean ...

  13. influence of cowpea genotype and sorghum-cropping system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    using seed dressing and varietal resistance. Samaru Journal of Agricultural Research. 17: 13-. 23. Karungi, J., Nampala, M. P., Adipala, E., Kyamanywa, S. and. Ogenga-Latigo, M. W. (1999). Population dynamics of selected cowpea insect pests as influenced by different management practices in eastern Uganda.

  14. Variability of host damage and response of some cowpea breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field and screen house studies were conducted at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) Research Farms, Minjibir, Kano State and farmer's plot, Ringim, Jigawa State in Sudan Savannah Agro-ecological Zone, North-Western, Nigeria to investigate the reaction of ten cowpea breeding lines to infestation of ...

  15. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... ²INRA Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations (CBGP), Campus International de Baillarguet, 34988,. Montferrier / Lez cedex, France. Accepted 3 June, 2008. The present study evaluated the resistance of 7 varieties of the broad bean Vicia faba L. to cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, 1854.

  16. Response of cowpea genotypes to Alectra vogelii parasitism in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers are however discouraged to grow the crop in this region due to massive attack by a parasitic weed Alectra vogelii (Benth). ... Significant differences were observed amongst cowpea genotypes in days to first Alectra emergence, number of Alectra shoots emerged at 6, 8, 10 and 12 week after planting and grain yield.

  17. Potential impact of intercropping on major cowpea field pests in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insect pests are perhaps the most important constraint to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) production. In Uganda, aphids, thrips, pod sucking bugs and pod borers are ubiquitous and very devastating, sometimes leading to total crop failure. On-farm studies were conducted at 3 sites in eastern Uganda for three ...

  18. Seed yield and agronomic parameters of cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) genotypes (two released cultivars and seven lines) were evaluated for grain yield and agronomic parameters at two locations within the Middle Black Sea region of Turkey for two years (2005 to 2006). Genotypes were evaluated for plant height, first pod height from ground, branches ...

  19. reaction of intercropping cowpea with pearl millet infected with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    observation) which were later threshed (with mortar and pestle) and weighed using an electric weighing balance from each plot. Data collected were subjected to paired T- test to separate the means of sole and intercropping to bring out the differences between them. RESULTS. Reaction of intercropping cowpea with pearl.

  20. quixotic coupling between irrigation system and maize-cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    QUIXOTIC COUPLING BETWEEN IRRIGATION SYSTEM AND MAIZE-COWPEA. INTERCROPPING FOR WEED SUPPRESSION AND WATER PRESERVATION. H.S. SAUDY and K.F. EL-BAGOURY1. Agronomy Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, P. O. Box 68-Hadayek Shoubra. 11241, Cairo, Egypt.

  1. Weed control in cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted between 1994 and 1997 at the University of Ilorin Teaching and Research Farm, Ilorin (8o29`N; 4o35`E), in the southern Guinea savanna agro-ecological zone, to evaluate the efficacy of pre-emergence applications of two imidazolinone-based herbicide mixtures in cowpea (Vigna ...

  2. Proteins synthesized in tobacco mosaic virus infected protoplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, R.

    1979-01-01

    The study described here concerns the proteins, synthesized as a result of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) multiplication in tobacco protoplasts and in cowpea protoplasts. The identification of proteins involved in the TMV infection, for instance in the virus RNA replication, helps to elucidate

  3. Genetic variability and resistance of cultivars of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] to cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Nova, M X; Leite, N G A; Houllou, L M; Medeiros, L V; Lira Neto, A C; Hsie, B S; Borges-Paluch, L R; Santos, B S; Araujo, C S F; Rocha, A A; Costa, A F

    2014-03-31

    The cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr.) is the most destructive pest of the cowpea bean; it reduces seed quality. To control this pest, resistance testing combined with genetic analysis using molecular markers has been widely applied in research. Among the markers that show reliable results, the inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) (microsatellites) are noteworthy. This study was performed to evaluate the resistance of 27 cultivars of cowpea bean to cowpea weevil. We tested the resistance related to the genetic variability of these cultivars using ISSR markers. To analyze the resistance of cultivars to weevil, a completely randomized test design with 4 replicates and 27 treatments was adopted. Five pairs of the insect were placed in 30 grains per replicate. Analysis of variance showed that the number of eggs and emerged insects were significantly different in the treatments, and the means were compared by statistical tests. The analysis of the large genetic variability in all cultivars resulted in the formation of different groups. The test of resistance showed that the cultivar Inhuma was the most sensitive to both number of eggs and number of emerged adults, while the TE96-290-12-G and MNC99-537-F4 (BRS Tumucumaque) cultivars were the least sensitive to the number of eggs and the number of emerged insects, respectively.

  4. Heavy metals and yield of cowpea cultivated under composted tannery sludge amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuna Carmo Ribeiro Gonçalves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the phytoavailability of heavy metals (Cr, Cd, Ni and Pb concentrations in leaves and grains, and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L grown in soil amended with composted tannery sludge (CTS for two consecutive years. The experiments were carried out in 2009 and 2010 in soil amended with CTS at 0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 Mg ha-1. The CTS amendment rates applied were above 10 Mg ha-1, increased Cr concentrations in cowpea leaves. There were not increases in the heavy metals concentrations in cowpea grains after two years. In 2009, the application of CTS amendment did not promote increase in plant yield. However, in 2010, CTS amendment at 10 and 20 Mg ha-1 increased cowpea yield. The amendment of composted tannery sludge linearly increased linearly the concentration of Cr in the leaves of cowpea after two years. Composted tannery sludge promoted increases in cowpea yield.

  5. STRAIN DIFFERENCES IN TWO SPECIES OF CALLOSOBRUCHUS (COLEOPTERA: BRUCHIDAE DEVELOPING ON SEEDS OF COWPEA {VIGNA UNGUICULATA (L.} AND GREEN GRAM {V. RADIATA (L.}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHIL DOBIE

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovipositional behaviour, development period, and density effect on adult survival of C. maculatus strains from Indonesia, Nigeria, and Yemen, and C. chinensis strains from Indonesia and Kenya on cowpea and green gram were studied at 20°C and 70% relative humidity. Variations on ovipositional behaviour were found among C. maculatus as well as among C. chinensis strains. Variations on developmental period were found only among C. maculatus strains. The developmental period of Callosobruchus spp. was shorter on green gram than that on cowpea. Density effect was remarkably found only on adult survival of C. maculatus Yemen strain. These results make useful contribution to the species biology, and have important implication if strains of these species are accidentally imported to countries, or when new legume crops are introduced. INTRODUCTION Beetles belonging to the family Bruchidae are the most important insect pests of stored legumes. Infestation by bruchids causes losses of weight, nutritional value and germination potential, and therefore the commercial value of the commodity may be reduced (Southgate 1978; Dick and Credland 1986. The most economically important and widespread bruchids species are the cowpea seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius, and the Adzuki bean beetle, C. chinensis (Linnaeus (Southgate 1978; TDRI 1984. The use of resistant varieties of cultivated legumes is one of the recommended control methods of bruchid infestations. Varietal resistance against Callosobruchus has been reported in cowpeas and chickpea (Dobie 1981; Raina 1971; Singh 1978.

  6. Alternation of cowpea genotypes affects the biology of Callosobruchus maculatus (fabr. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Marcileyne Pessôa Leite de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabr. is an important pest in stored cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., with ample distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. The effect of alternation of cowpea genotypes, susceptible (S and resistant (R, on the biology of (C. maculatus was studied after four generations. A no-choice test was carried out in a completely randomized design, factorial scheme, with five treatments, four host combinations (RR, RS, SR and SS and five replications. Each replication consisted of 30 grains of each genotype infested by two insect couples. The number of eggs per female was not different within or between combinations, evidencing that the genotypes and their alternation did not affect C. maculatus fecundity. Egg viability, however, varied between genotypes and between combinations. In combination RR, the longest duration of the immature stage was verified for genotype IT89KD-245; in addition, all genotypes presented the smallest survival for the same stage, resulting in a higher mortality of the pest. The resistance index categorized combination RR as moderately resistant for genotypes IT89KD-245, BR14-Mulato and BR17-Gurguéia, and as susceptible (S only for IT89KD-260, demonstrating that these combinations were not very adequate for the development of C. maculatus, a fact that was confirmed by the better performance of the pest on the genotype from combination SS, and because of a reduction in its performance when it returned to resistant genotypes.

  7. Response of cowpea genotypes to water stress in temperate climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Borivoj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitigation of global climate change impact on the agricultural production is the major priorities in future research. Cowpea as a drought tolerant plant is interesting for growing in semi-arid climate of the Vojvodina region. The effect of water stress on yield of cultivated plants can be obtained by calculating the yield response factor (Ky which represents the ratio between the relative evapotranspiration deficit (1-ETa/ETm and the relative decline in yield (1-Ya/Ym. The values of Ky ranged from 0.91 to 1.17 for genotype G1 and G2 respectively. Genotype G1, with a value lower than 1 of Ky, shows a good tolerance to water deficit, on the contrary, genotype G2, with a greater Ky than 1, expresses some sensitivity to water stress. Obtained results will be used in breeding programs to develop cowpea cultivars tolerant to stressful conditions, primarily to water stress, as well as more productive in water use. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 031016 i br. 31030

  8. Cowpeas as growth substrate do not support the production of aflatoxinby Aspergillus sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houssou, P.A.; Schnidt-Heydt, M.; Geisen, R.

    2008-01-01

    produced high amounts of aflatoxin after growth on YES medium. However after growth on cowpea based medium aflatoxin biosynthesis was strongly ceased, albeit the growth of the colony was only partly reduced. This was true for media made either with the whole cowpea seed or with cowpea seed without seed...

  9. Virus load in chimpanzees infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: effect of pre-exposure vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haaft, P.; Cornelissen, M.; Goudsmit, J.; Koornstra, W.; Dubbes, R.; Niphuis, H.; Peeters, M.; Thiriart, C.; Bruck, C.; Heeney, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Many reports indicate that a long-term asymptomatic state following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with a low amount of circulating virus. To evaluate the possible effect of stabilizing a low virus load by non-sterilizing pre-exposure vaccination, a quantitative

  10. Efeitos de extratos alcoólicos de plantas sobre o caruncho do feijão vigna (Callosobruchus maculatus Effect of alcoholic extract of plants on weevil of cowpea (Callosobruchus maculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de A. C. Almeida

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Através de três métodos, extratos vegetais foram aplicados, ao Callosobruchus maculatus na fase adulta, inoculados ou não em uma massa de sementes, e na fase imatura (ovo com o objetivo de se controlar esta praga do feijão armazenado. Utilizaram-se flores, folhas, frutos e caule secos de oito espécies vegetais na obtenção dos extratos, em percolador, com solvente álcool etílico (70%. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o inteiramente ao acaso, com os tratamentos distribuídos em esquema fatorial, cujos fatores quantitativos foram revelados pela regressão na análise de variância. Mediante os resultados obtidos, concluiu-se que a mortalidade dos insetos está relacionada com o tipo de extrato, os métodos de aplicação e com a dosagem aplicada, sendo os extratos de Callopogonium caeruleum e Piper nigrum os mais eficientes no controle do caruncho de feijão.Vegetable extracts were applied, through three methods, to the Callosobruchus maculatus in the adult phase, inoculated or not in a mass of seeds, in the immature phase (egg with the objective of controlling this pest of the stored beans. Dry flowers, leaves, fruits and dry stems of eight vegetable species were used to obtain the extracts in an extractor, with ethyl alcohol (70%. A completely randomized statistical design was used with the treatments distributed in a factorial scheme, the quantitative factors were analysed by the regression in the variance analysis. From the results obtained, it was concluded that the mortality of the insects is related to the extract type, the application methods and the applied dose, being the extracts of Callopogonium caeruleum and Piper nigrum the most efficient in the control of the weevil of cowpea.

  11. ARTICLE - Path analysis of iron and zinc contents and others traits in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeane de Oliveira Moura

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the direct and indirect effects of agronomic and culinary traits on iron and zinc contents in 11 cowpea populations. Correlations between traits were estimated and decomposed into direct and indirect effects using path analysis. For the study populations, breeding for larger grain size, higher number of grains per pod, grain yield, reduced cooking time, and number of days to flowering can lead to decreases in the levels of iron and zinc in the grain. Genetic gains for the iron content can be obtained by direct selection for protein content by indirect effects on the number of grains per pod, 100-grain weight and grain yield. The positive direct effect of grain size and protein content on the zinc content indicates the possibility of simultaneous gain by combined selection of these traits.

  12. stability and extent of resistance of cowpea lines to flower bud thrips ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) is a legume attacked by several field insect pests, with flower thrips. (Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom) being the most damaging. It causes 20 to 100% yield losses. Cowpea constitutes an important source of protein for resource poor households in Africa. The objective of this study.

  13. Alleviating acid soil stress in cowpea with a local population of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Huai Teecha village in Northern Thailand, local cowpeas were grown on acidic low phosphorus soil without stress symptoms. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from this system have been found to promote growth of many crops but there is no information about their benefit in cowpea. In a field experiment, three improved ...

  14. Traditional African plant products to protect stored cowpeas against insect damage : the battle against the beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds of the cowpea plant, Vigna unguiculata , a tropical crop, are very susceptible to attack by the cowpea beetle. This specialist beetle needs only the beans to reproduce rapidly.

    Most farmers in West Africa have few

  15. Analysis of pre- and post-harvest practices of cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practices such as farming and storage conditions may influence the production yield and the grain quality. In this study, pre- and post-harvest practices of cowpea were analysed in relation to the quality of the grains. A survey on cowpea farming activities was conducted in the four agro-ecological zones of Benin.

  16. Cowpea for a changing environment in the rainforest of South-South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction and use of appropriate cowpea varieties in south-south Nigeria may contribute to increased food security, especially in the context of the changing climate and desert encroachment in the country. In the context of evaluating diverse cowpea varieties for the changing environment, the present study involved ...

  17. Field trials with plant products to protect stored cowpea against insect damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Kossou, D.K.; Huis, van A.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Dicke, M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant products were evaluated under field conditions for their efficacy as insecticides against the cowpea beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus, on stored cowpea. Seeds, mixed with finely ground clay and three volatile oils were stored in air-tight jerry-cans and canisters. Pods were treated with leaf

  18. Influence of diets containing raw or heat processed cowpea on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the influence of diets containing raw or heat processed cowpeas on the performance and gut .... Heat processed cowpea on the performance and gut health of broiler chickens. Treatments included: T1) Control corn .... Gross energy /kcal/100g. 347.4. 357.7. Crude protein %. 22.75.

  19. Evaluation of Cowpea Germplasm Lines Adapted for Use as a Cover Crop in the Southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) are desirable as a cover crop, because they are tolerant of heat, drought and poor soils, grow vigorously and compete well against weeds, and provide nitrogen for rotational crops. Cowpeas were grown extensively as a forage and green manure crop in the southeastern U.S. ...

  20. Socio-cultural factors influencing and maintaining yam and cowpea diversity in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Tossou, R.C.; Vodouhè, S.; Richards, P.; Struik, P.C.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Ahanchédé, A.; Agbo, V.

    2007-01-01

    Yam and cowpea are important elements in the food culture of local communities in the Transitional Guinea-Sudan Zone of Benin. Yam and cowpea serve to satisfy vital needs in households and in communities, but also play an essential role in the rituals and ceremonies of the agrarian civilizations of

  1. Cowpea as a Potential Green Manure Crop in the Rain Forest Zone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four treatments consisting of control, mineral fertilizer at 51-30-30 kg NPK ha-1, cowpea green manure and cowpea green manure + 25-15-15 kg NPK ha-1 in RCBD of four replications were employed. Pods were harvested at physiological maturity for grain, while the green leaf and stem biomass were cut and incorporated ...

  2. SWJ:39-42 Inheritance of Pod Colour in Cowpea INHERITANCE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Ahmed

    a melanin-like substance are responsible for colour in cowpea and the expression of any pigment on the plant is the result of the interaction between several pigment genes and a general colour factor. (give reference). The pods of many cowpea varieties contain anthocyanin and are either partially or wholly purple. Harland ...

  3. Stability and extent of resistance of cowpea lines to flower bud thrips ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) is a legume attacked by several field insect pests, with flower thrips (Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom) being the most damaging. It causes 20 to 100% yield losses. Cowpea constitutes an important source of protein for resource poor households in Africa. The objective of this study was ...

  4. Restriction of virus infection by plants. Final report, July 1, 1987--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, G.

    1992-12-31

    The basis of genotypic resistance of the Arlington line of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) against cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been attributed, to an inhibitor of the processing of CPMV polyproteins. We sought to purify the protein that is postulated to be the inhibitor of polyprotein processing and to characterize the inhibitor and its gene. Such information can be the basis for engineering resistance to specific viruses in plants. In studies with cherry leafroll virus (CLRV) we sought understanding of the biochemical basis of the resistance.

  5. Nucleotide sequences from the genomes of diverse cowpea accessions for discovery of genetic variation as part of the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Climate Resilient Cowpea

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Nucleotide sequences were generated from 37 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) accessions relevant to Africa, China and the USA to discover at type of genetic...

  6. Cowpeas in Northern Ghana and the factors that predict caregivers' intention to give them to schoolchildren.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Razak Abizari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cowpeas are important staple legumes among the rural poor in northern Ghana. Our objectives were to assess the iron and zinc content of cowpea landraces and identify factors that predict the intention of mothers/caregivers to give cowpeas to their schoolchildren. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed biochemical analysis on 14 landraces of cowpeas and assessed the opinion of 120 caregiver-child pairs on constructs based on the combined model of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Health Belief Model. We used correlations and multiple regressions to measure simple associations between constructs and identify predictive constructs. Cowpea landraces contained iron and zinc in the range of 4.9-8.2 mg/100 g d.w and 2.7-4.1 mg/100 g d.w respectively. The landraces also contained high amounts of phytate (477-1110 mg/100 g d.w and polyphenol (327-1055 mg/100 g d.w. Intention of mothers was strongly associated (rs = 0.72, P<0.001 with and predicted (β = 0.63, P<0.001 behaviour. The constructs, barriers (β = -0.42, P = 0.001 and attitudes towards behaviour (β = 0.25, P<0.028, significantly predicted intention albeit the predictive ability of the model was weak. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some cowpea landraces from northern Ghana have appreciable amounts of iron and zinc but probably with poor bioavailability. Attitudes towards giving cowpeas and perception of barriers are important predictors of caregivers' intention to give cowpeas to their schoolchildren. Finally our results suggest that increasing knowledge on nutritional benefits of cowpeas may increase health values caregivers hold for their children in support of giving cowpeas to schoolchildren.

  7. Cowpeas in Northern Ghana and the Factors that Predict Caregivers’ Intention to Give Them to Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizari, Abdul-Razak; Pilime, Nerisa; Armar-Klemesu, Margaret; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cowpeas are important staple legumes among the rural poor in northern Ghana. Our objectives were to assess the iron and zinc content of cowpea landraces and identify factors that predict the intention of mothers/caregivers to give cowpeas to their schoolchildren. Methods and Findings We performed biochemical analysis on 14 landraces of cowpeas and assessed the opinion of 120 caregiver-child pairs on constructs based on the combined model of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Health Belief Model. We used correlations and multiple regressions to measure simple associations between constructs and identify predictive constructs. Cowpea landraces contained iron and zinc in the range of 4.9–8.2 mg/100 g d.w and 2.7–4.1 mg/100 g d.w respectively. The landraces also contained high amounts of phytate (477–1110 mg/100 g d.w) and polyphenol (327–1055 mg/100 g d.w). Intention of mothers was strongly associated (rs = 0.72, Pintention albeit the predictive ability of the model was weak. Conclusions We conclude that some cowpea landraces from northern Ghana have appreciable amounts of iron and zinc but probably with poor bioavailability. Attitudes towards giving cowpeas and perception of barriers are important predictors of caregivers’ intention to give cowpeas to their schoolchildren. Finally our results suggest that increasing knowledge on nutritional benefits of cowpeas may increase health values caregivers hold for their children in support of giving cowpeas to schoolchildren. PMID:23951289

  8. EXPLORING THE ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF VIRUS IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipongkor; Ahmed, Seemin S; Rabkin, Samuel D

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor with no effective treatments. Current conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation therapy, temozolomide (TMZ), and bevacizumab administration) typically fail to eradicate the tumors resulting in the recurrence of treatment-resistant tumors. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve therapeutic outcomes. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are excellent candidates as a more effective therapeutic strategy for aggressive cancers like malignant gliomas since OVs have a natural preference or have been genetically engineered to selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells. OVs have been used in numerous preclinical studies in malignant glioma, and a large number of clinical trials using OVs have been completed or are underway that have demonstrated safety, as well as provided indications of effective antiglioma activity. In this review, we will focus on those OVs that have been used in clinical trials for the treatment of malignant gliomas (herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, reovirus, poliovirus, Newcastle disease virus, measles virus, and retrovirus) and OVs examined preclinically (vesicular stomatitis virus and myxoma virus), and describe how these agents are being used.

  9. Quantum dot encapsulation in virus-like particles with tuneable structural properties and low toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tagit, O.; De Ruiter, M. V.; Brasch, M.; Ma, Y.; Cornelissen, J. J.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    A simple method for the encapsulation of quantum dots (QDs) in virus-like particle (VLP) nanoassemblies with tuneable structural properties and enhanced biocompatibility is presented. Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus-based capsid proteins assemble around the carboxylated QDs to form QD/VLP

  10. Insecticidal activity of 2-tridecanone against the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yussef F.B. Braga

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-tridecanone vapor on the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus development was determined. Seeds of cowpea were infested with adults and exposed to different doses of 2-tridecanone isolated from Pilocarpus microphyllus Stapf ex Holm, a plant species native from northeastern Brazil. The pure monoterpene was evaluated both undiluted as well as in the dilutions 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1,000 (v/v. The following parameters of the cowpea weevil life cycle were analyzed in response to decreasing doses of 2-tridecanone: number of eggs laid, percentage of egg hatching on seeds, percentage of adult emergence, adult weight at emergence, mean developmental time and number of adults emerged. Vapor of 2-tridecanone caused a significant (P O efeito dos vapores da 2-tridecanona sobre o caruncho do feijão-de-corda (Callosobruchus maculatus foi avaliado. Sementes de feijão-de-corda infestados com insetos adultos foram expostas a diferentes doses de 2-tridecanona isolada de Pilocarpus microphyllus, uma espécie nativa do Nordeste do Brasil. O monoterpeno puro foi utilizado nas diluições 1:10, 1:100 e 1:1000 (v/v. Os parâmetros da biologia do inseto foram analisados em função da resposta a doses decrescentes de 2-tridecanona: número de ovos postos por fêmea, percentagem de eclosão de ovos, percentagem de emergência de adultos, peso dos adultos recém-emergidos, tempo médio de desenvolvimento e número total de ovos emergidos. Diferenças significativas (P < 0.05 entre as doses de 2-tridecanona testadas foram observadas, para quatro dos seis parâmetros biológicos analisados. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que a 2-tridecanona é tóxica para C. maculatus, reduzindo significativamente (P < 0.05 o número de insetos emergidos após a infestação. Esse efeito foi causado principalmente pela significativa redução observada na eclosão dos ovos expostos ao vapor da substância.

  11. Vírus do mosaico severo do caupi-CPSMV como molécula carreadora para a p28 do vírus da artrite-encefalite caprina-CAEV Cowpea severe mosaic virus CPSMV as a carrier molecule to p28 from caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus-CAEV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jarbas Santos de Sousa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O vírus da Artrite-encefalite caprina (CAEV pertence à família Retroviridae, gênero Lentivirus. O CAEV infecta caprinos do mundo inteiro causando artrite, encefalite, mamite, pneumonia e emagrecimento progressivo. Este trabalho mostra a formação de uma quimera construída através da mistura da p28 do CAEV com glutaraldeído e CPSMV, purificada por meio de cromatografia em biogel e sephadex G-150. As cromatografias foram monitoradas através de leituras em espectrofotômetro no comprimento de onda de 280nm, dos líquidos coletados nos tubos. Os picos contendo a quimera foram coletados e submetidos à eletroforese (SDS-PAGE, sendo assim evidenciada a banda correspondente à mesma. Grupos de camundongos swiss foram imunizados com o vírus quimérico (CPSMV + p28, com o vírus CPSMV purificado e com a proteína p28 do CAEV, utilizando o adjuvante de Freund incompleto. Os anticorpos específicos produzidos contra o CPSMV e p28 reconheceram a proteína quimérica em Western Blotting e em teste de ELISA. Os anticorpos contra o vírus quimérico apresentaram títulos mais elevados do que os anticorpos produzidos contra a p28, demonstrando que o vírus quimérico apresenta maior imunogenicidade do que a proteína p28 sozinha. Os resultados mostraram que o acoplamento covalente entre o CPSMV e a p28 do CAEV foi obtido com sucesso, originando uma molécula estável não comprometendo a estrutura do capsídeo do CPSMV. Desta forma, sugere-se que o CPSMV possa ser utilizado como molécula carreadora na produção de vacinas para vírus que infectam animais.Caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV belongs to Retroviridae family, Lentivirus genus. This virus infects caprine all over the world causing arthritis, encephalitis, mammitis and progressive emaciating. This research showed chimera's building made by mixing up CAEV p28, with glutaraldehyde, and CPSMV, purified through the chromotography in biogel and sephadex (G-150. After that, some measures

  12. Changes in some antinutrients of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) processed with 'kanwa' alkaline salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzogara, S G; Morton, I D; Daniel, J W

    1990-10-01

    The effect on several anti-nutritional factors in cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) was investigated following treatment at 100 degrees C or 121 degrees C with solutions (0.1% w/v) of kanwa rock salt or NaHCO3 in distilled water. The concentration of polyphenols, calculated as tannic acid, was reduced substantially up to 67% under the alkaline conditions employed, but the reduction appeared to be greater (69-79%) at higher temperature. The loss of phytic acid was greater (27-40%) when beans were cooked in NaHCO3 than in kanwa (11-29%). The concentration of reducing sugars was decreased in all treatment groups especially under alkaline conditions. There was no evidence for the formation of lysinoalanine in any of the samples.

  13. Identification and quantification of antioxidant compounds in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regilda Saraiva dos Reis Moreira-Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dietary antioxidant compounds have been widely studied because of their ability to delay or inhibit oxidative damage, which allows them to play an important role in the prevention of diseases and the promotion of health. The identification and characterization of such compounds are required before their use in humans. This study aimed to identify and quantify antioxidant compounds in the cowpea cultivar, BRS Tumucumaque, and the cowpea strain, Pingo de Ouro 1-2, in view of their potential use in the development of new products with potent antioxidant activity. Here, we report the antioxidant activity and the phenolic compound content of the aforementioned cowpeas. The antioxidant extracts were analyzed by HPLC in a Shimadzu LC-20AT chromatograph model equipped with a manual injector using standard solutions of pure phenolic compounds, including gallic acid, quercetin, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, . -coumaric acid, catechin, and epicatechin. Gallic acid was the phenolic compound with the highest level in both BRS Tumucumaque and Pingo de Ouro 1-2 (45.4 ± 2.66 and 93.4 ± 1.25 mg/100 g, respectively. Moreover, we identified and quantified catechin (5.67 ± 0.34 and 6.48 ± 0.51 mg/100 g, respectively, epicatechin (8.67 ± 0.47 and 2.95 ± 0.17 mg/100 g, respectively, ferulic acid (11.1 ± 1.42 and 13.8 ± 0.55 mg/100 g, respectively, and chlorogenic acid (2.39 ± 0.24 and 0.59 ± 0.28 mg/100 g, respectively. In contrast, caffeic acid was only identified in BRS Tumucumaque and quantified at 27.8 ± 2.99 mg/100 g. We conclude that Vigna unguiculata demonstrates functional potential, as both the strain and the cultivar contain antioxidant compounds that help in disease prevention and health maintenance.

  14. Identification and comparative analysis of drought-associated microRNAs in two cowpea genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Philip A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata is an important crop in arid and semi-arid regions and is a good model for studying drought tolerance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are known to play critical roles in plant stress responses, but drought-associated miRNAs have not been identified in cowpea. In addition, it is not understood how miRNAs might contribute to different capacities of drought tolerance in different cowpea genotypes. Results We generated deep sequencing small RNA reads from two cowpea genotypes (CB46, drought-sensitive, and IT93K503-1, drought-tolerant that grew under well-watered and drought stress conditions. We mapped small RNA reads to cowpea genomic sequences and identified 157 miRNA genes that belong to 89 families. Among 44 drought-associated miRNAs, 30 were upregulated in drought condition and 14 were downregulated. Although miRNA expression was in general consistent in two genotypes, we found that nine miRNAs were predominantly or exclusively expressed in one of the two genotypes and that 11 miRNAs were drought-regulated in only one genotype, but not the other. Conclusions These results suggest that miRNAs may play important roles in drought tolerance in cowpea and may be a key factor in determining the level of drought tolerance in different cowpea genotypes.

  15. Relative planting times on the production components in sesame/cowpea bean intercropping in organic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrânio César de Araújo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at better land use, small farmers usually plant sesame and cowpea bean intercropped with other crops. The aim of this work was to analyze and quantify the influence of four relative planting times of the cowpea bean in intercropping with sesame from the standpoint of their production components, plant productivity and the index of land equivalent ratio (LER. The field experiment was conducted in a randomized blocks with four treatments and four replicates. The treatments were the sesame and the cowpea bean in intercropping with the cowpea bean planted at the same time, 7, 14 and 21days after than the sesame. A greater part of the production components of both the sesame as well the cowpea bean was affected by the intercropping and significant differences were noted among the treatments in a larger part of the parameters. As the planting of the cowpea bean became more distant from that of the sesame, the yield of the Pedaliaceae increased and the yield of the Fabaceae decreased. The results for LER findings on the other hand suggest that in the sesame/cowpea bean intercropping, when the Fabaceae is planted seven days after the sesame, there is better use of the land and a largest possibility to the producer earning a profit.

  16. [Use of cowpea (Vigna sinensis) as a chicken complement in an infant formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modernell, Marisa Guerra; Granito, Marisela; Paolini, Mariangel; Olaizola, Cristina

    2008-09-01

    Legumes represent an important protein source worldwide. In Venezuela, they are generally prepared at home and are consumed by adults, as soup or stew, while children eat them in very small quantities. In order to include legumes in the children's diet, the following work was done using cowpea (Vigna sinensis) as an complement of chicken in the preparation of a nutritionally balanced formula, adapted to the requirements of children. Several formulas were developed and three of them were selected based on their acceptability. In the first formula, the protein source was only of chicken. In the second formula, the chicken was partially substituted by cowpea, and in the third formula, the protein source was only made of cowpea. Other formula ingredients included rice, pumpkin (Curcubita maxima), carrot and some seasonings. Proximal analysis, protein quality (as protein efficiency ratio and protein digestibility) and sensory evaluation (7-point hedonic scale) were performed on the formulas. The proximal composition was similar in the three formulas: protein (3.5%), fat (1.3%) and carbohydrates (19.7%), with a good distribution of the energy contribution (98.9 kcal/100 g or 413.8 kJ/100 g). The protein quality and protein digestibility were higher for the chicken-cowpea formula than for the cowpea one. The acceptability with the mothers was higher for the chicken-cowpea formula than for the cowpea one. The acceptability of the chicken-cowpea formula with children was 77% (7-point hedonic facial scale) and 92% (measuring consumption). Due to the high acceptability and good protein quality, the chicken-cowpea formula could be included in the lunch meal of the children in daycare homes.

  17. Soil respiration, labile carbon pools, and enzyme activities as affected by tillage practices in a tropical rice-maize-cowpea cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, S; Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Panda, B B; Nayak, A K; Rao, K S; Manna, M C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify the viable option of tillage practices in rice-maize-cowpea cropping system that could cut down soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, sustain grain yield, and maintain better soil quality in tropical low land rice ecology soil respiration in terms of CO2 emission, labile carbon (C) pools, water-stable aggregate C fractions, and enzymatic activities were investigated in a sandy clay loam soil. Soil respiration is the major pathway of gaseous C efflux from terrestrial systems and acts as an important index of ecosystem functioning. The CO2-C emissions were quantified in between plants and rows throughout the year in rice-maize-cowpea cropping sequence both under conventional tillage (CT) and minimum tillage (MT) practices along with soil moisture and temperature. The CO2-C emissions, as a whole, were 24 % higher in between plants than in rows, and were in the range of 23.4-78.1, 37.1-128.1, and 28.6-101.2 mg m(-2) h(-1) under CT and 10.7-60.3, 17.3-99.1, and 17.2-79.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) under MT in rice, maize, and cowpea, respectively. The CO2-C emission was found highest under maize (44 %) followed by rice (33 %) and cowpea (23 %) irrespective of CT and MT practices. In CT system, the CO2-C emission increased significantly by 37.1 % with respect to MT on cumulative annual basis including fallow. The CO2-C emission per unit yield was at par in rice and cowpea signifying the beneficial effect of MT in maintaining soil quality and reduction of CO2 emission. The microbial biomass C (MBC), readily mineralizable C (RMC), water-soluble C (WSC), and permanganate-oxidizable C (PMOC) were 19.4, 20.4, 39.5, and 15.1 % higher under MT than CT. The C contents in soil aggregate fraction were significantly higher in MT than CT. Soil enzymatic activities like, dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and β-glucosidase were significantly higher by 13.8, 15.4, and 27.4 % under MT compared to CT. The soil labile C pools, enzymatic activities, and

  18. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on resistance to flower bud thrips ( Megalurothrips sjostedti ) identified in recombinant inbred lines of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp)

  19. Anti-influenza virus effect of aqueous extracts from dandelion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human influenza is a seasonal disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Anti-flu Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM has played a significant role in fighting the virus pandemic. In TCM, dandelion is a commonly used ingredient in many therapeutic remedies, either alone or in conjunction with other natural substances. Evidence suggests that dandelion is associated with a variety of pharmacological activities. In this study, we evaluated anti-influenza virus activity of an aqueous extract from dandelion, which was tested for in vitro antiviral activity against influenza virus type A, human A/PR/8/34 and WSN (H1N1. Results Results obstained using antiviral assays, minigenome assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that 0.625-5 mg/ml of dandelion extracts inhibited infections in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells or Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549 of PR8 or WSN viruses, as well as inhibited polymerase activity and reduced virus nucleoprotein (NP RNA level. The plant extract did not exhibit any apparent negative effects on cell viability, metabolism or proliferation at the effective dose. This result is consistent with the added advantage of lacking any reported complications of the plant's utility in traditional medicine over several centuries. Conclusion The antiviral activity of dandelion extracts indicates that a component or components of these extracts possess anti-influenza virus properties. Mechanisms of reduction of viral growth in MDCK or A549 cells by dandelion involve inhibition on virus replication.

  20. Identifying lines of the black-eyed cowpea having high productivity and quality commercial grain

    OpenAIRE

    Delmondes, Bruna de Lima; Menezes Júnior, José Ângelo Nogueira de; Silva, Kaesel Jackson Damasceno; Rocha,Maurisrael Moura; Neves,Adão Cabral das; Pereira, Cassiano Spaziani

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The black-eyed cowpea, is consumed in Brazil and valued in various other countries, and for this reason, can be found on the domestic market, showing the potential for export. The aim of this study was to identify lines of the black-eyed cowpea having high productivity and quality commercial grain. Twenty-four lines of black-eyed commercial subclass of cowpea, taken from the breeding program of Embrapa Meio-Norte, and two controls (BRS Itaim and CB-27) were evaluated. The experiments...

  1. Identification and characterization of resistance to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamphuis Lars G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea aphid (CPA; Aphis craccivora is the most important insect pest of cowpea and also causes significant yield losses in other legume crops including alfalfa, beans, chickpea, lentils, lupins and peanuts. In many of these crops there is no natural genetic resistance to this sap-sucking insect or resistance genes have been overcome by newly emerged CPA biotypes. Results In this study, we screened a subset of the Medicago truncatula core collection of the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI and identified strong resistance to CPA in a M. truncatula accession SA30199, compared to all other M. truncatula accessions tested. The biology of resistance to CPA in SA30199 plants was characterised compared to the highly susceptible accession Borung and showed that resistance occurred at the level of the phloem, required an intact plant and involved a combination of antixenosis and antibiosis. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis using a F2 population (n = 150 from a cross between SA30199 and Borung revealed that resistance to CPA is controlled in part by a major quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome 2, explaining 39% of the antibiosis resistance. Conclusions The identification of strong CPA resistance in M. truncatula allows for the identification of key regulators and genes important in this model legume to give effective CPA resistance that may have relevance for other legume crops. The identified locus will also facilitate marker assisted breeding of M. truncatula for increased resistance to CPA and potentially other closely related Medicago species such as alfalfa.

  2. Threshold virus dynamics with impulsive antiretroviral drug effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Lou, Yijun; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are twofold: to develop a rigorous approach to analyze the threshold behaviors of nonlinear virus dynamics models with impulsive drug effects and to examine the feasibility of virus clearance following the Manuals of National AIDS Free Antiviral Treatment in China. An impulsive system of differential equations is developed to describe the within-host virus dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant strains when a combination of antiretroviral drugs is used to induce instantaneous drug effects at a sequence of dosing times equally spaced while drug concentrations decay exponentially after the dosing time. Threshold parameters are derived using the basic reproduction number of periodic epidemic models, and are used to depict virus clearance/persistence scenarios using the theory of asymptotic periodic systems and the persistence theory of discrete dynamical systems. Numerical simulations using model systems parametrized in terms of the antiretroviral therapy recommended in the aforementioned Manuals illustrate the theoretical threshold virus dynamics, and examine conditions under which the impulsive antiretroviral therapy leads to treatment success. In particular, our results show that only the drug-resistant strain can dominate (the first-line treatment program guided by the Manuals) or both strains may be rapidly eliminated (the second-line treatment program), thus the work indicates the importance of implementing the second-line treatment program as soon as possible. PMID:21987085

  3. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped redundant clones together and

  4. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oelofse Dean

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped

  5. Colored Sticky Traps to Selectively Survey Thrips in Cowpea Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L D; Zhao, H Y; Fu, B L; Han, Y; Liu, K; Wu, J H

    2016-02-01

    The bean flower thrips, Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagrall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important pest of legume crops in South China. Yellow, blue, or white sticky traps are currently recommended for monitoring and controlling thrips, but it is not known whether one is more efficient than the other or if selectivity could be optimized by trap color. We investigated the response of thrips and beneficial insects to different-colored sticky traps on cowpea, Vigna unguiculata. More thrips were caught on blue, light blue, white, and purple traps than on yellow, green, pink, gray, red, or black traps. There was a weak correlation on the number of thrips caught on yellow traps and survey from flowers (r = 0.139), whereas a strong correlation was found for blue traps and thrips' survey on flowers (r = 0.929). On commercially available sticky traps (Jiaduo®), two and five times more thrips were caught on blue traps than on white and yellow traps, respectively. Otherwise, capture of beneficial insects was 1.7 times higher on yellow than on blue traps. The major natural enemies were the predatory ladybird beetles (63%) and pirate bugs Orius spp. (29%), followed by a number of less representative predators and parasitoids (8%). We conclude the blue sticky trap was the best to monitor thrips on cowpea in South China.

  6. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  7. Influence of Rhizobacterium Inoculation on NaCl Salinity Tolerance in Pusa Sukomal and RC101 Varieties of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhna Chaturvedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the most severe factors limiting growth and physiological response in cowpea plants. In the present study, the effect of rhizobacterium strains BR2 and BR3 on the growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. varieties—Pusa Sukomal and RC101—tolerance to 0, 25, 50, and 75 mM concentrations of NaCl salinity was evaluated. The rate of growth, in general, was high in plants irrigated with 25 mM NaCl saline water as compared to control, and thereafter, the growth reduced with increase in salinity concentrations. The results revealed that treating the seeds with rhizobacteria accompanied by NaCl salinity increased growth parameters of the cowpea plant as compared to the seeds irrigated with sodium chloride alone. Treatment with rhizobacteria mitigated the harmful effect of NaCl, and the growth was significantly better than the plants growing in saline water without rhizobacterium inoculation. The overall performance of Pusa Sukomal with BR3 strain was found to be better than the other combinations tested. Flowering in field plants started within 45 days of sowing, and the seeds in plants irrigated with saline water, in the presence of rhizobacterium, were found to be healthy as compared to control seeds. Seed protein profile was analyzed by SDS PAGE gel studies.

  8. Genetic variability of cultivated cowpea in Benin assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Kossou, D.K.; Ahanchédé, A.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Agbicodo, E.; Struik, P.C.; Sanni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of genetic diversity among cultivated cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] varieties is important to optimize the use of available genetic resources by farmers, local communities, researchers and breeders. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to evaluate the

  9. Sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich space of cowpea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Timko, Michael P; Rushton, Paul J; Laudeman, Thomas W; Bokowiec, Marta T; Chipumuro, Edmond; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Chen, Xianfeng

    2008-01-01

    Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its drought tolerance and ability to grow on poor quality soils. Approximately 80...

  10. Are investments in an informal seed system for cowpea a worthwhile endeavour?

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, P.C.; Stomph, T.J.; Kamara, A; Abdoulaye, T.; Hearne, S.; Struik, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    High seed quality is a critical component for realising yield potential. For smallholder cowpea farmers in northern Nigeria the informal seed system is a major supplier of genetically high-quality seed, but the physiological quality of farmers’ produced seed remains unknown. The project “Promoting Sustainable Agriculture in Borno State” (PROSAB) trained and supported farmers in seed production in Borno State, Nigeria. We analysed the quality of farmers’ produced cowpea seed based on standard ...

  11. Overcoming barriers to trust in agricultural biotechnology projects: a case study of Bt cowpea in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country, has been the world’s largest cowpea importer since 2004. The country is currently in the early phases of confined field trials for two genetically modified crops: Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt cowpea and nutritionally enhanced cassava (“BioCassava Plus”. Using the bio-safety guidelines process as a backdrop, we evaluate the role of trust in the operation of the Cowpea Productivity Improvement Project, which is an international agricultural biotechnology public-private partnership (PPP aimed at providing pest-resistant cowpea varieties to Nigerian farmers. Methods We reviewed the published literature and collected data through direct observations and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed based on emergent themes to create a comprehensive narrative on how trust is understood and built among the partners and with the community. Results Our findings highlight the importance of respecting mandates and eliminating conflicts of interest; holding community engagement initiatives early on; having on-going internal discussion and planning; and serving a locally-defined need. These four lessons could prove helpful to other agricultural biotechnology initiatives in which partners may face similar trust-related challenges. Conclusions Overcoming challenges to building trust requires concerted effort throughout all stages of project implementation. Currently, plans are being made to backcross the cowpea strain into a local variety in Nigeria. The development and adoption of the Bt cowpea seed hinges on the adoption of a National Biosafety Law in Nigeria. For countries that have decided to adopt biotech crops, the Nigerian cowpea experiment can be used as a model for other West African nations, and is actually applied as such in Ghana and Burkina Faso, interested in developing a Bt cowpea.

  12. Cowpea-Meloidogyne incognita interaction: Root proteomic analysis during early stages of nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeth, Gabriela R C; Carmo, Lilian S T; Silva, Luciano P; Fontes, Wagner; Grynberg, Priscila; Saraiva, Mario; Brasileiro, Ana C M; Carneiro, Regina M D; Oliveira, José T A; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Mehta, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is an important legume species well adapted to low fertility soils and prolonged drought periods. One of the main problems that cause severe yield losses in cowpea is the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The aim of this work was to analyze the differential expression of proteins in the contrasting cultivars of cowpea CE 31 (highly resistant) and CE 109 (slightly resistant) during early stages of M. incognita infection. Cowpea roots were collected at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation and used for protein extraction and 2-DE analysis. From a total of 59 differential spots, 37 proteins were identified, mostly involved in plant defense, such as spermidine synthase, patatin, proteasome component, and nitrile-specifier protein. A follow-up study was performed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of nine selected proteins and the results revealed a very similar upregulation trend between the protein expression profiles and the corresponding transcripts. This study also identified ACT and GAPDH as a good combination of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the pathosystem cowpea/nematode. Additionally, an interactome analysis showed three major pathways affected by nematode infection: proteasome endopeptidase complex, oxidative phosphorylation, and flavonoid biosynthesis. Taken together, the results obtained by proteome, transcriptome, and interactome approaches suggest that oxidative stress, ubiquitination, and glucosinolate degradation may be part of cowpea CE 31 resistance mechanisms in response to nematode infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Seed coat color, weight and eye pattern inheritance in gamma-rays induced cowpea M2-mutant line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda M. Gaafar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma radiation is a very effective tool for inducing genetic variation in characters of many plants. Black seeds of M2 mutant were obtained after exposure of an Egyptian cowpea cultivar (Kaha 1 to a low dose of gamma rays. Segregation of seed coat color, weight of 100 seeds and seed eye pattern of the black seeds of this mutant line were further examined in this study. Four colors were observed for seed coat in the M3 plants ranging from cream to reddish brown and three eye patterns were distinguished from each other. SDS–PAGE of the seed storage proteins showed 18 protein bands; five of these bands disappeared in the seeds of M3 plants compared to M2 and M0 controls while other 5 protein bands were specifically observed in seeds of M3 plants. PCR analysis using twelve ISSR primers showed 47 polymorphic and 8 unique amplicons. The eight unique amplicons were characteristic of the cream coat color and brown wide eye pattern (M03-G10 while the polymorphic bands were shared by 6 coat-color groups. A PCR fragment of 850 bp was amplified, using primer HB-12, in M3-G04 which showed high-100 seed weight. These results demonstrated the mutagenic effects of gamma rays on seed coat color, weight of 100 seeds and eye pattern of cowpea M3 mutant plants.

  14. Virus inactivation under the photodynamic effect of phthalocyanine zinc(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remichkova, Mimi; Mukova, Luchia; Nikolaeva-Glomb, Lubomira; Nikolova, Nadya; Doumanova, Lubka; Mantareva, Vanya; Angelov, Ivan; Kussovski, Veselin; Galabov, Angel S

    2017-03-01

    Various metal phthalocyanines have been studied for their capacity for photodynamic effects on viruses. Two newly synthesized water-soluble phthalocyanine Zn(II) complexes with different charges, cationic methylpyridyloxy-substituted Zn(II)- phthalocyanine (ZnPcMe) and anionic sulfophenoxy-substituted Zn(II)-phthalocyanine (ZnPcS), were used for photoinactivation of two DNA-containing enveloped viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1 and vaccinia virus), two RNA-containing enveloped viruses (bovine viral diarrhea virus and Newcastle disease virus) and two nude viruses (the enterovirus Coxsackie B1, a RNA-containing virus, and human adenovirus 5, a DNA virus). These two differently charged phthalocyanine complexes showed an identical marked virucidal effect against herpes simplex virus type 1, which was one and the same at an irradiation lasting 5 or 20 min (Δlog=3.0 and 4.0, respectively). Towards vaccinia virus this effect was lower, Δlog=1.8 under the effect of ZnPcMe and 2.0 for ZnPcS. Bovine viral diarrhea virus manifested a moderate sensitivity to ZnPcMe (Δlog=1.8) and a pronounced one to ZnPcS at 5- and 20-min irradiation (Δlog=5.8 and 5.3, respectively). The complexes were unable to inactivate Newcastle disease virus, Coxsackievirus B1 and human adenovirus type 5.

  15. [Study in the killing effect of Myxoma virus to C6 glioma cell in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Meng; Zhang, Qiu-Sheng; Liang, Shi-Jie; Ji, Tao; Lin, Heng-Zhou; Li, Wei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility of C6 glioma cells to Myxoma virus and the killing effect of Myxoma virus to the C6 glioma cells in vitro. C6 glioma cells were infected with myxoma virus, used death virus as the negative control, 5-FU as the positive control, DEMD as blank control. The number of living cells were counted every 24 h, and Western-Blot method, inverted microscope and MTT assay were applicated to observe the cell morphology and survival rate in each group. The cell number were decreased rapidly in virus effected group and 5-FU group, with significant differences to the negative and blank control groups. And cells in virus effected group appeared cytopathic effect. C6 glioma cells were susceptible to myxoma virus and myxoma virus had killing effect to C6 glioma cells in vitro.

  16. Propagation Effect of a Virus Outbreak on a Network with Limited Anti-Virus Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yonghong; Ren, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new computer virus spreading model which takes into account the possibility of a virus outbreak on a network with limited anti-virus ability. Then, the model is investigated for the existence of equilibria and their stabilities are proved and illustrated. Moreover, it is found that these two factors are not only relative to the threshold value determining whether the virus becomes extinct or not, but that they are also relative to the virus epidemic levels. Theoretical ...

  17. Quality of cowpea seeds treated with chemicals and stored in controlled and uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucicléia Mendes de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cowpea is a Fabaceae originated in Africa cultivated in the northern and northeastern of Brazil, where stands out as the main source of protein for the population. For the establishment of culture, seeds are treated to control and prevent pest attacks and diseases, can also attach nutrients to the seeds which will be available for plant development. The objective of the research was to evaluate the performance of cowpea seeds treated with chemical products and stored in controlled and uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions. The following seeds treatments were applied: control (no treatment; micronutrient Comol 118, insecticide thiamethoxam, fipronil and pyraclostrobin+thiophanate-methyl and imidacloprid+thiodicarb were then stored in a cold environment and natural. The assessment of physiological seed quality was made initially and every 45 days through the germination and vigor. Among all products used, the imidacloprid + thiodicarb and fipronil + pyraclostrobin + thiophanate methyl provides stimulating effect on seed performance; seeds treated with thiamethoxam were less affected by storage than the untreated seeds; seeds treated with micronutrients exhibits similar behavior to untreated seeds and storage in a controlled environment better preserves the seed physiological quality.

  18. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. Metabolomics: Osmoprotection as a Physiological Strategy for Drought Stress Resistance and Improved Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piebiep Goufo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants usually tolerate drought by producing organic solutes, which can either act as compatible osmolytes for maintaining turgor, or radical scavengers for protecting cellular functions. However, these two properties of organic solutes are often indistinguishable during stress progression. This study looked at individualizing properties of osmotic adjustment vs. osmoprotection in plants, using cowpea as the model species. Two cultivars were grown in well-watered soil, drought conditions, or drought followed by rewatering through fruit formation. Osmoadaptation was investigated in leaves and roots using photosynthetic traits, water homoeostasis, inorganic ions, and primary and secondary metabolites. Multifactorial analyses indicated allocation of high quantities of amino acids, sugars, and proanthocyanidins into roots, presumably linked to their role in growth and initial stress perception. Physiological and metabolic changes developed in parallel and drought/recovery responses showed a progressive acclimation of the cowpea plant to stress. Of the 88 metabolites studied, proline, galactinol, and a quercetin derivative responded the most to drought as highlighted by multivariate analyses, and their correlations with yield indicated beneficial effects. These metabolites accumulated differently in roots, but similarly in leaves, suggesting a more conservative strategy to cope with drought in the aerial parts. Changes in these compounds roughly reflected energy investment in protective mechanisms, although the ability of plants to adjust osmotically through inorganic ions uptake could not be discounted.

  19. Effectively Communicating the Uncertainties Surrounding Ebola Virus Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilianski, Andy; Evans, Nicholas G

    2015-10-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the uncertainties surrounding many aspects of Ebola virus virology, including routes of transmission. The scientific community played a leading role during the outbreak-potentially, the largest of its kind-as many of the questions surrounding ebolaviruses have only been interrogated in the laboratory. Scientists provided an invaluable resource for clinicians, public health officials, policy makers, and the lay public in understanding the progress of Ebola virus disease and the continuing outbreak. Not all of the scientific communication, however, was accurate or effective. There were multiple instances of published articles during the height of the outbreak containing potentially misleading scientific language that spurred media overreaction and potentially jeopardized preparedness and policy decisions at critical points. Here, we use articles declaring the potential for airborne transmission of Ebola virus as a case study in the inaccurate reporting of basic science, and we provide recommendations for improving the communication about unknown aspects of disease during public health crises.

  20. Inactivation of pathogenic viruses by plant-derived tannins: strong effects of extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki on a broad range of viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Ueda

    Full Text Available Tannins, plant-derived polyphenols and other related compounds, have been utilized for a long time in many fields such as the food industry and manufacturing. In this study, we investigated the anti-viral effects of tannins on 12 different viruses including both enveloped viruses (influenza virus H3N2, H5N3, herpes simplex virus-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus and non-enveloped viruses (poliovirus, coxsachievirus, adenovirus, rotavirus, feline calicivirus and mouse norovirus. We found that extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki, which contains ca. 22% of persimmon tannin, reduced viral infectivity in more than 4-log scale against all of the viruses tested, showing strong anti-viral effects against a broad range of viruses. Other tannins derived from green tea, acacia and gallnuts were effective for some of the viruses, while the coffee extracts were not effective for any of the virus. We then investigated the mechanism of the anti-viral effects of persimmon extracts by using mainly influenza virus. Persimmon extracts were effective within 30 seconds at a concentration of 0.25% and inhibited attachment of the virus to cells. Pretreatment of cells with the persimmon extracts before virus infection or post-treatment after virus infection did not inhibit virus replication. Protein aggregation seems to be a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-viral effect of persimmon tannin, since viral proteins formed aggregates when purified virions were treated with the persimmon extracts and since the anti-viral effect was competitively inhibited by a non-specific protein, bovine serum albumin. Considering that persimmon tannin is a food supplement, it has a potential to be utilized as a safe and highly effective anti-viral reagent against pathogenic viruses.

  1. Induction of protective immunity in swine by recombinant bamboo mosaic virus expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Na-Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant viruses can be employed as versatile vectors for the production of vaccines by expressing immunogenic epitopes on the surface of chimeric viral particles. Although several viruses, including tobacco mosaic virus, potato virus X and cowpea mosaic virus, have been developed as vectors, we aimed to develop a new viral vaccine delivery system, a bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV, that would carry larger transgene loads, and generate better immunity in the target animals with fewer adverse environmental effects. Methods We engineered the BaMV as a vaccine vector expressing the antigenic epitope(s of the capsid protein VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. The recombinant BaMV plasmid (pBVP1 was constructed by replacing DNA encoding the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues of the BaMV coat protein with that encoding 37 amino acid residues (T128-N164 of FMDV VP1. Results The pBVP1 was able to infect host plants and to generate a chimeric virion BVP1 expressing VP1 epitopes in its coat protein. Inoculation of swine with BVP1 virions resulted in the production of anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies. Real-time PCR analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the BVP1-immunized swine revealed that they produced VP1-specific IFN-γ. Furthermore, all BVP1-immunized swine were protected against FMDV challenge. Conclusion Chimeric BaMV virions that express partial sequence of FMDV VP1 can effectively induce not only humoral and cell-mediated immune responses but also full protection against FMDV in target animals. This BaMV-based vector technology may be applied to other vaccines that require correct expression of antigens on chimeric viral particles.

  2. Fertilizer Use and Management Practices among Maize and Cowpea Smallholder Farmer in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okebalama, CB.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In most parts of West Africa, poverty contributes immensely to poor fertilizer adoption by smallholder farmers. Fertilizer adoption could be improved with micro-dosing technology. A socio-economic survey was conducted in the semi-deciduous forest zone of Ghana to assess the extent of fertilizer use and management among maize and cowpea smallholder farmers. Oral interview with structured questionnaire was used to interview one hundred farmers each at two locations. The results showed that farmers are aware of the use of fertilizer to increase crop yield. About 65% and 80% of maize and cowpea farmers respectively, identified high cost of fertilizer as a major constraint to fertilizer utilization. Consequently, only 32% maize farmers and 19% cowpea farmers were fertilizer users. In addition, the choice of fertilizer type to use was dependent on the type available on the market. As such, NPK 15:15:15 was mostly used for both maize and cowpea crops. Also, fertilizer application rate was mainly determined by the quantity farmer can purchase. On average, fertilizer application rate for maize and cowpea crops were 18.45 kg/ha and 9.05 kg/ha, respectively. The prevalent fertilizer application method on maize was mostly by point/side placement while ring application was largely used for cowpea. Awareness of fertilizer micro-dosing among the farmers was only 10%. Since the quantity of fertilizer used by the farmers as well as the fertilizer application methods were comparable to fertilizer micro-dosing, dissemination of micro-dosing technology to these farmers could promote fertilizer use and management among smallholder farmers, and ultimately sustain maize and cowpea production.

  3. Effect of acute Zika virus infection on sperm and virus clearance in body fluids: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joguet, Guillaume; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Matusali, Giulia; Hamdi, Safouane; Walschaerts, Marie; Pavili, Lynda; Guyomard, Stefanie; Prisant, Nadia; Lamarre, Pierre; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Pasquier, Christophe; Bujan, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Evidence of human sexual transmission during Zika virus emergence is a matter of concern, particularly in procreation, but to date, kinetics of seminal shedding and the effects of infection on human reproductive function have not been described. To investigate the effects of Zika virus infection on semen and clearance of Zika virus from semen and body fluids, we aimed to study a cohort of Zika virus-infected men. This prospective observational study recruited men presenting with acute Zika virus infection at Pointe-à-Pitre University Hospital in Guadeloupe, French Caribbean, where a Zika virus outbreak occurred between April and November, 2016. Blood, urine, and semen were collected at days 7, 11, 20, 30, 60, 90, and 120 after symptom onset, and semen characteristics, such as total sperm count, sperm motility, vitality, and morphology, and reproductive hormone concentrations, such as testosterone, inhibin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinising hormone, were assessed. At days 7, 11, and 20, semen was processed to isolate motile spermatozoa. Zika virus RNA was detected by RT-PCR using whole blood, serum, urine, seminal plasma, semen cells, and motile spermatozoa fractions. Zika virus was isolated from different sperm fractions on Vero E6 cultures. 15 male volunteers (mean age 35 years [SD 5; range 25-44) with acute Zika virus infection and positive Zika virus RNA detection in blood or urine were enrolled. Total sperm count was decreased from median 119 × 10 6 spermatozoa (IQR 22-234) at day 7 to 45·2 × 10 6 (16·5-89·6) at day 30 and 70 × 10 6 (28·5-81·4) at day 60, respectively, after Zika virus infection. Inhibin values increased from 93·5 pg/mL (IQR 55-162) at day 7 to 150 pg/mL (78-209) at day 120 when total sperm count recovered. In motile spermatozoa obtained after density gradient separation, Zika virus RNA was found in three of 14 patients at day 7, four of 15 at day 11, and four of 15 at day 20, and replication-competent virus was

  4. Sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich space of cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Foo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its drought tolerance and ability to grow on poor quality soils. Approximately 80% of cowpea production takes place in the dry savannahs of tropical West and Central Africa, mostly by poor subsistence farmers. Despite its economic and social importance in the developing world, cowpea remains to a large extent an underexploited crop. Among the major goals of cowpea breeding and improvement programs is the stacking of desirable agronomic traits, such as disease and pest resistance and response to abiotic stresses. Implementation of marker-assisted selection and breeding programs is severely limited by a paucity of trait-linked markers and a general lack of information on gene structure and organization. With a nuclear genome size estimated at ~620 Mb, the cowpea genome is an ideal target for reduced representation sequencing. Results We report here the sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich, hypomethylated portion of the cowpea genome selectively cloned by methylation filtration (MF technology. Over 250,000 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs with an average length of 610 bp were generated, yielding ~160 Mb of sequence information. The GSRs were assembled, annotated by BLAST homology searches of four public protein annotation databases and four plant proteomes (A. thaliana, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and P. trichocarpa, and analyzed using various domain and gene modeling tools. A total of 41,260 GSR assemblies and singletons were annotated, of which 19,786 have unique GenBank accession numbers. Within the GSR dataset, 29% of the sequences were annotated using the Arabidopsis Gene Ontology (GO with the largest categories of assigned function being catalytic activity and metabolic processes, groups that include the majority of cellular enzymes and components of amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. A

  5. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata Cells with an Antibiotic Resistance Gene Using a Ti-Plasmid-Derived Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1986-01-01

    A chimaeric antibiotic resistance gene was transferred to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a member of the legume family. This transfer was established by inoculating cowpea leaf discs with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a Ti-plasmid-derived vector that contained two copies of a chimaeric

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis of accessions in the Chinese cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] germplasm collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is an important legume crop with diverse uses. The species is presently a minor crop, and evaluation of its genetic diversity has been very limited. In this study, a total of 200 genic and 100 genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from cowpea unigene ...

  7. Prioritising in situ conservation of crop resources: a case study of African cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, C; Game, E T; Maxted, N

    2014-06-17

    Conserving crop wild relatives (CWR) is critical for maintaining food security. However, CWR-focused conservation plans are lacking, and are often based on the entire genus, even though only a few taxa are useful for crop improvement. We used taxonomic and geographic prioritisation to identify the best locations for in situ conservation of the most important (priority) CWR, using African cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) as a case study. Cowpea is an important crop for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, yet its CWR are under-collected, under-conserved and under-utilised in breeding. We identified the most efficient sites to focus in situ cowpea CWR conservation and assessed whether priority CWR would be adequately represented in a genus-based conservation plan. We also investigated whether priority cowpea CWR are likely to be found in existing conservation areas and in areas important for mammal conservation. The genus-based method captured most priority CWR, and the distributions of many priority CWR overlapped with established conservation reserves and targets. These results suggest that priority cowpea CWR can be conserved by building on conservation initiatives established for other species.

  8. Propagation Effect of a Virus Outbreak on a Network with Limited Anti-Virus Ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Xu

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new computer virus spreading model which takes into account the possibility of a virus outbreak on a network with limited anti-virus ability. Then, the model is investigated for the existence of equilibria and their stabilities are proved and illustrated. Moreover, it is found that these two factors are not only relative to the threshold value determining whether the virus becomes extinct or not, but that they are also relative to the virus epidemic levels. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that, in some ways, it would be practically possible to eradicate the virus or suppress its prevalence below a suitable level. Consequently, some suggestions are proposed that may help eradicate or suppress virus propagation over a real computer network.

  9. Effectiveness of BPMC Application against Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius Population and CMMV Disease Incidence on Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wartono Wartono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Control of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is the starting point in suppressing the CMMV disease (cowpea mild mottle virus. This study aims to determine the influence of applications BPMC (500 g a.i./l against B. tabaci populations and disease incidence of CMMV on soybean plants. Research was conducted in the field with randomized complete block design consisting of 5 treatments i.e. five concentration levels: 0.75, 1.50,2.25, and 3.00 ml/l including control (untreated with 5 replications. The results showed that BPMC is effective in suppressing the adult population of B. tabaci and disease incidence of CMMV.

  10. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... Landrace V51 proved to be the most interesting, in that it resisted aphid attack by mechanisms involving tolerance and antibiosis. ... of two major viruses, FBNYV and BLRV (Oufroukh, 1997) and commercial losses due to ... Abbreviations: FBNYV, Faba bean necrotic yellows virus;. BLRV, Bean leafroll virus.

  11. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  12. Complex assembly behavior during the encapsulation of green fluorescent protein analogs in virus derived protein capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  13. Leaf gas exchange in cowpea and CO2 efflux in soil irrigated with saline water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson J. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leaf gas exchanges in plants and soil respiration are important tools for assessing the effects of salinity on the soil-plant system. An experiment was conducted with cowpea irrigated with saline water (0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 dS m-1 prepared with two sources: NaCl and a mixture of Ca, Mg, Na, K and Cl ions in a randomized block design and a 6 x 2 factorial scheme, with four replicates, totaling 48 experimental plots. At 20 days after planting (DAP, plants were evaluated for net photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (gs and transpiration (E using the Infra-Red Gas Analyzer (Model XT6400- LICOR, and water use efficiency, intrinsic water use efficiency and instantaneous efficiency of carboxylation were calculated. At 60 DAP, the soil CO2 efflux (soil respiration was determined with a camera (Model 6400-09- LICOR. Salinity caused reductions in A, gs and E. However, the salt source did not have significant effect on these variables. Soil CO2 efflux was reduced with the increase in the electrical conductivity, especially in the mixture of ions.

  14. NOTE - Phenotypic correlations between combining abilities of F 2 cowpea populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolline de Jesús Pires

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea is a crop that has become socio-economically relevant, mainly in developing countries. Correlation studies are important to determine the association between quantitative traits and yield to guide the selection, i.e., choose direct or indirect selection. The objective was to estimate the correlations between six agronomic traits in cowpea as well as the correlations between the estimates of combining abilities of parents. Genotypes with high pod weight and pod length, 100-grain weight, and number of beans per pod should be used to improve grain yield in cowpea. The breeder should preferably insert plants into his group of crosses that have a high combining ability for pod length, number of grains per pod and yield per plot.

  15. Evaluation of cookies produced from blends of wheat, cassava and cowpea flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun Adekunle Olapade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp were processed into flours and used to substitute wheat flour for preparation of cookies. The chemical, including proximate composition and anti-nutritional factors, and functional and pasting properties of the blends were determined. Cookies were produced from the blends with 100% wheat flour as a control. The anti-nutritional factors, physical properties and organoleptic attributes of the cookies were evaluated. An increase in the level of cassava flour substitution resulted in a decrease in the protein content of the composite flour. However, addition of cowpea flour resulted in an increase in the protein content. There were significant (p<0.05 reductions in the studied anti-nutritional factors after baking. Cookies from composite flours were not significantly (p>0.05 different from the control in overall acceptability. This indicates the feasibility of producing nutritious cookies with desirable organoleptic qualities from cassava, wheat and cowpea composite flour.

  16. The effect of infected external computers on the spread of viruses: A compartment modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2013-12-01

    Inevitably, there exist infected computers outside of the Internet. This paper aims to understand how infected external computers affect the spread of computer viruses. For that purpose, a new virus-antivirus spreading model, which takes into account the effect of infected/immune external computers, is established. A systematic study shows that, unlike most previous models, the proposed model admits no virus-free equilibrium and admits a globally asymptotically stable viral equilibrium. This result implies that it would be practically impossible to eradicate viruses on the Internet. As a result, inhibiting the virus prevalence to below an acceptable level would be the next best thing. A theoretical study reveals the effect of different parameters on the steady virus prevalence. On this basis, a number of suggestions are made so as to contain virus spreading.

  17. Influence of farmyard manure on some morphological and biochemical parameters of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seedling grown in cadmium-treated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asagba, Samuel Ogheneovo; Ezedom, Theresa; Kadiri, Helen

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to assess the effects of the two kinds of farmyard manure (poultry and pig manures) as amendments for soil on cadmium (Cd) toxicity in plants using cowpea seedlings as plant model. Cd toxicity was evaluated by assessing the effect of the metal on the growth rate and antioxidant status as well as the ability of the plant to metabolise xenobiotic. There was a significantly (p grown in all the treated soils relative to control. Addition of poultry manure to the soil significantly (p factor in a dose-dependent manner as compared with treatments with Cd pollution without manure addition and Cd pollution with pig manure addition. There was restoration of Cd-induced effect on growth rate parameters to levels comparable to controls in cowpea seedlings grown in Cd-treated soil augmented with poultry manure but not in cowpea seedlings in cadmium-treated soil with pig manure amendments. Similarly, augmentation of Cd-treated soil with pig manure did not alter the Cd-induced effect on the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in leaf, stem and roots, as SOD remained significantly (p grown in Cd-treated soils amended with poultry manure were restored to a level not significantly (p > 0.05) different from control. Like in the case of SOD, the Cd-induced inhibition of the activity of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, aldehyde oxidase and sulphite oxidase remained significantly (p grown in Cd-treated soil amended with pig manure. Conversely, the Cd-induced effect on the activities of these enzymes was reversed in the organs of seedlings exposed to Cd and poultry manure as it was not significantly (p > 0.05) different from control. In conclusion, the findings of the study revealed that supplementation of Cd-treated soils with pig and poultry manures reversed effects of Cd on cowpea seedlings. However, poultry manure was more effective than pig manure in ameliorating the effects of Cd.

  18. Cowpea production as affected by dry spells in no-tillage and conventional crop systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Magno Oliveira de Freitas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different periods of water shortage in no-tillage and conventional crop systems on cowpea yield components and grain yield in the Mossoró-RN region. For this, an experiment was conducted using two tillage systems (conventional and no-tillage subjected to periods of irrigation suspension (2; 6; 10; 14; 18 end 22 days, started at flowering (34 days after sowing. Plants were harvested 70 days after sowing, and the studied variables were: Pods length (CV, number of grains per pod (NGV, number of pods per plant (NPP, the hundred grains weight (PCG and grain yield (kg ha-1. The no-tillage system is more productive than the conventional under both irrigation and water stress treatments. The water stress length affected grain yield and all yield components studied in a negative way, except for the hundred grains weight. Among the systems studied, the no-tillage provides higher values for the yield components, except the hundred grains weight.

  19. Genetic parameters and path analysis in cowpea genotypes grown in the Cerrado/Pantanal ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, K V; Teodoro, P E; Silva, F A; Silva, M T; Fernandes, R L; Rodrigues, T C; Faria, T C; Corrêa, A M

    2017-05-18

    Estimating genetic parameters in plant breeding allows us to know the population potential for selecting and designing strategies that can maximize the achievement of superior genotypes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic potential of a population of 20 cowpea genotypes by estimating genetic parameters and path analysis among the traits to guide the selection strategies. The trial was conducted in randomized block design with four replications. Its morphophysiological components, components of green grain production and dry grain yield were estimated from genetic use and correlations between the traits. Phenotypic correlations were deployed through path analysis into direct and indirect effects of morphophysiological traits and yield components on dry grain yield. There were significant differences (P < 0.01) between the genotypes for most the traits, indicating the presence of genetic variability in the population and the possibility of practicing selection. The population presents the potential for future genetic breeding studies and is highly promising for the selection of traits dry grain yield, the number of grains per pod, and hundred grains mass. A number of grains per green pod is the main determinant trait of dry grain yield that is also influenced by the cultivar cycle and that the selection for the dry grain yield can be made indirectly by selecting the green pod mass and green pod length.

  20. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Selected Antibiotics in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to provide baseline information on Agrobacterium growth control and suitable selective agent(s) for use in in vitro cowpea genetic transformation studies. Ampicillin was identified as an effective alternative to cefotaxime, in suppressing Agrobacterium tumefaciens. It shows no toxicity to cowpea ...

  1. Effect of farmyard manure on senescence, nitrogen and protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of farmyard manure was studied on senescence, nitrogen and protein content of the leaves and grains of cowpea. The experimental site for this study was situated at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kano Station, Nigeria. The cowpea varieties used in this experiment were Kanannado a local ...

  2. Phenolics impart Au(3+)-stress tolerance to cowpea by generating nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P; Sharmila, P

    2014-01-01

    While evaluating impact of Au nanoparticles on seed germination and early seedling growth of cowpea, HAuCl4 was used as control. Seedlings of cowpea raised in HAuCl4, even at concentration as high as 1 mM, did not show any suppression in growth. Accordingly, Au(3+), despite being a heavy metal, did not alter levels of stress markers (viz. proline and malondialdehyde) in cowpea. Interestingly, cowpea turned clear pale yellow HAuCl4 solutions colloidal purple during the course of seed germination and seedling growth. These purple colloidal suspensions showed Au-nanoparticle specific surface plasmon resonance band in absorption spectra. Transmission electron microscopic and powder X-ray diffraction investigations confirmed presence of crystalline Au-nanoparticles in these purple suspensions. Each germinating seed of cowpea released ∼35 nmoles of GAE of phenolics and since phenolics promote generation of Au-nanoparticles, which are less/non toxic compared to Au(3+), it was contemplated that potential of cowpea to withstand Au(3+) is linked to phenolics. Of the different components of germinating seed of cowpea tested, seed coat possessed immense power to generate Au-nanoparticles, as it was the key source of phenolics. To establish role of phenolics in generation of Au-nanoparticles (i) seed coat and (ii) the incubation medium in which phenolics were released by germinating seeds, were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles. Interestingly, incubation of either of these components with Au(3+) triggered increase in generation of Au-nanoparticles with concomitant decrease in phenolics. Accordingly, with increase in concentration of Au(3+), a proportionate increase in generation of Au-nanoparticles and decrease in phenolics was recorded. In summary, our findings clearly established that cowpea possessed potential to withstand Au(3+)-stress as the phenolics released by seed coat of germinating seeds possess potential to reduce toxic Au(3+) to form non

  3. Phenolics Impart Au3+-Stress Tolerance to Cowpea by Generating Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P.; Sharmila, P.

    2014-01-01

    While evaluating impact of Au nanoparticles on seed germination and early seedling growth of cowpea, HAuCl4 was used as control. Seedlings of cowpea raised in HAuCl4, even at concentration as high as 1 mM, did not show any suppression in growth. Accordingly, Au3+, despite being a heavy metal, did not alter levels of stress markers (viz. proline and malondialdehyde) in cowpea. Interestingly, cowpea turned clear pale yellow HAuCl4 solutions colloidal purple during the course of seed germination and seedling growth. These purple colloidal suspensions showed Au-nanoparticle specific surface plasmon resonance band in absorption spectra. Transmission electron microscopic and powder X-ray diffraction investigations confirmed presence of crystalline Au-nanoparticles in these purple suspensions. Each germinating seed of cowpea released ∼35 nmoles of GAE of phenolics and since phenolics promote generation of Au-nanoparticles, which are less/non toxic compared to Au3+, it was contemplated that potential of cowpea to withstand Au3+ is linked to phenolics. Of the different components of germinating seed of cowpea tested, seed coat possessed immense power to generate Au-nanoparticles, as it was the key source of phenolics. To establish role of phenolics in generation of Au-nanoparticles (i) seed coat and (ii) the incubation medium in which phenolics were released by germinating seeds, were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles. Interestingly, incubation of either of these components with Au3+ triggered increase in generation of Au-nanoparticles with concomitant decrease in phenolics. Accordingly, with increase in concentration of Au3+, a proportionate increase in generation of Au-nanoparticles and decrease in phenolics was recorded. In summary, our findings clearly established that cowpea possessed potential to withstand Au3+-stress as the phenolics released by seed coat of germinating seeds possess potential to reduce toxic Au3+ to form non/less toxic Au

  4. Ebola virus disease: Effects of respiratory protection on healthcare workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohammed Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa sends an alarming message to all countries in the world, to increase the level of coordination and application of preventive measures globally to avoid a disastrous epidemic in the World, as the current situation in West Africa is critical especially after the World Health Organization increased the alarming level to an emergency in public health all over the world. Viral hemorrhagic fevers are important because they can readily spread within a hospital or mortuary setting, there is no effective cure or vaccine, they have a high mortality rate and they are difficult to recognize and diagnose rapidly. WHO has recommended respiratory protection for HCWs performing certain tasks such as aerosol-generating procedures, laboratory procedures, and autopsies. Particulate respirators are designed to help reduce the wearer’s exposure to certain airborne particles. The most effective way to block aerosolized particles is to use either a half-face or a full-face respirator. HCWs still need shoe covers, a full face respirator and latex or nitrile gloves to decrease the risk of Ebola virus contamination.

  5. Ocean viruses and their effects on microbial communities and biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Joshua S; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life forms on Earth, with an estimated 10(31) total viruses globally. The majority of these viruses infect microbes, whether bacteria, archaea or microeukaryotes. Given the importance of microbes in driving global biogeochemical cycles, it would seem, based on numerical abundances alone, that viruses also play an important role in the global cycling of carbon and nutrients. However, the importance of viruses in controlling host populations and ecosystem functions, such as the regeneration, storage and export of carbon and other nutrients, remains unresolved. Here, we report on advances in the study of ecological effects of viruses of microbes. In doing so, we focus on an area of increasing importance: the role that ocean viruses play in shaping microbial population sizes as well as in regenerating carbon and other nutrients.

  6. CGKB: an annotation knowledge base for cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. methylation filtered genomic genespace sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spraggins Thomas A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its ability to tolerate drought and grow on poor soils. It is cultivated mostly by poor farmers in developing countries, with 80% of production taking place in the dry savannah of tropical West and Central Africa. Cowpea is largely an underexploited crop with relatively little genomic information available for use in applied plant breeding. The goal of the Cowpea Genomics Initiative (CGI, funded by the Kirkhouse Trust, a UK-based charitable organization, is to leverage modern molecular genetic tools for gene discovery and cowpea improvement. One aspect of the initiative is the sequencing of the gene-rich region of the cowpea genome (termed the genespace recovered using methylation filtration technology and providing annotation and analysis of the sequence data. Description CGKB, Cowpea Genespace/Genomics Knowledge Base, is an annotation knowledge base developed under the CGI. The database is based on information derived from 298,848 cowpea genespace sequences (GSS isolated by methylation filtering of genomic DNA. The CGKB consists of three knowledge bases: GSS annotation and comparative genomics knowledge base, GSS enzyme and metabolic pathway knowledge base, and GSS simple sequence repeats (SSRs knowledge base for molecular marker discovery. A homology-based approach was applied for annotations of the GSS, mainly using BLASTX against four public FASTA formatted protein databases (NCBI GenBank Proteins, UniProtKB-Swiss-Prot, UniprotKB-PIR (Protein Information Resource, and UniProtKB-TrEMBL. Comparative genome analysis was done by BLASTX searches of the cowpea GSS against four plant proteomes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Medicago truncatula, and Populus trichocarpa. The possible exons and introns on each cowpea GSS were predicted using the HMM-based Genscan gene predication program and the

  7. CGKB: an annotation knowledge base for cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) methylation filtered genomic genespace sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianfeng; Laudeman, Thomas W; Rushton, Paul J; Spraggins, Thomas A; Timko, Michael P

    2007-04-19

    Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its ability to tolerate drought and grow on poor soils. It is cultivated mostly by poor farmers in developing countries, with 80% of production taking place in the dry savannah of tropical West and Central Africa. Cowpea is largely an underexploited crop with relatively little genomic information available for use in applied plant breeding. The goal of the Cowpea Genomics Initiative (CGI), funded by the Kirkhouse Trust, a UK-based charitable organization, is to leverage modern molecular genetic tools for gene discovery and cowpea improvement. One aspect of the initiative is the sequencing of the gene-rich region of the cowpea genome (termed the genespace) recovered using methylation filtration technology and providing annotation and analysis of the sequence data. CGKB, Cowpea Genespace/Genomics Knowledge Base, is an annotation knowledge base developed under the CGI. The database is based on information derived from 298,848 cowpea genespace sequences (GSS) isolated by methylation filtering of genomic DNA. The CGKB consists of three knowledge bases: GSS annotation and comparative genomics knowledge base, GSS enzyme and metabolic pathway knowledge base, and GSS simple sequence repeats (SSRs) knowledge base for molecular marker discovery. A homology-based approach was applied for annotations of the GSS, mainly using BLASTX against four public FASTA formatted protein databases (NCBI GenBank Proteins, UniProtKB-Swiss-Prot, UniprotKB-PIR (Protein Information Resource), and UniProtKB-TrEMBL). Comparative genome analysis was done by BLASTX searches of the cowpea GSS against four plant proteomes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Medicago truncatula, and Populus trichocarpa. The possible exons and introns on each cowpea GSS were predicted using the HMM-based Genscan gene predication program and the potential domains on annotated GSS were

  8. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunsola, KE. Vol 12, No 2 (2014) - Articles Effects of single and mixed infections of blackeye cowpea mosaic virus and cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus on cowpea. Abstract. ISSN: 1597-0906. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  9. Cowpea nodulation, biomass yield and nutrient uptake, as affected by biofertilizers and rhizobia, in a sodic soil amended with Acidithiobacillus - doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v35i4.16994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Pereira Stamford

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sodic soils require application of amendments as gypsum and organic matter. Many types of compost have been tested in sodic soils reclamation; however, these materials often do not provide satisfactory pH reduction. A recent study reported effective effects applying mixture of gypsum and sulfur inoculated with Acidithiobacillus in sodic soils with high pH and exchangeable sodium, though the effects on plant parameters were not evaluated. The present study was conducted to verify the effects of BPK rock biofertilizers on nodulation, biomass yield and nutrient uptake in cowpea compared with mineral fertilizer after sodic soil amendment. The BPK biofertilizers and PK mineral fertilizer were applied at different rates, and plants were inoculated with effective rhizobia strains. A control that did not receive PK fertilization was included. The results indicated that gypsum and sulfur with Acidithiobacillus reduced the soil’s pH and the amount of soil exchangeable sodium. BPK rock biofertilizer increased cowpea nodulation, biomass yield and nutrient uptake. The native rhizobia in the soil exhibited effectiveness in cowpea growth; displaying similar results compared with the rhizobia inoculated plants. BPK biofertilizers may be used as alternative to mineral PK fertilizers in sodic soils after the application of gypsum and sulfur inoculated with Acidithiobacillus.

  10. Effect of temperature on the in vitro transcriptase reaction of bluetongue virus, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus and African horsesickness virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, A.A.; Huismans, H. (Veterinary Research Inst., Onderstepoort (South Africa))

    1982-12-01

    Virions of bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) and African horsesickness virus (AHSV) can be converted to core particles by treatment with chymotrypsin and magnesium. The conversion is characterized by the removal of the 2 outer capsid polypeptides of the virion. The loss of these 2 proteins results in an increase in density from 1,36 g/ml to 1,40 g/ml on CsCl gradients. The BTV, EHDV and AHSV core particles have an associated double-stranded RNA dependent RNA transcriptase that appears to transcribe mRNA optimally at 28 degrees Celsius. It was found, at least in the case of BTV, that this low temperature preference is not an intrinsic characteristic of the transcriptase, but is due to a temperature-dependent inhibition of transcription at high core concentrations.

  11. Tomato and cowpea crop evapotranspiration in an unheated greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Junzeng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of protected cultivation of vegetables in China, it is necessary to study the water requirements of crops in greenhouses. Lysimeter experiments were carried out to investigate tomato (2001 and cowpea (2004 crop evapotranspiration (ETc in an unheated greenhouse in Eastern China. Results showed remarkably reduced crop evapotranspiration inside the greenhouse as compared with that outside. ETc increased with the growth of the crops, and varied in accordance with the temperature inside the greenhouse and 20-cm pan evaporation outside, reaching its maximum value at the stage when plants’ growth was most active. Differences between the variation of crop evapotranspiration and pan evaporation inside the greenhouse were caused by shading of the pan in the later period when the crops were taller than the location where the pan was installed, 70 cm above ground. The ratio of crop evapotranspiration to pan evaporation was not constant as reported in previous studies, and the variation of the inside ratio αin lagged behind that of the outside ratio αout. Simulation of crop evapotranspiration based on 20-cm pan evaporation inside the greenhouse is more reasonable than that based on 20-cm pan evaporation outside, although pan evaporation outside is more consistent with ETc than that inside. The value of αin, calculated based on air temperature, relative humidity, and ground temperature inside, plays a dominant role in the calculation of ETc. As the crop height increases, altering the location of the inside pan and placing it above the canopy, out of the shade, would help to achieve more reasonable values of crop evapotranspiration.

  12. Tomato and cowpea crop evapotranspiration in an unheated greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Junzeng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of protected cultivation of vegetables in China, it is necessary to study the water requirements of crops in greenhouses. Lysimeter experiments were carried out to investigate tomato (2001 and cowpea (2004 crop evapotranspiration (ETc in an unheated greenhouse in Eastern China. Results showed remarkably reduced crop evapotranspiration inside the greenhouse as compared with that outside. ETc increased with the growth of the crops, and varied in accordance with the temperature inside the greenhouse and 20-cm pan evaporation outside, reaching its maximum value at the stage when plants' growth was most active. Differences between the variation of crop evapotranspiration and pan evaporation inside the greenhouse were caused by shading of the pan in the later period when the crops were taller than the location where the pan was installed, 70 cm above ground. The ratio of crop evapotranspiration to pan evaporation was not constant as reported in previous studies, and the variation of the inside ratio αin lagged behind that of the outside ratio αout. Simulation of crop evapotranspiration based on 20-cm pan evaporation inside the greenhouse is more reasonable than that based on 20-cm pan evaporation outside, although pan evaporation outside is more consistent with ETc than that inside. The value of αin, calculated based on air temperature, relative humidity, and ground temperature inside, plays a dominant role in the calculation of ETc. As the crop height increases, altering the location of the inside pan and placing it above the canopy, out of the shade, would help to achieve more reasonable values of crop evapotranspiration.

  13. Treatment Effectiveness of Amantadine Against Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chieh-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ching

    2016-12-05

    BACKGROUND About 400 million cases of dengue, a mosquito-borne disease, are reported annually, but no drug is yet available for treatment. In 1988, at Feng Lin Clinic, Taiwan, we encountered about 10,000 cases and tested various drugs before confirming an antiviral effect of amantadine against dengue virus in vitro. After we administered amantadine to patients for 1-2 days, most achieved full remission. None experienced potentially life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. Herein, we present 34 cases from recent clinical experience that show amantadine's unusual effect against dengue virus infection. CASE REPORT We divided 34 patients with symptoms of dengue fever, confirmed by a screening test, into 3 groups: 6 Category 1 patients received amantadine at onset, 21 Category 2 patients received amantadine within 2-6 days, and 7 Contrast group patients received no amantadine because they visited other clinics or were admitted to a large hospital. When Category 1 patients were treated with amantadine 100 mg 3 times per day, all symptoms dramatically subsided within 1-2 days. In Category 2 patients, most symptoms diminished within 1-2 days after starting the same regimen. In the Contrast group, all symptoms persisted 7 days after onset. White blood cell and platelet counts in Category 1 and 2 patients recovered to normal range, but remained below low normal in the Contrast group. CONCLUSIONS Amantadine is effective and should be given as soon as possible to stop the disease course if dengue fever is confirmed through screening or clinical signs and symptoms. A well-designed larger sample study is warranted to test this effectiveness.

  14. Evaluation of Different Tillage Practices for Monocultural Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp Production in Ibadan, South Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndaeyo, NU.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-season (rainy and dry study was conducted in 1993 at the Teaching and Research Farm, University of Ibadan, Nigeria to assess the most productive tillage practice for monocultural cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp production. Completely randomised block design with four replications was used and tillage treatments were : No till-Slash and Burn (NSB, No till-Herbicide applied (NH, Conventional-ploughed and harrowed (CT, and Minimum-ploughed only (MT. Results revealed that tillage practices had no significant effect on percentage emergence, leaf and branch number in both seasons. In the first season, plant height was significantly (P <0.05 influenced by tillage treatments at 2 and 4 weeks after sowing (WAS with NH showing superiority over the other treatments. In the second season, plant height was significantly (P <0.05 higher in NSB and MT treatments at 6 and 8 WAS, respectively. Pod and grain yield (t ha-1 were not affected by tillage treatments in the first season but in the second season, NSB (1.84 t ha-1 and MT (1.53 t ha-1 showed significant superiority over other treatments. The highest cost of production was observed under NSB while CT produced the highest economie returns. Some soil properties were also influenced with NSB treatment having a higher soil bulk density at sowing and 6 WAS than the other treatments, while NH recorded a higher soil moisture content at 6 WAS than the other treatments. The study also suggests that with optimum precipitation, CT appears a better land preparation option for cowpea production.

  15. Growth of cowpea plants inoculated with Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil after application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jessyka Pereira Brito Fontenele

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out with the aim of evaluating the growth of cowpea cultivated in saline-sodic soils corrected with gypsum: one experiment in the laboratory, to identify the best level of gypsum for the correction of the saline-sodic soils of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil; and the other in a greenhouse, after correction of the soils. As the test plant, the cowpea cultivar pele de moça, inoculated with Rhizobium strain BR3267 was used. The experiments were arranged in a randomised block design in a 2 x 5 factorial arrangement, two soils and five levels of the gypsum requirement (GR, equivalent to 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250% of the GR of the soil, as determined by the Schoonover M-1 method, with five replications. The following were evaluated: electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract (EC, soil exchangeable sodium and percentage of soil exchangeable sodium (ESP, number of nodules (NN, nodule dry weight (NDW, shoot dry weight (SDW, shoot height (PH and nitrogen concentration (N in the shoots. Application of 100% of the GR, followed by the enough water for leaching, was effective for the correction of soil sodicity. The application of increasing levels of soil GR resulted in an increase in the number of nodules, dry weight of the nodules and shoots, and the height and levels of N absorbed by the plants in soil S2. In soil S1, the use of levels of 200 and 250% of soil the GR caused a decrease in all the variables under study.

  16. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on virus growth in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Inhalation of ozone and sulfur dioxide inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose of mice. Ozone inhalation caused the more pronounced inhibition of influenza virus growth: 0.6 ppM ozone for 3 hours post-virus exposure almost completely inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose, whereas sulfur dioxide (6 ppM for 7 days) caused only partial inhibition of influenza growth in the nose. Neither gas altered the propagation of influenza virus in the lungs of mice. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth was either unaffected by exposure to ozone (0.9 ppM for 3 hours) or, when ozone exposure preceded VSV exposure, the virus may have grown to slightly higher titer. The inhibitory effect of ozone and sulfur dioxide on influenza virus growth in nasal epithelium suggests a competitive interaction between the chemical inhalant, the virus, and host tissues, with net consequences for the pathogenesis of this disease. If the effects of these inhalants are to be properly interpreted, they should be determined for all major regions of virus growth and inhalant deposition.

  17. Seed-borne viruses detected on farm-retained seeds from smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso, Bangladesh and Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manyangarirwa, W.; Sibiya, J.; Mortensen, C A Nieves Paulino

    2010-01-01

    esculentum Mill.), paprika (Capsicum annuum L.), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp), bambara [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.] and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso, Bangladesh and Vietnam were tested for seed-borne viruses using various techniques including...

  18. Recent advances in cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] “omics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After decades of research on cowpea, significant amount of omics datasets are available and useful in understanding the genetic relationship between Vigna unguiculata ssp. unguiculata and other species belonging to the same genus as well as its genetic variation. Besides, the development of genetic map allowed the ...

  19. Active aggregation among sexes in bean flower thrips (Megalurothrips sjostedti) on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niassy, Saliou; Ekesi, Sunday; Maniania, Nguya K; Orindi, Benedict; Moritz, Gerald B; de Kogel, Willem J; Subramanian, Sevgan

    2016-01-01

    Male sexual aggregations are a common territorial, mating-related or resource-based, behaviour observed in diverse organisms, including insects such as thrips. The influence of factors such as plant substrate, time of day, and geographic location on aggregation of thrips is uncertain, therefore we monitored the dispersion of male and female bean flower thrips (BFT), Megalurothrips sjostedti (Trybom) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), on cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabaceae), over three cowpea growth stages and across three cowpea-growing areas of Kenya. Our results indicated that for all the crop growth stages, the density of BFTs varied over the time of day, with higher densities at 10:00, 13:00, and 16:00 hours than at 07:00 hours. Thrips densities did not differ among blocks at the budding stage, but they did at peak flowering and podding stages. Dispersion indices suggested that both male and female BFTs were aggregated. Active male aggregation occurred only on green plant parts and it varied across blocks, crop stages, and locations. Similarly, active female aggregation was observed in peak flowering and podding stages. Such active aggregation indicates a semiochemical or behaviour-mediated aggregation. Identification of such a semiochemical may offer new opportunities for refining monitoring and management strategies for BFT on cowpea, the most important grain legume in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26726262

  20. Cowpea-cereal intercrop productivity in the Sudan savanna Zone of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.l productivity in the West African sub-region is low due to attacks from insect pests;, inefficient cropping system and low yield potential of local varieties. Therefore, to increase productivity, it is necessary to develop suitable agronomic practices and planting arrangement that will maximize ...

  1. The major economic field diseases of cowpea in the humid agro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea, which has now become an important protein source for the teeming populace of Nigerians especially those living in the humid agro-ecological zones of South-western Nigeria, is severely attacked by diseases. The causal agents of these diseases find the environment more conducive for survival and hence induce ...

  2. Protein and Iron composition of cowpea leaves: An evaluation of six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineral element, protein-energy and micronutrient deficiencies are primary public health concerns in Eastern and Southern Africa. Promoting the consumption of traditional vegetables such as leaves of cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp could provide cheap sources of protein, micronutrients and mineral elements that ...

  3. Growth and yield of cassava as influenced by maize and cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field trials were conducted at the research farm of the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) Umudike, Igbariam sub-station (060151N, 060521E) in 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 cropping seasons to determine the growth and yield of cassava as influenced by maize and cowpea population densities. Cassava at ...

  4. Are investments in an informal seed system for cowpea a worthwhile endeavour?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.; Stomph, T.J.; Kamara, A.; Abdoulaye, T.; Hearne, S.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    High seed quality is a critical component for realising yield potential. For smallholder cowpea farmers in northern Nigeria the informal seed system is a major supplier of genetically high-quality seed, but the physiological quality of farmers’ produced seed remains unknown. The project “Promoting

  5. Soil properties and cowpea yield after six years of consecutive amendment of composted tannery sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Sérgio Ferreira de Araújo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated soil properties and cowpea yield after six years of consecutive amendment of composted tannery sludge. The compost was applied annually at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Mg ha-1 and at the end of the sixth year, the chemical and physical properties of the soil were evaluated using a randomized block design. The Cr, P, K, Ca, Na and organic C contents and the pH and cation exchange capacity increased linearly after six years of compost amendment. The soil bulk density decreased linearly while the aggregate stability index increased after compost amendment. As a consequence of the changes in the chemical and physical properties of the soil, cowpea yield showed a quadratic response to the tannery rates, with an estimated maximum cowpea yield at 8.3 Mg ha-1. In conclusion, the soil chemical and physical properties improved after six years of composted tannery sludge amendment. However, the soil pH and the Cr and Na contents increased with composted tannery sludge amendment, which influenced the cowpea yield and resulted in a quadratic response to the compost.

  6. Yam and cowpea diversity management by farmers in the Guinea-Sudan transition zone of Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Ahanchédé, A.; Struik, P.C.; Richards, P.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Tossau, R.; Vodouhè, S.

    2004-01-01

    The maintenance and utilization of crop genetic diversity is important to ensure food security. The relative importance of yam and cowpea varieties and the influence of the socio-cultural and local economy context on the diversity maintained were analysed in Benin. Whereas the diversity is large,

  7. Assessment of N 2 fixation in 32 cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 3.1 and 2.9 t/ha, respectively) in 2006. In general, these data show that genotypes that fixed more N also produced more biomass and grain yield and are therefore, the best candidates for inclusion in cropping systems as biofertilizers. Key words: Symbiotic performance, N nutrition, biomass, N-fixed, cowpea varieties.

  8. Radio Frequency Heat Treatments to Disinfest Dried Pulses of Cowpea Weevil

    Science.gov (United States)

    To explore the potential of radio frequency (RF) heat treatments as an alternative to chemical fumigants for disinfestation of dried pulses, the relative heat tolerance and dielectric properties of different stages of the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) was determined. Among the immature st...

  9. AFLP/SSR mapping of resistance genes to Alectra vogelii in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The parasite weed Alectra vogelii (Benth) causes significant yield reduction of cowpea in Africa. To find and map ... La plante parasite Alectra vogelii (Benth) provoque une réduction significative du rendement de niébé en Afrique. Pour repérer et .... polyacrylamide gels (Ready-to-use Acrylamide Gel. Matrix containing urea ...

  10. Southern Blight (Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.) of Cowpea: Genetic Characterization of Two Sources of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies were conducted to determine the inheritance of resistance to southern blight (caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.) exhibited by the cowpea [Vigna unguiculta (L.) Walp.] cultivars Carolina Cream and Brown Crowder, and to determine if a genetic relationship exists for this resistance betw...

  11. Insects observed on cowpea flowers in three districts in the central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipotriches sp., Melecta sp and Amegilla sp. and other insects, such as thrips, flies, butterflies / moths, beetles, and Dysdercus sp. Thrips were the insects most often observed on the cowpea flowers in the surveyed farms, followed by flies or dipterans, Lasioglossium sp and butterflies/moths. From the researcher's own ...

  12. Ecology and management of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) on cowpea in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: Senegal/Niger/rotation/millet/isolate characterization/fonio/compost amendment / bioagent/ Clonostachysrosea /solarizationCowpea ( Vignaunguiculata Walp.) is the most important pulse crop in

  13. In vitro digestibility of processed and fermented soya bean, cowpea and maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Tropical legumes, ie soya bean and cowpea, were pre-treated and subsequently fermented using pure cultures of Rhizopus spp. Impact of soaking, cooking and fermentation of the legumes on their digestibility was determined using an in vitro digestion method. Processing of white maize included, amongst

  14. physico-chemical properties of ten cowpea lines on resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    cloth for aeration and secured with a rubber band to prevent the insects from escaping. Physical characteristics of the cowpea lines used. The seed coat texture and colour were determined by visual examination, seed height measurement were taken as the maximum vertical dimension with the seed resting freely on the.

  15. Nitrogen symbiotically fixed by cowpea and gliricidia in traditional and agroforestry systems under semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Rodrigues Martins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the amounts of N fixed by cowpea in a traditional system and by cowpea and gliricidia in an agroforestry system in the Brazilian Northeast semiarid. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design, in a split-plot arrangement, with four replicates, in the semiarid region of the state of Paraíba, Brazil. Plots consisted of agroforestry and traditional systems (no trees, and split-plots of the three crops planted between the tree rows in the agroforestry system. To estimate N fixation, plant samples were collected in the fourth growth cycle of the perennial species and in the fourth planting cycle of the annual species. In the agroforestry system with buffel grass and prickly-pear cactus, gliricidia plants symbiotically fix high proportions of N (>50% and contribute with higher N amounts (40 kg ha-1 in leaves than in the traditional system (11 kg ha-1 in grain and 18 kg ha-1 in straw. In the agroforestry system with maize and cowpea, gliricidia plants do not fix nitrogen, and N input is limited to the fixation by cowpea (2.7 kg ha-1, which is lower than in the traditional system due to its lower biomass production.

  16. The major economic field diseases of cowpea in the humid agro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... survival and hence induce disease conditions in the host plant causing significant yield reduction. This paper reviews the ... Key words: Cowpea, field diseases, humid forest agro-ecology, Southwestern Nigeria. INTRODUCTION .... control practices, biological control as means of manag- ing Colletotrichum ...

  17. Alleviating acid soil stress in cowpea with a local population of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from this system have been found to promote ... fungi inoculation. Total dry weight of inoculated cowpea was not affected by soil acidity while it was depressed in un-inoculated plants. The fungi increased total dry weight ... total land (International Plant Nutrition Institute, 2009).

  18. The major economic field diseases of cowpea in the humid agro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... 1Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Obafemi Awolowo University, Moor Plantation, P.M.B. 5029, Ibadan,. Nigeria. 2Olabisi Onabanjo ..... blight, the latter being due to collar/foot rot. Web blight is induced by .... Cowpea Varieties for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita under field conditions.

  19. Use of Cowpea and Pigeon pea as Nutritional Ingredients in Culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cheap, locally available plant seeds such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) could be used in the design and formulation of microbial culture media in order to reduce the cost. Objective: To make use of locally cheap seeds as a basic nutrient medium for the isolation of different microorganisms ...

  20. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVeffect was transitory and greatest for IAV. T cell cytokine production was similar, with no evidence of Th2 or Th17 skewing. CONCLUSIONS, SIGNIFICANCE: Understanding the basis for the ability of HRSV in particular to symptomatically re-infect without significant antigenic change is of considerable interest. The present results show that these common respiratory viruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  1. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling the effect of comprehensive interventions on Ebola virus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin

    2015-10-01

    Since the re-emergence of Ebola in West Africa in 2014, comprehensive and stringent interventions have been implemented to decelerate the spread of the disease. The effectiveness of interventions still remains unclear. In this paper, we develop an epidemiological model that includes various controlling measures to systematically evaluate their effects on the disease transmission dynamics. By fitting the model to reported cumulative cases and deaths in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia until March 22, 2015, we estimate the basic reproduction number in these countries as 1.2552, 1.6093 and 1.7994, respectively. Model analysis shows that there exists a threshold of the effectiveness of isolation, below which increasing the fraction of latent individuals diagnosed prior to symptoms onset or shortening the duration between symptoms onset and isolation may lead to more Ebola infection. This challenges an existing view. Media coverage plays a substantial role in reducing the final epidemic size. The response to reported cumulative infected cases and deaths may have a different effect on the epidemic spread in different countries. Among all the interventions, we find that shortening the duration between death and burial and improving the effectiveness of isolation are two effective interventions for controlling the outbreak of Ebola virus infection.

  3. Beneficial fitness effects are not exponential for two viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokyta, Darin R; Beisel, Craig J; Joyce, Paul; Ferris, Martin T; Burch, Christina L; Wichman, Holly A

    2008-10-01

    The distribution of fitness effects for beneficial mutations is of paramount importance in determining the outcome of adaptation. It is generally assumed that fitness effects of beneficial mutations follow an exponential distribution, for example, in theoretical treatments of quantitative genetics, clonal interference, experimental evolution, and the adaptation of DNA sequences. This assumption has been justified by the statistical theory of extreme values, because the fitnesses conferred by beneficial mutations should represent samples from the extreme right tail of the fitness distribution. Yet in extreme value theory, there are three different limiting forms for right tails of distributions, and the exponential describes only those of distributions in the Gumbel domain of attraction. Using beneficial mutations from two viruses, we show for the first time that the Gumbel domain can be rejected in favor of a distribution with a right-truncated tail, thus providing evidence for an upper bound on fitness effects. Our data also violate the common assumption that small-effect beneficial mutations greatly outnumber those of large effect, as they are consistent with a uniform distribution of beneficial effects.

  4. Effects of heat-treated cowpea on Callosobruchus amculatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 4 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Short communication Effect of pesticides applied in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Mabel Antwi

    2014-08-02

    Aug 2, 2014 ... 4 Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture (El-Shatby), Alexandria University, Egypt. 5 Council for Scientific and Industrial Research-Crop Research Institute, Kumasi. 6 Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria Zootecnia. Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, México. (Received 4 July 2012; ...

  6. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Medk) variety T-36 pulse. Crop News. Lett. 3: 14-17. Duke L (1990). Introduction, In Singh SR (ed.) Insect pests of food legumes, Wiley, New York, p. 1-42. Gustafsson A (1940). The mutation system of the chlorophyll apparatus.

  7. Comparative Effects of Cowpea and Soybean Genotypes on N2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Agriculture, Sokoto . The millet was used as a reference crop to estimate nitrogen fixation by the grain legume using N difference method (. Hardarson and Danso, 1993). The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design replicated three times. Each experimental plot measured 16 m by 7.5 m, large ...

  8. Water-condition effects on rhizobia competition for cowpea nodule ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both strains showed good competition with other indigenous rhizobia populations under favourable- and limited-water conditions. Competition between the inoculated strains in the mixture varied between water regimes. In non-limited-water conditions, strain ORS 3257 was the best competitor, whereas in limited-water ...

  9. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-08-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses self-assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular, the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in solution. In this work, we use a mean-field theory to investigate how the secondary structure of the RNA combined with electrostatic interactions affects the efficiency of assembly and stability of the assembled virions. We show that the secondary structure of RNA may result in negative osmotic pressures while a linear polymer causes positive osmotic pressures for the same conditions. This may suggest that the branched structure makes the RNA more effectively packaged and the virion more stable.

  10. Antioxidant Activity of the Extracts of Some Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L Walp. Cultivars Commonly Consumed in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Feo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has been carried out to determine the antioxidant activity of the methanolic extracts obtained from four cultivars of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L Walp. seeds. Phenolic compounds present in the extracts showed the antioxidant and antiradical properties when investigated using a linoleic acid peroxidation model, FRAP, ORAC and TRAP assays, as well as DPPH, hydroxyl, nitric oxide and superoxide radical scavenging activity. The HPLC analysis of the cowpea extracts showed the presence of neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acids. The results indicated that methanolic extract of the cowpea resembled in the aforementioned activities those from other leguminous seeds and pulses. Phenolic constituents contained in cowpea may have a future role as ingredients in the development of functional foods.

  11. Multiple effects of toxins isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus on the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Jacqueline Farinha; Pereira, Carina Machado; Bittar, Cintia; Batista, Mariana Nogueira; Campos, Guilherme Rodrigues Fernandes; da Silva, Suely; Cintra, Adélia Cristina Oliveira; Zothner, Carsten; Harris, Mark; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Rahal, Paula; Jardim, Ana Carolina Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of liver disease and transplantation worldwide. Current therapy is expensive, presents additional side effects and viral resistance has been described. Therefore, studies for developing more efficient antivirals against HCV are needed. Compounds isolated from animal venoms have shown antiviral activity against some viruses such as Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus and Measles virus. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the complex crotoxin (CX) and its subunits crotapotin (CP) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2-CB) isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus on HCV life cycle. Huh 7.5 cells were infected with HCVcc JFH-1 strain in the presence or absence of these toxins and virus was titrated by focus formation units assay or by qPCR. Toxins were added to the cells at different time points depending on the stage of virus life cycle to be evaluated. The results showed that treatment with PLA2-CB inhibited HCV entry and replication but no effect on HCV release was observed. CX reduced virus entry and release but not replication. By treating cells with CP, an antiviral effect was observed on HCV release, the only stage inhibited by this compound. Our data demonstrated the multiple antiviral effects of toxins from animal venoms on HCV life cycle.

  12. A method for rapid production of heteromultimeric protein complexes in plants: assembly of protective bluetongue virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuenemann, Eva C; Meyers, Ann E; Verwey, Jeanette; Rybicki, Edward P; Lomonossoff, George P

    2013-09-01

    Plant expression systems based on nonreplicating virus-based vectors can be used for the simultaneous expression of multiple genes within the same cell. They therefore have great potential for the production of heteromultimeric protein complexes. This work describes the efficient plant-based production and assembly of Bluetongue virus-like particles (VLPs), requiring the simultaneous expression of four distinct proteins in varying amounts. Such particles have the potential to serve as a safe and effective vaccine against Bluetongue virus (BTV), which causes high mortality rates in ruminants and thus has a severe effect on the livestock trade. Here, VLPs produced and assembled in Nicotiana benthamiana using the cowpea mosaic virus-based HyperTrans (CPMV-HT) and associated pEAQ plant transient expression vector system were shown to elicit a strong antibody response in sheep. Furthermore, they provided protective immunity against a challenge with a South African BTV-8 field isolate. The results show that transient expression can be used to produce immunologically relevant complex heteromultimeric structures in plants in a matter of days. The results have implications beyond the realm of veterinary vaccines and could be applied to the production of VLPs for human use or the coexpression of multiple enzymes for the manipulation of metabolic pathways. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in pregnant women with human immunodeficiency virus infection. O.A. Adesina, J.O. Akinyemi, O.S. Michael, S.A. Fayemiwo, O.A. Awolude, B.O. Ogunbosi, M.A. Kuti, I.F. Adewole ...

  14. Modeling the indirect effect of Wolbachia on the infection dynamics of horizontally transmitted viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Friedrich Strauß

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are widely distributed in arthropods. There is growing empirical evidence that Wolbachia directly interacts with viruses and other parasites inside the arthropod host, sometimes resulting in low or no pathogen replication. Previous theoretical studies showed that this direct effect of Wolbachia can result in a reduced virus prevalence (within the population, suggesting that Wolbachia could be used in the biological control of vector-borne diseases (e.g., dengue fever. However, Wolbachia might also indirectly affect virus dynamics because Wolbachia-induced reproductive phenotypes (cytoplasmic incompatibility or male killing increase the larval mortality of hosts and thus alter the age structure of populations. We investigated this indirect effect using mathematical models with overlapping generations, and found the results to depend strongly on the host's life history. In general, the indirect effect can result in two different outcomes: (1 reduced virus prevalence and virus invasion ability, and (2 increased virus prevalence and virus invasion ability. The former occurs for host species with larval competition and undercompensation, the latter for hosts with either adult competition or larval competition and overcompensation. These findings suggest that the effect of Wolbachia on a specific virus is sensitive to the host's life history. We discuss the results with respect to biocontrol programs using Wolbachia.

  15. The effect of vaccination on foot and mouth disease virus transmission among dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orsel, K.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Bouma, A.; Stegeman, J.A.; Dekker, C.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of a single vaccination of dairy cows on foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) transmission. To estimate if vaccination could significantly reduce virus transmission, we performed two replicates of a transmission experiment with one group of vaccinated

  16. Effects of population size on virus evolution: a baculovirus perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the population genetics of the baculovirus infection process and the consequences for virus evolution. Using Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and lepidopteran insect larvae as a model system, we attempt to characterize (1) elemental virus-host and

  17. Effect of Phosphorylation of CM2 Protein on Influenza C Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takanari; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Muraki, Yasushi; Sho, Ri; Sugawara, Kanetsu; Hongo, Seiji

    2017-11-15

    CM2 is the second membrane protein of the influenza C virus and has been demonstrated to play a role in the uncoating and genome packaging processes in influenza C virus replication. Although the effects of N-linked glycosylation, disulfide-linked oligomerization, and palmitoylation of CM2 on virus replication have been analyzed, the effect of the phosphorylation of CM2 on virus replication remains to be determined. In this study, a phosphorylation site(s) at residue 78 and/or 103 of CM2 was replaced with an alanine residue(s), and the effects of the loss of phosphorylation on influenza C virus replication were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the packaging of the reporter gene between influenza C virus-like particles (VLPs) produced from 293T cells expressing wild-type CM2 and those from the cells expressing the CM2 mutants lacking the phosphorylation site(s). Reporter gene expression in HMV-II cells infected with VLPs containing the CM2 mutants was inhibited in comparison with that in cells infected with wild-type VLPs. The virus production of the recombinant influenza C virus possessing CM2 mutants containing a serine-to-alanine change at residue 78 was significantly lower than that of wild-type recombinant influenza C virus. Furthermore, the virus growth of the recombinant viruses possessing CM2 with a serine-to-aspartic acid change at position 78, to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, was virtually identical to that of the wild-type virus. These results suggest that phosphorylation of CM2 plays a role in efficient virus replication, probably through the addition of a negative charge to the Ser78 phosphorylation site. IMPORTANCE It is well-known that many host and viral proteins are posttranslationally modified by phosphorylation, which plays a role in the functions of these proteins. In influenza A and B viruses, phosphorylation of viral proteins NP, M1, NS1, and the nuclear export protein (NEP), which are not integrated into the

  18. Transmission Model of Hepatitis B Virus with the Migration Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Altaf Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: “the transmission between migrated and exposed class” and “the transmission between migrated and acute class.” With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease.

  19. Effectiveness of Four Disinfectants against Ebola Virus on Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Smither

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The West Africa Ebola virus (EBOV outbreak has highlighted the need for effective disinfectants capable of reducing viral load in a range of sample types, equipment and settings. Although chlorine-based products are widely used, they can also be damaging to equipment or apparatus that needs continuous use such as aircraft use for transportation of infected people. Two aircraft cleaning solutions were assessed alongside two common laboratory disinfectants in a contact kill assay with EBOV on two aircraft relevant materials representative of a porous and non-porous surface. A decimal log reduction of viral titre of 4 is required for a disinfectant to be deemed effective and two of the disinfectants fulfilled this criteria under the conditions tested. One product, Ardrox 6092, was found to perform similarly to sodium hypochlorite, but as it does not have the corrosive properties of sodium hypochlorite, it could be an alternative disinfectant solution to be used for decontamination of EBOV on sensitive apparatus.

  20. Increased Salinity Tolerance of Cowpea Plants by Dual Inoculation of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus clarum and a Nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, G H; Aboul-Nasr, M B; Al-Humiany, A

    2005-03-01

    Pot greenhouse experiments were carried out to attempt to increase the salinity tolerance of one of the most popular legume of the world; cowpea; by using dual inoculation of an Am fungus Glomus clarum and a nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense. The effect of these beneficial microbes, as single- or dual inoculation-treatments, was assessed in sterilized loamy sand soil at five NaCl levels (0.0~7.2 ds/m) in irrigating water. The results of this study revealed that percentage of mycorrhizal infection, plant height, dry weight, nodule number, protein content, nitrogenase and phosphatase activities, as well as nutrient elements N, P, K, Ca, Mg were significantly decreased by increasing salinity level in non-mycorrhized plants in absence of NFB. Plants inoculated with NFB showed higher nodule numbers, protein content, nitrogen concentration and nitrogenase activities than those of non-inoculated at all salinity levels. Mycorrhized plants exhibited better improvement in all measurements than that of non-mycorrhized ones at all salinity levels, especially, in the presence of NFB. The concentration of Na(+) was significantly accumulated in cowpea plants by rising salinity except in shoots of mycorrhizal plants which had K(+)/Na(+) ratios higher than other treatments. This study indicated that dual inoculation with Am fungi and N-fixer Azospirillum can support both needs for N and P, excess of NaCl and will be useful in terms of soil recovery in saline area.

  1. Protective hybrid coating containing silver, copper and zinc cations effective against human immunodeficiency virus and other enveloped viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodek, Jan; Zajícová, V.; Lovětinská-Šlamborová, I.; Stibor, I.; Müllerová, J.; Weber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, Apr 1 (2016), č. článku 56. ISSN 1471-2180 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11207 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hybrid coating * virucidal effect * HIV * enveloped viruses Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.644, year: 2016 http://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12866-016-0675-x

  2. Response of Sorghum bicolor L. to Residual Phosphate on Two Contrasting Soils Previously Planted to Cowpea or Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tola Omolayo Olasunkanmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper fertilizer nutrient management through adequate utilization of the residual value coupled with healthy crop rotation contributes significantly to sustainable crop production. This study was conducted to evaluate the direct and residual effects of two rock phosphate (RP materials on two contrasting soils previously planted with either the cereal crop or the leguminous crop. The effectiveness of the RP materials as substitute for the conventional P fertilizers was evaluated using single superphosphate as reference at the Department of Agronomy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. The experiments were 2 × 2 × 4 factorial in completely randomized design. The test crops in the first cropping performed better on the slightly acidic loamy sand than on the strongly acidic sandy clay loam. Performance of each crop was improved by P supply in the first and second cropping. Single superphosphate proved to be more efficient than the RPs in the first cropping but not as effective as MRP in the second cropping. In the second cropping, sorghum performed better on the soil previously cropped to cowpea while Morocco RP had the highest residual effect among the P-fertilizer sources. It is evident that rock phosphates are better substitutes to the conventional phosphorus fertilizers due to their long term residual effect in soils. The positive effects of healthy rotation of crops as well as the negative effects of low soil pH are also quite obvious.

  3. Combined effect of virus infection and water stress on water flow and water economy in grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aou-Ouad, Hanan; Pou, Alicia; Tomás, Magdalena; Montero, Rafael; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Medrano, Hipólito; Bota, Josefina

    2017-06-01

    Water limitation is one of the major threats affecting grapevine production. Thus, improving water-use efficiency (WUE) is crucial for a sustainable viticulture industry in Mediterranean regions. Under field conditions, water stress (WS) is often combined with viral infections as those are present in major grape-growing areas worldwide. Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) is one of the most important viruses affecting grapevines. Indeed, the optimization of water use in a real context of virus infection is an important topic that needs to be understood. In this work, we have focused our attention on determining the interaction of biotic and abiotic stresses on WUE and hydraulic conductance (Kh ) parameters in two white grapevine cultivars (Malvasia de Banyalbufar and Giró Ros). Under well-watered (WW) conditions, virus infection provokes a strong reduction (P < 0.001) in Kpetiole in both cultivars; however, Kleaf was only reduced in Malvasia de Banyalbufar. Moreover, the presence of virus also reduced whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Khplant ) in 2013 and 2014 for Malvasia de Banyalbufar and in 2014 for Giró Ros. Thus, the effect of virus infection on water flow might explain the imposed stomatal limitation. Under WS conditions, the virus effect on Kplant was negligible, because of the bigger effect of WS than virus infection. Whole-plant WUE (WUEWP ) was not affected by the presence of virus neither under WW nor under WS conditions, indicating that plants may adjust their physiology to counteract the virus infection by maintaining a tight stomatal control and by sustaining a balanced carbon change. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Effect of protein acetylation on hepatitis B virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIA Xiaofang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of protein acetylation in host cells on the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV in hepatocytes, since HBV infection greatly threatens human health and the acetylation of encoding proteins in infected cells plays an important role in HBV replication and infection. MethodsThe deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA and nicotinamide (NAM were used to stimulate HBV replication in HepG2.2.15 and HepAD38 cells, and the HBV replication markers were measured. The pan-acetylysin protein and Ac-H3 were examined by Western Blot. ResultsThe stimulation of cells with TSA and NAM increased the overall acetylation level of proteins in cells, and the acetylation level increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In the HepG2.2.15 and HepAD38 cells, stimulation with TSA and NAM reduced HBsAg level in the supernatant of cell culture and increased HBV DNA level in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while HBeAg in the supernatant of cell culture and DNA in cells did not change significantly. ConclusionAcetylation of host proteins may be involved in and affect HBV replication in cells, and further analysis and determination of host proteins whose acetylation affects HBV replication in cells help to learn more about the regulation of HBV replication and provide new thoughts for the development of specific antiviral strategies.

  5. Adoption of Kerala Agricultural University Recommended Practices of Amaranthus and Vegetable Cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K Anju

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in Thiruvananthapuram district of Kerala. Ninety farmers engaged in commercial cultivation of amaranthus and vegetable cowpea were selected through three stage random sampling procedure. Ten independent variables were selected based on judges’ relevancy rating. Majority of the respondents belonged to medium category with respect to adoption. In the case of amaranthus growers, four variables, namely, contact with extension agency, scientific orientation, innovativeness and mass media exposure were found to be significantly and positively related to adoption. Education, scientific orientation and innovativeness were found to be significantly and positively related to adoption in the case of vegetable cowpea growers.

  6. Impact of sucrose contents and cooking time on cowpea prices in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mb.D Faye

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An alternative approach to traditional consumer behaviour and demand theory is characteristics theory, which assumes that a consumer’s utility function is generated by the characteristics, or attributes, that goods and services possess. Instead of a utility being a function of a product, it becomes a function of the attributes provided by these products. In this paper a hedonic pricing model is used to investigate the influence of sucrose level and cooking time on cowpea prices in Senegal.  Cooking time has a significant impact on price only at Tilene market in Dakar, while the sucrose contents tend to provide a premium throughout. Further investigation shows that the local varieties, AW, Matam and Ndiassiw have higher sucrose contents than the other cowpea varieties.

  7. Bacterial strains from floodplain soils perform different plant-growth promoting processes and enhance cowpea growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Martins da Costa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Certain nodulating nitrogen-fixing bacteria in legumes and other nodule endophytes perform different plant-growth promoting processes. The objective of this study was to evaluate 26 bacterial strains isolated from cowpea nodules grown in floodplain soils in the Brazilian savannas, regarding performance of plant-growth promoting processes and ability to enhance cowpea growth. We also identified these strains by 16S rRNA sequencing. The following processes were evaluated: free-living biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, solubilization of calcium, aluminum and iron phosphates and production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. The abilities to nodulate and promote cowpea growth were evaluated in Leonard jars. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified 60 % of the strains as belonging to genus Paenibacillus. The following four genera were also identified: Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, Enterobacter and Pseudomonas. None of the strains fixed N2 free-living. Among the strains, 80 % solubilized Ca phosphate and one solubilized Al phosphate and none solubilized Fe phosphate. The highest IAA concentrations (52.37, 51.52 and 51.00 μg mL−1 were obtained in the 79 medium with tryptophan by Enterobacter strains UFPI B5-7A, UFPI B5-4 and UFPI B5-6, respectively. Only eight strains nodulated cowpea, however, all increased production of total dry matter. The fact that the strains evaluated perform different biological processes to promote plant growth indicates that these strains have potential use in agricultural crops to increase production and environmental sustainability.

  8. The Value ff Cowpea Diversity in the Transition Guinea Sudan Zone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words : Market preferences, cowpea varieties, marginal value, price, quality attributes. Les marchés jouent un grand rôle dans la valorisation et le maintien de la diversité des variétés de culture dans la chaîne de production et de consommation. La connaissance sur la distribution des préférences variétales de cette ...

  9. Effectiveness of Three Decontamination Treatments Against Influenza Virus Applied to Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    filtering facepiece respirators contami­ nated with H1N1 aerosols and droplets. Am J Infect Control; 39: 1-9. Rutten IM. (2007) Handbook of nonwoven ...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0080 EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE DECONTAMINATION TREATMENTS AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS APPLIED TO FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATORS...SEP-2010 Effectiveness of Three Decontamination Treatments Against Influenza Virus Applied to Filtering Facepiece Respirators (POSTPRINT) FA8650-07-C

  10. Multivariate analysis of the sensory changes in the dehydrated cowpea leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambaka, Hudson; Ryley, Janice

    2004-09-08

    Processing of foods, especially dehydration is known to result in alteration of sensory and nutritional qualities. Cowpea leaves is one of the common leafy vegetables consumed in Kenya that contain high levels of pro-vitamin A compounds and has good carotene retention during processing. A tasting panel was trained using a quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) test that was developed and used to characterize the sensory properties of dehydrated cowpea leaves. The panel identified sensory attributes in dehydrated cowpea leaves that were important in discriminating the dehydrated samples from the fresh material. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the QDA scores. The first principal component (PC1) which accounted for 85% of the variance was an index of the interrelationship among variables in differentiating the samples while PC2, which accounted for the remaining variance measured the attributes influence in discriminating samples. The results of the sensory attributes mean scores showed that aroma, texture and appearance had high influence in discriminating between the fresh, the sun-dried and the solar-dried samples. The solar dried products were close to the fresh material, which was characterized, as soft and tender with an appealing dark green color, than the sun dried product. The sun dried products differed from the other products more on appearance.

  11. CHROMIUM IN SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AND COWPEA AFTER FOUR CONSECUTIVE ANNUAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPOSTED TANNERY SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Lucia Jacinto Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tannery sludge contains high concentrations of inorganic elements, such as chromium (Cr, which may lead to environmental pollution and affect human health The behavior of Cr in organic matter fractions and in the growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. was studied in a sandy soil after four consecutive annual applications of composted tannery sludge (CTS. Over a four-year period, CTS was applied on permanent plots (2 × 5 m and incorporated in the soil (0-20 cm at the rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 Mg ha-1 (dry weight basis. These treatments were replicated four times in a randomized block design. In the fourth year, cowpea was planted and grown for 50 days, at which time we analyzed the Cr concentrations in the soil, in the fulvic acid, humic acid, and humin fractions, and in the leaves, pods, and grains of cowpea. Composted tannery sludge led to an increase in Cr concentration in the soil. Among the humic substances, the highest Cr concentration was found in humin. The application rates of CTS significantly increased Cr concentration in leaves and grains.

  12. SYMBIOTIC EFFICIENCY OF RHIZOBIA STRAINS WITH COWPEA IN SOUTHERN MARANHÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO PALHARES FARIAS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the symbiotic efficiency of three novel nitrogen-fixing bacterial strains with cowpea cv. BRS Guariba as forage. Two experiments were carried out in the field in Balsas and São Raimundo das Mangabeiras, MA, in a randomized block design with seven treatments and four replications: three novel strains efficient in symbiotic nitrogen fixation with cowpea (UFLA 3-153, UFLA 3-154 and UFLA 3-164, two strains already approved as inoculants by MAPA (UFLA 3-84/SEMIA 6461 and INPA 3-11B/SEMIA 6462, and two controls without inoculation, with and without mineral N. Symbiotic efficiency of strains was determined by the number of nodules, nodules dry matter, shoot dry matter, relative efficiency, crude protein content and shoot N content. Strains UFLA 3-154 and UFLA 3-164 were the most efficient in Balsas, whereas UFLA 3-153 and UFLA 3-164 were the most efficient in São Raimundo das Mangabeiras. Strains UFLA 3-153, UFLA 3-154 and UFLA 3-164 were more efficient in symbiotic nitrogen fixation with cowpea than the strains already approved as inoculants UFLA 3-84 and INPA 3-11B in the climatic and edaphic conditions of southern Maranhão. UFLA 3-164 is the most efficient strain in this region.

  13. The damage caused by Callosobruchus maculatus on cowpea grains is dependent on the plant genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Elida Barros; Nóbrega, Rafaela S A; Fernandes-Júnior, Paulo Ivan; Silva, Luciana Barboza; Dos Santos Carvalho, Gabriel; Marinho, Rita de Cassia Nunes; Pavan, Bruno E

    2016-09-01

    Beans from cowpea cultivars fertilized with mineral N or inoculated with various rhizobium strains may contain different nitrogen concentrations and nitrogen metabolite composition, which affects the beans' defense mechanisms against pests. In this study, the population growth of Callosobruchus maculatus reared on beans from four cowpea cultivars fertilized with different nitrogen sources was evaluated. The factors tested were beans from four cowpea cultivars and seven different nitrogen sources: mineral N fertilization, inoculation with five strains of symbiotic diazotrophic bacteria, and soil nitrogen (absolute control). BRS Tapaihum and BRS Acauã cultivars had lower cumulative emergence and instantaneous rate of population growth of the insects compared with other cultivars, indicating antixenosis resistance against C. maculatus. Inoculation of BRS Acauã cultivar with the diazotrophic bacteria strain BR 3299 resulted in higher mortality of C. maculatus. For BRS Tapaihum cultivar, inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria strains BR3267, BR 3262 and BR 3299, and nitrogen fertilization resulted in higher mortality among C. maculatus. BRS Tapaihum and BRS Acauã cultivars showed the lowest cumulative insect emergence and instantaneous rates of population growth, and the highest insect mortality, mainly when the grains were obtained from plants inoculated with rhizobial strains. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Gamma radiosensitivity in common bean plant and cowpea; Gama radiossensitividade em feijoeiro comum e caupi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Sandra da Silva; Colaco, Waldeciro [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    An indispensable step in mutation induction experiments is the determination of the sensitivity to mutagens to be used. Taking this into consideration the radiosensitivity of bean cultivars Carioca, Princesa (P. vulgaris L.), and IPA-206 [V. unguiculata (L.) Walp] to gamma rays from a {sup 60} Co source was evaluated. Sets of seeds (40 seeds/sample) were irradiated with 100, 150, 200, 250 Gy, and compared to a control without irradiation (0 Gy), under greenhouse conditions. Bean and cowpea seeds were respectively inoculated with a suspension of Rhizobium (SEMIA-4077) and Bradyrhizobium (SEMIA-6145) strains. The radiosensitivity was evaluated through seedling height reduction determined at 15 days after emergence (15-DAE), and also through dry matter yield of above-ground part and root nodules at 40-DAE. Seedling height was significantly reduced with increased dose of radiation in relation to the control. The dose causing reduction of 50% seedling height for P. vulgaris cultivar Princesa was set up between 150-250 Gy. Cowpea (IPA-206) was less sensitive to radiation than common bean cultivars, considering the dose range of radiation studied, and a 75% seedling height reduction was reached in the range of 150-250 Gy. Dry mater yield of the above-ground part, root and nodule, were inversely related to the doses. It is recommended a dose range of 300-350 Gy for mutation breeding purposes using the cowpea cultivar (IPA-206). (author)

  15. Comparative evaluation of six storage methods for postharvest preservation of cowpea grain

    KAUST Repository

    Baoua, I. B.

    2012-04-01

    Several technologies reputedly minimize losses of stored cowpea grain to bruchid beetles on low resource farms in Africa. Side by side comparison of these different postharvest storage methods can provide the basis for deciding which performs best. We compared six different technologies for cowpea storage: (1) grain mixed with ash; (2) mixed with sand; (3) fumigated with phostoxin; (4) admixed with the stems and leaves of . Boscia senegalensis (Pers) Lam ex Poir, a potential botanical insecticide; (5) disinfested using a solar heater, and; (6) hermetically sealed in triple-layer plastic bags. Sampling was done at thirty-day intervals over five months of storage. Counts were made of (i) adult emergence holes, (ii) dead larvae and (iii) surviving bruchid larvae and adults. Controls, which consisted of infested cowpea grain stored in cloth bags, were damaged extensively. . Boscia senegalensis-treated grain suffered similar severe damage. All other treatments suppressed bruchid population increases as was evident from the much lower counts of emergence holes and lower numbers of surviving or dead insects. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Evaluating sustainable and profitable cropping sequences with cassave and four legume crops: Effects on soil fertility and maize yields in the forest/savannah transitional agro-ecological zone of Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjei-Nsiah, S.; Kuyper, T.W.; Leeuwis, C.; Abekoe, M.K.; Giller, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    Rotations are important practices for managing soil fertility on smallholder farms. Six cropping sequences (cassava, pigeonpea, mucuna-maize-mucuna, cowpea-maize-cowpea, maize-maize-maize, and speargrass fallow) were evaluated during 2003-2004 in Wenchi district of Ghana for their effects on the

  17. Effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchley, E. R.; Gong, W.-L.; Alleman, J.E.; Rose, J.B.; Huffman, D.E.; Otaki, M.; Lisle, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater disinfection is practiced with the goal of reducing risks of human exposure to pathogenic microorganisms. In most circumstances, the efficacy of a wastewater disinfection process is regulated and monitored based on measurements of the responses of indicator bacteria. However, inactivation of indicator bacteria does not guarantee an acceptable degree of inactivation among other waterborne microorganisms (e.g., microbial pathogens). Undisinfected effluent samples from several municipal wastewater treatment facilities were collected for analysis. Facilities were selected to provide a broad spectrum of effluent quality, particularly as related to nitrogenous compounds. Samples were subjected to bench-scale chlorination and dechlorination and UV irradiation under conditions that allowed compliance with relevant discharge regulations and such that disinfectant exposures could be accurately quantified. Disinfected samples were subjected to a battery of assays to assess the immediate and long-term effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses. In general, (viable) bacterial populations showed an immediate decline as a result of disinfectant exposure; however, incubation of disinfected samples under conditions that were designed to mimic the conditions in a receiving stream resulted in substantial recovery of the total bacterial community. The bacterial groups that are commonly used as indicators do not provide an accurate representation of the response of the bacterial community to disinfectant exposure and subsequent recovery in the environment. UV irradiation and chlorination/dechlorination both accomplished measurable inactivation of indigenous phage; however, the extent of inactivation was fairly modest under the conditions of disinfection used in this study. UV irradiation was consistently more effective as a virucide than chlorination/dechlorination under the conditions of application, based on measurements of virus (phage

  18. The effect of maternal antibodies on the detection of bovine virus diarrhoea virus in peripheral blood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmer, G.M.; Maanen, van C.; Goey, de I.; Brinkhof, J.; Wentink, G.H.

    2004-01-01

    Persistently infected animals (PI animals), that is those animals born after an intrauterine infection of the dam during the first 120 days of gestation, are the main source of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVD virus) in a cattle population. The success of any BVD virus eradication programme depends

  19. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection.

  20. Effects of solution conditions on virus retention by the Viresolve® NFP filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishari, Shudipto K; Micklin, Matthew R; Sung, Ki-Joo; Zydney, Andrew L; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Earley, Jennifer N

    2015-01-01

    Virus filtration can provide a robust method for removal of adventitious parvoviruses in the production of biotherapeutics. Although virus filtration is typically thought to function by a purely size-based removal mechanism, there is limited data in the literature indicating that virus retention is a function of solution conditions. The objective of this work was to examine the effect of solution pH and ionic strength on virus retention by the Viresolve(®) NFP membrane. Data were obtained using the bacteriophage ϕX174 as a model virus, with retention data complemented by the use of confocal microscopy to directly visualize capture of fluorescently labeled ϕX174 within the filter. Virus retention was greatest at low pH and low ionic strength, conditions under which there was an attractive electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged membrane and the positively charged phage. In addition, the transient increase in virus transmission seen in response to a pressure disruption at pH 7.8 and 10 was completely absent at pH 4.9, suggesting that the trapped virus are unable to overcome the electrostatic attraction and diffuse out of the pores when the pressure is released. Further confirmation of this physical picture was provided by confocal microscopy. Images obtained at pH 10 showed the migration of previously captured phage; this phenomenon was absent at pH 4.9. These results provide important new insights into the factors governing virus retention using virus filtration membranes. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Cowpea fresh pods - a new legume for the market: assessment of their quality and dietary characteristics of 37 cowpea accessions grown in southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanos, Ioannis; Papandreou, Anastasia; Skouloudi, Marianna; Makrogianni, Despoina; Fernández, Juan A; Rosa, Eduardo; Ntatsi, Georgia; Bebeli, Penelope J; Savvas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    Cowpea is traditionally cultivated in some regions of southern Europe for its dried seeds; however, there is a scarcity of information on the quality and dietary characteristics of fresh pods, which are occasionally used in folk diets. This paper aims at covering this gap in knowledge, thereby contributing to the dissemination of fresh cowpea pods as a novel product for the market. The quality and dietary characteristics of pods from 37 accessions (Vigna unguiculata ssp. unguiculata and ssp. sesquipedalis) grown in southern Europe were assessed in an attempt to provide information on pod quality and nutritional properties and to identify relationships between quality traits and accession origin. Pods from the sesquipedalis accessions were heavier and larger, and reached commercial maturity 2 days later, than those from the unguiculata accessions. There were also large differences in the quality and dietary characteristics of the accessions. The pods of most accessions were rich in proteins, chlorophylls, carotenoids and phenolics, and showed high antioxidant activity and low concentrations of nitrates and raffinose-family oligosaccharides. Cluster analysis based on quality, dietary or antinutritional traits did not reveal any apparent grouping among the accessions. All the quality characteristics were independent of accession origin and subspecies. Most of the accessions produced fresh pods of good quality and high dietary value, suitable for introduction in the market and/or for use as valuable genetic material for the development of new improved varieties. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Depletion interactions effected by different variants of fd virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    July, Christoph; Lang, Peter R

    2010-12-21

    The depletion interaction between a probe sphere and a flat wall induced by fd virus is investigated by means of total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The viruses serve as a model system for monodisperse, rod-like colloids. We find that the experimental potentials are well described by the first-order density approximation up to an fd content of several overlap concentrations. This is in accordance with higher order density theory as confirmed by numerical calculations. Since the first-order analytical description still holds for all measurements, this exemplifies that higher order terms of the theory are unimportant for our system. Comparing the potentials induced by wild-type fd to those induced by a more rigid fd variant, it can be shown that the influence of the virus stiffness is beyond our experimental resolution and plays only a negligible role for the measured depletion potentials.

  3. Stylet penetration activities by Aphis craccivora (Hymenoptera: Aphididae) on plants and excised plant parts of resistant and susceptible cultivars of cowpea (Leguminosae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annan, B.; Tingey, W.M.; Schaefers, G.A.; Tjallingii, W.F.; Backus, E.A.; Saxena, K.N.

    2000-01-01

    Direct current electrical penetration graphs (DC-EPGs) were used to analyze the stylet penetration activities of cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, on plants of aphid-resistant (ICV-12) and aphid-susceptible (ICV-1) cultivars of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walpers. Aphid stylet penetration on

  4. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis for plant growth habit in worldwide Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea is a legume widely grown in Africa, North, Central and South America, and Asia. The Cowpea plant growth habits consist of erect, semi-prostrate, and prostrate types. Developing a cultivar while considering plant growth habit is essential within a breeding program since the need for a particul...

  5. Effect of watermelon silver mottle virus on the life history and feeding preference of Thrips palmi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Te Chen

    Full Text Available Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding, feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors.

  6. Effect of watermelon silver mottle virus on the life history and feeding preference of Thrips palmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Te; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Tsai, Chi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding), feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors.

  7. Oncolytic effects of a novel influenza A virus expressing interleukin-15 from the NS reading frame.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke van Rikxoort

    Full Text Available Oncolytic influenza A viruses with deleted NS1 gene (delNS1 replicate selectively in tumour cells with defective interferon response and/or activated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signalling pathway. To develop a delNS1 virus with specific immunostimulatory properties, we used an optimised technology to insert the interleukin-15 (IL-15 coding sequence into the viral NS gene segment (delNS1-IL-15. DelNS1 and delNS1-IL-15 exerted similar oncolytic effects. Both viruses replicated and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in interferon-defective melanoma cells. Virus replication was required for their oncolytic activity. Cisplatin enhanced the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses. The cytotoxic drug increased delNS1 replication and delNS1-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interference with MEK/ERK signalling by RNAi-mediated depletion or the MEK inhibitor U0126 did not affect the oncolytic effects of the delNS1 viruses. In oncolysis sensitive melanoma cells, delNS1-IL-15 (but not delNS1 infection resulted in the production of IL-15 levels ranging from 70 to 1140 pg/mL in the cell culture supernatants. The supernatants of delNS1-IL-15-infected (but not of delNS1-infected melanoma cells induced primary human natural killer cell-mediated lysis of non-infected tumour cells. In conclusion, we constructed a novel oncolytic influenza virus that combines the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses with immunostimulatory properties through production of functional IL-15. Moreover, we showed that the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses can be enhanced in combination with cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Effect of Watermelon Silver Mottle Virus on the Life History and Feeding Preference of Thrips palmi

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Te Chen; Chien-Hao Tseng; Chi-Wei Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospov...

  9. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; Schoot, Paul van der; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses self assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although

  10. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew, E-mail: apekosz@jhsph.edu

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  11. Pesticidal activity of certain plant extracts and their isolates against the cowpea beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimetry Nadia Zikry

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different extracts from seven plant species were assayed against the cowpea beetle (Callosobruchus maculatus in the laboratory. The plants were extracted sequentially with petroleum ether, chloroform and ethyl alcohol. The petroleum ether extract of each was fractionated into sap and unsap, then identified by GC chromatography. Also compounds isolated from chloroform and alcohol extracts of Citrullus colocynthis and petroleum ether extract of Nicandra physaloides were tested for their toxicity against the adult beetle. The sensitivity of the adults to various crude extracts revealed great variation in effectiveness. Petroleum ether and chloroform extracts of Nicandra physaloides proved to be the most toxic in comparison to other extracts tested, while petroleum ether extracts of Curcuma longa proved to be the least effective. All the fatty acid fractions of the seven plant species were toxic to the adult beetles at the tested concentrations. N. physaloides, Schinus terebinthifolius and Dodonaea viscosa resulted in 100% mortality of adults at the highest concentration tested (1.0%. Using 1.0% unsap fraction of Dodonaea viscosa resulted in 100% mortality between the adults. The least percentage mortality between the adult beetles recorded (22% was for unsap fraction of T. orientalis at concentration of 0.0625% but increased to 80.0% mortality at concentration of 1.0%. The compounds isolated from chloroform and alcohol extracts of C. colocynthis and petroleum ether extract of N. physaloides proved to be highly efficient against C. maculatus adults.

  12. Detailed Report on 2014/15 Influenza Virus Characteristics, and Estimates on Influenza Virus Vaccine Effectiveness from Austria's Sentinel Physician Surveillance Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Redlberger-Fritz

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE is influenced by the antigenic similarity between vaccine- and circulating strains.This paper presents data obtained by the Austrian sentinel surveillance system on the evolution of influenza viruses during the season 2014/15 and its impact on influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in Austria as estimated by a test-negative case control design. VE estimates were performed for each influenza virus type/subtype, stratified by underlying diseases and adjusted for age, sex and calendar week of infection.Detailed genetic and antigenic analyses showed that circulating A(H3N2 viruses were genetically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2 vaccine component indicating a profound vaccine mismatch. The Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 viruses were antigenically conserved and matched the respective vaccine component. Influenza B viruses were lineage-matched B/Yamagata viruses with a clade-level variation. Consistent with substantial vaccine mismatch for the A(H3N2 viruses a crude overall VE of only 47% was estimated, whereas the VE estimates for A(H1N1pdm09 were 84% and for influenza B viruses 70%. Increased VE estimates were obtained after stratification by underlying diseases and adjustment for the covariates sex and age, whereby the adjustment for the calendar week of infection was the covariate exerting the highest influence on adjusted VE estimates.In summary, VE data obtained in this study underscore the importance to perform VE estimates in the context of detailed characterization of the contributing viruses and also demonstrate that the calendar week of influenza virus infection is the most important confounder of VE estimates.

  13. Detailed Report on 2014/15 Influenza Virus Characteristics, and Estimates on Influenza Virus Vaccine Effectiveness from Austria's Sentinel Physician Surveillance Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Kundi, Michael; Popow-Kraupp, Theresia

    2016-01-01

    Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) is influenced by the antigenic similarity between vaccine- and circulating strains. This paper presents data obtained by the Austrian sentinel surveillance system on the evolution of influenza viruses during the season 2014/15 and its impact on influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in Austria as estimated by a test-negative case control design. VE estimates were performed for each influenza virus type/subtype, stratified by underlying diseases and adjusted for age, sex and calendar week of infection. Detailed genetic and antigenic analyses showed that circulating A(H3N2) viruses were genetically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2) vaccine component indicating a profound vaccine mismatch. The Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were antigenically conserved and matched the respective vaccine component. Influenza B viruses were lineage-matched B/Yamagata viruses with a clade-level variation. Consistent with substantial vaccine mismatch for the A(H3N2) viruses a crude overall VE of only 47% was estimated, whereas the VE estimates for A(H1N1)pdm09 were 84% and for influenza B viruses 70%. Increased VE estimates were obtained after stratification by underlying diseases and adjustment for the covariates sex and age, whereby the adjustment for the calendar week of infection was the covariate exerting the highest influence on adjusted VE estimates. In summary, VE data obtained in this study underscore the importance to perform VE estimates in the context of detailed characterization of the contributing viruses and also demonstrate that the calendar week of influenza virus infection is the most important confounder of VE estimates.

  14. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    The low number of envelope (Env) spikes presented on native HIV-1 particles is a major impediment for HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine development. We designed virus-like particle encoding adenoviral vectors utilizing SIVmac239 Gag as an anchor for full length and truncated HIV-1 M consensus Env...... were found between the different priming regimens as both induced high titered tier 1 neutralizing antibodies, but no tier 2 antibodies, possibly reflecting the similar presentation of trimer specific antibody epitopes. The described vaccine regimens provide insight into the effects of the HIV-1 Env...

  15. MORFOLOGI GALUR-GALUR HARAPAN KEDELAI TAHAN CPMMV (COWPEA MILD MOTTLE VIRUS SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR BIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Andri Setiawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning resources can be used by students in the learning procces to obtaining the information and knowledge. One of the learning resources that is can be used students are morphological of CpMMV-resistant soybean promising lines. This reasearch was to introduce morphological soy plant from crosses of genotype cause variation in morphological characters can be used as a source of learning Biology. Identification was conducted at ILETRI on March-June 2015. Descriptive data analysis is carried out. The results showed the existence of variation of morphological characters derived from crosses of the genotype. Based on the study of the processes and results of the study, morphological of CpMMV-resistant soybean promising lines can be use as a source of learning Biology. Sumber belajar dapat digunakan siswa dalam proses belajar untuk memperoleh informasi dan pengetahuan. Salah satu sumber belajar yang dapat digunakan siswa yaitu morfologi galur-galur harapan kedelai tahan CpMMV. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengenalkan bahwa morfologi tanaman kedelai dari hasil persilangan genotipe menimbulkan variasi karakter morfologi yang dapat digunakan sebagai sumber belajar Biologi. Identifikasi dilakukan di BALITKABI pada bulan Maret—Juni 2015. Analisis data dilakukan secara deskriptif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan adanya variasi karakter morfologi yang berasal dari persilangan genotipe. Berdasarkan kajian proses dan hasil penelitian, morfologi galur-galur harapan kedelai tahan CpMMV dapat dijadikan sebagai sumber belajar Biologi.

  16. Effect of the deletion of genes encoding proteins of the extracellular virion form of vaccinia virus on vaccine immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion (MV and the enveloped virion (EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and/or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.

  17. Effect of manufacturing process parameters on virus inactivation by dry heat treatment at 80 degrees C in factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P L; Dunkerley, C; McAuley, A; Winkelman, L

    2007-01-01

    Dry heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 72 h is used as a virus inactivation step for some coagulation factor concentrates such as Bio Products Laboratory's (BPL) factor VIII 8Y. In the current study, the effect of this process has been tested on a range of viruses. In addition the effect of various manufacturing process parameters on virus inactivation has been investigated. Samples of product intermediate were obtained from manufacturing, spiked with virus and subjected to freeze drying and dry heat treatment. Virus inactivation was determined by infectivity assay. Freeze drying followed by dry heat treatment was effective for inactivating a wide range of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses. Sucrose or protein concentration had no effect on virus inactivation. Product presentation or the interruption of heat treatment also had no effect. The inactivation of some of the viruses was greater at higher residual water content but under such conditions the stability of the product was reduced. This virus inactivation step was effective for a wide range of viruses and over the range of process conditions encountered in manufacturing. This demonstrates the robustness of this process step.

  18. Effects of maximum node degree on computer virus spreading in scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaarouf, O.; Ould Baba, A.; Lamzabi, S.; Rachadi, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.

    2017-10-01

    The increase of the use of the Internet networks favors the spread of viruses. In this paper, we studied the spread of viruses in the scale-free network with different topologies based on the Susceptible-Infected-External (SIE) model. It is found that the network structure influences the virus spreading. We have shown also that the nodes of high degree are more susceptible to infection than others. Furthermore, we have determined a critical maximum value of node degree (Kc), below which the network is more resistible and the computer virus cannot expand into the whole network. The influence of network size is also studied. We found that the network with low size is more effective to reduce the proportion of infected nodes.

  19. Computational sensing of herpes simplex virus using a cost-effective on-chip microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Ray, Aniruddha

    2017-07-03

    Caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), herpes is a viral infection that is one of the most widespread diseases worldwide. Here we present a computational sensing technique for specific detection of HSV using both viral immuno-specificity and the physical size range of the viruses. This label-free approach involves a compact and cost-effective holographic on-chip microscope and a surface-functionalized glass substrate prepared to specifically capture the target viruses. To enhance the optical signatures of individual viruses and increase their signal-to-noise ratio, self-assembled polyethylene glycol based nanolenses are rapidly formed around each virus particle captured on the substrate using a portable interface. Holographic shadows of specifically captured viruses that are surrounded by these self-assembled nanolenses are then reconstructed, and the phase image is used for automated quantification of the size of each particle within our large field-of-view, ~30 mm2. The combination of viral immuno-specificity due to surface functionalization and the physical size measurements enabled by holographic imaging is used to sensitively detect and enumerate HSV particles using our compact and cost-effective platform. This computational sensing technique can find numerous uses in global health related applications in resource-limited environments.

  20. Survival of hendra virus in the environment: modelling the effect of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, J C; Kung, N Y; Selleck, P W; Field, H E

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus (HeV), a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus recently emerged from bats, is a major concern to the horse industry in Australia. Previous research has shown that higher temperatures led to lower virus survival rates in the laboratory. We develop a model of survival of HeV in the environment as influenced by temperature. We used 20 years of daily temperature at six locations spanning the geographic range of reported HeV incidents to simulate the temporal and spatial impacts of temperature on HeV survival. At any location, simulated virus survival was greater in winter than in summer, and in any month of the year, survival was higher in higher latitudes. At any location, year-to-year variation in virus survival 24 h post-excretion was substantial and was as large as the difference between locations. Survival was higher in microhabitats with lower than ambient temperature, and when environmental exposure was shorter. The within-year pattern of virus survival mirrored the cumulative within-year occurrence of reported HeV cases, although there were no overall differences in survival in HeV case years and non-case years. The model examines the effect of temperature in isolation; actual virus survivability will reflect the effect of additional environmental factors.

  1. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses self assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in...

  2. Individualistic impact of unit operations of production, at household level, on some antinutritional factors in selected cowpea-based food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolade, Mathew K

    2016-05-01

    The individualistic effect of unit operations of production, at household level, on some antinutritional factors in selected cowpea-based food products (moin-moin, akara, and gbegiri) was investigated. Four cowpea types (IT93K-452-1, IT95K-499s-35, IT97K-568-18, and market sample) were used for the study, whereas the three traditional food products were produced from each of the cowpea types, respectively. The results revealed that every unit operation involved in the production of moin-moin, akara or gbegiri contributed to the overall reduction of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), phytic acid (PA), and tannin; though at varying degrees. In the production of moin-moin, the major contributions to the overall reduction in TIA were from steaming (64.2-72.0%), second-stage soaking (9.7-11.9%), and dehulling (9.4-10.2%). The contributions to the overall reduction in PA were from dehulling (34.0-40.4%), preliminary soaking (15.4-21.0%), and steaming (7.8-14.0%), whereas that of tannin were from dehulling (39.7-47.6%), steaming (19.6-24.7%), and preliminary soaking (9.8-15.9%). For akara production, the major contributions to TIA reduction were from deep frying (64.2-72.0%), second-stage soaking (9.7-11.9%), and dehulling (9.4-10.2%). The PA reduction was from dehulling (34.0-40.4%), preliminary soaking (15.4-21.0%), and deep frying (9.6-15.9%), whereas that of tannin reduction was from dehulling (39.7-47.6%), deep frying (20.7-25.3%), and preliminary soaking (9.8-15.9%). In the production of gbegiri, the overall reduction in TIA was contributed from pressure cooking (79.0-84.8%), preliminary soaking (5.8-11.3%), and dehulling (9.4-10.2%). The reduction in PA was contributed by dehulling (34.0-40.4%), pressure cooking (24.7-35.0%), and preliminary soaking (15.4-21.0%), whereas the overall reduction in tannin content was similarly contributed by dehulling (39.7-47.6%), pressure cooking (29.8-34.4%), and preliminary soaking (9.8-15.9%).

  3. Avian influenza virus (H5N1; effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Sajid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 (local strain virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 108.3 ELD50/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon®-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg was subjected to haemagglutination (HA and haemagglutination inhibition (HI tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56°C, after 1 day at 28°C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4°C. Acidic pH (1, 3 and basic pH (11, 13 were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h, 7 and 9 (more than 24 h. UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy®, detergent (surf excel® and alkali (caustic soda destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV outbreak.

  4. Avian influenza virus (H5N1); effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad Akbar; Abubakar, Muhammad; Hameed, Sajid; Hassan, Shamsul

    2009-03-28

    Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 (local strain) virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 10(8.3) ELD(50)/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light) and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda) agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF) from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg) was subjected to haemagglutination (HA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56 degrees C, after 1 day at 28 degrees C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4 degrees C. Acidic pH (1, 3) and basic pH (11, 13) were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h), 7 and 9 (more than 24 h). UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy), detergent (surf excel) and alkali (caustic soda) destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV) outbreak.

  5. Vicilins (7S storage globulins of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata seeds bind to chitinous structures of the midgut of Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chitin in midgut structures of Callosobruchus maculatus larvae was shown by chemical and immunocytochemical methods. Detection by Western blotting of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata seed vicilins (7S storage proteins bound to these structures suggested that C. maculatus-susceptible vicilins presented less staining when compared to C. maculatus-resistant vicilins. Storage proteins present in the microvilli in the larval midgut of the bruchid were recognized by immunolabeling of vicilins in the appropriate sections with immunogold conjugates. These labeling sites coincided with the sites labeled by an anti-chitin antibody. These results, taken together with those previously published showing that the lower rates of hydrolysis of variant vicilins from C. maculatus-resistant seeds by the insect's midgut proteinases and those showing that vicilins bind to chitin matrices, may explain the detrimental effects of variant vicilins on the development of C. maculatus larvae.

  6. Effect of Porphyridium sp. polysaccharide on malignant cell transformation by Moloney murine sarcoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihel, M; Arad, S

    2001-01-01

    The polysaccharide produced by the red microalga Porphyridium sp. was highly inhibitory for cell transformation of mouse fibroblast cells by an MSV-124 virus stock. This inhibition was most effective if the polysaccharide was added 2 h before or at the time of infection. The finding that the inhibition of cell transformation by MuSV-124 was reversible after removal of the polysaccharide suggested that Porphyridium sp. polysaccharide inhibited a late step after provirus integration into the host genome. Addition of the polysaccharide post-infection significantly reduced the number of transformed cells, but its effect was less marked than that obtained when the polysaccharide was added before or at the time of infection. These findings support the possibility that the polysaccharide may affect early steps in virus replication cycle, such as virus absorption into the host cells, in addition to its effect on a late step after provirus integration.

  7. FY04 LDRD Final Report: Interaction of Viruses with Membranes and Soil Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M

    2005-02-08

    The influence of ionic strength on the electrostatic interaction of viruses with environmentally relevant surfaces was determined for three viruses, MS2, Q{beta} and Norwalk. The environmental surface is modeled as charged Gouy-Chapman plane with and without a finite atomistic region (patch) of opposite charge. The virus is modeled as a particle comprised of ionizable amino acid residues in a shell surrounding a spherical RNA core of negative charge, these charges being compensated for by a Coulomb screening due to intercalated ions. Surface potential calculations for each of the viruses show excellent agreement with electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential measurements as a function of pH. The results indicate that the electrostatic interaction between the virus and the planar surface, mitigated by the ionic strength of the solute, is dependent upon the spatial distribution of the amino acid residues in the different viruses. Specifically, the order of interaction energies with the patch (MS2 greatest at 5 mM; Norwalk greatest at 20 mM) is dependent upon the ionic strength of the fluid as a direct result of the viral coat amino acid distributions. We have developed an atomistic-scale method of calculation of the binding energy of viruses to surfaces including electrostatic, van der Waals, electron-overlap repulsion, surface charge polarization (images), and hydrophobic effects. The surface is treated as a Gouy-Chapman plane allowing inclusion of pH and ionic strength effects on the electrostatic potential at each amino acid charge. Van der Waals parameters are obtained from the DREIDING force field and from Hamaker constant measurements. We applied this method to the calculation of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV), a negatively charged virus at a pH of 7.0, and find that the viral-gold surface interaction is very long range for both signs of surface potential, a result due to the electrostatic forces. For a negative (Au) surface potential of -0.05 volts, a nearly

  8. Comparisonof physicochemical properties of selected locally available legume varieties (mung bean, cowpea and soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulasooriyage Tharuka Gunathilake

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Grain legumes are widely used as high-protein contained crops that play a secondary role to cereal or root crops. In Sri Lanka various legume species are cultivated and often utilised in the whole grain boiled form. The objective of present study was to analyse and compare locally grown legumes varieties; Mung bean (MI 5, MI 6, Cowpea (Bombay, Waruni, Dhawal, MICP1, ANKCP1 and soybean (pb1, MISB1 for their morphological characteristics, proximate and mineral composition (Fe, Ca, Zn, K, P. Seed shape, seed coat texture and colour, seed size and 100 seed weight (g were observed morphological characteristics in present study. Most of the characteristics of mung bean and soybean were similar within their species whereas characteristics of cowpea varieties largely differed. Values of 100 seed weight among the varieties of mung bean, soybean and cowpea were ranged from 5.8 - 6.5 g, 13.5 - 14.1 g and 13.4 - 17.2 g, respectively. The moisture content of all legume seeds ranged from 6.81% to 11.99%. Results were shown that the protein content significantly higher in soybean (36.56 - 39.70% followed by mung bean (26.56 - 25.99% and cowpea (25.22 - 22.84% respectively. Range of total carbohydrate, crude fat, crude fibre and total ash contents of nine legume varieties varied from 15.29 - 62.97%, 1.25 - 22.02%, 3.04 - 7.93% and 3.43 - 6.35 respectively. potassium (K, phosphorus (P, calcium (Ca, iron (Fe and zinc (Zn ranged from 1000 - 1900, 360 - 669, 15.0 - 192.3, 2.26 - 11.6 and 1.67 - 4.26 mg.100g-1 respectively in all the species of studied legume varieties. The wide variation in the chemical and physical properties of observed nine legume varieties, suggesting possible applications for various end-use products. 

  9. The Effects of in utero Viral Infection on Embryonic, Fetal, and Neonatal Survival: A Comparison of SMEDI (Porcine Picorna) Viruses with Hog Cholera Vaccinal Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, H. W.; Wang, J. T.; Clark, C. D.; Hokanson, J. F.; Morimoto, T.; Bubash, G. R.

    1969-01-01

    SMEDI and hog cholera viruses were shown to have marked effects upon the survival of the embryo (from conception to 30 days of gestation), the fetus (from 30 days of gestation until birth), and the neonatal pig (from birth until five days after birth). Embryonic infection was characterized by death and absorption of the embryo and in some instances the return to estrus after an irregular estrous cycle. Embryonic infection also may have been responsible for the development of some abnormal pigs. Fetal infection caused death with mummification of one or more fetuses and occasionally all fetuses in the uterus. Infection established in early gestation produced effects on the fetus which apparently persisted until after birth and varied from a persistent viremia (as in hog cholera infection) to an undefined lack of resistance in the newborn (as in SMEDI virus infection). Hog cholera vaccinal virus was the more virulent of the two virus types and reacted somewhat like rubella virus, in that infection apparently could be established in the fetus even in middle trimester of pregnancy, and possibly later. SMEDI viruses, in contrast, were less virulent and were most pathogenic when the dam was infected during the first 30 days of pregnancy. Immunity against either virus could be established in the nonpregnant gilt and was most effective in preventing intrauterine infections with that virus. However, with as many as 10 enteroviruses (five are known to cause intrauterine infection) it was believed that maintaining a closed breeding herd and introducing new stock into contact with the breeding herd at least 30 days before breeding time might be a safer means of control. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:4243029

  10. Effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Aldabe, R; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-15

    The effects of transient expression of poliovirus 2A(pro) on p220 cleavage in COS cells have been analyzed. When 2A(pro) was cloned in plasmid pTM1 and transiently expressed in COS cells, efficient cleavage of p220 occurred after infection of these cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus bearing phage T7 RNA polymerase. High numbers of COS cells were transfected with pTM1-2A, as judged by p220 cleavage, thereby allowing an analysis of the effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression. A 40-50% cleavage of p220 by transfected poliovirus 2A(pro) was observed ten hours post infection and cleavage was almost complete (80-90%) 20-25 hours post infection with vaccinia virus. Profound inhibition of vaccinia virus protein synthesis was detectable ten hours post infection and was maximal 20-25 hours post infection. This inhibition resulted from neither a blockade of transcription of vaccinia virus nor a lack of translatability of the mRNAs present in cells that synthesize poliovirus 2A(pro). Addition of ara-C inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and allowed the continued synthesis of cellular proteins. Under these conditions, 2A(pro) is expressed and blocks cellular translation. Finally, p220 cleavage by 2A(pro) did not inhibit the translation of a mRNA encoding poliovirus protein 2C, as directed by the 5' leader sequences of encephalomiocarditis virus. Therefore, these findings show a correlation between p220 cleavage and inhibition of translation from newly made mRNAs. Our results are discussed in the light of present knowledge of p220 function, and new approaches are considered that might provide further insights into the function(s) of initiation factor eIF-4F.

  11. Effects of l-Glutamine Deprivation on Growth of HVJ (Sendai Virus) in BHK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Nagata, Ikuya; Kunii, Akira

    1974-01-01

    l-Glutamine requirement for viral maturation was found in BHK-HVJ cells, a cell line of baby hamster kidney cells persistently infected with HVJ (Sendai virus). Synthesis of envelope protein in BHK-HVJ cells was markedly suppressed by deprivation of l-glutamine, whereas development of nucleocapsid (S) antigen was less affected. More detailed examination of this phenomenon was carried out by using a cytolytic system. Growth of HVJ in BHK cells cultured in media deprived of various amino acids was investigated, and omission of l-glutamine from culture medium resulted in a marked inhibitory effect on the release of infectious virus and synthesis of envelope protein, although synthesis of virus-specific RNA and nucleocapsid antigen in the cells was readily detected. When l-glutamine was restored to the culture medium, infectious virus and envelope protein could be detected. l-Glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, or l-alanine could be substituted for l-glutamine. Effects of l-glutamine deprivation on HVJ growth in several other cells were also investigated. The growth of HVJ in the cells other than BHK and FL cells was not suppressed by lack of l-glutamine. Growth of Sindbis virus in BHK cells was also markedly retarded in the absence of l-glutamine. PMID:4362861

  12. Effects of sanitation, freezing and frozen storage on enteric viruses in berries and herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butot, S; Putallaz, T; Sánchez, G

    2008-08-15

    Norovirus (NV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are foodborne enteric viruses associated with outbreaks of disease following consumption of fresh or frozen produce. Model experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of certain commercial processes for the removal of enteric viruses that might be present in berries and herbs. The survival and persistence of HAV, NV, rotavirus (RV) and feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for NV, in frozen produce over time were determined. Survival and inactivation of HAV, RV and FCV were assessed by viral culture and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), whereas NV persistence was determined by quantitative RT-PCR only. Freezing did not significantly reduce the viability of any of the viruses except the infectivity of FCV in strawberries. Frozen storage for 3 months had limited effects on HAV and RV survival in all tested food products, whereas in frozen raspberries and strawberries FCV infectivity showed the highest decay rate due to acid pH. To simulate postharvesting conditions, fresh berries and herbs were rinsed with tap, warm or chlorinated water or with a chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) solution. Available chlorine at a concentration of 200 ppm and ClO(2) at 10 ppm reduced measurable enteric viruses in raspberry and parsley samples by less than 2 log(10) units.

  13. A multitrophic model to quantify the effects of marine viruses on microbial food webs and ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitz, Joshua S.; Stock, Charles A.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    that viruses can have significant stimulatory effects across whole-ecosystem scales. We suggest that existing efforts to predict carbon and nutrient cycling without considering virus effects are likely to miss essential features of marine food webs that regulate global biogeochemical cycles.The ISME Journal...

  14. Genotype x row spacing and environment interaction of cowpea in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype x within row spacing interaction effects were not significant, suggesting that selection at low densities would be effective in identifying superior and productive genotypes for further testing in either within row spacing. Because of significant genotype x environment and WRS interaction effects, this effectiveness ...

  15. Biocontrol in store: spatial and behavioural aspects of foraging by Uscana lariophaga, egg parasitoid of Callosobruchus maculatus, in stored cowpea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata Walpers), an important crop for West African subsistence farmers, is often infested in storage by the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius. The indigenous egg parasitoid Uscana

  16. Productive performance of cowpea-radish intercropping under different amounts of rooster tree biomass incorporated into the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. S. Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intercropping systems of cowpea with radish are beginning to be deployed in the semiarid region of Rio Grande do Norte state. The great challenge is to know whether or not there is productive efficiency in these systems when fertilized with organic matter produced by spontaneous species from the ‘Caatinga’ biome. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the productive performance of cowpea-radish intercropping systems under different amounts of rooster tree biomass incorporated into the soil. The study was conducted at the experimental farm Rafael Fernandes, rural zone of Mossoró, RN, in the period from June to September 2013, in an experimental design of randomized blocks with four treatments and five replicates. The treatments consisted of the following amounts of rooster tree biomass incorporated into the soil (10, 25, 40 and 55 t ha-1 on a dry weight basis. The best productive performance of the cowpea-radish intercrop was obtained when the rooster tree biomass amount of 50.01 t ha-1 was incorporated to the soil. The use of rooster tree biomass as green manure is agronomically viable in intercropped systems of cowpea-radish.

  17. Enhanced Synthesis of Antioxidant Enzymes, Defense Proteins and Leghemoglobin in Rhizobium-Free Cowpea Roots after Challenging with Meloydogine incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose T. A. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The root knot nematodes (RKN, Meloydogine spp., particularly Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne javanica species, parasitize several plant species and are responsible for large annual yield losses all over the world. Only a few available chemical nematicides are still authorized for RKN control owing to environmental and health reasons. Thus, plant resistance is currently considered the method of choice for controlling RKN, and research performed on the molecular interactions between plants and nematodes to identify genes of interest is of paramount importance. The present work aimed to identify the differential accumulation of root proteins of a resistant cowpea genotype (CE-31 inoculated with M. incognita (Race 3 in comparison with mock-inoculated control, using 2D electrophoresis assay, mass spectrometry identification and gene expression analyses by RT-PCR. The results showed that at least 22 proteins were differentially represented in response to RKN challenge of cowpea roots mainly within 4–6 days after inoculation. Amongst the up-represented proteins were SOD, APX, PR-1, β-1,3-glucanase, chitinases, cysteine protease, secondary metabolism enzymes, key enzymes involved in ethylene biosynthesis, proteins involved in MAPK pathway signaling and, surprisingly, leghemoglobin in non-rhizobium-bacterized cowpea. These findings show that an important rearrangement in the resistant cowpea root proteome occurred following challenge with M. incognita.

  18. Comparison of complete mitochondrial DNA sequences between old and new world strains of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial DNA provides useful tools for inferring population genetic structure within a species and phylogenetic relationships between species. The complete mitogenome sequences were assembled from strains of the cowpea aphids, Aphis craccivora, from the old (15,308 bp) and new world (15,305 bp...

  19. Probing plasma membrane microdomains in cowpea protoplasts using lipidated GFP-fusion proteins and multimode FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, J.E.M.; van Munster, E.B.; Vischer, N.O.; Gadella, T.

    2004-01-01

    Multimode fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was applied to study the plasma membrane organization using different lipidated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins co-expressed in cowpea protoplasts. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to the hyper variable region

  20. Natural infection of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) by toxigenic fungi and mycotoxin contamination in Benin, West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houssou, P.A.; Ahohuendo, B.C.; Fandohan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Natural infection of cowpea by toxigenic fungi and mycotoxin contamination in Benin, West Africa were studied. Cowpea samples were collected at harvest (T0) and after three months of storage (T3) from the four agro-ecological zones of the country. A total of 92 representative samples were analysed...... infection was found to increase after storage from 7.6% at T0 to 28.25% at T3. In spite of this natural infection of cowpea, very low levels of fumonisin and aflatoxin were detected. Only three out of the 92 cowpea samples, all collected at T0, were found to be fumonisin B1 positive with a mean level of 0.......03 mg/g. Similarly, only six samples out of the 92, all collected at T3, were aflatoxin B1 positive with mean levels of 3.58 µg/kg. Fumonisin (B2 and B3) and aflatoxin (B2, G1 and G2) were not detected in any of the samples. Contrary to the situation with maize and groundnut where high levels of toxin...