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Sample records for covalently bound protein

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces

  2. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface 125 I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with [ 35 S] methionine, 14 C-amino acids, or [ 3 H] palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11

  3. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

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    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  4. Structure of the red fluorescent protein from a lancelet (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): a novel GYG chromophore covalently bound to a nearby tyrosine

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    Pletnev, Vladimir Z., E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.; Fradkov, Arkady F.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Chepurnykh, Tatyana; Yampolsky, Ilia V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wlodawer, Alexander [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pletnev, Sergei, E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); SAIC-Frederick, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of the novel red emitting fluorescent protein from lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata) revealed an unusual five residues cyclic unit comprising Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60 chromophore, the following Phe61 and Tyr62 covalently bound to chromophore Tyr59. A key property of proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family is their ability to form a chromophore group by post-translational modifications of internal amino acids, e.g. Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67 in GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria (Cnidaria). Numerous structural studies have demonstrated that the green GFP-like chromophore represents the ‘core’ structure, which can be extended in red-shifted proteins owing to modifications of the protein backbone at the first chromophore-forming position. Here, the three-dimensional structures of green laGFP (λ{sub ex}/λ{sub em} = 502/511 nm) and red laRFP (λ{sub ex}/λ{sub em} ≃ 521/592 nm), which are fluorescent proteins (FPs) from the lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata), were determined together with the structure of a red variant laRFP-ΔS83 (deletion of Ser83) with improved folding. Lancelet FPs are evolutionarily distant and share only ∼20% sequence identity with cnidarian FPs, which have been extensively characterized and widely used as genetically encoded probes. The structure of red-emitting laRFP revealed three exceptional features that have not been observed in wild-type fluorescent proteins from Cnidaria reported to date: (i) an unusual chromophore-forming sequence Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60, (ii) the presence of Gln211 at the position of the conserved catalytic Glu (Glu222 in Aequorea GFP), which proved to be crucial for chromophore formation, and (iii) the absence of modifications typical of known red chromophores and the presence of an extremely unusual covalent bond between the Tyr59 C{sup β} atom and the hydroxyl of the proximal Tyr62. The impact of this covalent bond on the red emission and the large Stokes shift (

  5. Covalent modification of platelet proteins by palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muszbek, L.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    Covalent attachment of fatty acid to proteins plays an important role in association of certain proteins with hydrophobic membrane structures. In platelets, the structure of many membrane glycoproteins (GPs) has been examined in detail, but the question of fatty acid acylation of platelet proteins has not been addressed. In this study, we wished to determine (a) whether platelet proteins could be fatty acid acylated; and, if so, (b) whether these modified proteins were present in isolated platelet membranes and cytoskeletal fractions; and (c) if the pattern of fatty acid acylated proteins changed on stimulation of the platelets with the agonist thrombin. We observed that in platelets allowed to incorporate 3H-palmitate, a small percentage (1.37%) of radioactivity incorporated into the cells became covalently bound to protein. Selective cleavage of thioester, thioester plus O-ester, and amide-linked 3H-fatty acids from proteins, and their subsequent analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that the greatest part of 3H-fatty acid covalently bound to protein was thioester-linked 3H-palmitate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and fluorography, at least ten major radiolabeled proteins were detected. Activation of platelets by thrombin greatly increased the quantity of 3H-palmitoylated proteins associated with the cytoskeleton. Nearly all radiolabeled proteins were recovered in the membrane fraction, indicating that these proteins are either integral or peripheral membrane proteins or proteins tightly associated to membrane constituents. Components of the GPIIb-IIIa complex were not palmitoylated. Thus, platelet proteins are significantly modified posttranslationally by 3H-palmitate, and incorporation of palmitoylated proteins into the cytoskeleton is a prominent component of the platelet response to thrombin stimulation

  6. Production of recombinant cholesterol oxidase containing covalently bound FAD in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molla Gianluca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol oxidase is an alcohol dehydrogenase/oxidase flavoprotein that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of C(3-OH of cholesterol. It has two major biotechnological applications, i.e. in the determination of serum (and food cholesterol levels and as biocatalyst providing valuable intermediates for industrial steroid drug production. Cholesterol oxidases of type I are those containing the FAD cofactor tightly but not covalently bound to the protein moiety, whereas type II members contain covalently bound FAD. This is the first report on the over-expression in Escherichia coli of type II cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum (BCO. Results Design of the plasmid construct encoding the mature BCO, optimization of medium composition and identification of the best cultivation/induction conditions for growing and expressing the active protein in recombinant E. coli cells, concurred to achieve a valuable improvement: BCO volumetric productivity was increased from ~500 up to ~25000 U/L and its crude extract specific activity from 0.5 up to 7.0 U/mg protein. Interestingly, under optimal expression conditions, nearly 55% of the soluble recombinant BCO is produced as covalently FAD bound form, whereas the protein containing non-covalently bound FAD is preferentially accumulated in insoluble inclusion bodies. Conclusions Comparison of our results with those published on non-covalent (type I COs expressed in recombinant form (either in E. coli or Streptomyces spp., shows that the fully active type II BCO can be produced in E. coli at valuable expression levels. The improved over-production of the FAD-bound cholesterol oxidase will support its development as a novel biotool to be exploited in biotechnological applications.

  7. Covalently bound molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram von, Oertzen; Hans-Gerhard, Bohlen; Wolfram von, Oertzen

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear clustering in N=Z nuclei has been studied since many decades. States close to the decay thresholds, as described by the Ikeda diagram, are of particular interest. Recent studies in loosely bound systems, as observed with neutron-rich nuclei has revived the interest in cluster structures in nuclei, with additional valence neutrons, which give rise to pronounced covalent molecular structures. The Beryllium isotopes represent the first example of such unique states in nuclear physics with extreme deformations. In the deformed shell model these are referred to as super- and hyper-deformation. These states can be described explicitly by molecular concepts, with neutrons in covalent binding orbits. Examples of recent experiments performed at the HMI-Berlin demonstrating the molecular structure of the rotational bands in Beryllium isotopes are presented. Further work on chain states (nuclear polymers) in the carbon isotopes is in progress, these are the first examples of deformed structures in nuclei with an axis ratio of 3:1. A threshold diagram with clusters bound via neutrons in covalent molecular configurations can be established, which can serve as a guideline for future work. (authors)

  8. Building high-coverage monolayers of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mackenzie G.; Teplyakov, Andrew V., E-mail: andrewt@udel.edu

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A method for forming a layer of covalently bound nanoparticles is offered. • A nearly perfect monolayer of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles was formed on gold. • Spectroscopic techniques confirmed covalent binding by the “click” reaction. • The influence of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage was investigated. - Abstract: This work presents an approach for producing a high-coverage single monolayer of magnetic nanoparticles using “click chemistry” between complementarily functionalized nanoparticles and a flat substrate. This method highlights essential aspects of the functionalization scheme for substrate surface and nanoparticles to produce exceptionally high surface coverage without sacrificing selectivity or control over the layer produced. The deposition of one single layer of magnetic particles without agglomeration, over a large area, with a nearly 100% coverage is confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectroscopic techniques, supplemented by computational predictions, are used to interrogate the chemistry of the attachment and to confirm covalent binding, rather than attachment through self-assembly or weak van der Waals bonding. Density functional theory calculations for the surface intermediate of this copper-catalyzed process provide mechanistic insight into the effects of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage. Based on this analysis, it appears that steric limitations of the intermediate structure affect nanoparticle coverage on a flat solid substrate; however, this can be overcome by designing a functionalization scheme in such a way that the copper-based intermediate is formed on the spherical nanoparticles instead. This observation can be carried over to other approaches for creating highly controlled single- or multilayered nanostructures of a wide range of materials to result in high coverage and possibly, conformal filling.

  9. In vivo assessment of a novel dacron surface with covalently bound recombinant hirudin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyers, M C; Phaneuf, M D; Rzucidlo, E M; Contreras, M A; LoGerfo, F W; Quist, W C

    1999-01-01

    Prosthetic arterial graft surfaces are relatively thrombogenic and fail to heal with a cellular neointima. The goal of this study was to characterize the in vivo antithrombin properties of a novel Dacron surface with covalently linked recombinant hirudin (rHir) implanted in a canine thoracic aorta with high flow and shear rates. rHir was bound to a knitted Dacron patch using crosslinker-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a basecoat protein. BSA was first reacted with the heterobifunctional crosslinker, sulfo-SMCC. This BSA-SMCC complex was then bound to the carboxylic acid groups of hydrolyzed Dacron patches using the carbodiimide crosslinker, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride. Iodinated, Traut's-modified rHir (125I-rHir-SH) was then reacted with the Dacron-BSA-SMCC surface, thereby covalently binding 125I-rHir. Graft segments were washed and sonicated to remove any nonspecifically bound 125I-rHir. Dacron-BSA-SMCC-S-125I-rHir patches (n = 5) and control Dacron-BSA patches (n = 5) were implanted in series in the thoracic aortas of canines. These patches were exposed to nonheparinized, arterial blood flow for 2 hours. Patches were explanted and assessed for 125I-rHir loss. Antithrombin activity of explanted 1-cm2 patch segments was evaluated using a chromogenic assay with 1, 5, 10, 15 units of added thrombin. Light microscopy was performed to qualitatively examine the pseudointima. Two animals were excluded from the study owing to excessive bleeding through the knitted 125I-rHir patch. Comparison of preoperative and postoperative 125I-rHir gamma counts revealed an overall decrease of 20+/-5.4% over the period studied. Explanted 125I-rHir patch segments were able to inhibit 1, 5, and 7 NIHU of thrombin, demonstrating retained antithrombin activity. Gross and microscopic examination of the control and test Dacron surfaces showed marked differences. Dacron surfaces with covalently bound 125I-rHir had no gross thrombus and a thin

  10. Covalently bound conjugates of albumin and heparin: Synthesis, fractionation and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennink, Wim E.; Feijen, Jan; Ebert, Charles D.; Kim, Sung Wan

    1983-01-01

    Covalently bound conjugates of human serum albumin and heparin were prepared as compounds which could improve the blood-compatibility of polymer surfaces either by preadsorption or by covalent coupling of the conjugates onto blood contacting surfaces. The conjugates (10–16 weight % of heparin) were

  11. Covalently bound phosphate residues in bovine milk xanthine oxidase and in glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger: A reevaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA)); London, R.E. (National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The reported presence of covalently bound phosphate residues in flavoproteins has significant implications with regard to the catalytic mechanisms and structural stability of the specific enzymes themselves and in terms of general cellular metabolic regulation. These considerations have led to a reevaluation of the presence of covalently bound phosphorus in the flavoproteins xanthine oxidase and glucose oxidase. Milk xanthine oxidase purified by a procedure that includes anion-exchange chromatography is shown to contain three phosphate residues. All three are noncovalently associated with the protein, two with the FAD cofactor, and one with the molybdenum cofactor. Results of chemical analysis and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy indicate that enzyme purified by this method contains no phosphoserine residues. Xanthine oxidase preparations purified by chromatography on calcium phosphate gel in place of DEAE-Sephadex yielded higher phosphate-to-protein ratios, which could be reduced to the expected values by additional purification on a folate affinity column. Highly active, highly purified preparations of glucose oxidase are shown to contain only the two phosphate residues of the FAD cofactor. The covalently bound bridging phosphate reported by others may arise in aged or degraded preparations of the enzyme but appears not to be a constituent of functional glucose oxidase. These results suggest that the presence of covalent phosphate residues in other flavoproteins should be rigorously reevaluated as well.

  12. Covalently bound phosphate residues in bovine milk xanthine oxidase and in glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger: A reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; London, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The reported presence of covalently bound phosphate residues in flavoproteins has significant implications with regard to the catalytic mechanisms and structural stability of the specific enzymes themselves and in terms of general cellular metabolic regulation. These considerations have led to a reevaluation of the presence of covalently bound phosphorus in the flavoproteins xanthine oxidase and glucose oxidase. Milk xanthine oxidase purified by a procedure that includes anion-exchange chromatography is shown to contain three phosphate residues. All three are noncovalently associated with the protein, two with the FAD cofactor, and one with the molybdenum cofactor. Results of chemical analysis and 31 P NMR spectroscopy indicate that enzyme purified by this method contains no phosphoserine residues. Xanthine oxidase preparations purified by chromatography on calcium phosphate gel in place of DEAE-Sephadex yielded higher phosphate-to-protein ratios, which could be reduced to the expected values by additional purification on a folate affinity column. Highly active, highly purified preparations of glucose oxidase are shown to contain only the two phosphate residues of the FAD cofactor. The covalently bound bridging phosphate reported by others may arise in aged or degraded preparations of the enzyme but appears not to be a constituent of functional glucose oxidase. These results suggest that the presence of covalent phosphate residues in other flavoproteins should be rigorously reevaluated as well

  13. Protein covalent modification by biologically active quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIROSLAV J. GASIC

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The avarone/avarol quinone/hydroquinone couple shows considerable antitumor activity. In this work, covalent modification of b-lactoglobulin by avarone and its derivatives as well as by the synthetic steroidal quinone 2,5(10-estradiene-1,4,17-trione and its derivatives were studied. The techniques for studying chemical modification of b-lactoglobulin by quinones were: UV/Vis spectrophotometry, SDS PAGE and isoelectrofocusing. SDS PAGE results suggest that polymerization of the protein occurs. It could be seen that the protein of 18 kD gives the bands of 20 kD, 36 kD, 40 kD, 45 kD, 64 kD and 128 kD depending on modification agent. The shift of the pI of the protein (5.4 upon modification toward lower values (from pI 5.0 to 5.3 indicated that lysine amino groups are the principal site of the reaction of b-lactoglobulin with the quinones.

  14. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina; Lance, Emilie; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2010-03-01

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina; Lance, Emilie; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. - The study concerns method development for the LC-MS-MS analysis of both free and protein-bound microcystin in tissue materials.

  16. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina, E-mail: mneffling@gmail.co [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6 A, Biocity 3rd floor, FI-20520, Turku (Finland); Lance, Emilie [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042, Rennes Cedex (France); Meriluoto, Jussi [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6 A, Biocity 3rd floor, FI-20520, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. - The study concerns method development for the LC-MS-MS analysis of both free and protein-bound microcystin in tissue materials.

  17. Photochemistry of triarylmethane dyes bound to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indig, Guilherme L.

    1996-04-01

    Triarylmethanes represent a class of cationic dyes whose potential as photosensitizers for use in photodynamic therapy of neoplastic diseases has never been comprehensively evaluated. Here, the laser-induced photodecomposition of three triarylmethane dyes, crystal violet, ethyl violet, and malachite green, non-covalently bound to bovine serum albumin (a model biological target) was investigated. Upon laser excitation at 532 nm, the bleaching of the corresponding dye-protein molecular complexes follows spectroscopic patterns that suggest the formation of reduced forms of the dyes as major reaction photoproducts. That implies that an electron or hydrogen atom transfer from the protein to the dye's moiety within the guest-host complex is the first step of the photobleaching process. Since the availability of dissolved molecular oxygen was not identified as a limiting factor for the phototransformations to occur, these dyes can be seen as potential phototherapeutic agents for use in hypoxic areas of tumors. These triarylmethane dyes strongly absorb at relatively long wavelengths (absorption maximum around 600 nm; (epsilon) max approximately equals 105 M-1 cm-1), and only minor changes in their absorption characteristics are observed upon binding to the protein. However the binding event leads to a remarkable increase in their fluorescence quantum yield and photoreactivity.

  18. Covalent microcontact printing of proteins fro cell patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozkiewicz, D.I.; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Werten, Marc W.T.; de Wolf, Frits A.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ravoo, B.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe a straightforward approach to the covalent immobilization of cytophilic proteins by microcontact printing, which can be used to pattern cells on substrates. Cytophilic proteins are printed in micropatterns on reactive self-assembled monolayers by using imine chemistry. An

  19. In situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P C; Munro, C H; Smith, W E

    1996-06-01

    An in situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) procedure is described for the analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to a single strand of a cotton fibre. This procedure can be completed in 5 h, whereas an alternative enzyme digestion method takes approximately 21 h. These two fibre preparation methods give similar spectra from picogram quantities of dye present on a 2-5 mm length of fibre. The in situ nature of the analysis and the small sample size make this method particularly suitable for forensic applications.

  20. Targeting to cells of fluorescent liposomes covalently coupled with monoclonal antibody or protein A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leserman, Lee D.; Barbet, Jacques; Kourilsky, François; Weinstein, John N.

    1980-12-01

    Many applications envisioned for liposomes in cell biology and chemotherapy require their direction to specific cellular targets1-3. The ability to use antibody as a means of conferring specificity to liposomes would markedly increase their usefulness. We report here a method for covalently coupling soluble proteins, including monoclonal antibody and Staphylococcus aureus protein A (ref. 4), to small sonicated liposomes, by using the heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP, Pharmacia). Liposomes bearing covalently coupled mouse monoclonal antibody against human β2-microglobulin [antibody B1.1G6 (IgG2a, κ) (B. Malissen et al., in preparation)] bound specifically to human, but not to mouse cells. Liposomes bearing protein A became bound to human cells previously incubated with the B1.1G6 antibody, but not to cells incubated without antibody. The coupling method results in efficient binding of protein to the liposomes without aggregation and without denaturation of the coupled ligand; at least 60% of liposomes bound functional protein. Further, liposomes did not leak encapsulated carboxyfluorescein (CF) as a consequence of the reaction.

  1. Evaluation of the release characteristics of covalently attached or electrostatically bound biocidal polymers utilizing SERS and UV-Vis absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Mathioudakis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biocidal polymers with antimicrobial quaternized ammonium groups introduced in the polymer biocidal chains either through covalent attachment or electrostatic interaction have been separately incorporated in a poly (methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. The objective of present study was to highlight the release characteristics of biocidal polymers, primarily in saline but also in water ethanol solutions, utilizing UV-Vis absorption and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS. It is shown that through the combination of UV-Vis and SERS techniques, upon the release process, it is possible the discrimination of the polymeric backbone and the electrostatically bound biocidal species. Moreover, it is found that electrostatically bound and covalently attached biocidal species show different SERS patterns. The long term aim is the development of antimicrobial polymeric materials containing both ionically bound and covalently attached quaternary ammonium thus achieving a dual functionality in a single component polymeric design.

  2. Covalent DNA-protein crosslinking occurs after hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Bowden, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks occur in exponentially growing mouse leukemia cells (L1210) after exposure to ionizing radiation. The amount of DNA-protein crosslinks as measured by a filter binding assay is dose dependent upon X irradiation. Although hyperthermia and radiation in combination are synergistic with respect to cell lethality, the combination does not result in an increase of DNA-protein crosslinks when assayed immediately following treatments. Hyperthermia (43 degrees C/15 min) given prior to radiation does not alter the radiation dose dependency of the amount of initial crosslinking. In addition, the amount of DNA-protein crosslinking produced by heat plus radiation is independent of the length of heating the cells at 43 degrees C. The DNA-protein crosslinks produced by 50-Gy X ray alone are removed after 2 hr at 37 degrees C. However, if hyperthermia (43 degrees C/15 min) is given prior to 100-Gy X ray, the removal of DNA-protein crosslinks is delayed until 4.0 hr after radiation. Phospho-serine and phospho-threonine bonds are not produced with either radiation or the combination of hyperthermia plus radiation as judged by the resistance of the bonds to guanidine hydrochloride. However, hyperthermia plus radiation causes an increase in phosphate to nitrogen type bonding. These results show that radiation alone causes covalent DNA-protein crosslinks. Hyperthermia in combination with radiation does not increase the total amount of the crosslinks but delays the removal of the crosslinks and alters the distribution of the types of chemical bonding. These data suggest that the synergistic action on hyperthermia with radiation is more related to the rate of removal and the type of chemical bonding involved in the covalent DNA-protein crosslinks rather than the amount of DNA-protein crosslinks

  3. Malabsorption of protein bound vitamin B12.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, D W; Sawers, A H; Sharma, R K

    1984-01-01

    Patients with subnormal serum vitamin B12 concentrations were tested for absorption of protein bound vitamin B12 and compared with controls. Absorption of the protein bound vitamin appeared to decrease with increasing age in healthy subjects. Differences between the result of this test and the result of the Schilling test in patients who had undergone gastric surgery were confirmed; such differences were also seen in some patients who had iron deficiency anaemia, an excessive alcohol intake, ...

  4. The Search for Covalently Ligandable Proteins in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Lal Badshah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary highlights the recent article published in Nature, June 2016, titled: “Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems”. They screened the whole proteome of different human cell lines and cell lysates. Around 700 druggable cysteines in the whole proteome were found to bind the electrophilic fragments in both active and inactive states of the proteins. Their experiment and computational docking results agreed with one another. The usefulness of this study in terms of bringing a change in medicinal chemistry is highlighted here.

  5. Covalent DNA-protein crosslinking occurs after hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Bowden, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks occur in exponentially growing mouse leukemia cells (L1210) after exposure to ionizing radiation. The amount of DNA-protein crosslinks as measured by a filter binding assay is dose dependent upon x irradiation. Although hyperthermia and radiation in combination are synergistic with respect to cell lethality, the combination does not result in an increase of DNA-protein crosslinks when assayed immediately following treatments. Hyperthermia (43 0 C/15 min) given prior to radiation dose not alter the radiation dose dependency of the amount of initial crosslinking. In addition, the amount of DNA-protein crosslinking produced by heat plus radiation is independent of the length of heating the cells at 43 0 C. The DNA-protein crosslinks produced y 50-Gy x ray alone are removed after 2 hr at 37 0 C. However, if hyperthermia (43 0 C/15 min) is given prior to 100-Gy x ray, the removal of DNA-protein crosslinks is delayed until 4.0 hr after radiation. Phospho-serine and phospho-threonine bonds are not produced with either radiation or the combination of hyperthermia plus radiation as judged by the resistance of the bonds to guanidine hydrochloride. However, hyperthermia plus radiation causes an increase in phosphate to nitrogen type bonding. These results show that radiation alone causes covalent DNA-protein crosslinks. Hyperthermia in combination with radiation does not increase the total amount of the crosslinks but delays the removal of the crosslinks and alters the distribution of the types of chemical bonding

  6. Covalently coating dextran on macroporous polyglycidyl methacrylate microsphere enabled rapid protein chromatographic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Qiang; Li, Juan; Zhou, Weiqing; Ye, Peili; Gao, Yang; Ma, Guanghui, E-mail: ghma@home.ipe.ac.cn; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-12-01

    Protein denaturation and nonspecific adsorption on polymer media as a chromatographic support have been a problem which needs to be overcome. Macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-divinylbezene) (PGMA-DVB) microspheres prepared in this study were firstly covalently coated with dextran through a three-step method. The dextran was firstly adsorbed onto the microspheres and then covalently bound to the PGMA-DVB microsphere through ether bonds which were formed by hydroxyl group reacting with epoxy group at the presence of 4-(Dimethylamino) pyridine. Finally, the coating dextran layer was crosslinked by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether to form the continuous network coating. The coated microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscope, mercury porosimetry measurements, laser scanning confocal microscope, and protein adsorption experiments. Results showed that PGMA-DVB microspheres coated with dextran successfully maintained the macroporous structure and high permeability. The backpressure was only 1.69 MPa at a high flow rate of 2891 cm/h. Consequently, the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of modified microspheres were greatly improved, and the contact angle decreased from 184 Degree-Sign to 13 Degree-Sign , and nonspecific adsorption of proteins was decreased to little or none. The clad dextran coating with large amounts of hydroxyl group was easily derived to be various functional groups. The derived media have great potential applications in rapid protein chromatography. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Macroporous PGMA-DVB microspheres were covalently coated with dextran. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrophilicity of the coated microspheres was significantly improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The irreversible adsorption of proteins was reduced to zero. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coated microspheres can maintain the macropore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coated microspheres

  7. Covalently coating dextran on macroporous polyglycidyl methacrylate microsphere enabled rapid protein chromatographic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Qiang; Li, Juan; Zhou, Weiqing; Ye, Peili; Gao, Yang; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Protein denaturation and nonspecific adsorption on polymer media as a chromatographic support have been a problem which needs to be overcome. Macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate–divinylbezene) (PGMA–DVB) microspheres prepared in this study were firstly covalently coated with dextran through a three-step method. The dextran was firstly adsorbed onto the microspheres and then covalently bound to the PGMA–DVB microsphere through ether bonds which were formed by hydroxyl group reacting with epoxy group at the presence of 4-(Dimethylamino) pyridine. Finally, the coating dextran layer was crosslinked by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether to form the continuous network coating. The coated microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscope, mercury porosimetry measurements, laser scanning confocal microscope, and protein adsorption experiments. Results showed that PGMA–DVB microspheres coated with dextran successfully maintained the macroporous structure and high permeability. The backpressure was only 1.69 MPa at a high flow rate of 2891 cm/h. Consequently, the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of modified microspheres were greatly improved, and the contact angle decreased from 184° to 13°, and nonspecific adsorption of proteins was decreased to little or none. The clad dextran coating with large amounts of hydroxyl group was easily derived to be various functional groups. The derived media have great potential applications in rapid protein chromatography. - Highlights: ► Macroporous PGMA–DVB microspheres were covalently coated with dextran. ► The hydrophilicity of the coated microspheres was significantly improved. ► The irreversible adsorption of proteins was reduced to zero. ► The coated microspheres can maintain the macropore structure. ► The coated microspheres were applied to rapid protein separation.

  8. Alignment of non-covalent interactions at protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study and comparison of protein-protein interfaces is essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins. While there are many methods for comparing protein structures and protein binding sites, so far no methods have been reported for comparing the geometry of non-covalent interactions occurring at protein-protein interfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a method for aligning non-covalent interactions between different protein-protein interfaces. The method aligns the vector representations of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds based on their geometry. The method has been applied to a dataset which comprises a variety of protein-protein interfaces. The alignments are consistent to a large extent with the results obtained using two other complementary approaches. In addition, we apply the method to three examples of protein mimicry. The method successfully aligns respective interfaces and allows for recognizing conserved interface regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Galinter method has been validated in the comparison of interfaces in which homologous subunits are involved, including cases of mimicry. The method is also applicable to comparing interfaces involving non-peptidic compounds. Galinter assists users in identifying local interface regions with similar patterns of non-covalent interactions. This is particularly relevant to the investigation of the molecular basis of interaction mimicry.

  9. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of CdSe nanocrystals covalently bound to GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walzer, K.; Marx, E.; Greenham, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements of CdSe nanocrystals covalently attached to doped GaAs substrates using monolayers of 1,6-hexanedithiol. STM measurements showed the formation of stable, densely packed, homogeneous monolayers...... of nanocrystals. STS measurements showed rectifying behaviour, with high currents at the opposite sample bias to that previously observed for CdSe nanocrystals adsorbed on Si substrates. We explain the rectifying behaviour by considering the interaction between the electronic states of the nanocrystals...

  10. Covalent bindings in proteins following UV-C irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diezel, W.; Meffert, H.; Soennichsen, N.; Reinicke, C.

    1980-01-01

    Following a UV-C irradiation of catalase cross-linked catalase subunits could be detected by sodium dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis. The subunits of aldolase were not cross-linked. The origin of covalent bindings in the catalase molecule is suggested to be effected by a free radical chain reaction induced by the heme component of catalase after UV-C irradiation. (author)

  11. Covalently bound DNA on naked iron oxide nanoparticles: Intelligent colloidal nano-vector for cell transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Martinello, Tiziana; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Gomiero, Chiara; Baratella, Davide; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Cozza, Giorgio; Patruno, Marco; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    Conversely to common coated iron oxide nanoparticles, novel naked surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs) can covalently bind DNA. Plasmid (pDNA) harboring the coding gene for GFP was directly chemisorbed onto SAMNs, leading to a novel DNA nanovector (SAMN@pDNA). The spontaneous internalization of SAMN@pDNA into cells was compared with an extensively studied fluorescent SAMN derivative (SAMN@RITC). Moreover, the transfection efficiency of SAMN@pDNA was evaluated and explained by computational model. SAMN@pDNA was prepared and characterized by spectroscopic and computational methods, and molecular dynamic simulation. The size and hydrodynamic properties of SAMN@pDNA and SAMN@RITC were studied by electron transmission microscopy, light scattering and zeta-potential. The two nanomaterials were tested by confocal scanning microscopy on equine peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ePB-MSCs) and GFP expression by SAMN@pDNA was determined. Nanomaterials characterized by similar hydrodynamic properties were successfully internalized and stored into mesenchymal stem cells. Transfection by SAMN@pDNA occurred and GFP expression was higher than lipofectamine procedure, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. A computational model clarified that transfection efficiency can be ascribed to DNA availability inside cells. Direct covalent binding of DNA on naked magnetic nanoparticles led to an extremely robust gene delivery tool. Hydrodynamic and chemical-physical properties of SAMN@pDNA were responsible of the successful uptake by cells and of the efficiency of GFP gene transfection. SAMNs are characterized by colloidal stability, excellent cell uptake, persistence in the host cells, low toxicity and are proposed as novel intelligent DNA nanovectors for efficient cell transfection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chloroplast protein synthesis: thylakoid bound polysomes synthesize thylakoid proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus the major effect of light in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus translation initiation and termination probably control the cycling of bound ribosomes. While only 3 to 6% of total RNA is in bound polysomes the incorporation of 3 H-Leu into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. When Micrococcal nuclease-treated thylakoids were added to labeled runoff translation products of stroma ribosomes, less than 1% of the label adhered to the added membranes; but 37% of the labeled products made by thylakoid polysomes were bound. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid proteins

  13. Albumin solder covalently bound to a polymer membrane: New approach to improve binding strength in laser tissue soldering in-vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebl, B; Ascher, L; Luetzow, K; Kratz, K; Gruber, C; Mrowietz, C; Nehring, M E; Lendlein, A; Franke, R-P; Jung, F

    2018-01-01

    Laser tissue soldering (LTS) based on indocyanine green (ICG)-mediated heat-denaturation of proteins might be a promising alternative technique for micro-suturing, but up to now the problem of too weak shear strength of the solder welds in comparison to sutures is not solved. Earlier reports gave promising results showing that solder supported by carrier materials can enhance the cohesive strength of the liquid solder. In these studies, the solder was applied to the carriers by dip coating. Higher reliability of the connection between the solder and the carrier material is expected when the solder is bound covalently to the carrier material. In the present study a poly(ether imide) (PEI) membrane served as carrier material and ICG-supplemented albumin as solder substrate. The latter was covalently coupled to the carrier membrane under physiological conditions to prevent structural protein changes. As laser source a diode continuous-wave laser emitting at 808 nm with intensities between 250 mW and 1500 mW was utilized. The albumin functionalized carrier membrane was placed onto the tunica media of explanted pig thoracic aortae forming an overlapping area of approximately 0.5×0.5 cm2. All tests were performed in a dry state to prevent laser light absorption by water. Infrared spectroscopy, spectro-photometrical determination of the secondary and primary amine groups after acid orange II staining, contact angle measurements, and atomic force microscopy proved the successful functionalization of the PEI membrane with albumin. A laser power of 450 mW LTS could generate a membrane-blood vessel connection which was characterized by a shear strength of 0.08±0.002 MPa, corresponding to 15% of the tensile strength of the native blood vessel. Theoretically, an overlapping zone of 4.1 mm around the entire circumference of the blood vessel could have provided shear strength of the PEI membrane-blood vessel compound identical to the tensile strength of the native

  14. Broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of melimine covalently bound to contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Kumar, Naresh; Willcox, Mark D P

    2013-01-07

    To develop a stable antimicrobial contact lens, which is effective against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) panel microorganisms, Acanthamoeba castellanii and drug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Melimine was covalently incorporated into etafilcon A lenses. The amount of peptide present on the lens surface was quantified using amino acid analysis. After coating, the heat stability (121°C), lens surface hydrophobicity (by captive bubble), and in vitro cytotoxicity to mouse L929 cells of the lenses were investigated. Antimicrobial activity against the micro-organisms was evaluated by viable plate count and fluorescence microscopy, measuring the proportion of cell death compared with control lenses with no melimine. The most effective concentration was determined to be 152 ± 44 μg lens(-1) melimine on the lens surface. After coating, lenses were relatively hydrophilic and were nontoxic to mammalian cells. The activity remained high after autoclaving (e.g., 3.1, 3.9, 1.2, and 1.0 log inhibition against P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, A. castellanii, and Fusarium solani, respectively). Fluorescence microscopy confirmed significantly reduced (P bacteria to melimine contact lenses. Viable count confirmed that lenses were active against all the bacteria and fungi from the ISO panel, Acanthamoeba and gave at least 2 log inhibition against all the multidrug resistant S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Melimine may offer excellent potential for development as a broad spectrum antimicrobial coating for contact lenses, showing activity against all the bacterial and fungal ISO panel microorganisms, Acanthamoeba, and antibiotic resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

  15. Prevention of Bacterial Contamination of a Silica Matrix Containing Entrapped β-Galactosidase through the Action of Covalently Bound Lysozymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase was successfully encapsulated within an amino-functionalised silica matrix using a “fish-in-net” approach and molecular imprinting technique followed by covalent binding of lysozyme via a glutaraldehyde-based method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the silica matrix hosting the two enzymes. Both encapsulated β-galactosidase and bound lysozyme exhibited high enzymatic activities and outstanding operational stability in model reactions. Moreover, enzyme activities of the co-immobilised enzymes did not obviously change relative to enzymes immobilised separately. In antibacterial tests, bound lysozyme exhibited 95.5% and 89.6% growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC (American type culture collection 653 and Escherichia coli ATCC 1122, respectively. In milk treated with co-immobilised enzymes, favourable results were obtained regarding reduction of cell viability and high lactose hydrolysis rate. In addition, when both co-immobilised enzymes were employed to treat milk, high operational and storage stabilities were observed. The results demonstrate that the use of co-immobilised enzymes holds promise as an industrial strategy for producing low lactose milk to benefit people with lactose intolerance.

  16. Layer by layer assembly of a biocatalytic packaging film: lactase covalently bound to low-density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dana E; Talbert, Joey N; Goddard, Julie M

    2013-06-01

    Active packaging is utilized to overcome limitations of traditional processing to enhance the health, safety, economics, and shelf life of foods. Active packaging employs active components to interact with food constituents to give a desired effect. Herein we describe the development of an active package in which lactase is covalently attached to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) for in-package production of lactose-free dairy products. The specific goal of this work is to increase the total protein content loading onto LDPE using layer by layer (LbL) deposition, alternating polyethylenimine, glutaraldehyde (GL), and lactase, to enhance the overall activity of covalently attached lactase. The films were successfully oxidized via ultraviolet light, functionalized with polyethylenimine and glutaraldehyde, and layered with immobilized purified lactase. The total protein content increased with each additional layer of conjugated lactase, the 5-layer sample reaching up to 1.3 μg/cm2 . However, the increase in total protein did not lend to an increase in overall lactase activity. Calculated apparent Km indicated the affinity of immobilized lactase to substrate remains unchanged when compared to free lactase. Calculated apparent turnover numbers (kcat ) showed with each layer of attached lactase, a decrease in substrate turnover was experienced when compared to free lactase; with a decrease from 128.43 to 4.76 s(-1) for a 5-layer conjugation. Our results indicate that while LbL attachment of lactase to LDPE successfully increases total protein mass of the bulk material, the adverse impact in enzyme efficiency may limit the application of LbL immobilization chemistry for bioactive packaging use. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Toward the hybrid organic semiconductor FET (HOSFET) electrical and electrochemical characterization of functionalized and unfunctionalized, covalently bound organic monolayers on silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik Jouwert

    2006-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1993 the class of covalently bound organic monolayers on oxide free silicon surfaces have found their way to multiple application fields such as passivation layers in solar cells, masking layers in lithographic processing, insulating films in hybrid moleculesilicon

  18. Essential motions in a fungal lipase with bound substrate, covalently attached inhibitor and product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Bywater, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    -state mimic. We have applied a classical approach, using molecular dynamics simulations to monitor protein dynamics in the nanosecond regime. We filter out small amplitude fluctuations and focus on the anharmonic contributions to the overall dynamics. This 'essential dynamics' analysis reveals different modes...

  19. Twisting, supercoiling and stretching in protein bound DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2018-04-01

    We have calculated theoretical results for the torque and slope of the twisted DNA, with various proteins bound on it, using the Neukirch-Marko model, in the regime where plectonemes exist. We found that the torque in the protein bound DNA decreases compared to that in the bare DNA. This is caused by the decrease in the free energy g(f) , and hence the smaller persistence lengths, in the case of protein bound DNA. We hope our results will encourage experimental investigations of supercoiling in protein bound DNA, which can provide further tests of the Neukirch-Marko model.

  20. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization [version 1; referees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldal, Morten Peter; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control...

  1. In vitro Blood Compatibility of Polyethylene Terephthalate with Covalently Bounded Hirudin on Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang; WANG Jin; HUANG San

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET,Dacron) was modified by surface immobilization of hirudin with glutaraldehyde(GA) as coupling reagent to improve the blood compatibility.Hirudin-immobilizcd PETs were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements.The blood compatibility of the PETs was evaluated by platelet adhesion evaluation and fibrinogen conformational change measurements in vitro.The results showed the decrease of platelet adhesion and activation on hirudinimmobilized PET with increasing of glutaraldehyde concentration.Fibrinogen experiment showed that fibrinogen adherence and conformational changes of PET-HRD were less than those of untreated PET,which made the materials difficult to form thrombus.The proper reason of blood compatibility improvement was low interface tension between hirudin-immobilized PETs and blood,as well as blood proteins,and low ratio of dispersive/polar component of the surface energy(γsd/γsp) and high hydrophilicity.

  2. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  3. Protein tetrazinylation via diazonium coupling for covalent and catalyst-free bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Men, Yuwen; Lv, Shanshan; Yi, Long; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2015-12-21

    An efficient and bench-stable reagent was synthesized for direct and covalent introduction of tetrazines onto target protein or virus surfaces, which can be further modified based on tetrazine-ene ligation to achieve fluorescence labelling or PEGylation under mild conditions.

  4. Covalent immobilization of redox protein within the mesopores of transparent conducting electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, V.; Rathouský, Jiří; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 116, JAN 2014 (2014), s. 1-8 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/08/0435 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Covalent immobilization * Porous electrodes * Redox proteins Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  5. Covalent Bonding of Chlorogenic Acid Induces Structural Modifications on Sunflower Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karefyllakis, D.; Salakou, Stavroula; Bitter, J.H.; Goot, van der A.J.; Nikiforidis, K.

    2018-01-01

    Proteins and phenols coexist in the confined space of plant cells leading to reactions between them, which result in new covalently bonded complex molecules. This kind of reactions has been widely observed during storage and processing of plant materials. However, the nature of the new complex

  6. 21 CFR 862.1640 - Protein-bound iodine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protein-bound iodine test system. 862.1640 Section... Systems § 862.1640 Protein-bound iodine test system. (a) Identification. A protein-bound iodine test system is a device intended to measure protein-bound iodine in serum. Measurements of protein-bound...

  7. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Efficiency of New Polymers Comprised by Covalently Attached and/or Electrostatically Bound Bacteriostatic Species, Based on Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougia, Efstathia; Tselepi, Maria; Vasilopoulos, Gavriil; Lainioti, Georgia Ch; Koromilas, Nikos D; Druvari, Denisa; Bokias, Georgios; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kallitsis, Joannis K

    2015-12-01

    In the present work a detailed study of new bacteriostatic copolymers with quaternized ammonium groups introduced in the polymer chain through covalent attachment or electrostatic interaction, was performed. Different copolymers have been considered since beside the active species, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the co-monomer was also evaluated in the case of covalently attached bacteriostatic groups, aiming at achieving permanent antibacterial activity. Homopolymers with quaternized ammonium/phosphonium groups were also tested for comparison reasons. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized polymers after 3 and 24 h of exposure at 4 and 22 °C was investigated on cultures of Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa, E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus, E. faecalis) bacteria. It was found that the combination of the hydrophilic monomer acrylic acid (AA), at low contents, with the covalently attached bacteriostatic group vinyl benzyl dimethylhexadecylammonium chloride (VBCHAM) in the copolymer P(AA-co-VBCHAM88), resulted in a high bacteriostatic activity against P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis (6 log reduction in certain cases). Moreover, the combination of covalently attached VBCHAM units with electrostatically bound cetyltrimethylammonium 4-styrene sulfonate (SSAmC16) units in the P(SSAmC16-co-VBCHAMx) copolymers led to efficient antimicrobial materials, especially against Gram-positive bacteria, where a log reduction between 4.9 and 6.2 was verified. These materials remain remarkably efficient even when they are incorporated in polysulfone membranes.

  8. The yeast cell fusion protein Prm1p requires covalent dimerization to promote membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Engel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion.

  9. Holistic Approach to Partial Covalent Interactions in Protein Structure Prediction and Design with Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Steven A; Mueller, Benjamin K; Meiler, Jens

    2018-05-29

    Partial covalent interactions (PCIs) in proteins, which include hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, cation-π, and π-π interactions, contribute to thermodynamic stability and facilitate interactions with other biomolecules. Several score functions have been developed within the Rosetta protein modeling framework that identify and evaluate these PCIs through analyzing the geometry between participating atoms. However, we hypothesize that PCIs can be unified through a simplified electron orbital representation. To test this hypothesis, we have introduced orbital based chemical descriptors for PCIs into Rosetta, called the PCI score function. Optimal geometries for the PCIs are derived from a statistical analysis of high-quality protein structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and the relative orientation of electron deficient hydrogen atoms and electron-rich lone pair or π orbitals are evaluated. We demonstrate that nativelike geometries of hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, cation-π, and π-π interactions are recapitulated during minimization of protein conformation. The packing density of tested protein structures increased from the standard score function from 0.62 to 0.64, closer to the native value of 0.70. Overall, rotamer recovery improved when using the PCI score function (75%) as compared to the standard Rosetta score function (74%). The PCI score function represents an improvement over the standard Rosetta score function for protein model scoring; in addition, it provides a platform for future directions in the analysis of small molecule to protein interactions, which depend on partial covalent interactions.

  10. Analysis of protein-bound metabolites of furazolidone and furaltadone in pig liver by high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, E.; Cadogan, A.; O'Keeffe, M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    1996-01-01

    Studies undertaken using radiolabelled furazolidone have demonstrated the covalent binding of residues of the drug to cellular protein in vivo. A portion of these bound residues and those formed by furaltadone, a related nitrofuran drug, possess intact side-chains, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ) and

  11. Rooster comb hyaluronate-protein, a non-covalently linked complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiganos, C P; Vynios, D H; Kalpaxis, D L

    1986-01-01

    Hyaluronate from rooster comb was isolated by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose from tissue extracts and papain digests. The preparations were labelled with [14C]acetic anhydride and subjected to CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation in 4 M-guanidinium chloride in the presence and absence of 4% ZwittergentTM 3-12. A radioactive protein fraction was separated from the hyaluronate when the zwitterionic detergent was also present. The protein could also be separated from the glycosaminoglycan by chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B eluted with the same solvent mixture. The protein fraction contained three protein bands of Mr 15,000-17,000 as assessed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in 0.1% SDS, and seemed to lack lysozyme activity. No evidence of other protein or amino acid(s) covalently linked with the hyaluronate was obtained. The hyaluronate-protein complex may be re-formed upon mixing the components, the extent of its formation depending on the conditions used. The results show that, as in chondrosarcoma [Mason, d'Arville, Kimura & Hascall (1982) Biochem. J. 207, 445-457] and teratocarcinoma cells [Prehm (1983) Biochem. J. 211, 191-198] the rooster comb hyaluronate also is not linked covalently to a core protein. PMID:3741374

  12. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  13. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Emilie; Neffling, Milla-Riina; Gerard, Claudia; Meriluoto, Jussi; Bormans, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 μg L -1 ) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 μg MC-LR equivalents L -1 over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 μg total MCs g -1 dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 μg total MCs g -1 DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 μg g -1 DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. - The study concerns accumulation and elimination of both free and bound microcystins (MCs) in tissues of a gastropod exposed to MCs producing cyanobacteria or dissolved MC-LR.

  14. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.lance@live.f [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Neffling, Milla-Riina [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6, FI-20520 Turku (Finland); Gerard, Claudia [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Meriluoto, Jussi [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6, FI-20520 Turku (Finland); Bormans, Myriam [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 mug L{sup -1}) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 mug MC-LR equivalents L{sup -1} over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 mug total MCs g{sup -1} dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 mug total MCs g{sup -1} DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 mug g{sup -1} DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. - The study concerns accumulation and elimination of both free and bound microcystins (MCs) in tissues of a gastropod exposed to MCs producing cyanobacteria or dissolved MC-LR.

  15. Vanillyl alcohol oxidases produced in Komagataella phaffii contain a highly stable non-covalently bound anionic FAD semiquinone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gygli, G.A.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) from Penicillium simplicissimum is a covalent flavoprotein that has emerged as a promising biocatalyst for the production of aromatic fine chemicals such as vanillin, coniferyl alcohol and enantiopure 1-(4’-hydroxyphenyl) alcohols. The largescale production of this

  16. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Emilie; Neffling, Milla-Riina; Gérard, Claudia; Meriluoto, Jussi; Bormans, Myriam

    2010-03-01

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 microg L(-1)) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 microg MC-LR equivalents L(-1) over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 microg total MCs g(-1) dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 microg total MCs g(-1) DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 microg g(-1) DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cutaneous water loss and covalently bound lipids of the stratum corneum in nestling house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.) from desert and mesic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Michelle E; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis of birds and mammals, provide a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. The SC of birds consists of flat dead cells, called corneocytes, and two lipid compartments: an intercellular matrix and a monolayer of covalently bound lipids (CBLs) attached to the outer surface of the corneocytes. We previously found two classes of sphingolipids, ceramides and cerebrosides, covalently bound to corneocytes in the SC of house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.); these lipids were associated with cutaneous water loss (CWL). In this study, we collected adult and nestling house sparrows from Ohio and nestlings from Saudi Arabia, acclimated them to either high or low humidity, and measured their rates of CWL. We also measured CWL for natural populations of nestlings from Ohio and Saudi Arabia, beginning when chicks were 2 days old until they fledged. We then evaluated the composition of the CBLs of the SC of sparrows using thin layer chromatography. We found that adult house sparrows had a greater diversity of CBLs in their SC than previously described. During ontogeny, nestling sparrows increased the amount of CBLs and developed their CBLs differently, depending on their habitat. Acclimating nestlings to different humidity regimes did not alter the ontogeny of the CBLs, suggesting that these lipids represent a fundamental component of SC organization that does not respond to short-term environmental change.

  18. Characteristics of enzyme hydrolyzing natural covalent bond between RNA and protein VPg of encephalomyocarditis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drygin, Yu.F.; Siyanova, E.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    The isolation and a preliminary characterization of the enzyme specifically hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bond between protein VPg and the RNA of encephalomyocarditis virus was the goal of the present investigation. The enzyme was isolated from a salt extract of Krebs II mouse ascites carcinoma cells by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. It was found that the enzyme actually specifically cleaves the covalent bond between the RNA and protein, however, the isolation procedure does not free the enzyme from impurities which partially inhibit it. The enzyme cleaves the RNA-protein VPg complex of polio virus at a high rate, it is completely inactivated at 55 0 C, and is partially inhibited by EDTA

  19. Substrate-Bound Protein Gradients to Study Haptotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien G. Ricoult

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins – including many secreted cues – are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact-printing, light patterning and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro, and focus on their application to study axon guidance. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein make possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  20. Covalent attachment of proteins to solid supports and surfaces via Sortase-mediated ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilyan Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in the attachment of proteins to solid supports for the development of supported catalysts, affinity matrices, and micro devices as well as for the development of planar and bead based protein arrays for multiplexed assays of protein concentration, interactions, and activity. A critical requirement for these applications is the generation of a stable linkage between the solid support and the immobilized, but still functional, protein. METHODOLOGY: Solid supports including crosslinked polymer beads, beaded agarose, and planar glass surfaces, were modified to present an oligoglycine motif to solution. A range of proteins were ligated to the various surfaces using the Sortase A enzyme of S. aureus. Reactions were carried out in aqueous buffer conditions at room temperature for times between one and twelve hours. CONCLUSIONS: The Sortase A transpeptidase of S. aureus provides a general, robust, and gentle approach to the selective covalent immobilization of proteins on three very different solid supports. The proteins remain functional and accessible to solution. Sortase mediated ligation is therefore a straightforward methodology for the preparation of solid supported enzymes and bead based assays, as well as the modification of planar surfaces for microanalytical devices and protein arrays.

  1. Photogeneration of singlet oxygen by the phenothiazine derivatives covalently bound to the surface-modified glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata, E-mail: agata.blacha@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Piwowar, Katarzyna; Krukiewicz, Katarzyna [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Koscielniak, Piotr; Szuber, Jacek [Institute of Electronics, Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Zak, Jerzy K. [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The selected group of four NH{sub 2}-derivatives of phenothiazine was grafted to Glassy Carbon (GC) surface. • The grafted phenothiazines are able to generate {sup 1}O{sub 2} when activated by the radiation. • Such modified solid surfaces may find their application in the wastewater treatment. - Abstract: The selected group of four amine-derivatives of phenothiazine was covalently grafted to the glassy carbon surface in the four-step procedure consisting of the electrochemical reduction of the diazonium salt followed by the electrochemical and chemical post-modification steps. The proposed strategy involves the bonding of linker molecule to which the photosensitizer is attached. The synthesized organic layers were characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry, XPS and Raman Spectroscopy. It was shown that the phenothiazines immobilized via proposed strategy retain their photochemical properties and are able to generate {sup 1}O{sub 2} when activated by the laser radiation. The effectiveness of in situ singlet oxygen generation by those new solid photoactive materials was determined by means of UVVis spectroscopy. The reported, covalently modified solid surfaces may find their application as the singlet oxygen photogenerators in the fine chemicals’ synthesis or in the wastewater treatment.

  2. Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Mirica, Katherine A; Soh, Siowling; Phillips, Scott T; Taran, Olga; Mace, Charles R; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2012-03-28

    This paper describes the use of magnetic levitation (MagLev) to measure the association of proteins and ligands. The method starts with diamagnetic gel beads that are functionalized covalently with small molecules (putative ligands). Binding of protein to the ligands within the bead causes a change in the density of the bead. When these beads are suspended in a paramagnetic aqueous buffer and placed between the poles of two NbFeB magnets with like poles facing, the changes in the density of the bead on binding of protein result in changes in the levitation height of the bead that can be used to quantify the amount of protein bound. This paper uses a reaction-diffusion model to examine the physical principles that determine the values of rate and equilibrium constants measured by this system, using the well-defined model system of carbonic anhydrase and aryl sulfonamides. By tuning the experimental protocol, the method is capable of quantifying either the concentration of protein in a solution, or the binding affinities of a protein to several resin-bound small molecules simultaneously. Since this method requires no electricity and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it may find use in situations where portability and low cost are important, such as in bioanalysis in resource-limited settings, point-of-care diagnosis, veterinary medicine, and plant pathology. It still has several practical disadvantages. Most notably, the method requires relatively long assay times and cannot be applied to large proteins (>70 kDa), including antibodies. The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems.

  3. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Heme c: Functional Bases for Covalent Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Sarah E. J.; Bren, Kara L.

    2008-01-01

    A discussion of the literature concerning the synthesis, function, and activity of heme c-containing proteins is presented. Comparison of the properties of heme c, which is covalently bound to protein, is made to heme b, which is bound noncovalently. A question of interest is why nature uses biochemically expensive heme c in many proteins when its properties are expected to be similar to heme b. Considering the effects of covalent heme attachment on heme conformation and on the proximal histi...

  4. Human Serum Protein-Bound iodine and Protein Fractions at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iodine profile of Nigerians at different ages in both sexes and in pregnant women, and under narcotic influence, such as alcoholism, cigarette smoking and marijuana addiction were studied. Their serum total protein, albumin and globulin concentrations were also determined. Results of the study showed that serum protein ...

  5. Loss of covalently linked lipid as the mechanism for radiation-induced release of membrane-bound polysaccharide and exonuclease from Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of γ-radiation-induced release of polysaccharide and exonuclease from the midwall membrane of Micrococcus radiodurans has been examined. These two components appear to be released independently, but by very similar processes. Direct analysis of radiation-released polysaccharide indicated the absence of an alkali-labile neutral lipid normally present in the native material. Radiation-induced release therefore probably results from the radiolytic cleavage of a covalently linked lipid which normally serves to anchor these substances to the membrane. The absence of a natural membrane-bound carotenoid had no effect on the rate of release of these components. Likewise, the absence of exonuclease in an exonuclease minus mutant did not influence the release of polysaccharide. It is suggested that the major pathway of radical transfer from the initiating .OH and culminating in the cleavage of the neutral lipid anchor may not be via the membrane

  6. Direct covalent coupling of proteins to nanostructured plasma polymers: a route to tunable cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnichuk, Iurii; Choukourov, Andrei; Bilek, Marcela; Weiss, Anthony; Vandrovcová, Marta; Bačáková, Lucie; Hanuš, Jan; Kousal, Jaroslav; Shelemin, Artem; Solař, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Flat and nanostructured interfaces were overcoated by hydrocarbon plasma polymer. • Linker-free covalent attachment of proteins to resultant surfaces was validated. • Ultra-thin hydrocarbon overcoat (<2 nm) secured prolonged effective binding. • Pre-adsorbed tropoelastin promoted proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. • Nanostructured films were multi-affine and impeded cell adhesion. - Abstract: Flat and nanostructured thin films were fabricated by deposition of ultra-thin (<2 nm) layer of hydrocarbon plasma polymer over polished silicon and over a pattern of 8 nm-thick poly(ethylene) islands on silicon. Linker-free radical-based covalent binding of bovine serum albumin and tropoelastin was confirmed for both types of films. The binding capability of albumin was found to be stable over many days of ambient air storage time. Tropoelastin-mediated flat plasma polymers favored adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. Nanostructured plasma polymers were multi-affine and their hierarchical surface represented an additional barrier for cell attachment

  7. Suicide inactivation of cytochrome P-450 by methoxsalen. Evidence for the covalent binding of a reactive intermediate to the protein moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, G.; Descatoire, V.; Beaune, P.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D.

    1989-01-01

    Incubation of rat liver microsomes with [3H]methoxsalen and NADPH resulted in the covalent binding of a methoxsalen intermediate to proteins comigrating with cytochromes P-450 UT-A, PB-B/D, ISF-G and PCN-E. Binding was increased by pretreatments with phenobarbital, beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF) and dexamethasone. Such pretreatments also increased the loss of CO-binding capacity either after administration of methoxsalen, or after incubation of hepatic microsomes with methoxsalen and NADPH. Immunoprecipitation of the methoxsalen metabolite-protein adducts in phenobarbital-induced microsomes was moderate with anti-UT-A antibodies, but marked with anti-PB-B/D and anti-PCN-E antibodies. Immunoprecipitation was observed also with anti-ISF-G (anti-beta NF-B) antibodies in beta NF-induced microsomes. Methoxsalen (0.25 mM) inhibited markedly the benzphetamine demethylase activity of phenobarbital-induced microsomes and the erythromycin demethylase activity of dexamethasone-induced microsomes. Whereas methoxsalen itself did not produce any binding spectrum, in contrast either in vivo administration of methoxsalen or incubation in vitro with methoxsalen and NADPH resulted in a low-to-high spin conversion of cytochrome P-450 as suggested by the appearance of a spectrum analogous to a type I binding spectrum. This low-to-high spin conversion was apparently due to a methoxsalen intermediate (probably, covalently bound to the protein and preventing partial sixth ligation of the iron). We conclude that suicide inactivation of cytochrome P-450 by methoxsalen is related to the covalent binding of a methoxsalen intermediate to the protein moiety of several cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes (including UT-A, PB-B/D, PCN-E as well as ISF-G and/or beta NF-B)

  8. The isothiocyanate class of bioactive nutrients covalently inhibit the MEKK1 protein kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macdonald Timothy L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs are electrophilic compounds that have diverse biological activities including induction of apoptosis and effects on cell cycle. They protect against experimental carcinogenesis in animals, an activity believed to result from the transcriptional induction of "Phase 2" enzymes. The molecular mechanism of action of ITCs is unknown. Since ITCs are electrophiles capable of reacting with sulfhydryl groups on amino acids, we hypothesized that ITCs induce their biological effects through covalent modification of proteins, leading to changes in cell regulatory events. We previously demonstrated that stress-signaling kinase pathways are inhibited by other electrophilic compounds such as menadione. We therefore tested the effects of nutritional ITCs on MEKK1, an upstream regulator of the SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway. Methods The activity of MEKK1 expressed in cells was monitored using in vitro kinase assays to measure changes in catalytic activity. The activity of endogenous MEKK1, immunopurified from ITC treated and untreated LnCAP cells was also measured by in vitro kinase assay. A novel labeling and affinity reagent for detection of protein modification by ITCs was synthesized and used in competition assays to monitor direct modification of MEKK1 by ITC. Finally, immunoblots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to measure the activity of MAPK protein kinases. Results ITCs inhibited the MEKK1 protein kinase in a manner dependent on a specific cysteine residue in the ATP binding pocket. Inhibition of MEKK1 catalytic activity was due to direct, covalent and irreversible modification of the MEKK1 protein itself. In addition, ITCs inhibited the catalytic activity of endogenous MEKK1. This correlated with inhibition of the downstream target of MEKK1 activity, i.e. the SAPK/JNK kinase. This inhibition was specific to SAPK, as parallel MAPK pathways were unaffected. Conclusion These results

  9. The isothiocyanate class of bioactive nutrients covalently inhibit the MEKK1 protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, Janet V; Foss, Frank W; Rady, Joshua M; Macdonald, Timothy L; Templeton, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs) are electrophilic compounds that have diverse biological activities including induction of apoptosis and effects on cell cycle. They protect against experimental carcinogenesis in animals, an activity believed to result from the transcriptional induction of 'Phase 2' enzymes. The molecular mechanism of action of ITCs is unknown. Since ITCs are electrophiles capable of reacting with sulfhydryl groups on amino acids, we hypothesized that ITCs induce their biological effects through covalent modification of proteins, leading to changes in cell regulatory events. We previously demonstrated that stress-signaling kinase pathways are inhibited by other electrophilic compounds such as menadione. We therefore tested the effects of nutritional ITCs on MEKK1, an upstream regulator of the SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway. The activity of MEKK1 expressed in cells was monitored using in vitro kinase assays to measure changes in catalytic activity. The activity of endogenous MEKK1, immunopurified from ITC treated and untreated LnCAP cells was also measured by in vitro kinase assay. A novel labeling and affinity reagent for detection of protein modification by ITCs was synthesized and used in competition assays to monitor direct modification of MEKK1 by ITC. Finally, immunoblots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to measure the activity of MAPK protein kinases. ITCs inhibited the MEKK1 protein kinase in a manner dependent on a specific cysteine residue in the ATP binding pocket. Inhibition of MEKK1 catalytic activity was due to direct, covalent and irreversible modification of the MEKK1 protein itself. In addition, ITCs inhibited the catalytic activity of endogenous MEKK1. This correlated with inhibition of the downstream target of MEKK1 activity, i.e. the SAPK/JNK kinase. This inhibition was specific to SAPK, as parallel MAPK pathways were unaffected. These results demonstrate that MEKK1 is directly modified and inhibited by

  10. Hemoglobin protein hollow shells fabricated through covalent layer-by-layer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Li; He Qiang; Yan Xuehai; Cui Yue; Wang Kewei; Li Junbai

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) protein microcapsules held together by cross-linker, glutaraldehyde (GA), were successfully fabricated by covalent layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The Schiff base reaction occurred on the colloid templates between the aldehyde groups of GA and free amino sites of Hb results in the formation of GA/Hb microcapsules after the removal of the templates. The structure of obtained monodisperse protein microcapsule was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The UV-Vis spectra measurements demonstrate the existence of Hb in the assembled capsules. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and potential-controlled amperometric measurements (I-t curve) confirm that hemoglobin microcapsules after fabrication remain their heme electroactivity. Moreover, direct electron transfer process from protein to electrode surface was performed to detect the heme electrochemistry without using any mediator or promoter. The experiments of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) by CLSM demonstrate that the hemoglobin protein microcapsules have an improved permeability comparing to the conventional polyelectrolyte microcapsules

  11. Protein samples for NMR: expression and analysis without purification, and stabilization by covalent cyclization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otting, G.; Ozawa, K.; Prosselkov, P.; Williams, N.K.; Dixon, N.E.; Liepinsh, E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A modified cell-free in vitro expression system was established for the expression of milligram quantities of protein per mL reaction medium. Expression levels of the E coli cytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, PpiB, in 0 6 mL reaction medium were sufficient for the direct recording of clean 15N-HSQC spectra without chromatographic purification or sample concentration steps, using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer with cryoprobe. Besides providing a route to high-throughput sample preparation, in vitro expression systems are known to be highly economic in their utilization of selectively labelled ammo acids. Using dual-selective labelling with 15N- and 13C-labelled amino acids, the 15N-HSQC cross peaks of strategically selected ammo acids can readily be identified and monitored for their response to the presence of ligand molecules, again without sample purification. 2) The N-terminal domain of E coli DnaB is a protein of ca 110 residues with a structured core composed of 6 helices. Additional segments of 10 residues each at the N- and C-termini are highly mobile. Both ends are close in space and can be linked together in a covalent peptide bond using intern technology. The core structures of linear (lin-DnaB-N) and cyclized (cz-DnaB-N) protein are conserved, as evidenced by superimposable NOESY spectra and chemical shifts. The linker segment in cz-DnaB-N is mobile as shown by 1H-15N NOEs. Yet, the cyclic protein melts about 10 degrees higher than the linear version. A stabilization free energy of ca 2 kcal/mol is in agreement with predictions based on the reduced entropy in the unfolded state. Amide proton exchange rates are much slower in the cyclic protein and reveal cooperative exchange through total, global unfolding at a rate of once every 100 minutes in the linear protein

  12. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Meldal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control that is desired in this kind of application. Recent advances include the use of enzymes, such as sortase A, to couple proteins in a site-specific manner to materials such as microbeads, glass, and hydrogels. Also, self-labeling tags such as the SNAP-tag can be employed. Last but not least, chemical approaches based on bioorthogonal reactions, like the azide–alkyne cycloaddition, have proven to be powerful tools. The lack of comparative studies and quantitative analysis of these immobilization methods hampers the selection process of the optimal strategy for a given application. However, besides immobilization efficiency, the freedom in selecting the site of conjugation and the size of the conjugation tag and the researcher’s expertise regarding molecular biology and/or chemical techniques will be determining factors in this regard.

  13. Protein attachment to silane-functionalized porous silicon: A comparison of electrostatic and covalent attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowska, Malgorzata; Slota, Agata J; Eravuchira, Pinkie J; Alba, Maria; Formentin, Pilar; Pallarès, Josep; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Marsal, Lluís F

    2015-08-15

    Porous silicon (pSi) is a prosperous biomaterial, biocompatible, and biodegradable. Obtaining regularly functionalized pSi surfaces is required in many biotechnology applications. Silane-PEG-NHS (triethoxysilane-polyethylene-glycol-N-hydroxysuccinimide) is useful for single-molecule studies due to its ability to attach to only one biomolecule. We investigate the functionalization of pSi with silane-PEG-NHS and compare it with two common grafting agents: APTMS (3-aminopropylotrimethoxysilane) as electrostatic linker, and APTMS modified with glutaraldehyde as covalent spacer. We show the arrangement of two proteins (collagen and bovine serum albumin) as a function of the functionalization and of the pore size. FTIR is used to demonstrate correct functionalization while fluorescence confocal microscopy reveals that silane-PEG-NHS results in a more uniform protein distribution. Reflection interference spectroscopy (RIfS) is used to estimate the attachment of linker and proteins. The results open a way to obtain homogenous chemical modified silicon supports with a great value in biosensing, drug delivery and cell biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Wheat and Egg Constituents in the Formation of a Covalent and Non-covalent Protein Network in Fresh and Cooked Egg Noodles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Marlies A; Rombouts, Ine; Nivelle, Mieke A; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    Noodles of constant protein content and flour-to-egg protein ratio were made with whole egg, egg white, or egg yolk. The optimal cooking time, water absorption, and cooking loss of salted whole egg noodles was respectively lower and higher than of egg white and egg yolk noodles. However, cooked whole egg noodles showed the best Kieffer-rig extensibility. Differences in noodle properties were linked to protein network formation. Disulfide bonds in whole egg noodles developed faster and to a larger extent during cooking than in egg yolk noodles but slower and to a lower extent than in egg white noodles. The balance between the rate of protein cross-linking and starch swelling determines cooked noodle properties. Ionic and hydrophobic protein interactions increase the optimum cooking time and total work in Kieffer-rig extensibility testing of fresh noodles. Hydrogen bonds and covalent cross-links are probably the main determinants of the extensibility of cooked noodles. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  15. A novel sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with covalently bound monoclonal antibody and gold probe for sensitive and rapid detection of bovine β-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengfa; Li, Xin; Wu, Yong; Wu, Shandong; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Yuan, Juanli; Gao, Jinyan; Chen, Hongbing

    2018-06-01

    Bovine milk is a recognized allergenic food source with β-lactoglobulin (BLG) as its major allergen. Reliable detection of BLG epitopes can, therefore, be a useful marker for the presence of milk in processed food products, and for potential allergenicity. At the present, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the detection of BLG are time-consuming and generally not specific to BLG IgE epitopes. In this study, the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-activated anti-BLG IgE epitope monoclonal antibody (mAb 1G9) was covalently bound onto the KOH-treated microtiter plate surface. Using this mAb-bound plate in sandwich combination with biotinylated anti-BLG polyclonal antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles, a linear dynamic range between 31.25 and 64 × 10 3  ng mL -1 with a limit of detection for BLG of 0.49 ng mL -1 was obtained, which is 32 times wider and 16 times more sensitive than conventional sandwich ELISA (sELISA). Total recovery of BLG in spiked food samples was found, without matrix effects. Also in partially hydrolyzed infant formulas, the allergenic BLG residues were detected quantitatively. Compared with conventional and commercial BLG detection sELISAs, our sELISA is reliable, highly BLG epitope-specific, user-friendly, and time-saving and allows accurate detection of potentially allergenic residues in different types of processed foods. This improved sELISA protocol can be easily extended to detect other well-identified and characterized food allergens. Graphical abstract IgE epitope mAb-bound plate in sandwich combination with gold probe for sensitive and rapid detection of bovine β-lactoglobulin and its potentially allergenic residues.

  16. Formation of covalent linkages between nuclear and protein constituents of ribosomes of E. coli MRE 600 irradiated by gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekert, B; Giocanti, N [Institut du Radium, 91 - Orsay (France)

    1977-04-01

    Gamma irradiation of E.coli MRE 600 ribosomes in aqueous suspensions led to covalent linkages between the RNA and some ribosomal proteins. The presence of oxygen during the irradiation strongly inhibited this phenomenon. It appears clearly that only a few proteins were able to participate in these cross-linking reactions, which occurred simultaneously in the two sub-units. The radiochemical yield was determined at several concentrations and was relatively low.

  17. Studies on the metabolism of chlorotrianisene to a reactive intermediate and subsequent covalent binding to microsomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juedes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on chlorotrianisene were conducted to determine whether metabolism of chlorotrianisene occurs via the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system and whether a reactive intermediate is being formed that is capable of binding covalently to microsomal proteins. [ 3 H]-chlorotrianisene was incubated with liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH. At the termination of the incubation, the protein was trapped on a glass filter and the unbound chlorotrianisene was removed by extensive washing of the protein with organic solvent. A dramatic stimulation of covalent binding was demonstrated in microsomes from rats treated with methylcholanthrene (60 fold increase) versus control or phenobarbital treatment. Verification of covalent binding was achieved by localization of radiolabeled bands following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the macromolecules in the incubation mixture. Further analysis of the radiolabeled macromolecules separated on SDS-PAGE revealed that these macromolecules were degraded by protease degradation indicating that the macromolecules were proteins. Further investigations were done to determine the cause of the dramatic stimulation of covalent binding detected in microsomes from methylcholanthrene treated rats versus control or phenobarbital treated rats. Further evidence for the participation of P-450c was obtained with a reconstituted cytochrome P-450 system. Incubations of chlorotrianisene with reconstituted P-450c and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase exhibited covalent binding characteristics comparable to those seen in microsomal incubations. Investigations into the nature of the binding site and the reactive intermediate are currently being conducted. By analyzing the BSA adduct, the author intends to isolate the specific amino acid binding site(s)

  18. Functionality of whey proteins covalently modified by allyl isothiocyanate. Part 1 physicochemical and antibacterial properties of native and modified whey proteins at pH 2 to 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppler, Julia Katharina; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M.; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Nipoti, Elia; Coenye, Tom; Schwarz, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) (∼75% β-lactoglobulin (β-LG)) is frequently used in foods as a natural emulsifying agent. However, at an acidic pH value, its emulsification capacity is greatly reduced. The covalent attachment of natural electrophilic hydrophobic molecules to WPI proteins is a

  19. A gadolinium(III) complex of a carboxylic-phosphorus acid derivative of diethylenetriamine covalently bound to inulin, a potential macromolecular MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebdusková, Petra; Kotek, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A

    2004-01-01

    A novel conjugate of a polysaccharide and a Gd(III) chelate with potential as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was synthesized. The structure of the chelate was derived from H5DTPA by replacing the central pendant arm by a phosphinic acid functional group, which was covalently bound to the polysaccharide inulin. On the average, each monosaccharide unit of the inulin was attached to approximately one (0.9) chelate moiety. The average molecular weight is 23110 and the average number of Gd3+ ions per molecule is 24. The ligand binds the Gd3+ ion in an octadentate fashion via three nitrogen atoms, four carboxylate oxygen atoms, and one P-O oxygen atom, and its first coordination sphere is completed by a water molecule. This compound shows promising properties for application as a contrast agent for MRI thanks to a favorable residence lifetime of this water molecule (170 ns at 298 K), a relatively long rotational correlation time (866 ps at 298 K), and the presence of two water molecules in the second coordination sphere of the Gd3+ ion. Furthermore, its stability toward transmetalation with Zn(II) is as high as that of the clinically used [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2-.

  20. Covalent immobilisation of antibodies in Teflon-FEP microfluidic devices for the sensitive quantification of clinically relevant protein biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetal, Jeremy; Pereira, Filipa M; Barbosa, Ana I; Castanheira, Ana P; Reis, Nuno M; Edwards, Alexander D

    2017-03-13

    This study reports for the first time the sensitive colorimetric and fluorescence detection of clinically relevant protein biomarkers by sandwich immunoassays using the covalent immobilisation of antibodies onto the fluoropolymer surface inside Teflon®-FEP microfluidic devices. Teflon®-FEP has outstanding optical transparency ideal for high-sensitivity colorimetric and fluorescence bioassays, however this thermoplastic is regarded as chemically inert and very hydrophobic. Covalent immobilisation can offer benefits over passive adsorption to plastic surfaces by allowing better control over antibody density, orientation and analyte binding capacity, and so we tested a range of different and novel covalent immobilisation strategies. We first functionalised the inner surface of a 10-bore, 200 μm internal diameter FEP microcapillary film with high-molecular weight polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) without changing the outstanding optical transparency of the device delivered by the matched refractive index of FEP and water. Glutaraldehyde immobilisation was compared with the use of photoactivated linkers and NHS-ester crosslinkers for covalently immobilising capture antibodies onto PVOH. Three clinically relevant sandwich ELISAs were tested against the cytokine IL-1β, the myocardial infarct marker cardiac troponin I (cTnI), and the chronic heart failure marker brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Overall, glutaraldehyde immobilisation was effective for BNP assays, but yielded unacceptable background for IL-1β and cTnI assays caused by direct binding of the biotinylated detection antibody to the modified PVOH surface. We found NHS-ester groups reacted with APTES-treated PVOH coated fluoropolymers. This facilitated a novel method for capture antibody immobilisation onto fluoropolymer devices using a bifunctional NHS-maleimide crosslinker. The density of covalently immobilised capture antibodies achieved using PVOH/APTES/NHS/maleimide approached levels seen with passive adsorption

  1. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with [α- 32 P]dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the 32 P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50 0 C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the 32 P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110 0 C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond

  2. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-04-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the /sup 32/P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50/sup 0/C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the /sup 32/P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  4. Covalent Allosteric Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by an Inhibitor-Electrophile Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punthasee, Puminan; Laciak, Adrian R; Cummings, Andrea H; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Lewis, Sarah M; Hillebrand, Roman; Singh, Harkewal; Tanner, John J; Gates, Kent S

    2017-04-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a validated drug target, but it has proven difficult to develop medicinally useful, reversible inhibitors of this enzyme. Here we explored covalent strategies for the inactivation of PTP1B using a conjugate composed of an active site-directed 5-aryl-1,2,5-thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1-dioxide inhibitor connected via a short linker to an electrophilic α-bromoacetamide moiety. Inhibitor-electrophile conjugate 5a caused time-dependent loss of PTP1B activity consistent with a covalent inactivation mechanism. The inactivation occurred with a second-order rate constant of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10 2 M -1 min -1 . Mass spectrometric analysis of the inactivated enzyme indicated that the primary site of modification was C121, a residue distant from the active site. Previous work provided evidence that covalent modification of the allosteric residue C121 can cause inactivation of PTP1B [Hansen, S. K., Cancilla, M. T., Shiau, T. P., Kung, J., Chen, T., and Erlanson, D. A. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 7704-7712]. Overall, our results are consistent with an unusual enzyme inactivation process in which noncovalent binding of the inhibitor-electrophile conjugate to the active site of PTP1B protects the nucleophilic catalytic C215 residue from covalent modification, thus allowing inactivation of the enzyme via selective modification of allosteric residue C121.

  5. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Covalent Chromatography after Derivatization of Protein Digests Immobilized on Reversed-Phase Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Heinz; Nieves, Edward; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2013-01-01

    A rugged sample-preparation method for comprehensive affinity enrichment of phosphopeptides from protein digests has been developed. The method uses a series of chemical reactions to incorporate efficiently and specifically a thiol-functionalized affinity tag into the analyte by barium hydroxide catalyzed β-elimination with Michael addition using 2-aminoethanethiol as nucleophile and subsequent thiolation of the resulting amino group with sulfosuccinimidyl-2-(biotinamido) ethyl-1,3-dithiopropionate. Gentle oxidation of cysteine residues, followed by acetylation of α- and ε-amino groups before these reactions, ensured selectivity of reversible capture of the modified phosphopeptides by covalent chromatography on activated thiol sepharose. The use of C18 reversed-phase supports as a miniaturized reaction bed facilitated optimization of the individual modification steps for throughput and completeness of derivatization. Reagents were exchanged directly on the supports, eliminating sample transfer between the reaction steps and thus, allowing the immobilized analyte to be carried through the multistep reaction scheme with minimal sample loss. The use of this sample-preparation method for phosphopeptide enrichment was demonstrated with low-level amounts of in-gel-digested protein. As applied to tryptic digests of α-S1- and β-casein, the method enabled the enrichment and detection of the phosphorylated peptides contained in the mixture, including the tetraphosphorylated species of β-casein, which has escaped chemical procedures reported previously. The isolates proved highly suitable for mapping the sites of phosphorylation by collisionally induced dissociation. β-Elimination, with consecutive Michael addition, expanded the use of the solid-phase-based enrichment strategy to phosphothreonyl peptides and to phosphoseryl/phosphothreonyl peptides derived from proline-directed kinase substrates and to their O-sulfono- and O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O

  6. Functions that Protect Escherichia coli from Tightly Bound DNA-Protein Complexes Created by Mutant EcoRII Methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Morgan L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-01-01

    Expression of mutant EcoRII methyltransferase protein (M.EcoRII-C186A) in Escherichia coli leads to tightly bound DNA-protein complexes (TBCs), located sporadically on the chromosome rather than in tandem arrays. The mechanisms behind the lethality induced by such sporadic TBCs are not well studied, nor is it clear whether very tight binding but non-covalent complexes are processed in the same way as covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). Using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A block replication forks in vivo. Specific bubble molecules were detected as spots on the 2D gel, only when M.EcoRII-C186A was induced, and a mutation that eliminates a specific EcoRII methylation site led to disappearance of the corresponding spot. We also performed a candidate gene screen for mutants that are hypersensitive to TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A. We found several gene products necessary for protection against these TBCs that are known to also protect against DPCs induced with wild-type M.EcoRII (after 5-azacytidine incorporation): RecA, RecBC, RecG, RuvABC, UvrD, FtsK, XerCD and SsrA (tmRNA). In contrast, the RecFOR pathway and Rep helicase are needed for protection against TBCs but not DPCs induced by M.EcoRII. We propose that stalled fork processing by RecFOR and RecA promotes release of tightly bound (but non-covalent) blocking proteins, perhaps by licensing Rep helicase-driven dissociation of the blocking M.EcoRII-C186A. Our studies also argued against the involvement of several proteins that might be expected to protect against TBCs. We took the opportunity to directly compare the sensitivity of all tested mutants to two quinolone antibiotics, which target bacterial type II topoisomerases and induce a unique form of DPC. We uncovered rep, ftsK and xerCD as novel quinolone hypersensitive mutants, and also obtained evidence against the involvement of a number of functions that might be expected to protect against quinolones.

  7. Functions that Protect Escherichia coli from Tightly Bound DNA-Protein Complexes Created by Mutant EcoRII Methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan L Henderson

    Full Text Available Expression of mutant EcoRII methyltransferase protein (M.EcoRII-C186A in Escherichia coli leads to tightly bound DNA-protein complexes (TBCs, located sporadically on the chromosome rather than in tandem arrays. The mechanisms behind the lethality induced by such sporadic TBCs are not well studied, nor is it clear whether very tight binding but non-covalent complexes are processed in the same way as covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs. Using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A block replication forks in vivo. Specific bubble molecules were detected as spots on the 2D gel, only when M.EcoRII-C186A was induced, and a mutation that eliminates a specific EcoRII methylation site led to disappearance of the corresponding spot. We also performed a candidate gene screen for mutants that are hypersensitive to TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A. We found several gene products necessary for protection against these TBCs that are known to also protect against DPCs induced with wild-type M.EcoRII (after 5-azacytidine incorporation: RecA, RecBC, RecG, RuvABC, UvrD, FtsK, XerCD and SsrA (tmRNA. In contrast, the RecFOR pathway and Rep helicase are needed for protection against TBCs but not DPCs induced by M.EcoRII. We propose that stalled fork processing by RecFOR and RecA promotes release of tightly bound (but non-covalent blocking proteins, perhaps by licensing Rep helicase-driven dissociation of the blocking M.EcoRII-C186A. Our studies also argued against the involvement of several proteins that might be expected to protect against TBCs. We took the opportunity to directly compare the sensitivity of all tested mutants to two quinolone antibiotics, which target bacterial type II topoisomerases and induce a unique form of DPC. We uncovered rep, ftsK and xerCD as novel quinolone hypersensitive mutants, and also obtained evidence against the involvement of a number of functions that might be expected to protect against quinolones.

  8. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions with other proteins, or binding of small molecules. Covalent .... vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms .... stance, molecular dynamic simulation of glutamine binding pro- tein shows that ...

  9. A FRET-based probe for epidermal growth factor receptor bound non-covalently to a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Reina E.; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Fujioka, Aki; Sharma, Alok; Mayer, Bruce J.; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. To monitor the EGF receptor (EGFR) activity in living cells, we developed a probe for EGFR activity based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previously, we developed a probe designated as Picchu (Phosphorylation indicator of the CrkII chimeric unit), which detects the tyrosine phosphorylation of the CrkII adaptor protein. We used a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes, WinZipA2 and WinZipB1, to bind Picchu non-covalently to the carboxyl-terminus of the EGFR. Using this modified probe named Picchu-Z, the activity of EGFR was followed in EGF-stimulated Cos7 cells. We found that a high level of tyrosine phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe remained after endocytosis until the point when the EGFR was translocated to the perinuclear region. These findings are in agreement with the previously reported 'signaling endosome' model. Furthermore, by pulse stimulation with EGF and by acute ablation of EGFR activity with AG1478, it was suggested that the phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe, and probably the phosphorylation of EGFR also, underwent a rapid equilibrium (τ 1/2 < 2 min) between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in the presence of EGF

  10. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Halina Z

    2011-01-19

    The physiological processes in the cell are regulated by reversible, electrostatic protein-protein interactions. Apoptosis is such a regulated process, which is critically important in tissue homeostasis and development and leads to complete disintegration of the cell. Pathological apoptosis, a process similar to apoptosis, is associated with aging and infection. The current study shows that pathological apoptosis is a process caused by the covalent interactions between the signaling proteins, and a characteristic of this pathological network is the covalent binding of calmodulin to regulatory sequences. Small molecules able to bind covalently to the amino group of lysine, histidine, arginine, or glutamine modify the regulatory sequences of the proteins. The present study analyzed the interaction of calmodulin with the BH3 sequence of Bax, and the calmodulin-binding sequence of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate in the presence of xanthurenic acid in primary retinal epithelium cell cultures and murine epithelial fibroblast cell lines transformed with SV40 (wild type [WT], Bid knockout [Bid-/-], and Bax-/-/Bak-/- double knockout [DKO]). Cell death was observed to be associated with the covalent binding of calmodulin, in parallel, to the regulatory sequences of proteins. Xanthurenic acid is known to activate caspase-3 in primary cell cultures, and the results showed that this activation is also observed in WT and Bid-/- cells, but not in DKO cells. However, DKO cells were not protected against death, but high rates of cell death occurred by detachment. The results showed that small molecules modify the basic amino acids in the regulatory sequences of proteins leading to covalent interactions between the modified sequences (e.g., calmodulin to calmodulin-binding sites). The formation of these polymers (aggregates) leads to an unregulated and, consequently, pathological protein network. The results suggest a mechanism for the involvement of small molecules

  11. Direct covalent coupling of proteins to nanostructured plasma polymers: a route to tunable cell adhesion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melnichuk, I.; Choukourov, A.; Bilek, M.; Weiss, A.; Vandrovcová, Marta; Bačáková, Lucie; Hanuš, J.; Kousal, J.; Shelemin, A.; Solař, P.; Slavínská, D.; Biederman, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 351, Oct 1 (2015), s. 537-545 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13297 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : covalent binding * plasma polymers * MG-63 osteoblasts Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.150, year: 2015

  12. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-02

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important.

  13. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  14. Accelerated identification of proteins by mass spectrometry by employing covalent pre-gel staining with Uniblue A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Mata-Gómez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is a standard method in biopharmaceutical quality control and biochemical research. Prior to identification by mass spectrometry, proteins are usually pre-separated by electrophoresis. However, current protein staining and de-staining protocols are tedious and time consuming, and therefore prolong the sample preparation time for mass spectrometry. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a 1-minute covalent pre-gel staining protocol for proteins, which does not require de-staining before the mass spectrometry analysis. We investigated the electrophoretic properties of derivatized proteins and peptides and studied their behavior in mass spectrometry. Further, we elucidated the preferred reaction of proteins with Uniblue A and demonstrate the integration of the peptide derivatization into typical informatics tools. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The Uniblue A staining method drastically speeds up the sample preparation for the mass spectrometry based identification of proteins. The application of this chemo-proteomic strategy will be advantageous for routine quality control of proteins and for time-critical tasks in protein analysis.

  15. Differential Labeling of Free and Disulfide-Bound Thiol Functions in Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiwert, B.; Hayen, H.; Karst, U.

    2008-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of the number of free cysteine groups and disulfide-bound cysteine groups in proteins has been developed based on the sequential labeling of free and bound thiol functionalities with two ferrocene-based maleimide reagents. Liquid

  16. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  17. Characterization of the regions from E. coli 16 S RNA covalently linked to ribosomal proteins S4 and S20 after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Backendorf, C.; Ehresmann, C.; Ebel, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The use of ultraviolet irradiation to form photochemical covalent bonds between the 16 S RNA and a ribosomal protein is a reliable method to check RNA regions which are interacting with the protein. This technique was successfully used to covalently link RNA or DNA and specific proteins in several cases. In the case of ribosome, it has been shown that the irradiation of 30 S and 50 S subunits using high doses of ultraviolet light allowed the covalent binding of almost all of the ribosomal proteins to the 16 S or 23 S RNAs. Using mild conditions, only proteins S7 and L4 could be covalently linked to the 16 S and 23 S RNAs, respectively, and the 16 S RNA region linked to protein S7 has now been characterized. The specificity of the photoreaction was demonstrated earlier and the tryptic peptides from proteins S4 and S7, photochemically linked to the 16 S RNA complexes, were identified. A report is presented on the sequences of the RNA regions which can be photochemically linked to proteins S4 and S7 after ultraviolet irradiation of the specific S4-16 S RNA and 20 S-16 S RNA complexes

  18. Efficient protein immobilization on polyethersolfone electrospun nanofibrous membrane via covalent binding for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudifard, Matin [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soudi, Sara [Stem Cell Biology Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soleimani, Masoud [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Simzar [Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Elaheh [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vossoughi, Manouchehr, E-mail: vosoughi@sharif.edu [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun nanofibrous membrane based on ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling chemistry. To present the high performance of proposed biosensors, anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was used as a model to demonstrate the utility of our proposed system. Polymer solution of polyethersolfone was used to fabricate fine nanofibrous membrane. Moreover, industrial polyvinylidene fluoride membrane and conventional microtiter plate were also used to compare the efficiency of antibody immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy images were taken to study the morphology of the membranes. The surface activation of nanofibrous membrane was done with the help of O{sub 2} plasma. PES nanofibrous membrane with carboxyl functional groups for covalent attachment of antibodies were treated by EDC/NHS coupling agent. The quantity of antibody immobilization was measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to confirm the covalent immobilization of antibody on membrane. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and invert fluorescence microscopy were used to analyze the antibody distribution pattern on solid surfaces. Results show that oxygen plasma treatment effectively increased the amount of antibody immobilization through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. It was found that the use of nanofibrous membrane causes the improved detection signal of ELISA based biosensors in comparison to the standard assay carried out in the 96-well microtiter plate. This method has the potential to improve the ELISA-based biosensor and we believe that this technique can be used in various biosensing methods. - Highlights: • Introduction of novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun

  19. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OF MEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    OpenAIRE

    Loss, Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims...

  20. REE bound proteins in natural plant fern Dicranopteris dichitoma by MAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.Q.; Wang, Y.Q.; Sun, J.X.; Chen, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Biochemical techniques, including pH variation, outsalting, ultracentrifugation, gel filtration chromatography and electrophoresis, etc., have been employed together with instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to study the rare earth elements (REE) bound proteins in the natural plant fern, Dicranopteris dichitoma. INAA was also used to identify whether the proteins were bound firmly with REE. The results obtained show that two REE bound proteins (RBP-I and RBP-II) have been separated. The molecular weight of RBP-I on Sephadex G-200 gel column is about 8 x 10 5 Daltons and that of RBP-II is less than 12,400 Daltons, respectively. However, SDS-PAGE of the two proteins shows that they mainly have two protein subunits with MW 14,100 and 38,700 Daltons. They are probably conjugated proteins, glycoproteins with different glyco-units. (author). 22 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Study on REE bound proteins in natural plant fern dicranopteris dichotomy by MAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Fanqing; Wang Yuqi; Sun Jingxing; Chen Hongmin; Xu Lei; Cao Guoyin

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical techniques, including pH variation, outsalting, ultracentrifugation, gel filtration chromatography and electrophoresis, etc., have been employed together with instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to study the rare earth elements (REE) bound proteins in the natural plant fern, Dicranopteris dichotomy. INAA was also used to identify whether the proteins were bound firmly with REE. The results obtained show that two REE bound proteins (RBP-I and RBP-II) have been separated. The molecular mass (molecular weight, MW) of RBP-I on Sephadex G-200 gel column is about 8 x 10 5 and that of RBP-II is less than 12400, respectively. However, SDS-PAGE of the two proteins shows that they mainly have two protein subunits with MW 14100 and 38700. They are probably conjugated proteins, glycoproteins with different glycol-units

  2. Fiber-bound nitrogen in gorilla diets: implications for estimating dietary protein intake of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Jessica M; Chapman, Colin A; Pell, Alice N

    2008-07-01

    Protein is essential for living organisms, but digestibility of crude protein is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Nitrogen is used to estimate protein content because nitrogen is a component of the amino acids that comprise protein, but a substantial portion of the nitrogen in plants may be bound to fiber in an indigestible form. To estimate the amount of crude protein that is unavailable in the diets of mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, foods routinely eaten were analyzed to determine the amount of nitrogen bound to the acid-detergent fiber residue. The amount of fiber-bound nitrogen varied among plant parts: herbaceous leaves 14.5+/-8.9% (reported as a percentage of crude protein on a dry matter (DM) basis), tree leaves (16.1+/-6.7% DM), pith/herbaceous peel (26.2+/-8.9% DM), fruit (34.7+/-17.8% DM), bark (43.8+/-15.6% DM), and decaying wood (85.2+/-14.6% DM). When crude protein and available protein intake of adult gorillas was estimated over a year, 15.1% of the dietary crude protein was indigestible. These results indicate that the proportion of fiber-bound protein in primate diets should be considered when estimating protein intake, food selection, and food/habitat quality.

  3. Site-specific covalent attachment of DNA to proteins using a photoactivatable Tus-Ter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdah, Dahdah B; Morin, Isabelle; Moreau, Morgane J J; Dixon, Nicholas E; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2009-06-07

    Investigations into the photocrosslinking kinetics of the protein Tus with various bromodeoxyuridine-substituted Ter DNA variants highlight the potential use of this complex as a photoactivatable connector between proteins of interest and specific DNA sequences.

  4. Leaf phenolics and seaweed tannins : analysis, enzymatic oxidation and non-covalent protein binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon extraction of proteins from sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) and oarweed (Laminaria digitata) for animal food and feed purposes, endogenous phenolics and proteins can interact with each other, which might affect the protein’s applicability. Sugar beet leaf proteins

  5. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  6. The non-covalent decoration of self-assembling protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Zahra N; Grundy, Daniel J; Channon, Kevin J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2010-10-01

    The design of self-assembling fibers presents challenges in basic science, and has potential for developing materials for applications in areas such as tissue engineering. A contemporary issue in the field is the construction of multi-component, functionalized systems. Previously, we have developed peptide-based fibers, the SAF system, that comprises two complementary peptides, which affords considerable control over assembly and morphology. Here we present a straightforward route to functionalizing the SAFs with small molecules and, subsequently, other moieties. This is achieved via non-covalent recruitment of charged peptide tags, which offers advantages such as further control, reversibility, and future prospects for developing recombinant tags. We demonstrate the concept by appending fluorescent labels and biotin (and thence gold nanoparticles) to the peptides, and visualising the resulting decorated SAFs by light and electron microscopy. The peptide tags bind in the nm-mum range, and show specificity compared with control peptides, and for the SAFs over similar alpha-helix-based peptide fibers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell......, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated...

  8. A study on poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone covalently bonded NiTi surface for inhibiting protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Near equiatomic NiTi alloys have been extensively applied as biomaterials owing to its unique shape memory effect, superelasticity and biocompatibility. It has been demonstrated that surfaces capable of preventing plasma protein adsorption could reduce the reactivity of biomaterials with human blood. This motivated a lot of researches on the surface modification of NiTi alloy. In the present work, following heat and alkaline treatment and silanization by trichlorovinylsilane (TCVS, coating of poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP was produced on the NiTi alloy by gamma ray induced chemical bonding. The structures and properties of modified NiTi were characterized and in vitro biocompatibility of plasma protein adsorption was investigated. The results indicated that heat treatment at 823 K for 1 h could result in the formation of a protective TiO2 layer with “Ni-free” zone on NiTi surface. It was found that PVP was covalently bonded on NiTi surface to create a hydrophilic layer for inhibiting protein adsorption on the surface. The present work offers a green approach to introduce a bioorganic surface on metal and other polymeric or inorganic substrates by gamma irradiation.

  9. Room-temperature synthesis of core-shell structured magnetic covalent organic frameworks for efficient enrichment of peptides and simultaneous exclusion of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guo; Gao, Chaohong; Zheng, Qiong; Lei, Zhixian; Geng, Huijuan; Lin, Zian; Yang, Huanghao; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-03-28

    Core-shell structured magnetic covalent organic frameworks (Fe 3 O 4 @COFs) were synthesized via a facile approach at room temperature. Combining the advantages of high porosity, magnetic responsiveness, chemical stability and selectivity, Fe 3 O 4 @COFs can serve as an ideal absorbent for the highly efficient enrichment of peptides and the simultaneous exclusion of proteins from complex biological samples.

  10. Protein-bound toxins: added value in their removal with high convective volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; Reque, Javier Eduardo; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. In recent years, protein-bound toxins have become more important due to their association with increased morbidity and mortality, characterised by inadequate clearance during dialysis. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of high convective volumes on postdilution online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) on the removal of medium-sized molecules, small molecules and protein-bound molecules. In forty postdilutional OL-HDF sessions, the reduction rates of toxins of different molecular weights were measured in 13 patients, including protein-bound molecules such as p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine. Total convective volume was 28.3 (5.1) litres (range 16.3-38.0 litres). Mean reduction rate of protein-bound molecules was 44.4% (15.7%), 48.7% (14.1%) and 58.6% (8.8%) for p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine, respectively. Moreover, a statistically significant direct association was found between the reduction rates of all three molecules, the replacement volume and the Kt/V. High convective volumes during postdilution OL-HDF are associated with increased removal of protein-bound uraemic toxins. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Introduction of a covalent histidine-heme linkage in a hemoglobin: a promising tool for heme protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Selena L; Preimesberger, Matthew R; Johnson, Eric A; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2014-12-01

    The hemoglobins of the cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Synechocystis (GlbNs) are capable of spontaneous and irreversible attachment of the b heme to the protein matrix. The reaction, which saturates the heme 2-vinyl by addition of a histidine residue, is reproduced in vitro by preparing the recombinant apoprotein, adding ferric heme, and reducing the iron to the ferrous state. Spontaneous covalent attachment of the heme is potentially useful for protein engineering purposes. Thus, to explore whether the histidine-heme linkage can serve in such applications, we attempted to introduce it in a test protein. We selected as our target the heme domain of Chlamydomonas eugametos LI637 (CtrHb), a eukaryotic globin that exhibits less than 50% sequence identity with the cyanobacterial GlbNs. We chose two positions, 75 in the FG corner and 111 in the H helix, to situate a histidine near a vinyl group. We characterized the proteins with gel electrophoresis, absorbance spectroscopy, and NMR analysis. Both T111H and L75H CtrHbs reacted upon reduction of the ferric starting material containing cyanide as the distal ligand to the iron. With L75H CtrHb, nearly complete (>90%) crosslinking was observed to the 4-vinyl as expected from the X-ray structure of wild-type CtrHb. Reaction of T111H CtrHb also occurred at the 4-vinyl, in a 60% yield indicating a preference for the flipped heme orientation in the starting material. The work suggests that the His-heme modification will be applicable to the design of proteins with a non-dissociable heme group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue

  13. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, Angelita [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Marzi, Stefano [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002 CNRS, IBMC (Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology), 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, France, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Fabbretti, Attilio [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale -INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gualerzi, Claudio O. [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  14. Membrane morphology is actively transformed by covalent binding of the protein Atg8 to PE-lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland L Knorr

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway involving the shape transformation of lipid bilayers. During the onset of autophagy, the water-soluble protein Atg8 binds covalently to phosphatdylethanolamines (PEs in the membrane in an ubiquitin-like reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We reconstituted the Atg8 conjugation system in giant and nm-sized vesicles with a minimal set of enzymes and observed that formation of Atg8-PE on giant vesicles can cause substantial tubulation of membranes even in the absence of Atg12-Atg5-Atg16. Our findings show that ubiquitin-like processes can actively change properties of lipid membranes and that membrane crowding by proteins can be dynamically regulated in cells. Furthermore we provide evidence for curvature sorting of Atg8-PE. Curvature generation and sorting are directly linked to organelle shapes and, thus, to biological function. Our results suggest that a positive feedback exists between the ubiquitin-like reaction and the membrane curvature, which is important for dynamic shape changes of cell membranes, such as those involved in the formation of autophagosomes.

  15. Role of metabolic activation by cytochrome P-450 in covalent binding of VP 16-213 to rat liver and HeLa cell microsomal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Maanen, J.M.; de Ruiter, C.; de Vries, J.; Kootstra, P.R.; Gobas, F.; Pinedo, H.M.

    1985-09-01

    Covalent binding of /sup 3/H-labeled VP 16-213 to rat liver and HeLa cell microsomal proteins was studied in vitro. Metabolic activation by cytochrome P-450 was found to play a role in the covalent binding of VP 16-213 to rat liver microsomal proteins, as shown by the need of NADPH cofactor, the increased binding after phenobarbital pretreatment and the inhibition by SFK-525A. Addition of ascorbic acid or alpha-phenyl-N-tert. butylnitrone to the incubation mixture depressed covalent binding by about 85%, suggesting that formation of a reactive metabolite from the phenolic structure may be involved in the binding process. VP 16-213 did not inhibit aminopyrine N-demethylase at the concentration used in the binding experiments (17 microM), indicating that metabolism of its methylenedioxy group does not play a role in binding to microsomal proteins. HeLa cell microsomes were found to possess aminopyrine N-demethylase activity. Covalent binding of radiolabeled VP 16-213 to HeLa cell microsomes decreased by about 64% if NADPH was omitted.

  16. Covalent modification of cytoskeletal proteins in neuronal cells by tryptamine-4,5-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptamine, is a systemic bioactive amine that acts in the gut and brain. As a substrate of myeloperoxidase in vitro, serotonin is oxidized to tryptamine-4,5-dione (TD, which is highly reactive with thiols. In this work, we successively prepared a monoclonal antibody to quinone-modified proteins and found that the antibody preferentially recognizes the TD–thiol adduct. Using the antibody, we observed that the chloride ion, the predominant physiological substrate for myeloperoxidase in vivo, is not competitive toward the enzyme catalyzed serotonin oxidation process, suggesting that serotonin is a plausible physiological substrate for the enzyme in vivo. Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that TD staining was observed in the cytosol of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells while blot analyses showed that some cellular proteins were preferentially modified. Pull-down analyses confirmed that the cytoskeletal proteins tubulins, vimentin, and neurofilament-L were modified. When pure tubulins were exposed to micromolar levels of synthetic TD, self-polymerization was initially enhanced and then suppressed. These results suggest that serotonin oxidation by myeloperoxidase or the action of other oxidants could cause functional alteration of cellular proteins, which may be related to neurodegeneration processes or irritable bowel syndrome.

  17. Tumor promoter induced membrane-bound protein kinase C - its influence on hematogenous metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishna, R.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A correlation between the amount of membrane-bound detergent-extractable protein kinase C activity in various B16 melanoma sublines (F10, F1, BL6) and their lung metastasizing abilities following intravenous injection was found. The F10 subline which exhibits higher metastasizing ability was found to have higher membrane-bound protein kinase C compared to the lower metastasizing subline, F1. Treatment of F1 cells with 100 nM 12-0 tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for 1h resulted in 90% decrease in protein kinase C activity in the cytosol with a concommitent increase in membrane-bound activity. These TPA-treated cells when injected intravenously in C57BL/6 mice produced 6-fold increase in pulmonary metastases compared to untreated F1 cells. However, biologically inactive analogues 4 α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate and phorbol 13-acetate had no effect on either membrane-bound protein kinase C activity or pulmonary metastases. Treating F1 cells with the second-stage tumor promoter, mezerin, resulted in increase in both membrane association of protein kinase C and also lung metastases. Thus, these results strongly suggests that membrane associated protein kinase C activity influences hematogenous metastasis of these melanoma cells

  18. Covalent protein modification with ISG15 via a conserved cysteine in the hinge region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika N Bade

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene of 15 kDa is strongly induced by type I interferons and displays antiviral activity. As other ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls, ISG15 is post-translationally conjugated to substrate proteins by an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal glycine of ISG15 and the side chains of lysine residues in the substrates (ISGylation. ISG15 consists of two ubiquitin-like domains that are separated by a hinge region. In many orthologs, this region contains a single highly reactive cysteine residue. Several hundred potential substrates for ISGylation have been identified but only a few of them have been rigorously verified. In order to investigate the modification of several ISG15 substrates, we have purified ISG15 conjugates from cell extracts by metal-chelate affinity purification and immunoprecipitations. We found that the levels of proteins modified by human ISG15 can be decreased by the addition of reducing agents. With the help of thiol blocking reagents, a mutational analysis and miRNA mediated knock-down of ISG15 expression, we revealed that this modification occurs in living cells via a disulphide bridge between the substrates and Cys78 in the hinge region of ISG15. While the ISG15 activating enzyme UBE1L is conjugated by ISG15 in the classical way, we show that the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 can either be classically conjugated by ISG15 or can form a disulphide bridge with ISG15 at the active site cysteine 87. The latter modification would interfere with its function as ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. However, we found no evidence for an ISG15 modification of the dynamin-like GTPases MxA and hGBP1. These findings indicate that the analysis of potential substrates for ISG15 conjugation must be performed with great care to distinguish between the two types of modification since many assays such as immunoprecipitation or metal-chelate affinity purification are performed with little or no

  19. Covalent Organic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra

    chemistry of silicon, InAs and GaAs materials, covalentsurface functionalization using organosilanes, liquid-phase, and vapor-phasefunctionalizations, diazo-transfer reaction, CuAAC click chemistry, different types ofbiorthogonal chemistries, SPAAC chemistry, and cellular interactions of chemically...... immobilization of D-amino acid adhesion peptideson azide functionalized silicon, GaAs and InAs materials by using CuAAC-click chemistry.The covalent immobilization of penetration peptide (TAT) on gold nanotips of InAs NWs isalso demonstrated.In chapter four, the covalent immobilization of GFP on silicon wafers......, GaAs wafers andGaAs NWs is demonstrated. Series of Fmoc-Pra-OH, NHS-PEG5-NHS and BCN-NHSfunctionalized silicon surfaces has been prepared, whereby GFP-N3 and GFP-bicyclononyneare immobilized by using CuAAC and SPAAC chemistry. The specific and covalentimmobilization of GFP-N3 on bicyclononyne...

  20. Spermidine is bound to a unique protein in early sea urchin embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canellakis, Z.N.; Bondy, P.K.; Infante, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Spermidine is rapidly taken up and becomes bound to protein during the very early hours of sea urchin embryogenesis. During the first 6 hr after fertilization of freshly obtained sea urchin eggs (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), which are incubated in the presence of exogenous [ 3 H]-spermidine, up to 7% of the total cell-associated spermidine appears uniquely as spermidine bound in macromolecular form. This unique protein containing spermidine migrates as a single radioactive band in gel electrophoresis. It has a Mr of approximately equal to 30,000 and is readily distinguishable from the protein initiation factor eIF-4D, which has a Mr of 18,000, the only other identifiable protein known to date to be posttranslationally modified by polyamines

  1. Utilization of crystalline and protein-bound amino acids by growing-finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Buxant, L.; Clausen, D.

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that diets containing crystalline AA (CAA) and protein-bound AA had a comparable nitrogen retention rate, even though the CAA-based diet is optimized as having a standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of 100% for the CAA. Two isoenergetic diets were formulated to provide ident...

  2. Lysine-Derived Protein-Bound Heyns Compounds in Bakery Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibmann, Stephanie; Hellwig, Anne; Hellwig, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2017-12-06

    Fructose and dicarbonyl compounds resulting from fructose in heated foods have been linked to pathophysiological pathways of several metabolic disorders. Up to now, very little has been known about the Maillard reaction of fructose in food. Heyns rearrangement compounds (HRCs), the first stable intermediates of the Maillard reaction between amino components and fructose, have not yet been quantitated as protein-bound products in food. Therefore, the HRCs glucosyllysine and mannosyllysine were synthesized and characterized by NMR. Protein-bound HRCs in cookies containing various sugars and in commercial bakery products were quantitated after enzymatic hydrolysis by RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode through application of the standard addition method. Protein-bound HRCs were quantitated for the first time in model cookies and in commercial bakery products containing honey, banana, and invert sugar syrup. Concentrations of HRCs from 19 to 287 mg/kg were found, which were similar to or exceeded the content of other frequently analyzed Maillard reaction products, such as N-ε-carboxymethyllysine (10-76 mg/kg), N-ε-carboxyethyllysine (2.5-53 mg/kg), and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (10-218 mg/kg) in the analyzed cookies. These results show that substantial amounts of HRCs form during food processing. Analysis of protein-bound HRCs in cookies is therefore useful to evaluate the Maillard reaction of fructose.

  3. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m. Evidence for tumour localisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakovljevic, A.C.; Pojer, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    An hypothesis that cations accumulate in tumours independent of ligand is tested. A preparation of technetium-99m known to be ligand-free (that is, the technetium is protein bound and no other ligand is injected) has been shown to accumulate in a T-cell lymphoma

  4. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Ba...

  5. Unique Pattern of Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Rückriemen, Jana; Sandner, Daniel; Henle, Thomas

    2017-05-03

    As a unique feature, honey from the New Zealand manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium) contains substantial amounts of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). Although MGO is a reactive intermediate in the Maillard reaction, very little is known about reactions of MGO with honey proteins. We hypothesized that the abundance of MGO should result in a particular pattern of protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in manuka honey. A protein-rich high-molecular-weight fraction was isolated from 12 manuka and 8 non-manuka honeys and hydrolyzed enzymatically. By HPLC-MS/MS, 8 MRPs, namely, N-ε-fructosyllysine, N-ε-maltulosyllysine, carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine (CEL), pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1), were quantitated. Compared to non-manuka honeys, the manuka honeys were characterized by high concentrations of CEL and MG-H1, whereas the formation of N-ε-fructosyllysine was suppressed, indicating concurrence reactions of glucose and MGO at the ε-amino group of protein-bound lysine. Up to 31% of the lysine and 8% of the arginine residues, respectively, in the manuka honey protein can be modified to CEL and MG-H1, respectively. CEL and MG-H1 concentrations correlated strongly with the MGO concentration of the honeys. Manuka honey possesses a special pattern of protein-bound MRPs, which might be used to prove the reliability of labeled MGO levels in honeys and possibly enable the detection of fraudulent MGO or DHA addition to honey.

  6. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur in the pres......Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur...... in the presence of molecular O(2) and redox-active metal ions (e.g. Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Cr(6+)), which are known to increase the rate of DOPA oxidation. The majority of oxidative damage appears to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and HO(.) radicals, though other DOPA oxidation products...

  7. Oxidoreduction reactions involving the electrostatic and the covalent complex of cytochrome c and plastocyanin: Importance of the protein rearrangement for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerey, L.M.; Kostic, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c and French bean plastocyanin are cross-linked one-to-one by a carbodiimide in the same general orientation in which they associate electrostatically. The reduction potentials of the Fe and Cu atoms in the covalent diprotein complex are respectively 245 and 385 mV vs NHE; the EPR spectra of the two metals are not perturbed by cross-linking. For isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, which probably differ slightly from one another in the manner of cross-linking, are separated efficiently by cation-exchange chromatography. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric experiments with the covalent diprotein complex show that the presence of plastocyanin somewhat inhibits oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- and somewhat promotes oxidation of this protein by [Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 ] + . These changes in reactivity are explained in terms of electrostatic and steric effects. Pulse-radiolysis experiments with the electrostatic diprotein complex yield association constants of ≥5 x 10 6 and 1 x 10 5 M -1 at ionic strengths of 1 and 40 mM, respectively, and the rate constant of 1.05 x 10 3 s -1 , regardless of the ionic strength, for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. Analogous pulse-radiolysis experiments with each of the four isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, at ionic strengths of both 2 and 200 mM, show an absence of the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. A rearrangement of the proteins for this reaction seems to be possible (or unnecessary) in the electrostatic complex but impossible in the covalent complex

  8. Fragment-based modelling of single stranded RNA bound to RNA recognition motif containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beauchene, Isaure Chauvot; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protein-RNA complexes are important for many biological processes. However, structural modeling of such complexes is hampered by the high flexibility of RNA. Particularly challenging is the docking of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). We have developed a fragment-based approach to model the structure of ssRNA bound to a protein, based on only the protein structure, the RNA sequence and conserved contacts. The conformational diversity of each RNA fragment is sampled by an exhaustive library of trinucleotides extracted from all known experimental protein–RNA complexes. The method was applied to ssRNA with up to 12 nucleotides which bind to dimers of the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), a highly abundant eukaryotic RNA-binding domain. The fragment based docking allows a precise de novo atomic modeling of protein-bound ssRNA chains. On a benchmark of seven experimental ssRNA–RRM complexes, near-native models (with a mean heavy-atom deviation of <3 Å from experiment) were generated for six out of seven bound RNA chains, and even more precise models (deviation < 2 Å) were obtained for five out of seven cases, a significant improvement compared to the state of the art. The method is not restricted to RRMs but was also successfully applied to Pumilio RNA binding proteins. PMID:27131381

  9. Speciation of protein-bound trace elements by gel electrophoresis and atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Renli; McLeod, Cameron W; Tomlinson, Kerry; Poole, Robert K

    2004-08-01

    The metabolism of trace elements, in particular their binding to proteins in biological systems is of great importance in biochemical, toxicological, and pharmacological studies. As a result there has been a sustained interest over the last two decades in the speciation of protein-bound metals. Various analytical approaches have been employed, combining efficient separation of metalloproteins by liquid chromatography or electrophoresis with high-sensitivity elemental detection. Slab-gel electrophoresis (GE) is a key platform for high-resolution protein separation, and has been combined with autoradiography and various atomic spectrometric techniques for in-gel determination of protein-bound metals. Recently, the combination of GE with state-of-the-art inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), particularly when linked to laser ablation (LA) for direct gel interrogation, has opened up new opportunities for rapid characterization of metalloproteins. The use of GE and atomic spectrometry for the speciation of protein-bound trace elements is reviewed in this paper. Technical requirements for gel electrophoresis/atomic spectrometric measurement are considered in terms of method compatibilities, detection capability and potential usefulness. The literature is also surveyed to illustrate current status and future trends. Copyright 2004 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co.

  10. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  11. Incubation of 14C-trichloroethylene vapor with rat liver microsomes: uptake of radioactivity and covalent protein binding of metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Wolowski, L.; Buchter, A.; Bolt, W.; Gil, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    Microsomal uptake irreversible protein binding of labelled trichloroehtylene was measured following incubation with rat liver microsomes in an all-glass vacuum system. If the cofactor for oxidative metabolism, NADPH, is not added, the gaseous trichloroethylene rapidly equilibrates with the microsomal suspension. Addition of NADPH results in a further uptake of 14 C-trichloroethylene from the gas phase, linearly with time, which is due to enzymic metabolism. This part of uptake is inhibited by some arylimidazoles and 1.2.3-benzothiadiazoles. The compounds of greatest inhibitory potency were 6-chloro-1.2.3-benzothiadiazole and 5.6-dimethyl-1.2.3-benzothiadiazole. Part of the metabolites of 14 C-trichloroethylene formed by rat liver microsomes were irreversibly bound to microsomal protein, amounting up to 1 nmol per mg microsomal protein per hour. Model experiments on uptake of 14 C-trichloroethylene from the gas phase by albumin solutions and liposomal suspensions (from lecithin) showed a rapid equilibration of trichloroethylene also with these systems. Comparison with previous analogous data on vinyl chloride revealed an about 10 times higher affinity of trichloroethylene to albumin and lipid, consistent with the behaviour of both compounds in the rat liver microsomal system. (orig.) [de

  12. Using isoelectric focussing and neutron activation analysis to study protein-bound tracer elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, W.

    1976-01-01

    A method to determine protein-bound tracer elements was determined by combining a protein separation method with neutron activation analysis. Gel filtration, disk electrophoresis, and isoelectric focussing were studied with regard to their suitability as separation methods. Using isoelectric focussing, human serum protein could be separated with good resolution on a preparative scale. The Se, Cr, Ag, Sc, Fe, Zn, Co, Br, Na, Rb, and Cs contents of the various protein fractions were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and by gamma-spectroscopic identification of their long-lived nuclides. Particular attention was paid to the main source of error with this method, i.e. contamination of the proteins in the course of the separation process. Information on the binding of the elements to protein was obtained by comparing the contents in the serum and in the protein separated by gel chromatography. For example, 75% of the Se and 30% of the Cs are bound to protein. Contamination of the protein fractions was studied by means of tracer elements with the element Se, errors due to contamination could be ruled out. The method was modified for the special imvestigation of Se-protein complexes in the serum. The Se content was determined by activation analysis via the short-lived radionuclide sup(77m)Se, this considerably reducing the duration of analysis. With regard to focussing, discrimination was improved in the pH region in which specific Se complexes were found. The activity distribution in fractionated serum protein labelled in vitro with 75 Se in the presence of erythrocytes showed that specific labelling is possible in this way. It is thus possible to study the distribution of Se carrier proteins with the aid of a radiotracer technique. (orig./RB) [de

  13. Nanoscale observation of local bound charges of patterned protein arrays by scanning force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y J; Jo, W; Kim, S; Park, S; Kim, Y S

    2008-01-01

    A protein patterned surface using micro-contact printing methods has been investigated by scanning force microscopy. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) was utilized for imaging the topography and detecting the electrical properties such as the local bound charge distribution of the patterned proteins. It was found that the patterned IgG proteins are arranged down to 1 μm, and the 90 deg. rotation of patterned anti-IgG proteins was successfully undertaken. Through the estimation of the effective areas, it was possible to determine the local bound charges of patterned proteins which have opposite electrostatic force behaviors. Moreover, we studied the binding probability between IgG and anti-IgG in a 1 μm 2 MIMIC system by topographic and electrostatic signals for applicable label-free detections. We showed that the patterned proteins can be used for immunoassay of proteins on the functional substrate, and that they can also be used for bioelectronics device application, indicating distinct advantages with regard to accuracy and a label-free detection

  14. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  15. Characterization of a major 31-kilodalton peptidoglycan-bound protein of Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.A.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    A 31-kilodalton (kDa) protein was solubilized from the peptidoglycan (PG) fraction of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with either N-acetylmuramidase from the fungus Chalaropsis sp. or with mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus. The protein exhibited a ladderlike banding pattern by autoradiography when radiolabeled [(35S]cysteine or [35S]methionine) PG material was extensively treated with hen lysozyme. The banding patterns ranging between 31 and 45 kDa and between 55 and 60 kDa resolved as a single 31-kDa protein when the material was subsequently treated with N-acetylmuramidase. Analysis of the purified 31-kDa protein for diaminopimelic acid by gas chromatography revealed 1 mol of diaminopimelic acid per mol of protein. When outer membrane PG material containing the major outer membrane porin protein was treated with N-acetylmuramidase or mutanolysin, both the 28.5-kDa major outer membrane protein and the 31-kDa protein were solubilized from the PG material under reducing conditions. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a high-molecular-mass complex (100 kDa) was resolved. The results of this study indicate that a 31-kDa PG-bound protein is a major component of the cell wall of L. pneumophila whose function may be to anchor the major outer membrane protein to PG. Finally, a survey of other Legionella species and other serogroups of L. pneumophila suggested that PG-bound proteins may be a common feature of this genus

  16. Electrophoretic characterization of the Mammalian nuclear matrix proteome, nuclear envelope, nucleoli and covalently bound ADP-ribose polymers: potential applications to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Xavier G; Racho, Ronald G; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Alvarez-González, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid metabolism is biochemically compartmentalized to the nucleus. Thus, it is necessary to define the proteome of the various macromolecular structures within this organelle. We isolated the nuclear matrix (NM) fraction from rat liver by sequential centrifugation steps at 13,000 rpm, staggered between endogenous nuclease treatment for 2 h at 37°C, followed by high-salt (H.S.; 2.0 M NaCl) and non-ionic detergent extractions (0.1%- or 1.0% Triton X-100) to eliminate the bulk of chromosomal DNA/RNA, histone proteins and the nuclear envelope (NE). Integrity of the NM and NE structures was confirmed by electron microscopy. Next, we analyzed the NM proteome on a 20% polyacrylamide gel using the PhastSystem. We observed the absence of histone proteins and the characteristic presence of the lamins by Coomassie blue staining. By contrast, upon silver staining, following electrophoretic separation with a Tris-Borate-EDTA buffer, we observed the NM-associated nucleic RNA and protein-free ADP-ribose polymers. While polymers are found in much lower concentration than RNA in NM, they were purified by affinity chromatography on boronate resin prior to electrophoresis. We observed the electrophoretic resolution of free ADP-ribose chains (5-25 units) by silver staining. The significance of our observations to cancer studies and carcinogenesis is discussed. Copyright© 2014, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Protein-Bound Uremic Toxin Profiling as a Tool to Optimize Hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available We studied various hemodialysis strategies for the removal of protein-bound solutes, which are associated with cardiovascular damage.This study included 10 patients on standard (3 x 4 h/week high-flux hemodialysis. Blood was collected at the dialyzer inlet and outlet at several time points during a midweek session. Total and free concentration of several protein-bound solutes was determined as well as urea concentration. Per solute, a two-compartment kinetic model was fitted to the measured concentrations, estimating plasmatic volume (V1, total distribution volume (V tot and intercompartment clearance (K21. This calibrated model was then used to calculate which hemodialysis strategy offers optimal removal. Our own in vivo data, with the strategy variables entered into the mathematical simulations, was then validated against independent data from two other clinical studies.Dialyzer clearance K, V1 and V tot correlated inversely with percentage of protein binding. All Ks were different from each other. Of all protein-bound solutes, K21 was 2.7-5.3 times lower than that of urea. Longer and/or more frequent dialysis that processed the same amount of blood per week as standard 3 x 4 h dialysis at 300 mL/min blood flow showed no difference in removal of strongly bound solutes. However, longer and/or more frequent dialysis strategies that processed more blood per week than standard dialysis were markedly more adequate. These conclusions were successfully validated.When blood and dialysate flow per unit of time and type of hemodialyzer are kept the same, increasing the amount of processed blood per week by increasing frequency and/or duration of the sessions distinctly increases removal.

  18. Protein-Bound Uremic Toxin Profiling as a Tool to Optimize Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloot, Sunny; Schneditz, Daniel; Cornelis, Tom; Van Biesen, Wim; Glorieux, Griet; Dhondt, Annemie; Kooman, Jeroen; Vanholder, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We studied various hemodialysis strategies for the removal of protein-bound solutes, which are associated with cardiovascular damage. This study included 10 patients on standard (3 x 4 h/week) high-flux hemodialysis. Blood was collected at the dialyzer inlet and outlet at several time points during a midweek session. Total and free concentration of several protein-bound solutes was determined as well as urea concentration. Per solute, a two-compartment kinetic model was fitted to the measured concentrations, estimating plasmatic volume (V1), total distribution volume (V tot) and intercompartment clearance (K21). This calibrated model was then used to calculate which hemodialysis strategy offers optimal removal. Our own in vivo data, with the strategy variables entered into the mathematical simulations, was then validated against independent data from two other clinical studies. Dialyzer clearance K, V1 and V tot correlated inversely with percentage of protein binding. All Ks were different from each other. Of all protein-bound solutes, K21 was 2.7-5.3 times lower than that of urea. Longer and/or more frequent dialysis that processed the same amount of blood per week as standard 3 x 4 h dialysis at 300 mL/min blood flow showed no difference in removal of strongly bound solutes. However, longer and/or more frequent dialysis strategies that processed more blood per week than standard dialysis were markedly more adequate. These conclusions were successfully validated. When blood and dialysate flow per unit of time and type of hemodialyzer are kept the same, increasing the amount of processed blood per week by increasing frequency and/or duration of the sessions distinctly increases removal.

  19. Absorption and retention of free and milk protein-bound cyano- and hydroxocobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Linda Skibsted; Juul, Christian Bredgaard; Fedosov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    alone or bound to milk protein. Materials and methods We synthesized labeled OH[57Co]Cbl from commercially available CN[57Co]Cbl. Recombinant bovine transcobalamin (rbTC) was produced in yeast and skimmed milk obtained off the shelf. Male Wistar rats (250–300 g) received labeled Cbl by gastric gavage...... and CNCbl are absorbed equally well, but much more OHCbl accumulated in the liver. Benefits of oral supplementation with OHCbl compared to CNCbl should be investigated....

  20. Study of the role of the covalently linked cell wall protein (Ccw14p) and yeast glycoprotein (Ygp1p) within biofilm formation in a flor yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, J; Coi, A L; Zara, G; García-Martínez, T; Mauricio, J C; Budroni, M

    2018-03-01

    Flor yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains noted by their ability to create a type of biofilm in the air-liquid interface of some wines, known as 'flor' or 'velum', for which certain proteins play an essential role. Following a proteomic study of a flor yeast strain, we deleted the CCW14 (covalently linked cell wall protein) and YGP1 (yeast glycoprotein) genes-codifying for two cell surface glycoproteins-in a haploid flor yeast strain and we reported that both influence the weight of the biofilm as well as cell adherence (CCW14).

  1. Protein-bound homocyst(e)ine. A possible risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Cook, H Y; Norusis, M; Messer, J V

    1986-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic changes and thromboembolism are common features in homocystinurics. Hence, we postulate a positive correlation between the level of homocyst(e)ine in the blood and the occurrence of coronary artery disease. Homocysteine is found either as free homocystine, cysteine-homocysteine mixed disulfide, or protein-bound homocyst(e)ine. In nonhomocystinuric subjects, most homocysteine molecules are detectable in the protein-bound form. Thus, protein-bound homocyst(e)ine in stored plasma which reflected total plasma homocyst(e)ine was determined in 241 patients with coronary artery disease (173 males and 68 females). The mean +/- SD total plasma homocyst(e)ine was 5.41 +/- 1.62 nmol/ml in male patients, 4.37 +/- 1.09 nmol/ml in male controls, 5.66 +/- 1.93 nmol/ml in female patients, and 4.16 +/- 1.62 nmol/ml in female controls. The differences between the patients with coronary artery disease and the controls were statistically significant (P less than 0.0005). PMID:3700650

  2. Bound water at protein-protein interfaces: partners, roles and hydrophobic bubbles as a conserved motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa H Ahmed

    Full Text Available There is a great interest in understanding and exploiting protein-protein associations as new routes for treating human disease. However, these associations are difficult to structurally characterize or model although the number of X-ray structures for protein-protein complexes is expanding. One feature of these complexes that has received little attention is the role of water molecules in the interfacial region.A data set of 4741 water molecules abstracted from 179 high-resolution (≤ 2.30 Å X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes was analyzed with a suite of modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield and hydrogen-bonding geometry. A metric termed Relevance was used to classify the general roles of the water molecules.The water molecules were found to be involved in: a (bridging interactions with both proteins (21%, b favorable interactions with only one protein (53%, and c no interactions with either protein (26%. This trend is shown to be independent of the crystallographic resolution. Interactions with residue backbones are consistent for all classes and account for 21.5% of all interactions. Interactions with polar residues are significantly more common for the first group and interactions with non-polar residues dominate the last group. Waters interacting with both proteins stabilize on average the proteins' interaction (-0.46 kcal mol(-1, but the overall average contribution of a single water to the protein-protein interaction energy is unfavorable (+0.03 kcal mol(-1. Analysis of the waters without favorable interactions with either protein suggests that this is a conserved phenomenon: 42% of these waters have SASA ≤ 10 Å(2 and are thus largely buried, and 69% of these are within predominantly hydrophobic environments or "hydrophobic bubbles". Such water molecules may have an important biological purpose in mediating protein-protein interactions.

  3. Covalent binding of food carcinogens MeIQx, MeIQ and IQ to DNA and protein in microsomal incubations and isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, H.; Holme, J.A.; Alexander, J.

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic activation of 14 C-labelled food carcinogens 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx),2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline(MeIQ) and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) to macromolecular bound species was studied in microsomal and hepatocellular incubations. Several data indicated that the covalent binding was dependent on P450 enzymes: It was dependent on NADPH, it was induced many times by the P450 IA1 and IA2 upregulators β-naphthoflavone and polychlorinated biphenyls, and was inhibited by the P450 IA1 and IA2 inhibitor α-naphtoflavone. In both hepatocellular and microsomal incubations the three compounds bound with similar efficiency, with IQ being somewhat more potent compared to MeIQx and MeIQ. The binding appeared to follow saturation kinetics with K m values less than 20 μM. In incubations with hepatocytes the compounds bound to both cellular DNA and to bovine serum albumin in the medium. The fact that 13-26% of total adducts were formed with bovine serum albumin, indicates that reactive metabolites of the compounds may be transported and react at distant sites from their formation without any further activation. (au)

  4. CavityPlus: a web server for protein cavity detection with pharmacophore modelling, allosteric site identification and covalent ligand binding ability prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youjun; Wang, Shiwei; Hu, Qiwan; Gao, Shuaishi; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Weilin; Shen, Yihang; Chen, Fangjin; Lai, Luhua; Pei, Jianfeng

    2018-05-10

    CavityPlus is a web server that offers protein cavity detection and various functional analyses. Using protein three-dimensional structural information as the input, CavityPlus applies CAVITY to detect potential binding sites on the surface of a given protein structure and rank them based on ligandability and druggability scores. These potential binding sites can be further analysed using three submodules, CavPharmer, CorrSite, and CovCys. CavPharmer uses a receptor-based pharmacophore modelling program, Pocket, to automatically extract pharmacophore features within cavities. CorrSite identifies potential allosteric ligand-binding sites based on motion correlation analyses between cavities. CovCys automatically detects druggable cysteine residues, which is especially useful to identify novel binding sites for designing covalent allosteric ligands. Overall, CavityPlus provides an integrated platform for analysing comprehensive properties of protein binding cavities. Such analyses are useful for many aspects of drug design and discovery, including target selection and identification, virtual screening, de novo drug design, and allosteric and covalent-binding drug design. The CavityPlus web server is freely available at http://repharma.pku.edu.cn/cavityplus or http://www.pkumdl.cn/cavityplus.

  5. Photochemical properties and sensor applications of modified yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) covalently attached to the surfaces of etched optical fibers (EOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselov, Alexey A; Abraham, Bobin George; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Karp, Matti T; Tkachenko, Nikolai V

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have the inherent ability to act as sensing components which function both in vitro and inside living cells. We describe here a novel study on a covalent site-specific bonding of fluorescent proteins to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the surface of etched optical fibers (EOFs). Deposition of fluorescent proteins on EOFs gives the opportunity to increase the interaction of guided light with deposited molecules relative to plane glass surfaces. The EOF modification is carried out by surface activation using 3-aminopropylthrimethoxysilane (APTMS) and bifunctional crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) which exposes sulfhydryl-reactive maleimide groups followed by covalent site-specific coupling of modified yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Steady-state and fluorescence lifetime measurements confirm the formation of SAM. The sensor applications of YPF SAMs on EOF are demonstrated by the gradual increase of emission intensity upon addition of Ca(2+) ions in the concentration range from a few tens of micromolars up to a few tens of millimolars. The studies on the effect of pH, divalent cations, denaturing agents, and proteases reveal the stability of YFP on EOFs at normal physiological conditions. However, treatments with 0.5% SDS at pH 8.5 and protease trypsin are found to denaturate or cleave the YFP from fiber surfaces.

  6. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  7. Properties of chymotrypsin bound covalently to dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlateva, T P; Krysteva, M; Balajthy, Z; Elödi, P

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic properties dextran-chymotrypsin conjugate were studied by means of low molecular weight substrates. It was found that KM, kcat and kcat/KM of dextran chymotrypsin for the hydrolysis of benzoyl-L-tyrosine-ethyl-ester did not differ substantially from those of the free enzyme. However, the data found for kcat of dextran-chymotrypsin and free chymotrypsin assayed for the hydrolysis of three tripeptidyl-p-nitroanilide D-Arg-Val-Trp-pNA, D-Arg-Val-Tyr-pNA, Z-Phe-Pro-Phe-pNA, were definitely different. The inhibition of the modified chymotrypsin with soybean trypsin inhibitor was found to be less pronounced than that with the free enzyme. The effect of potassium and magnesium salts on the inactivation of both enzymes was also studied. The effect of dextran matrix on the catalytic properties and the conformational stability of modified chymotrypsin is discussed.

  8. Lateral translation of covalently bound fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphry, M J; Beton, P H; Keeling, D L; Fawcett, R H J; Moriarty, P; Butcher, M J; Birkett, P R; Walton, D R M; Taylor, R; Kroto, H W

    2006-01-01

    Lateral manipulation of fullerenes on clean silicon surfaces may be induced by either an attractive or repulsive interaction between adsorbed molecules and the tip of a scanning probe microscope, and can result in a complex response arising from molecular rolling. The model for rolling is supported by new results which show that manipulation is suppressed for adsorbed functionalized fullerenes due to the presence of phenyl sidegroups. The influence of varying the dwell time of the tip during manipulation is also reported. By reducing this time to a value which is less than the response time of the feedback control loop it is possible to induce manipulation in a quasi-constant height mode which is accompanied by large increases/decreases in current

  9. Protein-bound solute removal during extended multipass versus standard hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eloot, Sunny; Van Biesen, Wim; Axelsen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    and middle molecules compared to standard hemodialysis (SHD). Since protein-bound solutes (PBS) exert important pathophysiological effects, we investigated whether MPHD results in improved removal of PBS as well. METHODS: A cross-over study (Clinical Trial NCT01267760) was performed in nine stable HD......), hippuric acid (HA), indole acetic acid (IAA), indoxyl sulfate (IS), and p-cresylsulfate (PCS). Dialyser extraction ratio, reduction ratio, and solute removal were calculated for these solutes. RESULTS: Already at 60 min after dialysis start, the extraction ratio in the hemodialyser was a factor 1.4-4 lower...

  10. UVA photolysis using the protein-bound sensitizers present in human lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortwerth, B.J.; Olesen, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate that the protein-bound chromophores in aged human lens can act as sensitizers for protein damage by UVA light. The water-insoluble (WI) proteins from pooled human and bovine lenses were solubilized by sonication in water and illuminated with UV light similar in output to that transmitted by the cornea. Analysis of the irradiated proteins showed a linear decrease in sulfhydryl groups with a 30% loss after 2 h. No loss was seen when native α-crystallin was irradiated under the same conditions. A 25% loss of histidine residues was also observed with the human lens WI fraction, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels indicated considerable protein cross-linking. Similar photodamage was seen with a WI fraction from old bovine lenses. While the data show the presence of UVA sensitizers, some histidine destruction and protein cross-linking were also obtained with α-crystallin and with lysozyme which argue that part of the histidine loss in the human WISS was likely due to tryptophan acting as a sensitizer. (Author)

  11. Binding of monoclonal antibody to protein antigen in fluid phase or bound to solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S J

    1982-01-01

    Rat monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to fragment D (FgD) of human fibrinogen was used to characterize the direct binding of antibody to protein in solution or bound to solid supports. Purified IgG, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' were prepared from ascites fluid of hybridoma 104-14B which is a fusion product of spleen cells from a rat immunized with FgD and the mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of radioiodinated antibody preparations demonstrated the presence of hybrid immunoglobulin molecules, but only structures having rat heavy and rat light chains had active antibody combinig sites. The affinity constant for IgG as well as F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab', 6x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, was identical when tested using fluid phase antigen (/sup 125/I-labeled FgD). Affinity constants determined for direct binding of iodinated IgG using FgD immobilized on solid supports showed a slight dependence on the antigen concentration used in the measurement. These values ranged from 0.5x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at high antigen concentrations (1.3x10/sup -7/ M) to 9x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at low antigen concentration (1.3x10/sup -10/ M). Binding constants for F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' gave similar results indicating that binding was homogeneous and univalent. The capacity of solid state antigen to bind antibody varied with the method used to bind FgD to the solid support. FgD bound directly to polystyrene plates was least efficient at binding labeled antibody; FgD bound to plates through intermediate carriers poly(L-lysine) was only slightly more efficient, while antigen bound to Sepharose beads by cyanogen bromide activation was the most active.

  12. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  13. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; (Stanford-MED); (CH-Boston)

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  14. Role of protein-bound carbonyl groups in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, J; Furth, A J

    1997-08-22

    Several mechanisms have been postulated for the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glycated proteins; they all feature protein-bound carbonyl intermediates. Using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), we have detected these intermediates on bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin after in vitro glycation by glucose or fructose. Carbonyls were formed in parallel with AGE-fluorophores, via oxidative Maillard reactions. Neither Amadori nor Heyns products contributed to the DNPH reaction. Fluorophore and carbonyl yields were much enhanced in lipid-associated proteins, but both groups could also be detected in lipid-free proteins. When pre-glycated proteins were incubated in the absence of free sugar, carbonyl groups were rapidly lost in a first-order reaction, while fluorescence continued to develop beyond the 21 days of incubation. Another unexpected finding was that not all carbonyl groups were blocked by aminoguanidine, although there was complete inhibition of reactions leading to AGE-fluorescence. It is suggested that carbonyls acting as fluorophore precursors react readily with aminoguanidine, while others are resistant to this hydrazine, possibly because they are involved in ring closure. Factors influencing the relative rates of acyclisation and hydrazone formation are discussed, together with possible implications for antiglycation therapy.

  15. Protein-bound NAD(P)H Lifetime is Sensitive to Multiple Fates of Glucose Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T; Favreau, Peter F; Gillette, Amani A; Sdao, Sophia M; Merrins, Matthew J; Skala, Melissa C

    2018-04-03

    While NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can detect changes in flux through the TCA cycle and electron transport chain (ETC), it remains unclear whether NAD(P)H FLIM is sensitive to other potential fates of glucose. Glucose carbon can be diverted from mitochondria by the pentose phosphate pathway (via glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, G6PDH), lactate production (via lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), and rejection of carbon from the TCA cycle (via pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, PDK), all of which can be upregulated in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that multiphoton NAD(P)H FLIM can be used to quantify the relative concentrations of recombinant LDH and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in solution. In multiple epithelial cell lines, NAD(P)H FLIM was also sensitive to inhibition of LDH and PDK, as well as the directionality of LDH in cells forced to use pyruvate versus lactate as fuel sources. Among the parameters measurable by FLIM, only the lifetime of protein-bound NAD(P)H (τ 2 ) was sensitive to these changes, in contrast to the optical redox ratio, mean NAD(P)H lifetime, free NAD(P)H lifetime, or the relative amount of free and protein-bound NAD(P)H. NAD(P)H τ 2 offers the ability to non-invasively quantify diversions of carbon away from the TCA cycle/ETC, which may support mechanisms of drug resistance.

  16. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Growth Factor Receptor Bound-Protein in Clonorchis sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuelian; Lee, Ji-Yun; Kim, Tae Im; Dai, Fuhong; Lee, Tae-Jin; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis causes clonorchiasis, a potentially serious disease. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is a cytosolic protein conserved among animals and plays roles in cellular functions such as meiosis, organogenesis and energy metabolism. In the present study, we report first molecular characters of growth factor receptor bound-protein (CsGrb2) from C. sinensis as counter part of Grb2 from animals and its possible functions in development and organogenesis of C. sinensis. Methodology/Principal Findings A CsGrb2 cDNA clone retrieved from the C. sinensis transcriptome encoded a polypeptide with a SH3-SH2-SH3 structure. Recombinant CsGrb2 was bacterially produced and purified to homogeneity. Native CsGrb2 with estimated molecular weight was identified from C. sinensis adult extract by western blotting using a mouse immune serum to recombinant CsGrb2. CsGrb2 transcripts was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adults. Immunohistochemical staining showed that CsGrb2 was localized to the suckers, mesenchymal tissues, sperms in seminal receptacle and ovary in the adults, and abundantly expressed in most organs of the metacercariae. Recombinant CsGrb2 was evaluated to be little useful as a serodiagnostic reagent for C. sinesis human infections. Conclusion Grb2 protein found in C. sinensis was conserved among animals and suggested to play a role in the organogenesis, energy metabolism and mitotic spermatogenesis of C. sinensis. These findings from C. sinensis provide wider understanding on diverse function of Grb2 in lower animals such as platyhelminths. PMID:24454892

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of growth factor receptor bound-protein in Clonorchis sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clonorchis sinensis causes clonorchiasis, a potentially serious disease. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2 is a cytosolic protein conserved among animals and plays roles in cellular functions such as meiosis, organogenesis and energy metabolism. In the present study, we report first molecular characters of growth factor receptor bound-protein (CsGrb2 from C. sinensis as counter part of Grb2 from animals and its possible functions in development and organogenesis of C. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A CsGrb2 cDNA clone retrieved from the C. sinensis transcriptome encoded a polypeptide with a SH3-SH2-SH3 structure. Recombinant CsGrb2 was bacterially produced and purified to homogeneity. Native CsGrb2 with estimated molecular weight was identified from C. sinensis adult extract by western blotting using a mouse immune serum to recombinant CsGrb2. CsGrb2 transcripts was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adults. Immunohistochemical staining showed that CsGrb2 was localized to the suckers, mesenchymal tissues, sperms in seminal receptacle and ovary in the adults, and abundantly expressed in most organs of the metacercariae. Recombinant CsGrb2 was evaluated to be little useful as a serodiagnostic reagent for C. sinesis human infections. CONCLUSION: Grb2 protein found in C. sinensis was conserved among animals and suggested to play a role in the organogenesis, energy metabolism and mitotic spermatogenesis of C. sinensis. These findings from C. sinensis provide wider understanding on diverse function of Grb2 in lower animals such as platyhelminths.

  18. Sulfone-stabilized carbanions for the reversible covalent capture of a posttranslationally-generated cysteine oxoform found in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zachary D; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Santo, Nicholas; Gates, Kent S

    2016-06-15

    Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) involves oxidative conversion of the active site cysteine thiolate into an electrophilic sulfenyl amide residue. Reduction of the sulfenyl amide by biological thiols regenerates the native cysteine residue. Here we explored fundamental chemical reactions that may enable covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide residue in oxidized PTP1B. Various sulfone-containing carbon acids were found to react readily with a model peptide sulfenyl amide via attack of the sulfonyl carbanion on the electrophilic sulfur center in the sulfenyl amide. Both the products and the rates of these reactions were characterized. The results suggest that capture of a peptide sulfenyl amide residue by sulfone-stabilized carbanions can slow, but not completely prevent, thiol-mediated generation of the corresponding cysteine-containing peptide. Sulfone-containing carbon acids may be useful components in the construction of agents that knock down PTP1B activity in cells via transient covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide oxoform generated during insulin signaling processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An albumin-fixed membrane for the removal of protein-bound toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Dongtao; Wu Dewang; Shi Wei; Ma Yuanyuan; Tian Xiangdong; Liang Pengfei; Zhang Qiqing

    2006-01-01

    Established methods for kidney dialysis do not work for liver failure because kidney dialysis removes only water-soluble toxins, while the liver normally removes albumin-bound toxins. In the present study, a polysulfone dialysis membrane with a -OH reactive group was prepared by hydrolyzing the chloromethylated polysulfone membrane, and the bovine serum albumin molecules were fixed into the membrane with 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole activation. The content of albumin of the albumin-fixed membrane was 121.3 mg (g membrane) -1 . The albumin-fixed dialysis membranes were used to remove protein-bound toxins, bilirubin, from the bilirubin-albumin solution. The transfer rate of bilirubin of the albumin-fixed membrane was obviously higher compared to the normal dialysis membrane. The clearance of bilirubin with the albumin-fixed membrane was 49.8%. The albumin-fixed membrane can easily be regenerated by the bovine serum albumin and NaOH solution. Regeneration of the membrane suggested good mechanical and chemical stability, as well as good clearance of bilirubin. In addition, the effects of membrane thickness and bilirubin initial concentration on the removal of bilirubin were discussed

  20. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Esteban Ithuralde

    Full Text Available Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD, a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how

  1. Free and protein-bound cobalamin absorption in healthy middle-aged and older subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt, D Z; van den Broek, W J; Lamers, C B; Corstens, F H; Hoefnagels, W H

    1996-08-01

    To study free- and protein-bound cobalamin absorption and the correlation with atrophic gastritis in healthy middle-aged and older subjects. A cross-sectional study. Fifty-two healthy subjects, aged 26 to 87 years, apparently free from conditions known to influence the cobalamin status. Middle-aged subjects were defined as those younger than 65 years of age (median age 57 years) and older subjects as those 65 years and older (median age 75 years). Protein-bound cobalamin absorption was assessed by 48-hour urinary excretion method following oral administration of scrambled egg yolk, labeled in vivo with 57 Co-cobalamin by injecting a hen with 57 Co-cyanocobalamin. The percentage of 57 Co-cobalamin bound to protein was 65%. Free cobalamin absorption was assessed by 48-hour urinary excretion method following oral administration of crystalline 57 Co-cyanocobalamin. Plasma cobalamin, folate and fasting plasma gastrin, and pepsinogen A and C concentrations were determined. The median urinary excretion of egg yolk 57 Co-cobalamin in middle-aged subjects was 12.3% (25th and 75th percentiles 10.5%-14.5%) compared with 11.7% (25th and 75th percentiles 9.8%-13.6%) in older subjects (P = .283). The median urinary excretion after administration of free 57 Co-cobalamin in middle-aged subjects was 25.7% (25th and 75th percentiles 20.6%-30.7%) compared with 27.9% (25th and 75th percentiles 21.4%-34.5%) in older subjects (P = .694). Neither egg yolk nor free 57 Co-cobalamin excretion correlated with age. A ratio of pepsinogen A to pepsinogen C less than 1.6, indicating atrophic gastritis, was found in 13 subjects. Within the atrophic gastritis group, 11 subjects had a pepsinogen A concentration greater than or equal to 17 micrograms/L, indicating mild to moderate atrophic gastritis, and two subjects had a pepsinogen A concentration less than 17 micrograms/L, indicating severe atrophic gastritis or gastric atrophy. All subjects had normal fasting plasma gastrin concentrations. Free

  2. A photophysical study of two fluorogen-activating proteins bound to their cognate fluorogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, Tiziano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Hau B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jung, Jaemyeong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gnanakaran, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-14

    We are exploring the feasibility of using recently developed flu orogen-activating proteins (FAPs) as reporters for single-molecule imaging. FAPs are single-chain antibodies choosen to specifically bind small chromophoric molecules termed f1uorogens. Upon binding to its cognate FAP the fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorogen can increase substantially giving rise to a fluorescent complex. Based on the seminal work of Szent-Gyorgyi et al. (Nature Biotechnology, Volume 26, Number 2, pp 235-240, 2008) we have chosen to study two fluorogen-activating single-chain antibodies, HL 1.0.1-TOI and H6-MG bound to their cognate fluorogens, thiazole orange and malachite green derivatives, respectively. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study the photophysics of these fluorescent complexes.

  3. Comparison of methods for determination of testosterone and non-protein bound testosterone in men with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    The serum concentrations of testosterone and of non-protein bound testosterone were determined in 28 men with alcoholic liver disease having normal to decreased serum albumin concentrations and normal to raised SHBG concentrations. Serum testosterone concentrations determined with two...... radioimmunoassays using different purification procedures and antibody batches did not differ significantly and correlated significantly (r=0.91; p less than 0.001). The median serum concentration of non-protein bound testosterone was 0.265 nmol/l (range 0.068-0.495 nmol/l) when determined by equilibrium dialysis...... and 0.232 nmol/l (range 0.042-0.610 nmol/l) when calculated according to the law of mass action. This difference is insignificant. The concentrations of non-protein bound testosterone determined by the two methods correlated significantly (r=0.83; p less than 0.001). In the calculation of non...

  4. Covalent assembly of poly(ethyleneimine) via layer-by-layer deposition for enhancing surface density of protein and bacteria attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Bing, E-mail: xiabing@njfu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Forest Genetics and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education of China), Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Advanced Analysis and Testing Center, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Shi, Jisen; Dong, Chen; Zhang, Wenyi; Lu, Ye [Key Laboratory of Forest Genetics and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education of China), Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Guo, Ping [Nanjing College of Information Technology, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Covalently assembly of low molecular weight poly(ethyleneimine) was introduced to glass surfaces via glutaraldehyde crosslinking, with focus on its application on protein immobilization or bacteria attachment. Characterizations of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurement revealed a stepwise growth of poly(ethyleneimine) films by layer-by-layer deposition. After fluorescein isothiocyanate labelling, photoluminescence spectroscopy measurement indicated that the amount of surface accessible amine groups had been gradually enhanced with increasing poly(ethyleneimine) layers deposition. As compared with traditional aminosilanized surfaces, the surface density of amine groups was enhanced by ∼11 times after five layers grafting, which resulted in ∼9-time increasing of surface density of immobilized bovine serum albumin. Finally, these as-prepared PEI multi-films with excellent biocompatibility were adopted as culture substrates to improve Escherichia coli adherence, which showed that their surface density had been increased by ∼251 times.

  5. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs (G/CCGGAAGTGACGTCA) Preferentially Bound by GABPα and CREB Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Vinson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X4-N1-30-X4) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif (C/GCCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif (C/GCGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif. PMID:23050235

  6. How Diverse are the Protein-Bound Conformations of Small-Molecule Drugs and Cofactors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nils-Ole; Simsir, Méliné; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2018-03-01

    Knowledge of the bioactive conformations of small molecules or the ability to predict them with theoretical methods is of key importance to the design of bioactive compounds such as drugs, agrochemicals and cosmetics. Using an elaborate cheminformatics pipeline, which also evaluates the support of individual atom coordinates by the measured electron density, we compiled a complete set (“Sperrylite Dataset”) of high-quality structures of protein-bound ligand conformations from the PDB. The Sperrylite Dataset consists of a total of 10,936 high-quality structures of 4548 unique ligands. Based on this dataset, we assessed the variability of the bioactive conformations of 91 small molecules—each represented by a minimum of ten structures—and found it to be largely independent of the number of rotatable bonds. Sixty-nine molecules had at least two distinct conformations (defined by an RMSD greater than 1 Å). For a representative subset of 17 approved drugs and cofactors we observed a clear trend for the formation of few clusters of highly similar conformers. Even for proteins that share a very low sequence identity, ligands were regularly found to adopt similar conformations. For cofactors, a clear trend for extended conformations was measured, although in few cases also coiled conformers were observed. The Sperrylite Dataset is available for download from http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/sperrylite_dataset.

  7. Template-directed covalent conjugation of DNA to native antibodies, transferrin and other metal-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Christian B.; Kodal, Anne L. B.; Nielsen, Jesper S.; Schaffert, David H.; Scavenius, Carsten; Okholm, Anders H.; Voigt, Niels V.; Enghild, Jan J.; Kjems, Jørgen; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2014-09-01

    DNA-protein conjugates are important in bioanalytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics and bionanotechnology, as the DNA provides a unique handle to identify, functionalize or otherwise manipulate proteins. To maintain protein activity, conjugation of a single DNA handle to a specific location on the protein is often needed. However, preparing such high-quality site-specific conjugates often requires genetically engineered proteins, which is a laborious and technically challenging approach. Here we demonstrate a simpler method to create site-selective DNA-protein conjugates. Using a guiding DNA strand modified with a metal-binding functionality, we directed a second DNA strand to the vicinity of a metal-binding site of His6-tagged or wild-type metal-binding proteins, such as serotransferrin, where it subsequently reacted with lysine residues at that site. This method, DNA-templated protein conjugation, facilitates the production of site-selective protein conjugates, and also conjugation to IgG1 antibodies via a histidine cluster in the constant domain.

  8. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    bone cofactor was identified as a lipid containing a ceramide phosphate, a single chained glycerol lipid and a linker. Tendon uses a different cofactor made up of two fatty acid chains linked directly to the phosphate yielding a molecule about half the size. Moreover, adding the tendon factor/cofactor to osteosarcoma cells causes them to stop growing, which is opposite to its role with tendon cells. Thus, the cofactor is cell type specific both in composition and in the triggered response. Further support of its proposed role came from frozen sections from 5 week old mice where an antibody to the factor stained strongly at the growing ends of the tendon as predicted. In conclusion, the molecule needed for cell density signaling is a small protein bound to a unique, tissue-specific phospholipid yielding a membrane associated but diffusible molecule. Signal transduction is postulated to occur by an increased ordering of the plasma membrane as the concentration of this protein/lipid increases with cell density.

  9. UV induced DNA-protein cross links in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornhauser, A.

    1976-01-01

    The review was not intended to cover all the past year's literature in this field; only selective material published in 1974 and 1975 has been surveyed. Covalent linkage of DNA and RNA to proteins induced by UV is considered, but DNA-membrade attachment, amino acids covalently bound to DNA as functions of growth conditions and protein non-covalently bound to DNA involved in cell regulation are excluded. Studies of DNA-protein cross-links upon UV irradiation in chemical model systems, bacteria and tissue culture systems, and an in vivo mammalian system are all surveyed. (U.K.)

  10. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  11. Dimethyl Fumarate Inhibits the Nuclear Factor κB Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells by Covalent Modification of p65 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrati, Irida; Siklos, Marton I; Calderon-Gierszal, Esther L; El-Shennawy, Lamiaa; Georgieva, Gergana; Thayer, Emily N; Thatcher, Gregory R J; Frasor, Jonna

    2016-02-12

    In breast tumors, activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) pathway promotes survival, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, stem cell-like properties, and resistance to therapy--all phenotypes of aggressive disease where therapy options remain limited. Adding an anti-inflammatory/anti-NFκB agent to breast cancer treatment would be beneficial, but no such drug is approved as either a monotherapy or adjuvant therapy. To address this need, we examined whether dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an anti-inflammatory drug already in clinical use for multiple sclerosis, can inhibit the NFκB pathway. We found that DMF effectively blocks NFκB activity in multiple breast cancer cell lines and abrogates NFκB-dependent mammosphere formation, indicating that DMF has anti-cancer stem cell properties. In addition, DMF inhibits cell proliferation and significantly impairs xenograft tumor growth. Mechanistically, DMF prevents p65 nuclear translocation and attenuates its DNA binding activity but has no effect on upstream proteins in the NFκB pathway. Dimethyl succinate, the inactive analog of DMF that lacks the electrophilic double bond of fumarate, is unable to inhibit NFκB activity. Also, the cell-permeable thiol N-acetyl l-cysteine, reverses DMF inhibition of the NFκB pathway, supporting the notion that the electrophile, DMF, acts via covalent modification. To determine whether DMF interacts directly with p65, we synthesized and used a novel chemical probe of DMF by incorporating an alkyne functionality and found that DMF covalently modifies p65, with cysteine 38 being essential for the activity of DMF. These results establish DMF as an NFκB inhibitor with anti-tumor activity that may add therapeutic value in the treatment of aggressive breast cancers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Convective transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs facilitates direct penetration into deep tissues after topical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Anissimov, Yuri G; Jepps, Owen G; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To relate the varying dermal, subcutaneous and muscle microdialysate concentrations found in man after topical application to the nature of the drug applied and to the underlying physiology. METHODS We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in which transport to deeper tissues was determined by tissue diffusion, blood, lymphatic and intersitial flow transport and drug properties. The model was applied to interpret published human microdialysis data, estimated in vitro dermal diffusion and protein binding affinity of drugs that have been previously applied topically in vivo and measured in deep cutaneous tissues over time. RESULTS Deeper tissue microdialysis concentrations for various drugs in vivo vary widely. Here, we show that carriage by the blood to the deeper tissues below topical application sites facilitates the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs that penetrate the skin, leading to rapid and significant concentrations in those tissues. Hence, the fractional concentration for the highly plasma protein bound diclofenac in deeper tissues is 0.79 times that in a probe 4.5 mm below a superficial probe whereas the corresponding fractional concentration for the poorly protein bound nicotine is 0.02. Their corresponding estimated in vivo lag times for appearance of the drugs in the deeper probes were 1.1 min for diclofenac and 30 min for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Poorly plasma protein bound drugs are mainly transported to deeper tissues after topical application by tissue diffusion whereas the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs is additionally facilitated by convective blood, lymphatic and interstitial transport to deep tissues. PMID:21999217

  13. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  14. Studying repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo using the Flp-nick system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Andersen, Anni Hangaard; Bjergbæk, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The Flp-nick system is a simple in vivo system developed for studying the cellular responses to a protein-bound nick at a single genomic site in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Flp-nick system takes advantage of a mutant Flp recombinase that can introduce a nick at a specific Flp ...

  15. Intraerythrocyte Non-Protein-Bound Iron in Children with Bronchopulmonary Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Vasilyeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 230 children having bronchopulmonary pathology (BPP were examined. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their intraerythrocyte non-protein- bound iron (IE-NPBI levels. We investigated the relationship of the IE-NPBI level with parameters of respiratory function (RF tests, the severity of comorbidities, and level of other free intracellular ions, such as copper, zinc, and magnesium. The pronounced increase in IE-NPBI level was typical for patients with the connective tissue dysplasia, often accompanied by mitral valve prolapse, osteopenia, and mineral metabolism violation. The severe comorbid diagnoses were typical for patients with reduced levels of IE-NPBI (chronic cor pulmonale, tuberculosis infection. The largest number of comorbidities, aggravating the underlying disease, took place in the group of patients with a significant reduction in IE-NPBI level. A significant increase in IE-NPBI level, as well as a marked reduction of IE-NPBI level, was an unfavorable factor for the underlying disease. We found a correlation between IE-NPBI level and parameters of RF-test in patients with moderate increase in IE-NPBI level.

  16. Targeting of [[sup 111]In]biocytin to cultured ovarian adenocarcinoma cells using covalent monoclonal antibody -streptavidin conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, K.; Marks, A. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Banting and Best Dept. of Medical Research); Baumal, R. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Pathology)

    1992-11-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against the human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY, were substituted with maleimide and covalently bonded to thiolated streptavidin. The conjugates were separated from unreacted reagents by successive affinity chromatography on protein A-Sepharose and iminobiotin columns. Purified conjugates consisted of an immunoglobulin (Ig) monomer bound to a streptavidin tetramer through a covalent bond between the Ig molecule and one of the streptavidin subunits. The conjugates were able to specifically target [[sup 111]In]biocytin to HEY cells in vitro in the presence of human serum and ascitic fluid from ovarian cancer patients. (Author).

  17. Phospholipids as an alternative to direct covalent coupling: surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina for protein recognition and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Behn, Daniela; Kliesch, Torben-Tobias; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2012-01-15

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with aligned, cylindrical, non-intersecting pores with diameters of 75 nm and depths of 3.5 or 10 μm were functionalized with lipid monolayers harboring different receptor lipids. AAO was first functionalized with dodecyl-trichlorosilane, followed by fusion of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) forming a lipid monolayer. The SUVs' lipid composition was transferred onto the AAO surface, allowing us to control the surface receptor density. Owing to the optical transparency of the AAO, the overall vesicle spreading process and subsequent protein binding to the receptor-doped lipid monolayers could be investigated in situ by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). SUV spreading occurred at the pore-rim interface, followed by lateral diffusion of lipids within the pore-interior surface until homogeneous coverage was achieved with a lipid monolayer. The functionality of the system was demonstrated through streptavidin binding onto a biotin-DOPE containing POPC membrane, showing maximum protein coverage at 10 mol% of biotin-DOPE. The system enabled us to monitor in real-time the selective extraction of two histidine-tagged proteins, PIGEA14 (14 kDa) and ezrin (70 kDa), directly from cell lysate solutions using a DOGS-NTA(Ni)/DOPC (1:9) membrane. The purification process including protein binding and elution was monitored by OWS and confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduced protein bound uraemic toxins in vegetarian kidney failure patients treated by haemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandouz, Sakina; Mohamed, Ali Shendi; Zheng, Yishan; Sandeman, Susan; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p cresyl sulfate (PCS) are protein bound toxins which accumulate with chronic kidney disease. Haemodiafiltration (HDF) increases middle molecule clearances and has been suggested to increase IS and PCS clearance. We therefore wished to establish whether higher convective clearances with HDF would reduce IS and PCS concentrations. Methods We measured total plasma IS and PCS in a cohort of 138 CKD5d patients treated by On-line HDF (Ol-HDF), by high pressure liquid chromatography. Findings Mean patient age was 64.6 ± 16.5 years, 60.1% male, 57.3% diabetic, median dialysis vintage 25.9 months (12.4-62.0). The mean ICS concentration was 79.8 ± 56.4 umol/L and PCS 140.3 ± 101.8 umol/L. On multivariate analysis, IS was associated with serum albumin (β 4.31,P vegetarian diet(β-28.3, P = 0.048) and PCS negatively with log C reactive protein (β-75.8, P vegetarian diet (β-109, P = 0.001). Vegetarian patients had lower IS and PCS levels (median 41.5 (24.2-71.9) vs. 78.1 (49.5-107.5) and PCS (41.6 (14.2-178.3) vs. 127.3 (77.4-205.6) µmol/L, respectively, P Vegetarian patients had lower preOl-HDF serum urea, and phosphate (13.8 ±3.8 vs. 18.4 ± 5.2 mmol/L, and 1.33 ± 0.21 vs. 1.58 ± 0.45 mmol/L), and estimated urea nitrogen intake (1.25 ± 0.28 vs. 1.62 ± 0.5 g/kg/day), respectively, all P vegetarian diet had reduced IS and PCS concentrations. Although this could be due to differences in dietary protein intake, a vegetarian diet may also potentially reduce IS and PCS production by the intestinal microbiome. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. Competition between bound and free peptides in an ELISA-based procedure that assays peptides derived from protein digests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pace Umberto

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe an ELISA-based method that can be used to identify and quantitate proteins in biological samples. In this method, peptides in solution, derived from proteolytic digests of the sample, compete with substrate-attached synthetic peptides for antibodies, also in solution, generated against the chosen peptides. The peptides used for the ELISA are chosen on the basis of their being (i products of the proteolytic (e.g. tryptic digestion of the protein to be identified and (ii unique to the target protein, as far as one can know from the published sequences. Results In this paper we describe the competition assay and we define the optimal conditions for the most effective assay. We have performed an analysis of the kinetics of interaction between the four components of the assay: the plastic substratum to which the peptide is bound, the bound peptide itself, the competing added peptide, and the antibody that is specific for the peptide and we compare the results of theoretical simulations to the actual data in some model systems. Conclusion The data suggest that the peptides bind to the plastic substratum in more than one conformation and that, once bound, the peptide displays different affinities for the antibody, depending on how it has bound to the plate

  20. A method for analysing small samples of floral pollen for free and protein-bound amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabler, Daniel; Power, Eileen F; Borland, Anne M; Barnes, Jeremy D; Wright, Geraldine A

    2018-02-01

    Pollen provides floral visitors with essential nutrients including proteins, lipids, vitamins and minerals. As an important nutrient resource for pollinators, including honeybees and bumblebees, pollen quality is of growing interest in assessing available nutrition to foraging bees. To date, quantifying the protein-bound amino acids in pollen has been difficult and methods rely on large amounts of pollen, typically more than 1 g. More usual is to estimate a crude protein value based on the nitrogen content of pollen, however, such methods provide no information on the distribution of essential and non-essential amino acids constituting the proteins.Here, we describe a method of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis using low amounts of pollen that allows exploration of amino acid composition, quantified using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC), and a back calculation to estimate the crude protein content of pollen.Reliable analysis of protein-bound and free amino acids as well as an estimation of crude protein concentration was obtained from pollen samples as low as 1 mg. Greater variation in both protein-bound and free amino acids was found in pollen sample sizes amino acids in smaller sample sizes, we suggest a correction factor to apply to specific sample sizes of pollen in order to estimate total crude protein content.The method described in this paper will allow researchers to explore the composition of amino acids in pollen and will aid research assessing the available nutrition to pollinating animals. This method will be particularly useful in assaying the pollen of wild plants, from which it is difficult to obtain large sample weights.

  1. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  2. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m iron-dextran enhancement of technetium pyrophosphate uptake in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Jakovljevic, A.C.; Wise, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    The biodistribution of technetium-99m was studied in T-cell lymphoma and selected organs of iron-dextran treated and control mice given technetium-99m pyrophosphate. The results showed that high serum iron levels increased tumour uptake of technetium pyrophosphate. This supports the hypothesis that technetium, in common with other metal-based tumour seeking radiopharmaceuticals, is transported to tumours as a ligand-free protein-bound cation. (U.K.)

  3. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Nandita; Kar, Rekha; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; McEwen, Donald G.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-01-01

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 μM concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTPγS or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  4. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Circulating Covalent Protein Adducts Derived from a Drug Acyl Glucuronide Metabolite: Multiple Albumin Adductions in Diclofenac Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Thomas G.; Meng, Xiaoli; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Maggs, James L.; Castelazo, Anahi Santoyo; Regan, Sophie L.; Bennett, Stuart N. L.; Earnshaw, Caroline J.; Aithal, Guruprasad P.; Pande, Ira; Kenna, J. Gerry; Stachulski, Andrew V.; Park, B. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Covalent protein modifications by electrophilic acyl glucuronide (AG) metabolites are hypothetical causes of hypersensitivity reactions associated with certain carboxylate drugs. The complex rearrangements and reactivities of drug AG have been defined in great detail, and protein adducts of carboxylate drugs, such as diclofenac, have been found in liver and plasma of experimental animals and humans. However, in the absence of definitive molecular characterization, and specifically, identification of signature glycation conjugates retaining the glucuronyl and carboxyl residues, it cannot be assumed any of these adducts is derived uniquely or even fractionally from AG metabolites. We have therefore undertaken targeted mass spectrometric analyses of human serum albumin (HSA) isolated from diclofenac patients to characterize drug-derived structures and, thereby, for the first time, have deconstructed conclusively the pathways of adduct formation from a drug AG and its isomeric rearrangement products in vivo. These analyses were informed by a thorough understanding of the reactions of HSA with diclofenac AG in vitro. HSA from six patients without drug-related hypersensitivities had either a single drug-derived adduct or one of five combinations of 2–8 adducts from among seven diclofenac N-acylations and three AG glycations on seven of the protein’s 59 lysines. Only acylations were found in every patient. We present evidence that HSA modifications by diclofenac in vivo are complicated and variable, that at least a fraction of these modifications are derived from the drug’s AG metabolite, and that albumin adduction is not inevitably a causation of hypersensitivity to carboxylate drugs or a coincidental association. PMID:24902585

  5. Crystal Structures of SlyA Protein, a Master Virulence Regulator of Salmonella, in Free and DNA-bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Kyle T.; Duguid, Erica M.; He, Chuan (UC)

    2011-11-17

    SlyA is a master virulence regulator that controls the transcription of numerous genes in Salmonella enterica. We present here crystal structures of SlyA by itself and bound to a high-affinity DNA operator sequence in the slyA gene. SlyA interacts with DNA through direct recognition of a guanine base by Arg-65, as well as interactions between conserved Arg-86 and the minor groove and a large network of non-base-specific contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone. Our structures, together with an unpublished structure of SlyA bound to the small molecule effector salicylate (Protein Data Bank code 3DEU), reveal that, unlike many other MarR family proteins, SlyA dissociates from DNA without large conformational changes when bound to this effector. We propose that SlyA and other MarR global regulators rely more on indirect readout of DNA sequence to exert control over many genes, in contrast to proteins (such as OhrR) that recognize a single operator.

  6. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  8. A simple elution strategy for biotinylated proteins bound to streptavidin conjugated beads using excess biotin and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Joleen S; Yamada, Soichiro

    2017-12-02

    Protein-protein interactions are the molecular basis of cell signaling. Recently, proximity based biotin identification (BioID) has emerged as an alternative approach to traditional co-immunoprecipitation. In this protocol, a mutant biotin ligase promiscuously labels proximal binding partners with biotin, and resulting biotinylated proteins are purified using streptavidin conjugated beads. This approach does not require preservation of protein complexes in vitro, making it an ideal approach to identify transient or weak protein complexes. However, due to the high affinity bond between streptavidin and biotin, elution of biotinylated proteins from streptavidin conjugated beads requires harsh denaturing conditions, which are often incompatible with downstream processing. To effectively release biotinylated proteins bound to streptavidin conjugated beads, we designed a series of experiments to determine optimal binding and elution conditions. Interestingly, the concentrations of SDS and IGEPAL-CA630 during the incubation with streptavidin conjugated beads were the key to effective elution of biotinylated proteins using excess biotin and heating. This protocol provides an alternative method to isolate biotinylated proteins from streptavidin conjugated beads that is suitable for further downstream analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. How to calculate clearance of highly protein-bound drugs during continuous venovenous hemofiltration demonstrated with flucloxacillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Brigitte; Ahmed el Gendy, Salwa; Delle Karth, Georg; Locker, Gottfried J; Heinz, Gottfried; Jaeger, Walter; Thalhammer, Florian

    2003-01-01

    Flucloxacillin is an important antimicrobial drug in the treatment of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and therefore is often used in staphylococcal infections. Furthermore, flucloxacillin has a high protein binding rate as for example ceftriaxone or teicoplanin--drugs which have formerly been characterized as not being dialyzable. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 4.0 g flucloxacillin every 8 h were examined in 10 intensive care patients during continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) using a polyamide capillary hemofilter. In addition, the difficulty of calculating the hemofiltration clearance of a highly protein-bound drug is described. Flucloxacillin serum levels were significantly lowered (56.9 +/- 24.0%) even though only 15% of the drug was detected in the ultrafiltrate. Elimination half-life, total body clearance and sieving coefficient were 4.9 +/- 0.7 h, 117.2 +/- 79.1 ml/min and 0.21 +/- 0.09, respectively. These discrepancies can be explained by the high protein binding of flucloxacillin, the adsorbing property of polyamide and the equation in order to calculate hemofiltration clearance. The unbound fraction of a 4.0 g flucloxacillin dosage facilitates time above the minimum inhibitory concentration (T > MIC) of 60% only for strains up to a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.5 mg/l. Based on the data of this study, we conclude that intensive care patients with staphylococcal infections on CVVH should be treated with 4.0 g flucloxacillin every 8 h which was safe and well tolerated. Moreover, further studies with highly protein-bound drugs are recommended to check the classical 'hemodialysis' equation as the standard equation in calculating the CVVH clearance of highly protein-bound drugs. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Improved Energy Bound Accuracy Enhances the Efficiency of Continuous Protein Design

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    Flexibility and dynamics are important for protein function and a protein’s ability to accommodate amino acid substitutions. However, when computational protein design algorithms search over protein structures, the allowed flexibility is often reduced to a relatively small set of discrete side-chain and backbone conformations. While simplifications in scoring functions and protein flexibility are currently necessary to computationally search the vast protein sequence and conformational space,...

  11. Effects of solution chemistry and aging time on prion protein adsorption and replication of soil-bound prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prion interactions with soil may play an important role in the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie. Prions are known to bind to a wide range of soil surfaces, but the effects of adsorption solution chemistry and long-term soil binding on prion fate and transmission risk are unknown. We investigated HY TME prion protein (PrP(Sc adsorption to soil minerals in aqueous solutions of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and deionized water using western blotting. The replication efficiency of bound prions following adsorption in these solutions was also evaluated by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Aging studies investigated PrP(Sc desorption and replication efficiency up to one year following adsorption in PBS or DI water. Results indicate that adsorption solution chemistry can affect subsequent prion replication or desorption ability, especially after incubation periods of 30 d or longer. Observed effects were minor over the short-term (7 d or less. Results of long-term aging experiments demonstrate that unbound prions or prions bound to a diverse range of soil surfaces can readily replicate after one year. Our results suggest that while prion-soil interactions can vary with solution chemistry, prions bound to soil could remain a risk for transmitting prion diseases after months in the environment.

  12. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system.

  13. Non-covalent association of protein and capsular polysaccharide on bacteria-sized latex beads as a model for polysaccharide-specific humoral immunity to intact Gram-positive extracellular bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressing type 14 capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) and type III Streptococcus agalactiae containing a PPS14 core capsule identical to PPS14, exhibit non-covalent associations of PPS14 and bacterial protein, in contrast to soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. Both bacteria and conjugates induce murine PPS14-specific IgG responses dependent on CD4+ T cells. Further, secondary immunization with conjugate and S. agalactiae, although not S. pneumoniae, results in a boosted response. However, in contrast to conjugate, PPS14-specific IgG responses to bacteria lack affinity maturation, utilize the 44.1-idiotype and are dependent on marginal zone B cells. To better understand the mechanism underlying this dichotomy we developed a minimal model of intact bacteria in which PPS14 and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were stably attached to 1 μm (bacteria-sized) latex beads, but not directly linked to each other, in contrast to PPS14-PspA conjugate. PPS14+[PspA] beads, similar to conjugate, induced in mice boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary responses, dependent on T cells and ICOS-dependent costimulation, and in which priming could be achieved with PspA alone. In contrast to conjugate, but similar to intact bacteria, the primary PPS14-specific IgG response to PPS14+[PspA] beads peaked rapidly, with the secondary response highly enriched for the 44.1-idiotype and lacking affinity maturation. These results demonstrate that non-covalent association in a particle, of polysaccharide and protein, recapitulates essential immunologic characteristics of intact bacteria that are distinct from soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. PMID:23926322

  14. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M. (UMM); (HWMRI)

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  15. Free and Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Beer: Method Development and a Survey of Different Beer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2016-09-28

    The Maillard reaction is important for beer color and flavor, but little is known about the occurrence of individual glycated amino acids in beer. Therefore, seven Maillard reaction products (MRPs), namely, fructosyllysine, maltulosyllysine, pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, MG-H1, and argpyrimidine, were synthesized and quantitated in different types of beer (Pilsner, dark, bock, wheat, and nonalcoholic beers) by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode through application of the standard addition method. Free MRPs were analyzed directly. A high molecular weight fraction was isolated by dialysis and hydrolyzed enzymatically prior to analysis. Maltulosyllysine was quantitated for the first time in food. The most important free MRPs in beer are fructosyllysine (6.8-27.0 mg/L) and maltulosyllysine (3.7-21.8 mg/L). Beer contains comparatively high amounts of late-stage free MRPs such as pyrraline (0.2-1.6 mg/L) and MG-H1 (0.3-2.5 mg/L). Minor amounts of formyline (4-230 μg/L), maltosine (6-56 μg/L), and argpyrimidine (0.1-4.1 μg/L) were quantitated. Maltulosyllysine was the most significant protein-bound MRP, but both maltulosyllysine and fructosyllysine represent only 15-60% of the total protein-bound lysine-derived Amadori products. Differences in the patterns of protein-bound and free individual MRPs and the ratios between them were identified, which indicate differences in their chemical, biochemical, and microbiological stabilities during the brewing process.

  16. G protein- and agonist-bound serotonin 5-HT2A receptor model activated by steered molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ísberg, Vignir; Balle, Thomas; Sander, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The driving force for the transformation was the addition of several known intermolecular and receptor interhelical hydrogen bonds enforcing the necessary helical and rotameric movements. Subsquent MD simulations without constraints confirmed the stability......A 5-HT(2A) receptor model was constructed by homology modeling based on the ß(2)-adrenergic receptor and the G protein-bound opsin crystal structures. The 5-HT(2A) receptor model was transferred into an active conformation by an agonist ligand and a G(aq) peptide in four subsequent steered...

  17. Covalent interactions of 1,2,3-trichloropropane with hepatic macromolecules: studies in the male F-344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, G L; Sipes, I G

    1990-07-01

    Preliminary investigations into the role of biotransformation in 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)-induced tumor formation have been undertaken. Male F-344 rats were administered 30 mg/kg [14C]TCP (100 microCi/kg) ip and killed 4 hr later. The extent of covalent binding to hepatic protein, DNA, and RNA was 418, 244, and 432 pmol [14C]TCP equivalents/mg, respectively. An in vivo covalent binding time course showed no significant change in [14C]TCP equivalents bound to hepatic DNA (1-48 hr), while binding to protein was maximal by 4 hr and decreased significantly by 48 hr. The binding of TCP-associated radioactivity to hepatic protein and DNA was shown to be cumulative for two and three doses when given 24 hr apart. Pretreatment of animals with phenobarbital caused a decrease while pretreatment with SKF 525-A caused an increase in covalent binding of [14C]TCP equivalents to protein and DNA. Pretreatment of rats with beta-naphthoflavone did not alter the covalent binding of [14C]TCP equivalents to protein or DNA. However, glutathione depletion with L-buthionine-(R,S)-sulfoximine increased binding to protein by 342% while it decreased binding to DNA by 56%. Intraperitoneal administration of TCP also depleted hepatic GSH by 41 and 61% 2 hr after doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg. The in vivo binding data suggest a dual role for GSH in the bioactivation of TCP. It may, in part, be that GSH is involved in the bioactivation and covalent binding of TCP to hepatic DNA. However, it also appears to detoxify a reactive intermediate(s) that binds to protein.

  18. Dynamic features of apo and bound HIV-Nef protein reveal the anti-HIV dimerization inhibition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonsamy, Suri; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    The first account on the dynamic features of Nef or negative factor, a small myristoylated protein located in the cytoplasm believes to increase HIV-1 viral titer level, is reported herein. Due to its major role in HIV-1 pathogenicity, Nef protein is considered an emerging target in anti-HIV drug design and discovery process. In this study, comparative long-range all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed for apo and bound protein to unveil molecular mechanism of HIV-Nef dimerization and inhibition. Results clearly revealed that B9, a newly discovered Nef inhibitor, binds at the dimeric interface of Nef protein and caused significant separation between orthogonally opposed residues, namely Asp108, Leu112 and Gln104. Large differences in magnitudes were observed in the radius of gyration (∼1.5 Å), per-residue fluctuation (∼2 Å), C-alpha deviations (∼2 Å) which confirm a comparatively more flexible nature of apo conformation due to rapid dimeric association. Compared to the bound conformer, a more globally correlated motion in case of apo structure of HIV-Nef confirms the process of dimeric association. This clearly highlights the process of inhibition as a result of ligand binding. The difference in principal component analysis (PCA) scatter plot and per-residue mobility plot across first two normal modes further justifies the same findings. The in-depth dynamic analyses of Nef protein presented in this report would serve crucial in understanding its function and inhibition mechanisms. Information on inhibitor binding mode would also assist in designing of potential inhibitors against this important HIV target.

  19. Oxidation of 2,4,6,-tri-chlorophenol catalyzed by iron phthalocyanines covalently bound to silica. Oxydation du 2,4,6-trichlorophenol catalyse par des phtalocyanines de fer greffees sur silice par liaisons covalentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, M.; Hadasch, A.; Meunier, B. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France). Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination); Rabion, A. (Elf-Atochem, 64 - Artix (France). Centre de Recherche)

    1999-04-01

    The degradation of recalcitrant pollutants remains a high priority in order to preserve our environment. For example, chlorinated aromatic compounds are extremely persistent in the environment because of their slow biodegradation by microorganisms. One of the most notable toxic offenders is 2,4,6-tri-chlorophenol (TCP) which is produced by paper mills and also used as a biocide. Thus TCP is an obvious benchmark for research on the decontamination of waste waters. In this work, the covalent attachment of an iron phthalocyanine with chloro-sulfonyl substituents (FePcSO[sub 2]Cl) onto a functionalized 3-amino-propyl-silica has been achieved. This supported catalyst FePcSO[sub 2]Cl-silica is able to degrade a recalcitrant pollutant like TCP with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. In order to improve the catalytic efficiency of the grafted iron phthalocyanine complex, modifications of the macrocycle substituents, passivation of the silica surface, variation of the loading of the carrier and addition of an organic co solvent to the reaction mixture were carried out. (authors) 21 refs.

  20. Isolation, lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination, and recovery of proteins bound to insoluble immunoadsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, S.; McDougall, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the direct radioiodination and recovery of proteins specifically adsorbed to an insoluble immunoadsorbent is described. The optimal conditions for adsorption, washing, radiolabelling by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, and elution of radio-labelled proteins from the immunoadsorbent have been determined. The technique is a rapid and efficient means of isolating and radioiodinating specific proteins present in biological fluids and has been applied to the detection of immunoglobulin and histocompatibility antigens in mouse cell culture supernates. This method should be particularly applicable in research situations in which the specific antisera are available but the antigen concentration is low or the volume of material to be analyzed is limited

  1. Photoaffinity labeling of serum vitamin D binding protein by 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, R.P.; Kutner, A.; Schnoes, H.K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    3-Deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was covalently incorporated in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding site of purified human plasma vitamin D binding protein. Competition experiments showed that 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 bind at the same site on the protein. Tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was synthesized from tritiated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, retaining the high specific activity of the parent compound. The tritiated azido label bound reversibly to human vitamin D binding protein in the dark and covalently to human vitamin D binding protein after exposure to ultraviolet light. Reversible binding of tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was compared to tritiated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding to human vitamin D binding protein. Scatchard analysis of the data indicated equivalent maximum density binding sites with a KD,app of 0.21 nM for 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and a KD,app of 1.3 nM for the azido derivative. Covalent binding was observed only after exposure to ultraviolet irradiation, with an average of 3% of the reversibly bound label becoming covalently bound to vitamin D binding protein. The covalent binding was reduced 70-80% when 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was present, indicating strong covalent binding at the vitamin D binding site of the protein. When tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was incubated with human plasma in the absence and presence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 12% of the azido derivative was reversibly bound to vitamin D binding protein. After ultraviolet irradiation, four plasma proteins covalently bound the azido label, but vitamin D binding protein was the only protein of the four that was unlabeled in the presence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3

  2. Characterisation of bioactive protein-bound polysaccharides from Amanita ponderosa cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, C; Martins, M R; Arteiro, J M; Caldeira, A T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of protein-polysaccharide complexes obtained from A. ponderosa cultures using a new microanalytical approach to monitoring quickly and easily the production process.

  3. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.; Berry, Kayla N.; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Takahashi, Masateru; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  4. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  5. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in different tissues (liver, intestines, gills, and muscles) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry: Method characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadel-Six, Sabrina; Moyenga, David; Magny, Stéphanie; Trotereau, Sophie; Edery, Marc; Krys, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    So far only a few publications have explored the development of extraction methods of cyanotoxin extracted from complex matrices. With regard to cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs), the data on the contamination of the flesh of aquatic organisms is hard to compare and very limited due to the lack of validated methods. In recent years, evidence that both free and bound fractions of toxin are found in these tissues has highlighted the need to develop effective methods of quantification. Several techniques do exist, but only the Lemieux oxidation has so far been used to investigate complex tissue matrices. In this study, protocols based on the Lemieux approach were adapted for the quantitative chemical analysis of free MC-LR and MMPB derived from bound toxin in the tissues of juvenile trout gavaged with MC-LR. Afterwards, the NF V03 110 guideline was used to characterize the protocols elaborated and evaluate their effectiveness. -- Highlights: • We adapted the quantitative chemical analysis of free and total MC for the tissues of trout. • We characterize with the NF V03 110 guideline the protocols for free MC-LR and MMPB. • We quantify the free MC-LR and MMPB in the tissues of trout gavaged with MC-LR. -- We develop and characterize with the guideline NF V03 110 the protocols for the extraction and quantification of the free and total MC for different matrices

  6. Theory and Applications of Covalent Docking in Drug Discovery: Merits and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezekiel Mathambo Kumalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available he present art of drug discovery and design of new drugs is based on suicidal irreversible inhibitors. Covalent inhibition is the strategy that is used to achieve irreversible inhibition. Irreversible inhibitors interact with their targets in a time-dependent fashion, and the reaction proceeds to completion rather than to equilibrium. Covalent inhibitors possessed some significant advantages over non-covalent inhibitors such as covalent warheads can target rare, non-conserved residue of a particular target protein and thus led to development of highly selective inhibitors, covalent inhibitors can be effective in targeting proteins with shallow binding cleavage which will led to development of novel inhibitors with increased potency than non-covalent inhibitors. Several computational approaches have been developed to simulate covalent interactions; however, this is still a challenging area to explore. Covalent molecular docking has been recently implemented in the computer-aided drug design workflows to describe covalent interactions between inhibitors and biological targets. In this review we highlight: (i covalent interactions in biomolecular systems; (ii the mathematical framework of covalent molecular docking; (iii implementation of covalent docking protocol in drug design workflows; (iv applications covalent docking: case studies and (v shortcomings and future perspectives of covalent docking. To the best of our knowledge; this review is the first account that highlights different aspects of covalent docking with its merits and pitfalls. We believe that the method and applications highlighted in this study will help future efforts towards the design of irreversible inhibitors.

  7. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal insights into covalent flavinylation of the Escherichia coli Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbird, C.A.; Maklashina, Elena; Sharma, Pankaj; Qualls-Histed, Susan; Cecchini, Gary; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCSF); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-06-14

    The Escherichia coli Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR, FrdABCD) catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and succinate at a covalently attached FAD within the FrdA subunit. The SdhE assembly factor enhances covalent flavinylation of Complex II homologs, but the mechanisms underlying the covalent attachment of FAD remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we explored the mechanisms of covalent flavinylation of the E. coli QFR FrdA subunit. Using a ΔsdhE E. coli strain, we show that the requirement for the assembly factor depends on the cellular redox environment. We next identified residues important for the covalent attachment and selected the FrdAE245 residue, which contributes to proton shuttling during fumarate reduction, for detailed biophysical and structural characterization. We found that QFR complexes containing FrdAE245Q have a structure similar to that of the WT flavoprotein, but lack detectable substrate binding and turnover. In the context of the isolated FrdA subunit, the anticipated assembly intermediate during covalent flavinylation, FrdAE245 variants had stability similar to that of WT FrdA, contained noncovalent FAD, and displayed a reduced capacity to interact with SdhE. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis of WT FrdA cross-linked to SdhE suggested that the FrdAE245 residue is unlikely to contribute directly to the FrdA-SdhE protein-protein interface. We also found that no auxiliary factor is absolutely required for flavinylation, indicating that the covalent flavinylation is autocatalytic. We propose that multiple factors, including the SdhE assembly factor and bound dicarboxylates, stimulate covalent flavinylation by preorganizing the active site to stabilize the quinone-methide intermediate.

  8. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence for the Existence of One Antenna-Associated, Lipid-Dissolved and Two Protein-Bound Pools of Diadinoxanthin Cycle Pigments in Diatoms[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bernard; Volke, Daniela; Gilbert, Matthias; Wilhelm, Christian; Goss, Reimund

    2010-01-01

    We studied the localization of diadinoxanthin cycle pigments in the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Isolation of pigment protein complexes revealed that the majority of high-light-synthesized diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin is associated with the fucoxanthin chlorophyll protein (FCP) complexes. The characterization of intact cells, thylakoid membranes, and pigment protein complexes by absorption and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the FCPs contain certain amounts of protein-bound diadinoxanthin cycle pigments, which are not significantly different in high-light and low-light cultures. The largest part of high-light-formed diadinoxanthin cycle pigments, however, is not bound to antenna apoproteins but located in a lipid shield around the FCPs, which is copurified with the complexes. This lipid shield is primarily composed of the thylakoid membrane lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. We also show that the photosystem I (PSI) fraction contains a tightly connected FCP complex that is enriched in protein-bound diadinoxanthin cycle pigments. The peripheral FCP and the FCP associated with PSI are composed of different apoproteins. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the peripheral FCP is composed mainly of the light-harvesting complex protein Lhcf and also significant amounts of Lhcr. The PSI fraction, on the other hand, shows an enrichment of Lhcr proteins, which are thus responsible for the diadinoxanthin cycle pigment binding. The existence of lipid-dissolved and protein-bound diadinoxanthin cycle pigments in the peripheral antenna and in PSI is discussed with respect to different specific functions of the xanthophylls. PMID:20935178

  10. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...... carrying the ftsQAZ genes suppressed the lethality of deletions in the mre operon. Using GFP and cell fractionation methods, we showed that the MreC and MreD proteins were associated with the cell membrane. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, we found that MreC interacted with both MreB and Mre....... subtilis and C. crescentus, the mreB gene is essential. However, in E. coli, mreB was inferred not to be essential. Using a tight, conditional gene depletion system, we systematically investigated whether the E. coli mreBCD-encoded components were essential. We found that cells depleted of mreBCD became...

  11. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    products. In this study, we have examined the effect of glucose and carbonyl compounds (methylglyoxal, glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone), and glycation products arising from reaction of these materials with model proteins, on the activity of three key cellular enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate...... dehydrogenase (GAPDH), glutathione reductase, and lactate dehydrogenase, both in isolation and in cell lysates. In contrast to glucose (1M, both fresh and aged for 8 weeks), which had no effect, marked inhibition of all three enzymes was observed with methylglyoxal and glyoxal. GAPDH was also inhibited...... by glycolaldehyde and hydroxyacetone. Incubation of these enzymes with proteins that had been preglycated with methylglyoxal, but not glucose, also resulted in significant time- and concentration-dependent inhibition with both isolated enzymes and cell lysates. This inhibition was not metal ion, oxygen, superoxide...

  12. Pressurized liquid extraction-assisted mussel cytosol preparation for the determination of metals bound to metallothionein-like proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Rivas, Sandra; Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Alonso-Rodriguez, Elia; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario

    2007-01-01

    The possibilities of pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) have been novelty tested to assist the cytosol preparation from wet mussel soft tissue before the determination of metals bound to metallothionein-like proteins (MLPs). Results obtained after PLE were compared with those obtained after a classical blending procedure for mussel cytosolic preparation. Isoforms MLP-1 (retention time of 4.1 min) and MLP-2 (retention time of 7.4 min) were separated by anion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the concentrations of Ba, Cu, Mn, Sr and Zn bound to MLP isoforms were directly measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) as a multi-element detector. The optimized PLE-assisted mussel cytosol preparation has consisted of one extraction cycle at room temperature and 1500 psi for 2 min. Since separation between the solid mussel residue and the extract (cytosol) is performed by the PLE system, the cytosol preparation method is faster than conventional cytosol preparation methods by cutting/blending using Ultraturrax or Stomacher devices

  13. Identification of Proteins Bound to Dengue Viral RNA In Vivo Reveals New Host Proteins Important for Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacia L. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is the most prevalent cause of arthropod-borne infection worldwide. Due to the limited coding capacity of the viral genome and the complexity of the viral life cycle, host cell proteins play essential roles throughout the course of viral infection. Host RNA-binding proteins mediate various aspects of virus replication through their physical interactions with viral RNA. Here we describe a technique designed to identify such interactions in the context of infected cells using UV cross-linking followed by antisense-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified interactions, several of them novel, between host proteins and dengue viral RNA in infected Huh7 cells. Most of these interactions were subsequently validated using RNA immunoprecipitation. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated gene silencing, we showed that more than half of these host proteins are likely involved in regulating virus replication, demonstrating the utility of this method in identifying biologically relevant interactions that may not be identified using traditional in vitro approaches.

  14. Antimetastatic effect of PSK, a protein-bound polysaccharide, against the B16-BL6 mouse melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, K; Ohhara, M; Oguchi, Y; Iijima, H; Kobayashi, H

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effect of PSK, a protein-bound polysaccharide, upon in vivo metastasis and in vitro invasion of the B16-BL6 mouse melanoma cells. (1) PSK suppressed in vivo artificial and spontaneous lung metastases of B16-BL6 in C57BL/6 mice. (2) PSK in a dose-dependent fashion suppressed in vitro invasion and chemotaxis of the tumor cells using filters coated with a reconstituted basement membrane. (3) PSK had little effect on DNA synthesis in tumor cells in vitro, but suppressed tumor cell adhesion to, degradation of, and haptotaxis to components of the basement membrane. (4) PSK suppressed the binding of tumor cells to components of the basement membrane. These findings suggest that PSK may suppress metastasis through inhibition of tumor cell invasion and that this effect is the result of interactions between PSK and components of the basement membrane.

  15. Structure of a rare non-standard sequence k-turn bound by L7Ae protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Lilley, David M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Kt-23 from Thelohania solenopsae is a rare RNA kink turn (k-turn) where an adenine replaces the normal guanine at the 2n position. L7Ae is a member of a strongly conserved family of proteins that bind a range of k-turn structures in the ribosome, box C/D and H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs and U4 small nuclear RNA. We have solved the crystal structure of T. solenopsae Kt-23 RNA bound to Archeoglobus fulgidus L7Ae protein at a resolution of 2.95 Å. The protein binds in the major groove displayed on the outer face of the k-turn, in a manner similar to complexes with standard k-turn structures. The k-turn adopts a standard N3 class conformation, with a single hydrogen bond from A2b N6 to A2n N3. This contrasts with the structure of the same sequence located in the SAM-I riboswitch, where it adopts an N1 structure, showing the inherent plasticity of k-turn structure. This potentially can affect any tertiary interactions in which the RNA participates. PMID:24482444

  16. A potent transrepression domain in the retinoblastoma protein induces a cell cycle arrest when bound to E2F sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, W R; Rodgers, J W; Kaelin, W G

    1995-01-01

    An intact T/E1A-binding domain (the pocket) is necessary, but not sufficient, for the retinoblastoma protein (RB) to bind to DNA-protein complexes containing E2F and for RB to induce a G1/S block. Indirect evidence suggests that the binding of RB to E2F may, in addition to inhibiting E2F transactivation function, generate a complex capable of functioning as a transrepressor. Here we show that a chimera in which the E2F1 transactivation domain was replaced with the RB pocket could, in a DNA-binding and pocket-dependent manner, mimic the ability of RB to repress transcription and induce a cell cycle arrest. In contrast, a transdominant negative E2F1 mutant that is capable of blocking E2F-dependent transactivation did not. Fusion of the RB pocket to a heterologous DNA-binding domain unrelated to E2F likewise generated a transrepressor protein when scored against a suitable reporter. These results suggest that growth suppression by RB is due, at least in part, to transrepression mediated by the pocket domain bound to certain promoters via E2F. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524800

  17. Nutritional supplements modulate fluorescent protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts and digestive enzymes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Emily R; Deo, Permal

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia enhances the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, controlling blood glucose levels, inhibiting the formation of AGEs and reducing ROS are key therapeutic targets in early stage type 2 diabetes. The inhibitory effects of seven commercial liquid nutritional supplements against carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, α-amylase and α-glucosidase, was determined by dinitrosalicylic (DNS) reagent and p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside solution, respectively. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of fluorescent protein-bound AGEs. Total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant properties (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl antioxidant activity (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) were determined for correlation among these components and inhibitory activities. Samoan noni juice showed the greatest inhibitory effects against α-amylase, whereas chlorophyll extracts showed the greatest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase. Inhibition of α-glucosidase correlated with TFC (r(2) = 0.766; p 1) and FRAP (r(2) = 0.750; p 1) whereas no correlation was observed for α-amylase inhibition. All supplements inhibited fluorescent protein-bound AGEs, with the greatest effect exerted by Olive Leaf Extract, Blood Sugar Support (IC50 = 0.5 mg/ml). The IC50 values negatively correlated with TPC (r(2) = -0.707; p 1) and DPPH scavenging activities (r(2) = 0.515; p nutritional supplements in managing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Residual DNA-bound proteins are a source of in vitro transcription inhibitor peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venanzi, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatic breakdown of residual proteins occurs at mild alkaline pH (pH optimum 8.5) as monitored by using radioiodinated, purified genomic DNA from calf thymus. These DNA fibers also possess a differential ability to hydrolyze added exogenous small and linker histones. The results described argue strongly that a putative protease activity, co-purified with DNA, is the source of short chain peptides which inhibit transcription in vitro. Therefore, we propose that RNA repressor peptides must be of higher molecular weight than previously reported

  19. Fluorescence detection of a protein-bound 2Fe2S cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G; Goodlitt, Rochelle; Li, Rui; Smolke, Christina D; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2009-03-02

    A fluorescent biosensor is described for 2Fe2S clusters that is composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2), as illustrated here. 2Fe2S detection is based on the reduction of GFP fluorescence upon the 2Fe2S-induced dimerization of GFP-Grx2. This assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect submicromolar changes in 2Fe2S levels, thus making it suitable for high-throughput measurements of metallocluster degradation and synthesis reactions.

  20. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13 C line widths and <0.5 ppm 15 N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  1. Enhanced Biological Response of AVS-Functionalized Ti-6Al-4V Alloy through Covalent Immobilization of Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvanian, Parsa; Daza, Rafael; López, Patricia A; Ramos, Milagros; González-Nieto, Daniel; Elices, Manuel; Guinea, Gustavo V; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2018-02-20

    This study presents the development of an efficient procedure for covalently immobilizing collagen molecules on AVS-functionalized Ti-6Al-4V samples, and the assessment of the survival and proliferation of cells cultured on these substrates. Activated Vapor Silanization (AVS) is a versatile functionalization technique that allows obtaining a high density of active amine groups on the surface. A procedure is presented to covalently bind collagen to the functional layer using EDC/NHS as cross-linker. The covalently bound collagen proteins are characterized by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy and their stability is tested. The effect of the cross-linker concentration on the process is assessed. The concentration of the cross-linker is optimized and a reliable cleaning protocol is developed for the removal of the excess of carbodiimide from the samples. The results demonstrate that the covalent immobilization of collagen type I on Ti-6Al-4V substrates, using the optimized protocol, increases the number of viable cells present on the material. Consequently, AVS in combination with the carbodiimide chemistry appears as a robust method for the immobilization of proteins and, for the first time, it is shown that it can be used to enhance the biological response to the material.

  2. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  3. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Immune response of calves inoculated with proteins ofAnaplasma marginale bound to an immunostimulant complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Ribeiro Gasparini

    Full Text Available Despite our current knowledge of the immunology, pathology, and genetics of Anaplasma marginale, prevention in cattle is currently based on old standbys, including live attenuated vaccines, antibiotic treatment, and maintaining enzootic stability in cattle herds. In the present study, we evaluated the use of an immunostimulant complex (ISCOMATRIX adjuvant, associated with a pool of recombinant major surface proteins (rMSP1a, rMSP1b, rMSP4 and rMSP5 to improve the humoral immune response triggered in calves mainly by IgG2. Ten calves were divided in three groups: 4 calves were inoculated with the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs (G1; 2 calves were inoculated with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (G2; and 4 calves received saline (G3. Three inoculations were administered at 21-day intervals. In G1, the calves showed significant increases in total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 levels 21 days after the second inoculation, compared to the control group (p < 0.05, and G1 calves remained above the cut-off value 28 days after the third inoculation (p < 0.05. The post-immunized sera from calves in G1 reacted specifically for each of the rMSPs used. In conclusion, the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs induced antigen-specific seroconversion in calves. Therefore, additional testing to explore the protection induced by rMSPs, both alone and in conjunction with proteins previously identified as subdominant epitopes, is warranted.

  5. Determination of Free-Form and Peptide Bound Pyrraline in the Commercial Drinks Enriched with Different Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyrraline, a causative factor for the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is also employed as an indicator to evaluate heat damage and formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs in foods. Peptide-enriched drinks (PEDs are broadly consumed worldwide due to rapid rate of absorption and perceived health effects. It can be hypothesized that PED is an important source of pyrraline, especially peptide bound pyrraline (Pep-Pyr. In this study we determined free-form pyrraline (Free-Pyr and Pep-Pyr in drinks enriched with whey protein hydrolysate (WPH, soy protein hydrolysate (SPH and collagen protein hydrolysate (CPH. A detection method was developed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detector coupled with tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction (SPE. The SPE led to excellent recovery rates ranging between 93.2% and 98.5% and a high reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSD of <5%. The limits of detection and quantification obtained were 30.4 and 70.3 ng/mL, respectively. Pep-Pyr was identified as the most abundant form (above 96 percent of total pyrraline, whereas Free-Pyr was present in a small proportion (less than four percent of total pyrraline. The results indicate that PED is an important extrinsic source of pyrraline, especially Pep-Pyr. As compared with CPH- and SPH-enriched drinks, WPH-enriched drinks contained high content of Pep-Pyr. The Pep-Pyr content is associated with the distribution of peptide lengths and the amino acid compositions of protein in PEDs.

  6. Determination of free and bound riboflavin in cow's milk using a novel flavin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Julia; Monschein, Stefanie; Pauline Macheroux, E; Knaus, Tanja; Macheroux, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A recently described putative protease from the gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (termed ppBat) exhibits two tryptophan residues in the interface which enable specific binding of the isoalloxazine heterocycle of riboflavin and its two cofactor forms, FMN and FAD. Recombinant ppBat was used to capture riboflavin from bovine milk directly without any prior preparation steps. The flavin-loaded protein was then re-isolated by means of affinity chromatography to identify and quantify the captured flavins. Free riboflavin concentrations were determined to 197 and 151μg/l for milk with 3.5% and 0.5% fat content, respectively. Total riboflavin concentrations were also determined after acid-treatment of milk and were 4-5 times higher than for free riboflavin. Free FMN and FAD were not detectable and only trace amounts of FMN were found in milk following acid treatment. The method appears to be amenable to develop a direct assay for free riboflavin in milk and other foods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reversible covalent binding of neratinib to human serum albumin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Appavu; Shen, Li; Lockhead, Susan; Oganesian, Aram; Wang, Jianyao; Scatina, JoAnn

    2010-12-01

    Neratinib (HKI-272), an irreversible inhibitor of Her 2 tyrosine kinase, is currently in development as an alternative for first and second line therapy in metastatic breast cancer patients who overexpress Her 2. Following incubation of [(14)C]neratinib in control human plasma at 37°C for 6 hours, about 60% to 70% of the radioactivity was not extractable, due to covalent binding to albumin. In this study, factors that could potentially affect the covalent binding of neratinib to plasma proteins, specifically to albumin were investigated. When [(14)C]neratinib was incubated at 10 μg/mL in human serum albumin (HSA) or control human plasma, the percent binding increased with time; the highest percentages of binding (46 and 67%, respectively) were observed at 6 hours, the longest duration of incubation examined. Binding increased with increasing temperature; the highest percentages of binding to HSA or human plasma (59 and 78%) were observed at 45°C, the highest temperature tested. The binding also increased with increasing pH of incubation; the highest percentages of binding (56 and 65%) were observed at pH 8.5, the highest pH value tested. The percentages of binding were similar (53% to 57%) when a wide range of concentrations of [(14)C]neratinib (50 ng/mL to 10 μg/mL) were incubated with human plasma at 37°C for 6 hours, indicating that the binding was independent of the substrate concentration, especially in the therapeutic range (50 to 200 ng/mL). When human plasma proteins containing covalently bound [(14)C]neratinb were suspended in a 10 fold volume of phosphate buffer at pH 4.0, 6.0, 7.4, and 8.5, and further incubated at 37°C for ~ 16 hours, about 45%, 44%, 32%, and 12% of the total radioactivity, respectively, was released as unchanged [(14)C]neratinib, indicating that the binding is reversible in nature, with more released at pH 7.4 and below. In conclusion, the covalent binding of neratinib to serum albumin is pH, time and temperature dependent, but

  8. DNA Replication and Cell Cycle Progression Regulatedby Long Range Interaction between Protein Complexes bound to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, L

    2001-12-01

    A nonstationary interaction that controlsDNA replication and the cell cycle isderived from many-body physics in achemically open T cell. The model predictsa long range force F'(ξ) =- (κ/2) ξ(1 - ξ)(2 - ξ)between thepre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) boundby the origins in DNA, ξ = ϕ/N being the relativedisplacement of pre-RCs, ϕ the number of pre-RCs, N the number of replicons to be replicated,and κ the compressibilitymodulus in the lattice of pre-RCs whichbehaves dynamically like an elasticallybraced string. Initiation of DNAreplication is induced at the thresholdϕ = N by a switch ofsign of F''(ξ), fromattraction (-) and assembly in the G(1) phase (0force at ϕ = 2N, from repulsion inS phase back to attraction in G(2), when all primed replicons havebeen duplicated once. F'(0) = 0corresponds to a resting cell in theabsence of driving force at ϕ= 0. The model thus ensures that the DNAcontent in G(2) cells is exactlytwice that of G(1) cells. The switch of interaction at the R-point, at which N pre-RCs have been assembled, starts the release of Rb protein thus also explaining the shift in the Rb phosphorylation from mitogen-dependent cyclinD to mitogen-independent cyclin E.Shape,slope and scale of the response curvesderived agree well with experimental datafrom dividing T cells and polymerising MTs,the variable length of which is due to anonlinear dependence of the growthamplitude on the initial concentrations oftubulin dimers and guanosine-tri-phosphate(GTP). The model also explains the dynamic instabilityin growing MTs.

  9. Structures of holo wild-type human cellular retinol-binding protein II (hCRBPII) bound to retinol and retinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossoni, Zahra; Assar, Zahra; Yapici, Ipek; Nosrati, Meisam; Wang, Wenjing; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James

    2014-12-01

    Cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs) I and II, which are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) family, are retinoid chaperones that are responsible for the intracellular transport and delivery of both retinol and retinal. Although structures of retinol-bound CRBPI and CRBPII are known, no structure of a retinal-bound CRBP has been reported. In addition, the retinol-bound human CRBPII (hCRBPII) structure shows partial occupancy of a noncanonical conformation of retinol in the binding pocket. Here, the structure of retinal-bound hCRBPII and the structure of retinol-bound hCRBPII with retinol fully occupying the binding pocket are reported. It is further shown that the retinoid derivative seen in both the zebrafish CRBP and the hCRBPII structures is likely to be the product of flux-dependent and wavelength-dependent X-ray damage during data collection. The structures of retinoid-bound CRBPs are compared and contrasted, and rationales for the differences in binding affinities for retinal and retinol are provided.

  10. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms...

  11. ChIP-seq Analysis in R (CSAR): An R package for the statistical detection of protein-bound genomic regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino, J.M.; Kaufmann, K.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Krajewski, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background In vivo detection of protein-bound genomic regions can be achieved by combining chromatin-immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing technology (ChIP-seq). The large amount of sequence data produced by this method needs to be analyzed in a statistically proper and computationally

  12. New low-flux mixed matrix membranes that offer superior removal of protein-bound toxins from human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, Denys; van Geffen, Esmée; van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Glorieux, Griet; Vanholder, Raymond; Gerritsen, Karin G. F.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    Hemodialysis is a widely available and well-established treatment for patients with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). However, although life-sustaining, patient mortality rates are very high. Several recent studies corroborated the link between dialysis patients’ outcomes and elevated levels of protein-bound uremic toxins (PBUT) that are poorly removed by conventional hemodialysis. Therefore, new treatments are needed to improve their removal. Recently, our group showed that the combination of dialysis and adsorption on one membrane, the mixed matrix membrane (MMM), can effectively remove those toxins from human plasma. However, these first MMMs were rather large in diameter and their mass transport characteristics needed improvement before application in the clinical setting. Therefore, in this study we developed a new generation of MMMs that have a smaller diameter and optimized characteristics offering superior ability in removing the PBUT indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) in comparison to first generation MMMs (30 and 125% respectively), as well as, a commercial dialysis membrane (more than 100% better removal).

  13. ER-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B interacts with Src at the plasma membrane/substrate interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa C Monteleone

    Full Text Available PTP1B is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER anchored enzyme whose access to substrates is partly dependent on the ER distribution and dynamics. One of these substrates, the protein tyrosine kinase Src, has been found in the cytosol, endosomes, and plasma membrane. Here we analyzed where PTP1B and Src physically interact in intact cells, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC in combination with temporal and high resolution microscopy. We also determined the structural basis of this interaction. We found that BiFC signal is displayed as puncta scattered throughout the ER network, a feature that was enhanced when the substrate trapping mutant PTP1B-D181A was used. Time-lapse and co-localization analyses revealed that BiFC puncta did not correspond to vesicular carriers; instead they localized at the tip of dynamic ER tubules. BiFC puncta were retained in ventral membrane preparations after cell unroofing and were also detected within the evanescent field of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM associated to the ventral membranes of whole cells. Furthermore, BiFC puncta often colocalized with dark spots seen by surface reflection interference contrast (SRIC. Removal of Src myristoylation and polybasic motifs abolished BiFC. In addition, PTP1B active site and negative regulatory tyrosine 529 on Src were primary determinants of BiFC occurrence, although the SH3 binding motif on PTP1B also played a role. Our results suggest that ER-bound PTP1B dynamically interacts with the negative regulatory site at the C-terminus of Src at random puncta in the plasma membrane/substrate interface, likely leading to Src activation and recruitment to adhesion complexes. We postulate that this functional ER/plasma membrane crosstalk could apply to a wide array of protein partners, opening an exciting field of research.

  14. Enhanced photoprotection by protein-bound vs free xanthophyll pools: a comparative analysis of chlorophyll b and xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Havaux, Michel; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    When light absorbed by plants exceeds the capacity of photosynthesis, the xanthophyll violaxanthin is reversibly de-epoxidized to zeaxanthin in the so-called xanthophyll cycle. Zeaxanthin plays a key role in the protection of photosynthetic organisms against excess light, by promoting rapidly reversible (qE) and long-term (qI) quenching of excited chlorophylls, and preventing lipid oxidation. The photoprotective role of zeaxanthin, either free or bound to light-harvesting complexes (Lhcs), has been investigated by using mutants lacking Chl b (ch1) and/or specific xanthophyll species (npq, lut2). The ch1 mutation causes (1) the absence of Lhcb proteins; (2) strong reduction of the feedback de-excitation (qE); and (3) accumulation of xanthophylls as free pigments into thylakoids. Ch1 mutants showed extreme sensitivity to photo-oxidative stress in high light, due to higher singlet oxygen (¹O₂) release. The double mutant ch1npq1 was more sensitive to photo-oxidation than ch1, showing that zeaxanthin does protect lipids even when free in the membrane. Nevertheless, lack of zeaxanthin had a much stronger impact on the level of lipid peroxidation in Lhcs-containing plants (WT vs npq1) with respect to Lhc-less plants (ch1 vs ch1npq1), implying that its protective effect is enhanced by interaction with antenna proteins. It is proposed that the antioxidant capacity of zeaxanthin is empowered in the presence of PSII-LHCs-Zea complexes, while its effect on enhancement of qE only provides a minor contribution. Comparison of the sensitivity of WT vs npq1 plants to exogenous ¹O₂ suggests that besides the scavenging of ¹O₂, at least one additional mechanism is involved in chloroplast photoprotection.

  15. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegele, Joerg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N ε -fructoselysine (FL), N ε -carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 ± 3.81 nmol CML per μmol of free Lys (Lys free ) and 81.5 ± 87.8 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys free -1 vs. 3.72 ± 1.29 nmol FL μmol -1 Lys free -1 . In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 ± 0.08 nmol FL μmol -1 of protein-bound Lys (Lys p-b ), 0.04 ± 0.03 nmol CML μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 and 0.06 ± 0.02 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 . It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products

  16. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegele, Joerg [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)], E-mail: joerg.hegele@rdls.nestle.com; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2008-06-09

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N{sup {epsilon}}-fructoselysine (FL), N{sup {epsilon}}-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 {+-} 3.81 nmol CML per {mu}mol of free Lys (Lys{sub free}) and 81.5 {+-} 87.8 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1} vs. 3.72 {+-} 1.29 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1}. In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 {+-} 0.08 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} of protein-bound Lys (Lys{sub p-b}), 0.04 {+-} 0.03 nmol CML {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.02 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1}. It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  17. Specific binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to cytosolic and membrane-bound proteins of human platelets correlates with the activation of phospholipase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapetina, E.G.; Reep, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    We have assessed the binding of [alpha- 32 P]GTP to platelet proteins from cytosolic and membrane fractions. Proteins were separated by NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose. Incubation of the nitrocellulose blots with [alpha- 32 P]GTP indicated the presence of specific and distinct GTP-binding proteins in cytosol and membranes. Binding was prevented by 10-100 nM GTP and by 100 nM guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma S]) or GDP; binding was unaffected by 1 nM-1 microM ATP. One main GTP-binding protein (29.5 kDa) was detected in the membrane fraction, while three others (29, 27, and 21 kDa) were detected in the soluble fraction. Two cytosolic GTP-binding proteins (29 and 27 kDa) were degraded by trypsin; another cytosolic protein (21 kDa) and the membrane-bound protein (29.5 kDa) were resistant to the action of trypsin. Treatment of intact platelets with trypsin or thrombin, followed by lysis and fractionation, did not affect the binding of [alpha- 32 P]GTP to the membrane-bound protein. GTP[gamma S] still stimulated phospholipase C in permeabilized platelets already preincubated with trypsin. This suggests that trypsin-resistant GTP-binding proteins might regulate phospholipase C stimulated by GTP[gamma S

  18. Cell Signalling Through Covalent Modification and Allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Louise N.

    Phosphorylation plays essential roles in nearly every aspect of cell life. Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to a serine, threonine or tyrosine residue in protein substrates. This covalent modification allows activation or inhibition of enzyme activity, creates recognition sites for other proteins and promotes order/disorder or disorder/order transitions. These properties regulate ­signalling pathways and cellular processes that mediate metabolism, transcription, cell cycle progression, differentiation, cytoskeleton arrangement and cell movement, apoptosis, intercellular communication, and neuronal and immunological functions. In this lecture I shall review the structural consequences of protein phosphorylation using our work on glycogen phosphorylase and the cell cycle cyclin dependent protein kinases as illustrations. Regulation of protein phosphorylation may be disrupted in the diseased state and protein kinases have become high profile targets for drug development. To date there are 11 compounds that have been approved for clinical use in the treatment of cancer.

  19. Tecto-dendrimers: a study of covalently bound nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Paul M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cynthia F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a computational and theoretical study of the size, shape, and solution properties of tecto-dendrimers. This class of polymer, composed of a central dendrimer with multiple dendrimers attached at its periphery, holds promise for multi-drug delivery and environmental remediation applications. We find (i) that the maximum number of tecto-units that may be attached to the central core varies logarightmically with the ratio of the sizes of the dendrimers, (ii) that their density profiles display a minimum near the junction of the tecto-units with the core, (iii) that a simple expression captures their radius of gyration, (iv) that their intrinsic viscosity will display a maximum as a function of the number of tecto-units attached, and (v) that their sphericity increases with increasing number of attached tecto-units. These results should bear upon both the synthesis and application of these materials.

  20. Characterising non-covalent interactions with the Cambridge Structural Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommerse, J P; Taylor, R

    1997-02-01

    This review describes how the CSD can be used to study non-covalent interactions. Several different types of information may be obtained. First, the relative frequencies of various interactions can be studied; for example, we have shown that the terminal oxygen atoms of phosphate groups accept hydrogen bonds far more often than the linkage oxygens. Secondly, information can be obtained about the geometries of nonbonded contacts; for example, hydrogen bonds to P-O groups rarely form along the extension of the P-O bond, whereas short contacts between oxygen and carbon-bound iodine show a strong preference for linear C-I ... O angles. Thirdly, the CSD can be searched for novel interactions which may be exploited in inhibitor design; for example, the I ... O contacts just mentioned, and N-H ... pi hydrogen bonds. Finally, the CSD can suggest synthetic targets for medicinal chemistry; for example, molecules containing delocalised electron deficient groups such as trimethylammonium, pyridinium, thaizolium and dinitrophenyl have a good chance of binding to an active-site tryptophan. Although the CSD contains small-molecule crystal structures, not protein-ligand complexes, there is considerable evidence that the contacts seen in the two types of structures are similar. We have illustrated this a number of times in the present review and additional evidence has been given previously by Klebe. The major advantages of the CSD are its size, diversity and experimental accuracy. For these reasons, it is a useful tool for modellers engaged in rational inhibitor design.

  1. P-aminobenzoic acid and tritiated cyanoborohydride for the detection of pyruvoyl residues in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Poelje, P.D.; Snell, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for the detection of covalently bound pyruvic acid in purified proteins or in crude extracts is described. The dialyzed sample is first treated with sodium cyanoborohydride to reduce any Schiff bases present and then incubated with p-aminobenzoic acid and sodium [ 3 H]cyanoborohydride. Derivatized proteins are visualized by fluorography following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel slices containing the labeled proteins are hydrolyzed, and, after removal of polyacrylic acid, the hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. The presence of pyruvic acid is established by the detection of a tritiated, 280-nm absorbing compound with a retention time corresponding to that of synthetic N-(p-carboxyphenyl)alanine. The procedure is capable of detecting protein-bound pyruvic acid in the picomolar range and is easily modified to screen for other covalently bound keto acids

  2. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  3. A Study of Lipid- and Protein- Bound Sialic Acids for the Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer and Their Relationships with the Severity of Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Habibi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard for detection of bladder cancer is cystoscopy, which is an invasive and complicated procedure. Our study was conducted to find a tumor marker with high specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 58 bladder cancer patients and 60 healthy control subjects. Levels of lipid-bound sialic acid (LBSA, and protein-bound sialic acid (PBSA were measured spectrophotometrically by Aminoff’s method. Results: Mean levels of both markers were found to be significantly higher in the patients than the healthy controls. Positive correlations were observed between serum levels of lipid- (r=0.283, p<0.05 and protein- bound (r=0.56, p<0.05 sialic acids and the grade of malignancy. To differentiate patients with bladder tumors from healthy controls, cut-offpoints were determined for each of the two parameters based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis (LBSA=21.25 mg/dL, PBSA=6.15 mg/dL. The data showed good sensitivities (LBSA=89%, PBSA=79%, specificities (LBSA=70%, PBSA=70% and accuracies (LBSA=83%, PBSA=81% for both markers. Conclusion: Measuring serum LBSA and PBSA by this simple, reproducible, noninvasive, and inexpensive method can accurately discriminate cancer patients from healthy individuals.

  4. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K d values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k on ) and dissociation (k off ) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein

  5. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  6. Acylation of cellular proteins with endogenously synthesized fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, D.; Glaser, L.

    1986-01-01

    A number of cellular proteins contain covalently bound fatty acids. Previous studies have identified myristic acid and palmitic acid covalently linked to protein, the former usually attached to proteins by an amide linkage and the latter by ester or thio ester linkages. While in a few instances specific proteins have been isolated from cells and their fatty acid composition has been determined, the most frequent approach to the identification of protein-linked fatty acids is to biosynthetically label proteins with fatty acids added to intact cells. This procedure introduces possible bias in that only a selected fraction of proteins may be labeled, and it is not known whether the radioactive fatty acid linked to the protein is identical with that which is attached to the protein when the fatty acid is derived from endogenous sources. We have examined the distribution of protein-bound fatty acid following labeling with [ 3 H]acetate, a general precursor of all fatty acids, using BC 3 H1 cells (a mouse muscle cell line) and A431 cells (a human epidermoid carcinoma). Myristate, palmitate, and stearate account for essentially all of the fatty acids linked to protein following labeling with [ 3 H]acetate, but at least 30% of the protein-bound palmitate in these cells was present in amide linkage. In BC3H1 cells, exogenous palmitate becomes covalently bound to protein such that less than 10% of the fatty acid is present in amide linkage. These data are compatible with multiple protein acylating activities specific for acceptor protein fatty acid chain length and linkage

  7. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi, E-mail: h-yokoya@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  8. Design of a covalently bonded glycosphingolipid microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arigi, Emma; Blixt, Klas Ola; Buschard, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    , the major classes of plant and fungal GSLs. In this work, a prototype "universal" GSL-based covalent microarray has been designed, and preliminary evaluation of its potential utility in assaying protein-GSL binding interactions investigated. An essential step in development involved the enzymatic release...... of the fatty acyl moiety of the ceramide aglycone of selected mammalian GSLs with sphingolipid N-deacylase (SCDase). Derivatization of the free amino group of a typical lyso-GSL, lyso-G(M1), with a prototype linker assembled from succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-diethyleneglycol] ester and 2...

  9. Evolution of protein bound Maillard reaction end-products and free Amadori compounds in low lactose milk in presence of fructosamine oxidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Buonanno, Martina; Fiore, Alberto; Monti, Simona Maria; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Thermal treatments and storage influence milk quality, particularly in low lactose milk as the higher concentration of reducing sugars can lead to the increased formation of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The control of the Amadori products (APs) formation is the key step to mitigate the Maillard reaction (MR) in milk. The use of fructosamine oxidases, (Faox) provided promising results. In this paper, the effects of Faox I were evaluated by monitoring the concentration of free and bound MRPs in low lactose milk during shelf life. Results showed that the enzyme reduced the formation of protein-bound MRPs down to 79% after six days at 37°C. Faox I lowered the glycation of almost all the free amino acids resulting effective on basic and polar amino acids. Data here reported corroborate previous findings on the potentiality of Faox enzymes in controlling the early stage of the MR in foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Membrane-bound conformation of M13 major coat protein : a structure validation through FRET-derived constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, W.L.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    M13 major coat protein, a 50-amino-acid-long protein, was incorporated into DOPC/DOPG (80/20 molar ratio) unilamellar vesicles. Over 60% of all amino acid residues was replaced with cysteine residues, and the single cysteine mutants were labeled with the fluorescent label I-AEDANS. The coat protein

  11. Biofunctional Paper via Covalent Modification of Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Shang, Jing; Cheng, Fang; Paik, Bradford A.; Kaplan, Justin M.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Paper-based analytical devices are the subject of growing interest for the development of low-cost point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring technologies and research tools for limited-resource settings. However, there are limited chemistries available for the conjugation of biomolecules to cellulose for use in biomedical applications. Herein, divinyl sulfone (DVS) chemistry was demonstrated to covalently immobilize small molecules, proteins and DNA onto the hydroxyl groups of cellulose membranes through nucleophilic addition. Assays on modified cellulose using protein-carbohydrate and protein-glycoprotein interactions as well as oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the membrane’s bioactivity was specific, dose-dependent, and stable over a long period of time. Use of an inkjet printer to form patterns of biomolecules on DVS-activated cellulose illustrates the adaptability of the DVS functionalization technique to pattern sophisticated designs, with potential applications in cellulose-based lateral flow devices. PMID:22708701

  12. Covalent modification of serum transferrin with phospholipid and incorporation into liposomal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Demant, E J; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for incorporation of water-soluble proteins into liposomal membranes using covalent protein-phospholipid conjugates in detergent solution. A disulfide derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine containing a reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide ester group is synthesized, and the deriva......A method is described for incorporation of water-soluble proteins into liposomal membranes using covalent protein-phospholipid conjugates in detergent solution. A disulfide derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine containing a reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide ester group is synthesized...

  13. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  14. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Seung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin or linear (amylose. The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM. We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is

  15. An improved method for the immunological detection of mineral bound protein using hydrofluoric acid and direct capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, O E; Collins, M J

    2000-03-06

    Immunological detection of proteins adsorbed to mineral and ceramic surfaces has proved not only difficult but controversial. Unlike the immunological detection of proteins associated with carbonate or phosphate minerals (e.g. shells and bones) proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals cannot readily be removed by dissolution of the mineral phase. We have previously examined alternative extraction methodologies which claim to bring the protein into solution, but found none of these to be effective. Here we report a novel strategy for immuno-detection of proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals, the Digestion and Capture Immunoassay (DACIA). The method involves the use of cold, concentrated (4M) hydrofluoric acid (HF) with the simultaneous capture of liberated protein onto a solid phase. The combination of low temperatures and surface stabilisation enables us to detect epitopes from even partially degraded proteins. The method may have a wide application in forensic, archaeological, soil and earth sciences.

  16. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    photographs of the dispersions of amide-functio- nalized DWNTs in dichloromethane and tetrahydro- furan. In figure 3b, we show a TEM image of DWNTs after covalent functionalization. The images are not as sharp after functionalization as in the case of pris- tine nanotubes (figure 3a), and the bundles seem to be intact.

  17. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...

  18. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    Linking organic molecules by covalent bonds into extended solids typically generates amorphous, disordered materials. The ability to develop strategies for obtaining crystals of such solids is of interest because it opens the way for precise control of the geometry and functionality of the extended structure, and the stereochemical orientation of its constituents. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a new class of porous covalent organic structures whose backbone is composed entirely of light elements (B, C, N, O, Si) that represent a successful demonstration of how crystalline materials of covalent solids can be achieved. COFs are made by combination of organic building units covalently linked into extended structures to make crystalline materials. The attainment of crystals is done by several techniques in which a balance is struck between the thermodynamic reversibility of the linking reactions and their kinetics. This success has led to the expansion of COF materials to include organic units linked by these strong covalent bonds: B-O, C-N, B-N, and B-O-Si. Since the organic constituents of COFs, when linked, do not undergo significant change in their overall geometry, it has been possible to predict the structures of the resulting COFs, and this advantage has facilitated their characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. It has also allowed for the synthesis of COF structures by design and for their formation with the desired composition, pore size, and aperture. In practice, the modeled PXRD pattern for a given expected COF is compared with the experimental one, and depending on the quality of the match, this is used as a starting point for solving and then refining the crystal structure of the target COF. These characteristics make COFs an attractive class of new porous materials. Accordingly, they have been used as gas storage materials for energy applications, solid supports for catalysis, and optoelectronic devices. A large and

  19. The role of double covalent flavin binding in chito-oligosaccharide oxidase from Fusarium graminearum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Winter, Remko T.; Damsma, Gerke E.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    ChitO (chito-oligosaccharide oxidase) from Fusarium graminearum catalyses the regioselective oxidation of N-acetylated oligosaccharides. The enzyme harbours an FAD cofactor that is covalently attached to His(94) and Cys(154). The functional role of this unusual bi-covalent flavin-protein linkage was

  20. Generation of covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B viruses via intracellular recycling is regulated in a virus specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Köck

    Full Text Available Persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection requires covalently closed circular (cccDNA formation and amplification, which can occur via intracellular recycling of the viral polymerase-linked relaxed circular (rc DNA genomes present in virions. Here we reveal a fundamental difference between HBV and the related duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV in the recycling mechanism. Direct comparison of HBV and DHBV cccDNA amplification in cross-species transfection experiments showed that, in the same human cell background, DHBV but not HBV rcDNA converts efficiently into cccDNA. By characterizing the distinct forms of HBV and DHBV rcDNA accumulating in the cells we find that nuclear import, complete versus partial release from the capsid and complete versus partial removal of the covalently bound polymerase contribute to limiting HBV cccDNA formation; particularly, we identify genome region-selectively opened nuclear capsids as a putative novel HBV uncoating intermediate. However, the presence in the nucleus of around 40% of completely uncoated rcDNA that lacks most if not all of the covalently bound protein strongly suggests a major block further downstream that operates in the HBV but not DHBV recycling pathway. In summary, our results uncover an unexpected contribution of the virus to cccDNA formation that might help to better understand the persistence of HBV infection. Moreover, efficient DHBV cccDNA formation in human hepatoma cells should greatly facilitate experimental identification, and possibly inhibition, of the human cell factors involved in the process.

  1. Solubilization and separation of the human erythrocyte D-glucose transporter covalently and noncovalently photoaffinity-labeled with [3H]cytochalasin B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, T.; Tillotson, L.G.; Chen, C.C.; Isselbacher, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The D-glucose transporter in the human erythrocyte membranes was photoaffinity-labeled with [ 3 H]cytochalasin B and solubilized with n-octyl β-D-glucopyranoside (octyl glucoside). [ 3 H]Cytochalasin B-bound proteins were further isolated by using Sephadex G-50 chromatography. The amount of [ 3 H]cytochalasin B associated with the membrane proteins was approximately 10% of the total radioactivity in the octyl glucoside extract. The solubilized photoaffinity-labeled D-glucose transporter was isolated and found to consist of two major peaks by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. The radioactivity of peak II was considerably greater than that of peak I. The incorporation of [ 3 H]cytochalasin B into both peaks was blocked by the presence of D-glucose during photolysis. These results indicate the [ 3 H]cytochalasin B was covalently bound to the D-glucose transporter only in peak II and that peak II could be generated by the photoaffinity labeling of peak I. However, the D-glucose transport activity was associated only with peak I. These findings suggest that the anionic domain of the D-glucose transporter becomes exposed because of the conformational changes of the protein as a result of covalent binding with [ 3 H]cytochalasin B by photoaffinity labeling

  2. Determination of steady-state protein breakdown rate in vivo by the disappearance of protein-bound tracer-labeled amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; O'Rourke, Bruce; Ebenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the rate of protein breakdown in individual proteins was developed and tested in rats and confirmed in humans, using administration of deuterium oxide and incorporation of the deuterium into alanine that was subsequently incorporated into body proteins. Measurement of the fr...

  3. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  4. Optimised purification and characterisation of lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b from barley malt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Melanie; Lombard, Nicolaas; Rautenbach, Marina

    2014-08-15

    In beer brewing, brewers worldwide strive to obtain product consistency in terms of flavour, colour and foam. Important proteins contributing to beer foam are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), in particular LTP1 and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b, which are known to transport lipids in vivo and prevent lipids from destabilising the beer foam. LTP1 and LTP1b were successfully purified using only five purification steps with a high purified protein yield (160 mg LTP1 and LTP1b from 200 g barley). Circular dichroism of LTP1 and LTP1b confirmed that both proteins are highly tolerant to high temperatures (>90 °C) and are pH stable, particularly at a neutral to a more basic pH. Only LTP1 exhibited antiyeast and thermo-stable lytic activity, while LTP1b was inactive, indicating that the fatty acid moiety compromised the antimicrobial activity of LTP1. This lack in antiyeast activity and the positive foam properties of LTP1b would benefit beer fermentation and quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The predominant circular form of avocado sunblotch viroid accumulates in planta as a free RNA adopting a rod-shaped secondary structure unprotected by tightly bound host proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carrasco, Amparo; Flores, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), the type member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates and accumulates in chloroplasts. Whether this minimal non-protein-coding circular RNA of 246-250 nt exists in vivo as a free nucleic acid or closely associated with host proteins remains unknown. To tackle this issue, the secondary structures of the monomeric circular (mc) (+) and (-) strands of ASBVd have been examined in silico by searching those of minimal free energy, and in vitro at single-nucleotide resolution by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (SHAPE). Both approaches resulted in predominant rod-like secondary structures without tertiary interactions, with the mc (+) RNA being more compact than its (-) counterpart as revealed by non-denaturing polyacryamide gel electrophoresis. Moreover, in vivo SHAPE showed that the mc ASBVd (+) form accumulates in avocado leaves as a free RNA adopting a similar rod-shaped conformation unprotected by tightly bound host proteins. Hence, the mc ASBVd (+) RNA behaves in planta like the previously studied mc (+) RNA of potato spindle tuber viroid, the type member of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae), indicating that two different viroids replicating and accumulating in distinct subcellular compartments, have converged into a common structural solution. Circularity and compact secondary structures confer to these RNAs, and probably to all viroids, the intrinsic stability needed to survive in their natural habitats. However, in vivo SHAPE has not revealed the (possibly transient or loose) interactions of the mc ASBVd (+) RNA with two host proteins observed previously by UV irradiation of infected avocado leaves.

  6. In Situ Proteolysis for Crystallization of Membrane Bound Cytochrome P450 17A1 and 17A2 Proteins from Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Egli, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Fish and human cytochrome P450 (P450) 17A1 catalyze both steroid 17α-hydroxylation and 17α,20-lyase reactions. Fish P450 17A2 catalyzes only 17α-hydroxylation. Both enzymes are microsomal-type P450s, integral membrane proteins that bind to the membrane through their N-terminal hydrophobic segment, the signal anchor sequence. The presence of this N-terminal region renders expression of full-length proteins challenging or impossible. For some proteins, variable truncation of the signal anchor sequence precludes expression or results in poor expression levels. To crystallize P450 17A1 and 17A2 in order to gain insight into their different activities, we used an alternative N-terminal sequence to boost expression together with in situ proteolysis. Key features of our approach to identify crystallizable P450 fragments were the use of an N-terminal leader sequence, a screen composed of 12 proteases to establish optimal cleavage, variations of protease concentration in combination with an SDS-PAGE assay, and analysis of the resulting fragments using Edman sequencing. Described in this unit are protocols for vector preparation, expression, purification, and in situ proteolytic crystallization of two membrane-bound P450 proteins. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  8. cGAS senses long and HMGB/TFAM-bound U-turn DNA by forming protein-DNA ladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Liudmila; Hiller, Björn; Kostrewa, Dirk; Lässig, Charlotte; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Jan Drexler, David; Maiser, Andreas; Gaidt, Moritz; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Hornung, Veit; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2017-09-21

    Cytosolic DNA arising from intracellular pathogens triggers a powerful innate immune response. It is sensed by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which elicits the production of type I interferons by generating the second messenger 2'3'-cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP). Endogenous nuclear or mitochondrial DNA can also be sensed by cGAS under certain conditions, resulting in sterile inflammation. The cGAS dimer binds two DNA ligands shorter than 20 base pairs side-by-side, but 20-base-pair DNA fails to activate cGAS in vivo and is a poor activator in vitro. Here we show that cGAS is activated in a strongly DNA length-dependent manner both in vitro and in human cells. We also show that cGAS dimers form ladder-like networks with DNA, leading to cooperative sensing of DNA length: assembly of the pioneering cGAS dimer between two DNA molecules is ineffective; but, once formed, it prearranges the flanking DNA to promote binding of subsequent cGAS dimers. Remarkably, bacterial and mitochondrial nucleoid proteins HU and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as well as high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), can strongly stimulate long DNA sensing by cGAS. U-turns and bends in DNA induced by these proteins pre-structure DNA to nucleate cGAS dimers. Our results suggest a nucleation-cooperativity-based mechanism for sensitive detection of mitochondrial DNA and pathogen genomes, and identify HMGB/TFAM proteins as DNA-structuring host factors. They provide an explanation for the peculiar cGAS dimer structure and suggest that cGAS preferentially binds incomplete nucleoid-like structures or bent DNA.

  9. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2005-06-14

    Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins--histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases--encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set) can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes

  10. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  11. The Three-Dimensional Solution Structure of the Src Homology Domain-2 of the Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, Mary M.; Frederick, Anne F.; Black, Stuart; Murgolo, Nicholas J.; Perkins, Louise M.; Wilson, Oswald; Snow, Mark E.; Wang Yusen

    1998-01-01

    A set of high-resolution three-dimensional solution structures of the Src homology region-2 (SH2) domain of the growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 was determined using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data used in this study were collected on a stable monomeric protein solution that was free of protein aggregates and proteolysis. The solution structure was determined based upon a total of 1439 constraints, which included 1326 nuclear Overhauser effect distance constraints, 70 hydrogen bond constraints, and 43 dihedral angle constraints. Distance geometry-simulated annealing calculations followed by energy minimization yielded a family of 18 structures that converged to a root-mean-square deviation of 1.09 A for all backbone atoms and 0.40 A for the backbone atoms of the central β-sheet. The core structure of the SH2 domain contains an antiparallel β-sheet flanked by two parallel α-helices displaying an overall architecture that is similar to other known SH2 domain structures. This family of NMR structures is compared to the X-ray structure and to another family of NMR solution structures determined under different solution conditions

  12. The Chloroplast Division Protein ARC6 Acts to Inhibit Disassembly of GDP-bound FtsZ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min Woo; Shaik, Rahamthulla; TerBush, Allan D; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Vitha, Stanislav; Holzenburg, Andreas

    2018-05-16

    Chloroplasts host photosynthesis and fulfill other metabolic functions that are essential to plant life. They have to divide by binary fission to maintain their numbers throughout cycles of cell division. Chloroplast division is achieved by a complex ring-shaped division machinery located on both the inner (stromal) and the outer (cytosolic) side of the chloroplast envelope. The inner division ring (termed the Z ring) is formed by the assembly of tubulin-like FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 proteins. ARC6 is a key chloroplast division protein that interacts with the Z ring. ARC6 spans the inner envelope membrane, is known to stabilize or maintain the Z ring, and anchors the Z ring to the inner membrane through interaction with FtsZ2. The underlying mechanism of Z-ring stabilization is not well understood. Here, biochemical and structural characterization of ARC6 was conducted using light scattering, sedimentation, and light and transmission electron microscopy. The recombinant protein was purified as a dimer. The results indicated that a truncated form of ARC6 (tARC6), representing the stromal portion of ARC6, affects FtsZ2 assembly without forming higher-order structures, and exerts its effect via FtsZ2 dynamics. tARC6 prevented GDP-induced FtsZ2 disassembly and caused a significant net increase in FtsZ2 assembly when GDP was present. Single particle analysis and 3D reconstruction were performed to elucidate the structural basis of ARC6 activity. Together, the data reveal that a dimeric form of tARC6 binds to FtsZ2 filaments and does not increase FtsZ polymerization rates but rather inhibits GDP-associated FtsZ2 disassembly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  14. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  15. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  16. Facile method for the site-specific, covalent attachment of full-length IgG onto nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, James Zhe; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Cheng, Zhiliang; Popik, Vladimir; Zhang, Hongtao; Luning Prak, Eline T; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2014-08-27

    Antibodies, most commonly IgGs, have been widely used as targeting ligands in research and therapeutic applications due to their wide array of targets, high specificity and proven efficacy. Many of these applications require antibodies to be conjugated onto surfaces (e.g. nanoparticles and microplates); however, most conventional bioconjugation techniques exhibit low crosslinking efficiencies, reduced functionality due to non-site-specific labeling and random surface orientation, and/or require protein engineering (e.g. cysteine handles), which can be technically challenging. To overcome these limitations, we have recombinantly expressed Protein Z, which binds the Fc region of IgG, with an UV active non-natural amino acid benzoylphenyalanine (BPA) within its binding domain. Upon exposure to long wavelength UV light, the BPA is activated and forms a covalent link between the Protein Z and the bound Fc region of IgG. This technology was combined with expressed protein ligation (EPL), which allowed for the introduction of a fluorophore and click chemistry-compatible azide group onto the C-terminus of Protein Z during the recombinant protein purification step. This enabled the crosslinked-Protein Z-IgG complexes to be efficiently and site-specifically attached to aza-dibenzocyclooctyne-modified nanoparticles, via copper-free click chemistry. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Towards first-principles calculation of electronic excitations in the ring of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophylls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Igor V.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Moskovsky, Alexander A.; Shabanov, Boris M.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2018-04-01

    Modeling electronic excitation of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules in light-harvesting (LH) antennae from photosynthetic centers presents a challenge for the quantum theory. We report on a quantum chemical study of the ring of 32 BChl molecules from the bacterial core complex LH1-RC. Diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the excitonic Hamiltonian matrices are estimated in quantum chemical calculations of relevant fragments using the TD-DFT and CIS approaches. The deviation of the computed excitation energy of this BChl system from the experimental data related to the Qy band maximum of this LH1-RC complex is about 0.2 eV. We demonstrate that corrections due to improvement in modeling of an individual BChl molecule and due to contributions from the protein environment are in the range of the obtained discrepancy between theory and experiment. Differences between results of the excitonic model and direct quantum chemical calculations of BChl aggregates fall in the same range.

  18. A critical switch in the enzymatic properties of the Cid1 protein deciphered from its product-bound crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Tello, Paola; Gabus, Caroline; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The addition of uridine nucleotide by the poly(U) polymerase (PUP) enzymes has a demonstrated impact on various classes of RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs), histone-encoding RNAs and messenger RNAs. Cid1 protein is a member of the PUP family. We solved the crystal structure of Cid1 in complex with non-hydrolyzable UMPNPP and a short dinucleotide compound ApU. These structures revealed new residues involved in substrate/product stabilization. In particular, one of the three catalytic aspartate residues explains the RNA dependence of its PUP activity. Moreover, other residues such as residue N165 or the β-trapdoor are shown to be critical for Cid1 activity. We finally suggest that the length and sequence of Cid1 substrate RNA influence the balance between Cid1's processive and distributive activities. We propose that particular processes regulated by PUPs require the enzymes to switch between the two types of activity as shown for the miRNA biogenesis where PUPs can either promote DICER cleavage via short U-tail or trigger miRNA degradation by adding longer poly(U) tail. The enzymatic properties of these enzymes may be critical for determining their particular function in vivo.

  19. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained by solubil...... by solubilization of the lamellae in phenol/acetic acid/8 M urea. Feeding barley seedlings with [14C]-biotin revealed that the vitamin is not degraded into respiratory substrates by the plant, but is specifically incorporated into biotin carboxyl carrier protein....

  20. Actin-interacting Protein 1 Promotes Disassembly of Actin-depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin-bound Actin Filaments in a pH-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-03-04

    Actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is a conserved WD repeat protein that promotes disassembly of actin filaments when actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is present. Although AIP1 is known to be essential for a number of cellular events involving dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, the regulatory mechanism of the function of AIP1 is unknown. In this study, we report that two AIP1 isoforms from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, known as UNC-78 and AIPL-1, are pH-sensitive in enhancement of actin filament disassembly. Both AIP1 isoforms only weakly enhance disassembly of ADF/cofilin-bound actin filaments at an acidic pH but show stronger disassembly activity at neutral and basic pH values. However, a severing-defective mutant of UNC-78 shows pH-insensitive binding to ADF/cofilin-decorated actin filaments, suggesting that the process of filament severing or disassembly, but not filament binding, is pH-dependent. His-60 of AIP1 is located near the predicted binding surface for the ADF/cofilin-actin complex, and an H60K mutation of AIP1 partially impairs its pH sensitivity, suggesting that His-60 is involved in the pH sensor for AIP1. These biochemical results suggest that pH-dependent changes in AIP1 activity might be a novel regulatory mechanism of actin filament dynamics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Identification of peptides from foot‐and‐mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    within the structural proteins of foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T‐cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted...... FMDV peptides bound to SLA‐2*0401, whereas five of the nine predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA‐1*0401. These methods provide the characterization of T‐cell epitopes in response to pathogens in more detail. The development of such approaches to analyze vaccine performance will contribute to a more...

  2. Electron population uncertainty and atomic covalency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.B.

    2006-01-01

    The atoms-in-molecules (AIM) index of atomic covalency is directly related to the AIM atomic population uncertainty. The covalent bond order, delocalization index, and, therefore, the atomic covalency are maximal when electron pairs are equally shared by the atoms involved. When polarization effects are present, these measures of covalent bond character decrease. We present atomic covalences for the single- and double-heavy atom hydrides of elements of the first and second low rows of the periodic table to illustrate these effects. Some usual behavior is seen in hydrogen-bridged species due in some cases to stronger than expected multicenter bonds and in other cases to many atoms contributing to the covalency index

  3. Grass cell wall feruloylation: distribution of bound ferulate and candidate gene expression in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Bruno Correa Molinari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cell walls of grasses such as wheat, maize, rice and sugar cane, contain large amounts of ferulate that is ester-linked to the cell wall polysaccharide glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX. This ferulate is considered to limit the digestibility of polysaccharide in grass biomass as it forms covalent linkages between polysaccharide and lignin components. Candidate genes within a grass-specific clade of the BAHD acyl-coA transferase superfamily have been identified as being responsible for the ester linkage of ferulate to GAX. Manipulation of these BAHD genes may therefore be a biotechnological target for increasing efficiency of conversion of grass biomass into biofuel. Here, we describe the expression of these candidate genes and amounts of bound ferulate from various tissues and developmental stages of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon. BAHD candidate transcripts and significant amounts of bound ferulate were present in every tissue and developmental stage. We hypothesise that BAHD candidate genes similar to the recently described rice OsPMT gene (PMT sub-clade are principally responsible for the bound coumaric acid (pCA, and that other BAHD candidates (non-PMT sub-clade are responsible for bound ferulic acid (FA. There were some similarities with between the ratio of expression non-PMT / PMT genes and the ratio of bound FA / pCA between tissue types, compatible with this hypothesis. However, much further work to modify BAHD genes in grasses and to characterise the heterologously expressed proteins is required to demonstrate their function.

  4. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  5. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  6. Dynamic covalent gels assembled from small molecules:from discrete gelators to dynamic covalent polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Yong Zhang; Li-Hua Zeng; Juan Feng

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic covalent chemistry has emerged recently to be a powerful tool to construct functional materials.This article reviews the progress in the research and development of dynamic covalent chemistry in gels assembled from small molecules.First dynamic covalent reactions used in gels are reviewed to understand the dynamic covalent bonding.Afterwards the catalogues of dynamic covalent gels are reviewed according to the nature of gelators and the interactions between gelators.Dynamic covalent bonding can be involved to form low molecular weight gelators.Low molecular weight molecules with multiple functional groups react to form dynamic covalent cross-linked polymers and act as gelators.Two catalogues of gels show different properties arising from their different structures.This review aims to illustrate the structure-property relationships of these dynamic covalent gels.

  7. Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Mansson, Alf

    2017-11-15

    The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems and lab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aryloxyalkanoic Acids as Non-Covalent Modifiers of the Allosteric Properties of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsattar M. Omar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb modifiers that stereospecifically inhibit sickle hemoglobin polymer formation and/or allosterically increase Hb affinity for oxygen have been shown to prevent the primary pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD, specifically, Hb polymerization and red blood cell sickling. Several such compounds are currently being clinically studied for the treatment of SCD. Based on the previously reported non-covalent Hb binding characteristics of substituted aryloxyalkanoic acids that exhibited antisickling properties, we designed, synthesized and evaluated 18 new compounds (KAUS II series for enhanced antisickling activities. Surprisingly, select test compounds showed no antisickling effects or promoted erythrocyte sickling. Additionally, the compounds showed no significant effect on Hb oxygen affinity (or in some cases, even decreased the affinity for oxygen. The X-ray structure of deoxygenated Hb in complex with a prototype compound, KAUS-23, revealed that the effector bound in the central water cavity of the protein, providing atomic level explanations for the observed functional and biological activities. Although the structural modification did not lead to the anticipated biological effects, the findings provide important direction for designing candidate antisickling agents, as well as a framework for novel Hb allosteric effectors that conversely, decrease the protein affinity for oxygen for potential therapeutic use for hypoxic- and/or ischemic-related diseases.

  9. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography: application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herraez-Hernandez, R.; van de Merbel, N.C.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of

  10. Determination of the total concentration of highly protein-bound drugs in plasma by on-line dialysis and column liquid chromatography : application to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herráez-Hernández, R; van de Merbel, N C; Brinkman, U A

    1995-01-01

    The potential of on-line dialysis as a sample preparation procedure for compounds highly bound to plasma proteins is evaluated, using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as model compounds and column liquid chromatography as the separation technique. Different strategies to reduce the degree of

  11. THE UNCOVERING OF A NOVEL REGULATORY MECHANISM FOR PLD2: FORMATION OF A TERNARY COMPLEX WITH PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE PTP1B AND GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-BOUND PROTEIN GRB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jeff; Lopez, Isabel; Miller, Mill; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of PLD2 activation is poorly understood at present. Transient transfection of COS-7 with a mycPLD2 construct results in elevated levels of PLD2 enzymatic activity and tyrosyl phosphorylation. To investigate whether this phosphorylation affects PLD2 enzymatic activity, anti-myc immunoprecipitates were treated with recombinant protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B. Surprisingly, lipase activity and PY levels both increased over a range of PTP1B concentrations. These increases occurred in parallel to a measurable PTP1B-associated phosphatase activity. Inhibitor studies demonstrated that an EGF-receptor type kinase is involved in phosphorylation. In a COS-7 cell line created in the laboratory that stably expressed myc-PLD2, PTP1B induced a robust (>6-fold) augmentation of myc-PLD2 phosphotyrosine content. The addition of growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) to cell extracts also elevated PY levels of myc-PLD (>10-fold). Systematic co-immunoprecipitation-immunoblotting experiments pointed at a physical association between PLD2, Grb2 and PTP1B in both physiological conditions and in overexpressed cells. This is the first report of a demonstration of the mammalian isoform PLD2 existing in a ternary complex with a protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP1b, and the docking protein Grb2 which greatly enhances tyrosyl phosphorylation of the lipase. PMID:15896299

  12. Structural changes of the regulatory proteins bound to the thin filaments in skeletal muscle contraction by X-ray fiber diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Takezawa, Yasunori; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the structural changes related to the regulation mechanism in skeletal muscle contraction, the intensity changes of thin filament-based reflections were investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. The time course and extent of intensity changes of the first to third order troponin (TN)-associated meridional reflections with a basic repeat of 38.4 nm were different for each of these reflections. The intensity of the first and second thin filament layer lines changed in a reciprocal manner both during initial activation and during the force generation process. The axial spacings of the TN-meridional reflections decreased by ∼0.1% upon activation relative to the relaxing state and increased by ∼0.24% in the force generation state, in line with that of the 2.7-nm reflection. Ca 2+ -binding to TN triggered the shortening and a change in the helical symmetry of the thin filaments. Modeling of the structural changes using the intensities of the thin filament-based reflections suggested that the conformation of the globular core domain of TN altered upon activation, undergoing additional conformational changes at the tension plateau. The tail domain of TN moved together with tropomyosin during contraction. The results indicate that the structural changes of regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments occur in two steps, the first in response to the Ca 2+ -binding and the second induced by actomyosin interaction

  13. HPMA copolymer-bound doxorubicin induces immunogenic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirova, M; Kabesova, M; Kovar, L; Etrych, T; Strohalm, J; Ulbrich, K; Rihova, B

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of murine EL4 T cell lymphoma with N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer conjugates of doxorubicin (Dox) leads to complete tumor regression and to the development of therapy-dependent longlasting cancer resistance. This phenomenon occurs with two types of Dox conjugates tested, despite differences in the covalent linkage of Dox to the polymer carrier. Such a cancer resistance cannot fully express in conventional treatment with free Dox, due to substantial immunotoxicity of the treatment, which was not observed in the polymer conjugates. In this study, calreticulin (CRT) translocation and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) release was observed in EL4 cells treated with a conjugate releasing Dox by a pH-dependent manner. As a result, the treated tumor cells were engulfed by dendritic cells (DC) in vitro, and induced their expression of CD80, CD86, and MHC II maturation markers. Conjugates with Dox bound via an amide bond only increased translocation of HSPs to the membrane, which led to an elevated phagocytosis but was not sufficient to induce increase of the maturation markers on DCs in vitro. Both types of conjugates induced engulfment of the target tumor cells in vivo, that was more intense than that seen with free Dox. It means that the induction of anti-tumor immunity documented upon treatment of EL4 lymphoma with HPMA-bound Dox conjugates does not rely solely on CRT-mediated cell death, but involves multiple mechanisms.

  14. p56Lck and p59Fyn Regulate CD28 Binding to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein GRB-2, and T Cell-Specific Protein-Tyrosine Kinase ITK: Implications for T-Cell Costimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Monika; Cai, Yun-Cai; Bunnell, Stephen C.; Heyeck, Stephanie D.; Berg, Leslie J.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    1995-09-01

    T-cell activation requires cooperative signals generated by the T-cell antigen receptor ξ-chain complex (TCRξ-CD3) and the costimulatory antigen CD28. CD28 interacts with three intracellular proteins-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), T cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase ITK (formerly TSK or EMT), and the complex between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 and son of sevenless guanine nucleotide exchange protein (GRB-2-SOS). PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 bind to the CD28 phosphotyrosine-based Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif by means of intrinsic Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains. The requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif for SH2 domain binding implicates an intervening protein-tyrosine kinase in the recruitment of PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 by CD28. Candidate kinases include p56Lck, p59Fyn, ξ-chain-associated 70-kDa protein (ZAP-70), and ITK. In this study, we demonstrate in coexpression studies that p56Lck and p59Fyn phosphorylate CD28 primarily at Tyr-191 of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif, inducing a 3- to 8-fold increase in p85 (subunit of PI 3-kinase) and GRB-2 SH2 binding to CD28. Phosphatase digestion of CD28 eliminated binding. In contrast to Src kinases, ZAP-70 and ITK failed to induce these events. Further, ITK binding to CD28 was dependent on the presence of p56Lck and is thus likely to act downstream of p56Lck/p59Fyn in a signaling cascade. p56Lck is therefore likely to be a central switch in T-cell activation, with the dual function of regulating CD28-mediated costimulation as well as TCR-CD3-CD4 signaling.

  15. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle—Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Ralf P.; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.

  16. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  17. Effect of photocurrent enhancement in porphyrin–graphene covalent hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Niu, Lin; Liu, Jixian; Wang, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Xie, Shiqiang; Huang, Linjun; Xu, Qingsong; Wang, Yuan; Belfiore, Laurence A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets were covalently functionalized with 5-p-aminophenyl-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin (NH 2 TPP) by an amidation reaction between the amino group in NH 2 TPP and carboxyl groups in GO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning and transmission electron microscopies reveal that NH 2 TPP covalent bonds form on the double surface of graphene oxide sheets, generating a unique nano-framework, i.e., NH 2 TPP-graphene-NH 2 TPP. Its UV–visible spectroscopy reveals that the absorption spectrum is not a linear superposition of the spectra of NH 2 TPP and graphene oxide, because a 59 nm red shift of the strong graphene oxide absorption is observed from 238 to 297 nm, with significant spectral broadening between 300 and 700 nm. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy indicates efficient quenching of NH 2 TPP photoluminescence in this hybrid material, suggesting that photo-induced electron transfer occurs at the interface between NH 2 TPP and GO. A reversible on/off photo-current density of 47 mA/cm 2 is observed when NH 2 TPP-graphene-NH 2 TPP hybrid sandwiches are subjected to pulsed white-light illumination. Covalently-bound porphyrins decrease the optical HOMO/LUMO band gap of graphene oxide by ≈ 1 eV, according to UV–visible spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry predicts a small HOMO/LUMO band gap of 0.84 eV for NH 2 TPP-graphene-NH 2 TPP hybrid sandwiches, which is consistent with efficient electron transfer and fluorescence quenching. - Highlights: • Porphyrins are covalently bound to sheets of graphene oxide via an amidation reaction. • The formed hetero-junction interface decreases the optical band gap of graphene oxide. • Cyclic voltammetry predicts a graphene oxide band gap of 0.84 eV, which is easily photo-excited. • Its on/off photo-current density of 46 μA/cm 2 is 5-fold larger than that for physically stacked hybrid

  18. Probing the molecular forces involved in binding of selected volatile flavour compounds to salt-extracted pea proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Arntfield, Susan D

    2016-11-15

    Molecular interactions between heterologous classes of flavour compounds with salt-extracted pea protein isolates (PPIs) were determined using various bond disrupting agents followed by GC/MS analysis. Flavour bound by proteins decreased in the order: dibutyl disulfide>octanal>hexyl acetate>2-octanone=benzaldehyde. Benzaldehyde, 2-octanone and hexyl acetate interacted non-covalently with PPIs, whereas octanal bound PPIs via covalent and non-covalent forces. Dibutyl disulfide reacted with PPIs covalently, as its retention was not diminished by urea and guanidine hydrochloride. Using propylene glycol, H-bonding and ionic interactions were implicated for hexyl acetate, benzaldehyde, and 2-octanone. A protein-destabilising salt (Cl3CCOONa) reduced bindings for 2-octanone, hexyl acetate, and benzaldehyde; however, retention for octanal and dibutyl disulfide increased. Conversely, a protein-stabilising salt (Na2SO4) enhanced retention for benzaldehyde, 2-octanone, hexyl acetate and octanal. Formation of a volatile flavour by-product, 1-butanethiol, from dibutyl disulfide when PPIs were treated with dithiothreitol indicated occurrence of sulfhydryl-disulfide interchange reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction of strongly protein bound BMS-299897 from human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y J; Pursley, Janice; Arnold, Mark

    2007-04-11

    BMS-299897 is a gamma-secretase inhibitor that is being developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) methods have been developed and validated for the quantitation of BMS-299897 in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both methods utilized (13)C6-BMS-299897, the stable label isotope analog, as the internal standard. For the human plasma extraction method, two incubation steps were required after the addition of 5 mM ammonium acetate and the internal standard in acetonitrile to release the analyte bound to proteins prior to LLE with toluene. For the human CSF extraction method, after the addition of 0.5 N HCl and the internal standard, CSF samples were extracted with toluene and no incubation was required. The organic layers obtained from both extraction methods were removed and evaporated to dryness. The residues were reconstituted and injected into the LC/MS/MS system. Chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a MetaChem C18 Hypersil BDS column (2.0 mm x 50 mm, 3 microm). The mobile phase contained 10 mM ammonium acetate pH 5 and acetonitrile. Detection was by negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The standard curves ranged from 1 to 1000 ng/ml for human plasma and 0.25-100 ng/ml for human CSF. Both standard curves were fitted to a 1/x weighted quadratic regression model. For both methods, the intra-assay precision was within 8.2% CV, the inter-assay precision was within 5.4% CV, and assay accuracy was within +/-7.4% of the nominal values. The validation and sample analysis results demonstrated that both methods had acceptable precision and accuracy across the calibration ranges.

  20. The MUC4 membrane-bound mucin regulates esophageal cancer cell proliferation and migration properties: Implication for S100A4 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyere, Emilie; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Frenois, Frederic; Mariette, Christophe; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Loss of MUC4 reduces proliferation of esophageal cancer cells. → MUC4 inhibition impairs migration of esophageal cancer cells but not their invasion. → Loss of MUC4 significantly reduces in vivo tumor growth. → Decrease of S100A4 induced by MUC4 inhibition impairs proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC4 is a membrane-bound mucin known to participate in tumor progression. It has been shown that MUC4 pattern of expression is modified during esophageal carcinogenesis, with a progressive increase from metaplastic lesions to adenocarcinoma. The principal cause of development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is the gastro-esophageal reflux, and MUC4 was previously shown to be upregulated by several bile acids present in reflux. In this report, our aim was thus to determine whether MUC4 plays a role in biological properties of human esophageal cancer cells. For that stable MUC4-deficient cancer cell lines (shMUC4 cells) were established using a shRNA approach. In vitro (proliferation, migration and invasion) and in vivo (tumor growth following subcutaneous xenografts in SCID mice) biological properties of shMUC4 cells were analyzed. Our results show that shMUC4 cells were less proliferative, had decreased migration properties and did not express S100A4 protein when compared with MUC4 expressing cells. Absence of MUC4 did not impair shMUC4 invasiveness. Subcutaneous xenografts showed a significant decrease in tumor size when cells did not express MUC4. Altogether, these data indicate that MUC4 plays a key role in proliferative and migrating properties of esophageal cancer cells as well as is a tumor growth promoter. MUC4 mucin appears thus as a good therapeutic target to slow-down esophageal tumor progression.

  1. The MUC4 membrane-bound mucin regulates esophageal cancer cell proliferation and migration properties: Implication for S100A4 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyere, Emilie; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Frenois, Frederic [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Mariette, Christophe [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Department of Digestive and Oncological Surgery, University Hospital Claude Huriez, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Van Seuningen, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.vanseuningen@inserm.fr [Inserm, UMR837, Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center, Team 5 ' Mucins, Epithelial Differentiation and Carcinogenesis' , rue Polonovski, 59045 Lille Cedex (France); Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Loss of MUC4 reduces proliferation of esophageal cancer cells. {yields} MUC4 inhibition impairs migration of esophageal cancer cells but not their invasion. {yields} Loss of MUC4 significantly reduces in vivo tumor growth. {yields} Decrease of S100A4 induced by MUC4 inhibition impairs proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC4 is a membrane-bound mucin known to participate in tumor progression. It has been shown that MUC4 pattern of expression is modified during esophageal carcinogenesis, with a progressive increase from metaplastic lesions to adenocarcinoma. The principal cause of development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is the gastro-esophageal reflux, and MUC4 was previously shown to be upregulated by several bile acids present in reflux. In this report, our aim was thus to determine whether MUC4 plays a role in biological properties of human esophageal cancer cells. For that stable MUC4-deficient cancer cell lines (shMUC4 cells) were established using a shRNA approach. In vitro (proliferation, migration and invasion) and in vivo (tumor growth following subcutaneous xenografts in SCID mice) biological properties of shMUC4 cells were analyzed. Our results show that shMUC4 cells were less proliferative, had decreased migration properties and did not express S100A4 protein when compared with MUC4 expressing cells. Absence of MUC4 did not impair shMUC4 invasiveness. Subcutaneous xenografts showed a significant decrease in tumor size when cells did not express MUC4. Altogether, these data indicate that MUC4 plays a key role in proliferative and migrating properties of esophageal cancer cells as well as is a tumor growth promoter. MUC4 mucin appears thus as a good therapeutic target to slow-down esophageal tumor progression.

  2. A Perspective on Reagent Diversity and Non-covalent Binding of Reactive Carbonyl Species (RCS and Effector Reagents in Non-enzymatic Glycation (NEG: Mechanistic Considerations and Implications for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Rodnick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This perspective focuses on illustrating the underappreciated connections between reactive carbonyl species (RCS, initial binding in the nonenzymatic glycation (NEG process, and nonenzymatic covalent protein modification (here termed NECPM. While glucose is the central species involved in NEG, recent studies indicate that the initially-bound glucose species in the NEG of human hemoglobin (HbA and human serum albumin (HSA are non-RCS ring-closed isomers. The ring-opened glucose, an RCS structure that reacts in the NEG process, is most likely generated from previously-bound ring-closed isomers undergoing concerted acid/base reactions while bound to protein. The generation of the glucose RCS can involve concomitantly-bound physiological species (e.g., inorganic phosphate, water, etc.; here termed effector reagents. Extant NEG schemes do not account for these recent findings. In addition, effector reagent reactions with glucose in the serum and erythrocyte cytosol can generate RCS (e.g., glyoxal, glyceraldehyde, etc.. Recent research has shown that these RCS covalently modify proteins in vivo via NECPM mechanisms. A general scheme that reflects both the reagent and mechanistic diversity that can lead to NEG and NECPM is presented here. A perspective that accounts for the relationships between RCS, NEG, and NECPM can facilitate the understanding of site selectivity, may help explain overall glycation rates, and may have implications for the clinical assessment/control of diabetes mellitus. In view of this perspective, concentrations of ribose, fructose, Pi, bicarbonate, counter ions, and the resulting RCS generated within intracellular and extracellular compartments may be of importance and of clinical relevance. Future research is also proposed.

  3. Structure of the Z Ring-associated Protein, ZapD, Bound to the C-terminal Domain of the Tubulin-like Protein, FtsZ, Suggests Mechanism of Z Ring Stabilization through FtsZ Cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Maria A; Huang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zeng, Wenjie; Janakiraman, Anuradha

    2017-03-03

    Cell division in most bacteria is mediated by the tubulin-like FtsZ protein, which polymerizes in a GTP-dependent manner to form the cytokinetic Z ring. A diverse repertoire of FtsZ-binding proteins affects FtsZ localization and polymerization to ensure correct Z ring formation. Many of these proteins bind the C-terminal domain (CTD) of FtsZ, which serves as a hub for FtsZ regulation. FtsZ ring-associated proteins, ZapA-D (Zaps), are important FtsZ regulatory proteins that stabilize FtsZ assembly and enhance Z ring formation by increasing lateral assembly of FtsZ protofilaments, which then form the Z ring. There are no structures of a Zap protein bound to FtsZ; therefore, how these proteins affect FtsZ polymerization has been unclear. Recent data showed ZapD binds specifically to the FtsZ CTD. Thus, to obtain insight into the ZapD-CTD interaction and how it may mediate FtsZ protofilament assembly, we determined the Escherichia coli ZapD-FtsZ CTD structure to 2.67 Å resolution. The structure shows that the CTD docks within a hydrophobic cleft in the ZapD helical domain and adopts an unusual structure composed of two turns of helix separated by a proline kink. FtsZ CTD residue Phe-377 inserts into the ZapD pocket, anchoring the CTD in place and permitting hydrophobic contacts between FtsZ residues Ile-374, Pro-375, and Leu-378 with ZapD residues Leu-74, Trp-77, Leu-91, and Leu-174. The structural findings were supported by mutagenesis coupled with biochemical and in vivo studies. The combined data suggest that ZapD acts as a molecular cross-linking reagent between FtsZ protofilaments to enhance FtsZ assembly. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Disorder phenomena in covalent semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure of the amorphous semiconductors has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and by computer simulation of random network models. Amorphous germanium contains mainly five and six-membered rings of atoms. In glassy state, the ternary compounds A 2 B 4 C 2 5 , such as CdGeAs 2 contain only even rings of atoms (six-membered and eight-membered rings). In the memory glasses of the type A 2 B 4 C 2 5 , such as GeAs 2 Te 7 , the valency state of every element is that from the crystal and important van der Waals forces are effective in the network. No Ge-Ge, Ge-As and As-As bonds are formed. The high pressure forms of the germanium have been simulated by computer. The force constants of the covalent bonds in Ge III and Ge IV differ from those in Ge I. The bond bending force constant decreases rapidly when the density of the crystal increases, a fact which has been imparted to a reduction of the sp 3 hybridization. The compressibility curve of the Ge I has been explained. The effect of the radial and uniaxial deformation on the non-crystalline networks has been studied. The compressibility of the amorphous germanium is by 1.5 per cent greater than that of crystalline germanium. The Poisson coefficient for a-Ge network is 0.233. The structure of the As 2 S 3 glass doped with different amounts of germanium (up to 40 at. per cent) and silver (up to 12 at. per cent) has been investigated. The As 2 S 3 Gesub(x) compositions are constituted from a disordered packing of structural units whose chemical composition and relative proportion in the glass essentially depends on the germanium content. (author)

  5. Covalent bonding in heavy metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Hrovat, Dave A.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2017-04-07

    Novel theoretical methods were used to quantify the magnitude and the energetic contributions of 4f/5f-O2p and 5d/6d-O2p interactions to covalent bonding in lanthanide and actinide oxides. Although many analyses have neglected the involvement of the frontier d orbitals, the present study shows that f and d covalency are of comparable importance. Two trends are identified. As is expected, the covalent mixing is larger when the nominal oxidation state is higher. More subtly, the importance of the nf covalent mixing decreases sharply relative to (n+1)d as the nf occupation increases. Atomic properties of the metal cations that drive these trends are identified.

  6. Covalently linked bisporphyrins bearing tetraphenylporphyrin and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Covalently linked bisporphyrins bearing tetraphenylporphyrin and perbromoporphyrin units: Synthesis and their properties. Puttaiah Bhyrappa V Krishnan ... yields of the TPP moiety. Electrochemical redox and fluorescence data seem to suggest the possible existence of intramolecular interactions in these bisporphyrins.

  7. Covalent Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavia Sanders, Adriana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A report meant to document the chemistries investigated by the author for covalent surface modification of CNTs. Oxidation, cycloaddition, and radical reactions were explored to determine their success at covalently altering the CNT surface. Characterization through infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis was performed in order to determine the success of the chemistries employed. This report is not exhaustive and was performed for CNT surface modification exploration as it pertains to the "Next Gen" project.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of new chiral ketopinic acid-derived catalysts immobilized on polystyrene-bound imidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Four new chiral ketopinic acid-derived catalysts were anchored on a polystyrene-bound imidazole via non-covalent bond. The resulting heterogeneous catalysts were successfully characterized using IR, SEM, and TGA analyses.

  9. Macromolecular weight specificity in covalent binding of bromobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.D.; Dent, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Bromobenzene is a hepatotoxicant that causes centrilobular necrosis. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholanthrene decreases and phenobarbital pretreatment enhances the hepatotoxic action of this compound. We have investigated the macromolecular weight specificity of the covalent interactions of bromobenzene with liver macromolecules following incubation of [ 14 C]bromobenzene in isolated hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were prepared from Fischer-344 rats treated for 3 days with 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital, or normal saline. After a 1-hr incubation, total covalent binding, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-equilibrium dialysis, was twofold less in hepatocytes from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats and sixfold greater in hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated rats, as compared to hepatocytes from control animals. Analysis of the arylated macromolecules by electrophoresis on 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide disc gels indicated that in the first 1 to 3 min of incubation substantial amounts of covalently bound radiolabel were associated with macromolecules of between 20,000 and 40,000. The amount of radioactivity associated with these macromolecules rapidly diminished in hepatocytes from control and 3-methylcholanthrene-treated animals. In hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated animals, the amount of radioactivity associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased throughout the incubation. The amount of radiolabel associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased in all incubations. When nontoxic doses of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a specific inhibitor of serine proteases, were added to control hepatocytes incubated with [ 14 C]-bromobenzene, the decrease in radioactivity associated with larger (greater than 20,000) macromolecules was inhibited and a corresponding lack of increase in radioactivity associated with smaller macromolecules was observed

  10. Molecular characterization of covalent complexes between tissue transglutaminase and gliadin peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2004-01-01

    recognized by intestinal T cells from patients. Incubation of TG2 with gliadin peptides also results in the formation of covalent TG2-peptide complexes. Here we report the characterization of complexes between TG2 and two immunodominant gliadin peptides. Two types of covalent complexes were found......; the peptides are either linked via a thioester bond to the active site cysteine of TG2 or via isopeptide bonds to particular lysine residues of the enzyme. We quantified the number of gliadin peptides bound to TG2 under different conditions. After 30 min of incubation of TG2 at 1 microm with an equimolar ratio...... of peptides to TG2, approximately equal amounts of peptides were bound by thioester and isopeptide linkage. At higher peptide to TG2 ratios, more than one peptide was linked to TG2, and isopeptide bond formation dominated. The lysine residues in TG2 that act as acyl acceptors were identified by matrix...

  11. Perceptron Mistake Bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Mohri, Mehryar; Rostamizadeh, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    We present a brief survey of existing mistake bounds and introduce novel bounds for the Perceptron or the kernel Perceptron algorithm. Our novel bounds generalize beyond standard margin-loss type bounds, allow for any convex and Lipschitz loss function, and admit a very simple proof.

  12. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Junya [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Hirano, Hidemi [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  13. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  14. Circuit lower bounds in bounded arithmetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pich, Ján

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 1 (2015), s. 29-45 ISSN 0168-0072 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Keywords : bounded arithmetic * circuit lower bounds Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.582, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007214000888

  15. The effect of bound to dialdehudecellulose protein concentration on the activity of immobilized trypsin after γ-irradiation and in process of storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Ryl'tsev, V.V.; Ignatyuk, T.E.; Filatov, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    It is found the complex effect of the bound enzyme concentration on the proteolytic activity of trypsin immobilized to dialdehydecellulose (preriodate oxidation) after γ-irradiation and in process of storage. It is shown the occurance of three stages of immobilized enzyme inactivation in process of immobilization and storage. The velocity of inactivation did not depend on bound trypsin concentration. The ratio of proteolytic activity of samples before and after γ-irradiation was increased with the increase of immobilized to carrier enzyme concentration and was not change (in range of experiment error) in process of storage. The results were compared with that of cryctlline trypsin

  16. Inhibitory profiles of spices against free and protein-bound heterocyclic amines of roast beef patties as revealed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; He, Zhiyong; Qin, Fang; Chen, Jie; Cao, Dongsheng; Guo, Fengxian; Zeng, Maomao

    2017-11-15

    The effects of various levels of chili pepper, Sichuan pepper, and black pepper on the amounts of 17 heterocyclic amines (HAs) from seven categories of both free and protein-bound states in roast beef patties were assessed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with principal component analysis. Three groups of HA, including imidazopyridines (DMIP), imidazoquinoxalines (MeIQx and 4,8-MeIQx), and β-carbolines (norharman and harman), were detected and quantified in both their free and protein-bound states, whereas PhIP was detected only in its free state, and imidazoquinolines (IQ, IQ[4,5-b], and MeIQ), α-carbolines (AαC and MeAαC), and phenylpyridines (Phe-P-1) were detected only in their protein-bound states. The results demonstrate that the peppers at all three levels had significant inhibitory effects on free PhIP, DMIP, MeIQx, and 4,8-DiMeIQx and could promote free norharman. Harman was significantly suppressed by chili pepper and black pepper, but enhanced by Sichuan pepper. All 11 protein-bound HAs, with the exception of IQ, IQ[4,5-b], and MeIQx with added chili pepper, were significantly reduced by the three peppers. The total amounts of the free and protein-bound states of all 11 HAs (1692.4 ± 78.9 ng g -1 ), imidazopyridines (5.5 ± 0.2 ng g -1 ), imidazoquinolines (7.2 ± 0.2 ng g -1 ), imidazoquinoxalines (6.9 ± 0.2 ng g -1 ), α-carbolines (20.1 ± 0.4 ng g -1 ), and β-carbolines (1651.7 ± 79.5 ng g -1 ) were suppressed by each level of all of the three peppers except for 0.5% and 1.0% chili pepper. Our findings may facilitate the inhibition of HA formation in the processing of meat products.

  17. Mechanisms for Covalent Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase on Ion-Beam-Treated Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Kondyurin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of polyethylene was modified by plasma immersion ion implantation. Structure changes including carbonization and oxidation were observed. High surface energy of the modified polyethylene was attributed to the presence of free radicals on the surface. The surface energy decay with storage time after treatment was explained by a decay of the free radical concentration while the concentration of oxygen-containing groups increased with storage time. Horseradish peroxidase was covalently attached onto the modified surface by the reaction with free radicals. Appropriate blocking agents can block this reaction. All aminoacid residues can take part in the covalent attachment process, providing a universal mechanism of attachment for all proteins. The native conformation of attached protein is retained due to hydrophilic interactions in the interface region. The enzymatic activity of covalently attached protein remained high. The long-term activity of the modified layer to attach protein is explained by stabilisation of unpaired electrons in sp2 carbon structures. A high concentration of free radicals can give multiple covalent bonds to the protein molecule and destroy the native conformation and with it the catalytic activity. The universal mechanism of protein attachment to free radicals could be extended to various methods of radiation damage of polymers.

  18. CovalentDock Cloud: a web server for automated covalent docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xuchang; Zhou, Shuo; Ge, Zemei; Li, Runtao; Kwoh, Chee Keong

    2013-07-01

    Covalent binding is an important mechanism for many drugs to gain its function. We developed a computational algorithm to model this chemical event and extended it to a web server, the CovalentDock Cloud, to make it accessible directly online without any local installation and configuration. It provides a simple yet user-friendly web interface to perform covalent docking experiments and analysis online. The web server accepts the structures of both the ligand and the receptor uploaded by the user or retrieved from online databases with valid access id. It identifies the potential covalent binding patterns, carries out the covalent docking experiments and provides visualization of the result for user analysis. This web server is free and open to all users at http://docking.sce.ntu.edu.sg/.

  19. Biofunctional paper via the covalent modification of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Shang, Jing; Cheng, Fang; Paik, Bradford A; Kaplan, Justin M; Andrade, Rodrigo B; Ratner, Daniel M

    2012-07-31

    Paper-based analytical devices are the subject of growing interest for the development of low-cost point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring technologies, and research tools for limited-resource settings. However, there are limited chemistries available for the conjugation of biomolecules to cellulose for use in biomedical applications. Herein, divinyl sulfone (DVS) chemistry was demonstrated to immobilize small molecules, proteins, and DNA covalently onto the hydroxyl groups of cellulose membranes through nucleophilic addition. Assays on modified cellulose using protein-carbohydrate and protein-glycoprotein interactions as well as oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the membrane's bioactivity was specific, dose-dependent, and stable over a long period of time. The use of an inkjet printer to form patterns of biomolecules on DVS-activated cellulose illustrates the adaptability of the DVS functionalization technique to pattern sophisticated designs, with potential applications in cellulose-based lateral flow devices.

  20. Passage of stable isotope-labeled grass silage fiber and fiber-bound protein through the gastroinstestinal tract of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Dijkstra, J.; Hendriks, W.H.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Fractional passage rates are required to predict nutrient absorption in ruminants but data on nutrient-specific passage kinetics are largely lacking. With the use of the stable isotope ratio (d) as an internal marker, we assessed passage kinetics of fiber and fiber-bound nitrogen (N) of

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of phospholipid-bound Sfh1p, a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec14p-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Gabriel; Betts, Laurie; Garrett, Teresa A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2006-01-01

    Yeast Sfh1p, a close homolog of the Sec14p phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, was crystallized in the absence of detergent. X-ray data have been collected to 2.5 Å. Sec14p is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of a large eukaryotic protein superfamily. This protein catalyzes the exchange of either PtdIns or PtdCho between membrane bilayers in vitro and this exchange reaction requires no external input of energy or of other protein cofactors. Despite the previous elucidation of the crystal structure of a detergent-bound form of Sec14p, the conformational changes that accompany the phospholipid-exchange reaction remain undefined. Moreover, a structural appreciation of how Sec14p or its homologs bind their various phospholipid substrates remains elusive. Here, the purification and crystallization of yeast Sfh1p, the protein most closely related to Sec14p, are reported. A combination of electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry and collision-induced decomposition mass-spectrometry methods indicate that recombinant Sfh1p loads predominantly with phosphatidylethanolamine. Unlike phospholipid-bound forms of Sec14p, this form of Sfh1p crystallizes readily in the absence of detergent. Sfh1p crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and belong to the orthorhombic primitive space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 49.40, b = 71.55, c = 98.21 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. One Sfh1p molecule is present in the asymmetric unit (V M = 2.5 Å 3 Da −1 ; V s = 50%). Crystallization of a phospholipid-bound Sec14p-like protein is a critical first step in obtaining the first high-resolution picture of how proteins of the Sec14p superfamily bind their phospholipid ligands. This information will significantly extend our current understanding of how Sec14p-like proteins catalyze phospholipid exchange

  2. Isolation and expression of the genes coding for the membrane bound transglycosylase B (MltB and the transferrin binding protein B (TbpB of the salmon pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN WILHELM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated and sequenced the genes encoding the membrane bound transglycosylase B (MltB and the transferring binding protein B (TbpB of the salmon pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis. The results of the sequence revealed two open reading frames that encode proteins with calculated molecular weights of 38,830 and 85,140. The deduced aminoacid sequences of both proteins show a significant homology to the respective protein from phylogenetically related microorganisms. Partial sequences coding the amino and carboxyl regions of MltB and a sequence of 761 base pairs encoding the amino region of TbpB have been expressed in E. coli. The strong humoral response elicited by these proteins in mouse confirmed the immunogenic properties of the recombinant proteins. A similar response was elicited by both proteins when injected intraperitoneally in Atlantic salmon. The present data indicates that these proteins are good candidates to be used in formulations to study the protective immunity of salmon to infection by P. salmonis.

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals the ATP-bound monomeric state of the ATPase domain from the homodimeric MutL endonuclease, a GHKL phosphotransferase superfamily protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishida, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Fukui, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    DNA mismatch repair is an excision system that removes mismatched bases chiefly generated by replication errors. In this system, MutL endonucleases direct the excision reaction to the error-containing strand of the duplex by specifically incising the newly synthesized strand. Both bacterial homodimeric and eukaryotic heterodimeric MutL proteins belong to the GHKL ATPase/kinase superfamily that comprises the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal dimerization regions. Generally, the GHKL proteins show large ATPase cycle-dependent conformational changes, including dimerization-coupled ATP binding of the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, the ATPase domain of human PMS2, a subunit of the MutL heterodimer, binds ATP without dimerization. The monomeric ATP-bound state of the domain has been thought to be characteristic of heterodimeric GHKL proteins. In this study, we characterized the ATP-bound state of the ATPase domain from the Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease, which is a homodimeric GHKL protein unlike the eukaryotic MutL. Gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses clearly showed that the domain binds ATP in a monomeric form despite its homodimeric nature. This indicates that the uncoupling of dimerization and ATP binding is a common feature among bacterial and eukaryotic MutL endonucleases, which we suggest is closely related to the molecular mechanisms underlying mismatch repair.

  4. Scattering by bound nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Hirokazu.

    1984-10-01

    Scattering of a particle by bound nucleons is discussed. Effects of nucleons that are bound in a nucleus are taken as a structure function. The way how to calculate the structure function is given. (author)

  5. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  6. Comparison of the rate of uptake and biologic effects of retinol added to human keratinocytes either directly to the culture medium or bound to serum retinol-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodam, J.R.; St Hilaire, P.; Creek, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    Retinol circulates in the plasma bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), but the mechanism by which retinol is transferred from RBP to target cells is not known. To study retinol delivery, human keratinocytes (HKc) were incubated with [3H]retinol added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP and the uptake of [3H]retinol was determined at various times. During the first hour of incubation, the rate of [3H]retinol accumulation by HKc was about 40 times greater when the vitamin was added directly to the media rather than bound to RBP. Although maximal uptake of [3H]retinol added directly to the culture medium occurred at 3 h, the uptake of [3H]retinol from RBP was linear with time for at least 72 h. By 57 h, cell-associated [3H]retinol was the same whether it was added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP. Excess unlabeled retinol or pretreatment of HKc with retinol had no effect on the uptake of [3H]retinol added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP. Apo- but not holo-RBP was capable of competing with HKc for the uptake of [3H]retinol from RBP. No specific or saturable binding of 125I-labeled RBP to HKc cultured in the absence or the presence of retinol was found. The dose response of retinol inhibition of cholesterol sulfate synthesis and phorbol ester-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity or retinol modulation of keratin expression was the same whether the retinol was delivered to HKc bound to RBP or added directly to the medium. Our data support a mechanism for retinol delivery from RBP to HKc that does not involve cell-surface RBP receptors but instead suggest that the vitamin is first slowly released from RBP and then becomes cell-associated from the aqueous phase. This mechanism is consistent with the finding that HKc respond identically to retinol whether or not it is delivered to them bound to RBP

  7. Covalent biofunctionalization of silicon nitride surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, A.; Giesbers, M.; Rosso, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; White, R.G.; Li Yang,; Linford, M.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2007-01-01

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on etched silicon nitride (SixN4; x 3) surfaces were prepared by reaction of SixN4-coated wafers with neat or solutions of 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes in refluxing mesitylene. The surface modification was monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle,

  8. Carbohydrate as covalent crosslink in human inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, T E; Faarvang, K L; Ploug, M

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor is partially elucidated, but controversy about the construction of the polypeptide backbone still exists. We present evidence suggesting that inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor represents a novel plasma protein structure with two separate polypept...... polypeptide chains covalently crosslinked only by carbohydrate (chondroitin sulphate)....

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of the oxysterol binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.R.; Kandutsch, A.A.; Anzalone, L.; Spencer, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cytosolic receptor protein for oxygenated sterols, that is thought to be involved in the regulation of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol biosynthesis, can be labeled covalently by the photoactivated affinity compound [5,6- 3 H]-7,7'-azocholestane-3β,25-diol (I). Several other compounds were tested including 25-hydroxycholesta-4,6-dien-3-one, 25-azido-27-norcholest-5-en-3β-ol,3β,25-dihydroxycholest-5-en-7-one and 3β-hydroxycholesta-8(14),9(11)-dien-15-one. However, these sterols either did not bind to the receptor with adequate affinity or did not react covalently with the receptor during photolysis. Compound I binds to the receptor with very high affinity (K/sub d/ = 30 nM). After activation with long wavelength UV, two tritium labeled proteins, M/sub r/ approximately 95K and 65K daltons, are found upon SDS gel electrophoresis. No labeling occurs when the binding reaction is carried out in the presence of a large excess of 25-hydroxycholesterol. It is possible that the smaller polypeptide is a degradation product. Under the reaction conditions investigated so far labeling is relatively inefficient (< 1% of bound sterol). These results are generally consistent with previous information suggesting that the M/sub r/ of the receptor subunit is 97,000. Covalent labeling of the receptor should greatly facilitate its further purification and characterization

  10. Covalent functionalization of graphene with reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyeung; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-01-15

    Graphene, a material made exclusively of sp(2) carbon atoms with its π electrons delocalized over the entire 2D network, is somewhat chemically inert. Covalent functionalization can enhance graphene's properties including opening its band gap, tuning conductivity, and improving solubility and stability. Covalent functionalization of pristine graphene typically requires reactive species that can form covalent adducts with the sp(2) carbon structures in graphene. In this Account, we describe graphene functionalization reactions using reactive intermediates of radicals, nitrenes, carbenes, and arynes. These reactive species covalently modify graphene through free radical addition, CH insertion, or cycloaddition reactions. Free radical additions are among the most common reaction, and these radicals can be generated from diazonium salts and benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer from graphene to aryl diazonium ion or photoactivation of benzoyl peroxide yields aryl radicals that subsequently add to graphene to form covalent adducts. Nitrenes, electron-deficient species generated by thermal or photochemical activation of organic azides, can functionalize graphene very efficiently. Because perfluorophenyl nitrenes show enhanced bimolecular reactions compared with alkyl or phenyl nitrenes, perfluorophenyl azides are especially effective. Carbenes are used less frequently than nitrenes, but they undergo CH insertion and C═C cycloaddition reactions with graphene. In addition, arynes can serve as a dienophile in a Diels-Alder type reaction with graphene. Further study is needed to understand and exploit the chemistry of graphene. The generation of highly reactive intermediates in these reactions leads to side products that complicate the product composition and analysis. Fundamental questions remain about the reactivity and regioselectivity of graphene. The differences in the basal plane and the undercoordinated edges of graphene and the zigzag versus arm-chair configurations

  11. Novel covalently linked insulin dimer engineered to investigate the function of insulin dimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine N Vinther

    Full Text Available An ingenious system evolved to facilitate insulin binding to the insulin receptor as a monomer and at the same time ensure sufficient stability of insulin during storage. Insulin dimer is the cornerstone of this system. Insulin dimer is relatively weak, which ensures dissociation into monomers in the circulation, and it is stabilized by hexamer formation in the presence of zinc ions during storage in the pancreatic β-cell. Due to the transient nature of insulin dimer, direct investigation of this important form is inherently difficult. To address the relationship between insulin oligomerization and insulin stability and function, we engineered a covalently linked insulin dimer in which two monomers were linked by a disulfide bond. The structure of this covalent dimer was identical to the self-association dimer of human insulin. Importantly, this covalent dimer was capable of further oligomerization to form the structural equivalent of the classical hexamer. The covalently linked dimer neither bound to the insulin receptor, nor induced a metabolic response in vitro. However, it was extremely thermodynamically stable and did not form amyloid fibrils when subjected to mechanical stress, underlining the importance of oligomerization for insulin stability.

  12. Posttranslational modification of Klebsiella pneumoniae flavodoxin by covalent attachment of coenzyme A, shown by sup 31 P NMR and electrospray mass spectrometry, prevents electron transfer from the nifJ protein to nitrogenase. A possible new regulatory mechanism for biological nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorneley, R.N.F.; Ashby, G.A.; Drummond, M.H.; Eady, R.R.; Huff, S.; Macdonald, C.J. (Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)); Abell, C.; Schneier, A. (Univ. Chemical Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1992-02-04

    A strain of Escherichia coli (71-18) that produces ca. 15% of its soluble cytoplasmic protein as a flavodoxin, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifF gene product, has been constructed. The flavodoxin was purified using FPLC and resolved into two forms, designated KpFldI and KpFldII, which were shown to have identical N-terminal amino acid sequences (30 residues) in agreement with that predicted by the K. pneumoniae nifF DNA sequence. {sup 31}P NMR, electrospray mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectra, and thiol group estimations showed that the single cysteine residue (position 68) of KpFldI is posttranslationally modified in KpFldII by the covalent, mixed disulfide, attachment of coenzyme A. KpFldII was inactive as an electron carrier between the K. pneumoniae nifJ product (a pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase) and K. pneumoniae nifH product (the Fe-protein of nitrogenase). This novel posttranslational modification of a flavodoxin is discussed in terms of the regulation of nitrogenase activity in vivo in response to the level of dissolved O{sub 2} and the carbon status of diazotrophic cultures.

  13. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  14. Maximally asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic lipids alters the structure and interaction with lipids of an amyloidogenic protein dimer bound to the membrane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-03-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effects of asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids on the structure of a protein on the membrane surface and subsequent protein-lipid interactions. Our simulation systems consisted of an amyloidogenic, beta-sheet rich dimeric protein (D42) absorbed to the phosphatidylcholine (PC) leaflet, or protein-contact PC leaflet, of two membrane systems: a single-component PC bilayer and double PC/PS bilayers. The latter comprised of a stable but asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in the presence of counterions, with a 1-component PC leaflet coupled to a 1-component PS leaflet in each bilayer. The maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer had a non-zero transmembrane potential (TMP) difference and higher lipid order packing, whereas the symmetric PC bilayer had a zero TMP difference and lower lipid order packing under physiologically relevant conditions. Analysis of the adsorbed protein structures revealed weaker protein binding, more folding in the N-terminal domain, more aggregation of the N- and C-terminal domains and larger tilt angle of D42 on the PC leaflet surface of the PC/PS bilayer versus the PC bilayer. Also, analysis of protein-induced membrane structural disruption revealed more localized bilayer thinning in the PC/PS versus PC bilayer. Although the electric field profile in the non-protein-contact PS leaflet of the PC/PS bilayer differed significantly from that in the non-protein-contact PC leaflet of the PC bilayer, no significant difference in the electric field profile in the protein-contact PC leaflet of either bilayer was evident. We speculate that lipid packing has a larger effect on the surface adsorbed protein structure than the electric field for a maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer. Our results support the mechanism that the higher lipid packing in a lipid leaflet promotes stronger protein-protein but weaker protein-lipid interactions for a dimeric protein on

  15. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  16. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  17. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  18. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  19. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    ) resultant by means of mixed volume, as well as recent advances on aggregate root bounds for univariate polynomials, and are applicable to arbitrary positive dimensional systems. We improve upon Canny's gap theorem [7] by a factor of O(dn-1), where d bounds the degree of the polynomials, and n is the number...... bound on the number of steps that subdivision-based algorithms perform in order to isolate all real roots of a polynomial system. This leads to the first complexity bound of Milne's algorithm [22] in 2D....

  20. Self-Assembled Polystyrene Beads for Templated Covalent Functionalization of Graphitic Substrates Using Diazonium Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, Hans; Walke, Peter; Bragança, Ana M; Greenwood, John; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Hirsch, Brandon E; De Feyter, Steven

    2018-04-11

    A network of self-assembled polystyrene beads was employed as a lithographic mask during covalent functionalization reactions on graphitic surfaces to create nanocorrals for confined molecular self-assembly studies. The beads were initially assembled into hexagonal arrays at the air-liquid interface and then transferred to the substrate surface. Subsequent electrochemical grafting reactions involving aryl diazonium molecules created covalently bound molecular units that were localized in the void space between the nanospheres. Removal of the bead template exposed hexagonally arranged circular nanocorrals separated by regions of chemisorbed molecules. Small molecule self-assembly was then investigated inside the resultant nanocorrals using scanning tunneling microscopy to highlight localized confinement effects. Overall, this work illustrates the utility of self-assembly principles to transcend length scale gaps in the development of hierarchically patterned molecular materials.

  1. Flavin-N5 Covalent Intermediate in a Nonredox Dehalogenation Reaction Catalyzed by an Atypical Flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yumin; Kizjakina, Karina; Campbell, Ashley C; Korasick, David A; Tanner, John J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2018-01-04

    The flavin-dependent enzyme 2-haloacrylate hydratase (2-HAH) catalyzes the conversion of 2-chloroacrylate, a major component in the manufacture of acrylic polymers, to pyruvate. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 2-HAH was shown to be monomeric in solution and contained a non-covalent, yet tightly bound, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Although the catalyzed reaction was redox-neutral, 2-HAH was active only in the reduced state. A covalent flavin-substrate intermediate, consistent with the flavin-acrylate iminium ion, was trapped with cyanoborohydride and characterized by mass spectrometry. Small-angle X-ray scattering was consistent with 2-HAH belonging to the succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase family of flavoproteins. These studies establish 2-HAH as a novel noncanonical flavoenzyme. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 is a membrane-bound protein requiring homooligomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum for its cellular activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, M.C.E.; Weber, H.; Hluska, T.; Leonte, G.; Anderson, S. P.; Novák, Ondřej; Senes, A.; Werner, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 3 (2018), s. 2024-2039 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : HELIX-HELIX ASSOCIATION * VIRUS MOVEMENT PROTEIN * RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN S Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  3. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  4. Protein-bound tyrosine oxidation, nitration and chlorination by-products assessed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Kuligowski, Julia; Cárcel, María; Cháfer-Pericás, Consuelo; Asensi, Miguel; Solberg, Rønnaug; Cubells, Elena; Nuñez, Antonio; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Vento, Máximo; Escobar, Javier

    2016-03-24

    Free radicals cause alterations in cellular protein structure and function. Oxidized, nitrated, and chlorinated modifications of aromatic amino acids including phenylalanine and tyrosine are reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in clinical conditions. To develop, validate and apply a rapid method for the quantification of known hallmarks of tyrosine oxidation, nitration and chlorination in plasma and tissue proteins providing a snapshot of the oxidative stress and inflammatory status of the organism and of target organs respectively. The extraction and clean up procedure entailed protein precipitation, followed by protein re-suspension and enzymatic digestion with pronase. An Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to quantify protein released ortho-tyrosine (o-Tyr), meta-tyrosine (m-Tyr), 3-nitrotyrosine (3NO2-Tyr) and 3-chlorotyrosine (3Cl-Tyr) as well as native phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (p-Tyr) in plasma and tissue from a validated hypoxic newborn piglet experimental model. In plasma there was a significant increase in the 3NO2-Tyr/p-Tyr ratio. On the other hand m-Tyr/Phe and 3Cl-Tyr/p-Tyr ratios were significantly increased in liver of hypoxic compared with normoxic animals. Although no significant differences were found in brain tissue, a clear tendency to increased ratios was observed under hypoxic conditions. UPLC-MS/MS has proven suitable for the analysis of plasma and tissue samples from newborn piglets. The analysis of biomarkers of protein oxidation, nitration and chlorination will be applied in future studies aiming to provide a deeper insight into the mechanisms of oxidation-derived protein modification caused during neonatal asphyxia and resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transfer in SDS of biotinylated proteins from acrylamide gels to an avidin-coated membrane filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Arthur; Wang, Chaojian; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang

    2004-06-01

    Avidin was covalently linked to aldehyde-derivatized polyethersulfone membrane filters. These filters were used in Western blot analysis of proteins reacted with biotinylation reagents and electrophoresed in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on polyacrylamide gels. Electrophoretic transfer from the gels to these filters was in 0.1% SDS, in which the covalently bound avidin retained its biotin-binding capacity. We compared Western blots on avidin-coated membrane filters of biotinylated and nonbiotinylated forms of mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), mouse IgG heavy chain, muscle-type acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit, and fused alpha and beta subunits of receptor. Biotinylated proteins were captured with high specificity compared to their nonbiotinylated counterparts and sensitively detected on the avidin-coated membranes.

  6. Structure and Modification of Electrode Materials for Protein Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuken, Lars J C

    The interactions between proteins and electrode surfaces are of fundamental importance in bioelectrochemistry, including photobioelectrochemistry. In order to optimise the interaction between electrode and redox protein, either the electrode or the protein can be engineered, with the former being the most adopted approach. This tutorial review provides a basic description of the most commonly used electrode materials in bioelectrochemistry and discusses approaches to modify these surfaces. Carbon, gold and transparent electrodes (e.g. indium tin oxide) are covered, while approaches to form meso- and macroporous structured electrodes are also described. Electrode modifications include the chemical modification with (self-assembled) monolayers and the use of conducting polymers in which the protein is imbedded. The proteins themselves can either be in solution, electrostatically adsorbed on the surface or covalently bound to the electrode. Drawbacks and benefits of each material and its modifications are discussed. Where examples exist of applications in photobioelectrochemistry, these are highlighted.

  7. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...... with the proposed explicit noise-model extension....

  8. Bounded Intention Planning Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Sievers Silvan; Wehrle Martin; Helmert Malte

    2014-01-01

    Bounded intention planning provides a pruning technique for optimal planning that has been proposed several years ago. In addition partial order reduction techniques based on stubborn sets have recently been investigated for this purpose. In this paper we revisit bounded intention planning in the view of stubborn sets.

  9. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  10. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  11. In vitro covalent binding of 3-[14C]methylindole metabolites in goat tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, T.M.; Carlson, J.R.; Nocerini, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Covalent binding of 3-[ 14 C]methylindole (3[ 14 C]MI) in crude microsomal preparations of goat lung, liver, and kidney was measured to determine if a reactive intermediate was formed during the in vitro metabolism of 3-methylindole (3MI). The bound radioactivity was highest in lung compared to liver and kidney. The amount of bound radioactivity per nanomole of cytochrome P-450 was approximately 10 times higher in the lung compared to the liver. No detectable bound radioactivity was found when 3-[ 3 H]methyloxindole was used as the substrate. Cofactor requirements and the effects of inhibitors indicate that a mixed function oxidase (MFO) system is involved in formation of a reactive intermediate. Inhibitors and conjugating agents that are known to reduce the severity of 3MI-induced lung injury such as piperonyl butoxide (MFO inhibitor) and glutathione (conjugating agent) significantly decreased the in vitro binding of 3[ 14 C]MI. The results indicate that a reactive intermediate is produced during the metabolism of 3MI by the MFO system. The organ specificity in binding suggests that covalent binding by lung microsomes may be related to the mechanism of 3MI-induced lung injury

  12. Cholesteryl ester transfer activity in plasma measured by using solid-phase-bound high-density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, D.L.; Frohlich, J.; Cullis, P.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the ability of lipid-transfer factors in plasma to promote transfer, to endogenous lipoproteins, of [ 3 H]cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) covalently bound to Sepharose 4B beads. After incubation for 2 h at 37 degrees C, 12 to 14% of the [ 3 H]cholesteryl ester had been transferred to the lipoproteins of the plasma, in the proportions 57% to HDL and 43% to low- and very-low-density lipoproteins. This process was a function of the amount of plasma present and was stimulated by addition of partly purified lipid-transfer protein. Transfer also depended on the concentration of donor HDL but was independent of the amount of acceptor lipoprotein. This simple evaluation of cholesteryl ester transfer does not require removal of lipoproteins from the plasma before incubation

  13. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  14. Spatially resolved microrheology of heterogeneous biopolymer hydrogels using covalently bound microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, L.H.; Kurniawan, Nicholas A.; Too, H.-P.; Rajagopalan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the rheological properties of heterogeneous biopolymers is important not only to understand the effect of substrate elasticity on cell behaviors, but also to provide insights into mechanical changes during cellular remodeling of the environment. Conventional particle-tracking

  15. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Schrapers

    Full Text Available A cobalamin (Cbl cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmbCoIII(OH2, (dmbCoII(OH2, and (dmbCoIII(CH3 sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2, CoII(OH2, and CoIII(CH3 sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II. The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  16. Membrane-bound and cytosolic forms of heterotrimeric G proteins in young and adult rat myocardium: influence of neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Jiří; Bouřová, Lenka; Kolář, František; Svoboda, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2001), s. 215-224 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1660; GA MŠk VS97099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : development * G proteins * young and adult rat myocardium Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2001

  17. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a ...... in neuronal cells....

  18. Identification and characterisation of the proteins bound by specific phage-displayed recombinant antibodies (scFv) obtained against Brazil nut and almond extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Silvia; Madrid, Raquel; García-García, Aina; Alcocer, Marcos; Martín, Rosario; González, Isabel; García, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Almonds and Brazil nuts are widely consumed allergenic nuts whose presence must be declared according to food labelling regulations. Their detection in food products has been recently achieved by ELISA methods with recombinant antibodies (scFv) isolated against complete Brazil nut and almond protein extracts. The screening of phage-scFv libraries against complete protein extracts confers a series of advantages over the use of purified proteins, as recombinant proteins might alter their native folding. However, using this strategy, the nature of the target detected by phage-displayed antibodies remains unknown, and requires further research to identify whether they are nut allergens or other molecules present in the extract, but not related to their allergenic potential. Electrophoretic, chromatographic, immunological and spectrometric techniques revealed that the Brazil nut (BE95) and almond (PD1F6 and PD2C9) specific phage-scFvs detected conformational epitopes of the Brazil nut and almond 11S globulins, recognised by WHO/IUIS as Ber e 2 and Pru du 6 major allergens. Circular dichroism data indicated that severe heat treatment would entail loss of epitope structure, disabling scFv for target detection. The presence of important Brazil nut and almond allergens (Ber e 2 and Pru du 6) in foodstuffs can be determined by using phage-display antibodies BE95, PD1F6 and PD2C9 as affinity probes in ELISA. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Nature and consequences of non-covalent interactions between flavonoids and macronutrients in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordenave, Nicolas; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Many of the potential health benefits of flavonoids have been associated with their specific chemical and biological properties including their ability to interact and bind non-covalently to macronutrients in foods. While flavonoid-protein interactions and binding have been the subject of intensive study, significantly less is understood about non-covalent interactions with carbohydrates and lipids. These interactions with macronutrients are likely to impact both the flavonoid properties in foods, such as their radical scavenging activity, and the food or beverage matrix itself, including their taste, texture and other sensorial properties. Overall, non-covalent binding of flavonoids with macronutrients is primarily driven by van der Waals interactions. From the flavonoid perspective, these interactions are modulated by characteristics such as degree of polymerization, molecular flexibility, number of external hydroxyl groups, or number of terminal galloyl groups. From the macronutrient standpoint, electrostatic and ionic interactions are generally predominant with carbohydrates, while hydrophobic interactions are generally predominant with lipids and mainly limited to interactions with flavonols. All of these interactions are involved in flavonoid-protein interactions. While primarily associated with undesirable characteristics in foods and beverages, such as astringency, negative impact on macronutrient digestibility and hazing, more recent efforts have attempted to leverage these interactions to develop controlled delivery systems or strategies to enhance flavonoids bioavailability. This paper aims at reviewing the fundamental bases for non-covalent interactions, their occurrence in food and beverage systems and their impact on the physico-chemical, organoleptic and some nutritional properties of food.

  20. Improved anticancer effects of albumin-bound paclitaxel nanoparticle via augmentation of EPR effect and albumin-protein interactions using S-nitrosated human serum albumin dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Ishima, Yu; Chuang, Victor T G; Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Taro; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2017-09-01

    In the latest trend of anticancer chemotherapy research, there were many macromolecular anticancer drugs developed based on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, such as albumin bound paclitaxel nanoparticle (nab- PTX, also called Abraxane ® ). However, cancers with low vascular permeability posed a challenge for these EPR based therapeutic systems. Augmenting the intrinsic EPR effect with an intrinsic vascular modulator such as nitric oxide (NO) could be a promising strategy. S-nitrosated human serum albumin dimer (SNO-HSA Dimer) shown promising activity previously was evaluated for the synergistic effect when used as a pretreatment agent in nab-PTX therapy against various tumor models. In the high vascular permeability C26 murine colon cancer subcutaneous inoculation model, SNO-HSA Dimer enhanced tumor selectivity of nab-PTX, and attenuated myelosuppression. SNO-HSA Dimer also augmented the tumor growth inhibition of nab-PTX in low vascular permeability B16 murine melanoma subcutaneous inoculation model. Furthermore, nab-PTX therapy combined with SNO-HSA Dimer showed higher antitumor activity and improved survival rate of SUIT2 human pancreatic cancer orthotopic model. In conclusion, SNO-HSA Dimer could enhance the therapeutic effect of nab-PTX even in low vascular permeability or intractable pancreatic cancers. The possible underlying mechanisms of action of SNO-HSA Dimer were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) modified with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellberg, Kristina; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Banaszak, Leonard J.; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Bernlohr, David A. (UMM)

    2012-07-11

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) have been characterized as facilitating the intracellular solubilization and transport of long-chain fatty acyl carboxylates via noncovalent interactions. More recent work has shown that the adipocyte FABP is also covalently modified in vivo on Cys117 with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a bioactive aldehyde linked to oxidative stress and inflammation. To evaluate 4-HNE binding and modification, the crystal structures of adipocyte FABP covalently and noncovalently bound to 4-HNE have been solved to 1.9 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. While the 4-HNE in the noncovalently modified protein is coordinated similarly to a carboxylate of a fatty acid, the covalent form show a novel coordination through a water molecule at the polar end of the lipid. Other defining features between the two structures with 4-HNE and previously solved structures of the protein include a peptide flip between residues Ala36 and Lys37 and the rotation of the side chain of Phe57 into its closed conformation. Representing the first structure of an endogenous target protein covalently modified by 4-HNE, these results define a new class of in vivo ligands for FABPs and extend their physiological substrates to include bioactive aldehydes.

  2. Organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs

  3. Deeply bound pionic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1989-01-01

    The standard method of pionic atom formation does not produce deeply bound pionic atoms. A study is made on the properties of deeply bound pionic atom states by using the standard pion-nucleus optical potential. Another study is made to estimate the cross sections of the formation of ls pionic atom states by various methods. The pion-nucleus optical potential is determined by weakly bound pionic atom states and pion nucleus scattering. Although this potential may not be valid for deeply bound pionic atoms, it should provide some hint on binding energies and level widths of deeply bound states. The width of the ls state comes out to be 0.3 MeV and is well separated from the rest. The charge dependence of the ls state is investigated. The binding energies and the widths increase linearly with Z azbove a Z of 30. The report then discusses various methods to populate deeply bound pionic atoms. In particular, 'pion exchange' reactions are proposed. (n, pπ) reaction is discussed first. The cross section is calculated by assuming the in- and out-going nucleons on-shell and the produced pion in (n1) pionic atom states. Then, (n, dπ - ) cross sections are estimated. (p, 2 Heπ - ) reaction would have cross sections similar to the cross section of (n, dπ - ) reaction. In conclusion, it seems best to do (n, p) experiment on heavy nuclei for deeply bound pionic atom. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the human calcineurin homologous protein CHP2 bound to the cytoplasmic region of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ammar, Youssef; Takeda, Soichi; Sugawara, Mitsuaki; Miyano, Masashi; Mori, Hidezo; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of the human CHP2–NHE1 binding domain complex. Calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) is a Ca 2+ -binding protein that directly interacts with and regulates the activity of all plasma-membrane Na + /H + -exchanger (NHE) family members. In contrast to the ubiquitous isoform CHP1, CHP2 is highly expressed in cancer cells. To understand the regulatory mechanism of NHE1 by CHP2, the complex CHP2–NHE1 (amino acids 503–545) has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as precipitant. The crystals diffract to 2.7 Å and belong to a tetragonal space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 49.96, c = 103.20 Å

  5. Crystallographic and single-particle analyses of native- and nucleotide-bound forms of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awayn, N H; Rosenberg, M F; Kamis, A B; Aleksandrov, L A; Riordan, J R; Ford, R C

    2005-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis, one of the major human inherited diseases, is caused by defects in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a cell-membrane protein. CFTR acts as a chloride channel which can be opened by ATP. Low-resolution structural studies of purified recombinant human CFTR are described in the present paper. Localization of the C-terminal decahistidine tag in CFTR was achieved by Ni2+-nitriloacetate nanogold labelling, followed by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The presence of the gold label appears to improve the single-particle-alignment procedure. Projection structures of CFTR from two-dimensional crystals analysed by electron crystallography displayed two alternative conformational states in the presence of nucleotide and nanogold, but only one form of the protein was observed in the quiescent (nucleotide-free) state.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of prion protein bound to the Fab fragment of the POM1 antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baral, Pravas Kumar; Wieland, Barbara; Swayampakula, Mridula; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Aguzzi, Adriano; Kav, Nat N. V.; James, Michael N. G.

    2011-01-01

    The complex of MoPrP(120–232) and Fab POM1 has been crystallized (space group C2, unit-cell parameters a = 83.68, b = 106.9, c = 76.25 Å, β = 95.6°). Diffraction data to 2.30 Å resolution have been collected using synchrotron radiation. Prion diseases are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP c to the pathogenic isoform PrP sc . Several antibodies are known to interact with the cellular prion protein and to inhibit this transition. An antibody Fab fragment, Fab POM1, was produced that recognizes a structural motif of the C-terminal domain of mouse prion protein. To study the mechanism by which Fab POM1 recognizes and binds the prion molecule, the complex between Fab POM1 and the C-terminal domain of mouse prion (residues 120–232) was prepared and crystallized. Crystals of this binary complex belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.68, b = 106.9, c = 76.25 Å, β = 95.6°

  7. Crystal Structure of Mn2+-bound Escherichia coli L-arabinose Isomerase (ECAI) and Implications in Protein Catalytic Mechanism and Thermo-Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W.; Manjasetty, B.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    The functional properties of proteins depend on their three-dimensional shapes. Protein structures can be determined by X-ray crystallography as a tool. The three-dimensional structure of the apo form of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase (ECAI) has recently been determined. ECAI is responsible for the initial stage of L-arabinose catabolism, converting arabinose into ribulose in vivo. This enzyme also plays a crucial role in catalyzing the conversion of galactose into tagatose (low calorie natural sugar) in vitro. ECAI utilizes Mn 2+ for its catalytic activity. Crystals of the ECAI + Mn 2+ complex helps to investigate the catalytic properties of the enzyme. Therefore, crystals of ECAI + Mn 2+ complex were grown using hanging drop vapor diffusion method at room temperature. Diffraction data were collected at X4C beamline, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure was solved by the molecular replacement technique and has been refined to Rwork of 0.23 at 2.8 (angstrom) resolution using X3A beamline computational facility. The structure was deposited to Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2HXG). Mn 2+ ion was localized to the previously identified putative active site with octahedral coordination. Comparison of apo and holo form of ECAI structures permits the identification of structural features that are of importance to the intrinsic activity and heat stability of AI

  8. Relativistic four-component potential energy curves for the lowest 23 covalent states of molecular bromine (Br2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José da Silva; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L; M de Macedo, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-08-07

    The covalent excited states and ground state of the Br2 molecule has been investigated by using four-component relativistic COSCI and MRCISD methods. These methods were performed for all covalent states in the representation Ω((±)). Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) were obtained at the four-component COSCI level, and spectroscopic constants (R(e), D(e), D0, ω(e), ω(e)x(e), ω(e)y(e), B(e), α(e), γ(e), Te, Dv) for bounded states are reported. The vertical excitations for all covalent states are reported at COSCI, MRCISD, and MRCISD+Q levels. We also present spectroscopic constants for two weakly bounded states (A':(1)2u and B':(1)0(-)u) not yet reported in the literature, as well as accurate analytical curves for all five relativistic molecular bounded sates [the ground state X:0 g(+) and the excited states A:(1)1(u), B:(1)0(u)(+), C:(2)1(u), and B':(1)0(u)(-)] found in this work.

  9. Bounded Rationality and Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mukdad

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the theory of bounded rationality which had been introduced by Herbert Simon in the 1950s. Simon introduced the notion of bounded rationality stating that while decision-makers strive for rationality, they are limited by the effect of the environment, their information process capacity and by the constraints on their information storage and retrieval capabilities. Moreover, this article tries to specifically blend this notion into budgeting, using the foundations of inc...

  10. Patient-derived Hormone-naive Prostate Cancer Xenograft Models Reveal Growth Factor Receptor Bound Protein 10 as an Androgen Receptor-repressed Gene Driving the Development of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jun; Ci, Xinpei; Xue, Hui; Wu, Rebecca; Dong, Xin; Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; He, Haiqing; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Fang; Qu, Sifeng; Zhang, Fan; Haegert, Anne M; Gout, Peter W; Zoubeidi, Amina; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin E; Lin, Dong; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2018-06-01

    Although androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in controlling growth of hormone-naive prostate cancers (HNPCs) in patients, currently incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) inevitably develops. To identify CRPC driver genes that may provide new targets to enhance CRPC therapy. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of HNPCs that develop CRPC following host castration were examined for changes in expression of genes at various time points after castration using transcriptome profiling analysis; particular attention was given to pre-CRPC changes in expression indicative of genes acting as potential CRPC drivers. The functionality of a potential CRPC driver was validated via its knockdown in cultured prostate cancer cells; its clinical relevance was established using data from prostate cancer patient databases. Eighty genes were found to be significantly upregulated at the CRPC stage, while seven of them also showed elevated expression prior to CRPC development. Among the latter, growth factor receptor bound protein 10 (GRB10) was the most significantly and consistently upregulated gene. Moreover, elevated GRB10 expression in clinical prostate cancer samples correlated with more aggressive tumor types and poorer patient treatment outcome. GRB10 knockdown markedly reduced prostate cancer cell proliferation and activity of AKT, a well-established CRPC mediator. A positive correlation between AKT activity and GRB10 expression was also found in clinical cohorts. GRB10 acts as a driver of CRPC and sensitizes androgen receptor pathway inhibitors, and hence GRB10 targeting provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the disease. Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major problem in the management of the disease. Using state-of-the-art patient-derived hormone-naive prostate cancer xenograft models, we found and validated the growth factor receptor bound protein 10 gene as a driver of CRPC, indicating that it may be used as a

  11. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  12. Bound and rebound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzalesi, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    In relativistic quantum theory, bound states generate forces in the crossed channel; such forces can affect the binding and self-consistent solutions should be sought for the bound-state problem. The author investigates how self-consistency can be achieved by successive approximations, in a simple scalar model and with successive relativistic eikonal approximations (EAs). Within the generalized ladder approximation, some exact properties of the resulting ''first generation'' bound states are discussed. The binding energies in this approximation are rather small even for rather large values of the primary coupling constant. The coupling of the constituent particles to the first-generation reggeon is determined by a suitable EA and a new generalized ladder amplitude is constructed with rungs given either by the primary gluons or by the first-generation reggeons. The resulting new (second-generation) bound states are found in a reggeized EA. The size of the corrections to the binding energies due to the rebinding effects is surprisingly large. The procedure is then iterated, so as to find - again in an EA - the third-generation bound states. The procedure is found to be self-consistent already at this stage: the third-generation bound states coincide with those of second generation, and no further rebinding takes place in the higher iterations of the approximation method. Features - good and bad - of the model are discussed, as well as the possible relevance of rebinding mechanisms in hadron dynamics. (author)

  13. Noncovalent synthesis of protein dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempens, E.H.M.; Baal, van I.; Dongen, van J.L.J.; Hackeng, T.M.; Merkx, M.; Meijer, E.W.

    2009-01-01

    The covalent synthesis of complex biomolecular systems such as multivalent protein dendrimers often proceeds with low efficiency, thereby making alternative strategies based on noncovalent chemistry of high interest. Here, the synthesis of protein dendrimers using a strong but noncovalent

  14. Diazonium-derived aryl films on gold nanoparticles: evidence for a carbon-gold covalent bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentius, Lars; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy; Du, Rongbing; Lopinski, Gregory P; McDermott, Mark T

    2011-05-24

    Tailoring the surface chemistry of metallic nanoparticles is generally a key step for their use in a wide range of applications. There are few examples of organic films covalently bound to metal nanoparticles. We demonstrate here that aryl films are formed on gold nanoparticles from the spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts. The structure and the bonding of the film is probed with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Extinction spectroscopy and SERS show that a nitrobenzene film forms on gold nanoparticles from the corresponding diazonium salt. Comparison of the SERS spectrum with spectra computed from density functional theory models reveals a band characteristic of a Au-C stretch. The observation of this stretch is direct evidence of a covalent bond. A similar band is observed in high-resolution electron energy loss spectra of nitrobenzene layers on planar gold. The bonding of these types of films through a covalent interaction on gold is consistent with their enhanced stability observed in other studies. These findings provide motivation for the use of diazonium-derived films on gold and other metals in applications where high stability and/or strong adsorbate-substrate coupling are required.

  15. Covalent bonding of chloroanilines to humic constituents: Pathways, kinetics, and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Deyang; Xia, Qing; Liu, Guoqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Covalent coupling to natural humic constituents comprises an important transformation pathway for anilinic pollutants in the environment. We systematically investigated the reactions of chlorine substituted anilines with catechol and syringic acid in horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed systems. It was demonstrated that although nucleophilic addition was the mechanism of covalent bonding to both catechol and syringic acid, chloroanilines coupled to the 2 humic constituents via slightly different pathways. 1,4-addition and 1,2-addition are involved to catechol and syringic acid, respectively. 1,4-addition showed empirical 2nd order kinetics and this pathway seemed to be more permanent than 1,2-addition. Stability experiments demonstrated that cross-coupling products with syringic acid could be easily released in acidic conditions. However, cross-coupling with catechol was relatively stable at similar conditions. Thus, the environmental behavior and bioavailability of the coupling products should be carefully assessed. -- Highlights: •Chloroanilines covalently coupled to humic constituents in HRP catalyzed processes, which facilitated their transformation. •MS technique was employed to analyze the coupling products and therefore elucidate the reaction pathways. •Chloroanilines couple to catechol and syringic acid via 1,4- and 1,2-nucleophilic addition pathways, respectively. •Cross-coupling products formed via 1,4-nucleophilic addition pathway were more stable than those via 1,2-addition pathway. -- Bound residues of chloroanilines formed via 1,2- and 1,4-nucleophilic addition pathways showed different stability

  16. Immobilization of β-glucosidase onto mesoporous silica support: Physical adsorption and covalent binding of enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivetić Darjana Ž.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates β-glucosidase immobilization onto mesoporous silica support by physical adsorption and covalent binding. The immobilization was carried out onto micro-size silica aggregates with the average pore size of 29 nm. During physical adsorption the highest yield of immobilized β-glucosidase was obtained at initial protein concentration of 0.9 mg ml-1. Addition of NaCl increased 1.7-fold, while Triton X-100 addition decreased 6-fold yield of adsorption in comparison to the one obtained without any addition. Covalently bonded β-glucosidase, via glutaraldehyde previously bonded to silanized silica, had higher yield of immobilized enzyme as well as higher activity and substrate affinity in comparison to the one physically adsorbed. Covalent binding did not considerably changed pH and temperature stability of obtained biocatalyst in range of values that are commonly used in reactions in comparison to unbounded enzyme. Furthermore, covalent binding provided biocatalyst which retained over 70% of its activity after 10 cycles of reuse. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45021

  17. Inorganic Materials as Supports for Covalent Enzyme Immobilization: Methods and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zucca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several inorganic materials are potentially suitable for enzymatic covalent immobilization, by means of several different techniques. Such materials must meet stringent criteria to be suitable as solid matrices: complete insolubility in water, reasonable mechanical strength and chemical resistance under the operational conditions, the capability to form manageable particles with high surface area, reactivity towards derivatizing/functionalizing agents. Non-specific protein adsorption should be always considered when planning covalent immobilization on inorganic solids. A huge mass of experimental work has shown that silica, silicates, borosilicates and aluminosilicates, alumina, titania, and other oxides, are the materials of choice when attempting enzyme immobilizations on inorganic supports. More recently, some forms of elemental carbon, silicon, and certain metals have been also proposed for certain applications. With regard to the derivatization/functionalization techniques, the use of organosilanes through silanization is undoubtedly the most studied and the most applied, although inorganic bridge formation and acylation with selected acyl halides have been deeply studied. In the present article, the most common inorganic supports for covalent immobilization of the enzymes are reviewed, with particular focus on their advantages and disadvantages in terms of enzyme loadings, operational stability, undesired adsorption, and costs. Mechanisms and methods for covalent immobilization are also discussed, focusing on the most widespread activating approaches (such as glutaraldehyde, cyanogen bromide, divinylsulfone, carbodiimides, carbonyldiimidazole, sulfonyl chlorides, chlorocarbonates, N-hydroxysuccinimides.

  18. Isolation and characterization of cAMP-free and cAMP-bound forms of bovine heart type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine heart type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase holoenzyme (cAMP-PK) was purified to homogeneity as determined by denaturing SDS-PAGE. An HPLC-DEAE purification step resolved two distinct peaks of cAMP-dependent kinase activity, which were designated Peak 1 and Peak 2 based on their order of elution. They had the same Stoke's radii and had very similar sedimentation coefficients. As determined by densitometric scanning of SDS-PAGE brands, by their mobility on denaturing PAGE, and by the ratios of equilibrium [ 3 H] cAMP binding to maximal kinase activity, the subunit stoichiometry of the two peaks was the same. In a cAMP assay it was found that Peak 1 holoenzyme was cAMP-free, but half of the Peak 2 holoenzyme cAMP binding sites contained cAMP. Dissociation assays indicated that the cAMP was equally distributed in binding Site 1 and Site 2 of Peak 2. Although SDS-PAGE analysis ruled out conversions by proteolysis or autophosphorylation-dephosphorylation, Peak 1 could be partially converted to Peak 2 by the addition of subsaturating amounts of cAMP, and Peak 2 could be partially converted to Peak 1 by aging. The interconvertibility of the two holoenzyme peaks strongly suggested that the difference between the two peaks was caused by the presence of cAMP in Peak 2

  19. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    Related key attacks (RKAs) are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an adversary can change the secret key and observe the effect of such changes at the output. The state of the art in RKA security protects against an a-priori unbounded number of certain algebraic induced key relations, e.......g., affine functions or polynomials of bounded degree. In this work, we show that it is possible to go beyond the algebraic barrier and achieve security against arbitrary key relations, by restricting the number of tampering queries the adversary is allowed to ask for. The latter restriction is necessary......-protocols (including the Okamoto scheme, for instance) are secure even if the adversary can arbitrarily tamper with the prover’s state a bounded number of times and obtain some bounded amount of leakage. Interestingly, for the Okamoto scheme we can allow also independent tampering with the public parameters. We show...

  20. Massive Galileon positivity bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Melville, Scott; Tolley, Andrew J.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The EFT coefficients in any gapped, scalar, Lorentz invariant field theory must satisfy positivity requirements if there is to exist a local, analytic Wilsonian UV completion. We apply these bounds to the tree level scattering amplitudes for a massive Galileon. The addition of a mass term, which does not spoil the non-renormalization theorem of the Galileon and preserves the Galileon symmetry at loop level, is necessary to satisfy the lowest order positivity bound. We further show that a careful choice of successively higher derivative corrections are necessary to satisfy the higher order positivity bounds. There is then no obstruction to a local UV completion from considerations of tree level 2-to-2 scattering alone. To demonstrate this we give an explicit example of such a UV completion.

  1. Proteomic Identification of Dengue Virus Binding Proteins in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes and Aedes albopictus Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main vector of dengue in America is the mosquito Aedes aegypti, which is infected by dengue virus (DENV through receptors of midgut epithelial cells. The envelope protein (E of dengue virus binds to receptors present on the host cells through its domain III that has been primarily recognized to bind cell receptors. In order to identify potential receptors, proteins from mosquito midgut tissue and C6/36 cells were purified by affinity using columns with the recombinant E protein domain III (rE-DIII or DENV particles bound covalently to Sepharose 4B to compare and evaluate their performance to bind proteins including putative receptors from female mosquitoes of Ae. aegypti. To determine their identity mass spectrometric analysis of purified proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. Our results indicate that both viral particles and rE-DIII bound proteins with the same apparent molecular weights of 57 and 67 kDa. In addition, viral particles bound high molecular weight proteins. Purified proteins identified were enolase, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-ARK, translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha/Tu, and cadherin.

  2. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    the need for its multiplexing with other fluorophores to some extent. On the other ... formed using a picosecond pulsed-diode laser-based. TCSPC fluorescence ... at 620 nm is collected at right angles to the direction of the excitation beam, ...

  3. Revisiting nitrogen species in covalent triazine frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Osadchii, Dmitrii Yu.

    2017-11-28

    Covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) are porous organic materials promising for applications in catalysis and separation due to their high stability, adjustable porosity and intrinsic nitrogen functionalities. CTFs are prepared by ionothermal trimerization of aromatic nitriles, however, multiple side reactions also occur under synthesis conditions, and their influence on the material properties is still poorly described. Here we report the systematic characterization of nitrogen in CTFs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). With the use of model compounds, we could distinguish several types of nitrogen species. By combining these data with textural properties, we unravel the influence that the reaction temperature, the catalyst and the monomer structure and composition have on the properties of the resulting CTF materials.

  4. Non-covalent associative structure of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, H. [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The recent progress of non-covalent associative structure of coal and the mechanisms of the carbon disulphide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (CS{sub 2}/NMP) are mixed solvent and the additive addition enhancing the extraction yield of coals are reviewed, and the aggregation behaviour of coal in solid and solution states are presented, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states are introduced in this paper. Coal extraction and swelling in organic solvents at room temperature were the most useful methods to understand the associative structure of coal. CS{sub 2}/NMP is a unique solvent to give high extraction yields for some bituminous coals. Some additives such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) can dissociate the stronger interactions among coal molecules and enhance the extraction yields of coal in the mixed solvent. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures.

  6. Revisiting nitrogen species in covalent triazine frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Osadchii, Dmitrii Yu.; Olivos Suarez, Alma Itzel; Bavykina, Anastasiya V.; Gascon, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) are porous organic materials promising for applications in catalysis and separation due to their high stability, adjustable porosity and intrinsic nitrogen functionalities. CTFs are prepared by ionothermal trimerization of aromatic nitriles, however, multiple side reactions also occur under synthesis conditions, and their influence on the material properties is still poorly described. Here we report the systematic characterization of nitrogen in CTFs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). With the use of model compounds, we could distinguish several types of nitrogen species. By combining these data with textural properties, we unravel the influence that the reaction temperature, the catalyst and the monomer structure and composition have on the properties of the resulting CTF materials.

  7. Pore surface engineering in covalent organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Atsushi; Guo, Zhaoqi; Feng, Xiao; Jin, Shangbin; Chen, Xiong; Ding, Xuesong; Jiang, Donglin

    2011-11-15

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a class of important porous materials that allow atomically precise integration of building blocks to achieve pre-designable pore size and geometry; however, pore surface engineering in COFs remains challenging. Here we introduce pore surface engineering to COF chemistry, which allows the controlled functionalization of COF pore walls with organic groups. This functionalization is made possible by the use of azide-appended building blocks for the synthesis of COFs with walls to which a designable content of azide units is anchored. The azide units can then undergo a quantitative click reaction with alkynes to produce pore surfaces with desired groups and preferred densities. The diversity of click reactions performed shows that the protocol is compatible with the development of various specific surfaces in COFs. Therefore, this methodology constitutes a step in the pore surface engineering of COFs to realize pre-designed compositions, components and functions.

  8. Selective Covalent Conjugation of Phosphorothioate DNA Oligonucleotides with Streptavidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof M. Niemeyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA conjugates have found numerous applications in the field of diagnostics and nanobiotechnology, however, their intrinsic susceptibility to DNA degradation by nucleases represents a major obstacle for many applications. We here report the selective covalent conjugation of the protein streptavidin (STV with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (psDNA containing a terminal alkylthiolgroup as the chemically addressable linking unit, using a heterobifunctional NHS-/maleimide crosslinker. The psDNA-STV conjugates were synthesized in about 10% isolated yields. We demonstrate that the terminal alkylthiol group selectively reacts with the maleimide while the backbone sulfur atoms are not engaged in chemical conjugation. The novel psDNA-STV conjugates retain their binding capabilities for both biotinylated macromolecules and the complementary nucleic acid. Moreover, the psDNA-STV conjugate retained its binding capacity for complementary oligomers even after a nuclease digestion step, which effectively degrades deoxyribonucleotide oligomers and thus the binding capability of regular DNA-STV conjugates. The psDNA-STV therefore hold particular promise for applications e.g. in proteome research and novel biosensing devices, where interfering endogenous nucleic acids need to be removed from analytes by nuclease digestion.

  9. Structural Analysis of a Viral Ovarian Tumor Domain Protease from the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Complex with Covalently Bonded Ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Baker, Erica A.; Masters, Emily M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Pegan, Scott D. (Denver); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(-)] nairovirus that produces fever, prostration, and severe hemorrhages in humans. With fatality rates for CCHF ranging up to 70% based on several factors, CCHF is considered a dangerous emerging disease. Originally identified in the former Soviet Union and the Congo, CCHF has rapidly spread across large sections of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Recent reports have identified a viral homologue of the ovarian tumor protease superfamily (vOTU) within its L protein. This protease has subsequently been implicated in downregulation of the type I interferon immune response through cleavage of posttranslational modifying proteins ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like interferon-simulated gene 15 (ISG15). Additionally, homologues of vOTU have been suggested to perform similar roles in the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(+)] arteriviruses. By utilizing X-ray crystallographic techniques, the structure of vOTU covalently bound to ubiquitin propylamine, a suicide substrate of the enzyme, was elucidated to 1.7 {angstrom}, revealing unique structural elements that define this new subclass of the OTU superfamily. In addition, kinetic studies were carried out with aminomethylcoumarin (AMC) conjugates of monomeric Ub, ISG15, and NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8) substrates in order to provide quantitative insights into vOTU's preference for Ub and Ub-like substrates.

  10. Trisulfides in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus W.; Tachibana, Christine; Hansen, Niels Erik

    2011-01-01

    Trisulfides and other oligosulfides are widely distributed in the biological world. In plants, e.g., garlic, trisulfides are associated with potentially beneficial properties. However, an extra neutral sulfur atom covalently bound between the two sulfur atoms of a pair of cysteines is not a common...

  11. Covalent versus ionic bonding in alkalimetal fluoride oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Sola, M.; Fonseca Guerra, C.

    2007-01-01

    The most polar bond in chemistry is that between a fluorine and an alkalimetal atom. Inspired by our recent finding that other polar bonds (C - M and H - M) have important covalent contributions (i.e., stabilization due to bond overlap), we herein address the question if covalency is also essential

  12. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by microwave irradiation for lysozyme attachment: comparison of covalent and adsorption methods by kinetics of thermal inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes-Camacho, Daniel; Velázquez, Enrique F.; Rodríguez-Félix, Dora E.; Castillo-Ortega, Mónica; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; del Castillo-Castro, Teresa

    2017-12-01

    Proteins suffer changes in their tertiary structure when they are immobilized, and enzymatic activity is affected due to the low biocompatibility of some supporting materials. In this work immobilization of lysozyme on carbon nanotubes previously functionalized by microwave irradiation was studied. The effectiveness of the microwave-assisted acid treatment of carbon nanotubes was evaluated by XPS, TEM, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The carboxylic modification of nanotube surfaces by this fast, simple and feasible method allowed the physical adsorption and covalent linking of active lysozyme onto the carbonaceous material. Thermal inactivation kinetics, thermodynamic parameters and storage stability were studied for adsorbed and covalent enzyme complexes. A major stability was found for lysozyme immobilized by the covalent method, the activation energy for inactivation of the enzyme was higher for the covalent method and it was stable after 50 d of storage at 4 °C. The current study highlights the effect of protein immobilization method on the biotechnological potential of nanostructured biocatalysts.

  13. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  14. Activation of ATPase activity of simian virus 40 large T antigen by the covalent affinity analog of ATP, fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5'-adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, M K

    1990-01-01

    Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5'-adenosine (FSBA) bound to one site in simian virus 40 large T antigen (T) and covalently modified greater than 95% of the molecules in a complete reaction. This analog for ATP specifically cross-links to the Mg-phosphate pocket in ATP-binding sites. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and tryptic digestion of [14C]FSBA-labeled protein, paired with T-specific monoclonal antibody analyses, were used to map the site in T to a tryptic peptide just C terminal to the PAb204 epitope. The location of the FSBA linkage was consistent with the predicted tertiary structure of the ATP-binding region in T described previously (M. K. Bradley, T. F. Smith, R. H. Lathrop, D. M. Livingston, and T. A. Webster, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:4026-4030, 1987). Binding of FSBA to T was cooperative, implying an interaction between two binding sites. This could occur if the protein formed a dimer, and it is known that the ATPase activity is associated with a dimeric T. Most interesting was the activation of the ATPase when up to 50% of T was bound by the analog. The effect was also produced by preincubation with millimolar concentrations of ATP or the nonhydrolyzable analog gamma beta-methylene 5'-adenosine diphosphate at elevated temperatures. When greater than 50% of T was modified by FSBA, the ATPase was inhibited as the analog cross-linked to the second, previously activated, binding site. These data support a dual function for the one ATP-binding site in T as both regulatory and catalytic. Images PMID:1697910

  15. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-08-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to manipulate water content. Hydration properties are probed using the water-sensitive fluorescence from Hb bound pyranine and covalently attached Badan. Protein dynamics are probed through ligand recombination traces derived from photodissociated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin on a log scale that exposes the potential role of both α and β solvent fluctuations in modulating protein dynamics. The results open the possibility of probing hydration level phenomena in this system using a combination of NMR and optical probes.

  16. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of polymer-bound heme complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Eishun; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hidenari; Shirai, Tsuneo.

    1984-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra were measured on the heme complexes of poly(1-vinyl- and 1-vinyl-2-methylimidazole)(PVI and PMI) and heme derivatives with covalently bound imidazoleligand (IH) and 2-methylimidazole-ligand (MIH) embedded in poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) film. Quadrupole splitting (ΔE sub(Q)) for the carbon monoxide adduct of PMI-heme indicated large electronic field gradient at the iron nucleus, probably due to steric hindrance of the polymer chain, and this behavior agreed with its low affinity with carbon monoxide. PMI-heme formed an oxygen adduct and its isomer shift and ΔE sub(Q) values were obtained. (author)

  17. Polyamine binding to proteins in oat and Petunia protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y.; Applewhite, P. B.; Galston, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work (A Apelbaum et al. [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 996-998) has demonstrated binding of labeled spermidine (Spd) to a developmentally regulated 18 kilodalton protein in tobacco tissue cultures derived from thin surface layer explants. To assess the general importance of such Spd-protein complexes, we attempted bulk isolation from protoplasts of Petunia and oat (Avena sativa). In Petunia, as in tobacco, fed radioactive Spd is bound to protein, but in oat, Spd is first converted to 1,3,-diaminopropane (DAP), probably by polyamine oxidase action. In oat, binding of DAP to protein depends on age of donor leaf and conditions of illumination and temperature, and the extraction of the DAP-protein complex depends upon buffer and pH. The yield of the DAP-protein complex was maximized by extraction of frozen-thawed protoplasts with a pH 8.8 carbonate buffer containing SDS. Its molecular size, based on Sephacryl column fractionation of ammonium sulfate precipitated material, exceeded 45 kilodaltons. Bound Spd or DAP can be released from their complexes by the action of Pronase, but not DNAse, RNAse, or strong salt solutions, indicating covalent attachment to protein.

  18. Covalent structures of potato tuber lipases (patatins) and implications for vacuolar import

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Karen Gjesing; Jørgensen, Malene

    that the path is via the Golgi apparatus. However, the vacuolar targeting signal has never been identified for this storage and defence protein, which amounts to 25-40% of tuber protein. We propose that a six-residue ct-propeptide, -ANKASY-COO- composes this signal. The crystallographic structure...... the Danish Research Council for Technology and Production, and grant 2052-03-0022 from the Danish Research Agency.   Reference Welinder KG, Jørgensen M (2009) Covalent structures of potato tuber lipases (patatins) and implications for vacuolar import. J. Biol. Chem., Feb 2009; doi:10.1074/jbc.M809674200....

  19. Potent haloperidol derivatives covalently binding to the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Tobias; Kaindl, Jonas; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R) is a common drug target for the treatment of a variety of neurological disorders including schizophrenia. Structure based design of subtype selective D 2 R antagonists requires high resolution crystal structures of the receptor and pharmacological tools promoting a better understanding of the protein-ligand interactions. Recently, we reported the development of a chemically activated dopamine derivative (FAUC150) designed to covalently bind the L94C mutant of the dopamine D 2 receptor. Using FAUC150 as a template, we elaborated the design and synthesis of irreversible analogs of the potent antipsychotic drug haloperidol forming covalent D 2 R-ligand complexes. The disulfide- and Michael acceptor-functionalized compounds showed significant receptor affinity and an irreversible binding profile in radioligand depletion experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maps of Bounded Rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The work cited by the Nobel committee was done jointly with the late Amos Tversky (1937-1996) during a long and unusually close collaboration. Together, we explored the psychology of intuitive beliefs and choices and examined their bounded rationality. This essay presents a current perspective on the three major topics of our joint work: heuristics of judgment, risky choice, and framing effects. In all three domains we studied intuitions - thoughts and preferences that come to mind quickly an...

  1. Bounded Satisfiability for PCTL

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Nathalie; Fearnley, John; Schewe, Sven

    2012-01-01

    While model checking PCTL for Markov chains is decidable in polynomial-time, the decidability of PCTL satisfiability, as well as its finite model property, are long standing open problems. While general satisfiability is an intriguing challenge from a purely theoretical point of view, we argue that general solutions would not be of interest to practitioners: such solutions could be too big to be implementable or even infinite. Inspired by bounded synthesis techniques, we turn to the more appl...

  2. Affinity of hemoglobin for the cytoplasmic fragment of human erythrocyte membrane band 3. Equilibrium measurements at physiological pH using matrix-bound proteins: the effects of ionic strength, deoxygenation and of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chétrite, G; Cassoly, R

    1985-10-05

    The cytoplasmic fragment of band 3 protein isolated from the human erythrocyte membrane was linked to a CNBr-activated Sepharose matrix in an attempt to measure, in batch experiments, its equilibrium binding constant with oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin at physiological pH and ionic strength values and in the presence or the absence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. All the experiments were done at pH 7.2, and equilibrium constants were computed on the basis of one hemoglobin tetramer bound per monomer of fragment. In 10 mM-phosphate buffer, a dissociation constant KD = 2 X 10(-4)M was measured for oxyhemoglobin and was shown to increase to 8 X 10(-4)M in the presence of 50 mM-NaCl. Association could not be demonstrated at higher salt concentrations. Diphosphoglycerate-stripped deoxyhemoglobin was shown to associate more strongly with the cytoplasmic fragment of band 3. In 10 mM-bis-Tris (pH 7.2) and in the presence of 120 mM-NaCl, a dissociation constant KD = 4 X 10(-4)M was measured. Upon addition of increasing amounts of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the complex formed between deoxyhemoglobin and the cytoplasmic fragment of band 3 was dissociated. On the reasonable assumption that the hemoglobin binding site present on band 3 fragment was not modified upon linking the protein to the Sepharose matrix, the results indicated that diphosphoglycerate-stripped deoxyhemoglobin or partially liganded hemoglobin tetramers in the T state could bind band 3 inside the intact human red blood cell.

  3. Detection of HBV Covalently Closed Circular DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection affects approximately 240 million people worldwide and remains a serious public health concern because its complete cure is impossible with current treatments. Covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in the nucleus of infected cells cannot be eliminated by present therapeutics and may result in persistence and relapse. Drug development targeting cccDNA formation and maintenance is hindered by the lack of efficient cccDNA models and reliable cccDNA detection methods. Southern blotting is regarded as the gold standard for quantitative cccDNA detection, but it is complicated and not suitable for high-throughput drug screening, so more sensitive and simple methods, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods, Invader assays, in situ hybridization and surrogates, have been developed for cccDNA detection. However, most methods are not reliable enough, and there are no unified standards for these approaches. This review will summarize available methods for cccDNA detection. It is hoped that more robust methods for cccDNA monitoring will be developed and that standard operation procedures for routine cccDNA detection in scientific research and clinical monitoring will be established.

  4. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Christopher (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Adzima, Brian J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  5. Identification of Bound Nitro Musk-Protein Adduct in Fish Liver By Gas Chromatography-Mass Sectrometry: Biotransformation, Dose-Response and Toxicokinetics of Nitro Musk Metabolites Protein Adducts in Trout Liver as Biomarker of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The In vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) - protein adducts in trout liver have been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Bio...

  6. Anisotropic Covalency Contributions to Superexchange Pathways in Type One Copper Active Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Type one (T1) Cu sites deliver electrons to catalytic Cu active sites: the mononuclear type two (T2) Cu site in nitrite reductases (NiRs) and the trinuclear Cu cluster in the multicopper oxidases (MCOs). The T1 Cu and the remote catalytic sites are connected via a Cys-His intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) bridge, which contains two potential ET pathways: P1 through the protein backbone and P2 through the H-bond between the Cys and the His. The high covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond is shown here to activate the T1 Cu site for hole superexchange via occupied valence orbitals of the bridge. This covalency-activated electronic coupling (HDA) facilitates long-range ET through both pathways. These pathways can be selectively activated depending on the geometric and electronic structure of the T1 Cu site and thus the anisotropic covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond. In NiRs, blue (π-type) T1 sites utilize P1 and green (σ-type) T1 sites utilize P2, with P2 being more efficient. Comparing the MCOs to NiRs, the second-sphere environment changes the conformation of the Cys-His pathway, which selectively activates HDA for superexchange by blue π sites for efficient turnover in catalysis. These studies show that a given protein bridge, here Cys-His, provides different superexchange pathways and electronic couplings depending on the anisotropic covalencies of the donor and acceptor metal sites. PMID:25310460

  7. CBC bound proteins and RNA fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacometti, Simone

    ) complex (CBCN), were recently shown to target capped RNA either toward export or degradation, but the mechanisms by which they can discriminate between different RNA families and route them toward different metabolic pathways still remain unclear. A major question to be answered is how and when...... the different CBC subcomplexes are recruited to the RNP. Here, we used an individual nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) approach to identify the transcriptome-wide targets for 5 different components of the CBCAP and CBCN complexes, and compared results to the previously...... analysed NEXT-component RBM7. We report that: (i) CBP20, ARS2, PHAX and ZC3H18 bind close to the cap, while RBM7 and MTR4 bind throughout the mRNA body; (ii) CBP20, ARS2, PHAX and ZC3H18 associate with a broad set of RNA polymerase II (PolII)-derived RNAs and have only mild species preferences; (iii...

  8. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  9. An expanded allosteric network in PTP1B by multitemperature crystallography, fragment screening, and covalent tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Daniel A; Hill, Zachary B; Biel, Justin T; Kang, Emily; Rettenmaier, T Justin; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Pearce, Nicholas M; von Delft, Frank; Wells, James A; Fraser, James S

    2018-06-07

    Allostery is an inherent feature of proteins, but it remains challenging to reveal the mechanisms by which allosteric signals propagate. A clearer understanding of this intrinsic circuitry would afford new opportunities to modulate protein function. Here we have identified allosteric sites in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by combining multiple-temperature X-ray crystallography experiments and structure determination from hundreds of individual small-molecule fragment soaks. New modeling approaches reveal 'hidden' low-occupancy conformational states for protein and ligands. Our results converge on allosteric sites that are conformationally coupled to the active-site WPD loop and are hotspots for fragment binding. Targeting one of these sites with covalently tethered molecules or mutations allosterically inhibits enzyme activity. Overall, this work demonstrates how the ensemble nature of macromolecular structure, revealed here by multitemperature crystallography, can elucidate allosteric mechanisms and open new doors for long-range control of protein function. © 2018, Keedy et al.

  10. Study on immobilization enzyme using radiation grafting and condensation covalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jin; Su Zongxian; Gao Jianfeng

    1989-01-01

    The immobilization of gluecose oxidase (GOD) on polyethylene and F 46 is described by radiation grafting and condensation covalent. The GOD on polyethylene film is characterized with IR-spectrum. The results show that the enzyme activity on F 46 film is high when dose rate and covalent yield are low. When covalent yield is 4.3% the enzyme relative activity achieves the greatest value for F 46 film. The experiment also demonstrates that acrylic acid affects the relative activity of enzyme and the method of IR-pectrum character is convenient and efficient for GOD on polyethylene film

  11. Crystal structures of barley thioredoxin h isoforms HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 reveal features involved in protein recognition and possibly in discriminating the isoform specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2008-01-01

    segment of one HvTrxh1 molecule is positioned along a shallow hydrophobic groove at the primary nucleophile Cys40 of another HvTrxh1 molecule. The association mode can serve as a model for the target protein recognition by Trx, as it brings the Met82 C gamma atom (gamma position as a disulfide sulfur......) of the bound loop segment in the proximity of the Cys40 thiol. The interaction involves three characteristic backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in an antiparallel beta-sheet-like arrangement, similar to the arrangement observed in the structure of an engineered, covalently bound complex between Trx...... and a substrate protein, as reported by Maeda et al. in an earlier paper. The occurrence of an intermolecular salt bridge between Glu80 of the bound loop segment and Arg101 near the hydrophobic groove suggests that charge complementarity plays a role in the specificity of Trx. In HvTrxh2, isoleucine corresponds...

  12. Desalting Protein Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry Using Supercharging Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassou, Catherine A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6–29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions. PMID:25133273

  13. Universal bounds on current fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  14. Surfaceome and Proteosurfaceome in Parietal Monoderm Bacteria: Focus on Protein Cell-Surface Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Desvaux

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cell envelope of parietal monoderm bacteria (archetypal Gram-positive bacteria is formed of a cytoplasmic membrane (CM and a cell wall (CW. While the CM is composed of phospholipids, the CW is composed at least of peptidoglycan (PG covalently linked to other biopolymers, such as teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and/or polyglutamate. Considering the CW is a porous structure with low selective permeability contrary to the CM, the bacterial cell surface hugs the molecular figure of the CW components as a well of the external side of the CM. While the surfaceome corresponds to the totality of the molecules found at the bacterial cell surface, the proteinaceous complement of the surfaceome is the proteosurfaceome. Once translocated across the CM, secreted proteins can either be released in the extracellular milieu or exposed at the cell surface by associating to the CM or the CW. Following the gene ontology (GO for cellular components, cell-surface proteins at the CM can either be integral (GO: 0031226, i.e., the integral membrane proteins, or anchored to the membrane (GO: 0046658, i.e., the lipoproteins. At the CW (GO: 0009275, cell-surface proteins can be covalently bound, i.e., the LPXTG-proteins, or bound through weak interactions to the PG or wall polysaccharides, i.e., the cell wall binding proteins. Besides monopolypeptides, some proteins can associate to each other to form supramolecular protein structures of high molecular weight, namely the S-layer, pili, flagella, and cellulosomes. After reviewing the cell envelope components and the different molecular mechanisms involved in protein attachment to the cell envelope, perspectives in investigating the proteosurfaceome in parietal monoderm bacteria are further discussed.

  15. A bound on chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldacena, Juan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States); Shenker, Stephen H. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford, Douglas [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-08-17

    We conjecture a sharp bound on the rate of growth of chaos in thermal quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Chaos can be diagnosed using an out-of-time-order correlation function closely related to the commutator of operators separated in time. We conjecture that the influence of chaos on this correlator can develop no faster than exponentially, with Lyapunov exponent λ{sub L}≤2πk{sub B}T/ℏ. We give a precise mathematical argument, based on plausible physical assumptions, establishing this conjecture.

  16. Predominantly ligand guided non-covalently linked assemblies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JUBARAJ B BARUAH

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... Abstract. Various non-covalently linked inorganic self-assemblies formed by the supramolecular interacting .... metal-organic frameworks.59 Inorganic chemists rou- ...... two-dimensional organic–inorganic layered perovskite.

  17. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Sciences and Technology Division and Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research (AcSIR), ... workers proposed the electrostatic-covalent model of hydrogen bonding. ..... tain degree of electron donation and acceptance occurs.

  18. Hydrogels Based on Dynamic Covalent and Non Covalent Bonds: A Chemistry Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Picchioni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels based on reversible covalent bonds represent an attractive topic for research at both academic and industrial level. While the concept of reversible covalent bonds dates back a few decades, novel developments continue to appear in the general research area of gels and especially hydrogels. The reversible character of the bonds, when translated at the general level of the polymeric network, allows reversible interaction with substrates as well as responsiveness to variety of external stimuli (e.g., self-healing. These represent crucial characteristics in applications such as drug delivery and, more generally, in the biomedical world. Furthermore, the several possible choices that can be made in terms of reversible interactions generate an almost endless number of possibilities in terms of final product structure and properties. In the present work, we aim at reviewing the latest developments in this field (i.e., the last five years by focusing on the chemistry of the systems at hand. As such, this should allow molecular designers to develop a toolbox for the synthesis of new systems with tailored properties for a given application.

  19. Autoradiographic evidence of 2-methylindole covalent binding to pulmonary epithelial cells in the goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.M.; Breeze, R.G.; Carlson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    3-Methylindole (3MI), the main ruminal fermentation product of L-tryptophan, causes acute pulmonary edema and interstitial emphysema in ruminants. Intravenous infusion of 3MI in goats causes necrosis and sloughing of pneumocytes and bronchial epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that a reactive metabolite or metabolites of 3MI bind covalently to tissue macromolecules in the lung and this binding is associated with the pneumotoxicity of 3MI. We undertook this autoradiographic study of 3MI covalent binding to test the hypothesis that reactive 3MI metabolite(s) bind to the lung cells susceptible to 3MI-induced injury. We infused goats with ( 3 H)3MI and killed them either 0.5, 2 or 6 h after start of the infusion. Sections of fixed lung were extensively washed, alcohol dehydrated and embedded in plastic. Only covalently bound radioactivity remained. Silver grains were quantitated per area in the developed autoradiographs. There was a 2:1 ratio of binding to the small airway epithelium compared to the interalveolar septa in all the goats. Both ciliated and non-ciliated bronchiolar cells were labelled, as were both types I and II pneumocytes. Normal goat lung slices incubated in vitro with ( 3 H)3MI were labeled in the same pattern. Inclusion of either of the inhibitors of cytochrome P-450, SKF-525-A or piperonyl butoxide significantly reduced this binding to both the pneumocytes and the bronchiolar cells. We consider these results supportive of our hypothesis that 3MI is metabolized to reactive intermediates by the epithelial cells of the lung, where they bind to macromolecules, which may cause cellular damage. (author)

  20. Conformational Dynamics of the Receptor Protein Galactose/Glucose Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Troy; Talaga, David

    2006-03-01

    We have performed time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) anisotropy and Stokes Shift measurements on bulk solutions of galactose/glucose binding protein. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to provide a single cysteine amino acid near the sugar-binding center of the protein (glutamine 26 to cysteine -- Q26C). The cysteine was covalently labeled with the environmentally-sensitive fluorophore acrylodan, and a long-lived ruthenium complex was covalently attached to the N-terminus to provide a fluorescent reference. The TCSPC data were analyzed using global convolute-and-compare fitting routines over the entire glucose titration and temperature range to provide minimal reduced chi-squared values and the highest time resolution possible. Using a standard ligand-binding model, the resulting distributions show that the closed (ligand-bound) conformation exists even at zero glucose concentration. At 20^oC, the relative abundance of this conformation is as high as 40%. The temperature dependence of this conformational study will be discussed and related to the ligand-binding free energy surface.

  1. Non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 dictates its degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4. GTPCH1 protein degradation has been reported in animal models of several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GTPCH1 is degraded remain uncharacterized. Here we report a novel non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTPCH1 in vitro and in vivo. The non-covalent binding of GTPCH1 to polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD results in ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin in cultured cells accelerated GTPCH1 degradation. In cultured cells and in vitro assays, Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains, but not Lys63-linked chains, interacted with GTPCH1 and targeted it for degradation. Consistently, proteasome inhibition attenuated GTPCH1 degradation. Finally, direct mutagenesis of an isoleucine (Ile131 in the hydrophobic patch of the GTPCH1 UBD affected its ubiquitin binding and the enzyme stability. Taken together, we conclude that GTPCH1 non-covalently interacts with polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain. The polyubiquitin binding directs GTPCH1 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation.

  2. Elevated free nitrotyrosine levels, but not protein-bound nitrotyrosine or hydroxyl radicals, throughout amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like disease implicate tyrosine nitration as an aberrant in vivo property of one familial ALS-linked superoxide dismutase 1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, L I; Beal, M F; Becher, M W; Schulz, J B; Wong, P C; Price, D L; Cleveland, D W

    1997-07-08

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; EC 1.15.1.1) are responsible for a proportion of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through acquisition of an as-yet-unidentified toxic property or properties. Two proposed possibilities are that toxicity may arise from imperfectly folded mutant SOD1 catalyzing the nitration of tyrosines [Beckman, J. S., Carson, M., Smith, C. D. & Koppenol, W. H. (1993) Nature (London) 364, 584] through use of peroxynitrite or from peroxidation arising from elevated production of hydroxyl radicals through use of hydrogen peroxide as a substrate [Wiedau-Pazos, M., Goto, J. J., Rabizadeh, S., Gralla, E. D., Roe, J. A., Valentine, J. S. & Bredesen, D. E. (1996) Science 271, 515-518]. To test these possibilities, levels of nitrotyrosine and markers for hydroxyl radical formation were measured in two lines of transgenic mice that develop progressive motor neuron disease from expressing human familial ALS-linked SOD1 mutation G37R. Relative to normal mice or mice expressing high levels of wild-type human SOD1, 3-nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by 2- to 3-fold in spinal cords coincident with the earliest pathological abnormalities and remained elevated in spinal cord throughout progression of disease. However, no increases in protein-bound nitrotyrosine were found during any stage of SOD1-mutant-mediated disease in mice or at end stage of sporadic or SOD1-mediated familial human ALS. When salicylate trapping of hydroxyl radicals and measurement of levels of malondialdehyde were used, there was no evidence throughout disease progression in mice for enhanced production of hydroxyl radicals or lipid peroxidation, respectively. The presence of elevated nitrotyrosine levels beginning at the earliest stages of cellular pathology and continuing throughout progression of disease demonstrates that tyrosine nitration is one in vivo aberrant property of this ALS-linked SOD1 mutant.

  3. Covalent Immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase on Aldehyde-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chun Chi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the synthesis and use of surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for the covalent immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (BlGGT. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by an alkaline solution of divalent and trivalent iron ions, and they were subsequently treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APES to obtain the aminosilane-coated nanoparticles. The functional group on the particle surface and the amino group of BlGGT was then cross-linked using glutaraldehyde as the coupling reagent. The loading capacity of the prepared nanoparticles for BlGGT was 34.2 mg/g support, corresponding to 52.4% recovery of the initial activity. Monographs of transmission electron microscopy revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles had a mean diameter of 15.1 ± 3.7 nm, and the covalent cross-linking of the enzyme did not significantly change their particle size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the immobilization of BlGGT on the magnetic nanoparticles. The chemical and kinetic behaviors of immobilized BlGGT are mostly consistent with those of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme could be recycled ten times with 36.2% retention of the initial activity and had a comparable stability respective to free enzyme during the storage period of 30 days. Collectively, the straightforward synthesis of aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles and the efficiency of enzyme immobilization offer wide perspectives for the practical use of surface-bound BlGGT.

  4. Covalent modification of calcium hydroxyapatite surface by grafting phenyl phosphonate moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissa, Abdallah; Debbabi, Mongi; Gruselle, Michel; Thouvenot, Rene; Gredin, Patrick; Traksmaa, Rainer; Tonsuaadu, Kaia

    2007-01-01

    The reaction between phenyl phosphonic dichloride (C 6 H 5 P(O)Cl 2 ) and synthetic calcium hydroxy- and fluorapatite has been investigated. The presence of mono- or polymeric (C 6 H 5 PO) fragment bound to hydroxyapatite was evidenced by IR, and solid-state 31 P NMR spectroscopy. X-ray powder analysis has shown that the apatitic structure remains unchanged during the reaction. In contrast, no reaction was found using fluorapatite. According to the results found for these two different apatites a mechanism was proposed for the formation of covalent P-O-P bonds as the result of a reaction between the C 6 H 5 P(O)Cl 2 organic reagent and (HPO 4 ) - and/or OH - ions of the hydroxyapatite. - Graphical abstract: Representation of the first step of the reaction between the phenyl phosphonic dichloride and the hydroxyl groups on the surface of the apatite, leading to covalent P-O-P bond with elimination of HCl

  5. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  6. DNA-DNA hybridization determined in micro-wells using covalent attachment of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Angen, Øystein; Mutters, R.

    2000-01-01

    The present study was aimed at reducing the time and labour used to perform DNA-DNA hybridizations for classification of bacteria at the species level. A micro-well-format DNA hybridization method was developed and validated. DNA extractions were performed by a small-scale method and DNA...... was sheared mechanically into fragments of between 400 and 700 bases. The hybridization conditions were calibrated according to DNA similarities obtained by the spectrophotometric method using strains within the family Pasteurellaceae, Optimal conditions were obtained with 300 ng DNA added per well and bound...... by covalent attachment to NucleoLink. Hybridization was performed with 500 ng DNA, 5% (w/w) of which was labelled with photo-activatable biotin (competitive hybridization) for 2.5 h at 65 degrees C in 2 x SSC followed by stringent washing with 2 x SSC at the same temperature. The criteria for acceptance...

  7. Relativistic bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, Burke

    2006-01-01

    The Hamiltonian for Dirac's second-order equation depends nonlinearly on the potential V and the energy E. For this reason the magnetic contribution to the Hamiltonian for s-waves, which has a short range, is attractive for a repulsive Coulomb potential (V>0) and repulsive for an attractive Coulomb potential (V 2 . Usually solutions are found in the regime E=mc 2 +ε , where except for high Z, ε 2 . Here it is shown that for V>0 the attractive magnetic term and the linear repulsive term combine to support a bound state near E=0.5mc 2 corresponding to a binding energy E b =-ε =0.5mc 2

  8. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.M.B. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia]|[Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal). Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of {sup 35}S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author).

  9. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.M.B.; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35 S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author)

  10. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme on ethylene vinyl alcohol films for nonmigrating antimicrobial packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel-Galet, V; Talbert, J N; Hernandez-Munoz, P; Gavara, R; Goddard, J M

    2013-07-10

    The objective of this study was to develop a new antimicrobial film, in which lysozyme was covalently attached onto two different ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH 29 and EVOH 44). The EVOH surface was modified with UV irradiation treatment to generate carboxylic acid groups, and lysozyme was covalently attached to the functionalized polymer surface. Surface characterization of control and modified films was performed using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and dye assay. The value of protein loading after attachment on the surface was 8.49 μg protein/cm(2) and 5.74 μg protein/cm(2) for EVOH 29 and EVOH 44, respectively, after 10 min UV irradiation and bioconjugation. The efficacy of the EVOH-lysozyme films was assessed using Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The antimicrobial activity of the films was tested against Listeria monocytogenes and was similar to an equivalent amount of free enzyme. The reduction was 1.08 log for EVOH 29-lysozyme, 0.95 log for EVOH 44-lysozyme, and 1.34 log for free lysozyme. This work confirmed the successful use of lysozyme immobilization on the EVOH surface for antimicrobial packaging.

  11. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  12. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Yalcin, Erdal; Schröder, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and longterm...

  13. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and long...

  14. Quivers of Bound Path Algebras and Bound Path Coalgebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Intan Muchtadi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available bras and coalgebras can be represented as quiver (directed graph, and from quiver we can construct algebras and coalgebras called path algebras and path coalgebras. In this paper we show that the quiver of a bound path coalgebra (resp. algebra is the dual quiver of its bound path algebra (resp. coalgebra.

  15. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FangFang; WANG Yi; WANG BingQiang; WANG YinFeng; MA Fang; Li ZhiRu

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer (TTF·~+-TTF·~+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π/π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π/π bonding has the bonding energy of about-21 kcal·mol~(-1) and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·~+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·~+ subunit,I.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  16. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer(TTF·+-TTF·+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π /π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π /π bonding has the bonding energy of about -21 kcal·mol-1 and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·+ subunit,i.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  17. Covalent modification and exfoliation of graphene oxide using ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, M. B.; Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Sundarayya, Y.; Govindaraju, T.

    2010-09-01

    Large scale preparation of single-layer graphene and graphene oxide is of great importance due to their potential applications. We report a simple room temperature method for the exfoliation of graphene oxide using covalent modification of graphene oxide with ferrocene to obtain single-layer graphene oxide sheets. The samples were characterized by FESEM, HRTEM, AFM, EDAX, FT-IR, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies. HRTEM micrograph of the covalently modified graphene oxide showed increased interlayer spacing of ~2.4 nm due to ferrocene intercalation. The presence of single-layer graphene oxide sheets were confirmed by AFM studies. The covalently modified ferrocene-graphene oxide composite showed interesting magnetic behavior.Large scale preparation of single-layer graphene and graphene oxide is of great importance due to their potential applications. We report a simple room temperature method for the exfoliation of graphene oxide using covalent modification of graphene oxide with ferrocene to obtain single-layer graphene oxide sheets. The samples were characterized by FESEM, HRTEM, AFM, EDAX, FT-IR, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies. HRTEM micrograph of the covalently modified graphene oxide showed increased interlayer spacing of ~2.4 nm due to ferrocene intercalation. The presence of single-layer graphene oxide sheets were confirmed by AFM studies. The covalently modified ferrocene-graphene oxide composite showed interesting magnetic behavior. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Magnetic data; AFM images; TEM micrographs; and Mössbauer spectroscopic data. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00024h

  18. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2015-07-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC50 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL-1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL-1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer-drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders.

  19. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC_5_0 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL"−"1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL"−"1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer–drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders. (paper)

  20. Structure and Calcium Binding Properties of a Neuronal Calcium-Myristoyl Switch Protein, Visinin-Like Protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congmin; Lim, Sunghyuk; Braunewell, Karl H; Ames, James B

    2016-01-01

    Visinin-like protein 3 (VILIP-3) belongs to a family of Ca2+-myristoyl switch proteins that regulate signal transduction in the brain and retina. Here we analyze Ca2+ binding, characterize Ca2+-induced conformational changes, and determine the NMR structure of myristoylated VILIP-3. Three Ca2+ bind cooperatively to VILIP-3 at EF2, EF3 and EF4 (KD = 0.52 μM and Hill slope of 1.8). NMR assignments, mutagenesis and structural analysis indicate that the covalently attached myristoyl group is solvent exposed in Ca2+-bound VILIP-3, whereas Ca2+-free VILIP-3 contains a sequestered myristoyl group that interacts with protein residues (E26, Y64, V68), which are distinct from myristate contacts seen in other Ca2+-myristoyl switch proteins. The myristoyl group in VILIP-3 forms an unusual L-shaped structure that places the C14 methyl group inside a shallow protein groove, in contrast to the much deeper myristoyl binding pockets observed for recoverin, NCS-1 and GCAP1. Thus, the myristoylated VILIP-3 protein structure determined in this study is quite different from those of other known myristoyl switch proteins (recoverin, NCS-1, and GCAP1). We propose that myristoylation serves to fine tune the three-dimensional structures of neuronal calcium sensor proteins as a means of generating functional diversity.

  1. Construction of covalently coupled, concatameric dimers of 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager, Marie; Scholl, D Jason; Kubale, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    -Ala repeats flanked by flexible spacers and positively charged residues to ensure correct inside-out orientation plus an extracellular HA-tag to construct covalently coupled dimers of 7TM receptors. Such 15 TM concatameric homo- and heterodimers of the beta(2)-adrenergic and the NK(1) receptors, which...... for either of the protomers, which was not observed upon simple coexpression of the two receptors. It is concluded that covalently joined 7TM receptor dimers with surprisingly normal receptor properties can be constructed with use of an artificial transmembrane connector, which perhaps can be used to fuse...

  2. Trapping and partial characterization of an adduct postulated to be the covalent catalytic ternary complex of thymidylate synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, F.; Moore, M.A.; Dunlap, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The proposed mechanism of action of thymidylate synthetase envisages the formation of a covalent ternary complex of the enzyme via the active site cysteine with dUMP and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH 2 H 4 folate). The authors recent success in using trichloroacetic acid to trap the covalent enzyme-FdUMP binary and ternary (enzyme-FdUMP-CH 2 H 4 folate) complexes led to the use of this technique in attempts to trap the transient covalent catalytic ternary complex. Experiments performed with [2-C 14 ]dUMP and 3 H-CH 2 H 4 folate show that both these ligands remained bound to the enzyme after trichloroacetic acid precipitation. The trapped covalent catalytic ternary complex was subjected to CNBr fragmentation, and the peptides were fractionated by HPLC. The isolated active-site peptide was shown to retain the two ligands and was subjected to a limited sequence analysis by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The inhibitory ternary complex formed with 14 C-FdUMP and 3 H-CH 2 4 folate served as a control. The active-site peptides isolated from the CNBr treated inhibitory ternary complex and the catalytic complex exhibited identical sequences for the first four N-terminal residues, Ala-Leu-Pro-Pro, and the fifth residue was found to be associated with the labeled ligands. Sequence analysis of the active site peptide derived from the carboxymethylated enzyme confirmed this sequence and the 5th residue was shown to be Cm-Cys

  3. Trapping and partial characterization of an adduct postulated to be the covalent catalytic ternary complex of thymidylate synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, F.; Moore, M.A.; Dunlap, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    The proposed mechanism of action of thymidylate synthetase envisages the formation of a covalent ternary complex of the enzyme via the active site cysteine with dUMP and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH/sub 2/H/sub 4/folate). The authors recent success in using trichloroacetic acid to trap the covalent enzyme-FdUMP binary and ternary (enzyme-FdUMP-CH/sub 2/H/sub 4/folate) complexes led to the use of this technique in attempts to trap the transient covalent catalytic ternary complex. Experiments performed with (2-C/sup 14/)dUMP and /sup 3/H-CH/sub 2/H/sub 4/folate show that both these ligands remained bound to the enzyme after trichloroacetic acid precipitation. The trapped covalent catalytic ternary complex was subjected to CNBr fragmentation, and the peptides were fractionated by HPLC. The isolated active-site peptide was shown to retain the two ligands and was subjected to a limited sequence analysis by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The inhibitory ternary complex formed with /sup 14/C-FdUMP and /sup 3/H-CH/sub 2/ /sub 4/folate served as a control. The active-site peptides isolated from the CNBr treated inhibitory ternary complex and the catalytic complex exhibited identical sequences for the first four N-terminal residues, Ala-Leu-Pro-Pro, and the fifth residue was found to be associated with the labeled ligands. Sequence analysis of the active site peptide derived from the carboxymethylated enzyme confirmed this sequence and the 5th residue was shown to be Cm-Cys.

  4. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  5. Product differentiation under bounded rationality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Poutré, La J.A.; Kok, de A.G.; Pyka, A.; Handa, H.; Ishibuchi, H.; Ong, Y.-S.; Tan, K.-C.

    2015-01-01

    We study product differentiation equilibria and dynamics on the Salop circle under bounded rationality. Due to bounded rationality, firms tend to agglomerate in pairs. Upon adding a second tier of component suppliers, downstream assemblers may escape pairwise horizontal agglomeration. Moreover, we

  6. Covalently linked multimers of gold nanoclusters Au102(p-MBA)44 and Au∼250(p-MBA)n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Tanja; Hulkko, Eero; Sokołowska, Karolina; Tero, Tiia-Riikka; Saarnio, Ville; Lindgren, Johan; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2016-11-10

    We present the synthesis, separation, and characterization of covalently-bound multimers of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (p-MBA) protected gold nanoclusters. The multimers were synthesized by performing a ligand-exchange reaction of a pre-characterized Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 nanocluster with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPDT). The reaction products were separated using gel electrophoresis yielding several distinct bands. The bands were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealing monomer, dimer, and trimer fractions of the nanocluster. TEM analysis of dimers in combination with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the nanoclusters are covalently bound via a disulfide bridge between BPDT molecules. The linking chemistry is not specific to Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 . The same approach yields multimers also for a larger monodisperse p-MBA-protected cluster of approximately 250 gold atoms, Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n . While the Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 is not plasmonic, the Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n nanocluster supports localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at 530 nm. Multimers of the Au ∼250 (p-MBA) n exhibit additional transitions in their UV-vis spectrum at 630 nm and 810 nm, indicating the presence of hybridized LSPR modes. Well-defined structures and relatively small sizes make these systems excellent candidates for connecting ab initio theoretical studies and experimental quantum plasmonics. Moreover, our work opens new possibilities in the controlled synthesis of advanced monodisperse nanocluster superstructures.

  7. Covalent docking of selected boron-based serine beta-lactamase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Novati, Beatrice; Colombo, Giorgio; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    AmpC β-lactamase is a hydrolytic enzyme conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, identification of non-β-lactam compounds able to inhibit the enzyme is crucial for the development of novel antibacterial therapies. In general, AmpC inhibitors have to engage the highly solvent-exposed catalytic site of the enzyme. Therefore, understanding the implications of ligand-protein induced-fit and water-mediated interactions behind the inhibitor-enzyme recognition process is fundamental for undertaking structure-based drug design process. Here, we focus on boronic acids, a promising class of beta-lactamase covalent inhibitors. First, we optimized a docking protocol able to reproduce the experimentally determined binding mode of AmpC inhibitors bearing a boronic group. This goal was pursued (1) performing rigid and flexible docking calculations aiming to establish the role of the side chain conformations; and (2) investigating the role of specific water molecules in shaping the enzyme active site and mediating ligand protein interactions. Our calculations showed that some water molecules, conserved in the majority of the considered X-ray structures, are needed to correctly predict the binding pose of known covalent AmpC inhibitors. On this basis, we formalized our findings in a docking and scoring protocol that could be useful for the structure-based design of new boronic acid AmpC inhibitors.

  8. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  9. Interactions between macromolecule-bound antioxidants and Trolox during liposome autoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Ecem Evrim; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Andersen, Mogens Larsen

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between free and macromolecule-bound antioxidants were investigated in order to evaluate their combined effects on the antioxidant environment. Dietary fiber (DF), protein and lipid-bound antioxidants, obtained from whole wheat, soybean and olive oil products, respectively and Tr...... of logistic function was successfully used for modelling the oxidation curve of liposomes. Principal component analysis revealed two separate phases of liposome autoxidation.......The interactions between free and macromolecule-bound antioxidants were investigated in order to evaluate their combined effects on the antioxidant environment. Dietary fiber (DF), protein and lipid-bound antioxidants, obtained from whole wheat, soybean and olive oil products, respectively...... of the simple addition effects of Trolox and bound antioxidants with measured values on lipid oxidation revealed synergetic interactions for DF and refined olive oil-bound antioxidants, and antagonistic interactions for protein and extra virgin olive oil-bound antioxidants with Trolox. A generalized version...

  10. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100 degree C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein

  11. A new look on protein-polyphenol complexation during honey storage: is this a random or organized event with the help of dirigent-like proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brudzynski

    Full Text Available Honey storage initiates melanoidin formation that involves a cascade of seemingly unguided redox reactions between amino acids/proteins, reducing sugars and polyphenols. In the process, high molecular weight protein-polyphenol complexes are formed, but the mechanism involved remains unknown. The objective of this study was twofold: to determine quantitative and qualitative changes in proteins in honeys stored for prolonged times and in different temperatures and to relate these changes to the formation of protein-polyphenol complexes. Six -month storage decreased the protein content by 46.7% in all tested honeys (t-test, p<0.002 with the rapid reduction occurring during the first three month. The changes in protein levels coincided with alterations in molecular size and net charge of proteins on SDS -PAGE. Electro-blotted proteins reacted with a quinone-specific nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT on nitrocellulose membranes indicating that quinones derived from oxidized polyphenols formed covalent bonds with proteins. Protein-polyphenol complexes isolated by size-exclusion chromatography differed in size and stoichiometry and fall into two categories: (a high molecular weight complexes (230-180 kDa enriched in proteins but possessing a limited reducing activity toward the NBT and (b lower molecular size complexes (110-85 kDa enriched in polyphenols but strongly reducing the dye. The variable stoichiometry suggest that the large, "protein-type" complexes were formed by protein cross-linking, while in the smaller, "polyphenol-type" complexes polyphenols were first polymerized prior to protein binding. Quinones preferentially bound a 31 kDa protein which, by the electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Qtof-MS analysis, showed homology to dirigent-like proteins known for assisting in radical coupling and polymerization of phenolic compounds. These findings provide a new look on protein-polyphenol interaction in honey where the

  12. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  13. Capillary electrophoresis of covalently functionalized single-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pingli; Meany, Brendan; Wang, Chunyan; Piao, Yanmei; Kwon, Hyejin; Deng, Shunliu; Wang, YuHuang

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the separation of chirality-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by degree of surface functionalization using high-performance CE. Controlled amounts of negatively charged and positively charged functional groups were attached to the sidewall of chirality-enriched SWCNTs through covalent functionalization using 4-carboxybenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate or 4-diazo-N,N-diethylaniline tetrafluoroborate, respectively. Surfactant- and pH-dependent studies confirmed that under conditions that minimized ionic screening effects, separation of these functionalized SWCNTs was strongly dependent on the surface charge density introduced through covalent surface chemistry. For both heterogeneous mixtures and single-chirality-enriched samples, covalently functionalized SWCNTs showed substantially increased peak width in electropherogram spectra compared to nonfunctionalized SWCNTs, which can be attributed to a distribution of surface charges along the functionalized nanotubes. Successful separation of functionalized single-chirality SWCNTs by functional density was confirmed with UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies of fraction collected samples. These results suggest a high degree of structural heterogeneity in covalently functionalized SWCNTs, even for chirality-enriched samples, and show the feasibility of applying CE for high-performance separation of nanomaterials based on differences in surface functional density. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. COVAL, Compound Probability Distribution for Function of Probability Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astolfi, M.; Elbaz, J.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Computation of the probability distribution of a function of variables, given the probability distribution of the variables themselves. 'COVAL' has been applied to reliability analysis of a structure subject to random loads. 2 - Method of solution: Numerical transformation of probability distributions

  15. Covalent Attachment of Bent-Core Mesogens to Silicon Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, L.; Achten, R.; Giesbers, M.; Smet, de L.; Arafat, A.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2009-01-01

    Two vinyl-terminated bent core-shaped liquid crystalline molecules that exhibit thermotropic antiferroelectric SmCPA phases have been covalently attached onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon(111) surface. The surface attachment was achieved via a mild procedure from a mesitylene solution, using

  16. Multi-step non-covalent pathways to supramolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous organization of building blocks into ordered structures governed by non-covalent interactions, or self-assembly, is a commonly encountered pathway in nature to obtain functional materials. These materials often consist of many different components ordered into intricate structures.

  17. Covalent Functionalization of Carbon Nanotube by Tetrasubtituted Amino Manganese Phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Long YANG; Hong Zheng CHEN; Lei CAO; Han Yin LI; Mang WANG

    2004-01-01

    The multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bonded to 2, 9, 16, 23-tetraamino manganese phthalocyanine (TAMnPc) was obtained by covalent functionalization, and its chemical structure was characterized by TEM. The photoconductivity of single-layered photoreceptors, where MWCNT bonded by TAMnPc (MWCNT-b-TAMnPc) served as the charge generation material (CGM), was also studied.

  18. Double Dynamic Supramolecular Polymers of Covalent Oligo-Dynamers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaeffer, Gaël; Buhler, Eric; Candau, Sauveur Jean; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Double-dynamic polymers, incorporating both molecular and supramolecular dynamic features (“double dynamers”) have been generated, where these functions are present in a nonstoichiometric ratio in the main chain of the polymer. It has been achieved by (1) the formation of covalent oligo-dynamers in

  19. Curvature bound from gravitational catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Holger; Martini, Riccardo

    2018-04-01

    We determine bounds on the curvature of local patches of spacetime from the requirement of intact long-range chiral symmetry. The bounds arise from a scale-dependent analysis of gravitational catalysis and its influence on the effective potential for the chiral order parameter, as induced by fermionic fluctuations on a curved spacetime with local hyperbolic properties. The bound is expressed in terms of the local curvature scalar measured in units of a gauge-invariant coarse-graining scale. We argue that any effective field theory of quantum gravity obeying this curvature bound is safe from chiral symmetry breaking through gravitational catalysis and thus compatible with the simultaneous existence of chiral fermions in the low-energy spectrum. With increasing number of dimensions, the curvature bound in terms of the hyperbolic scale parameter becomes stronger. Applying the curvature bound to the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions translates into bounds on the matter content of particle physics models.

  20. The rat IgGFcγBP and Muc2 C-terminal domains and TFF3 in two intestinal mucus layers bind together by covalent interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    Full Text Available The secreted proteins from goblet cells compose the intestinal mucus. The aims of this study were to determine how they exist in two intestinal mucus layers.The intestinal mucosa was fixed with Carnoy solution and immunostained. Mucus from the loose layer, the firm layer was gently suctioned or scraped, respectively, lysed in SDS sample buffer with or without DTT, then subjected to the western blotting of rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP or rMuc2. The non-reduced or reduced soluble mucus samples in RIPA buffer were co-immunoprecipitated to investigate their possible interactions. Polyclonal antibodies for rTFF3, the rIgGFcγBP C-terminal domain and the rMuc2 C-terminal domain confirmed their localization in the mucus layer and in the mucus collected from the rat intestinal loose layer or firm layer in both western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments. A complex of rTFF3, which was approximately 250 kDa, and a monomer of 6 kDa were present in both layers of the intestinal mucus; rIgGFcγBP was present in the complex (250-280 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but shifted to 164 kDa under reducing conditions in both of the layers. rMuc2 was found mainly in a complex of 214-270 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but it shifted to 140 kDa under reducing conditions. The co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that binding occurs among rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP and rMuc2 in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus. Blocking the covalent interaction by 100 mM DTT in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus disassociated their binding.Rat goblet cell-secreted TFF3, IgGFcγBP and Muc2, existing in the two intestinal mucus layers, are bound together by covalent interactions in the soluble fraction of intestinal mucus and form heteropolymers to be one of the biochemical mechanisms of composing the net-like structure of mucus.

  1. The effective fragment molecular orbital method for fragments connected by covalent bonds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Steinmann

    Full Text Available We extend the effective fragment molecular orbital method (EFMO into treating fragments connected by covalent bonds. The accuracy of EFMO is compared to FMO and conventional ab initio electronic structure methods for polypeptides including proteins. Errors in energy for RHF and MP2 are within 2 kcal/mol for neutral polypeptides and 6 kcal/mol for charged polypeptides similar to FMO but obtained two to five times faster. For proteins, the errors are also within a few kcal/mol of the FMO results. We developed both the RHF and MP2 gradient for EFMO. Compared to ab initio, the EFMO optimized structures had an RMSD of 0.40 and 0.44 Å for RHF and MP2, respectively.

  2. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  3. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...... and Rosenberg's theorem), are also hard for dynamic range searching in the group model. This theorem allows us to reuse decades of research on range reporting lower bounds to immediately obtain a range of new group model lower bounds. Amongst others, this includes an improved lower bound for the fundamental...

  4. A role for non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs in Pc2/CBX4 E3 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C Merrill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by the small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO is an essential process in mammalian cells. SUMO is covalently attached to lysines in target proteins via an enzymatic cascade which consists of E1 and E2, SUMO activating and conjugating enzymes. There is also a variable requirement for non-enzymatic E3 adapter like proteins, which can increase the efficiency and specificity of the sumoylation process. In addition to covalent attachment of SUMO to target proteins, specific non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs that are generally short hydrophobic peptide motifs have been identified.Intriguingly, consensus SIMs are present in most SUMO E3s, including the polycomb protein, Pc2/Cbx4. However, a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity remains to be shown. We show that Pc2 contains two functional SIMs, both of which contribute to full E3 activity in mammalian cells, and are also required for sumoylation of Pc2 itself. Pc2 forms distinct sub-nuclear foci, termed polycomb bodies, and can recruit partner proteins, such as the corepressor CtBP. We demonstrate that mutation of the SIMs in Pc2 prevents Pc2-dependent CtBP sumoylation, and decreases enrichment of SUMO1 and SUMO2 at polycomb foci. Furthermore, mutational analysis of both SUMO1 and SUMO2 reveals that the SIM-interacting residues of both SUMO isoforms are required for Pc2-mediated sumoylation and localization to polycomb foci.This work provides the first clear evidence for a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity.

  5. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions in the Intact Cell of Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633)

    OpenAIRE

    Winters, Michael S.; Day, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The salt bridge, paired group-specific reagent cyanogen (ethanedinitrile; C2N2) converts naturally occurring pairs of functional groups into covalently linked products. Cyanogen readily permeates cell walls and membranes. When the paired groups are shared between associated proteins, isolation of the covalently linked proteins allows their identity to be assigned. Examination of organisms of known genome sequence permits identification of the linked proteins by mass spectrometric techniques a...

  6. Exploring Covalent Allosteric Inhibition of Antigen 85C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Ebselen Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, Christopher M; Dajnowicz, Steven; Thanna, Sandeep; Sucheck, Steven J; Parks, Jerry M; Ronning, Donald R

    2017-05-12

    Previous studies identified ebselen as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, comprising three homologous enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the mycobacterial cell wall. In this study, the Mtb Ag85C enzyme was cocrystallized with azido and adamantyl ebselen derivatives, resulting in two crystallographic structures of 2.01 and 1.30 Å resolution, respectively. Both structures displayed the anticipated covalent modification of the solvent accessible, noncatalytic Cys209 residue forming a selenenylsulfide bond. Continuous difference density for both thiol modifiers allowed for the assessment of interactions that influence ebselen binding and inhibitor orientation that were unobserved in previous Ag85C ebselen structures. The k inact /K I values for ebselen, adamantyl ebselen, and azido ebselen support the importance of observed constructive chemical interactions with Arg239 for increased in vitro efficacy toward Ag85C. To better understand the in vitro kinetic properties of these ebselen derivatives, the energetics of specific protein-inhibitor interactions and relative reaction free energies were calculated for ebselen and both derivatives using density functional theory. These studies further support the different in vitro properties of ebselen and two select ebselen derivatives from our previously published ebselen library with respect to kinetics and protein-inhibitor interactions. In both structures, the α9 helix was displaced farther from the enzyme active site than the previous Ag85C ebselen structure, resulting in the restructuring of a connecting loop and imparting a conformational change to residues believed to play a role in substrate binding specific to Ag85C. These notable structural changes directly affect protein stability, reducing the overall melting temperature by up to 14.5 °C, resulting in the unfolding of protein at physiological temperatures. Additionally, this structural

  7. Bound states in string nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  8. On functions of bounded semivariation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2015), s. 233-276 ISSN 0147-1937 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : semivariation * functions of bounded variation * regulated functions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://projecteuclid.org/euclid.rae/1491271216

  9. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence of cationic dyes covalently bound to poly(methacrylic acid) in rigid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulo Moises de Oliveira, Hueder [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gehlen, Marcelo Henrique [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelog@iqsc.usp.br

    2006-12-15

    Atactic poly(methacrylic acid) labeled with acridine and Nile blue (NB) were studied by photophysical techniques in bulk solid state and in solution-cast films over different surfaces (glass, ITO, and polymethylmethacrylate). In the systems with both dyes, energy transfer from acridine to NB occurs with an efficiency depending on the type of substrate (solid or film). The films are more disordered fluorescent rigid media than the bulk chromophoric or bichromophoric polymers, and this effect is ascribed to inhomogeneous distribution of the dyes in the film. This effect enhances dye bimolecular interactions and increases the energy transfer rates between acridine donor and NB acceptor. Bimodal distributions of donor fluorescence lifetimes are observed.

  11. Binding matter with antimatter: the covalent positron bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charry, Jorge Alfonso; Varella, Marcio T Do N; Reyes, Andrés

    2018-05-16

    We report sufficient theoretical evidence of the energy stability of the e⁺H₂²⁻ molecule, formed by two H⁻ anions and one positron. Analysis of the electronic and positronic densities of the latter compound undoubtedly points out the formation of a positronic covalent bond between the otherwise repelling hydride anions. The lower limit for the bonding energy of the e⁺H₂²⁻ molecule is 74 kJ/mol (0.77 eV), accounting for the zero-point vibrational correction. The formation of a non electronic covalent bond is fundamentally distinct from positron attachment to stable molecules, as the latter process is characterized by a positron affinity, analogous to the electron affinity. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Two supramolecular complexes based on polyoxometalates and Co-EDTA units via covalent connection or non-covalent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Chunlin; Xiao, Hanxi [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Cai, Qing [Chemistry Department, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tang, Jianting; Cai, Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Deng, Qian, E-mail: dengqian10502@163.com [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Two new 3D network organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes ([Na{sub 6}(CoEDTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 13}]·(H{sub 2}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·xH{sub 2}O)n (1) and [CoH{sub 4}EDTA(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·15H{sub 2}O (2) (H{sub 4}EDTA=Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) have been successfully synthesized by solution method, and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single{sup −}crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both of the complexes are the supramolecules, but with different liking mode, they are two representative models of supramolecule. complex (1) is a 3D infinite network supramolecular coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through coordinate-covalent bonds. While complex (2) is normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions, such as H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. Both of complex (1) and (2) exhibit good catalytic activities for catalytic oxidation of methanol, when the initial concentration of methanol is 3.0 g m{sup −3}, flow rate is 10 mL min{sup −1}, and the quality of catalyst is 0.2 g, for complex (1) and complex (2) the maximum elimination rates of methanol are 85% (150 °C) and 92% (120 °C), respectively. - Graphical abstract: Two new organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes based on Co-EDTA, and Keggin polyanions have been successfully synthesized with different pH value by solution method. They are attributed to two representative models of supramolecule. Complex(1) is an infinite coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through covalent bonds. Complex (2) is a normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions of H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. - Highlights: • Two supramolecules

  13. Dislocations in materials with mixed covalent and metallic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Cawkwell, M.J.; Groeger, R.; Mrovec, M.; Porizek, R.; Pettifor, D.G.; Vitek, V.

    2005-01-01

    Environment-dependent bond-order potentials have been developed for L1 0 TiAl, bcc Mo and fcc Ir. They comprise both the angular character of bonding and the screening effect of nearly free electrons. These potentials have been employed in atomistic studies of screw dislocations that revealed the non-planar character of their cores. It is argued that both covalent as well as metallic character of bonding govern these structures, which in turn control the mechanical behaviour

  14. Preparation and characterization of two types of covalently immobilized amyloglucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN VUJCIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloglucosidase from A. niger was covalently immobilized onto poly (GMA-co-EGDMA by the glutaraldehyde and periodate method. The immobilization of amyloglucosidase after periodate oxidation gave a preparate with the highest specific activity reported so far on similar polymers. The obtained immobilized preparates show the same pH optimum, but a higher temperature optimum compared with the soluble enzyme. The kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of soluble starch by free and both immobilized enzymes were determined.

  15. Determination of total, and bound Se in sera by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spate, V.L.; Mason, M.M.; Reams, C.L.; Baskett, C.K.; Morris, J.S.; Mills, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison between the total selenium in serum ('total Se') with that which is apparently bound to high molecular weight (> 12.000 D) species, presumably proteins ('bound Se') was reported. Nine hundred seventy seven (977) serum samples arising out of a population-based epidemiological study were prepared in duplicate for the determination of 'total Se' by pipeting directly into irradiation vials; and separate duplicate aliquots were dialyzed against DI water for the determination of 'bound Se'. All samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis via 77m Se (17.4s) A small dialyzable Se component (∼ 6%) ('free Se'), defined as the difference between the 'total Se' minus the 'bound Se', was identified. (author) 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  16. Juvenile hormone-binding proteins of Melanoplus bivittatus identified by EFDA photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins that bind juvenile hormone in the hemolymph and fat body of the grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus were identified by photoaffinity labeling with radiolabeled epoxyfarnesyl diazoacetate ( 3 H-EFDA), and were characterized by electrophoretic analysis. A protocol was developed which allowed detection of 3 H-EFDA that was covalently linked to proteins upon exposure to ultraviolet light at 254 nm. Quantification of protein-linked 3 H-EFDA by liquid scintillation spectrometry took advantage of the differential solubility of unlinked 3 H-EFDA in toluene alone, and of the protein-linked 3 H-EFDA in toluene plus the detergent, Triton X-100. Competition between EFDA and juvenile hormone (JH) for binding to JH-specific binding sites was measured by hydroxyapatite protein binding assays in the presence of radiolabeled JH or EFDA and competing non-radiolabeled hormone. The protein-linked EFDA was detected on fluorograms of SDS or nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (PAGE), and by liquid scintillation spectrometry of membranes to which the proteins had been electrophoretically transferred. Proteins which specifically bound JH were identified by photolabeling proteins in the presence and absence of nonlabeled JH-III

  17. Evidence of significant covalent bonding in Au(CN)(2)(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiao-Peng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2009-11-18

    The Au(CN)(2)(-) ion is the most stable Au compound known for centuries, yet a detailed understanding of its chemical bonding is still lacking. Here we report direct experimental evidence of significant covalent bonding character in the Au-C bonds in Au(CN)(2)(-) using photoelectron spectroscopy and comparisons with its lighter congeners, Ag(CN)(2)(-) and Cu(CN)(2)(-). Vibrational progressions in the Au-C stretching mode were observed for all detachment transitions for Au(CN)(2)(-), in contrast to the atomic-like transitions for Cu(CN)(2)(-), revealing the Au-C covalent bonding character. In addition, rich electronic structural information was obtained for Au(CN)(2)(-) by employing 118 nm detachment photons. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations were carried out to understand the photoelectron spectra and obtain insight into the nature of the chemical bonding in the M(CN)(2)(-) complexes. Significant covalent character in the Au-C bonding due to the strong relativistic effects was revealed in Au(CN)(2)(-), consistent with its high stability.

  18. Solid-state mAbs and ADCs subjected to heat-stress stability conditions can be covalently modified with buffer and excipient molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliere-Douglass, John F; Lewis, Patsy; Salas-Solano, Oscar; Jiang, Shan

    2015-02-01

    We report that a unique type of chemical modification occurs on lyophilized proteins. Freeze-dried mAbs and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) can be covalently modified with buffer and excipient molecules on the side chains of Glu, Asp, Thr, and Ser amino acids when subjected to temperature stress. The reaction occurs primarily via condensation of common buffers and excipients such as histidine, tris, trehalose and sucrose, with Glu and Asp carboxylates in the primary sequence of proteins. The reaction was also found to proceed through condensation of carboxylate containing buffers such as citrate, with Thr and Ser hydroxyls in the primary sequence of proteins. Based on the mass of the covalent adducts observed on mAbs and ADCs, it is apparent that the reaction produces water as a product and is thus favored in a low moisture environments such as a lyophilized protein cake. Herein, we present the evidence for the covalent modification of proteins drawn from case studies of in-depth characterization of heat-stressed mAbs and ADCs in the solid state. We also demonstrate how common charge variant assays such as imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry can be used to monitor this specific class of protein modification. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Simulation bounds for system availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietjen, G.L.; Waller, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    System availability is a dominant factor in the practicality of nuclear power electrical generating plants. A proposed model for obtaining either lower bounds or interval estimates on availability uses observed data on ''n'' failure-to-repair cycles of the system to estimate the parameters in the time-to-failure and time-to-repair models. These estimates are then used in simulating failure/repair cycles of the system. The availability estimate is obtained for each of 5000 samples of ''n'' failure/repair cycles to form a distribution of estimates. Specific percentile points of those simulated distributions are selected as lower simulation bounds or simulation interval bounds for the system availability. The method is illustrated with operational data from two nuclear plants for which an exponential time-to-failure and a lognormal time-to-repair are assumed

  20. Relativistic bound state wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micu, L.

    2005-01-01

    A particular method of writing the bound state wave functions in relativistic form is applied to the solutions of the Dirac equation with confining potentials in order to obtain a relativistic description of a quark antiquark bound system representing a given meson. Concerning the role of the effective constituent in the present approach we first observe that without this additional constituent we couldn't expand the bound state wave function in terms of products of free states. Indeed, we notice that if the wave function depends on the relative coordinates only, all the expansion coefficients would be infinite. Secondly we remark that the effective constituent enabled us to give a Lorentz covariant meaning to the potential energy of the bound system which is now seen as the 4th component of a 4-momentum. On the other side, by relating the effective constituent to the quantum fluctuations of the background field which generate the binding, we provided a justification for the existence of some spatial degrees of freedom accompanying the interaction potential. These ones, which are quite unusual in quantum mechanics, in our model are the natural consequence of the the independence of the quarks and can be seen as the effect of the imperfect cancellation of the vector momenta during the quantum fluctuations. Related with all these we remark that the adequate representation for the relativistic description of a bound system is the momentum representation, because of the transparent and easy way of writing the conservation laws and the transformation properties of the wave functions. The only condition to be fulfilled is to find a suitable way to take into account the potential energy of the bound system. A particular feature of the present approach is that the confining forces are due to a kind of glue where both quarks are embedded. This recalls other bound state models where the wave function is factorized in terms of constituent wave functions and the confinement is

  1. Four-quark bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouzou, S.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of simple non-relativistic potential models, we examine the system consisting of two quarks and two antiquarks with equal or unequal masses. We search for possible bound states below the threshold for the spontaneous dissociation into two mesons. We solve the four body problem by empirical or systematic variational methods and we include the virtual meson-meson components of the wave function. With standard two-body potentials, there is no proliferation of multiquarks. With unequal quark masses, we obtain however exotic (anti Qanti Qqq) bound states with a baryonic antidiquark-quark-quark structure very analogous to the heavy flavoured (Q'qq) baryons. (orig.)

  2. Bound entanglement and local realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Zukowski, Marek; Gnacinski, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    We show using a numerical approach, which gives necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of local realism, that the bound entangled state presented in Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5385 (1999)] admits a local and realistic description. We also find the lowest possible amount of some appropriate entangled state that must be ad-mixed to the bound entangled state so that the resulting density operator has no local and realistic description and as such can be useful in quantum communication and quantum computation

  3. The treatment of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes with chloroquine leads to accumulation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX bound to particular parasite proteins and to the inhibition of the parasite's 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin O.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FPIX is a potentially toxic product of hemoglobin digestion by intra-erythrocytic malaria parasites. It is detoxified by biomineralization or through degradation by glutathione. Both processes are inhibited by the antimalarial drug chloroquine, leading to the accumulation of FPIX in the membranes of the infected cell and their consequent permeabilization. It is shown here that treatment of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes with chloroquine also leads to the binding of FPIX to a subset of parasite proteins. Parasite enzymes such as aldolase, pyrimidine nucleoside monophosphate kinase and pyrimidine 5'- nucleotidase were inhibited by FPIX in vitro, but only the activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was reduced significantly in cells after drug treatment. Additional proteins were extracted from parasite cytosol by their ability to bind FPIX. Sequencing of these proteins identified heat shock proteins 90 and 70, enolase, elongation factor 1-α, phoshoglycerate kinase, glyceraldehyde 3- phosphate dehydrogenase, L-lactate dehydrogenase and gametocytogenesis onset-specific protein. The possible involvement of these proteins in the antimalarial mode of action of chloroquine is discussed. It is concluded that drug-induced binding of FPIX to parasite glycolytic enzymes could underlie the demonstrable inhibition of glycolysis by chloroquine. The inhibition of 6- phosphogluconate dehydrogenase could explain the reduction of the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt by the drug. Inhibition of both processes is deleterious to parasite survival. Binding of FPIX to other proteins is probably inconsequential to the rapid killing of the parasite by chloroquine.

  4. Reconstitution of Qbeta RNA replicase from a covalently bonded elongation factor Tu-Ts complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Blumenthal, T

    1976-01-01

    of these polypeptides, protein synthesis elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-Ts, can be covalently crosslinked with dimethyl suberimidate to form a complex which lacks the ability to catalyze the known host functions catalyzed by the individual elongation factors. Using a previously developed reconstitution system we have...... examined the effects of crosslinking the EF-Tu-Ts complex on reconstituted replicase activity. Renaturation is significantly more efficient when exogenously added native EF-Tu-Ts is crosslinked than when it is not. Crosslinked EF-Tu-Ts can be purified from a crude crosslinked postribosomal supernatant...... by its ability to replace EF-Tu and EF-Ts in the renaturation of denatured Qbeta replicase. A sample of Qbeta replicase with crosslinked EF-Tu-Ts replacing the individual elongation factors was prepared. Although it lacked EF-Tu and EF-Ts activities, it could initiate transcription of both poly...

  5. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  6. Dimeric DNA Aptamer Complexes for High-capacity–targeted Drug Delivery Using pH-sensitive Covalent Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Boyacioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with doxorubicin (Dox results in serious systemic toxicities that limit effectiveness for cancer treatment and cause long-term health issues for cancer patients. We identified a new DNA aptamer to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA using fixed sequences to promote Dox binding and developed dimeric aptamer complexes (DACs for specific delivery of Dox to PSMA+ cancer cells. DACs are stable under physiological conditions and are internalized specifically into PSMA+ C4-2 cells with minimal uptake into PSMA-null PC3 cells. Cellular internalization of DAC was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Covalent modification of DAC with Dox (DAC-D resulted in a complex with stoichiometry ~4:1. Dox was covalently bound in DAC-D using a reversible linker that promotes covalent attachment of Dox to genomic DNA following cell internalization. Dox was released from the DAC-D under physiological conditions with a half-life of 8 hours, sufficient for in vivo targeting. DAC-D was used to selectively deliver Dox to C4-2 cells with endosomal release and nuclear localization of Dox. DAC-D was selectively cytotoxic to C4-2 cells with similar cytotoxicity as the molar equivalent of free-Dox. In contrast, DAC-D displayed minimal cytotoxicity to PC3 cells, demonstrating the complex displays a high degree of selectivity for PSMA+ cells. DAC-D displays specificity and stability features that may be useful for improved delivery of Dox selectively to malignant tissue in vivo.

  7. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokui Yu

    Full Text Available Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB, a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells.

  8. Covalent structure of the insect toxin of the North African scorpion Androctonus australis Hector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbon, H.; Kopeyan, C.; Rietschoten, J. van; Rochat, H.; Zlotkin, E.

    1982-01-01

    The complete covalent structure of the insect toxin purified from the venom of the North-African scorpion Androctonus australis Hector was described. Its amino acid sequence was established by phenylisothiocyanate degradation of several protein derivatives and proteolytic fragments in a liquid protein sequencer using either a ''protein'' or a ''peptide'' program. The position of the four disulfide bridges were deduced by analysis of proteolytic peptides before and after performic oxidation, and by partial labeling of the half cystine residues with [ 14 C]-iodoacetic acid and determining the specific radioactivities of the S-[ 14 C]-carboxymethylated phenylthiohydantoin cysteines. The sequences of the insect and mammal toxins from scorpions can be aligned with homology with the positions of seven half-cystine residues as registers. The mammal and insect toxins have three disulfide bridges at homologous positions. The fourth bridge is different in that Cys 12 in mammal toxin II is replaced by Cys 38 in the insect toxin. It is likely that the position of the disulfide bridges is the same for all scorpion neurotoxins active on mammals. We believe that the shift of one half-cystine residue in the insect toxin may induce a conformational change in the structure of the protein, which, in turn, may partially account for the total specificity of this toxin for insect nervous system. (author)

  9. Quantitative Measurement of GPCR Endocytosis via Pulse-Chase Covalent Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Kumagai

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play a critical role in many physiological systems and represent one of the largest families of signal-transducing receptors. The number of GPCRs at the cell surface regulates cellular responsiveness to their cognate ligands, and the number of GPCRs, in turn, is dynamically controlled by receptor endocytosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that GPCR endocytosis, in addition to affecting receptor desensitization and resensitization, contributes to acute G protein-mediated signaling. Thus, endocytic GPCR behavior has a significant impact on various aspects of physiology. In this study, we developed a novel GPCR internalization assay to facilitate characterization of endocytic GPCR behavior. We genetically engineered chimeric GPCRs by fusing HaloTag (a catalytically inactive derivative of a bacterial hydrolase to the N-terminal end of the receptor (HT-GPCR. HaloTag has the ability to form a stable covalent bond with synthetic HaloTag ligands that contain fluorophores or a high-affinity handle (such as biotin and the HaloTag reactive linker. We selectively labeled HT-GPCRs at the cell surface with a HaloTag PEG ligand, and this pulse-chase covalent labeling allowed us to directly monitor the relative number of internalized GPCRs after agonist stimulation. Because the endocytic activities of GPCR ligands are not necessarily correlated with their agonistic activities, applying this novel methodology to orphan GPCRs, or even to already characterized GPCRs, will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands that have been missed by conventional pharmacological assays.

  10. Specific labeling of the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin: determination of the amino acid composition of a labeled peptide fragment isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, M; Perret, V

    1987-08-01

    [125I] Thyroxine has been covalently bound to the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin by reaction with the bifunctional reagent, 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. An average of 0.47 mol of [125I] thyroxine was incorporated per mol protein; nonspecific binding amounted to 8%. A labeled peptide fragment was isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein by HPLC and its amino acid composition was determined. Comparison with the amino acid sequence of thyroxine-binding globulin indicated partial correspondence of the labeled peptide with two possible regions in the protein. These regions also coincide with part of the barrel structure present in the closely homologous protein, alpha 1-antitrypsin.

  11. Extractable Bacterial Surface Proteins in Probiotic–Host Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillipe L. R. do Carmo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Some Gram-positive bacteria, including probiotic ones, are covered with an external proteinaceous layer called a surface-layer. Described as a paracrystalline layer and formed by the self-assembly of a surface-layer-protein (Slp, this optional structure is peculiar. The surface layer per se is conserved and encountered in many prokaryotes. However, the sequence of the corresponding Slp protein is highly variable among bacterial species, or even among strains of the same species. Other proteins, including surface layer associated proteins (SLAPs, and other non-covalently surface-bound proteins may also be extracted with this surface structure. They can be involved a various functions. In probiotic Gram-positives, they were shown by different authors and experimental approaches to play a role in key interactions with the host. Depending on the species, and sometime on the strain, they can be involved in stress tolerance, in survival within the host digestive tract, in adhesion to host cells or mucus, or in the modulation of intestinal inflammation. Future trends include the valorization of their properties in the formation of nanoparticles, coating and encapsulation, and in the development of new vaccines.

  12. Contribution of granule bound starch synthase in kernel modification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of gbssI and gbssII genes, encoding granule bound starch synthase enzyme I and II, respectively, in quality protein maize (QPM) were studied at different days after pollination (DAP). Total RNA was used for first strand cDNA synthesis using the ImpromIISriptTM reverse transcriptase. No detectable levels of gbssI ...

  13. Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    Skórko, R; Osipiuk, J; Stetter, K O

    1989-01-01

    Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase has been isolated from a crude extract of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by isopycnic centrifugation in CsCl. Divalent cations (Mn2+ greater than Mg2+) stimulated the reaction. The enzyme does not require the presence of histones for its activity; it is inhibited strongly by phosphate and slightly by fluoride. The protein from the glycogen complex migrated in a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a 57-kilodalton protein band; after isoelectric focusing ...

  14. Semiclassical bounds in magnetic bottles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Kovařík, H.; Weidl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2016), s. 1650002 ISSN 0129-055X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : magnetic Laplacian * discrete spectrum * eigenvalue bounds Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2016

  15. Positivity bounds for Sivers functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Zhongbo; Soffer, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    We generalize a positivity constraint derived initially for parity-conserving processes to the parity-violating ones, and use it to derive non-trivial bounds on several Sivers functions, entering in the theoretical description of single spin asymmetry for various processes.

  16. Bound states of 'dressed' particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, M.I.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of bound states in relativistic quantum field theories is suggested. It uses the creation - destruction operators of 'dresses' particles which have been granted by Faddeev's (1963) 'dressing' formalism. Peculiarities of the proposed approach as compared to the known ones are discussed. 8 refs. (author)

  17. Quantum lower bound for sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yaoyun

    2000-01-01

    We prove that \\Omega(n log(n)) comparisons are necessary for any quantum algorithm that sorts n numbers with high success probability and uses only comparisons. If no error is allowed, at least 0.110nlog_2(n) - 0.067n + O(1) comparisons must be made. The previous known lower bound is \\Omega(n).

  18. Unconditional lower bounds against advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhrman, H.; Fortnow, L.; Santhanam, R.

    2009-01-01

    We show several unconditional lower bounds for exponential time classes against polynomial time classes with advice, including: (1) For any constant c, NEXP not in P^{NP[n^c]} (2) For any constant c, MAEXP not in MA/n^c (3) BPEXP not in BPP/n^{o(1)}. It was previously unknown even whether NEXP in

  19. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Scaled MP3 non-covalent interaction energies agree closely with accurate CCSD(T) benchmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Cerný, Jirí; Grimme, Stefan; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-12

    Scaled MP3 interaction energies calculated as a sum of MP2/CBS (complete basis set limit) interaction energies and scaled third-order energy contributions obtained in small or medium size basis sets agree very closely with the estimated CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies for the 22 H-bonded, dispersion-controlled and mixed non-covalent complexes from the S22 data set. Performance of this so-called MP2.5 (third-order scaling factor of 0.5) method has also been tested for 33 nucleic acid base pairs and two stacked conformers of porphine dimer. In all the test cases, performance of the MP2.5 method was shown to be superior to the scaled spin-component MP2 based methods, e.g. SCS-MP2, SCSN-MP2 and SCS(MI)-MP2. In particular, a very balanced treatment of hydrogen-bonded compared to stacked complexes is achieved with MP2.5. The main advantage of the approach is that it employs only a single empirical parameter and is thus biased by two rigorously defined, asymptotically correct ab-initio methods, MP2 and MP3. The method is proposed as an accurate but computationally feasible alternative to CCSD(T) for the computation of the properties of various kinds of non-covalently bound systems.