WorldWideScience

Sample records for coupling limit analytical

  1. Analytical solution for a coaxial plasma gun: Weak coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, D.

    1987-01-01

    The analytical solution of the system of coupled ODE's which describes the time evolution of an ideal (i.e., zero resistance) coaxial plasma gun operating in the snowplow mode is obtained in the weak coupling limit, i.e, when the gun is fully influenced by the driving (RLC) circuit in which it resides but the circuit is negligibly influenced by the gun. Criteria for the validity of this limit are derived and numerical examples are presented. Although others have obtained approximate, asymptotic and numerical solutions of the equations, the present analytical results seem not to have appeared previously in the literature

  2. Renormalization group functions of the φ4 theory in the strong coupling limit: Analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslov, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous attempts of reconstructing the Gell-Mann-Low function β(g) of the φ 4 theory by summing perturbation series give the asymptotic behavior β(g) = β ∞ g in the limit g → ∞, where α = 1 for the space dimensions d = 2, 3, 4. It can be hypothesized that the asymptotic behavior is β(g) ∼ g for all d values. The consideration of the zero-dimensional case supports this hypothesis and reveals the mechanism of its appearance: it is associated with vanishing of one of the functional integrals. The generalization of the analysis confirms the asymptotic behavior β(g) ∼ g in the general d-dimensional case. The asymptotic behaviors of other renormalization group functions are constant. The connection with the zero-charge problem and triviality of the φ 4 theory is discussed

  3. An analytic Pade-motivated QCD coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, H. E.; Cvetic, G.

    2010-01-01

    We consider a modification of the Minimal Analytic (MA) coupling of Shirkov and Solovtsov. This modified MA (mMA) coupling reflects the desired analytic properties of the space-like observables. We show that an approximation by Dirac deltas of its discontinuity function ρ is equivalent to a Pade(rational) approximation of the mMA coupling that keeps its analytic structure. We propose a modification to mMA that, as preliminary results indicate, could be an improvement in the evaluation of low-energy observables compared with other analytic couplings.

  4. Learning Analytics: Challenges and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Watson, Cate; Thompson, Terrie Lynn; Drew, Valerie; Doyle, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Learning analytic implementations are increasingly being included in learning management systems in higher education. We lay out some concerns with the way learning analytics--both data and algorithms--are often presented within an unproblematized Big Data discourse. We describe some potential problems with the often implicit assumptions about…

  5. Analytical solutions in the two-cavity coupling problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayzatsky, N.I.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical solutions of precise equations that describe the rf-coupling of two cavities through a co-axial cylindrical hole are given for various limited cases.For their derivation we have used the method of solution of an infinite set of linear algebraic equations,based on its transformation into dual integral equations

  6. Analytical model of internally coupled ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Leo van Hemmen, J

    2010-01-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude...... additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example...

  7. Detection of nanoplastics in food by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering: possibilities, challenges and analytical limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia, Manuel; Löschner, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    We tested the suitability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for detection of nanoplastics in fish. A homogenized fish sample was spiked with 100 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) (1.3 mg/g fish). Two sample preparation strategies...... were tested: acid digestion and enzymatic digestion with proteinase K. Both procedures were found suitable for degradation of the organic matrix. However, acid digestion resulted in large PSNPs aggregates/agglomerates (> 1 μm). The presence of large particulates was not observed after enzymatic...

  8. Wilson loop OPE, analytic continuation and multi-Regge limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2014-05-01

    We explore a direct connection between the collinear limit and the multi-Regge limit for scattering amplitudes in the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. Starting with the collinear expansion for the six-gluon amplitude in the Euclidean kinematic region, we perform an analytic continuation term by term to the so-called Mandelstam region. We find that the result coincides with the collinear expansion of the analytically continued amplitude. We then take the multi-Regge limit, and conjecture that the final result precisely reproduces the one from the BFKL approach. Combining this procedure with the OPE for null polygonal Wilson loops, we explicitly compute the leading contribution in the ''collinear-Regge'' limit up to five loops. Our results agree with all the known results up to four loops. At five-loop, our results up to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic approximation (NNLLA) also reproduce the known results, and for the N 3 LLA and the N 4 LLA give non-trivial predictions. We further present an all-loop prediction for the imaginary part of the next-to-double-leading logarithmic approximation. Our procedure has a possibility of an interpolation from weak to strong coupling in the multi-Regge limit with the help of the OPE.

  9. Improving Conceptions in Analytical Chemistry: The Central Limit Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Margarita; Carrasquillo, Arnaldo, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the central limit theorem (CLT) and its relation to analytical chemistry. The pedagogic rational, which argues for teaching the CLT in the analytical chemistry classroom, is discussed. Some analytical chemistry concepts that could be improved through an understanding of the CLT are also described. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. New analytic solutions of stochastic coupled KdV equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Chaoqing; Chen Junlang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, firstly, we use the exp-function method to seek new exact solutions of the Riccati equation. Then, with the help of Hermit transformation, we employ the Riccati equation and its new exact solutions to find new analytic solutions of the stochastic coupled KdV equation in the white noise environment. As some special examples, some analytic solutions can degenerate into these solutions reported in open literatures.

  11. Design Evaluation of Wind Turbine Spline Couplings Using an Analytical Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Wallen, R.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.; Lambert, S.

    2015-02-01

    Articulated splines are commonly used in the planetary stage of wind turbine gearboxes for transmitting the driving torque and improving load sharing. Direct measurement of spline loads and performance is extremely challenging because of limited accessibility. This paper presents an analytical model for the analysis of articulated spline coupling designs. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, this analytical model quickly yields insights into relationships between the spline design parameters and resulting loads; bending, contact, and shear stresses; and safety factors considering various heat treatment methods. Comparisons of this analytical model against previously published computational approaches are also presented.

  12. Validation of Analytical Damping Ratio by Fatigue Stress Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Faruq Muhammad; Chung Ket, Thein; Beng Lee, Ooi; Aziz, Abdul Rashid Abdul

    2018-03-01

    The optimisation process of a vibration energy harvester is usually restricted to experimental approaches due to the lack of an analytical equation to describe the damping of a system. This study derives an analytical equation, which describes the first mode damping ratio of a clamp-free cantilever beam under harmonic base excitation by combining the transverse equation of motion of the beam with the damping-stress equation. This equation, as opposed to other common damping determination methods, is independent of experimental inputs or finite element simulations and can be solved using a simple iterative convergence method. The derived equation was determined to be correct for cases when the maximum bending stress in the beam is below the fatigue limit stress of the beam. However, an increasing trend in the error between the experiment and the analytical results were observed at high stress levels. Hence, the fatigue limit stress was used as a parameter to define the validity of the analytical equation.

  13. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-04-06

    Social learning-by observing and copying others-is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an 'unreflective copying bias', which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers' reasoning-even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning.

  14. Analytical Evaluation of the Nonlinear Vibration of Coupled Oscillator Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, M.; Shahidi, M.; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    approximations to the achieved nonlinear differential oscillation equations where the displacement of the two-mass system can be obtained directly from the linear second-order differential equation using the first order of the current approach. Compared with exact solutions, just one iteration leads us to high......We consider periodic solutions for nonlinear free vibration of conservative, coupled mass-spring systems with linear and nonlinear stiffnesses. Two practical cases of these systems are explained and introduced. An analytical technique called energy balance method (EBM) was applied to calculate...

  15. Analytical solution to the coupled evolution of multidimensional NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial time savings in the collection of multidimensional NMR data can be achieved by coupling the evolution of nuclei in the indirect dimensions. In order to save time, the sampling of the indirect dimensions is inherently incomplete. Therefore, many algorithms and samplings schemes have been developed aimed at separating the coevolved frequencies into analyzable data with limited artifacts. This paper extends the use of circulant matrices to describe coupled evolution with convolutions. By understanding the data in terms of convolutions, there is an exact solution to the inversion problem of extracting the orthogonal vectors from the coupled dimensions. Previously, this inversion problem has been solved using peak coordinates extracted from spectra. In contrast, the method described here uses spectra directly. This solution suggests a simple sampling scheme of collecting N orthogonal spectra, and N + 1 projections at specific projection angles, however, the theory developed can be extended generally to arbitrary projection angles. The circulant matrix methodology is demonstrated for simulated and real data. Further, an algorithm for separating overlapped signals in the detected dimension is presented. The algorithm involves the forward calculation of the coupled spectra from the orthogonal spectra, followed by back calculation of the orthogonal spectra from the coupled spectra, thus permitting rigorous cross-validation. This algorithm is shown to be robust in that erroneous solutions give rise to large artifacts

  16. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in finite arrays of globally coupled Stratonovich models: strong coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senf, Fabian; Altrock, Philipp M; Behn, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    A finite array of N globally coupled Stratonovich models exhibits a continuous nonequilibrium phase transition. In the limit of strong coupling, there is a clear separation of timescales of centre of mass and relative coordinates. The latter relax very fast to zero and the array behaves as a single entity described by the centre of mass coordinate. We compute analytically the stationary probability distribution and the moments of the centre of mass coordinate. The scaling behaviour of the moments near the critical value of the control parameter a c (N) is determined. We identify a crossover from linear to square root scaling with increasing distance from a c . The crossover point approaches a c in the limit N→∞ which reproduces previous results for infinite arrays. Our results are obtained in both the Fokker-Planck and the Langevin approach and are corroborated by numerical simulations. For a general class of models we show that the transition manifold in the parameter space depends on N and is determined by the scaling behaviour near a fixed point of the stochastic flow.

  17. Assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was conducted for selected analytes of importance in water quality applications and hydrologic research. A multielement calibration curve technique was designed to produce accurate and precise results in analysis times of approximately one minute. The suite of elements included Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn. The effects of sample matrix composition on the accuracy of the determinations showed that matrix elements (such as Na, Ca, Mg, and K) that may be present in natural water samples at concentration levels greater than 50 mg/L resulted in as much as a 10% suppression in ion current for analyte elements. Operational detection limits are presented.

  18. Damped driven coupled oscillators: entanglement, decoherence and the classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancilla, R D Guerrero; Rey-Gonzalez, R R; Fonseca-Romero, K M [Grupo de Optica e Informacion Cuantica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)], E-mail: rdguerrerom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: rrreyg@unal.edu.co, E-mail: kmfonsecar@unal.edu.co

    2009-03-13

    We investigate the quantum-classical border, the entanglement and decoherence of an analytically solvable model, comprising a first subsystem (a harmonic oscillator) coupled to a driven and damped second subsystem (another harmonic oscillator). We choose initial states whose dynamics is confined to a couple of two-level systems, and show that the maximum value of entanglement between the two subsystems, as measured by concurrence, depends on the dissipation rate to the coupling-constant ratio and the initial state. While in a related model the entropy of the first subsystem (a two-level system) never grows appreciably (for large dissipation rates), in our model it reaches a maximum before decreasing. Although both models predict small values of entanglement and dissipation, for fixed times of the order of the inverse of the coupling constant and large dissipation rates, these quantities decrease faster, as a function of the ratio of the dissipation rate to the coupling constant, in our model.

  19. Damped driven coupled oscillators: entanglement, decoherence and the classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancilla, R D Guerrero; Rey-Gonzalez, R R; Fonseca-Romero, K M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the quantum-classical border, the entanglement and decoherence of an analytically solvable model, comprising a first subsystem (a harmonic oscillator) coupled to a driven and damped second subsystem (another harmonic oscillator). We choose initial states whose dynamics is confined to a couple of two-level systems, and show that the maximum value of entanglement between the two subsystems, as measured by concurrence, depends on the dissipation rate to the coupling-constant ratio and the initial state. While in a related model the entropy of the first subsystem (a two-level system) never grows appreciably (for large dissipation rates), in our model it reaches a maximum before decreasing. Although both models predict small values of entanglement and dissipation, for fixed times of the order of the inverse of the coupling constant and large dissipation rates, these quantities decrease faster, as a function of the ratio of the dissipation rate to the coupling constant, in our model

  20. Analytic Models of Brown Dwarfs and the Substellar Mass Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Auddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the analytic theory of brown dwarf evolution and the lower mass limit of the hydrogen burning main-sequence stars and introduce some modifications to the existing models. We give an exact expression for the pressure of an ideal nonrelativistic Fermi gas at a finite temperature, therefore allowing for nonzero values of the degeneracy parameter. We review the derivation of surface luminosity using an entropy matching condition and the first-order phase transition between the molecular hydrogen in the outer envelope and the partially ionized hydrogen in the inner region. We also discuss the results of modern simulations of the plasma phase transition, which illustrate the uncertainties in determining its critical temperature. Based on the existing models and with some simple modification, we find the maximum mass for a brown dwarf to be in the range 0.064M⊙–0.087M⊙. An analytic formula for the luminosity evolution allows us to estimate the time period of the nonsteady state (i.e., non-main-sequence nuclear burning for substellar objects. We also calculate the evolution of very low mass stars. We estimate that ≃11% of stars take longer than 107 yr to reach the main sequence, and ≃5% of stars take longer than 108 yr.

  1. Analytical solutions of coupled-mode equations for microring ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equivalent to waveguide and single microring coupled system. The 3 × 3 coupled system is equivalent to waveguide and double microring coupled system. In this paper, we adopt a novel approach for obtaining coupled-mode equations for linearly distributed and circularly distributed multiwaveguide systems with different ...

  2. Analytical solutions for coupling fractional partial differential equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Li; Nieto, Juan J.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the analytical solutions of coupling fractional partial differential equations (FPDEs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on a finite domain. Firstly, the method of successive approximations is used to obtain the analytical solutions of coupling multi-term time fractional ordinary differential equations. Then, the technique of spectral representation of the fractional Laplacian operator is used to convert the coupling FPDEs to the coupling multi-term time fractional ordinary differential equations. By applying the obtained analytical solutions to the resulting multi-term time fractional ordinary differential equations, the desired analytical solutions of the coupling FPDEs are given. Our results are applied to derive the analytical solutions of some special cases to demonstrate their applicability.

  3. Transport zonation limits coupled nitrification-denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Adam John; Glud, R.N.; Cardenas, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    - and N-15-N-2 gas. The measured two-dimensional profiles correlate with computational model simulations, showing a deep pool of N-2 gas forming, and being advected to the surface below ripple peaks. Further isotope pairing calculations on these data indicate that coupled nitrification......-denitrification is severely limited in permeable sediments because the flow and transport field limits interaction between oxic and anoxic pore water. The approach allowed for new detailed insight into subsurface denitrification zones in complex permeable sediments....

  4. Analytical scheme calculations of angular momentum coupling and recoupling coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveikis, A.; Kuznecovas, A.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the Scheme programming language opportunities to analytically calculate the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner 6j and 9j symbols, and general recoupling coefficients that are used in the quantum theory of angular momentum. The considered coefficients are calculated by a direct evaluation of the sum formulas. The calculation results for large values of quantum angular momenta were compared with analogous calculations with FORTRAN and Java programming languages.

  5. Analytical scheme calculations of angular momentum coupling and recoupling coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveikis, A.; Kuznecovas, A.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the Scheme programming language opportunities to analytically calculate the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner 6j and 9j symbols, and general recoupling coefficients that are used in the quantum theory of angular momentum. The considered coefficients are calculated by a direct evaluation of the sum formulas. The calculation results for large values of quantum angular momenta were compared with analogous calculations with FORTRAN and Java programming languages

  6. Causal vs. analytic constraints on anomalous quartic gauge couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    We derive one loop constraints on the anomalous quartic gauge couplings using a general non-forward dispersion relation for the elastic scattering amplitude of two longitudinally polarized vector bosons. We show that for exactly chiral theories more stringent bounds can be obtained by the assumption that the underlying theory satisfies the causality principle of Special Relativity

  7. Causal vs. Analytic constraints on anomalous quartic gauge couplings

    OpenAIRE

    Vecchi, Luca

    2007-01-01

    We derive one loop constraints on the anomalous quartic gauge couplings using a general non-forward dispersion relation for the elastic scattering amplitude of two longitudinally polarized vector bosons. We compare this result with another one derived by the assumption that the underlying theory satisfies the causality principle of Special Relativity and show that this latter is more constraining.

  8. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  9. Analytical solutions of weakly coupled map lattices using recurrence relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo Herrera, Dolores, E-mail: dsh@dfmf.uned.e [Applied Maths, EUITI, UPM, Ronda de Valencia, 3-28012 Madrid (Spain); San Martin, Jesus [Applied Maths, EUITI, UPM, Ronda de Valencia, 3-28012 Madrid (Spain); Dep. Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, UNED, Senda del Rey 9-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-20

    By using asymptotic methods recurrence relations are found that rule weakly CML evolution, with both global and diffusive coupling. The solutions obtained from these relations are very general because they do not hold restrictions about boundary conditions, initial conditions and number of oscilators in the CML. Furthermore, oscillators are ruled by an arbitraty C{sup 2} function.

  10. Analytical treatment of Coriolis coupling for three-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Bill

    2005-01-31

    In a previous article [J. Chem. Phys. 108 (1998) 5216], an efficient method was presented for performing 'exact' quantum calculations for the three-body rovibrational Hamiltonian, within the helicity-conserving approximation. This approach makes use of a certain three-body ''effective potential,'' enabling the same bend angle basis set to be employed for all values of the rotational quantum numbers, J, K and M. In the present work, the method is extended to incorporate Coriolis coupling, for which the relevant matrix elements are derived exactly. These can be used to solve the full three-body rovibrational problem, in the standard Jacobi coordinate vector embedding. Generalization of the method for coupled kinetic energy operators arising from other coordinate systems, embeddings, and/or system sizes, is also discussed.

  11. Scaling properties of the pairing problem in the strong coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, M.B.; Cenni, R.; Molinari, A.; Quaglia, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    We study the excited states of the pairing Hamiltonian providing an expansion for their energy in the strong coupling limit. To assess the role of the pairing interaction we apply the formalism to the case of a heavy atomic nucleus. We show that only a few statistical moments of the level distribution are sufficient to yield an accurate estimate of the energy for not too small values of the coupling G and we give the analytic expressions of the first four terms of the series. Further, we discuss the convergence radius G sing of the expansion showing that it strongly depends upon the details of the level distribution. Furthermore G sing is not related to the critical values of the coupling G crit , which characterize the physics of the pairing Hamiltonian, since it can exist even in the absence of these critical points. -- Highlights: •We study the excitation spectrum of the pairing Hamiltonian. •We provide an analytic expansion around the strong coupling limit. •We discuss the convergence radius of the expansion. •We connect the radius with the critical points of H

  12. Suppression and revival of oscillation in indirectly coupled limit cycle oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.R.; Kamal, N.K.; Verma, U.K.; Suresh, K.; Thamilmaran, K.; Shrimali, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations are studied in indirectly coupled nonlinear oscillators. • The decay parameter and a feedback factor play a crucial role in emergent dynamical behavior of oscillators. • The critical curves for different dynamical regions are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. • Electronic circuit experiments demonstrate these emergent dynamical states. - Abstract: We study the phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations in a system of limit cycle oscillators coupled indirectly via a dynamic local environment. The dynamics of the environment is assumed to decay exponentially with time. We show that for appropriate coupling strength, the decay parameter of the environment plays a crucial role in the emergent dynamics such as amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). We also show that introducing a feedback factor in the diffusion term revives the oscillations in this system. The critical curves for the regions of different emergent states as a function of coupling strength, decay parameter of the environment and feedback factor in the coupling are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. These results are found to be consistent with the numerics and are also observed experimentally.

  13. Limits on Tensor Coupling from Neutron $\\beta$-Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Pattie Jr, Robert W.; Hickerson, Kevin P.; Young, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    Limits on the tensor couplings generating a Fierz interference term, b, in mixed Gamow-Teller Fermi decays can be derived by combining data from measurements of angular correlation parameters in neutron decay, the neutron lifetime, and $G_{\\text{V}}=G_{\\text{F}} V_{ud}$ as extracted from measurements of the $\\mathcal{F}t$ values from the $0^{+} \\to 0^{+}$ superallowed decays dataset. These limits are derived by comparing the neutron $\\beta$-decay rate as predicted in the standard model with t...

  14. Analytical performance, reference values and decision limits. A need to differentiate between reference intervals and decision limits and to define analytical quality specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Jensen, Esther A; Brandslund, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    of the values of analytical components measured on reference samples from reference individuals. Decision limits are based on guidelines from national and international expert groups defining specific concentrations of certain components as limits for decision about diagnosis or well-defined specific actions....... Analytical quality specifications for reference intervals have been defined for bias since the 1990s, but in the recommendations specified in the clinical guidelines analytical quality specifications are only scarcely defined. The demands for negligible biases are, however, even more essential for decision...... limits, as the choice is no longer left to the clinician, but emerge directly from the concentration. Even a small bias will change the number of diseased individuals, so the demands for negligible biases are obvious. A view over the analytical quality as published gives a variable picture of bias...

  15. Analyticity of effective coupling and propagators in massless models of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehme, R.

    1982-01-01

    For massless models of quantum field theory, some general theorems are proved concerning the analytic continuation of the renormalization group functions as well as the effective coupling and the propagators. Starting points are analytic properties of the effective coupling and the propagators in the momentum variable k 2 , which can be converted into analyticity of β- and γ-functions in the coupling parameter lambda. It is shown that the β-function can have branch point singularities related to stationary points of the effective coupling as a function of k 2 . The type of these singularities of β(lambda) can be determined explicitly. Examples of possible physical interest are extremal values of the effective coupling at space-like points in the momentum variable, as well as complex conjugate stationary points close to the real k 2 -axis. The latter may be related to the sudden transition between weak and strong coupling regimes of the system. Finally, for the effective coupling and for the propagators, the analytic continuation in both variables k 2 and lambda is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Limit cycle analysis of nuclear coupled density wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of limit cycle behavior for the nuclear-coupled density wave oscillation (NCDWO) in a boiling water reactor (BWR) was performed. A simplified nonlinear model of BWR core behavior was developed using a two-region flow channel representation, coupled with a form of the point-kinetics equation. This model has been used to investigate the behavior of large amplitude NCDWO's through conventional time-integration solutions and through application of a direct relaxation-oscillation limit cycle solution in phase space. The numerical solutions demonstrate the potential for severe global power and flow oscillations in a BWR core at off-normal conditions, such as might occur during Anticipated Transients without Scram. Because of the many simplifying assumptions used, it is felt that the results should not be interpreted as an absolute prediction of core behavior, but as an indication of the potential for large oscillations and a demonstration of the corresponding limit cycle mechanisms. The oscillations in channel density drive the core power variations, and are reinforced by heat flux variations due to the changing fuel temperature. A global temperature increase occurs as energy is accumulated in the fuel, and limits the magnitude of the oscillations because as the average channel density decreases, the amplitude and duration of positive void reactivity at a given oscillation amplitude is lessened

  17. Non compact continuum limit of two coupled Potts models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernier, Éric; Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Saleur, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    We study two Q-state Potts models coupled by the product of their energy operators, in the regime 2  3 (2) vertex model. It corresponds to a selfdual system of two antiferromagnetic Potts models, coupled ferromagnetically. We derive the Bethe ansatz equations and study them numerically for two arbitrary twist angles. The continuum limit is shown to involve two compact bosons and one non compact boson, with discrete states emerging from the continuum at appropriate twists. The non compact boson entails strong logarithmic corrections to the finite-size behaviour of the scaling levels, an understanding of which allows us to correct an earlier proposal for some of the critical exponents. In particular, we infer the full set of magnetic scaling dimensions (watermelon operators) of the Potts model. (paper)

  18. Determining passive cooling limits in CPV using an analytical thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, Federico; Arenas, Osvaldo; Vossier, Alexis; Dollet, Alain; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We propose an original thermal analytical model aiming to predict the practical limits of passive cooling systems for high concentration photovoltaic modules. The analytical model is described and validated by comparison with a commercial 3D finite element model. The limiting performances of flat plate cooling systems in natural convection are then derived and discussed.

  19. Analytical and experimental study of two concentric cylinders coupled by a fluid gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Turula, P.; Chung, H.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1975-04-01

    A breeder reactor vessel is a substantial steel cylinder which is partially protected from the nuclear reaction temperature by a relatively thin concentric shell separated from the vessel by a narrow fluid-filled gap. An experimental and analytical study of the vibration of a model of such a shell used in the Fast Test Reactor is described. The analytical work consists first using a free vibration solution of the shell in vacuum as a basis for extrapolating vibration behavior for the same shell with a fluid gap. Then a direct finite element solution is found for the actual problem--the shell and the fluid coupling it to the rigid outer container. All the finite element computations were carried out using the NASTRAN program. The experimental setup consisted of a steel sheet rolled and welded into a cylinder, free at the top edge and at the bottom soldered to a disc which in turn was bolted to a heavy base plate. The fluid gap was provided by using a thick concrete shell as the outer cylinder. A series of these cylinders was used to provide several sizes of annular gap. The case of the steel shell alone, without fluid, was also considered. The steel cylinder was vibrated by an electromagnetic exciter using both harmonic loading and random loading functions. In general, correspondence of experimental and analytical results is within acceptable limits; however, several vibration modes corresponding to solutions with low circumferential wave numbers were not detected experimentally. Response analysis performed to compare the response amplitude at various modes indicates that the intensity at the modes in question is very low. (U.S.)

  20. A Horneyan analytic perspective on couple therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, N M

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes the study, diagnosis, and course of treatment of a marital couple incorporating Horney theory as a basis for understanding. The case illustrates how fundamental features of Horney theory--character structure, pride positions, attacks on the idealized image, alienated aspects of self, externalization and counter-externalization-can be illuminated in the expanded context of a specific other, the spouse, as background. In a marriage characterized by conflict, omnipresent struggles for authority, and malignantly destructive communication, the wife adopts a position of self-effacement externalizing expansiveness to her husband while the husband adopts an expansive-detached position externalizing both expansiveness and self-effacement to the wife. Externalizations from the wife include a form that has not been described in the psychoanalytic literature of the Horney school: indirect active externalization. As shown, the wife attributes an idealization of her husband to third parties. We observe, too, that the husband's reasonableness and the wife's emotional stridency have the effect of attacking the idealized image of the other. Defenses are mobilized in order to repair hurt pride reactions: for the husband, the wife's stridency is an assault on his sense of himself as a principled, virtous man. For the wife, the husband's reasonableness is experienced as an assault on her sense of herself as a caring wife and mother. In order to block their pride responses and attacks on each other's idealized image, which made conjoint sessions antagonistic and unproductive for a time, a "glass wall" technique was employed for some months that enabled each to speak to the other through me. I struggled against the temptation of siding with the husband's rationality and seeing the wife as secondary. I came to understand that the husband's reasonableness was oppressive for the wife. In order for the wife to feel understood empathically, I needed to fill the role of

  1. Analytical torque calculation and experimental verification of synchronous permanent magnet couplings with Halbach arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sung-Won; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Ho; Choi, Jang-Young

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents analytical torque calculation and experimental verification of synchronous permanent magnet couplings (SPMCs) with Halbach arrays. A Halbach array is composed of various numbers of segments per pole; we calculate and compare the magnetic torques for 2, 3, and 4 segments. Firstly, based on the magnetic vector potential, and using a 2D polar coordinate system, we obtain analytical solutions for the magnetic field. Next, through a series of processes, we perform magnetic torque calculations using the derived solutions and a Maxwell stress tensor. Finally, the analytical results are verified by comparison with the results of 2D and 3D finite element analysis and the results of an experiment.

  2. Coupled Analytical-Finite Element Methods for Linear Electromagnetic Actuator Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srairi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear electromagnetic actuator with moving parts is analyzed. The movement is considered through the modification of boundary conditions only using coupled analytical and finite element analysis. In order to evaluate the dynamic performance of the device, the coupling between electric, magnetic and mechanical phenomena is established. The displacement of the moving parts and the inductor current are determined when the device is supplied by capacitor discharge voltage.

  3. Sample diagnosis using indicator elements and non-analyte signals for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antler, Margaret; Ying Hai; Burns, David H.; Salin, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    A sample diagnosis procedure that uses both non-analyte and analyte signals to estimate matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry is presented. Non-analyte signals are those of background species in the plasma (e.g. N + , ArO + ), and changes in these signals can indicate changes in plasma conditions. Matrix effects of Al, Ba, Cs, K and Na on 19 non-analyte signals and 15 element signals were monitored. Multiple linear regression was used to build the prediction models, using a genetic algorithm for objective feature selection. Non-analyte elemental signals and non-analyte signals were compared for diagnosing matrix effects, and both were found to be suitable for estimating matrix effects. Individual analyte matrix effect estimation was compared with the overall matrix effect prediction, and models used to diagnose overall matrix effects were more accurate than individual analyte models. In previous work [Spectrochim. Acta Part B 57 (2002) 277], we tested models for analytical decision making. The current models were tested in the same way, and were able to successfully diagnose matrix effects with at least an 80% success rate

  4. Application of Statistical Methods to Activation Analytical Results near the Limit of Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Wanscher, B.

    1978-01-01

    Reporting actual numbers instead of upper limits for analytical results at or below the detection limit may produce reliable data when these numbers are subjected to appropriate statistical processing. Particularly in radiometric methods, such as activation analysis, where individual standard...... deviations of analytical results may be estimated, improved discrimination may be based on the Analysis of Precision. Actual experimental results from a study of the concentrations of arsenic in human skin demonstrate the power of this principle....

  5. Analytical estimations of limit cycle amplitude for delay-differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Molnár

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The amplitude of limit cycles arising from Hopf bifurcation is estimated for nonlinear delay-differential equations by means of analytical formulas. An improved analytical estimation is introduced, which allows more accurate quantitative prediction of periodic solutions than the standard approach that formulates the amplitude as a square-root function of the bifurcation parameter. The improved estimation is based on special global properties of the system: the method can be applied if the limit cycle blows up and disappears at a certain value of the bifurcation parameter. As an illustrative example, the improved analytical formula is applied to the problem of stick balancing.

  6. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  7. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Fielder, Richard; Blednykh, Alexei; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  8. Analytical and experimental study of two delay-coupled excitable units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weicker, Lionel; Erneux, Thomas; Keuninckx, Lars; Danckaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of time-periodic oscillations for a system of two identical delay-coupled excitable (nonoscillatory) units. We first analyze these solutions by using asymptotic methods. The oscillations are described as relaxation oscillations exhibiting successive slow and fast changes. The analysis highlights the determinant role of the delay during the fast transition layers. We then study experimentally a system of two coupled electronic circuits that is modeled mathematically by the same delay differential equations. We obtain quantitative agreements between analytical and experimental bifurcation diagrams.

  9. A fully analytic treatment of resonant inductive coupling in the far field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2012-02-01

    For the application of resonant inductive coupling for wireless power transfer, fabrication of flat spiral coils using ribbon wire allows for analytic expressions of the capacitance and inductance of the coils and therefore the resonant frequency. The expressions can also be used in an approximate way for the analysis of coils constructed from cylindrical wire. Ribbon wire constructed from both standard metals as well as high temperature superconducting material is commercially available, so using these derived expressions as a basis, a fully analytic treatment is presented that allows for design trades to be made for hybrid designs incorporating either technology. The model is then extended to analyze the performance of the technology as applied to inductively coupled communications, which has been demonstrated as having an advantage in circumstances where radiated signals would suffer unacceptable levels of attenuation.

  10. Analytical Model for Diffusive Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Coupled with Interfacial Cooling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan A H; Biggs, Simon R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2018-05-30

    Current analytical models for sessile droplet evaporation do not consider the nonuniform temperature field within the droplet and can overpredict the evaporation by 20%. This deviation can be attributed to a significant temperature drop due to the release of the latent heat of evaporation along the air-liquid interface. We report, for the first time, an analytical solution of the sessile droplet evaporation coupled with this interfacial cooling effect. The two-way coupling model of the quasi-steady thermal diffusion within the droplet and the quasi-steady diffusion-controlled droplet evaporation is conveniently solved in the toroidal coordinate system by applying the method of separation of variables. Our new analytical model for the coupled vapor concentration and temperature fields is in the closed form and is applicable for a full range of spherical-cap shape droplets of different contact angles and types of fluids. Our analytical results are uniquely quantified by a dimensionless evaporative cooling number E o whose magnitude is determined only by the thermophysical properties of the liquid and the atmosphere. Accordingly, the larger the magnitude of E o , the more significant the effect of the evaporative cooling, which results in stronger suppression on the evaporation rate. The classical isothermal model is recovered if the temperature gradient along the air-liquid interface is negligible ( E o = 0). For substrates with very high thermal conductivities (isothermal substrates), our analytical model predicts a reversal of temperature gradient along the droplet-free surface at a contact angle of 119°. Our findings pose interesting challenges but also guidance for experimental investigations.

  11. A fully analytic treatment of resonant inductive coupling in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    For the application of resonant inductive coupling for wireless power transfer, fabrication of flat spiral coils using ribbon wire allows for analytic expressions of the capacitance and inductance of the coils and therefore the resonant frequency. The expressions can also be used in an approximate way for the analysis of coils constructed from cylindrical wire. Ribbon wire constructed from both standard metals as well as high temperature superconducting material is commercially available, so using these derived expressions as a basis, a fully analytic treatment is presented that allows for design trades to be made for hybrid designs incorporating either technology. The model is then extended to analyze the performance of the technology as applied to inductively coupled communications, which has been demonstrated as having an advantage in circumstances where radiated signals would suffer unacceptable levels of attenuation. - Highlights: ► An analytic framework finds power and efficiency for resonant inductive coupling. ► The framework supports superconducting, resistive and dielectric elements. ► Maximum power transfer occurs at an efficiency of 50% when in close proximity. ► A 100 turn superconducting design achieves 10% efficiency out to 280 coil radii. ► The system response to narrow band amplitude modulation is modeled and presented.

  12. Coupling Numerical Methods and Analytical Models for Ducted Turbines to Evaluate Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Knight

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrokinetic turbines extract energy from currents in oceans, rivers, and streams. Ducts can be used to accelerate the flow across the turbine to improve performance. The objective of this work is to couple an analytical model with a Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS computational fluid dynamics (CFD solver to evaluate designs. An analytical model is derived for ducted turbines. A steady-state moving reference frame solver is used to analyze both the freestream and ducted turbine. A sliding mesh solver is examined for the freestream turbine. An efficient duct is introduced to accelerate the flow at the turbine. Since the turbine is optimized for operation in the freestream and not within the duct, there is a decrease in efficiency due to duct-turbine interaction. Despite the decrease in efficiency, the power extracted by the turbine is increased. The analytical model under-predicts the flow rejection from the duct that is predicted by CFD since the CFD predicts separation but the analytical model does not. Once the mass flow rate is corrected, the model can be used as a design tool to evaluate how the turbine-duct pair reduces mass flow efficiency. To better understand this phenomenon, the turbine is also analyzed within a tube with the analytical model and CFD. The analytical model shows that the duct’s mass flow efficiency reduces as a function of loading, showing that the system will be more efficient when lightly loaded. Using the conclusions of the analytical model, a more efficient ducted turbine system is designed. The turbine is pitched more heavily and the twist profile is adapted to the radial throat velocity profile.

  13. Analytical solutions of couple stress fluid flows with slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devakar M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, the exact solutions for fundamental flows namely Couette, Poiseuille and generalized Couette flows of an incompressible couple stress fluid between parallel plates are obtained using slip boundary conditions. The effect of various parameters on velocity for each problem is discussed. It is found that, for each of the problems, the solution in the limiting case as couple stresses approaches to zero is similar to that of classical viscous Newtonian fluid. The results indicate that, the presence of couple stresses decreases the velocity of the fluid.

  14. On modal cross-coupling in the asymptotic modal limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Dean; Dowell, Earl

    2018-03-01

    The conditions under which significant modal cross-coupling occurs in dynamical systems responding to high-frequency, broadband forcing that excites many modes is studied. The modal overlap factor plays a key role in the analysis of these systems as the modal density (the ratio of number of modes to the frequency bandwidth) becomes large. The modal overlap factor is effectively the ratio of the width of a resonant peak (the damping ratio times the resonant frequency) to the average frequency interval between resonant peaks (or rather, the inverse of the modal density). It is shown that this parameter largely determines whether substantial modal cross-coupling occurs in a given system's response. Here, two prototypical systems are considered. The first is a simple rectangular plate whose significant modal cross-coupling is the exception rather than the norm. The second is a pair of rectangular plates attached at a point where significant modal cross-coupling is more likely to occur. We show that, for certain cases of modal density and damping, non-negligible cross coupling occurs in both systems. Under similar circumstances, the constraint force between the two plates in the latter system becomes broadband. The implications of this for using Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) in multi-component systems are discussed.

  15. Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of free piston Stirling engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formosa, F., E-mail: fabien.formosa@univ-savoie.f [Laboratoire SYMME, Universite de Savoie, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy le Vieux Cedex (France)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The free piston Stirling behaviour relies on its thermal and dynamic features. {yields} A global semi-analytical model for preliminary design is developed. {yields} The model compared with NASA-RE1000 experimental data shows good correlations. -- Abstract: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both accurate thermodynamic and dynamic modelling to predict its performances. The steady state behaviour of the engine partly relies on non linear dissipative phenomena such as pressure drop loss within heat exchangers which is dependant on the temperature within the associated components. An analytical thermodynamic model which encompasses the effectiveness and the flaws of the heat exchangers and the regenerator has been previously developed and validated. A semi-analytical dynamic model of FPSE is developed and presented in this paper. The thermodynamic model is used to define the thermal variables that are used in the dynamic model which evaluates the kinematic results. Thus, a coupled iterative strategy has been used to perform a global simulation. The global modelling approach has been validated using the experimental data available from the NASA RE-1000 Stirling engine prototype. The resulting coupled thermodynamic-dynamic model using a standardized description of the engine allows efficient and realistic preliminary design of FPSE.

  16. Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of free piston Stirling engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formosa, F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The free piston Stirling behaviour relies on its thermal and dynamic features. → A global semi-analytical model for preliminary design is developed. → The model compared with NASA-RE1000 experimental data shows good correlations. -- Abstract: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both accurate thermodynamic and dynamic modelling to predict its performances. The steady state behaviour of the engine partly relies on non linear dissipative phenomena such as pressure drop loss within heat exchangers which is dependant on the temperature within the associated components. An analytical thermodynamic model which encompasses the effectiveness and the flaws of the heat exchangers and the regenerator has been previously developed and validated. A semi-analytical dynamic model of FPSE is developed and presented in this paper. The thermodynamic model is used to define the thermal variables that are used in the dynamic model which evaluates the kinematic results. Thus, a coupled iterative strategy has been used to perform a global simulation. The global modelling approach has been validated using the experimental data available from the NASA RE-1000 Stirling engine prototype. The resulting coupled thermodynamic-dynamic model using a standardized description of the engine allows efficient and realistic preliminary design of FPSE.

  17. Continuous limits for an integrable coupling system of Toda equation hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Yu Fajun

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we present an integrable coupling system of lattice hierarchy and its continuous limits by using of Lie algebra sl(4). By introducing a complex discrete spectral problem, the integrable coupling system of Toda lattice hierarchy is derived. It is shown that a new complex lattice spectral problem converges to the integrable couplings of discrete soliton equation hierarchy, which has the integrable coupling system of C-KdV hierarchy as a new kind of continuous limit.

  18. An integrable coupling system of lattice hierarchy and its continuous limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Fajun; Li Li

    2009-01-01

    In [E.G. Fan, Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 6368], Fan present a lattice hierarchy and its continuous limits. In this Letter, we extend this method, by introducing a complex discrete spectral problem, a coupling lattice hierarchy is derived. It is shown that a new sequence of combinations of complex lattice spectral problem converges to the integrable coupling couplings of soliton equation hierarchy, which has the integrable coupling system of AKNS hierarchy as a continuous limit.

  19. Continuous limits for an integrable coupling system of Toda equation hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [College of Maths and Systematic Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China); Yu Fajun, E-mail: yfajun@163.co [College of Maths and Systematic Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China)

    2009-09-21

    In this Letter, we present an integrable coupling system of lattice hierarchy and its continuous limits by using of Lie algebra sl(4). By introducing a complex discrete spectral problem, the integrable coupling system of Toda lattice hierarchy is derived. It is shown that a new complex lattice spectral problem converges to the integrable couplings of discrete soliton equation hierarchy, which has the integrable coupling system of C-KdV hierarchy as a new kind of continuous limit.

  20. An analytical demonstration of coupling schemes between magnetohydrodynamic codes and eddy current codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueqiang; Albanese, R.; Rubinacci, G.; Portone, A.; Villone, F.

    2008-01-01

    In order to model a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that strongly couples to external conducting structures (walls and/or coils) in a fusion device, it is often necessary to combine a MHD code solving for the plasma response, with an eddy current code computing the fields and currents of conductors. We present a rigorous proof of the coupling schemes between these two types of codes. One of the coupling schemes has been introduced and implemented in the CARMA code [R. Albanese, Y. Q. Liu, A. Portone, G. Rubinacci, and F. Villone, IEEE Trans. Magn. 44, 1654 (2008); A. Portone, F. Villone, Y. Q. Liu, R. Albanese, and G. Rubinacci, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 085004 (2008)] that couples the MHD code MARS-F[Y. Q. Liu, A. Bondeson, C. M. Fransson, B. Lennartson, and C. Breitholtz, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] and the eddy current code CARIDDI[R. Albanese and G. Rubinacci, Adv. Imaging Electron Phys. 102, 1 (1998)]. While the coupling schemes are described for a general toroidal geometry, we give the analytical proof for a cylindrical plasma.

  1. GA-4/GA-9 honeycomb impact limiter tests and analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koploy, M.A.; Taylor, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has a test program underway to obtain data on the behavior of a honeycomb impact limiter. The program includes testing of small samples to obtain basic information, as well as testing of complete 1/4-scale impact limiters to obtain load-versus-deflection curves for different crush orientations. GA has used the test results to aid in the development of an analytical model to predict the impact limiter loads. The results also helped optimize the design of the impact limiters for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks

  2. Analytical expressions for radiatively corrected Higgs masses and couplings in the MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carena, M.

    1995-03-01

    We propose, for the computation of the Higgs mass spectrum and couplings, a renormalization-group improved leading-log approximation, where the renormalization scale is fixed to the top-quark pole mass. For the case m A ∝M SUSY , our leading-log approximation differs by less than 2 GeV from previous results on the Higgs mass computed using a nearly scale independent renormalization-group improved effective potential up to next-to-leading order. Moreover, for the general case m A SUSY , we provide analytical formulae (including two-loop leading-log corrections) for all the masses and couplings in the Higgs sector. For M SUSY A , tan β and the stop mixing parameters, they reproduce the numerical renormalization-group improved leading-log result for the Higgs masses with an error of less than 3 GeV. For the Higgs couplings, our analytical formulae reproduce the numerical results equally well. Comparison with other methods is also performed. (orig.)

  3. Direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry of drug residues from latent fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Kristina; Wiley, Rachel; Waverka, Kristin; Fox, James; Dziekonski, Eric; Verbeck, Guido F

    2013-07-01

    Here, we present a method of extracting drug residues from fingerprints via Direct Analyte-Probed Nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DAPNe-NSI-MS). This instrumental technique provides higher selectivity and lower detection limits over current methods, greatly reducing sample preparation, and does not compromise the integrity of latent fingerprints. This coupled to Raman microscopy is an advantageous supplement for location and identification of trace particles. DAPNe uses a nanomanipulator for extraction and differing microscopies for localization of chemicals of interest. A capillary tip with solvent of choice is placed in a nanopositioner. The surface to be analyzed is placed under a microscope, and a particle of interest is located. Using a pressure injector, the solvent is injected onto the surface where it dissolves the analyte, and then extracted back into the capillary tip. The solution is then directly analyzed via NSI-MS. Analyses of caffeine, cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, and ecstasy have been performed successfully. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Analytic modeling, simulation and interpretation of broadband beam coupling impedance bench measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermayer, U., E-mail: niedermayer@temf.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Eidam, L. [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    First, a generalized theoretical approach towards beam coupling impedances and stretched-wire measurements is introduced. Applied to a circular symmetric setup, this approach allows to compare beam and wire impedances. The conversion formulas for TEM scattering parameters from measurements to impedances are thoroughly analyzed and compared to the analytical beam impedance solution. A proof of validity for the distributed impedance formula is given. The interaction of the beam or the TEM wave with dispersive material such as ferrite is discussed. The dependence of the obtained beam impedance on the relativistic velocity β is investigated and found as material property dependent. Second, numerical simulations of wakefields and scattering parameters are compared. The applicability of scattering parameter conversion formulas for finite device length is investigated. Laboratory measurement results for a circularly symmetric test setup, i.e. a ferrite ring, are shown and compared to analytic and numeric models. The optimization of the measurement process and error reduction strategies are discussed.

  5. The Use and Abuse of Limits of Detection in Environmental Analytical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. C. Brown

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The limit of detection (LoD serves as an important method performance measure that is useful for the comparison of measurement techniques and the assessment of likely signal to noise performance, especially in environmental analytical chemistry. However, the LoD is only truly related to the precision characteristics of the analytical instrument employed for the analysis and the content of analyte in the blank sample. This article discusses how other criteria, such as sampling volume, can serve to distort the quoted LoD artificially and make comparison between various analytical methods inequitable. In order to compare LoDs between methods properly, it is necessary to state clearly all of the input parameters relating to the measurements that have been used in the calculation of the LoD. Additionally, the article discusses that the use of LoDs in contexts other than the comparison of the attributes of analytical methods, in particular when reporting analytical results, may be confusing, less informative than quoting the actual result with an accompanying statement of uncertainty, and may act to bias descriptive statistics.

  6. Splay states in globally coupled Josephson arrays: Analytical prediction of Floquet multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strogatz, S.H.; Mirollo, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    In recent numerical experiments on series arrays of overdamped Josephson junctions, Nichols and Wiesenfeld [Phys. Rev. A 45, 8430 (1992)] discovered that the periodic states known as splay states are neutrally stable in all but four directions in phase space. We present a theory that accounts for this enormous degree of neutral stability. The theory also predicts the four non-neutral Floquet multipliers to within 0.1% of their numerically computed values. The analytical approach used here may be appli- cable to other globally coupled systems of oscillators, such as multimode lasers, electronic oscillator circuits, and solid-state laser arrays

  7. Perturbation theory and coupling constant analyticity in two-dimensional field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, B.

    1973-01-01

    Conjectural material and results over a year old are presented in the discussion of perturbation theory and coupling constant analyticity in two-dimensional field theories. General properties of perturbation series are discussed rather than questions of field theory. The question is interesting for two reasons: First, one would like to understand why perturbation theory is such a good guide (to show that perturbation theory determines the theory in some way). Secondly, one hopes to prove that some or all of the theories are nontrivial. (U.S.)

  8. Decoupling the NLO coupled DGLAP evolution equations: an analytic solution to pQCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; McKay, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Using repeated Laplace transforms, we turn coupled, integral-differential singlet DGLAP equations into NLO (next-to-leading) coupled algebraic equations, which we then decouple. After two Laplace inversions we find new tools for pQCD: decoupled NLO analytic solutions F s (x,Q 2 )=F s (F s0 (x),G 0 (x)), G(x,Q 2 )=G(F s0 (x), G 0 (x)). F s , G are known NLO functions and F s0 (x)≡F s (x,Q 0 2 ), G 0 (x)≡G(x,Q 0 2 ) are starting functions for evolution beginning at Q 2 =Q 0 2 . We successfully compare our u and d non-singlet valence quark distributions with MSTW results (Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63:189, 2009). (orig.)

  9. New limits on coupled dark energy model after Planck 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Yang, Weiqiang; Wu, Yabo; Jiang, Ying

    2018-06-01

    We used the Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background anisotropy, baryon acoustic oscillation, type-Ia supernovae, redshift-space distortions, and weak gravitational lensing to test the model parameter space of coupled dark energy. We assumed the constant and time-varying equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treated dark matter and dark energy as the fluids whose energy transfer was proportional to the combined term of the energy densities and equation of state, such as Q = 3 Hξ(1 +wx) ρx and Q = 3 Hξ [ 1 +w0 +w1(1 - a) ] ρx, the full space of equation of state could be measured when we considered the term (1 +wx) in the energy exchange. According to the joint observational constraint, the results showed that wx = - 1.006-0.027+0.047 and ξ = 0.098-0.098>+0.026 for coupled dark energy with a constant equation of state, w0 = -1.076-0.076+0.085, w1 = - 0.069-0.319+0.361, and ξ = 0.210-0.210+0.048 for a variable equation of state. We did not get any clear evidence for the coupling in the dark fluids at 1 σ region.

  10. An analytical erosion model for divertor plates and limiter experiments in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Akiyama, R.; Arimoto, H.; Idei, H.; Iguchi, H.; Kaneko, O.; Kohmoto, T.; Kubo, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Morita, S.; Motojima, O.; Nishimura, K.; Okamura, S.; Takahasi, C.; Takita, Y.; Yamada, I.; Matsunami, N.; Rice, J.; Yamada, H.; Shoji, T.; Ueda, M.

    1992-01-01

    A self-consistent analytical solution for net erosion of a divertor plate which is set perpendicular to magnetic field lines is presented. The primary flux profile of hydrogen and impurities except redepositing particles is externally given as well as the return ratio of sputtered atoms to the plate. In the direction along the divertor trace, all conditions are uniform. The ionization mean free path is assumed constant to simplify equations. The analytical solution is compared with net erosion experiments carried out in compact helical system (CHS) by exposing a graphite target to a neutral beam heated plasma column introduced perpendicularly to the target along the magnetic field lines through a 2 cm slit opend on a graphite limiter. After exposure to 98 discharges, the target surface is analyzed with Rutherford backscattering method. Deposition profiles of Ti and O impurities are very well explained with the analytical predictions. (orig.)

  11. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%.

  12. Indirect Pursuits of Intimacy in Romantic Couples Everyday Conversations: A Discourse Analytic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neill Korobov

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A discourse analytic approach was used to examine how twenty young adult romantic couples (ages 19-26 employed criticisms and insinuations of infidelity in their natural unstructured interactions to indirectly and creatively pursue closeness. The research has been motivated by an expanding arena of research that shows that ostensibly contentious interactional moments among young adult intimates may not be adversarial, but rather may be methods that promote a playful repartee that leads to affiliation. I demonstrate how criticisms are both often highly gendered and typically formulated and responded to in tongue-in-cheek, non-serious ways that involve the creative use of various forms of irony, laughter, rekeyings, abrupt non-sequiturs, and topic shifts that mitigate the potential for the criticisms to become adversarial. Similarly, the insinuations of infidelity were often designed by the couples to attend to interactional breaches. They functioned as a brief but effective way for one partner to signal that they had been dismissed or neglected in the preceding discursive turns. My central finding is that young adult romantic couples maintain closeness amidst potential conflict in their natural everyday conversational interactions.

  13. Analytical Energy Gradients for Excited-State Coupled-Cluster Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyslawski, Mark; Nooijen, Marcel

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) and similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (STEOM-CC) methods have been firmly established as accurate and routinely applicable extensions of single-reference coupled-cluster theory to describe electronically excited states. An overview of these methods is provided, with emphasis on the many-body similarity transform concept that is the key to a rationalization of their accuracy. The main topic of the paper is the derivation of analytical energy gradients for such non-variational electronic structure approaches, with an ultimate focus on obtaining their detailed algebraic working equations. A general theoretical framework using Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers is presented, and the method is applied to formulate the EOM-CC and STEOM-CC gradients in abstract operator terms, following the previous work in [P.G. Szalay, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 55 (1995) 151] and [S.R. Gwaltney, R.J. Bartlett, M. Nooijen, J. Chem. Phys. 111 (1999) 58]. Moreover, the systematics of the Lagrange multiplier approach is suitable for automation by computer, enabling the derivation of the detailed derivative equations through a standardized and direct procedure. To this end, we have developed the SMART (Symbolic Manipulation and Regrouping of Tensors) package of automated symbolic algebra routines, written in the Mathematica programming language. The SMART toolkit provides the means to expand, differentiate, and simplify equations by manipulation of the detailed algebraic tensor expressions directly. The Lagrangian multiplier formulation establishes a uniform strategy to perform the automated derivation in a standardized manner: A Lagrange multiplier functional is constructed from the explicit algebraic equations that define the energy in the electronic method; the energy functional is then made fully variational with respect to all of its parameters, and the symbolic differentiations directly yield the explicit

  14. Analytic properties of the OCP and ionic mixtures in the strongly coupled fluid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Exact results for the Madelung constants and first order anharmonic energies are given for the inverse power potentials with the Coulomb potential as the softest example. Similar exact results are obtained using the analysis of Rosenfeld on the Γ → ∞ limit for the OCP internal energy, direct correlation function, screening function, and bridge functions. Knowing these exact limits for the fluid phase of the OCP allows one to determine the nature of the thermal corrections to the strongly coupled results. Solutions of the HNC equation modified with the hard sphere bridge function give an example

  15. Limits on the abundance and coupling of cosmic axions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePanfilis, S.; Melissinos, A.C.; Moskowitz, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    We report preliminary results from a search for galactic axions in the mass range 4.5 -13 eV, we obtain the experimental limit (g/sub aγγ/m/sub a/) 2 rho/sub a/ -41 . The theoretical prediction is (g/sub aγγ/m/sub a/) 2 rho/sub a/ = 3.9 x 10 -44 with the local galactic axion density rho/sub a/ = 300 MeV/cm 3 . We have also searched for the presence of a continuous spectrum of light pseudoscalar particles; assuming that the local galactic axion density is composed of axions with masses uniformly distributed between 4.5 and 5.0 μeV, we find that g/sub aγγ/ -30 MeV/sup 1/2/ cm/sup 3/2/ ≅ 10 11 GeV -1 . Limits have also been set on the production of light pseudoscalar x particles; we find g/sub xγγ/ -24 MeV/sup 1/2/ cm/sup 3/2/ ≅ 10 -5 GeV -1 for 0< m/sub x/ ≤ 4μeV. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry: analytical assessment of the technique at the beginning of the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The main application of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) today is in atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), as an excitation spectrochemical source, although uses of an ICP for fluorescence as just an atomizer, and specially for mass spectrometry, as an ionization source, are rocketing in the last few years. Since its inception, only a quarter of a century ago, ICP-AES has rapidly evolved to one of the preferred routine analytical techniques for convenient determination of many elements with high speed, at low levels and in the most varied samples. Perhaps its comparatively high kinetic temperature (capable of atomizing virtually every compound of any sample), its high excitation and ionization temperatures, and its favourable spatial structure at the core of the ICP success. By now, the ICP-AES can be considered as having achieved maturity in that a huge amount of analytical problems can be tackled with this technique, while no major or fundamental changes have been adopted for several years. Despite this fact, important driving forces are still in operation to further improve the ICP-AES sensitivity, selectivity, precision, sample throughput, etc. Moreover, proposals to extend the scope of the technique to traditionally elusive fields (e.g. non-metals and organic compound analysis) are also appearing in the recent literature. In this paper the 'state of the art', the last developments and the expectations in trying to circumvent the limitations of the ICP-AES (on the light of literature data and personal experience) are reviewed. (author)

  17. An analytical model for predicting transport in a coupled vadose/phreatic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasko, D.

    1997-05-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting the transport of a contaminant in both the unsaturated (vadose) and saturated (phreatic) zones following a surficial spill. The model incorporates advection, dispersion, adsorption, and first-order decay in both zones and couples the transport processes at the water table. The governing equation is solved by using the method of Laplace transforms, with numerical inversion of the Laplace space equation for concentration. Because of the complexity of the functional form for the Laplace space solution, a numerical methodology using the real and imaginary parts of a Fourier series was implemented. To reduce conservatism in the model, dilution at the water table was also included. Verification of the model is demonstrated by its ability to reproduce the source history at the surface and to replicate appropriate one-dimensional transport through either the vadose or phreatic zone. Because of its simplicity and lack of detailed input data requirements, the model is recommended for scoping calculations

  18. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Thai Monazite by Inductively Coupled Plasma and Nuclear Analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Ratanapra, Dusadee; Sukharn, Sumalee; Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart

    2003-10-01

    The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for the determination of individual rare-earth elements (REE) was evaluated by comparison with instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). The accuracy and precision of INAA and ICP-AES were evaluated by using standard reference material IGS-36, a monazite concentrate. For INAA, the results were close to the certified value while ICP-AES were in good agreement except for some low concentration rare earth. The techniques were applied for the analysis of some rare earth elements in two Thai monazite samples preparing as the in-house reference material for the Rare Earth Research and Development Center, Chemistry Division, Office of Atoms for Peace. The analytical results obtained by these techniques were in good agreement with each other

  19. Level population measurements on analyte atom and ion excited states in the inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Z.H.; Blades, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    During the past decade a number of publications dealing with fundamental studies of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) have appeared in the literature. The purpose of many of these investigations has been to understand the nature of the interaction between the plasma gas and the analyte. The general conclusion drawn from these studies has been that the ICP is very close to Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), but that some deviations from LTE do occur. Recent studies by the authors' have been directed towards the measurement of analyte atom and ion excited state level populations with the objective of obtaining a better understanding of both ionization and excitation in the ICP discharge and the extent to which such processes contribute to a non-equilibrium state. Further discussion is drawn from similar measurements made on elements with low ionization potentials, such as Barium, as well as on elements such as Iron in the presence of Easily Ionizable Elements (EIE's). The spatial and power dependences of such measurements are also discussed

  20. Analytical study of index-coupled herd behavior in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Yonatan; Shapira, Yoash; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-12-01

    Herd behavior in financial markets had been investigated extensively in the past few decades. Scholars have argued that the behavioral tendency of traders and investors to follow the market trend, notably reflected in indices both on short and long time scales, is substantially affecting the overall market behavior. Research has also been devoted to revealing these behaviors and characterizing the market herd behavior. In this paper we present a simple herd behavior model for the dynamics of financial variables by introducing a simple coupling mechanism of stock returns to the index return, deriving analytic expressions for statistical properties of the returns. We found that several important phenomena in the stock market, namely the correlations between stock market returns and the exponential decay of short-term autocorrelations, are derived from our model. These phenomena have been given various explanations and theories, with herd market behavior being one of the leading. We conclude that the coupling mechanism, which essentially encapsulates the herd behavior, indeed creates correlation and autocorrelation. We also show that this introduces a time scale to the system, which is the characteristic time lag between a change in the index and its effect on the return of a stock.

  1. Squid-inspired vehicle design using coupled fluid-solid analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio-Serchi, Francesco; Weymouth, Gabriel

    2017-11-01

    The need for enhanced automation in the marine and maritime fields is fostering research into robust and highly maneuverable autonomous underwater vehicles. To address these needs we develop design principles for a new generation of soft-bodied aquatic vehicles similar to octopi and squids. In particular, we consider the capability of pulsed-jetting bodies to boost thrust by actively modifying their external body-shape and in this way benefit of the contribution from added-mass variation. We present an analytical formulation of the coupled fluid-structure interaction between the elastic body and the ambient fluid. The model incorporates a number of new salient contributions to the soft-body dynamics. We highlight the role of added-mass variation effects of the external fluid in enhancing thrust and assess how the shape-changing actuation is impeded by a confinement-related unsteady inertial term and by an external shape-dependent fluid stiffness contribution. We show how the analysis of these combined terms has guided us to the design of a new prototype of a squid-inspired vehicle tuning of the natural frequency of the coupled fluid-solid system with the purpose of optimizing its actuation routine.

  2. Decoupling the NLO coupled DGLAP evolution equations: an analytic solution to pQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Martin M. [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (United States); Durand, Loyal [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Ha, Phuoc [Towson University, Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson, MD (United States); McKay, Douglas W. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Using repeated Laplace transforms, we turn coupled, integral-differential singlet DGLAP equations into NLO (next-to-leading) coupled algebraic equations, which we then decouple. After two Laplace inversions we find new tools for pQCD: decoupled NLO analytic solutions F{sub s}(x,Q{sup 2})=F{sub s}(F{sub s0}(x),G{sub 0}(x)), G(x,Q{sup 2})=G(F{sub s0}(x), G{sub 0}(x)). F{sub s}, G are known NLO functions and F{sub s0}(x){identical_to}F{sub s}(x,Q{sub 0}{sup 2}), G{sub 0}(x){identical_to}G(x,Q{sub 0}{sup 2}) are starting functions for evolution beginning at Q{sup 2}=Q{sub 0}{sup 2}. We successfully compare our u and d non-singlet valence quark distributions with MSTW results (Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63:189, 2009). (orig.)

  3. Analytical Kinematics and Coupled Vibrations Analysis of Mechanical System Operated by Solar Array Drive Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M.; Wei, C.; Jalali, A.; Sattar, R.

    2017-07-01

    To address the impact of solar array (SA) anomalies and vibrations on performance of precision space-based operations, it is important to complete its accurate jitter analysis. This work provides mathematical modelling scheme to approximate kinematics and coupled micro disturbance dynamics of rigid load supported and operated by solar array drive assembly (SADA). SADA employed in analysis provides a step wave excitation torque to activate the system. Analytical investigations into kinematics is accomplished by using generalized linear and Euler angle coordinates, applying multi-body dynamics concepts and transformations principles. Theoretical model is extended, to develop equations of motion (EoM), through energy method (Lagrange equation). The main emphasis is to research coupled frequency response by determining energies dissipated and observing dynamic behaviour of internal vibratory systems of SADA. The disturbance model captures discrete active harmonics of SADA, natural modes and vibration amplifications caused by interactions between active harmonics and structural modes of mechanical assembly. The proposed methodology can help to predict true micro disturbance nature of SADA operating rigid load. Moreover, performance outputs may be compared against actual mission requirements to assess precise spacecraft controller design to meet next space generation stringent accuracy goals.

  4. Fundamental (f) oscillations in a magnetically coupled solar interior-atmosphere system - An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Balázs; Erdélyi, R.

    2018-01-01

    Solar fundamental (f) acoustic mode oscillations are investigated analytically in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The model consists of three layers in planar geometry, representing the solar interior, the magnetic atmosphere, and a transitional layer sandwiched between them. Since we focus on the fundamental mode here, we assume the plasma is incompressible. A horizontal, canopy-like, magnetic field is introduced to the atmosphere, in which degenerated slow MHD waves can exist. The global (f-mode) oscillations can couple to local atmospheric Alfvén waves, resulting, e.g., in a frequency shift of the oscillations. The dispersion relation of the global oscillation mode is derived, and is solved analytically for the thin-transitional layer approximation and for the weak-field approximation. Analytical formulae are also provided for the frequency shifts due to the presence of a thin transitional layer and a weak atmospheric magnetic field. The analytical results generally indicate that, compared to the fundamental value (ω =√{ gk }), the mode frequency is reduced by the presence of an atmosphere by a few per cent. A thin transitional layer reduces the eigen-frequencies further by about an additional hundred microhertz. Finally, a weak atmospheric magnetic field can slightly, by a few percent, increase the frequency of the eigen-mode. Stronger magnetic fields, however, can increase the f-mode frequency by even up to ten per cent, which cannot be seen in observed data. The presence of a magnetic atmosphere in the three-layer model also introduces non-permitted propagation windows in the frequency spectrum; here, f-mode oscillations cannot exist with certain values of the harmonic degree. The eigen-frequencies can be sensitive to the background physical parameters, such as an atmospheric density scale-height or the rate of the plasma density drop at the photosphere. Such information, if ever observed with high-resolution instrumentation and inverted, could help to

  5. Pushing the limits of signal resolution to make coupling measurement easier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert Pucheta, José Enrique; Pitoux, Daisy; Grison, Claire M; Robin, Sylvie; Merlet, Denis; Aitken, David J; Giraud, Nicolas; Farjon, Jonathan

    2015-05-07

    Probing scalar couplings are essential for structural elucidation in molecular (bio)chemistry. While the measurement of JHH couplings is facilitated by SERF experiments, overcrowded signals represent a significant limitation. Here, a new band selective pure shift SERF allows access to δ(1)H and JHH with an ultrahigh spectral resolution.

  6. Analytical solutions by squeezing to the anisotropic Rabi model in the nonperturbative deep-strong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu; Chen, Xiang-You

    2017-12-01

    An unexplored nonperturbative deep strong coupling (npDSC) achieved in superconducting circuits has been studied in the anisotropic Rabi model by the generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation. Energy levels are evaluated analytically from the reformulated Hamiltonian and agree well with numerical ones in a wide range of coupling strength. Such improvement ascribes to deformation effects in the displaced-squeezed state presented by the squeezed momentum variance, which are omitted in previous displaced states. The atom population dynamics confirms the validity of our approach for the npDSC strength. Our approach offers the possibility to explore interesting phenomena analytically in the npDSC regime in qubit-oscillator experiments.

  7. Analytic derivative couplings for spin-flip configuration interaction singles and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of analytic derivative couplings for configuration interaction singles (CIS), and derive and implement these couplings for its spin-flip variant for the first time. Our algorithm is closely related to the CIS analytic energy gradient algorithm and should be straightforward to implement in any quantum chemistry code that has CIS analytic energy gradients. The additional cost of evaluating the derivative couplings is small in comparison to the cost of evaluating the gradients for the two electronic states in question. Incorporation of an exchange-correlation term provides an ad hoc extension of this formalism to time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation, without the need to invoke quadratic response theory or evaluate third derivatives of the exchange-correlation functional. Application to several different conical intersections in ethylene demonstrates that minimum-energy crossing points along conical seams can be located at substantially reduced cost when analytic derivative couplings are employed, as compared to use of a branching-plane updating algorithm that does not require these couplings. Application to H 3 near its D 3h geometry demonstrates that correct topology is obtained in the vicinity of a conical intersection involving a degenerate ground state

  8. Effective charge versus bare charge: an analytical estimate for colloids in the infinite dilution limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubouy, Miguel; Trizac, Emmanuel; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2003-01-01

    We propose an analytical approximation for the dependence of the effective charge on the bare charge for spherical and cylindrical macro-ions as a function of the size of the colloid and salt content, for the situation of a unique colloid immersed in a sea of electrolyte (where the definition of an effective charge is non-ambiguous). Our approach is based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) mean-field theory. Mathematically speaking, our estimate is asymptotically exact in the limit κa >> 1, where a is the radius of the colloid and κ is the inverse screening length. In practice, a careful comparison with effective charge parameters, obtained by numerically solving the full nonlinear PB theory, proves that our estimate is good down to κa ∼ 1. This is precisely the limit appropriate to treat colloidal suspensions. A particular emphasis is put on the range of parameters suitable to describe both single and double strand DNA molecules under physiological conditions

  9. Analytical solutions by squeezing to the anisotropic Rabi model in the nonperturbative deep-strong coupling regime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Yu; Chen, Xiang-You

    2017-01-01

    A novel, unexplored nonperturbative deep-strong coupling (npDSC) achieved in superconducting circuits has been studied in the anisotropic Rabi model by the generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation (GSRWA). Energy levels are evaluated analytically from the reformulated Hamiltonian and agree well with numerical ones under a wide range of coupling strength. Such improvement ascribes to deformation effects in the displaced-squeezed state presented by the squeezed momentum variance, which...

  10. Possibilities and limits of multiprofessional attention in the care of psychiatric emergencies: analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Lima de Paula

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Goal: to analyze the possibilities and limits of multiprofessional care in the attention to psychiatric emergencies. Method: it is an analytical study of the type integrative review of the comprehensive literature. Searches were conducted in the Latin American and Caribbean Literature (LILACS and Nursing Database (BDENF databases and in the ScieLo Virtual Library, with the use of Descriptors in Health Sciences (DECs: “Emergency Services, Psychiatric”, “Forensic Psychiatry”, “Psychiatric Rehabilitation”, in the period from 2007 to 2017. Results: after data analysis, two thematic categories emerged: “Possibilities and limits in multiprofessional care for patients in crisis” and “The continuity of care to the patient in crisis by the multiprofessional team”. The studies point out fragility in the management of the multiprofessional team of care to the patients in psychiatric crisis. Therefore, in the substitutive services to the psychiatric hospital, it is necessary to strengthen the care and bonding tools for continuity of treatment after the cases of psychiatric emergency of these patients. Conclusion: this research provided a deepening of the knowledge regarding the challenges of the multiprofessional team in the care of analytical psychiatric emergencies and in relation to the patient in crisis, considering the main multiprofessional actions, understanding how this approach is done and patient follow-up. Descriptors: Emergency Services, Psychiatric. Forensic Psychiatry. Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

  11. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A.A.; Qamar, S.; Atta, M.A. (A.Q. Khan Research Labs., Rawalpindi (Pakistan))

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ([mu]g/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of tine of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) has been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD[sub B]) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision. (Author).

  12. Data analytics for continuous renal replacement therapy: historical limitations and recent technology advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William R; Garzotto, Francesco; Neri, Mauro; Lorenzin, Anna; Zaccaria, Marta; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-10-10

    Dialysis is a highly quantitative therapy involving large volumes of both clinical and technical data. While automated data collection has been implemented for chronic dialysis, this has not been done for acute kidney injury patients treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). After a brief review of the fundamental aspects of electronic medical records (EMRs), a new tool designed to provide clinicians with individualized CRRT treatment data is analyzed, with emphasis on its quality assurance capabilities. The first platform addressing the problem of data collection and management with current CRRT machines (Sharesource system; Baxter Healthcare) is described. The system provides connectivity for the Prismaflex CRRT machine and enables both EMR connectivity and therapy analytics with 2 basic components: the connect module and the report module. The enormous amount of data in CRRT should be collected and analyzed to enable adequate clinical decisions. Current CRRT technology presents significant limitations with consequent lack of rigorous analysis of technical data and relevant feedback. From a quality assurance perspective, these limitations preclude any systematic assessment of prescription and delivery trends that may be adversely affecting clinical outcomes. A detailed assessment of current practice limitations is provided together with several possible ways to address such limitations by a new technical tool.

  13. Analytic prediction of unconfined boundary layer flashback limits in premixed hydrogen-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoferichter, Vera; Hirsch, Christoph; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Flame flashback is a major challenge in premixed combustion. Hence, the prediction of the minimum flow velocity to prevent boundary layer flashback is of high technical interest. This paper presents an analytic approach to predicting boundary layer flashback limits for channel and tube burners. The model reflects the experimentally observed flashback mechanism and consists of a local and global analysis. Based on the local analysis, the flow velocity at flashback initiation is obtained depending on flame angle and local turbulent burning velocity. The local turbulent burning velocity is calculated in accordance with a predictive model for boundary layer flashback limits of duct-confined flames presented by the authors in an earlier publication. This ensures consistency of both models. The flame angle of the stable flame near flashback conditions can be obtained by various methods. In this study, an approach based on global mass conservation is applied and is validated using Mie-scattering images from a channel burner test rig at ambient conditions. The predicted flashback limits are compared to experimental results and to literature data from preheated tube burner experiments. Finally, a method for including the effect of burner exit temperature is demonstrated and used to explain the discrepancies in flashback limits obtained from different burner configurations reported in the literature.

  14. Debye potentials, electromagnetic reciprocity and impedance boundary conditions for efficient analytic approximation of coupling impedances in complex heterogeneous accelerator pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petracca, S [Salerno Univ. (Italy)

    1996-08-01

    Debye potentials, the Lorentz reciprocity theorem, and (extended) Leontovich boundary conditions can be used to obtain simple and accurate analytic estimates of the longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances of (piecewise longitudinally uniform) multi-layered pipes with non simple transverse geometry and/or (spatially inhomogeneous) boundary conditions. (author)

  15. Strategy for solving semi-analytically three-dimensional transient flow in a coupled N-layer aquifer system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, E.J.M.; Maas, C.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient strategies for solving semi-analytically the transient groundwater head in a coupled N-layer aquifer system phi(i)(r, z, t), i = 1, ..., N, with radial symmetry, with full z-dependency, and partially penetrating wells are presented. Aquitards are treated as aquifers with their own

  16. Analytical coupled modeling of a magneto-based acoustic metamaterial harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H.; Zhu, R.; Chen, J. K.; Tracy, S. L.; Huang, G. L.

    2018-05-01

    Membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) have demonstrated unusual capacity in controlling low-frequency sound transmission, reflection, and absorption. In this paper, an analytical vibro-acoustic-electromagnetic coupling model is developed to study MAM harvester sound absorption, energy conversion, and energy harvesting behavior under a normal sound incidence. The MAM harvester is composed of a prestressed membrane with an attached rigid mass, a magnet coil, and a permanent magnet coin. To accurately capture finite-dimension rigid mass effects on the membrane deformation under the variable magnet force, a theoretical model based on the deviating acoustic surface Green’s function approach is developed by considering the acoustic near field and distributed effective shear force along the interfacial boundary between the mass and the membrane. The accuracy and capability of the theoretical model is verified through comparison with the finite element method. In particular, sound absorption, acoustic-electric energy conversion, and harvesting coefficient are quantitatively investigated by varying the weight and size of the attached mass, prestress and thickness of the membrane. It is found that the highest achievable conversion and harvesting coefficients can reach up to 48%, and 36%, respectively. The developed model can serve as an efficient tool for designing MAM harvesters.

  17. Studies on the spectral interference of gadolinium on different analytes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Thulasidas, S.K.; Natarajan, V.; Airan, Yougant

    2015-01-01

    Due to the multi-electronic nature, rare earth elements are prone to exhibit spectral interference in ICP-AES, which leads to erroneous determination of analytes in presence of such matrix. This interference is very significant, when the analytes are to be determined at trace level in presence of emission rich matrix elements. An attempt was made to understand the spectral interference of Gd on 29 common analytes like Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Fe, Ga, Gd, In, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Pr, Sr, Tl and Zn using ICP-AES with capacitive Charged Coupled Device (CCD) as detector. The present study includes identification of suitable interference free analytical lines of these analytes, evaluation of correction factor for each analytical line and determination of tolerance levels of these analytical lines along with the ICP-AES based methodology for simultaneous determination of Gd. Based on the spectral interference study, an ICP-AES based method was developed for the determination of these analytes at trace level in presence of Gd matrix without chemical separation. Further the developed methodology was validated using synthetic samples prepared from commercially available reference material solution of individual element; the results were found to be satisfactory. The method was also compared with other existing techniques

  18. Determination of mycotoxins in foods: current state of analytical methods and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppen, Robert; Koch, Matthias; Siegel, David; Merkel, Stefan; Maul, Ronald; Nehls, Irene

    2010-05-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants produced by a range of fungal species. Their common occurrence in food and feed poses a threat to the health of humans and animals. This threat is caused either by the direct contamination of agricultural commodities or by a "carry-over" of mycotoxins and their metabolites into animal tissues, milk, and eggs after feeding of contaminated hay or corn. As a consequence of their diverse chemical structures and varying physical properties, mycotoxins exhibit a wide range of biological effects. Individual mycotoxins can be genotoxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, teratogenic, and oestrogenic. To protect consumer health and to reduce economic losses, surveillance and control of mycotoxins in food and feed has become a major objective for producers, regulatory authorities and researchers worldwide. However, the variety of chemical structures makes it impossible to use one single technique for mycotoxin analysis. Hence, a vast number of analytical methods has been developed and validated. The heterogeneity of food matrices combined with the demand for a fast, simultaneous and accurate determination of multiple mycotoxins creates enormous challenges for routine analysis. The most crucial issues will be discussed in this review. These are (1) the collection of representative samples, (2) the performance of classical and emerging analytical methods based on chromatographic or immunochemical techniques, (3) the validation of official methods for enforcement, and (4) the limitations and future prospects of the current methods.

  19. A Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Methods for Modeling Dissolution and Other Reactions in Transport Limited Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstetler, D. L.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling the transport of reactive species is a computationally demanding problem, especially in complex subsurface media, where it is crucial to improve understanding of geochemical processes and the fate of groundwater contaminants. In most of these systems, reactions are inherently fast and actual rates of transformations are limited by the slower physical transport mechanisms. There have been efforts to reformulate multi-component reactive transport problems into systems that are simpler and less demanding to solve. These reformulations include defining conservative species and decoupling of reactive transport equations so that fewer of them must be solved, leaving mostly conservative equations for transport [e.g., De Simoni et al., 2005; De Simoni et al., 2007; Kräutle and Knabner, 2007; Molins et al., 2004]. Complex and computationally cumbersome numerical codes used to solve such problems have also caused De Simoni et al. [2005] to develop more manageable analytical solutions. Furthermore, this work evaluates reaction rates and has reaffirmed that the mixing rate,▽TuD▽u, where u is a solute concentration and D is the dispersion tensor, as defined by Kitanidis [1994], is an important and sometimes dominant factor in determining reaction rates. Thus, mixing of solutions is often reaction-limiting. We will present results from analytical and computational modeling of multi-component reactive-transport problems. The results have applications to dissolution of solid boundaries (e.g., calcite), dissolution of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in separate phases, and mixing of saltwater and freshwater (e.g. saltwater intrusion in coastal carbonate aquifers). We quantify reaction rates, compare numerical and analytical results, and analyze under what circumstances which approach is most effective for a given problem. References: DeSimoni, M., et al. (2005), A procedure for the solution of multicomponent reactive transport problems, Water Resources Research, 41

  20. Magnetic exchange couplings from constrained density functional theory: an efficient approach utilizing analytic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2011-11-14

    We introduce a method for evaluating magnetic exchange couplings based on the constrained density functional theory (C-DFT) approach of Rudra, Wu, and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 024103 (2006)]. Our method shares the same physical principles as C-DFT but makes use of the fact that the electronic energy changes quadratically and bilinearly with respect to the constraints in the range of interest. This allows us to use coupled perturbed Kohn-Sham spin density functional theory to determine approximately the corrections to the energy of the different spin configurations and construct a priori the relevant energy-landscapes obtained by constrained spin density functional theory. We assess this methodology in a set of binuclear transition-metal complexes and show that it reproduces very closely the results of C-DFT. This demonstrates a proof-of-concept for this method as a potential tool for studying a number of other molecular phenomena. Additionally, routes to improving upon the limitations of this method are discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. Critical evaluation of analytical performance of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for mercury determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krata, A.; Bulska, E.

    2005-01-01

    The analytical performance of cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS), graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for mercury determination have been investigated with the use of two reference materials SRM 2710 Montana I Soil and BCR-144R (sewage sludge from domestic origin). The digestion conditions and their influence on determination of mercury have been studied. Samples were decomposed by microwave digestion in closed vessels with the use of HCl alone or mixture of HCl+HNO 3 +HF. The digestion solutions were analyzed by CV AAS using NaBH 4 as a reducing agent, by GF AAS with Pd or mixture of Pd/Rh as modifiers and by ICP-MS with Rh as internal standard. In the case of CV AAS, results were not dependent on digestion conditions. In the case of GF AAS and ICP-MS, results depended significantly on digestion conditions; in both cases, the use of the mixture of acids as defined above suppressed the signal of mercury. Therefore, in those cases, the microwave digestion with HCl is recommended. Detection limits of 0.003, 0.01 and 0.2 μg g -1 were achieved by ICP-MS, CV AAS and GF AAS, respectively

  2. Breakdown of the 1/N expansion in the continuum limit of strong coupling lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bralic, N.; Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Chile, Santiago. Facultad de Fisica); Loewe, M.

    1983-08-01

    The restoration of lorentz covariance in the continuum limit of strong coupling lattice QCD is shown to require the breakdown of the 1/N expansion. With the leading 1/N appoximation becoming irrelevant in that limit. To leading order in 1/N lorentz convariance can be restored only as an approximate long distance symmetry a non conventional continuum limit with a non hermitian hamiltonian. (Author) [pt

  3. Development of an analytical method for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sewage sludge by the use of gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Petra; Zuliani, Tea; Milačič, Radmila; Ščančar, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants. As a consequence of their widespread use, they have been released into the environment. PBDEs are lipophilic organic contaminants that enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from urban, agricultural and industrial discharges. Because of their low aqueous solubility and resistance to biodegradation, up to 90% of the PBDEs are accumulated in the sewage sludge during the wastewater treatment. To assess the possibilities for sludge re-use, a reliable determination of the concentrations of these PBDEs is of crucial importance. Six PBDE congeners (BDE 28, BDE 47, BDE 99, BDE 100, BDE 153 and BDE 154) are listed as priority substances under the EU Water Framework Directive. In the present work a simple analytical method with minimal sample-preparation steps was developed for a sensitive and reliable determination of the six PBDEs in sewage sludge by the use of gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). For this purpose an extraction procedure was optimised. Different extracting agents (methanol (MeOH), acetic acid (AcOH)/MeOH mixture (3:1) and 0.1 mol L"−"1 hydrochloric acid (HCl) in MeOH) followed by the addition of a Tris-citrate buffer (co-extracting agent) and iso-octane were applied under different modes of extraction (mechanical shaking, microwave- and ultrasound-assisted extraction). Mechanical shaking or the microwave-assisted extraction of sewage sludge with 0.1 mol L"−"1 HCl in MeOH and the subsequent addition of the Tris-citrate buffer and the iso-octane extracted the PBDEs from the complex sludge matrix most effectively. However, due to easier sample manipulation during the extraction step, mechanical shaking was used. The PBDEs in the organic phase were quantified with GC-ICP-MS by applying a standard addition calibration method. The spike recovery test (recoveries between 95 and 104%) and comparative analyses with the species-specific isotope

  4. Development of an analytical method for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sewage sludge by the use of gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Petra [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zuliani, Tea [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Milačič, Radmila [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ščančar, Janez, E-mail: janez.scancar@ijs.si [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-04-07

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants. As a consequence of their widespread use, they have been released into the environment. PBDEs are lipophilic organic contaminants that enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from urban, agricultural and industrial discharges. Because of their low aqueous solubility and resistance to biodegradation, up to 90% of the PBDEs are accumulated in the sewage sludge during the wastewater treatment. To assess the possibilities for sludge re-use, a reliable determination of the concentrations of these PBDEs is of crucial importance. Six PBDE congeners (BDE 28, BDE 47, BDE 99, BDE 100, BDE 153 and BDE 154) are listed as priority substances under the EU Water Framework Directive. In the present work a simple analytical method with minimal sample-preparation steps was developed for a sensitive and reliable determination of the six PBDEs in sewage sludge by the use of gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). For this purpose an extraction procedure was optimised. Different extracting agents (methanol (MeOH), acetic acid (AcOH)/MeOH mixture (3:1) and 0.1 mol L{sup −1} hydrochloric acid (HCl) in MeOH) followed by the addition of a Tris-citrate buffer (co-extracting agent) and iso-octane were applied under different modes of extraction (mechanical shaking, microwave- and ultrasound-assisted extraction). Mechanical shaking or the microwave-assisted extraction of sewage sludge with 0.1 mol L{sup −1} HCl in MeOH and the subsequent addition of the Tris-citrate buffer and the iso-octane extracted the PBDEs from the complex sludge matrix most effectively. However, due to easier sample manipulation during the extraction step, mechanical shaking was used. The PBDEs in the organic phase were quantified with GC-ICP-MS by applying a standard addition calibration method. The spike recovery test (recoveries between 95 and 104%) and comparative analyses with the species

  5. Analytic solution to leading order coupled DGLAP evolution equations: A new perturbative QCD tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; McKay, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    We have analytically solved the LO perturbative QCD singlet DGLAP equations [V. N. Gribov and L. N. Lipatov, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 15, 438 (1972)][G. Altarelli and G. Parisi, Nucl. Phys. B126, 298 (1977)][Y. L. Dokshitzer, Sov. Phys. JETP 46, 641 (1977)] using Laplace transform techniques. Newly developed, highly accurate, numerical inverse Laplace transform algorithms [M. M. Block, Eur. Phys. J. C 65, 1 (2010)][M. M. Block, Eur. Phys. J. C 68, 683 (2010)] allow us to write fully decoupled solutions for the singlet structure function F s (x,Q 2 ) and G(x,Q 2 ) as F s (x,Q 2 )=F s (F s0 (x 0 ),G 0 (x 0 )) and G(x,Q 2 )=G(F s0 (x 0 ),G 0 (x 0 )), where the x 0 are the Bjorken x values at Q 0 2 . Here F s and G are known functions--found using LO DGLAP splitting functions--of the initial boundary conditions F s0 (x)≡F s (x,Q 0 2 ) and G 0 (x)≡G(x,Q 0 2 ), i.e., the chosen starting functions at the virtuality Q 0 2 . For both G(x) and F s (x), we are able to either devolve or evolve each separately and rapidly, with very high numerical accuracy--a computational fractional precision of O(10 -9 ). Armed with this powerful new tool in the perturbative QCD arsenal, we compare our numerical results from the above equations with the published MSTW2008 and CTEQ6L LO gluon and singlet F s distributions [A. D. Martin, W. J. Stirling, R. S. Thorne, and G. Watt, Eur. Phys. J. C 63, 189 (2009)], starting from their initial values at Q 0 2 =1 GeV 2 and 1.69 GeV 2 , respectively, using their choice of α s (Q 2 ). This allows an important independent check on the accuracies of their evolution codes and, therefore, the computational accuracies of their published parton distributions. Our method completely decouples the two LO distributions, at the same time guaranteeing that both G and F s satisfy the singlet coupled DGLAP equations. It also allows one to easily obtain the effects of the starting functions on the evolved gluon and singlet structure functions, as functions of both Q

  6. Experimental evaluation of analyte excitation mechanisms in the inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehn, Scott A.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is a justifiably popular source for atomic emission spectrometry. However, despite its popularity, the ICP is still only partially understood. Even the mechanisms of analyte excitation remain unclear; some energy levels are quite clearly populated by charge transfer while others might be populated by electron-ion recombination, by electron impact, or by Penning processes. Distinguishing among these alternatives is possible by means of a steady-state kinetics approach that examines correlations between the emission of a selected atom, ion, or level and the local number densities of species assumed to produce the excitation. In an earlier investigation, strong correlations were found between either calcium atom or ion emission and selected combinations of calcium atom or ion number densities and electron number densities in the plasma. However, all radially resolved data employed in the earlier study were produced from Abel inversion and from measurements that were crude by today's standards. Now, by means of tomographic imaging, laser-saturated atomic fluorescence, and Thomson and Rayleigh scattering, it is possible to measure the required radially resolved data without Abel inversion and with far greater fidelity. The correlations previously studied for calcium have been investigated with these more reliable data. Ion-electron recombination, either radiative or with argon as a third body, was determined to be the most likely excitation mechanism for calcium atom, while electron impact appeared to be the most important process to produce excite-state calcium ions. These results were consistent with the previous study. However, the present study suggests that collisional deactivation, rather than radiative decay, is the most likely mode of returning both calcium atoms and ions to the ground state

  7. Quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing: Reference intervals and decision limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2017-07-01

    Reference intervals and decision limits are a critical part of the clinical laboratory report. The evaluation of their correct use represents a tool to verify the post analytical quality. Four elements are identified as indicators. 1. The use of decision limits for lipids and glycated hemoglobin. 2. The use, whenever possible, of common reference values. 3. The presence of gender-related reference intervals for at least the following common serum measurands (besides obviously the fertility relate hormones): alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK), creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), IgM, ferritin, iron, transferrin, urate, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). 4. The presence of age-related reference intervals. The problem of specific reference intervals for elderly people is discussed, but their use is not recommended; on the contrary it is necessary the presence of pediatric age-related reference intervals at least for the following common serum measurands: ALP, amylase, creatinine, inorganic phosphate, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, urate, insulin like growth factor 1, white blood cells, RBC, Hb, Hct, alfa-fetoprotein and fertility related hormones. The lack of such reference intervals may imply significant risks for the patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Valley detection using a graphene gradual pn junction with spin–orbit coupling: An analytical conductance calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mou, E-mail: yang.mou@hotmail.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Rui-Qiang [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Bai, Yan-Kui [College of Physical Science and Information Engineering and Hebei Advance Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050024 (China)

    2015-09-04

    Graphene pn junction is the brick to build up variety of graphene nano-structures. The analytical formula of the conductance of graphene gradual pn junctions in the whole bipolar region has been absent up to now. In this paper, we analytically calculated that pn conductance with the spin–orbit coupling and stagger potential taken into account. Our analytical expression indicates that the energy gap causes the conductance to drop a constant value with respect to that without gap in a certain parameter region, and manifests that the curve of the conductance versus the stagger potential consists of two Gaussian peaks – one valley contributes one peak. The latter feature allows one to detect the valley polarization without using double-interface resonant devices. - Highlights: • Analytical conductance formula of the gradual graphene pn junction with spin–orbit coupling in the whole bipolar region. • Exploring the valley-dependent transport of gradual graphene pn junctions analytically. • Conductance peak without resonance.

  9. Compiled data set of exact NOE distance limits, residual dipolar couplings and scalar couplings for the protein GB3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Vögeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We compiled an NMR data set consisting of exact nuclear Overhauser enhancement (eNOE distance limits, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs and scalar (J couplings for GB3, which forms one of the largest and most diverse data set for structural characterization of a protein to date. All data have small experimental errors, which are carefully estimated. We use the data in the research article Vogeli et al., 2015, Complementarity and congruence between exact NOEs and traditional NMR probes for spatial decoding of protein dynamics, J. Struct. Biol., 191, 3, 306–317, doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2015.07.008 [1] for cross-validation in multiple-state structural ensemble calculation. We advocate this set to be an ideal test case for molecular dynamics simulations and structure calculations.

  10. The Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu and the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yuan, E-mail: huangy22@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Deng Youjin, E-mail: yjdeng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke, E-mail: jacobsen@lpt.ens.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Salas, Jesus, E-mail: jsalas@math.uc3m.es [Grupo de Modelizacion, Simulacion Numerica y Matematica Industrial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Grupo de Teorias de Campos y Fisica Estadistica, Instituto Gregorio Millan, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Unidad asociada al IEM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-11

    We show how the Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu model (which is a generalization of the well-known Baxter-Wu model to a general Eulerian triangulation) can be mapped onto a particular infinite-coupling-limit of the Ashkin-Teller model. We work out some mappings among these models, also including the standard and mixed Ashkin-Teller models. Finally, we compute the phase diagram of the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller model on the square, triangular, hexagonal, and kagome lattices.

  11. High Z neoclassical transport: Application and limitation of analytical formulae for modelling JET experimental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, S.; Casson, F. J.; Bourdelle, C.; Angioni, C.; Belli, E.; Camenen, Y.; Citrin, J.; Garbet, X.; Sarazin, Y.; Sertoli, M.; JET Contributors

    2018-01-01

    Heavy impurities, such as tungsten (W), can exhibit strongly poloidally asymmetric density profiles in rotating or radio frequency heated plasmas. In the metallic environment of JET, the poloidal asymmetry of tungsten enhances its neoclassical transport up to an order of magnitude, so that neoclassical convection dominates over turbulent transport in the core. Accounting for asymmetries in neoclassical transport is hence necessary in the integrated modeling framework. The neoclassical drift kinetic code, NEO [E. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion P50, 095010 (2008)], includes the impact of poloidal asymmetries on W transport. However, the computational cost required to run NEO slows down significantly integrated modeling. A previous analytical formulation to describe heavy impurity neoclassical transport in the presence of poloidal asymmetries in specific collisional regimes [C. Angioni and P. Helander, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 124001 (2014)] is compared in this work to numerical results from NEO. Within the domain of validity of the formula, the factor for reducing the temperature screening due to poloidal asymmetries had to be empirically adjusted. After adjustment, the modified formula can reproduce NEO results outside of its definition domain, with some limitations: When main ions are in the banana regime, the formula reproduces NEO results whatever the collisionality regime of impurities, provided that the poloidal asymmetry is not too large. However, for very strong poloidal asymmetries, agreement requires impurities in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime. Within the JETTO integrated transport code, the analytical formula combined with the poloidally symmetric neoclassical code NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] predicts the same tungsten profile as NEO in certain cases, while saving a factor of one thousand in computer time, which can be useful in scoping studies. The parametric dependencies of the temperature

  12. Approximately analytical solutions of the Manning-Rosen potential with the spin-orbit coupling term and spin symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gaofeng; Dong Shihai

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter the approximately analytical bound state solutions of the Dirac equation with the Manning-Rosen potential for arbitrary spin-orbit coupling quantum number k are carried out by taking a properly approximate expansion for the spin-orbit coupling term. In the case of exact spin symmetry, the associated two-component spinor wave functions of the Dirac equation for arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number k are presented and the corresponding bound state energy equation is derived. We study briefly two special cases; the general s-wave problem and the equal scalar and vector Manning-Rosen potential

  13. Information-Theoretic Limits on Broadband Multi-Antenna Systems in the Presence of Mutual Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taluja, Pawandeep Singh

    2011-12-01

    Multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) systems have received considerable attention over the last decade due to their ability to provide high throughputs and mitigate multipath fading effects. While most of these benefits are obtained for ideal arrays with large separation between the antennas, practical devices are often constrained in physical dimensions. With smaller inter-element spacings, signal correlation and mutual coupling between the antennas start to degrade the system performance, thereby limiting the deployment of a large number of antennas. Various studies have proposed transceiver designs based on optimal matching networks to compensate for this loss. However, such networks are considered impractical due to their multiport structure and sensitivity to the RF bandwidth of the system. In this dissertation, we investigate two aspects of compact transceiver design. First, we consider simpler architectures that exploit coupling between the antennas, and second, we establish information-theoretic limits of broadband communication systems with closely-spaced antennas. We begin with a receiver model of a diversity antenna selection system and propose novel strategies that make use of inactive elements by virtue of mutual coupling. We then examine the limits on the matching efficiency of a single antenna system using broadband matching theory. Next, we present an extension to this theory for coupled MIMO systems to elucidate the impact of coupling on the RF bandwidth of the system, and derive optimal transceiver designs. Lastly, we summarize the main findings of this dissertation and suggest open problems for future work.

  14. Analytical determination of size-dependent natural frequencies of fully clamped rectangular microplates based on the modified couple stress theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, Amir R.; Tahani, Masoud [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents an analytical and size-dependent model for vibrational analysis of fully clamped rectangular microplates. Modified couple stress theory (MCST) and the Kirchhoff plate model are considered, and Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the size dependent equation of motion that accounts for the effect of residual stresses. The natural frequencies of the microplate are extracted analytically by extended Kantorovich method. The present findings are validated with the available results in the literature, and an excellent agreement is observed between them. In addition, a parametric study is conducted to demonstrate the significant effects of couple stress components on the natural frequencies of fully clamped microplates. The ratio of MCST natural frequencies to those obtained with classical theory depends only on the Poisson's ratio of the plate and is independent of the aspect ratio of the plate for cases with no residual stresses.

  15. Analytical determination of size-dependent natural frequencies of fully clamped rectangular microplates based on the modified couple stress theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askari, Amir R.; Tahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and size-dependent model for vibrational analysis of fully clamped rectangular microplates. Modified couple stress theory (MCST) and the Kirchhoff plate model are considered, and Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the size dependent equation of motion that accounts for the effect of residual stresses. The natural frequencies of the microplate are extracted analytically by extended Kantorovich method. The present findings are validated with the available results in the literature, and an excellent agreement is observed between them. In addition, a parametric study is conducted to demonstrate the significant effects of couple stress components on the natural frequencies of fully clamped microplates. The ratio of MCST natural frequencies to those obtained with classical theory depends only on the Poisson's ratio of the plate and is independent of the aspect ratio of the plate for cases with no residual stresses.

  16. Weak coupling theory of the ripplon limited mobility of a 2-D electron lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahm, A.J.; Mehrotra, R.

    1981-01-01

    The one ripplon-n phonon scattering contribution to the mobility of a 2D electron lattice supported by a liquid helium substrate is calculated in first order perturbation theory to all orders of n in the weak coupling limit. The Debye Waller factor is shown to limit the momentum transfer at large ripplon wave-vectors and high temperatures causing a minimum in the mobility as a function of temperature. (orig.)

  17. An improved limit on the axion-photon coupling from the CAST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Irastorza, I.G. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Lasseur, C.; Papaevangelou, T.; Placci, A.; Stewart, L.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K. [CERN, European Org Nucl Res, CH-1211 Geneva 23, (Switzerland); Belov, A.; Gninenko, S. [Russian Acad Sci, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Gomez, H.; Irastorza, I.G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. [Univ Zaragoza, Inst Fis Nucl and Altas Energias, Zaragoza, (Spain); Brauninger, H.; Englhauser, J.; Friedrich, P.; Kuster, M. [Max Planck Inst Extraterr Phys, D-85748 Garching, (Germany); Collar, J.I.; Miller, D.; Vieira, J. [Univ Chicago, Enrico Fermi Inst and KICP, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dafni, T.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Kuster, M.; Riege, H. [Tech Univ Darmstadt, Inst Kernphys, D-64289 Darmstadt, (Germany); Eleftheriadis, C.; Liolios, A.; Savvidis, I. [Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, GR-54006 Thessaloniki, (Greece); Fanourakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kousouris, K. [Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Athens, (Greece); Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Kang, D.; Konigsmann, K.; Vogel, J. [Univ Freiburg, Freiburg, (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    We have searched for solar axions or similar particles that couple to two photons by using the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) set-up with improved conditions in all detectors. From the absence of excess x-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set an upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g{sub a{gamma}} {<=} 8.8 x 10{sup -11} GeV{sup -1} at 95% CL for m{sub a} {<=} 0.02 eV. This result is the best experimental limit over a broad range of axion masses and for m{sub a} {<=} 0.02 eV also supersedes the previous limit derived from energy-loss arguments on globular cluster stars. (authors)

  18. A logical way through the limits of quantitation in inductively coupled plasma spectrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet, J.M.; Granier, G.; Fichet, P.

    2012-01-01

    The limit of quantitation (LOQ) is a crucial parameter in quantitative analysis. Besides the classical “10 s B approach”, other concepts have been previously described based on the limitation resulting from the calibration procedure, namely from the prediction bands and the uncertainty calibration. Because of the difficulty of obtaining a reliable value of the blank standard deviation, this approach was replaced by the study of the %RSD of the net signal as a function of the concentration. Recently described, the so-called accuracy profile method, accuracy being the contribution of both the trueness and the precision, allows the analyst to define a validity domain, the lowest point acting as a limit of quantitation. The aim of this work was to determine these various limits of quantitation, including that from the accuracy profile, to compare them, and to study the parameters that can influence their values. It was concluded that the LOQ deduced from the accuracy profile is a realistic one. Its value is mainly influenced by the calibration procedure, particularly when a weighting procedure is used. A 1/y weighting factor, y being the analyte line intensity, seems to be an efficient compromise for calibration. - Highlights: ► An analytical method is defined by its accuracy, i.e. both trueness and precision. ► A limit of quantitation should be based on an accuracy criterion and not on precision. ► The accuracy as a function of an analyte concentration is an accuracy profile. ► Profile-based tolerance intervals define a validity domain. ► The lowest concentration of this domain corresponds to a limit of quantitation.

  19. Analytical Solution for Two-Dimensional Coupled Thermoelastodynamics in a Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Eskandari-Ghadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An infinitely long hollow cylinder containing isotropic linear elastic material is considered under the effect of arbitrary boundary stress and thermal condition. The two-dimensional coupled thermoelastodynamic PDEs are specified based on equations of motion and energy equation, which are uncoupled using Nowacki potential functions. The Laplace integral transform and Bessel-Fourier series are used to derive the solution for the potential functions, and then the displacements-, stresses- and temperature-potential relationships are used to determine the displacements, stresses and temperature fields. It is shown that the formulation presented here are identically collapsed on the solution existed in the literature for simpler case of axissymetric configuration. A numerical procedure is needed to evaluate the displacements, stresses and temperature at any point and any time. The numerical inversion method proposed by Durbin is applied to evaluate the inverse Laplace transforms of different functions involved in this paper. For numerical inversion, there exist many difficulties such as singular points in the integrand functions, infinite limit of the integral and the time step of integration. With a very precise attention, the desired functions have been numerically evaluated and shown that the boundary conditions have been satisfied very accurately. The numerical evaluations are graphically shown to make engineering sense for the problem involved in this paper for different case of boundary conditions. The results show the wave velocity and the time lack of receiving stress waves. The effect of temperature boundary conditions are shown to be somehow oscillatory, which is used in designing of such an elements.

  20. Analysis of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter with pancake coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shizhuo; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Qingquan; Zhang, Guomin

    2017-10-01

    The characteristics of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter (SFCL) with pancake coils are investigated in this paper. The conventional double-wound non-inductive pancake coil used in AC power systems has an inevitable defect in Voltage Sourced Converter Based High Voltage DC (VSC-HVDC) power systems. Due to its special structure, flashover would occur easily during the fault in high voltage environment. Considering the shortcomings of conventional resistive SFCLs with non-inductive coils, a novel flux-coupling type SFCL with pancake coils is carried out. The module connections of pancake coils are performed. The electromagnetic field and force analysis of the module are contrasted under different parameters. To ensure proper operation of the module, the impedance of the module under representative operating conditions is calculated. Finally, the feasibility of the flux-coupling type SFCL in VSC-HVDC power systems is discussed.

  1. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes

  2. Periodic Forcing of a 555-IC Based Electronic Oscillator in the Strong Coupling Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán, Moisés

    We designed and developed a master-slave electronic oscillatory system (based on the 555-timer IC working in the astable mode), and investigated its dynamic behavior regarding synchronization. For that purpose, we measured the rotation numbers corresponding to the phase-locking rhythms achieved in a large set of values of the normalized forcing frequency (NFF) and of the coupling strength between the master and the slave oscillators. In particular, we were interested in the system behavior in the strong-coupling limit, because such problem has not been extensively studied from an experimental perspective. Our results indicate that, in such a limit, a degenerate codimension-2 bifurcation point at NFF = 2 exists, in which all the phase-locking regions converge. These findings were corroborated by means of a mathematical model developed to that end, as well as by ad hoc further experiments.

  3. Applying the Coupled-Cluster Ansatz to Solids and Surfaces in the Thermodynamic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Liao, Ke; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Hummel, Felix; Grüneis, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    Modern electronic structure theories can predict and simulate a wealth of phenomena in surface science and solid-state physics. In order to allow for a direct comparison with experiment, such ab initio predictions have to be made in the thermodynamic limit, substantially increasing the computational cost of many-electron wave-function theories. Here, we present a method that achieves thermodynamic limit results for solids and surfaces using the "gold standard" coupled cluster ansatz of quantum chemistry with unprecedented efficiency. We study the energy difference between carbon diamond and graphite crystals, adsorption energies of water on h -BN, as well as the cohesive energy of the Ne solid, demonstrating the increased efficiency and accuracy of coupled cluster theory for solids and surfaces.

  4. Current limiting characteristics of transformer type SFCL with coupled secondary windings according to its winding direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sung Hun [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Tae Hee [Dept. of Aero Materials Engineering, Jungwon University, Goesan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, the current limiting characteristics of the transformer type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with the two coupled secondary windings due to its winding direction were analyzed. To analyze the dependence of transient fault current limiting characteristics on the winding direction of the additional secondary winding, the fault current limiting tests of the SFCL with an additional secondary winding, wound as subtractive polarity winding and additive polarity winding, were carried out. The time interval of quench occurrence between two superconducting elements comprising the transformer type SFCL with the additional secondary winding was confirmed to be affected by the winding direction of the additional secondary winding. In case of the subtractive polarity winding of the additional secondary winding, the time interval of the quench occurrence in two superconducting elements was shorter than the case of the additive polarity winding.

  5. Current limiting characteristics of transformer type SFCL with coupled secondary windings according to its winding direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sung Hun; Han, Tae Hee

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the current limiting characteristics of the transformer type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with the two coupled secondary windings due to its winding direction were analyzed. To analyze the dependence of transient fault current limiting characteristics on the winding direction of the additional secondary winding, the fault current limiting tests of the SFCL with an additional secondary winding, wound as subtractive polarity winding and additive polarity winding, were carried out. The time interval of quench occurrence between two superconducting elements comprising the transformer type SFCL with the additional secondary winding was confirmed to be affected by the winding direction of the additional secondary winding. In case of the subtractive polarity winding of the additional secondary winding, the time interval of the quench occurrence in two superconducting elements was shorter than the case of the additive polarity winding

  6. A fluid-coupled transmitting CMUT operated in collapse mode : Semi-analytic modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekař, Martin; van Nispen, Stephan H.M.; Fey, Rob H.B.; Shulepov, Sergei; Mihajlović, Nenad; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2017-01-01

    An electro-mechanical, semi-analytic, reduced-order (RO) model of a fluid-loaded transmitting capacitive-micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) operated in collapse mode is developed. Simulation of static deflections, approximated by a linear combination of six mode shapes, are benchmarked

  7. Renormalization group summation, spectrality constraints, and coupling constant analyticity for phenomenological applications of two-point correlators in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivovarov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The analytic structure in the strong coupling constant that emerges for some observables in QCD after duality averaging of renormalization-group-improved amplitudes is discussed, and the validity of the infrared renormalon hypothesis for the determination of this structure is critically reexamined. A consistent description of peculiar features of perturbation theory series related to hypothetical infrared renormalons and corresponding power corrections is considered. It is shown that perturbation theory series for the spectral moments of two-point correlators of hadronic currents in QCD can explicitly be summed in all orders using the definition of the moments that avoids integration through the infrared region in momentum space. Such a definition of the moments relies on the analytic properties of two-point correlators in the momentum variable that allows for shifting the integration contour into the complex plane of the momentum. For definiteness, an explicit case of gluonic current correlators is discussed in detail

  8. The limited relevance of analytical ethics to the problems of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R L

    1990-04-01

    Philosophical ethics comprises metaethics, normative ethics and applied ethics. These have characteristically received analytic treatment by twentieth-century Anglo-American philosophy. But there has been disagreement over their interrelationship to one another and the relationship of analytical ethics to substantive morality--the making of moral judgments. I contend that the expertise philosophers have in either theoretical or applied ethics does not equip them to make sounder moral judgments on the problems of bioethics than nonphilosophers. One cannot "apply" theories like Kantianism or consequentialism to get solutions to practical moral problems unless one knows which theory is correct, and that is a metaethical question over which there is no consensus. On the other hand, to presume to be able to reach solutions through neutral analysis of problems is unavoidably to beg controversial theoretical issues in the process. Thus, while analytical ethics can play an important clarificatory role in bioethics, it can neither provide, nor substitute for, moral wisdom.

  9. Quality assurance of nuclear analytical techniques based on Bayesian characteristic limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    2000-01-01

    Based on Bayesian statistics, characteristic limits such as decision threshold, detection limit and confidence limits can be calculated taking into account all sources of experimental uncertainties. This approach separates the complete evaluation of a measurement according to the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement from the determination of the characteristic limits. Using the principle of maximum entropy the characteristic limits are determined from the complete standard uncertainty of the measurand. (author)

  10. Generalized 3D Zernike functions for analytic construction of band-limited line-detecting wavelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider 3D versions of the Zernike polynomials that are commonly used in 2D in optics and lithography. We generalize the 3D Zernike polynomials to functions that vanish to a prescribed degree $\\alpha\\geq0$ at the rim of their supporting ball $\\rho\\leq1$. The analytic theory of the 3D generalized

  11. Analytical solution of a stochastic model of risk spreading with global coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin

    2013-11-01

    We study a stochastic matrix model to understand the mechanics of risk spreading (or bet hedging) by dispersion. Up to now, this model has been mostly dealt with numerically, except for the well-mixed case. Here, we present an analytical result that shows that optimal dispersion leads to Zipf's law. Moreover, we found that the arithmetic ensemble average of the total growth rate converges to the geometric one, because the sample size is finite.

  12. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Analytic Formulation for the Evaluation of Spline Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Errichello, Robert [GEARTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Halse, Chris [Romax Technology, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life; however, they commonly meet and exceed the design criteria specified in current standards in the gear, bearing, and wind turbine industry as well as third-party certification criteria. The cost of gearbox replacements and rebuilds, as well as the down time associated with these failures, has elevated the cost of wind energy. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2006; its key goal is to understand the root causes of premature gearbox failures and improve their reliability using a combined approach of dynamometer testing, field testing, and modeling. As part of the GRC program, this paper investigates the design of the spline coupling often used in modern wind turbine gearboxes to connect the planetary and helical gear stages. Aside from transmitting the driving torque, another common function of the spline coupling is to allow the sun to float between the planets. The amount the sun can float is determined by the spline design and the sun shaft flexibility subject to the operational loads. Current standards address spline coupling design requirements in varying detail. This report provides additional insight beyond these current standards to quickly evaluate spline coupling designs.

  13. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasiatomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi-one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them is the "quasiatomic limit." We find integral expressions for the (interchain) transport coefficients, including the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermopower, and we extract their power law dependencies on temperature. Luttinger liquid physics is manifested in a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law; the Lorenz number is larger than the Fermi liquid value by a factor between γ2 and γ4, where γ ≥1 is a measure of the electron-electron interaction strength in the system.

  14. Analytically continued Fock space multi-reference coupled-cluster theory: Application to the shape resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sourav; Sajeev, Y.; Vaval, Nayana

    2006-01-01

    The Fock space multi-reference coupled-cluster (FSMRCC) method is used for the study of the shape resonance energy and width in an electron-atom/molecule collision. The procedure is based upon combining a complex absorbing potential (CAP) with FSMRCC theory. Accurate resonance parameters are obtained by solving a small non-Hermitian eigen-value problem. We study the shape resonances in e - -C 2 H 4 and e - -Mg

  15. Analytical and hybrid methods in the theory of slot-hole coupling of electrodynamic volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Katrich, Victor A; Berdnik, Sergey L; Berdnik, Sergey L

    2008-01-01

    Narration of the text is both laconic and visually accessible, providing the reader with the possibility of rapid study and application of methods of computer analysis of electrodynamic problemsThe book is aimed at university professors, researchers and those specialists who are interested in theory and practical analysis of waveguide devices and systems using slot coupling elementsTopics included in the book are directly based on the original research results obtained by the authors and otherwise unknown earlier.

  16. Contribution of analytical techniques coupled to the knowledge of the uranium speciation in natural conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.

    2009-06-01

    To understand the transport mechanisms and the radionuclides behaviour in the bio-geosphere is necessary to evaluate healthy and environmental risks of nuclear industry. These mechanisms are monitored by radioelements speciation, namely the distribution between their different physico-chemical forms in the environment. From this perspective, this PhD thesis deals with uranium speciation in a natural background. A detailed summary of uranium biogeochemistry has been written, which enables to restrict the PhD issue to uranium complexation with oxalic acid, a hydrophilic organic acid with good binding properties, ubiquitous in soil waters. Analytical conditions have been established by means of speciation diagrams. The speciation diagrams building by means of literature stability constants has allowed to define the analytical conditions of complex formation. The chosen analytical technique is the hyphenation of a separative technique (liquid chromatography LC or capillary electrophoresis CE) with mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The studied complexes presence in the synthetic samples has been confirmed with UV/visible spectrophotometry. LC-ICPMS analyses have proved the lability of the uranyl-organic acid complexes, namely their tendency to dissociate during analysis, which prevents from studying uranium speciation. CE-ICPMS study of labile complexes from a metal-ligand system has been made possible by employing affinity capillary electrophoresis, which enables to determine stability constants and electrophoretic mobilities. This PhD thesis has allowed to compare the different mathematical treatments of binding isotherm and to take into account ionic strength and real ligand concentration. Affinity CE has been applied successfully to lanthanum-oxalate (model system) and uranium-oxalate systems. The obtained results have been applied to a real system (situated in Le Bouchet). This shows the contribution of the developed method to the modelling of uranium speciation. (author)

  17. Infrared exponents and the strong-coupling limit in lattice Landau gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternbeck, Andre; Smekal, Lorenz von

    2010-01-01

    We study the gluon and ghost propagators of lattice Landau gauge in the strong-coupling limit β=0 in pure SU(2) lattice gauge theory to find evidence of the conformal infrared behavior of these propagators as predicted by a variety of functional continuum methods for asymptotically small momenta q 2 QCD 2 . In the strong-coupling limit, this same behavior is obtained for the larger values of a 2 q 2 (in units of the lattice spacing a), where it is otherwise swamped by the gauge-field dynamics. Deviations for a 2 q 2 <1 are well parameterized by a transverse gluon mass ∝1/a. Perhaps unexpectedly, these deviations are thus no finite-volume effect but persist in the infinite-volume limit. They furthermore depend on the definition of gauge fields on the lattice, while the asymptotic conformal behavior does not. We also comment on a misinterpretation of our results by Cucchieri and Mendes (Phys. Rev. D 81:016005, 2010). (orig.)

  18. Analytical Calculation of Mutual Information between Weakly Coupled Poisson-Spiking Neurons in Models of Dynamically Gated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Mutual information is a commonly used measure of communication between neurons, but little theory exists describing the relationship between mutual information and the parameters of the underlying neuronal interaction. Such a theory could help us understand how specific physiological changes affect the capacity of neurons to synaptically communicate, and, in particular, they could help us characterize the mechanisms by which neuronal dynamics gate the flow of information in the brain. Here we study a pair of linear-nonlinear-Poisson neurons coupled by a weak synapse. We derive an analytical expression describing the mutual information between their spike trains in terms of synapse strength, neuronal activation function, the time course of postsynaptic currents, and the time course of the background input received by the two neurons. This expression allows mutual information calculations that would otherwise be computationally intractable. We use this expression to analytically explore the interaction of excitation, information transmission, and the convexity of the activation function. Then, using this expression to quantify mutual information in simulations, we illustrate the information-gating effects of neural oscillations and oscillatory coherence, which may either increase or decrease the mutual information across the synapse depending on parameters. Finally, we show analytically that our results can quantitatively describe the selection of one information pathway over another when multiple sending neurons project weakly to a single receiving neuron.

  19. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  20. Analytical study of a quasi-zero stiffness coupling using a torsion magnetic spring with negative stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yisheng; Zhang, Xinong; Luo, Yajun; Zhang, Yahong; Xie, Shilin

    2018-02-01

    By now, many translation quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) mechanisms have been proposed to overcome the restriction between the isolation frequency range and the load bearing capacity of linear isolators. The couplings of rotor systems undertake the functions of transmitting static driving torque and isolating disturbing torque simultaneously, which creates the demand of torsion QZS mechanisms. Hence a QZS coupling is presented in this paper, where a torsion magnetic spring (TMS) composed of two coaxial ring magnet arrangements in repulsive configuration is employed to produce negative torsion stiffness to counteract the positive stiffness of a rubber spring. In this paper, the expressions of magnetic torque and stiffness are given firstly and verified by finite element simulations; and the effect of geometric parameters of the TMS on its stiffness characteristic is analyzed in detail, which contributes to the optimal design of the TMS. Then dynamic analysis of the QZS coupling is performed and the analytical expression of the torque transmissibility is achieved based on the Harmonic Balance Method. Finally, simulation of the torque transmissibility is carried out to reveal how geometric parameters of the TMS affect the isolation performance.

  1. Generalized 3D Zernike functions for analytic construction of band-limited line-detecting wavelets

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Augustus J. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider 3D versions of the Zernike polynomials that are commonly used in 2D in optics and lithography. We generalize the 3D Zernike polynomials to functions that vanish to a prescribed degree $\\alpha\\geq0$ at the rim of their supporting ball $\\rho\\leq1$. The analytic theory of the 3D generalized Zernike functions is developed, with attention for computational results for their Fourier transform, Funk and Radon transform, and scaling operations. The Fourier transform of generalized 3D Zern...

  2. Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Coupled with Finite Element Limit Equilibrium Method for Geotechnical Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modified particle swarm optimization algorithm coupled with the finite element limit equilibrium method (FELEM for the minimum factor of safety and the location of associated noncircular critical failure surfaces for various geotechnical practices. During the search process, the stress compatibility constraints coupled with the geometrical and kinematical compatibility constraints are firstly established based on the features of slope geometry and stress distribution to guarantee realistic slip surfaces from being unreasonable. Furthermore, in the FELEM, based on rigorous theoretical analyses and derivation, it is noted that the physical meaning of the factor of safety can be formulated on the basis of strength reserving theory rather than the overloading theory. Consequently, compared with the limit equilibrium method (LEM and the shear strength reduction method (SSRM through several numerical examples, the FELEM in conjunction with the improved search strategy is proved to be an effective and efficient approach to routine analysis and design in geotechnical practices with a high level of confidence.

  3. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-01-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρ r and its conjugate variable, the phase θ r of the pairing order parameter Δ r . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρ r /2, where the bosons have a mass m B =2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude g B =4πa B /m B ,a B =2a (a the s-wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude t B =J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction U B =2Jz, where J=4t 2 /U (t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites)

  4. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-07-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρr and its conjugate variable, the phase θr of the pairing order parameter Δr . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρr/2 , where the bosons have a mass mB=2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude gB=4πaB/mB,aB=2a ( a the s -wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude tB=J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction UB=2Jz , where J=4t2/U ( t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites).

  5. Analytical and Numerical Evaluation of Limit States of MSE Wall Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drusa Marián

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simplification of the design of Mechanically Stabilized Earth wall structures (MSE wall or MSEW is now an important factor that helps us not only to save a time and costs, but also to achieve the desired results more reliably. It is quite common way in practice, that the designer of a section of motorway or railway line gives order for design to a supplier of geosynthetics materials. However, supplier company has experience and skills, but a general designer does not review the safety level of design and its efficiency, and is simply incorporating into the overall design of the construction project. Actually, large number of analytical computational methods for analysis and design of MSE walls or similar structures are known. The problem of these analytical methods is the verification of deformations and global stability of structure. The article aims to clarify two methods of calculating the internal stability of MSE wall and their comparison with FEM numerical model. Comparison of design approaches allows us to draft an effective retaining wall and tells us about the appropriateness of using a reinforcing element.

  6. Analytical steady-state solutions for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.; Suarez, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems modeling framework that accounts for reduced plant water uptake due to root zone salinity. Two explicit, closed-form analytical solutions for the root zone solute concentration profile are obtained, corresponding to two alternative functional forms of the uptake reduction function. The solutions express a general relationship between irrigation water salinity, irrigation rate, crop salt tolerance, crop transpiration, and (using standard approximations) crop yield. Example applications are illustrated, including the calculation of irrigation requirements for obtaining targeted submaximal yields, and the generation of crop-water production functions for varying irrigation waters, irrigation rates, and crops. Model predictions are shown to be mostly consistent with existing models and available experimental data. Yet the new solutions possess advantages over available alternatives, including: (i) the solutions were derived from a complete physical-mathematical description of the system, rather than based on an ad hoc formulation; (ii) the analytical solutions are explicit and can be evaluated without iterative techniques; (iii) the solutions permit consideration of two common functional forms of salinity induced reductions in crop water uptake, rather than being tied to one particular representation; and (iv) the utilized modeling framework is compatible with leading transient-state numerical models.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma as atomization, excitation and ionization sources in analytical atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Studies on inductively coupled plasma (ICP) for atomic emission and mass spectrometry accomplished in our laboratory since 1978 are reviewed. In emission spectrometry, the characteristics of the plasma are studied concerning the spatial profiles of spectral line intensity, axial profiles of gas and excitation temperatures, spectral line widths and matrix effect. The studies are particularly emphasized on the instrumentation such as developments of plasma generator, emission spectrometers, water-cooled torches and sample introduction methods. A slew-scan type spectrometer developed in these works represents a predecessor of the current commercial spectrometers. An ICP mass spectrometer was first developed in Japan in this laboratory in 1984. Non-spectroscopic interference of this method was found to have the correlation with the atomic weight of the matrix element. Plasma gases other than argon such as nitrogen and oxygen were used for the ICP to evaluate their performance in mass spectrometry as for the sensitivity and interferences. (author). 63 refs

  8. An analytical model for neutral and charged particles in closed pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokar, M.Z.

    1990-01-01

    In number of modern tokamaks pump limiters are used for control of the edge plasma parameters. In thermonuclear reactor projects pump limiters are considered as a possible alternative or additional for divertor configuration of magnetic field method for unburnt fuel, helium ash and other impurity exhaust. From the point of view of limiter operation efficiency the dependence of neutral particle pressure P g in pumping system on the plasma parameters in the scrape-off layer (SOL) is of importance since an increase of P g will permit to decrease needed pump rate and facilitate solution of reactor technological problems. In connection with this the experimentally observed mode of closed pump limiter operation with strong neutral compression is of great interest. In such a mode P g sharply grows up when the SOL plasma density n s exceeds some critial level. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  9. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of individual gold nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 80, 100, 150, and 200 nm was measured using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Since the particles are not perfectly monodisperse, a distribution of ICP-MS intensity was obtained for each nominal diameter. The distribution of particle mass was determined from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the particles. The distribution of ICP-MS intensity and the distribution of particle mass for each nominal diameter were correlated to give a calibration curve. The calibration curves are linear, but the slope decreases as the nominal diameter increases. The reduced slope is probably due to a smaller degree of vaporization of the large particles. In addition to the degree of particle vaporization, the rate of analyte diffusion in the ICP is an important factor that determines the measured ICP-MS intensity. Simulated ICP-MS intensity versus particle size was calculated using a simple computer program that accounts for the vaporization rate of the gold nanoparticles and the diffusion rate and degree of ionization of the gold atoms. The curvature of the simulated calibration curves changes with sampling depth because the effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion on the ICP-MS intensity are dependent on the residence time of the particle in the ICP. Calibration curves of four hypothetical particles representing the four combinations of high and low boiling points (2000 and 4000 K) and high and low analyte diffusion rates (atomic masses of 10 and 200 Da) were calculated to further illustrate the relative effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion. The simulated calibration curves show that the sensitivity of single-particle ICP-MS is smaller than that of the ICP-MS measurement of continuous flow of standard solutions by a factor of 2 or more. Calibration using continuous flow of standard solution is semi-quantitative at best. An

  10. Possibilities for decreasing detection limits of analytical methods for determination of transformation products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kenessov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most rockets of middle and heavy class launched from Kazakhstan, Russia, China and other countries still use highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH as a liquid propellant. Study of migration, distribution and accumulation of UDMH transformation products in environment and human health impact assessment of space rocket activity are currently complicated due to the absence of analytical methods allowing detection of trace concentrations of these compounds in analyzed samples. This paper reviews methods and approaches, which can be applied for development of such methods. Detection limits at a part-per-trillion (ppt level may be achieved using most selective and sensitive methods based on gas or liquid chromatography in combination of tandem or high-resolution mass spectrometry. In addition, 1000-fold concentration of samples or integrated sample preparation methods, e.g., dynamic headspace extraction, are required. Special attention during development and application of such methods must be paid to purity of laboratory air, reagents, glassware and analytical instruments.

  11. Numerical and Analytical Study of Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers between Close Circular Coplanar Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro da Silva Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and analytical study of optimal low-thrust limited-power trajectories for simple transfer (no rendezvous between close circular coplanar orbits in an inverse-square force field is presented. The numerical study is carried out by means of an indirect approach of the optimization problem in which the two-point boundary value problem, obtained from the set of necessary conditions describing the optimal solutions, is solved through a neighboring extremal algorithm based on the solution of the linearized two-point boundary value problem through Riccati transformation. The analytical study is provided by a linear theory which is expressed in terms of nonsingular elements and is determined through the canonical transformation theory. The fuel consumption is taken as the performance criterion and the analysis is carried out considering various radius ratios and transfer durations. The results are compared to the ones provided by a numerical method based on gradient techniques.

  12. Analytical characterization and optimization in the determination of trihalomethanes on drinking water by purge and trap coupled to a gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Junior, Nelson Vicente da

    2010-01-01

    This work shows an analytical methodology developed and optimized to determine trihalomethanes level THMs, in drinking water samples, using purge and trap coupled to gas chromatography (GC-PT). THMs are byproducts water chlorination, these compounds must have a maximum of 100 μg.L -1 under Brazilian law, due these compounds be suspected human carcinogens base on studies in laboratory animals. The technique of purge and trap efficiently extracts these compounds from water, and the gas chromatograph separates the THMs. The GC uses a light polarity column and electron capture detector. This detector is selective and more sensitive in the detection of these compounds. The methodology was validated in terms of: linearity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, quantification limit, detection limit and robustness. The detection limit was less than 0,5 μg.L -1 . The accuracy and precision were adequate for testing the trace compounds. The drinking water samples were collected in the city of Suzano-SP, which belongs to 'Alto do Tiete', in this region lay 'Tiete' river with predominant vegetation. The THMs compound found in drinking water at higher concentrations was chloroform where the spread of values found between 15,9 to 111,0 μg.L -1 in drinking water. (author)

  13. Simulation of population response to ionizing radiation in an ecosystem with a limiting resource – Model and analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G.; Kryshev, Alexander I.

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic mathematical model is formulated, predicting the development of radiation effects in a generic animal population, inhabiting an elemental ecosystem ‘population-limiting resource’. Differential equations of the model describe the dynamic responses to radiation damage of the following population characteristics: gross biomass; intrinsic fractions of healthy and reversibly damaged tissues in biomass; intrinsic concentrations of the self-repairing pool and the growth factor; and amount of the limiting resource available in the environment. Analytical formulae are found for the steady states of model variables as non-linear functions of the dose rate of chronic radiation exposure. Analytical solutions make it possible to predict the expected severity of radiation effects in a model ecosystem, including such endpoints as morbidity, mortality, life shortening, biosynthesis, and population biomass. Model parameters are selected from species data on lifespan, physiological growth and mortality rates, and individual radiosensitivity. Thresholds for population extinction can be analytically calculated for different animal species, examples are provided for generic mice and wolf populations. The ecosystem model demonstrates a compensatory effect of the environment on the development of radiation effects in wildlife. The model can be employed to construct a preliminary scale ‘radiation exposure-population effects’ for different animal species; species can be identified, which are vulnerable at a population level to chronic radiation exposure. - Highlights: • Mathematical model is formulated predicting radiation effects in elemental ecosystem. • Analytical formulae are found for steady states of variables as functions of exposure. • Severity of radiation effects are calculated, including population extinction. • Model parameterization is made for generic mice and wolf populations.

  14. Numerical and Analytical Assessment of a Coupled Rotating Detonation Engine and Turbine Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is presented of an experimental rig comprising a rotating detonation engine (RDE) with bypass flow coupled to a downstream turbine. The analysis used a validated computational fluid dynamics RDE simulation combined with straightforward algebraic mixing equations for the bypass flow. The objectives of the analysis were to supplement and interpret the necessarily sparse measurements from the rig, and to assess the performance of the RDE itself (which was not instrumented in this installation). The analysis is seen to agree reasonably well with available data. It shows that the RDE is operating in an unusual fashion, with subsonic flow throughout the exhaust plane. The detonation event itself is producing a total pressure rise relative to the pre-detonative pressure; however, the length of the device and the substantial flow restriction at the inlet yield an overall pressure loss. This is not surprising since the objective of the rig test was primarily aimed at investigating RDEturbine interactions, and not on performance optimization. Furthermore, the RDE was designed for fundamental detonation studies and not performance. Nevertheless, the analysis indicates that with some small alterations to the design, an RDE with an overall pressure rise is possible.

  15. Analytical solution to DGLAP integro-differential equation in a simple toy-model with a fixed gauge coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Gustavo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Concepcion Univ. (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Cvetic, Gorazd [Univ. Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kondrashuk, Igor [Univ. del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile). Grupo de Matematica Aplicada; Univ. del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile). Grupo de Fisica de Altas Energias; Parra-Ferrada, Ivan [Talca Univ. (Chile). Inst. de Matematica y Fisica

    2016-11-15

    We consider a simple model for QCD dynamics in which DGLAP integro-differential equation may be solved analytically. This is a gauge model which possesses dominant evolution of gauge boson (gluon) distribution and in which the gauge coupling does not run. This may be N=4 supersymmetric gauge theory with softly broken supersymmetry, other finite supersymmetric gauge theory with lower level of supersymmetry, or topological Chern-Simons field theories. We maintain only one term in the splitting function of unintegrated gluon distribution and solve DGLAP analytically for this simplified splitting function. The solution is found by use of the Cauchy integral formula. The solution restricts form of the unintegrated gluon distribution as function of transfer momentum and of Bjorken x. Then we consider an almost realistic splitting function of unintegrated gluon distribution as an input to DGLAP equation and solve it by the same method which we have developed to solve DGLAP equation for the toy-model. We study a result obtained for the realistic gluon distribution and find a singular Bessel-like behaviour in the vicinity of the point x=0 and a smooth behaviour in the vicinity of the point x=1.

  16. Analytical applications of atomic spectroscopy, with particular reference to inductively coupled plasma emission analysis of coal and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougnet, M.A.B.

    1983-08-01

    This thesis outlines the analytical applications of atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy to a variety of materials. Special attention was directed to the analysis of coal and coal ashes. A simple slurry sampling technique was developed and used to determine V, Ni, Co, Mo and Mn in the National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (NBS-SRM) coals 1632a and 1635 by furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). Coal and fly ash were analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The determination of B, Be, Li, C, K and other trace elements by ICP-AES was investigated. Analytical methods were developed for the analysis of coal, fly ash and water samples. Fusion with sodium carbonate and a digestion bomb dissolution method were compared for the determination of boron in a South African boron-rich mineral (Kornerupine). Eight elements were determined in 10 industrial water samples from a power plant. Ca, Mg, Si and B were determined by ICP-AES and V, Ni, Co and Mo by FAAS. Various problems encountered during the course of the work and interferences in ICP-AES analysis are discussed. Some recommendations concerning method development and routine analysis by this technique are suggested

  17. Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of spheres: Analytical comparison between coupled phase model and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of small spheres is studied using two models: a hydrodynamic model based on the coupled phase equations and an acoustic model based on the ECAH (ECAH: Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley) multiple scattering theory. The aim is to compare both models through the study of three fundamental kinds of particles: rigid particles, elastic spheres, and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic model is based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation generalized to elastic spheres and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic forces for elastic spheres are introduced by analogy with those of droplets. The ECAH theory is also modified in order to take into account the velocity of rigid particles. Analytical calculations performed for long wavelength, low dilution, and weak absorption in the ambient fluid show that both models are strictly equivalent for the three kinds of particles studied. The analytical calculations show that dilatational and translational mechanisms are modeled in the same way by both models. The effective parameters of dilute suspensions are also calculated.

  18. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with the density-fitting approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C. David

    2016-01-01

    An efficient implementation is presented for analytic gradients of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method with the density-fitting approximation, denoted DF-CCSD. Frozen core terms are also included. When applied to a set of alkanes, the DF-CCSD analytic gradients are significantly accelerated compared to conventional CCSD for larger molecules. The efficiency of our DF-CCSD algorithm arises from the acceleration of several different terms, which are designated as the “gradient terms”: computation of particle density matrices (PDMs), generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the relaxed PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of PDMs and GFM to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and evaluation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the alkane set (C 10 H 22 ), the computational times for the gradient terms (with the cc-pVTZ basis set) are 2582.6 (CCSD) and 310.7 (DF-CCSD) min, respectively, a speed up of more than 8-folds. For gradient related terms, the DF approach avoids the usage of four-index electron repulsion integrals. Based on our previous study [U. Bozkaya, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124108 (2014)], our formalism completely avoids construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), using instead 2- and 3-index TPDMs. The DF approach introduces negligible errors for equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  19. Stochastic heat and Burgers equations and their singularities II - Analytical Properties and Limiting Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, I M; Zhao, H

    2004-01-01

    We study the inviscid limit, $\\mu\\to 0$, of the stochastic viscous Burgers equation, for the velocity field $v^{\\mu}(x,t)$, $t>0$, $x\\in\\mathbb R^d$,\\frac{\\partial{v^{\\mu}}}{\\partial{t}} + (v^{\\mu}\\cdot\

  20. What Limits the Encoding Effect of Note-Taking? A Meta-Analytic Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses indicate that the overall encoding effect of note-taking is positive but modest. This meta-analysis of 57 note-taking versus no note-taking comparison studies explored what limits the encoding effect by examining the moderating influence of seven variables: intervention, schooling level, presentation mode and length, test…

  1. Kinetics-Driven Superconducting Gap in Underdoped Cuprate Superconductors Within the Strong-Coupling Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Yildirim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A generic theory of the quasiparticle superconducting gap in underdoped cuprates is derived in the strong-coupling limit, and found to describe the experimental “second gap” in absolute scale. In drastic contrast to the standard pairing gap associated with Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, the quasiparticle gap is shown to originate from anomalous kinetic (scattering processes, with a size unrelated to the pairing strength. Consequently, the k dependence of the gap deviates significantly from the pure d_{x^{2}-y^{2}} wave of the order parameter. Our study reveals a new paradigm for the nature of the superconducting gap, and is expected to reconcile numerous apparent contradictions among existing experiments and point toward a more coherent understanding of high-temperature superconductivity.

  2. Silicon coupled-ring resonator structures for slow light applications: potential, impairments and ultimate limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canciamilla, A; Torregiani, M; Ferrari, C; Morichetti, F; Melloni, A; De La Rue, R M; Samarelli, A; Sorel, M

    2010-01-01

    Coupled-ring resonator-based slow light structures are reported and discussed. By combining the advantages of high index contrast silicon-on-insulator technology with an efficient thermo-optical activation, they provide an on-chip solution with a bandwidth of up to 100 GHz and a slowdown factor of up to 16, as well as a continuous reconfiguration scheme and a fine tunability. The performance of these devices is investigated in detail for both static and dynamic operation, in order to evaluate their potential in optical signal processing applications at high bit rate. The main impairments imposed by fabrication imperfections are also discussed in relation to the slowdown factor. In particular, the analysis of the impact of backscatter, disorder and two-photon absorption on the device transfer function reveals the ultimate limits of these structures and provides valuable design rules for their optimization

  3. Laboratory methodologies for indicators of iron status: strengths, limitations, and analytical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christine M; Looker, Anne C

    2017-12-01

    Biochemical assessment of iron status relies on serum-based indicators, such as serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), as well as erythrocyte protoporphyrin. These indicators present challenges for clinical practice and national nutrition surveys, and often iron status interpretation is based on the combination of several indicators. The diagnosis of iron deficiency (ID) through SF concentration, the most commonly used indicator, is complicated by concomitant inflammation. sTfR concentration is an indicator of functional ID that is not an acute-phase reactant, but challenges in its interpretation arise because of the lack of assay standardization, common reference ranges, and common cutoffs. It is unclear which indicators are best suited to assess excess iron status. The value of hepcidin, non-transferrin-bound iron, and reticulocyte indexes is being explored in research settings. Serum-based indicators are generally measured on fully automated clinical analyzers available in most hospitals. Although international reference materials have been available for years, the standardization of immunoassays is complicated by the heterogeneity of antibodies used and the absence of physicochemical reference methods to establish "true" concentrations. From 1988 to 2006, the assessment of iron status in NHANES was based on the multi-indicator ferritin model. However, the model did not indicate the severity of ID and produced categorical estimates. More recently, iron status assessment in NHANES has used the total body iron stores (TBI) model, in which the log ratio of sTfR to SF is assessed. Together, sTfR and SF concentrations cover the full range of iron status. The TBI model better predicts the absence of bone marrow iron than SF concentration alone, and TBI can be analyzed as a continuous variable. Additional consideration of methodologies, interpretation of indicators, and analytic standardization is important for further

  4. Cu determination in crude oil distillation products by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after analyte transfer to aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Ruszczynska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    Cu was determined in a wide range of petroleum products from crude oil distillation using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Different procedures of sample preparation were evaluated: (i) mineralization with sulfuric acid in an open system (ii) mineralization in a closed microwave system (iii) combustion in hydrogen-oxygen flame in the Wickbold's apparatus (iv) matrix evaporation followed by acid dissolution, and (v) acidic extraction. All the above procedures led to the transfer of the analyte into an aqueous solution for the analytical measurement step. It was found that application of FAAS was limited to the analysis of the heaviest petroleum products of high Cu content. In ICP-MS, the use of internal reference method (with Rh or In as internal reference element) was required to eliminate the matrix effects in the analysis of extracts and the concentrated solutions of mineralized heavy petroleum products. The detection limits (in original samples) were equal to, respectively, 10, 86, 3.3, 0.9 and 0.4 ng g -1 in procedures i-v with ETAAS detection and 10, 78, 1.1 and 0.5 ng g -1 in procedures i-iii and v with ICP-MS detection. The procedures recommended here were validated by recovery experiments, certified reference materials analysis and comparison of results, obtained for a given sample, in different ways. The Cu content in the analyzed samples was: 50-110 ng g -1 in crude oil, -1 in gasoline, -1 in atmospheric oil, -1 in heavy vacuum oil and 140-300 ng g -1 in distillation residue

  5. Cu determination in crude oil distillation products by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after analyte transfer to aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Ruszczyńska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa

    2005-03-01

    Cu was determined in a wide range of petroleum products from crude oil distillation using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Different procedures of sample preparation were evaluated: (i) mineralization with sulfuric acid in an open system, (ii) mineralization in a closed microwave system, (iii) combustion in hydrogen-oxygen flame in the Wickbold's apparatus, (iv) matrix evaporation followed by acid dissolution, and (v) acidic extraction. All the above procedures led to the transfer of the analyte into an aqueous solution for the analytical measurement step. It was found that application of FAAS was limited to the analysis of the heaviest petroleum products of high Cu content. In ICP-MS, the use of internal reference method (with Rh or In as internal reference element) was required to eliminate the matrix effects in the analysis of extracts and the concentrated solutions of mineralized heavy petroleum products. The detection limits (in original samples) were equal to, respectively, 10, 86, 3.3, 0.9 and 0.4 ng g - 1 in procedures i-v with ETAAS detection and 10, 78, 1.1 and 0.5 ng g - 1 in procedures i-iii and v with ICP-MS detection. The procedures recommended here were validated by recovery experiments, certified reference materials analysis and comparison of results, obtained for a given sample, in different ways. The Cu content in the analyzed samples was: 50-110 ng g - 1 in crude oil, oil, oil and 140-300 ng g - 1 in distillation residue.

  6. Analytical method development for the determination of emerging contaminants in water using supercritical-fluid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen Salvatierra-Stamp, Vilma; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalez, Jorge; Ibarra-Galván, Valentin; Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method using supercritical-fluid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection for the determination of seven emerging contaminants-two pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and glyburide), three endocrine disruptors (17α-ethinyl estradiol, bisphenol A, and 17β-estradiol), one bactericide (triclosan), and one pesticide (diuron)-was developed and validated. These contaminants were chosen because of their frequency of use and their toxic effects on both humans and the environment. The optimized chromatographic separation on a Viridis BEH 2-EP column achieved baseline resolution for all compounds in less than 10 min. This separation was applied to environmental water samples after sample preparation. The optimized sample treatment involved a preconcentration step by means of solid-phase extraction using C18-OH cartridges. The proposed method was validated, finding recoveries higher than 94 % and limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.10-1.59 μg L(-1) and 0.31-4.83 μg L(-1), respectively. Method validation established the proposed method to be selective, linear, accurate, and precise. Finally, the method was successfully applied to environmental water samples.

  7. Pesticides residues in water treatment plant sludge: validation of analytical methodology using liquid chromatography coupled to Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moracci, Luiz Fernando Soares

    2008-01-01

    The evolving scenario of Brazilian agriculture brings benefits to the population and demands technological advances to this field. Constantly, new pesticides are introduced encouraging scientific studies with the aim of determine and evaluate impacts on the population and on environment. In this work, the evaluated sample was the sludge resulted from water treatment plant located in the Vale do Ribeira, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The technique used was the reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Compounds were previously liquid extracted from the matrix. The development of the methodology demanded data processing in order to be transformed into reliable information. The processes involved concepts of validation of chemical analysis. The evaluated parameters were selectivity, linearity, range, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification and robustness. The obtained qualitative and quantitative results were statistically treated and presented. The developed and validated methodology is simple. As results, even exploring the sensitivity of the analytical technique, the work compounds were not detected in the sludge of the WTP. One can explain that these compounds can be present in a very low concentration, can be degraded under the conditions of the water treatment process or are not completely retained by the WTP. (author)

  8. Full characterisation of a background limited antenna coupled KID over an octave of bandwidth for THz radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueno, J.; Yurduseven, O.; Yates, S. J. C.; Llombart, N.; Murugesan, V.; Thoen, D. J.; Baryshev, A. M.; Neto, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and full characterisation (sensitivity, beam pattern, and frequency response) of a background limited broadband antenna coupled kinetic inductance detector covering the frequency range from 1.4 to 2.8 THz. This device shows photon noise limited performance with a

  9. Self-compression of spatially limited laser pulses in a system of coupled light-guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    The self-action features of wave packets propagating in a 2D system of equidistantly arranged fibers are studied analytically and numerically on the basis of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Self-consistent equations for the characteristic scales of a Gaussian wave packet are derived on the basis of the variational approach, which are proved numerically for powers P beams become filamented, and their amplitude is limited due to the nonlinear breaking of the interaction between neighboring light-guides. This makes it impossible to collect a powerful wave beam in a single light-guide. Variational analysis shows the possibility of the adiabatic self-compression of soliton-like laser pulses in the process of 3D self-focusing on the central light-guide. However, further increase of the field amplitude during self-compression leads to the development of longitudinal modulation instability and the formation of a set of light bullets in the central fiber. In the regime of hollow wave beams, filamentation instability becomes predominant. As a result, it becomes possible to form a set of light bullets in optical fibers located on the ring.

  10. Complex nonlinear dynamics in the limit of weak coupling of a system of microcantilevers connected by a geometrically nonlinear tunable nanomembrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Cho, Hanna; Keum, Hohyun; Kim, Seok; Michael McFarland, D; Bergman, Lawrence A; King, William P; Vakakis, Alexander F

    2014-11-21

    Intentional utilization of geometric nonlinearity in micro/nanomechanical resonators provides a breakthrough to overcome the narrow bandwidth limitation of linear dynamic systems. In past works, implementation of intentional geometric nonlinearity to an otherwise linear nano/micromechanical resonator has been successfully achieved by local modification of the system through nonlinear attachments of nanoscale size, such as nanotubes and nanowires. However, the conventional fabrication method involving manual integration of nanoscale components produced a low yield rate in these systems. In the present work, we employed a transfer-printing assembly technique to reliably integrate a silicon nanomembrane as a nonlinear coupling component onto a linear dynamic system with two discrete microcantilevers. The dynamics of the developed system was modeled analytically and investigated experimentally as the coupling strength was finely tuned via FIB post-processing. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear dynamic regime with gradual change in the coupling strength was experimentally studied. In addition, we observed for the weakly coupled system that oscillation was asynchronous in the vicinity of the resonance, thus exhibiting a nonlinear complex mode. We conjectured that the emergence of this nonlinear complex mode could be attributed to the nonlinear damping arising from the attached nanomembrane.

  11. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Velitchkova, N. [Geological Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str., bl.24, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Havezov, I. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Daskalova, N., E-mail: das15482@svr.igic.bas.b [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-02-15

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g{sup -1} were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  12. Determination of Total Arsenic and Speciation in Apple Juice by Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Colon, Luis A.; Aga, Diana S.

    2016-01-01

    A two-part laboratory experiment was designed for upper-level analytical chemistry students to provide hands-on experience in the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. In the first part of the experiment, the students analyze total arsenic in…

  13. Power harvesting by electromagnetic coupling from wind-induced limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalero, G.; Olivieri, S.; Mazzino, A.; Boragno, C.

    2017-09-01

    Recent developments of low-power microprocessors open to new applications such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the consequent problem of autonomous powering. For this purpose, a possible strategy is represented by energy harvesting from wind or other flows exploiting fluid-structure interactions. In this work, we present an updated picture of a flutter-based device characterized by fully passive dynamics and a simple constructive layout, where limit cycle oscillations are undergone by an elastically bounded wing. In this case, the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy is performed by means of an electromagnetic coupling between a pair of coils and magnets. A centimetric-size prototype is shown to harvest energy from low wind velocities (between 2 and 4 m s-1), reaching a power peak of 14 mW, representing a valuable amount for applications related to WSN. A mathematical description of the nonlinear dynamics is then provided by a quasi-steady phenomenological model, revealing satisfactory agreement with the experimental framework within a certain parametric range and representing a useful tool for future optimizations.

  14. Mode-coupling theory predictions for a limited valency attractive square well model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccarelli, E; Saika-Voivod, I; Moreno, A J; Nave, E La; Buldyrev, S V; Sciortino, F; Tartaglia, P

    2006-01-01

    Recently we have studied, using numerical simulations, a limited valency model, i.e. an attractive square well model with a constraint on the maximum number of bonded neighbours. Studying a large region of temperatures T and packing fractions φ, we have estimated the location of the liquid-gas phase separation spinodal and the loci of dynamic arrest, where the system is trapped in a disordered non-ergodic state. Two distinct arrest lines for the system are present in the system: a (repulsive) glass line at high packing fraction, and a gel line at low φ and T. The former is essentially vertical φ controlled), while the latter is rather horizontal (T controlled) in the φ-T) plane. We here complement the molecular dynamics results with mode coupling theory calculations, using the numerical structure factors as input. We find that the theory predicts a repulsive glass line-in satisfactory agreement with the simulation results-and an attractive glass line, which appears to be unrelated to the gel line

  15. Analytical applications of the electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) coupled to capillary/microchip electrophoresis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Ming; Wei Wei; Liu Songqin

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The mechanism of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ electrochemiluminescence, addition mode of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ , recent applications of capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrochemiluminescent detection in drug and other substrates analysis are reviewed. - Abstract: A comprehensive review on the development of analytical methods, by coupling electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip electrophoresis (ME), is presented. After the description of the basic mechanism of ECL, the addition mode of luminescence reagent in CE-ECL system has been discussed. The analytical applications of the CE-ECL technique in terms of different analytes are also given. Due to the importance of ME as a separation method for the present and future, the ME detection methods based on ECL are considered in a relatively detailed way. Finally, possible trends for CE/ME-ECL in the near future are discussed.

  16. Analytical applications of the electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) coupled to capillary/microchip electrophoresis: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Ming; Wei Wei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China); Liu Songqin, E-mail: liusq@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China)

    2011-10-17

    Graphical abstract: The mechanism of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} electrochemiluminescence, addition mode of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, recent applications of capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrochemiluminescent detection in drug and other substrates analysis are reviewed. - Abstract: A comprehensive review on the development of analytical methods, by coupling electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip electrophoresis (ME), is presented. After the description of the basic mechanism of ECL, the addition mode of luminescence reagent in CE-ECL system has been discussed. The analytical applications of the CE-ECL technique in terms of different analytes are also given. Due to the importance of ME as a separation method for the present and future, the ME detection methods based on ECL are considered in a relatively detailed way. Finally, possible trends for CE/ME-ECL in the near future are discussed.

  17. Evaluation on current-limiting performance of the YBCO thin-film wire considering electric coupling condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, H.-I.; Han, B.-S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Song, S.-S.; Han, T.-H.; Han, S.-C.

    2011-01-01

    The basic way to improve the performance of a superconducting current limiter is to apply and evaluate a superconducting device that is appropriate to the superconducting current limiter. Among the many types of superconducting devices, the YBCO thin film wire has excellent current-limiting performance that is appropriate for actual system application. For the application of the YBCO thin film wire to superconducting current limiters, its current-limiting performance as a unit device must be accurately evaluated, and measures to improve its current-limiting performance must be sought. Accordingly, to evaluate the current-limiting performance of the YBCO thin film wire, this study was conducted to evaluate its resistance-increasing trend, V max , T r , I max , I qt , and current-limiting rate as a unit device, after which the electric coupling condition that consists of a core and windings was used to evaluate the current-limiting performance of the YBCO thin film wire.

  18. Singular inextensible limit in the vibrations of post-buckled rods: Analytical derivation and role of boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    2014-02-01

    In-plane vibrations of an elastic rod clamped at both extremities are studied. The rod is modeled as an extensible planar Kirchhoff elastic rod under large displacements and rotations. Equilibrium configurations and vibrations around these configurations are computed analytically in the incipient post-buckling regime. Of particular interest is the variation of the first mode frequency as the load is increased through the buckling threshold. The loading type is found to have a crucial importance as the first mode frequency is shown to behave singularly in the zero thickness limit in the case of prescribed axial displacement, whereas a regular behavior is found in the case of prescribed axial load. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Analytical Investigation of the Limits for the In-Plane Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using a Suspended Membrane Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linseis, V.; Völklein, F.; Reith, H.; Woias, P.; Nielsch, K.

    2018-06-01

    An analytical study has been performed on the measurement capabilities of a 100-nm thin suspended membrane setup for the in-plane thermal conductivity measurements of thin film samples using the 3 ω measurement technique, utilizing a COSMOL Multiphysics simulation. The maximum measurement range under observance of given boundary conditions has been studied. Three different exemplary sample materials, with a thickness from the nanometer to the micrometer range and a thermal conductivity from 0.4 W/mK up to 100 W/mK have been investigated as showcase studies. The results of the simulations have been compared to a previously published evaluation model, in order to determine the deviation between both and thereby the measurement limit. As thermal transport properties are temperature dependent, all calculations refer to constant room temperature conditions.

  20. Mechanical coupling limits the density and quality of self-organized carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A. John

    2013-03-01

    Aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures are promising for many applications; however, as-grown CNT "forests" synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are typically low-density and mostly comprise tortuous defective CNTs. Here, we present evidence that the density and alignment of self-organized CNT growth is limited by mechanical coupling among CNTs in contact, in combination with their diameter-dependent growth rates. This study is enabled by comprehensive X-ray characterization of the spatially and temporally-varying internal morphology of CNT forests. Based on this data, we model the time evolution and diameter-dependent scaling of the ensuing mechanical forces on catalyst nanoparticles during CNT growth, which arise from the mismatch between the collective lengthening rate of the forest and the diameter-dependent growth rates of individual CNTs. In addition to enabling self-organization of CNTs into forests, time-varying forces between CNTs in contact dictate the hierarchical tortuous morphology of CNT forests, and may be sufficient to influence the structural quality of CNTs. These forces reach a maximum that is coincident with the maximum density observed in our growth process, and are proportional to CNT diameter. Therefore, we propose that improved manufacturing strategies for self-organized CNTs should consider both chemical and mechanical effects. This may be especially necessary to achieve high density CNT forests with low defect density, such as for improved thermal interfaces and high-permeability membranes.Aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures are promising for many applications; however, as-grown CNT "forests" synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are typically low-density and mostly comprise tortuous defective CNTs. Here, we present evidence that the density and alignment of self-organized CNT growth is limited by mechanical coupling among CNTs in contact, in combination with their diameter-dependent growth rates. This study is

  1. The Study of WGamma production at D0: Anomalous Coupling Limits and the Radiation Amplitude Zero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawloski, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    Wγ production is analyzed in the electron and muon decay channels with approximately 1 fb -1 of data from p(bar p) collisions that were produced at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and that were collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The inclusive p(bar p) → (ell)νγ cross section is measured in both channels and is found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation of 2.08 ± 0.05 PDF pb for events with a photon E T > 11 GeV, ΔR # ell# # sub γ) > 0.7, and (ell)νγ transverse mass greater than 90 GeV . The observed cross section is measured to be 2.05 ± 0.18 stat ± 0.10 sys ± 0.13 lumi pb and a.72 ± 0.19 stat ± 0.15 sys ± 0.10 lumi pb for the electron and muon channels respectively. The photon E T spectrum is examined for indications of anomalous WWγ couplings. No evidence is found, and the following one-dimensional limits are set at a 95% confidence level: -0.18 < λ < 0.18 and 0.16 < κ < 1.84. The observed charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and is indicative of the theoretically expected radiation amplitude zero. The distribution exhibits a bimodal structure which is expected from the destructive interference, with the unimodal hypothesis being ruled out at the 94% confidence level

  2. Analytic coupling and Sudakov effects in exclusive processes: pion and γ*γ→π0 form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanis, N.G.

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss in technical detail an infrared-finite factorization and optimized renormalization scheme for calculating exclusive processes, which enables the inclusion of transverse degrees of freedom without entailing suppression of calculated observables, like form factors. This is achieved by employing an analytic, i.e., infrared stable, running strong-coupling α s (Q 2 ) which removes the Landau singularity at Q 2 =Λ QCD 2 by a minimum power-behaved correction. The ensuing contributions to the cusp anomalous dimension - related to the Sudakov form factor - and to the quark anomalous dimension - which controls evolution - lead to an enhancement at high Q 2 of the hard part of exclusive amplitudes, calculated in perturbative QCD, while simultaneously improving its scaling behavior. The phenomenological implications of this framework are analyzed by applying it to the pion's electromagnetic form factor, including the NLO contribution to the hard-scattering amplitude, and also to the pion-photon transition at LO. For the pion wave function, an improved ansatz of the Brodsky-Huang-Lepage type is employed, which includes an effective (constituent-like) quark mass, m q =0.33 GeV. Predictions for both form factors are presented and compared to the experimental data, applying Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie commensurate scale setting. We find that the perturbative hard part prevails at momentum transfers above about 20 GeV 2 , while at lower Q 2 values the pion form factor is dominated by Feynman-type contributions. The theoretical prediction for the γ * γ→π 0 form factor indicates that the true pion distribution amplitude may be somewhat broader than the asymptotic one. (orig.)

  3. Coupling an analytical description of anti-scatter grids with simulation software of radiographic systems using Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M.; Tabary, J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of focused anti-scatter grids on digital radiographic systems with two-dimensional detectors produces acquisitions with a decreased scatter to primary ratio and thus improved contrast and resolution. Simulation software is of great interest in optimizing grid configuration according to a specific application. Classical simulators are based on complete detailed geometric descriptions of the grid. They are accurate but very time consuming since they use Monte Carlo code to simulate scatter within the high-frequency grids. We propose a new practical method which couples an analytical simulation of the grid interaction with a radiographic system simulation program. First, a two dimensional matrix of probability depending on the grid is created offline, in which the first dimension represents the angle of impact with respect to the normal to the grid lines and the other the energy of the photon. This matrix of probability is then used by the Monte Carlo simulation software in order to provide the final scattered flux image. To evaluate the gain of CPU time, we define the increasing factor as the increase of CPU time of the simulation with as opposed to without the grid. Increasing factors were calculated with the new model and with classical methods representing the grid with its CAD model as part of the object. With the new method, increasing factors are shorter by one to two orders of magnitude compared with the second one. These results were obtained with a difference in calculated scatter of less than five percent between the new and the classical method. (authors)

  4. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  5. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  6. Kirchhoff plate theory-based electromechanically-coupled analytical model considering inertia and stiffness effects of a surface-bonded piezoelectric patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Youn, Byeng D; Kim, Heung Soo

    2016-01-01

    As a compact and durable design concept, piezoelectric energy harvesting skin (PEH skin) has been recently proposed for self-powered electronic device applications. This study aims to develop an electromechanically-coupled analytical model of PEH skin considering the inertia and stiffness effects of a piezoelectric patch. Based on Kirchhoff plate theory, Hamilton’s principle is used to derive the electromechanically-coupled differential equation of motion. Due to the geometric discontinuity of the piezoelectric patch, the Rayleigh–Ritz method is applied to calculate the natural frequency and corresponding mode shapes. The electrical circuit equation is derived from Gauss’s law. Output voltage is estimated by solving the equation of motion and electrical circuit equation, simultaneously. For the purpose of evaluating the predictive capability, the results of the electromechanically-coupled analytical model are compared with those of the finite element method in a hierarchical manner. The outstanding merits of the electromechanically-coupled analytical model of PEH skin are three-fold: (1) consideration of the inertia and stiffness effects of the piezoelectric patches; (2) physical parameterization between the two-dimensional mechanical configuration and piezoelectric transduction; (3) manipulability of the twisting modes of a cantilever plate with a small aspect ratio. (paper)

  7. Demonstration of coupling correction below the per-mil limit in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Fartoukh, Stephane; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Wierichs, David Alexander; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Linear coupling between betatron motion in the transverse planes is one of the key optics parameters for any accelerator. It can substantially affect the nonlinear dynamics, influencing both lifetime and the damping of instabilities, as well as affecting the ability to measure and control the linear optics. A review of published material revealed no account of coupling having been corrected significantly below the per-mil level in any hadron accelerator. This note reports the achievement of a sub-per-mil coupling correction during an LHC Machine Development study.

  8. Multielement detection limits and sample nebulization efficiencies of an improved ultrasonic nebulizer and a conventional pneumatic nebulizer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two important aspects of the analytical performance of a newly developed ultrasonic nebulizer and a specially designed pneumatic nebulizer have been compared for use in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The ultrasonic nebulizer, when combined with a conventional aerosol desolvation apparatus, provided an order of magnitude or more improvement in simultaneous multielement detection limits as compared to those obtained when the pneumatic nebulizer was used either with or without desolvation. Application of a novel method for direct measurement of the overall efficiency of nebulization to the two systems showed that an approximately tenfold greater rate of sample delivery to the plasma torch was primarily responsible for the superior detection limits afforded by the ultrasonic nebulizer. A unique feature of the ultrasonic nebulizer described is the protection against chemical attack which is achieved by completely enclosing the transducer in an acoustically coupled borosilicate glass cylinder. Direct sample introduction, convenient sample change, and rapid cleanout are other important characteristics of the system which make it an attractive alternate to pneumatic nebulizer systems

  9. Experimental control of the solvent load of inductively coupled argon plasmas and effects of the chloroform plasma load on their analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen, F. J. M. J.; Kreuning, G.; Balke, J.

    The solvent plasma load ( QSPL) of water, methanol and chloroform was established as a function of the liquid uptake rate ( QL) by using a continuous weighing method for recording the rate differences between the relevant liquid streams. The shape of the QL vs QSPL curves revealed that the liquid uptake rate is a parameter much too insensitive to serve as a criterion for assessing the stability of "organic" plasmas. The quantity "maximum tolerable solvent plasma load" is suggested as a more useful criterion. Effects of rf power, observation height and solvent plasma load on the properties of chloroform inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are reported. The measurement of the axial distribution of net line intensities of representative spectral lines showed that the behaviour of emission lines as to their "hardness" is essentially the same in ICPs loaded with chloroform or water. The chloroform plasma load was regulated by the use of a condenser of which the temperature was varied in a range between -50°C and +20°C. Analytical performance characteristics such as net line and background intensities, signal-to-background ratios, and relative standard deviations of the background signal are presented for ICPs with various chloroform loads. Two sets of experimental conditions were finally selected for simultaneous multielement analysis of chloroform solvent solutions, one with and one without aerosol cooling. In the case that aerosol cooling was applied, the detection limits were similar to those for aqueous plasmas. Without aerosol cooling the detection limits were up to an order of magnitude poorer. An attempt has been made to catagorize organic solvents on the basis of both volatility and their behaviour in ICP systems. For a better understanding of the consequences of solvent volatility in ICP-AES it is of importance to consider separately the properties that determine the volatility of liquids, viz. the evaporation rate and the saturation vapour pressure.

  10. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasi-atomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them...

  11. Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stošić, Dušan; Auroux, Aline

    Basic principles of calorimetry coupled with other techniques are introduced. These methods are used in heterogeneous catalysis for characterization of acidic, basic and red-ox properties of solid catalysts. Estimation of these features is achieved by monitoring the interaction of various probe molecules with the surface of such materials. Overview of gas phase, as well as liquid phase techniques is given. Special attention is devoted to coupled calorimetry-volumetry method. Furthermore, the influence of different experimental parameters on the results of these techniques is discussed, since it is known that they can significantly influence the evaluation of catalytic properties of investigated materials.

  12. Mass of the Stabilized Radion in the Limit of Finite Quartic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tofighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an exact treatment of the modulus stabilization condition with the general boundary conditions of the bulk scalar field in the Randall-Sundrum model. We find analytical expressions for the value of the modulus and the mass of the radion.

  13. Real-time dynamic coupling of GPC-enhanced diffraction-limited focal spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Kopylov, Oleksii; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling of an optically manipulated wave-guided optical waveguide (WOW) using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. In this work, the generation of the coupling focal spots is done in real-time following the position of the WOW. Object-tracking routine has been added in the trapping program to get the position of the WOW. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the WOWs which may be useful in some application. In addition, we include a GPC light shaper module in the holography setup to efficiently illuminate the spatial light modulator (SLM). The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our WOWs for potential applications in stimulation and nonlinear optics.

  14. Real-time Dynamic Coupling of GPC-enhanced Diffraction-limited Focal Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Kopylov, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling of an optically manipulated wave-guided optical waveguide (WOW) using diffractive techniques on a “point and shoot” approach. In this work, the generation of the coupling focal spots is done in real-time following the position of the WOW....... Object-tracking routine has been added in the trapping program to get the position of the WOW. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the WOWs which may be useful in some application. In addition, we include a GPC light shaper module in the holography setup to efficiently illuminate...... the spatial light modulator (SLM). The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our WOWs for potential applications in stimulation and nonlinear optics....

  15. Four point function of R-currents in N=4 SYM in the Regge limit at weak coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Mischler, A.M.; Salvadore, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-04-15

    We compute, in N = 4 super Yang-Mills, the four point correlation function of R-currents in the Regge limit in the leading logarithmic approximation at weak coupling. Such a correlator is the closest analog to photon-photon scattering within QCD, and there is a well defined procedure to perform the analogous computation at strong coupling via AdS/CFT. The main result of this paper is, on the gauge theory side, the proof of Regge factorization and the explicit computation of the R-current impact factors. (orig.)

  16. Simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with nano quantity analyte detector

    OpenAIRE

    Honggen Zhang; Zhenyu Wang; Oscar Liu

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation was developed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a nano quantitation analytical detector (UHPLC–NQAD). All components in kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 were well separated on an Acquity BEH C18 column. Mobile phase A was 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water and mobile phase B was acetonitrile. A gradient elution sequence was programed initially with 60%...

  17. Nearly perturbative lattice-motivated QCD coupling with zero IR limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd; Kögerler, Reinhart; Kondrashuk, Igor

    2018-03-01

    The product of the gluon dressing function and the square of the ghost dressing function in the Landau gauge can be regarded to represent, apart from the inverse power corrections 1/{Q}2n, a nonperturbative generalization { \\mathcal A }({Q}2) of the perturbative QCD running coupling a({Q}2) (\\equiv {α }s({Q}2)/π ). Recent large volume lattice calculations for these dressing functions indicate that the coupling defined in such a way goes to zero as { \\mathcal A }({Q}2)∼ {Q}2 when the squared momenta Q 2 go to zero ({Q}2\\ll 1 {GeV}}2). In this work we construct such a QCD coupling { \\mathcal A }({Q}2) which fulfills also various other physically motivated conditions. At high momenta it becomes the underlying perturbative coupling a({Q}2) to a very high precision. And at intermediate low squared momenta {Q}2∼ 1 {GeV}}2 it gives results consistent with the data of the semihadronic τ lepton decays as measured by OPAL and ALEPH. The coupling is constructed in a dispersive way, resulting as a byproduct in the holomorphic behavior of { \\mathcal A }({Q}2) in the complex Q 2-plane which reflects the holomorphic behavior of the spacelike QCD observables. Application of the Borel sum rules to τ-decay V + A spectral functions allows us to obtain values for the gluon (dimension-4) condensate and the dimension-6 condensate, which reproduce the measured OPAL and ALEPH data to a significantly better precision than the perturbative \\overline{MS}} coupling approach.

  18. Benchmark Tests to Develop Analytical Time-Temperature Limit for HANA-6 Cladding for Compliance with New LOCA Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Yong; Jang, Hun; Lim, Jea Young; Kim, Dae Il; Kim, Yoon Ho; Mok, Yong Kyoon [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    According to 10CFR50.46c, two analytical time and temperature limits for breakaway oxidation and postquench ductility (PQD) should be determined by approved experimental procedure as described in NRC Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.222 and 1.223. According to RG 1.222 and 1.223, rigorous qualification requirements for test system are required, such as thermal and weight gain benchmarks. In order to meet these requirements, KEPCO NF has developed the new special facility to evaluate LOCA performance of zirconium alloy cladding. In this paper, qualification results for test facility and HT oxidation model for HANA-6 are summarized. The results of thermal benchmark tests of LOCA HT oxidation tester is summarized as follows. 1. The best estimate HT oxidation model of HANA- 6 was developed for the vender proprietary HT oxidation model. 2. In accordance with the RG 1.222 and 1.223, Benchmark tests were performed by using LOCA HT oxidation tester 3. The maximum axial and circumferential temperature difference are ± 9 .deg. C and ± 2 .deg. C at 1200 .deg. C, respectively. At the other temperature conditions, temperature difference is less than 1200 .deg. C result. Thermal benchmark test results meet the requirements of NRC RG 1.222 and 1.223.

  19. Analytical evaluation of nebulizers for the introduction of acetic acid extracts aiming at the determination of trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gois, Jefferson S. de; Maranhao, Tatiane de A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Fernando J.S. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Gerencia de Meio Ambiente, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frescura, Vera L.A.; Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G., E-mail: daniel.borges@ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    Most of the official procedures aiming at classification of solid waste toxicity take into account metal solubility and bioavailability by means of extraction experiments using acetic acid solutions. Hence, the aim of this work was to investigate and optimize conditions to suppress the effect of acetic acid on the determination of trace elements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The performance of four nebulizers (cross-flow (CFN), ultrasonic (USN), Meinhard (MN) and MicroMist (MMN)) were compared as to their efficiency in minimizing spectral and non-spectral effects on the determination of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb and Se, with the ultimate goal to analyze acetic acid extracts obtained from solid waste residues. Operating conditions (desolvation temperatures for USN, RF power and nebulizer gas flow rates) were optimized individually for each nebulizer and for all analytes maintained in 0.14 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} solutions and in solutions prepared with acetic acid and acetic acid + NaOH, adjusted to pH 2.88 and 4.93, respectively. Pronounced non-spectral interferences for {sup 75}As and {sup 82}Se were observed in the presence of acetic acid for CF and MN, although to a less extent also for MMN and USN. Signal increase for blank solutions measured at m/z 208 ({sup 208}Pb) for CFN and MN, 107 ({sup 107}Ag) for USN and MN coupled to a cyclonic chamber and, m/z 82 ({sup 82}Se) for USN was observed, indicating an increased risk of spectral interference upon an increase in the concentration of acetic acid. Signal increase at specific m/z ratios, however, was not significant when the MMN was used, with the exception of m/z 52 ({sup 52}Cr) in acetic acid solutions, arising from the formation of {sup 40}Ar{sup 12}C{sup +}. This same effect was noticed for all nebulizers, although at noticeably different intensities. A signal stability study was performed, demonstrating that variations in the analytical signal were within a 20% range for all analytes

  20. Application of Enzyme Coupling Reactions to Shift Thermodynamically Limited Biocatalytic Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    , it can be challenging to combine several engineered enzymes in vitro for the conversion of non-natural substrates. In this mini-review we focus on enzyme coupling reactions as a tool to alleviate thermodynamic constraints in synthetically useful biocatalytic reactions. The implications of thermodynamic...... shift the equilibrium of otherwise thermodynamically unfavourable reactions to give a higher conversion of the target product. By coupling an energetically unfavourable reaction with a more favourable one, the multi-enzyme cascade mimics the approach taken in nature in metabolic pathways. Nevertheless...

  1. Ultrathin Limit of Exchange Bias Coupling at Oxide Multiferroic/Ferromagnetic Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijben, Mark; Yu, P.; Martin, L.W.; Molegraaf, Hajo; Chu, Y.H.; Holcomb, M.B.; Balke, N.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Ramesh, R.

    2013-01-01

    Exchange bias coupling at the multiferroic- ferromagnetic interface in BiFeO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 heterostructures exhibits a critical thickness for ultrathin BiFeO3 layers of 5 unit cells (2 nm). Linear dichroism measurements demonstrate the dependence on the BiFeO3 layer thickness with a strong

  2. Study of the $e^+ e^- \\to Z \\gamma$ Process at LEP and Limits on Triple Neutral-Gauge-Boson Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    The process e^+e^- --> Z gamma, where the Z boson decays into hadrons or neutrinos, is studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV up to 209 GeV. The cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings, forbidden in the Standard Model at tree level, are derived. Limits on the energy scales at which the anomalous couplings could be manifest are set. They range from 0.3 TeV to 2.3 TeV depending on the new physics effect under consideration.

  3. Crossover to Fermi-liquid behavior for weakly-coupled Luttinger liquids in the anisotropic large-dimension limit

    OpenAIRE

    Arrigoni, E.

    1999-01-01

    We study the problem of the crossover from one- to higher-dimensional metals by considering an array of Luttinger liquids (one-dimensional chains) coupled by a weak interchain hopping {\\tp.} We evaluate the exact asymptotic low-energy behavior of the self-energy in the anisotropic infinite-dimension limit. This limit extends the dinamical mean field concept to the case of a chain embedded in a self-consistent medium. The system flows to a Fermi-liquid fixed point for energies below the dimens...

  4. Class of very simple gauge theories which remain renormalizable even in the limit of infinite gauge coupling constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptanoglu, S.

    1983-01-01

    A class of local gauge theories based on compact semisimple Lie groups is studied in the limit of infinite gauge coupling constant (g = infinity). In general, in this limit, the gauge fields become auxiliary in all gauge theories, and the system develops a richer structure of constraints. Unfortunately for most gauge theories, this limit turns out to be too singular to quantize and the theory ceases to be renormalizable. For a special class of gauge theories, however, where there are no fermions and there is only one multiplet of scalars in the adjoint representation, we prove that a consistent renormalizable quantum theory exists even in this very singular limit. We trace this exceptional behavior to a new local translationlike symmetry in the functional space that this class of gauge models possesses in the limit of infinite gauge coupling constant. By carrying out the constraint analysis, evaluating the Faddeev-Popov-Senjanovic determinant, and doing the functional integrations over the canonical momenta, the gauge fields, and most of the components of the scalar fields, we obtain an extremely simple result with no non-Abelian structure left in it. For example, for the group SU(2), the final answer reduces to the theory of a one-component self-interacting real phi 4 scalar field theory. Throughout this paper, we use functional methods and make no approximations; our results are nonperturbative and exact. We also discuss some of the possible implications of our results

  5. Contribution to the development of new analytical methods by the coupling between capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and ESI-MS): applications to the nuclear and biological fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitois, A.

    2006-04-01

    The coupling between chromatographic and electrophoretic separation techniques and mass spectrometry is used to combine the efficiency of the separation technique to the selectivity and sensitivity of the detectors. In this work, the number of applications of the CE-MS couplings has been increased. New analytical methods have been set up in the nuclear and biological fields. New analytical methods for the determination of fission products (cesium and lanthanides) have been developed by CE-ICP-MS. They enable to determine both concentration and isotopic composition of the fission products for very low detection limits (ng/mL by CE-Q-ICPMS, pg/mL by CE-HR-ICP-MS), since all the isobaric interferences are resolved. Moreover, only some nano-liters of sample are necessary to perform the analysis. These method have been applied with success to a simulated sample of spent fuel, to a nuclear sample from PUREX process and to a leaching of MOX fuel. Then, lanthanides have been analysed by CE-ESI-MS and the capability of ESI-MS to provide structural information has been studied. Elementary information has been obtained for strong potentials. Structural information has been obtained for low potentials. Finally, a new analytical method by CE-ESI-MS for the determination of 10B-boronophenylalanine (10B-BPA) has been developed for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It has been applied to the cellular lines F98 and HUVEC. This CE-ESI-MS method has been validated by HR-ICP-MS. It enables a direct quantification of the chemical form 10B-BPA in samples of limited size (some nano-liters) and for low concentrations (ng/mL). As a consequence, this CE-ESI-MS method has enabled the study of the kinetics of 10B-BPA release and uptake for the F98 cells. (author)

  6. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  7. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: Evaluation of first-order electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Dipayan, E-mail: datta@uni-mainz.de; Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: gauss@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH{sub 2}Cl, ClO{sub 2}, and SiCl radicals.

  8. Fabricating Simple Wax Screen-Printing Paper-Based Analytical Devices to Demonstrate the Concept of Limiting Reagent in Acid- Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwong, Pithakpong; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a low-cost, simple, and rapid fabrication of paper-based analytical devices (PADs) using a wax screen-printing method is reported here. The acid-base reaction is implemented in the simple PADs to demonstrate to students the chemistry concept of a limiting reagent. When a fixed concentration of base reacts with a gradually…

  9. Semi-analytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We present and validate a semi-analytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained, ......-trivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest.......We present and validate a semi-analytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained......, and for two types of two-dimensional PhCs, with one and two cavities side-coupled to an extended waveguide, the theory is validated against numerically exact computations. For the single cavity, a slightly asymmetric spectrum is found, which the QNM theory reproduces, and for two cavities a non...

  10. Network coupling via a current-limiting throttle with a high-Tc superconductor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochenek, E.; Fischer, R.; Lampen, U.; Voigt, H.

    1989-01-01

    A current-limiting concept is tested by means of a choke with a current-responsive inductivity for linking three-phase current supplies. The choke has a core of a material with a high transition point T c . In the case of nominal current, the core is superconductive and keeps the resulting inductance of the choke low by shield currents. In the case of overload, the core passes into the normal conductive state due to the increased magnetic field of the winding. The resulting inductance of the choke rises and, in doing so, effects current limitation. (orig.) [de

  11. Limitations of Evolutionary Theory in Explaining Marital Satisfaction and Stability of Couple Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Cabrera García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The explanation of marital satisfaction and stability in trajectories of couple relationships has been the central interest in different studies (Karney, Bradbury. & Johnson, 1999; Sabatelli & Ripoll, 2004; Schoebi, Karney & Bradbury, 2012. However, there are still several questions and unknown aspects surrounding the topic. Within this context, the present reflection seeks to analyze whether the principles of Evolutionary Theory suffice to explain three marital trajectories in terms of satisfaction and stability. With this in mind, we have included other explanations proposed by the Psychosocial Theory that Evolutionary Theory does not refer to in order to better understand mating behavior. Moreover, other factors that could account for satisfied and stable relationships were analyzed. Suggestions for future investigations include the analysis of other marital trajectories that may or may not end in separation or divorce but are not included in this article.

  12. Benthic Foraminifera, Food in the Deep Sea, and Limits to Bentho-Pelagic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.; Boscolo-Galazzo, F.; Arreguin-Rodrigu, G. J.; Ortiz, S.; Alegret, L.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea is the largest habitat on Earth, contains highly diverse biota, but is very little known. Many of its abundant benthic biota (e.g., nematodes) are not preserved in the fossil record. Calcareous and agglutinated benthic foraminifera (unicellular eukaryotes, Rhizaria; efficient dispersers) and ostracodes (Animalia, Crustacea; non-efficient dispersers) are the most common organisms providing a fossil record of deep-sea environments. Very little food is supplied to the deep-sea, because organic matter produced by photosynthesis is largely degraded before it arrives at the seafloor. Only a few % of organic matter is carried to the ocean bottom by 'marine snow', with its particle size and behavior in the water column controlled by surface ecosystem structure, including type of dominant primary producers (diatoms, cyanobacteria). Food supply and its seasonality are generally seen as the dominant control on benthic assemblages (combined with oxygenation), providing bentho-pelagic coupling between primary and benthic productivity. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages (composition and density) thus are used widely to estimate past productivity, especially during episodes of global climate change, ocean acidification, and mass extinction of primary producers. We show that some environmental circumstances may result in interrupting bentho-pelagic coupling, e.g. through lateral supply of organic matter along continental margins (adding more refractory organic matter), through trophic focusing and/or fine particle winnowing on seamounts (giving an advantage to suspension feeders), and through carbonate undersaturation (giving advantage to infaunal over epifaunal calcifyers). In addition, increased remineralization of organic matter combined with increased metabolic rates may cause assemblages to reflect more oligotrophic conditions at stable primary productivity during periods of global warming. As a result, benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates must be carefully

  13. New approach to the theory of coupled πNN-NN system. III. A three-body limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.; Mizutani, T.

    1980-01-01

    In the limit where the pion is restricted to be emitted only by the nucleon that first absorbed it, it is shown that the equations previously developed to describe the couple πNN (πd) - NN system reduce to conventional three-body equations. Specifically, it is found in this limit that the input πN p 11 amplitude which, put on-shell, is directly related to the experimental phase shift, contrary to the original equations where the direct (dressed) nucleon pole term and the non-pole part of this partial wave enter separately. The present study clarifies the limitation of pure three-body approach to the πNN-NN problems as well as suggests a rare opportunity of observing a possible resonance behavior in the non-pole part of the πN P 11 amplitude through πd experiments

  14. Grey radiative transfer in binary statistical media with material temperature coupling: asymptotic limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.; Olson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Simplified models for the unconditional ensemble-averaged radiation intensity and material energy are developed for radiative transfer in binary statistical media. Asymptotic analysis is used to construct an effective transport model with homogenized opacities in two limits. In the first, the material properties are assumed to have low contrast on average, and is shown to correctly reproduce the well-known atomic mix model in both time-dependent and equilibrium situations. Our analysis successfully resolves an inconsistency previously noted in the literature with the application of the standard definition of the atomic mix limit to radiative transfer in participating random media. In the second limit considered, the materials are assumed to have highly contrasting opacities, yielding a reduced transport model with effective scattering. The existence of these limits requires the mean chunk sizes to be independent of the photon direction and this creates an ambiguity in the interpretation of the models when the underlying stochastic geometry is comprised of alternating one-dimensional slabs. A consistent one-dimensional setting is defined and the asymptotic models are numerically validated over a broad range of physical parameter values

  15. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  16. Vertex function for the coupling of an electron with intramolecular phonons: Exact results in the antiadiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Y.; Higuchi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's-function techniques, especially the one developed in the preceding paper [Takada, Phys. Rev. B 52, 12 708 (1995)], are employed to calculate the electron-phonon vertex part as well as the electronic self-energy exactly on both real- and imaginary-frequency axes in the electron-phonon Holstein model with the on-site Coulomb repulsion in the limit in which the intramolecular phonon energy ω 0 is much larger than the electronic bandwidth. The rigorous vertex part is found to diverge at the frequencies at which an electron is locked by such local phonons with an infinitely strong effective coupling. Characteristic frequencies of this divergence, which are not equal to multiples of ω 0 , are calculated as a function of the electron-phonon bare coupling constant. Our results for the self-energy are checked successfully with the exact ones obtained by the Lang-Firsov canonical transformation

  17. A new analytical approach for limit cycles and quasi-periodic solutions of nonlinear oscillators: the example of the forced Van der Pol Duffing oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Anant Kant; Ramamohan, T R; Srinivas, S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a technique to obtain limit cycles and quasi-periodic solutions of forced nonlinear oscillators. We apply this technique to the forced Van der Pol oscillator and the forced Van der Pol Duffing oscillator and obtain for the first time their limit cycles (periodic) and quasi-periodic solutions analytically. We introduce a modification of the homotopy analysis method to obtain these solutions. We minimize the square residual error to obtain accurate approximations to these solutions. The obtained analytical solutions are convergent and agree well with numerical solutions even at large times. Time trajectories of the solution, its first derivative and phase plots are presented to confirm the validity of the proposed approach. We also provide rough criteria for the determination of parameter regimes which lead to limit cycle or quasi-periodic behaviour. (papers)

  18. Limiting efficiency of generalized realistic c-Si solar cells coupled to ideal up-converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig M.; Conibeer, Gavin J.

    2012-11-01

    The detailed balance model of photovoltaic up-conversion is revised for the specific case of a c-Si solar cell under the AM1.5G solar spectrum. The limiting efficiency of an ideal solar cell with a band gap of 1.117 eV may be increased from approximately 33% to 40% with ideal up-conversion. However, real solar cells do not demonstrate the step-function absorption characteristic assumed in the standard detailed balance model. Here, we use tabulated Si refractive index data to develop a generalized model of a realistic conventional c-Si solar cell. The model incorporates optical design and material parameters such as free carrier absorption that have a non-trivial impact on the operation of the up-conversion layer. While these modifications are shown to decrease the absolute limiting efficiency, the benefit of up-conversion is shown to be relatively greater.

  19. Affordances and Limitations of Learning Analytics for Computer-Assisted Language Learning: A Case Study of the VITAL Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelan, Anouk; Fastré, Greet; Verjans, Martine; Martin, Niels; Janssenswillen, Gert; Creemers, Mathijs; Lieben, Jonas; Depaire, Benoît; Thomas, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Learning analytics (LA) has emerged as a field that offers promising new ways to prevent drop-out and aid retention. However, other research suggests that large datasets of learner activity can be used to understand online learning behaviour and improve pedagogy. While the use of LA in language learning has received little attention to date,…

  20. Development of precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for experimental and environmental studies of their behavior. In order to obtain precise isotopic data using MC-ICP-MS, the mass discrimination effect was corrected by an exponential law correction method. The resulting isotopic data demonstrated that highly precise isotopic analyses (better than 0.1 per mille as 2SD) could be achieved. We also adopted a de-solvating nebulizer system to improve the sensitivity. This system could minimize the water load into the plasma and provided about five times larger intensity of analyte than a conventional nebulizer system did. (author)

  1. Study of the $W^+ W^- \\gamma$ Process and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Boson Couplings at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Violini, P.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The process e+e- --> W+ W- \\gamma is studied using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP. New results, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427.4 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies from 192~GeV to 207~GeV, are presented. The W+W-\\gamma cross sections are measured to be in agreement with Standard Model expectations. No hints of anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings are observed. Limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived using also the process e+e- --> \

  2. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  3. Energy density functionals from the strong-coupling limit applied to the anions of the He isoelectronic series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirtschink, André; Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Umrigar, C. J.; Morgan, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Anions and radicals are important for many applications including environmental chemistry, semiconductors, and charge transfer, but are poorly described by the available approximate energy density functionals. Here we test an approximate exchange-correlation functional based on the exact strong-coupling limit of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional on the prototypical case of the He isoelectronic series with varying nuclear charge Z − and to capture in general the physics of loosely bound anions, with a tendency to strongly overbind that can be proven mathematically. We also include corrections based on the uniform electron gas which improve the results

  4. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Wilten; Tripp, Bryan; Scott, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks.

  5. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilten eNicola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF. The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks

  6. Simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with nano quantity analyte detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggen Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation was developed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a nano quantitation analytical detector (UHPLC–NQAD. All components in kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 were well separated on an Acquity BEH C18 column. Mobile phase A was 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA in water and mobile phase B was acetonitrile. A gradient elution sequence was programed initially with 60% organic solvent, slowly increased to 100% within 8 min. The flow rate was 0.7 mL/min. Good linearity (r>0.95 was obtained in the range of 27.6–1381.1 μg/mL for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 0.8–202.0 μg/mL for caprylic acid triglyceride and 2.7–221.9 μg/mL for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. The relative standard deviations (RSD ranged from 0.6% to 1.7% for intra-day precision and from 0.4% to 2.7% for inter-day precision. The overall recoveries (accuracy were 99.7%–101.4% for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 96.7%–99.6% for caprylic acid triglyceride, and 94.1%–103.3% for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. Quantification limits (QL were determined as 27.6 μg/mL for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 0.8 μg/mL for caprylic acid triglyceride, and 2.7 μg/mL for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. No interferences were observed in the retention time ranges of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, QL, and robustness. The proposed method has been applied to microemulsion formulation analyses with good recoveries (82.2%–103.4%.

  7. Simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with nano quantity analyte detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honggen; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Oscar

    2016-02-01

    A novel method for simultaneous determination of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 in microemulsion formulation was developed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a nano quantitation analytical detector (UHPLC-NQAD). All components in kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812 were well separated on an Acquity BEH C 18 column. Mobile phase A was 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water and mobile phase B was acetonitrile. A gradient elution sequence was programed initially with 60% organic solvent, slowly increased to 100% within 8 min. The flow rate was 0.7 mL/min. Good linearity ( r >0.95) was obtained in the range of 27.6-1381.1 μg/mL for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 0.8-202.0 μg/mL for caprylic acid triglyceride and 2.7-221.9 μg/mL for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. The relative standard deviations (RSD) ranged from 0.6% to 1.7% for intra-day precision and from 0.4% to 2.7% for inter-day precision. The overall recoveries (accuracy) were 99.7%-101.4% for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 96.7%-99.6% for caprylic acid triglyceride, and 94.1%-103.3% for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. Quantification limits (QL) were determined as 27.6 μg/mL for polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate in kolliphor HS15, 0.8 μg/mL for caprylic acid triglyceride, and 2.7 μg/mL for capric acid triglyceride in miglyol 812. No interferences were observed in the retention time ranges of kolliphor HS15 and miglyol 812. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, QL, and robustness. The proposed method has been applied to microemulsion formulation analyses with good recoveries (82.2%-103.4%).

  8. Semiclassical analysis of the weak-coupling limit of SU(2) lattice gauge theory: The subspace of constant fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Wu, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the first part of a systematic semiclassical analysis of the weak-coupling limit of lattice gauge theories, using the Hamiltonian formulation. The model consists of an N 3 cubic lattice of pure SU(2) Yang-Mills theory, and in this first part we limit ourselves to the subspace of constant field configurations. We investigate the flow of classical trajectories, with a particular emphasis on the existence and location of caustics. There the ground-state wave function is expected to peak. It is found that regions densely filled with caustics are very close to the origin, i.e., in the domain of weak field configurations. This strongly supports the expectation that caustics are essential for quantities of physical interest

  9. Affordances and limitations of learning analytics for computer-assisted language learning: a case study of the VITAL project

    OpenAIRE

    Gelan, Anouk; Fastré, Greet; Verjans, Martine; Martin, Niels; Janssenswillen, Gert; Creemers, Mathijs; Lieben, Jonas; Depaire, Benoît; Thomas, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Learning analytics (LA) has emerged as a field that offers promising new ways to prevent drop-out and aid retention. However, other research suggests that large datasets of learner activity can be used to understand online learning behaviour and improve pedagogy. While the use of LA in language learning has received little attention to date, available research suggests that LA could provide valuable insights into task design for instructors and materials designers, as well as help students wi...

  10. Application of a modified flux-coupling type superconducting fault current limiter to transient performance enhancement of micro-grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei, E-mail: stclchen1982@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zheng, Feng; Deng, Changhong; Li, Shichun; Li, Miao; Liu, Hui [School of Electrical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhu, Lin [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996 (United States); Guo, Fang [Department of Substation, Guang Dong Electric Power Design Institute, Guangzhou 510663 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A modified flux-coupling type SFCL is suggested to enhance the transient performance of a micro-grid. • The SFCL’s main contribution is to improve the micro-grid’s fault ride-through capability. • The SFCL also can make the micro-grid carry out a smooth transition between its grid-connected and islanded modes. • The simulations show that the SFCL can availably strengthen the micro-grid’s voltage and frequency stability. - Abstract: Concerning the application and development of a micro-grid system which is designed to accommodate high penetration of intermittent renewable resources, one of the main issues is related to an increase in the fault-current level. It is crucial to ensure the micro-grid’s operational stability and service reliability when a fault occurs in the main network. In this paper, our research group suggests a modified flux-coupling type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to enhance the transient performance of a typical micro-grid system. The SFCL is installed at the point of common coupling (PCC) between the main network and the micro-grid, and it is expected to actively improve the micro-grid’s fault ride-through capability. And for some specific faults, the micro-grid should disconnect from the main network, and the SFCL’s contribution is to make the micro-grid carry out a smooth transition between its grid-connected and islanded modes. Related theory derivation, technical discussion and simulation analysis are performed. From the demonstrated results, applying the SFCL can effectively limit the fault current, maintain the power balance, and enhance the voltage and frequency stability of the micro-grid.

  11. Application of a modified flux-coupling type superconducting fault current limiter to transient performance enhancement of micro-grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lei; Zheng, Feng; Deng, Changhong; Li, Shichun; Li, Miao; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Lin; Guo, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A modified flux-coupling type SFCL is suggested to enhance the transient performance of a micro-grid. • The SFCL’s main contribution is to improve the micro-grid’s fault ride-through capability. • The SFCL also can make the micro-grid carry out a smooth transition between its grid-connected and islanded modes. • The simulations show that the SFCL can availably strengthen the micro-grid’s voltage and frequency stability. - Abstract: Concerning the application and development of a micro-grid system which is designed to accommodate high penetration of intermittent renewable resources, one of the main issues is related to an increase in the fault-current level. It is crucial to ensure the micro-grid’s operational stability and service reliability when a fault occurs in the main network. In this paper, our research group suggests a modified flux-coupling type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to enhance the transient performance of a typical micro-grid system. The SFCL is installed at the point of common coupling (PCC) between the main network and the micro-grid, and it is expected to actively improve the micro-grid’s fault ride-through capability. And for some specific faults, the micro-grid should disconnect from the main network, and the SFCL’s contribution is to make the micro-grid carry out a smooth transition between its grid-connected and islanded modes. Related theory derivation, technical discussion and simulation analysis are performed. From the demonstrated results, applying the SFCL can effectively limit the fault current, maintain the power balance, and enhance the voltage and frequency stability of the micro-grid.

  12. Kinetic coupling of phosphate release, force generation and rate-limiting steps in the cross-bridge cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Robert; Tesi, Chiara

    2017-08-01

    A basic goal in muscle research is to understand how the cyclic ATPase activity of cross-bridges is converted into mechanical force. A direct approach to study the chemo-mechanical coupling between P i release and the force-generating step is provided by the kinetics of force response induced by a rapid change in [P i ]. Classical studies on fibres using caged-P i discovered that rapid increases in [P i ] induce fast force decays dependent on final [P i ] whose kinetics were interpreted to probe a fast force-generating step prior to P i release. However, this hypothesis was called into question by studies on skeletal and cardiac myofibrils subjected to P i jumps in both directions (increases and decreases in [P i ]) which revealed that rapid decreases in [P i ] trigger force rises with slow kinetics, similar to those of calcium-induced force development and mechanically-induced force redevelopment at the same [P i ]. A possible explanation for this discrepancy came from imaging of individual sarcomeres in cardiac myofibrils, showing that the fast force decay upon increase in [P i ] results from so-called sarcomere 'give'. The slow force rise upon decrease in [P i ] was found to better reflect overall sarcomeres cross-bridge kinetics and its [P i ] dependence, suggesting that the force generation coupled to P i release cannot be separated from the rate-limiting transition. The reasons for the different conclusions achieved in fibre and myofibril studies are re-examined as the recent findings on cardiac myofibrils have fundamental consequences for the coupling between P i release, rate-limiting steps and force generation. The implications from P i -induced force kinetics of myofibrils are discussed in combination with historical and recent models of the cross-bridge cycle.

  13. Analytical Approach to Circulating Current Mitigation in Hexagram Converter-Based Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems Using Multiwinding Coupled Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullrahman A. Al-Shamma’a

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The hexagram multilevel converter (HMC is composed of six conventional two-level voltage source converters (VSCs, where each VSC module is connected to a string of PV arrays. The VSC modules are connected through inductors, which are essential to minimize the circulating current. Selecting inductors with suitable inductance is no simple process, where the inductance value should be large to minimize the circulating current as well as small to reduce an extra voltage drop. This paper analyzes the utilization of a multiwinding (e.g., two, three, and six windings coupled inductor to interconnect the six VSC modules instead of six single inductors, to minimize the circulating current inside the HMC. Then, a theoretical relationship between the total impedance to the circulating current, the number of coupled inductor windings, and the magnetizing inductance is derived. Owing to the coupled inductors, the impedance on the circulating current path is a multiple of six times the magnetizing inductance, whereas the terminal voltage is slightly affected by the leakage inductance. The HMC is controlled to work under variable solar radiation, providing active power to the grid. Additional functions such as DSTATCOM, during daytime, are also demonstrated. The controller performance is found to be satisfactory for both active and reactive power supplies.

  14. Enhanced fluorescence sensitivity by coupling yttrium-analyte complexes and three-way fast high-performance liquid chromatography data modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Mirta R.; Culzoni, María J., E-mail: mculzoni@fbcb.unl.edu.ar; Goicoechea, Héctor C., E-mail: hgoico@fbcb.unl.edu.ar

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a sensitive chromatographic method for the analysis of seven fluoroquinolones (FQs) in environmental water samples, by coupling yttrium-analyte complex and three-way chromatographic data modeling. This method based on the use of HPLC-FSFD does not require complex or tedious sample treatments or enrichment processes before the analysis, due to the significant fluorescence increments of the analytes reached by the presence of Y{sup 3+}. Enhancement achieved for the FQs signals obtained after Y{sup 3+} addition reaches 103- to 1743-fold. Prediction results corresponding to the application of MCR-ALS to the validation set showed relative error of prediction (REP%) values below 10% in all cases. A recovery study that includes the simultaneous determination of the seven FQs in three different environmental aqueous matrices was conducted. The recovery studies assert the efficiency and the accuracy of the proposed method. The LOD values calculated are in the order of part per trillion (below 0.5 ng mL{sup −1} for all the FQs, except for enoxacin). It is noteworthy to mention that the method herein proposed, which does not include pre-concentration steps, allows reaching LOD values in the same order of magnitude than those achieved by more sophisticated methods based on SPE and UHPLC-MS/MS. - Highlights: • Highly sensitive method for the analysis of seven fluoroquinolones. • Coupling of yttrium-analyte complex and three-way modeling. • Complex or tedious sample treatments or enrichment processes are nor required. • Accuracy on the quantitation of fluoroquinolones in real water river samples.

  15. Benefits and limitations of using decision analytic tools to assess uncertainty and prioritize Landscape Conservation Cooperative information needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post van der Burg, Max; Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Nelson, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are a network of partnerships throughout North America that are tasked with integrating science and management to support more effective delivery of conservation at a landscape scale. In order to achieve this integration, some LCCs have adopted the approach of providing their partners with better scientific information in an effort to facilitate more effective and coordinated conservation decisions. Taking this approach has led many LCCs to begin funding research to provide the information for improved decision making. To ensure that funding goes to research projects with the highest likelihood of leading to more integrated broad scale conservation, some LCCs have also developed approaches for prioritizing which information needs will be of most benefit to their partnerships. We describe two case studies in which decision analytic tools were used to quantitatively assess the relative importance of information for decisions made by partners in the Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC. The results of the case studies point toward a few valuable lessons in terms of using these tools with LCCs. Decision analytic tools tend to help shift focus away from research oriented discussions and toward discussions about how information is used in making better decisions. However, many technical experts do not have enough knowledge about decision making contexts to fully inform the latter type of discussion. When assessed in the right decision context, however, decision analyses can point out where uncertainties actually affect optimal decisions and where they do not. This helps technical experts understand that not all research is valuable in improving decision making. But perhaps most importantly, our results suggest that decision analytic tools may be more useful for LCCs as way of developing integrated objectives for coordinating partner decisions across the landscape, rather than simply ranking research priorities.

  16. A critical review of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for geoanalysis, geochemistry and hydrology, Part 1. Analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, I.B.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    Present-day inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation is described briefly. Emphasis is placed on performance characteristics for geoanalysis, geochemistry, and hydrology. Applications where ICP-MS would be indispensable are indicated. Determination of geochemically diagnostic trace elements (such as the rare earth elements [REE], U and Th), of isotope ratios for fingerprinting, tracer and other geo-isotope applications, and benchmark isotope dilution determinations are considered to be typical priority applications for ICP-MS. It is concluded that ICP-MS furnishes unique geoanalytical and environmental data that are not readily provided by conventional spectroscopic (emission and absorption) techniques.

  17. Extension of the analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES to triangular-Z geometry and coupling with COBRA-IIIc for hexagonal core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, Juan-Andres; Jimenez, Javier; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Aragones, Jose-Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the extension of the multigroup nodal diffusion code ANDES, based on the Analytic Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (ACMFD) method, from Cartesian to hexagonal geometry is presented, as well as its coupling with the thermal-hydraulic (TH) code COBRA-IIIc for hexagonal core analysis. In extending the ACMFD method to hexagonal assemblies, triangular-Z nodes are used. In the radial plane, a direct transverse integration procedure is applied along the three directions that are orthogonal to the triangle interfaces. The triangular nodalization avoids the singularities, that appear when applying transverse integration to hexagonal nodes, and allows the advantage of the mesh subdivision capabilities implicit within that geometry. As for the thermal-hydraulics, the extension of the coupling scheme to hexagonal geometry has been performed with the capability to model the core using either assembly-wise channels (hexagonal mesh) or a higher refinement with six channels per fuel assembly (triangular mesh). Achieving this level of TH mesh refinement with COBRA-IIIc code provides a better estimation of the in-core 3D flow distribution, improving the TH core modelling. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled code, ANDES/COBRA-IIIc, previously verified in Cartesian geometry core analysis, can also be applied now to full three-dimensional VVER core problems, as well as to other thermal and fast hexagonal core designs. Verification results are provided, corresponding to the different cases of the OECD/NEA-NSC VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmarks.

  18. Analytical Investigation of the Heat-Transfer Limits of a Novel Solar Loop-Heat Pipe Employing a Mini-Channel Evaporator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierno M. O. Diallo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical investigation of heat-transfer limits of a novel solar loop-heat pipe developed for space heating and domestic hot water use. In the loop-heat pipe, the condensate liquid returns to the evaporator via small specially designed holes, using a mini-channel evaporator. The study considered the commonly known heat-transfer limits of loop-heat pipes, namely, the viscous, sonic, entrainment, boiling and heat-transfer limits due to the two-phase pressure drop in the loop. The analysis considered the main factors that affect the limits in the mini-channel evaporator: the operating temperature, mini-channel aspect ratio, evaporator length, evaporator inclination angle, evaporator-to-condenser height difference and the dimension of the holes. It was found that the entrainment is the main governing limit of the system operation. With the specified loop design and operational conditions, the solar loop-heat pipe can achieve a heat-transport capacity of 725 W. The analytical model presented in this study can be used to optimise the heat-transfer capacity of the novel solar loop-heat pipe.

  19. Capillary gel electrophoresis-coupled aptamer enzymatic cleavage protection strategy for the simultaneous detection of multiple small analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Sandrine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Ravelet, Corinne; Guieu, Valérie; Peyrin, Eric

    2014-05-06

    This novel, multi small-analyte sensing strategy is the result of combining the target-induced aptamer enzymatic protection approach with the CGE-LIF (capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence) technique. The implemented assay principle is based on an analysis of the phosphodiesterase I (PDE I)-mediated size variation of a fluorescein-labeled aptamer (FApt), the enzyme catalyzing the removal of nucleotides from DNA in the 3' to 5' direction. In the absence of the target, the unfolded aptamer was enzymatically cleaved into short DNA fragments. Upon target binding, the DNA substrate was partially protected against enzymatic hydrolysis. The amount of bound aptamer remaining after the exonuclease reaction was proportional to the concentration of the target. The CGE technique, which was used to determine the separation of FApt species from DNA digested products, permitted the quantification of adenosine (A), ochratoxin A (O), and tyrosinamide (T) under the same optimized enzymatic conditions. This assay strategy was subsequently applied to the simultaneous detection of A, O, and T in a single capillary under buffered conditions using corresponding FApt probes of different lengths (23, 36, and 49 nucleotides, respectively). Additionally, the detection of these three small molecules was successfully achieved in a complex medium (diluted, heat-treated human serum) showing a good recovery. It is worth noting that the multiplexed analysis was accomplished for targets with different charge states by using aptamers possessing various structural features. This sensing platform constitutes a rationalized and reliable approach with an expanded potential for a high-throughput determination of small analytes in a single capillary.

  20. Unconventional superconductivity in the strong-coupling limit for the heavy fermion system CeCoIn5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Y.; Szabó, P.; Kačmarčík, J.; Pribulová, Z.; Pedrazzini, P.; Samuely, P.; Correa, V. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the local quasiparticles' excitation spectra of the heavy fermion CeCoIn5 between 440 mK and 3 K in samples with a bulk Tc = 2.25 K . The spectral shape of our low-temperature tunneling data, quite textbook nodal- Δ conductance, allow us to confidently fit the spectra with a d-wave density of states considering also a shortening of quasiparticles' lifetime term Γ. The Δ (0) value obtained from the fits yields a BCS ratio 2 Δ /kTc = 7.73 suggesting that CeCoIn5 is an unconventional superconductor in the strong coupling limit. The fits also reveal that the height of coherence peaks in CeCoIn5 is reduced with respect to a pure BCS spectra and therefore the coupling of quasiparticles with spin excitations should play a relevant role. The tunneling conductance shows a depletion at energies smaller than Δ for temperatures larger than the bulk Tc, giving further support to the existence of a pseudogap phase that in our samples span up to T* ∼ 1.2Tc . The phenomenological scaling of the pseudogap temperature observed in various families of cuprates, 2 Δ /kT* ∼ 4.3 , is not fulfilled in our measurements. This suggests that in CeCoIn5 the strong magnetic fluctuations might conspire to close the local superconducting gap at a smaller pesudogap temperature-scale than in cuprates.

  1. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: Divergences and resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process

  2. Analytic solutions of Oldroyd-B fluid with fractional derivatives in a circular duct that applies a constant couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Riaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to analyze the rotational flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid with fractional derivatives, induced by an infinite circular cylinder that applies a constant couple to the fluid. Such kind of problem in the settings of fractional derivatives has not been found in the literature. The solutions are based on an important remark regarding the governing equation for the non-trivial shear stress. The solutions that have been obtained satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and can easily be reduced to the similar solutions corresponding to ordinary Oldroyd-B, fractional/ordinary Maxwell, fractional/ordinary second-grade, and Newtonian fluids performing the same motion. The obtained results are expressed in terms of Newtonian and non-Newtonian contributions. Finally, the influence of fractional parameters on the velocity, shear stress and a comparison between generalized and ordinary fluids is graphically underlined.

  3. Limit Cycles and Chaos via Quasi-periodicity in Two Coupled Ensembles of Ultra-cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil; Altshuler, Boris

    We study the dynamics of two mesoscopic ensembles of ultra-cold two level atoms, which are collectively coupled to an optical cavity and are being pumped incoherently to the excited state. Whereas the time independent steady states are well understood, little is known about the time dependent ones. We explore and categorize various time dependent steady states, e.g. limit cycles and chaotic behavior. We draw a non-equilibrium phase diagram indicating different steady-state behaviors in different parts of the parameter space. We discuss the synchronization of the two ensembles in the time dependent steady states. We also show the onset of chaos via quasi-periodicity. The rich time dependent steady-state behavior, especially the existence of chaos, opens up possibilities for several engineering applications. Supported in part by the University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship.

  4. An analytical nonlinear magnetoelectric coupling model of laminated composites under combined pre-stress and magnetic bias loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Qu, Shao-Xing; Ou, Xiao-Wei; Xiao, Ying; Wu, Hua-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Based on the equivalent circuit method, this paper adopts the nonlinear magnetostrictive constitutive relations to establish an analytical nonlinear magnetoelectric coefficient model for magnetostrictive/piezoelectric/magnetostrictive laminated magnetoelectric composites. When the pre-stress is set to zero in the model, the predicted results of the magnetoelectric coefficient coincide well with the available experimental results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Using the model, we can qualitatively predict the influence of the pre-stress, magnetic bias fields and the volume fraction of the magnetostrictive material on the magnetoelectric coefficient. The predicted results show that the influences of the pre-stress on the magnetoelectric coefficient, which varies with the magnetic bias field, before and after reaching the magnetoelectric coefficient maximum, are opposite. That is, the influence of the pre-stress on curves of the magnetoelectric coefficient reverses when the magnetoelectric coefficient reaches its maximum. Therefore, the correct setting of the pre-stress can lower the applied magnetic bias field and improve the magnetoelectric coefficient. The established nonlinear magnetoelectric effect model can provide a theoretical basis for regulating the magnetoelectric coefficient by the pre-stress and magnetic bias field and make it possible to design high-precision miniature magnetoelectric devices. (paper)

  5. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  6. The Importance and Current Limitations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Retrieval from Space for Land-Atmosphere Coupling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Schaefer, A.

    2016-12-01

    There is an established need for improved PBL remote sounding over land for hydrology, land-atmosphere (L-A), PBL, cloud/convection, pollution/chemistry studies and associated model evaluation and development. Most notably, the connection of surface hydrology (through soil moisture) to clouds and precipitation relies on proper quantification of water's transport through the coupled system, which is modulated strongly by PBL structure, growth, and feedback processes such as entrainment. In-situ (ground-based or radiosonde) measurements will be spatially limited to small field campaigns for the foreseeable future, so satellite data is a must in order to understand these processes globally. The scales of these applications require diurnal resolution (e.g. 3-hourly or finer) at land-PBL coupling and water and energy cycles at their native scales. Today's satellite sensors (e.g. advanced IR, GEO, lidar, GPS-RO) do not reach close to these targets in terms of accuracy or resolution, and each of these sensors has some advantages but even more limitations that make them impractical for PBL and L-A studies. Unfortunately, there is very little attention or planning (short or long-term) in place for improving lower tropospheric sounding over land, and as a result PBL and L-A interactions have been identified as `gaps' in current programmatic focal areas. It is therefore timely to assess how these technologies can be leveraged, combined, or evolved in order to form a dedicated mission or sub-mission to routinely monitor the PBL on diurnal timescales. In addition, improved PBL monitoring from space needs to be addressed in the next Decadal Survey. In this talk, the importance of PBL information (structure, evolution) for L-A coupling diagnostics and model development will be summarized. The current array of PBL retrieval methods and products from space will then be assessed in terms of meeting the needs of these models, diagnostics, and scales, with a look forward as to how

  7. Eikonal Scattering in the sdg Interacting Boson Model:. Analytical Results in the SUsdg(3) Limit and Their Generalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, V. K. B.

    General expression for the representation matrix elements in the SUsdg(3) limit of the sdg interacting boson model (sdgIBM) is derived that determine the scattering amplitude in the eikonal approximation for medium energy proton-nucleus scattering when the target nucleus is deformed and it is described by the SUsdg(3) limit. The SUsdg(3) result is generalized to two important situations: (i) when the target nucleus ground band states are described as states arising out of angular momentum projection from a general single Kπ = 0+ intrinsic state in sdg space; (ii) for rotational bands built on one-phonon excitations in sdgIBM.

  8. Analytic study of transverse shunt resistance and even-odd mode coupling of a rod type RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koscielniak, S.

    1994-06-01

    To minimize the ohmic power losses, it is necessary to maximize the transverse shunt resistance, R shunt . The cell of a rod-type RFQ is modelled by a parallel two-rod transmission line supported above a parallel ground conductor by two legs. Due to coupling between neighboring supports, the loading impedance is modified depending on the leg spacing. The shunt resistance is improved by reducing the cell length and increasing the leg spacing, and maximized when the legs are equally spaced. However, this is also the condition for strong excitation of the unwanted 'even-mode' in which a potential difference exists between the ends of the rods mid-plane and the grounding conductor or tank, Once the legs of the support are longitudinally separated, some even-mode excitation of the structure is inevitable because some current must be injected into the ground conductor; the even-mode excitation rises as leg separation increases. Further, when the desired odd-mode voltage is symmetric about the cell centre, the even-mode voltage is anti-symmetric This paper is a very much abridged version of two internal design notes[3], [4]. (author). 4 refs.,1 fig

  9. Dark matter as a dynamic effect due to a non-minimal gravitational coupling with matter (I): Analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O; Paramos, J

    2010-01-01

    In this work the phenomenology of models possessing a non-minimal coupling between matter and geometry is discussed, with a particular focus on the possibility of describing the flattening of the galactic rotation curves as a dynamically generated effect derived from this modification to General Relativity. Two possibilities are discussed: firstly, that the observed discrepancy between the measured rotation velocity and the classical prediction is due to a deviation from geodesic motion, due to a non-(covariant) conservation of the energy-momentum tensor; secondly, that even if the principle of energy conservation holds, the dynamical effects arising due to the non-trivial terms in the Einstein equations of motion can give rise to an extra density contribution that may be interpreted as dark matter. In this work, The mechanism of the latter alternative is detailed; a numerical session ascertaining the order of magnitude of the relevant parameters is undertaken in another contribution to this volume, with possible cosmological implications discussed.

  10. Large deformation of uniaxially loaded slender microbeams on the basis of modified couple stress theory: Analytical solution and Galerkin-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Large deformation regime of micro-scale slender beam-like structures subjected to axially pointed loads is of high interest to nanotechnologists and applied mechanics community. Herein, size-dependent nonlinear governing equations are derived by employing modified couple stress theory. Under various boundary conditions, analytical relations between axially applied loads and deformations are presented. Additionally, a novel Galerkin-based assumed mode method (AMM) is established to solve the highly nonlinear equations. In some particular cases, the predicted results by the analytical approach are also checked with those of AMM and a reasonably good agreement is reported. Subsequently, the key role of the material length scale on the load-deformation of microbeams is discussed and the deficiencies of the classical elasticity theory in predicting such a crucial mechanical behavior are explained in some detail. The influences of slenderness ratio and thickness of the microbeam on the obtained results are also examined. The present work could be considered as a pivotal step in better realizing the postbuckling behavior of nano-/micro- electro-mechanical systems consist of microbeams.

  11. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy

  12. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Development and analytical characterization of a Grimm-type glow discharge ion source operated with high gas flow rates and coupled to a mass spectrometer with high mass resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Claus; Feldmann, Ingo; Gilmour, Dave; Hoffmann, Volker; Jakubowski, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    A Grimm-type glow discharge ion source has been developed and was coupled to a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) with high mass resolution (Axiom, ThermoElemental, Winsford, UK) by exchanging the front plate of the ICP-MS interface system only. In addition to high discharge powers of up to 70 W, which are typical for a Grimm-type design, this source could be operated with relative high gas flow rates of up to 240 ml min -1 . In combination with a high discharge voltage the signal intensities are reaching a constant level within the first 20 s after the discharge has started. An analytical characterization of this source is given utilizing a calibration using the steel standard reference material NIST 1261A-1265A. The sensitivity for the investigated elements measured with a resolution of 4000 is in the range of 500-6000 cps μg -1 g -1 , and a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the measured isotope relative to Fe of less than 8% for the major and minor components of the sample has been achieved. Limits of detection at ng g -1 levels could be obtained

  14. Speciation of trace elements in biological samples by nuclear analytical and related techniques coupled with chemical and biochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Gao, Y.X.; Li, B.; Yu, H.W.; Li, Y.F.; Sun, J.; Chai, Z.F.

    2005-01-01

    In the past, most analytical problems relating to biological systems were addressed by measuring the total concentrations of elements. Now there is increasing interest of the importance of their chemical forms, in which an element is present in biological systems, e.g., the oxidation state, the binding state with macromolecules, or even the molecular structure. The biological effects of chromium, which is classified as an essential nutrient, are dependent upon its oxidation. state. In general, trivalent chromium is biochemically active, whereas hexavalent chromium is considered to be toxic. Mercury is one of serious environmental persistent pollutants. However, organic forms of mercury are known to possess much higher toxicity than inorganic mercury. Therefore, information on speciation is critically required in order to better understanding of their bioavailability, metabolism, transformation, and toxicity in vivo. Recently, chemical speciation of selenium, mercury, copper, zinc, iron, and so on, has been investigated by INAA, ICP-MS, XRF, EXAFS and related techniques combined with chemical and biochemical separation (extraction, chromatography, gel electrophoresis, etc.). INAA, XRF, and ICP-MS have superior advantages in aspect of multielemental analysis with high accuracy and sensitivity, which render the possibility of analyzing various elements of interest simultaneously. These offline or online techniques have been flexibly applied to different biological matrixes, such as human hair, serum, urine, various tissues and organs in our researches. In addition, EXAFS provides structural information about the moiety of metal centers up to a distance of approximately 4-5 Anstrom. For instance, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Imbalance of elements, such as Se, Zn, Fe, Cu, Cd, Ca, etc., has been found in the whole blood or serum of patients with HCC. We found that the profiles of Se, Cd, Fe, Zn and Cu-containing proteins

  15. Geometrical determinations of IMRT photon pencil-beam path in radiotherapy wedges and limit divergence angle with the Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Casesnoves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Static wedge filters (WF are commonly used in radiation therapy, forward and/or inverse planning. We calculated the exact 2D/3D geometrical pathway of the photon-beam through the usual alloy WF, in order to get a better dose related to the beam intensity attenuation factor(s, after the beam has passed through the WF. The objective was to provide general formulation into the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA model coordinates system (depending on collimator/wedge angles that also can be applied to other models. Additionally, second purpose of this study was to develop integral formulation for 3D wedge exponential factor with statistical approximations, with introduction for the limit angle/conformal wedge.Methods: The radiotherapy model used to develop this mathematical task is the classical superposition-convolution algorithm, AAA (developed by Ulmer and Harder. We worked with optimal geometrical approximations to make the computational IMRT calculations quicker/reduce the planning-system time. Analytic geometry/computational-techniques to carry out simulations (for standard wedges are detailed/developed sharply. Integral developments/integral-statistical approximations are explained. Beam-divergence limit Angle for optimal wedge filtration formulas is calculated/sketched, with geometrical approximations. Fundamental trigonometry is used for this purpose.Results: Extent simulation tables for WF of 15º, 30º, 45º, and 60º are shown with errors. As a result, it is possible to determine the best individual treatment dose distribution for each patient. We presented these basic simulations/numerical examples for standard manufacturing WF of straight sloping surface, to check the accuracy/errors of the calculations. Simulations results give low RMS/Relative Error values (formulated for WF of 15º, 30º, 45º, and 60º.Conclusion: We obtained a series of formulas of analytic geometry for WF that can be applied for any particular dose

  16. A semi-analytical solution to accelerate spin-up of a coupled carbon and nitrogen land model to steady state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spin-up of land models to steady state of coupled carbon–nitrogen processes is computationally so costly that it becomes a bottleneck issue for global analysis. In this study, we introduced a semi-analytical solution (SAS for the spin-up issue. SAS is fundamentally based on the analytic solution to a set of equations that describe carbon transfers within ecosystems over time. SAS is implemented by three steps: (1 having an initial spin-up with prior pool-size values until net primary productivity (NPP reaches stabilization, (2 calculating quasi-steady-state pool sizes by letting fluxes of the equations equal zero, and (3 having a final spin-up to meet the criterion of steady state. Step 2 is enabled by averaged time-varying variables over one period of repeated driving forcings. SAS was applied to both site-level and global scale spin-up of the Australian Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE model. For the carbon-cycle-only simulations, SAS saved 95.7% and 92.4% of computational time for site-level and global spin-up, respectively, in comparison with the traditional method (a long-term iterative simulation to achieve the steady states of variables. For the carbon–nitrogen coupled simulations, SAS reduced computational cost by 84.5% and 86.6% for site-level and global spin-up, respectively. The estimated steady-state pool sizes represent the ecosystem carbon storage capacity, which was 12.1 kg C m−2 with the coupled carbon–nitrogen global model, 14.6% lower than that with the carbon-only model. The nitrogen down-regulation in modeled carbon storage is partly due to the 4.6% decrease in carbon influx (i.e., net primary productivity and partly due to the 10.5% reduction in residence times. This steady-state analysis accelerated by the SAS method can facilitate comparative studies of structural differences in determining the ecosystem carbon storage capacity among biogeochemical models. Overall, the

  17. Nitrogen and carbon limitation of planktonic primary production and phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling in ponds on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, B.K.; Hawes, I.; Safi, K.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of nutrient limitation and coupling of planktonic primary and secondary production were investigated in meltwater ponds of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, using regression tree analysis and multiple regression. Phytoplankton were primaril N-limited but inorganic carbon apparently co...

  18. Socioeconomic status, anthropometric status, and psychomotor development of Kenyan children from resource-limited settings: a path-analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Amina; Van de Vijver, Fons; Van Baar, Anneloes; Mbonani, Leonard; Kalu, Raphael; Newton, Charles; Holding, Penny

    2008-09-01

    Sub-optimal physical growth has been suggested as a key pathway between the effect of environmental risk and developmental outcome. To determine if anthropometric status mediates the relation between socioeconomic status and psychomotor development of young children in resource-limited settings. A cross-sectional study design was used. A total of 204 (105 girls) children from two resource-limited communities in the Coast Province, Kenya. The mean age of these children was 29 months (SD = 3.43; range: 24-35 months). Psychomotor functioning was assessed using a locally developed and validated measure, the Kilifi Developmental Inventory. A significant association was found between anthropometric status (as measured by weight-for-age, height-for-age, mid-upper arm circumference, and head circumference) and psychomotor functioning and also between socioeconomic status and anthropometric status; no direct effects were found between socioeconomic status and developmental outcome. The models showed that weight, height and to a lesser extent mid-upper arm circumference mediate the relation between socioeconomic status and developmental outcome, while head circumference did not show the same effect. Among children under 3 years living in poverty, anthropometric status shows a clear association with psychomotor development while socioeconomic status may only have an indirect association.

  19. Limits on the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings in p bar p collisions at √s=1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G.A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Aronson, S.H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R.E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S.R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M.K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A.N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T.L.; Genik, R.J. II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutnikov, Y.E.; Hadley, N.J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.

    1995-01-01

    We performed a direct search for the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings by studying p bar p→llγ+X (l=e,μ) events at √s=1.8 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A fit to the transverse energy spectrum of the photon in the signal events, based on the data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 14.3pb -1 (13.7pb -1 ) for the electron (muon) channel, yields the following 95% confidence level limits on the anomalous CP-conserving ZZγ couplings: |h 30 Z | 40 Z =0) and |h 40 Z | 30 Z =0), for a form-factor scale Λ=500 GeV. Limits for the Zγγ couplings and CP-violating couplings are also discussed

  20. Limits on the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings in p anti p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abachi, S.

    1995-07-01

    The authors performed a direct search for the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings by studying p anti p → ell ell γ + X, (ell = e, μ) events at √s = 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A fit to the transverse energy spectrum of the photon in the signal events, based on the data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 14.3 pb -1 (13.7 pb -1 ) for the electron (muon) channel, yields the following 95% confidence level limits on the anomalous CP-conserving ZZγ couplings: |h 30 Z | 40 Z = 0), and |h 40 Z | 30 Z = 0), for a form-factor scale Λ = 500 GeV. Limits for the Zγγ couplings and CP-violating couplings are also discussed

  1. Coupled spin and shape evolution of small rubble-pile asteroids and self-limitation of the YORP effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto-Figueroa, D.; Statler, T.; Richardson, D.; Tanga, P.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of the first simulations that self-consistently model the YORP effect on the spin states of dynamically evolving aggregates. Extensive analyses of the basic behavior of the YORP effect have been previously conducted leading to the idea of the classical ''YORP cycle''. These studies are based on the assumption that the objects are rigid bodies, but evidence from lightcurve observations strongly suggests that most asteroids are aggregates. The timescales over which mass reconfiguration occur are much shorter than the timescales over which YORP changes the spin states and Statler [2009] has shown that the YORP effect has an extreme sensitivity to the topography of the asteroids (Icarus 202, 501--513). As the YORP effect changes the spin, the change in spin results in a change of the shape, which subsequently changes the YORP torques. The continuous changes in the shape of an aggregate result in a different evolution of the YORP torques and therefore aggregates do not evolve through the YORP cycle as a rigid body would. Instead of having a spin evolution ruled by long periods of rotational acceleration and deceleration as predicted by the YORP cycle, the YORP effect is self-limiting on aggregate asteroids exhibiting a stochastic behavior and/or a self-governed behavior. We provide a description of the stochastic and self-governed behaviors of the YORP effect along with the results of shape evolution including the types, magnitudes, and frequencies of movement and shedding of material. Although rotational acceleration for long periods of time is not achieved, a fraction of objects do present mass-shedding episodes at lower spin rates than the critical spin limit for aggregate asteroids. We also provide the bulk properties of the obtained distribution of changes in the spin rates, which are necessary in order to model correctly the coupled Yarkovsky/YORP evolution.

  2. A Complete First-Order Analytical Solution for Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers Between Coplanar Orbits with Small Eccentricities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Fernandes, Sandro; Das Chagas Carvalho, Francisco; Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho

    The purpose of this work is to present a complete first order analytical solution, which includes short periodic terms, for the problem of optimal low-thrust limited power trajectories with large amplitude transfers (no rendezvous) between coplanar orbits with small eccentricities in Newtonian central gravity field. The study of these transfers is particularly interesting because the orbits found in practice often have a small eccentricity and the problem of transferring a vehicle from a low earth orbit to a high earth orbit is frequently found. Besides, the analysis has been motivated by the renewed interest in the use of low-thrust propulsion systems in space missions verified in the last two decades. Several researchers have obtained numerical and sometimes analytical solutions for a number of specific initial orbits and specific thrust profiles. Averaging methods are also used in such researches. Firstly, the optimization problem associated to the space transfer problem is formulated as a Mayer problem of optimal control with Cartesian elements - position and velocity vectors - as state variables. After applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, successive Mathieu transformations are performed and suitable sets of orbital elements are introduced. The short periodic terms are eliminated from the maximum Hamiltonian function through an infinitesimal canonical transformation built through Hori method - a perturbation canonical method based on Lie series. The new Hamiltonian function, which results from the infinitesimal canonical transformation, describes the extremal trajectories for long duration maneuvers. Closed-form analytical solutions are obtained for the new canonical system by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation through the separation of variables technique. By applying the transformation equations of the algorithm of Hori method, a first order analytical solution for the problem is obtained in non-singular orbital elements. For long duration maneuvers

  3. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O’Carroll, Michael; Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-01-01

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  4. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A., E-mail: veiga@icmc.usp.br; O’Carroll, Michael, E-mail: michaelocarroll@gmail.com; Valencia Alvites, José C., E-mail: cien.mat@hotmail.com [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada e Estatística, ICMC, USP-São Carlos, C.P. 668, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  5. Reaffirmed limitations of meta-analytic methods in the study of mild traumatic brain injury: a response to Rohling et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Farrer, Thomas J; Pertab, Jon L; James, Kelly; Petrie, Jo Ann; Hedges, Dawson W

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 Pertab, James, and Bigler published a critique of two prior meta-analyses by Binder, Rohling, and Larrabee (1997) and Frencham, Fox, and Maybery (2005) that showed small effect size difference at least 3 months post-injury in individuals who had sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The Binder et al. and Frencham et al. meta-analyses have been widely cited as showing no lasting effect of mTBI. In their critique Pertab et al. (2009) point out many limitations of these two prior meta-analyses, demonstrating that depending on how inclusion/exclusion criteria were defined different meta-analytic findings occur, some supporting the persistence of neuropsychological impairments beyond 3 months. Rohling et al. (2011) have now critiqued Pertab et al. (2009). Herein we respond to the Rolling et al. (2011) critique reaffirming the original findings of Pertab et al. (2009), providing additional details concerning the flaws in prior meta-analytic mTBI studies and the effects on neuropsychological performance.

  6. Dynamics and non-equilibrium steady state in a system of coupled harmonic oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghesquière, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Ghesquiere@nithep.ac.za; Sinayskiy, Ilya, E-mail: sinayskiy@ukzn.ac.za; Petruccione, Francesco, E-mail: petruccione@ukzn.ac.za

    2013-10-15

    A system of two coupled oscillators, each of them coupled to an independent reservoir, is analysed. The analytical solution of the non-rotating wave master equation is obtained in the high-temperature and weak coupling limits. No thermal entanglement is found in the high-temperature limit. In the weak coupling limit the system converges to an entangled non-equilibrium steady state. A critical temperature for the appearance of quantum correlations is found.

  7. Sb(III) and Sb(V) separation and analytical speciation by a continuous tandem on-line separation device in connection with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez Garcia, A. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Perez Rodriguez, M.C. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Sanchez Uria, J.F. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Sanz-Medel, A. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, precise and automated non-chromatographic method for Sb(III) and Sb(V) analytical speciation based on a continuous tandem on-line separation device in connection with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission (ICP-AES) detection is proposed. Two on-line successive separation steps are included into this method: a continuous liquid-liquid extraction of Sb(III) with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) into methylisobuthylketone (MIBK), followed by direct stibine generation from the organic phase. Both separation steps are carried out in a continuous mode and on-line with the ICP-AES detector. Optimization of experimental conditions for the tandem separation and ICP-AES detection are investigated in detail. Detection limits for Sb(III) were 3 ng.mL{sup -1} and for Sb(V) 8 ng.mL{sup -1}. Precisions observed are in the range {+-} 5%. The proposed methodology has been applied to Sb(III) and Sb(V) speciation in sea-water samples. (orig.)

  8. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: Accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N6) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm-1) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm-1), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm-1) and CCSD (84 cm-1) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol-1, which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol-1), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol-1) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is only 0.1 kcal

  9. Analytic energy derivatives for the calculation of the first-order molecular properties using the domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipayan; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CC) theory has recently emerged as an efficient and powerful quantum-chemical method for the calculation of energies of molecules comprised of several hundred atoms. It has been demonstrated that the DLPNO-CC approach attains the accuracy of a standard canonical coupled-cluster calculation to about 99.9% of the basis set correlation energy while realizing linear scaling of the computational cost with respect to system size. This is achieved by combining (a) localized occupied orbitals, (b) large virtual orbital correlation domains spanned by the projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), and (c) compaction of the virtual space through a truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) basis. In this paper, we report on the implementation of an analytic scheme for the calculation of the first derivatives of the DLPNO-CC energy for basis set independent perturbations within the singles and doubles approximation (DLPNO-CCSD) for closed-shell molecules. Perturbation-independent one-particle density matrices have been implemented in order to account for the response of the CC wave function to the external perturbation. Orbital-relaxation effects due to external perturbation are not taken into account in the current implementation. We investigate in detail the dependence of the computed first-order electrical properties (e.g., dipole moment) on the three major truncation parameters used in a DLPNO-CC calculation, namely, the natural orbital occupation number cutoff used for the construction of the PNOs, the weak electron-pair cutoff, and the domain size cutoff. No additional truncation parameter has been introduced for property calculation. We present benchmark calculations on dipole moments for a set of 10 molecules consisting of 20-40 atoms. We demonstrate that 98%-99% accuracy relative to the canonical CCSD results can be consistently achieved in these calculations. However, this comes with the price of tightening the

  10. Analytical description of spin-Rabi oscillation controlled electronic transitions rates between weakly coupled pairs of paramagnetic states with S=(1)/(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, R.; Baker, W. J.; Boehme, C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the theoretical and experimental study of spin-dependent electronic transition rates which are controlled by a radiation-induced spin-Rabi oscillation of weakly spin-exchange and spin-dipolar coupled paramagnetic states (S=(1)/(2)). The oscillation components [the Fourier content, F(s)] of the net transition rates within spin-pair ensembles are derived for randomly distributed spin resonances, with an account of a possible correlation between the two distributions corresponding to individual pair partners. Our study shows that when electrically detected Rabi spectroscopy is conducted under an increasing driving field B1, the Rabi spectrum, F(s), evolves from a single peak at s=ΩR, where ΩR=γB1 is the Rabi frequency (γ is the gyromagnetic ratio), to three peaks at s=ΩR, s=2ΩR, and low s≪ΩR. The crossover between the two regimes takes place when ΩR exceeds the expectation value δ0 of the difference in the Zeeman energies within the pairs, which corresponds to the broadening of the magnetic resonance by disorder caused by a hyperfine field or distributions of Landé g factors. We capture this crossover by analytically calculating the shapes of all three peaks at an arbitrary relation between ΩR and δ0. When the peaks are well developed their widths are Δs˜δ02/ΩR. We find a good quantitative agreement between the theory and experiment.

  11. High Precision Seawater Sr/Ca Measurements in the Florida Keys by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry: Analytical Method and Implications for Coral Paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, A.; Kilbourne, K. H.; Schijf, J.

    2017-12-01

    Standard methods of reconstructing past sea surface temperatures (SSTs) with coral skeletal Sr/Ca ratios assume the seawater Sr/Ca ratio is constant. However, there is little data to support this assumption, in part because analytical techniques capable of determining seawater Sr/Ca with sufficient accuracy and precision are expensive and time consuming. We demonstrate a method to measure seawater Sr/Ca using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry where we employ an intensity ratio calibration routine that reduces the self- matrix effects of calcium and cancels out the matrix effects that are common to both calcium and strontium. A seawater standard solution cross-calibrated with multiple instruments is used to correct for long-term instrument drift and any remnant matrix effects. The resulting method produces accurate seawater Sr/Ca determinations rapidly, inexpensively, and with a precision better than 0.2%. This method will make it easier for coral paleoclimatologists to quantify potentially problematic fluctuations in seawater Sr/Ca at their study locations. We apply our method to test for variability in surface seawater Sr/Ca along the Florida Keys Reef Tract. We are collecting winter and summer samples for two years in a grid with eleven nearshore to offshore transects across the reef, as well as continuous samples collected by osmotic pumps at four locations adjacent to our grid. Our initial analysis of the grid samples indicates a trend of decreasing Sr/Ca values offshore potentially due to a decreasing groundwater influence. The values differ by as much as 0.05 mmol/mol which could lead to an error of 1°C in mean SST reconstructions. Future work involves continued sampling in the Florida Keys to test for seasonal and interannual variability in seawater Sr/Ca, as well as collecting data from small reefs in the Virgin Islands to test the stability of seawater Sr/Ca under different geologic, hydrologic and hydrographic environments.

  12. Two- and four-quasiparticle states in the interacting boson model: Strong-coupling and decoupled band patterns in the SU(3) limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, V.; Bonsignori, G.; Savoia, M.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of the interacting boson approximation model is proposed by allowing for two- and four-quasiparticle excitations out of the boson space. The formation of band patterns based on two- and four-quasiparticle states is investigated in the SU(3) limit of the model. For hole-type (particle-type) fermions coupled to the SU(3) prolate (oblate) core, it is shown that the algebraic K-representation basis, which is the analog of the strong-coupling basis of the geometrical model, provides an appropriate description of the low-lying two-quasiparticle bands. In the case of particle-type (hole-type) fermions coupled to the SU(3) prolate (oblate) core, a new algebraic decoupling basis is derived that is equivalent in the geometrical limit to Stephens' rotation-aligned basis. Comparing the wave functions that are obtained by diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian to the decoupling basis, several low-lying two-quasiparticle bands are identified. The effects of an interaction that conserves only the total nucleon number, mixing states with different number of fermions, are investigated in both the strong-coupling and decoupling limits. All calculations are performed for an SU(3) boson core and the h11/2 fermion orbital

  13. La operación analítica: límites y fundamentos The analytical operation: limits and fundaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Laznik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La construcción del corpus teórico psicoanalítico, en tanto teoría de una praxis, experimenta a lo largo de la obra freudiana diversas rectificaciones que inciden en la delimitación de los conceptos y de las operaciones inherentes a su campo. Desde esa perspectiva, la pregunta por el alcance y los límites del método psicoanalítico subsiste en articulación con las sucesivas reformulaciones. Luego de establecer la segunda tópica, Freud sistematiza, en 1926, los diferentes tipos de resistencias. Posteriormente y en diversos momentos, retoma la problemática en torno a los obstáculos que complican el trabajo analítico. Estas consideraciones introducen nuevos interrogantes y recortan la incidencia de nuevos factores que, aún sin precipitar en una formalización acabada, complejizan el estatuto y el alcance de la operación analítica.The construction of the theoretical psychoanalytic corpus, as a theory of a praxis, experiences along the Freudian work diverse rectifications that affect in the delimiting of the concepts and of the operations inherent to his field. From this perspective, the question for the range and the limits of the psychoanalytic method survives in joint with the successive reformulations. After establishing the second topic, Freud systematizes, in 1926, the different types of resistances. Later, and in diverse moments, he recaptures the problematics around the obstacles that complicate the analytical work. These considerations introduce new questions and delimits the incident of new factors that, still without precipitating in a finished formalization, complex the statute and the range of the analytical operation.

  14. Limitations of the electromagnetic isolation for multi-antenna systems on small terminals with capacitive coupling elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; Alrabadi, Osama; Franek, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest for evaluating the performance potential of multiple antenna systems on small terminals. This work focuses on Capacitive Coupling Elements (CCEs), which are expected to perform differently with respect to self-resonating elements. Several CCEs...

  15. Development of analytical methods for the determination of trace elements in sediment with Neutron ActivAtion method (NAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Jin; Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Sun Ha

    2005-01-01

    The analytical methods for the determination of major elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg) in sediment have been investigated with ICP-MS. The analytical results of major elements with Cool ICP-MS were much better than those with normal ICP-MS. The analytical results were compared with those of NAA. NAA were a little superior to ICP-MS for the determination of major elements in sediment, and NAA is a non-destructive analytical method. The analytical methods for the determination of minor elements (Cr, Ce, U, Co, Pb, As, Se) in sediment have been also studied with ICP-MS. The analytical results by standard calibration with ICP-MS were not accurate due to matrix interferences. Thus, internal standard method was applied, then the analytical results for minor element with ICP-MS were greatly improved. The analytical results obtained by ICP-MS were compared with those obtained by NAA. It showed that the two analytical methods have great capabilities for the determination of minor elements in sediments

  16. Limited analytical capacity for cyanotoxins in developing countries may hide serious environmental health problems: simple and affordable methods may be the answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pírez, Macarena; Gonzalez-Sapienza, Gualberto; Sienra, Daniel; Ferrari, Graciela; Last, Michael; Last, Jerold A; Brena, Beatriz M

    2013-01-15

    In recent years, the international demand for commodities has prompted enormous growth in agriculture in most South American countries. Due to intensive use of fertilizers, cyanobacterial blooms have become a recurrent phenomenon throughout the continent, but their potential health risk remains largely unknown due to the lack of analytical capacity. In this paper we report the main results and conclusions of more than five years of systematic monitoring of cyanobacterial blooms in 20 beaches of Montevideo, Uruguay, on the Rio de la Plata, the fifth largest basin in the world. A locally developed microcystin ELISA was used to establish a sustainable monitoring program that revealed seasonal peaks of extremely high toxicity, more than one-thousand-fold greater than the WHO limit for recreational water. Comparison with cyanobacterial cell counts and chlorophyll-a determination, two commonly used parameters for indirect estimation of toxicity, showed that such indicators can be highly misleading. On the other hand, the accumulated experience led to the definition of a simple criterion for visual classification of blooms, that can be used by trained lifeguards and technicians to take rapid on-site decisions on beach management. The simple and low cost approach is broadly applicable to risk assessment and risk management in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radionuclide transport in fractured porous media -- Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures with a kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.H.; Chen, C.T.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical solutions are developed for the problem of radionuclide transport in a system of parallel fractures situated in a porous rock matrix. A kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model is used as the inlet boundary condition. The solutions consider the following processes: (a) advective transport in the fractures, (b) mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion along the fractures, (c) molecular diffusion from a fracture to the porous matrix, (d) molecular diffusion within the porous matrix in the direction perpendicular to the fracture axis, (e) adsorption onto the fracture wall, (f) adsorption within the porous matrix, and (g) radioactive decay. The solutions are based on the Laplace transform method. The general transient solution is in the form of a double integral that is evaluated using composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature. A simpler transient solution that is in the form of a single integral is also presented for the case that assumes negligible longitudinal dispersion along the fractures. The steady-state solutions are also provided. A number of examples are given to illustrate the effects of the following important parameters: (a) fracture spacings, (b) dissolution-rate constants, (c) fracture dispersion coefficient, (d) matrix retardation factor, and (e) fracture retardation factor

  18. arXiv Measurement of $W^{\\pm}W^{\\pm}$ vector-boson scattering and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; 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Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-07-28

    This paper presents the extended results of measurements of $W^{\\pm}W^{\\pm}jj$ production and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) with the same electric charge and at least two jets are analyzed. Production cross-sections are determined in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. An additional fiducial region, particularly sensitive to anomalous quartic gauge coupling parameters $\\alpha_4$ and $\\alpha_5$, is introduced, which allows more stringent limits on these parameters compared to the previous ATLAS measurement.

  19. Small-x behavior of the structure function F2 and its slope ∂lnF2/∂ln(1/x) for ''frozen'' and analytic strong-coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, G.; Kniehl, B.A.; Kotikov, A.V.

    2009-06-01

    Using the leading-twist approximation of the Wilson operator product expansion with ''frozen'' and analytic versions of the strong-coupling constant, we show that the Bessel-inspired behavior of the structure function F 2 and its slope ∂lnF 2 /∂ln(1/x) at small values of x, obtained for a at initial condition in the DGLAP evolution equations, leads to good agreement with experimental data of deep-inelastic scattering at DESY HERA. (orig.)

  20. Two strongly correlated electron systems: the Kondo mode in the strong coupling limit and a 2-D model of electrons close to an electronic topological transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouis, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two strongly correlated electron systems are considered in this work, Kondo insulators and high Tc cuprates. Experiments and theory suggest on one hand that the Kondo screening occurs on a rather short length scale and on the other hand that the Kondo coupling is renormalized to infinity in the low energy limit. The strong coupling limit is then the logical approach although the real coupling is moderate. A systematic development is performed around this limit in the first part. The band structure of these materials is reproduced within this scheme. Magnetic fluctuations are also studied. The antiferromagnetic transition is examined in the case where fermionic excitations are shifted to high energy. In the second part, the Popov and Fedotov representation of spins is used to formulate the Kondo and the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model in terms of a non-polynomial action of boson fields. In the third part the properties of high Tc cuprates are explained by a change of topology of the Fermi surface. This phenomenon would happen near the point of optimal doping and zero temperature. It results in the appearance of a density wave phase in the under-doped regime. The possibility that this phase has a non-conventional symmetry is considered. The phase diagram that described the interaction and coexistence of density wave and superconductivity is established in the mean-field approximation. The similarities with the experimental observations are numerous in particular those concerning the pseudo-gap and the behavior of the resistivity near optimal doping. (author)

  1. Determination of Fe-55 and Ni-63 in Environmental Samples. Analytical Problems. Characteristic Limits. Automatized Calculation; Determinacion de 55{sup F}e y 63{sup N}i en Muestras Ambientales. Problemas Analiticos. Limites Caracteristicos. Calculo Automatizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C; Navarro, N; Gonzalez, P; Heras, M C; Gapan, M P; Alonso, C; Calderon, A; Sanchez, D; Morante, R; Fernandez, M; Gajate, A; Alvarez, A

    2008-08-06

    The Department of Vigilance Radiologica y Radiactividad Ambiental from CIEMAT has developed an appropriate analytical methodology for Fe-55 and Ni-63 sequential determination in environmental samples based on the procedure used by RIS0 Laboratories. The experimental results obtained in the mayor and minor elements behaviour (soil and air constituents) in the different types of resins used for separating Fe-55 and Ni-63 are showed in this report. The measuring method of both isotopes by scintillation counting has been optimized with Ultima Gold liquid with different concentrations of stable element Fe and Ni. The decontamination factors of different gamma-emitters are experimentally determined in this method with the presence of soil matrix. The Fe-55 and Ni-63 activity concentrations and their associated uncertainties have been calculated from the counting data and sample preparation. A computer application has been implemented in Visual Basic in excel sheets for: (I) obtaining the counting data from spectrometer and counts in each window, (II) representing graphically the background and sample spectrums, (III) determining the activity concentration and its associated uncertainty and (IV) calculating the characteristic limits using ISO 11929 (2007) with various confidence levels. (Author) 30 refs.

  2. Critical behavior of the compact 3D U(1) theory in the limit of zero spatial coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O; Gravina, M; Papa, A

    2008-01-01

    Critical properties of the compact three-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory are explored at finite temperatures on an asymmetric lattice. For vanishing value of the spatial gauge coupling one obtains an effective two-dimensional spin model which describes the interaction between Polyakov loops. We study numerically the effective spin model for N t = 1,4,8 on lattices with spatial extent ranging from L = 64 to 256. Our results indicate that the finite temperature U(1) lattice gauge theory belongs to the universality class of the two-dimensional XY model, thus supporting the Svetitsky–Yaffe conjecture

  3. 1-W quasi-cw near-diffraction-limited semiconductor laser pumped optically by a fibre-coupled diode bar

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanjal, S.; Hoogland, S.; Roberts, J.S.; Hayward, R.A.; Clarkson, W.A.; Tropper, Anne

    2000-01-01

    We describe a diode-bar-pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser, which in quasi-cw operation emitted a peak power of >1 W at 1020 nm in a circular, near diffraction-limited beam.

  4. The determination of the weak neutral current coupling constants and limits on the electromagnetic properties of the muon neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callas, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine experimentally the cross section for nu/sub μ/e → nu/sub μ/e scattering from a sample of over 100 expected nu/sub μ/e → nu/sub μ/e events collected by the E734 neutrino detector in BNL wide band neutrino beam. By combining these results with results from an anti-neutrino determination of the cross section for anti nu/sub μ/e → anti nu/sub μ/e scattering in the form of a ratio of cross sections, the weak coupling constants for the electron, g/sub V/ and g/sub A/ can be determined in a model independent way to within a four fold ambiguity where three of the ambiguities can be eliminated by results from e + e - experiments. The predictions of the Standard Model for the weak coupling constants can then be tested and a precise determination of the electroweak mixing parameter, sin 2 θ/sub W/ can be made

  5. Novel water-soluble b-cyclodextrin-calix[4]arene couples as fluorescent sensor molecules for the detection of neutral analytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugler, H.J.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis and the host-guest chemistry of two novel fluorescent B-cyclodextrin-calix[4]arene couples 1 and 2 is described. The compounds were prepared by coupling a B-cyclodextrin linked with an aminoxylyl spacer with two different calix[4]arene building blocks each bearing a fluorophore. The

  6. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson final states and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has recently searched for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. We also present searches for the electroweak production of a Z boson and a photon together with two jets. The results are compared to state-of-the art theory predictions and have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings.

  7. Vector Boson Scattering, Triple Gauge-Boson Final States, and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration searched for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. ATLAS has also searched for the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs. All results have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings and have been compared to the latest theory predictions.

  8. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson final states and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has recently searched for the production of three $W$ bosons or of a $W$ boson and a photon together with a $Z$ or $W$ boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. We also present searches for the electroweak production of a $Z$ boson and a photon together with two jets. The results are compared to state-of-the art theory predictions and have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings.

  9. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson final states and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has recently searched for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. We also present searches for the electroweak production of a Z boson and a photon together with two jets. The results are compared to state-of-the art theory predictions and have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings.

  10. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock: FY17 Progress. Predecisional Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Xu, Hao; Kim, Kunwhi; Voltolini, Marco; Cao, Xiaoyuan

    2017-07-03

    The focus of research within the Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) (formerly called Used Fuel Disposal) Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of EBS bentonite and an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrologicalmechanical- chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer materials and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of temperature rise caused by waste heat. This report documents the following research activities. Section 2 presents THM model developments and validation, including modeling of underground heater experiments at Mont Terri and Bure underground research laboratories (URLs). The heater experiments modeled are the Mont Terri FE (Full-scale Emplacement) Experiment, conducted as part of the Mont Terri Project, and the TED in heater test conducted in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx) at the Meuse/Haute-Marne (MHM) underground research laboratory in France. The modeling of the TED heater test is one of the Tasks of the DEvelopment of COupled Models and their VAlidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX)-2019 project. Section 3 presents the development and application of thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) modeling to evaluate EBS bentonite and argillite rock responses under different temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C). Model results are presented to help to understand the impact of high temperatures on the properties and behavior of bentonite and argillite rock. Eventually the process model will support a robust GDSA model for repository performance assessments. Section 4 presents coupled THMC modeling for an in situ test conducted at Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland in the Full

  11. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson final states and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, Tatsumi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration searched for the production of three $W$ bosons or of a $W$ boson and a photon together with a $Z$ or $W$ boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. ATLAS has also searched for the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. All results have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings and have been compared to the latest theory predictions.

  12. Vector boson scattering, triple gauge-boson final states and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, Tatsumi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of three electroweak gauge bosons and of vector-boson scattering processes at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration searched for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV. ATLAS has also searched for the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs. All results have been used to constrain anomalous quartic gauge couplings and have been compared to the latest theory predictions.

  13. Signature effect in the SU(3) limit of SU(6) particle-quadrupole phonon coupling model (PTQM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paar, V.; Brant, S.

    1981-09-01

    Systematic deviations from the J(J + 1) energy rule in the SU(3) limit of PTQM are studied and interpreted in terms of signature from the rotational model. The signature effect, which is in the rotational mode introduced via the Coriolis force, is generated here by the correlation of PTQM. (author)

  14. Nitrogen and carbon limitation of planktonic primary production and phytoplankton–bacterioplankton coupling in ponds on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrell, Brian K; Safi, Karl; Hawes, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We compared planktonic primary and secondary production across twenty meltwater ponds on the surface of the McMurdo Ice Shelf in January 2007, including some ponds with basal brines created by meromictic stratification. Primary production ranged from 1.07 to 65.72 mgC m −3 h −1 in surface waters. In stratified ponds primary production was always more than ten times higher in basal brines than in the corresponding mixolimnion. Regression tree analysis (r 2 = 0.80) identified inorganic nitrogen (as NH 4 + ) as the main factor limiting planktonic primary production. However, there was also evidence of inorganic carbon co-limitation of photosynthesis in some of the more oligotrophic waters. Neither C nor N limited carbon fixation at [NH 4 –N] > 50 mg m −3 , with photoinhibition the factor most likely limiting photosynthesis under such conditions. Primary production was the only factor significantly correlated to bacterial production and the relationship (r 2 = 0.56) was non-linear. Nitrogen limitation and tight coupling of planktonic primary and bacterial production is surprising in these ponds, as all have large pools of dissolved organic carbon (1.2–260 g m −3 ) and organic nitrogen (all >130 mg m −3 ). The dissolved pools of organic carbon and nitrogen appear to be recalcitrant and bacterial production to be constrained by limited release of labile organics from phytoplankton. (letter)

  15. Web Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Web Analytics Program collects, analyzes, and provides reports on traffic, quality assurance, and customer satisfaction metrics for EPA’s website. The program uses a variety of analytics tools, including Google Analytics and CrazyEgg.

  16. A wavelet-coupled support vector machine model for forecasting global incident solar radiation using limited meteorological dataset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Ravinesh C.; Wen, Xiaohu; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A forecasting model for short- and long-term global incident solar radiation (R_n) has been developed. • The support vector machine and discrete wavelet transformation algorithm has been integrated. • The precision of the wavelet-coupled hybrid model is assessed using several prediction score metrics. • The proposed model is an appealing tool for forecasting R_n in the present study region. - Abstract: A solar radiation forecasting model can be utilized is a scientific contrivance for investigating future viability of solar energy potentials. In this paper, a wavelet-coupled support vector machine (W-SVM) model was adopted to forecast global incident solar radiation based on the sunshine hours (S_t), minimum temperature (T_m_a_x), maximum temperature (T_m_a_x), windspeed (U), evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) as the predictor variables. To ascertain conclusive results, the merit of the W-SVM was benchmarked with the classical SVM model. For daily forecasting, sixteen months of data (01-March-2014 to 30-June-2015) partitioned into the train (65%) and test (35%) set for the three metropolitan stations (Brisbane City, Cairns Aero and Townsville Aero) were utilized. Data were decomposed into their wavelet sub-series by discrete wavelet transformation algorithm and summed up to create new series with one approximation and four levels of detail using Daubechies-2 mother wavelet. For daily forecasting, six model scenarios were formulated where the number of input was increased and the forecast was assessed by statistical metrics (correlation coefficient r; Willmott’s index d; Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient E_N_S; peak deviation P_d_v), distribution statistics and prediction errors (mean absolute error MAE; root mean square error RMSE; mean absolute percentage error MAPE; relative root mean square error RMSE). Results for daily forecasts showed that the W-SVM model outperformed the classical SVM model for optimum input combinations. A sensitivity

  17. Surrogate analyte approach for quantitation of endogenous NAD(+) in human acidified blood samples using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liling; Cui, Zhiyi; Deng, Yuzhong; Dean, Brian; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Liang, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for the quantitative determination of NAD(+) in human whole blood using a surrogate analyte approach was developed and validated. Human whole blood was acidified using 0.5N perchloric acid at a ratio of 1:3 (v:v, blood:perchloric acid) during sample collection. 25μL of acidified blood was extracted using a protein precipitation method and the resulting extracts were analyzed using reverse-phase chromatography and positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. (13)C5-NAD(+) was used as the surrogate analyte for authentic analyte, NAD(+). The standard curve ranging from 0.250 to 25.0μg/mL in acidified human blood for (13)C5-NAD(+) was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted linear regression model. The LC-MS/MS response between surrogate analyte and authentic analyte at the same concentration was obtained before and after the batch run. This response factor was not applied when determining the NAD(+) concentration from the (13)C5-NAD(+) standard curve since the percent difference was less than 5%. The precision and accuracy of the LC-MS/MS assay based on the five analytical QC levels were well within the acceptance criteria from both FDA and EMA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Average extraction recovery of (13)C5-NAD(+) was 94.6% across the curve range. Matrix factor was 0.99 for both high and low QC indicating minimal ion suppression or enhancement. The validated assay was used to measure the baseline level of NAD(+) in 29 male and 21 female human subjects. This assay was also used to study the circadian effect of endogenous level of NAD(+) in 10 human subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation for composite bosons as the strong-coupling limit of the fermionic broken-symmetry random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strinati, G.C.; Pieri, P.

    2004-01-01

    The linear response to a space- and time-dependent external disturbance of a system of dilute condensed composite bosons at zero temperature, as obtained from the linearized version of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, is shown to result also from the strong-coupling limit of the time-dependent BCS (or broken-symmetry random-phase) approximation for the constituent fermions subject to the same external disturbance. In this way, it is possible to connect excited-state properties of the bosonic and fermionic systems by placing the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in perspective with the corresponding fermionic approximations

  19. Measurement of the diboson production cross section at 8TeV and 13TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00530530; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Diboson measurements allow to test the gauge structure of the Standard Model, verify the validity of Standard Model theory predictions and probe new physics beyond the reach of the LHC in a model-independent way via anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGC). Measurements on $WW$, $WZ$, and $ZZ$ diboson production, differential cross sections and aTGC limits obtained with these channels, have been published, using ATLAS data at center-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s} = $8TeV and 13TeV collected in 2012, 2015 and 2016. In the following, a short summary of these diboson measurements focusing on recent results will be given.

  20. Use of oxidative and reducing vapor generation for reducing the detection limits of iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vtorushina, Eh.A.; Saprykin, A.I.; Knapp, G.

    2009-01-01

    Procedures of microwave combustion in an oxygen flow and microwave acid decomposition of biological samples were optimized for the subsequent determination of iodine. A new method was proposed for the generation of molecular iodine from periodate iona using hydrogen peroxide as a reductant. Procedures were developed for determining iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using oxidative and reducing vapor generation; these allowed the detection limit for iodine to be lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The developed procedures were used to analyze certified reference materials of milk (Skim Milk Powder BCR 150) and seaweed (Sea Lettuce BCR 279) and a Supradyn vitamin complex

  1. Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ludwig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous applications of hydrological models have shown their capability to simulate hydrological processes with a reasonable degree of certainty. For flood modelling, the quality of precipitation data — the key input parameter — is very important but often remains questionable. This paper presents a critical review of experience in the EU-funded RAPHAEL project. Different meteorological data sources were evaluated to assess their applicability for flood modelling and forecasting in the Bavarian pre-alpine catchment of the Ammer river (709 km2, for which the hydrological aspects of runoff production are described as well as the complex nature of floods. Apart from conventional rain gauge data, forecasts from several Numerical Weather Prediction Models (NWP as well as rain radar data are examined, scaled and applied within the framework of a GIS-structured and physically based hydrological model. Multi-scenario results are compared and analysed. The synergetic approach leads to promising results under certain meteorological conditions but emphasises various drawbacks. At present, NWPs are the only source of rainfall forecasts (up to 96 hours with large spatial coverage and high temporal resolution. On the other hand, the coarse spatial resolution of NWP grids cannot yet address, adequately, the heterogeneous structures of orographic rainfields in complex convective situations; hence, a major downscaling problem for mountain catchment applications is introduced. As shown for two selected Ammer flood events, a high variability in prediction accuracy has still to be accepted at present. Sensitivity analysis of both meteo-data input and hydrological model performance in terms of process description are discussed and positive conclusions have been drawn for future applications of an advanced meteo-hydro model synergy. Keywords: RAPHAEL, modelling, forecasting, model coupling, PROMET-D, TOPMODEL

  2. Predictive coupled-cluster isomer orderings for some Si{sub n}C{sub m} (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: A pragmatic comparison between DFT and complete basis limit coupled-cluster benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, Jason N., E-mail: byrd.jason@ensco.com [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); ENSCO, Inc., 4849 North Wickham Road, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Lutz, Jesse J., E-mail: jesse.lutz.ctr@afit.edu; Jin, Yifan; Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J., E-mail: rodbartl@ufl.edu [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Montgomery, John A. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Duan, Xiaofeng F. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Burggraf, Larry W. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Sanders, Beverly A. [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-07-14

    The accurate determination of the preferred Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} isomer is important to guide experimental efforts directed towards synthesizing SiC nano-wires and related polymer structures which are anticipated to be highly efficient exciton materials for the opto-electronic devices. In order to definitively identify preferred isomeric structures for silicon carbon nano-clusters, highly accurate geometries, energies, and harmonic zero point energies have been computed using coupled-cluster theory with systematic extrapolation to the complete basis limit for set of silicon carbon clusters ranging in size from SiC{sub 3} to Si{sub 12}C{sub 12}. It is found that post-MBPT(2) correlation energy plays a significant role in obtaining converged relative isomer energies, suggesting that predictions using low rung density functional methods will not have adequate accuracy. Utilizing the best composite coupled-cluster energy that is still computationally feasible, entailing a 3-4 SCF and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles extrapolation with triple-ζ (T) correlation, the closo Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} isomer is identified to be the preferred isomer in the support of previous calculations [X. F. Duan and L. W. Burggraf, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 034303 (2015)]. Additionally we have investigated more pragmatic approaches to obtaining accurate silicon carbide isomer energies, including the use of frozen natural orbital coupled-cluster theory and several rungs of standard and double-hybrid density functional theory. Frozen natural orbitals as a way to compute post-MBPT(2) correlation energy are found to be an excellent balance between efficiency and accuracy.

  3. Predictive coupled-cluster isomer orderings for some SinCm (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: A pragmatic comparison between DFT and complete basis limit coupled-cluster benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, Jason N.; Lutz, Jesse J.; Jin, Yifan; Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Montgomery, John A.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.; Sanders, Beverly A.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate determination of the preferred Si 12 C 12 isomer is important to guide experimental efforts directed towards synthesizing SiC nano-wires and related polymer structures which are anticipated to be highly efficient exciton materials for the opto-electronic devices. In order to definitively identify preferred isomeric structures for silicon carbon nano-clusters, highly accurate geometries, energies, and harmonic zero point energies have been computed using coupled-cluster theory with systematic extrapolation to the complete basis limit for set of silicon carbon clusters ranging in size from SiC 3 to Si 12 C 12 . It is found that post-MBPT(2) correlation energy plays a significant role in obtaining converged relative isomer energies, suggesting that predictions using low rung density functional methods will not have adequate accuracy. Utilizing the best composite coupled-cluster energy that is still computationally feasible, entailing a 3-4 SCF and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles extrapolation with triple-ζ (T) correlation, the closo Si 12 C 12 isomer is identified to be the preferred isomer in the support of previous calculations [X. F. Duan and L. W. Burggraf, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 034303 (2015)]. Additionally we have investigated more pragmatic approaches to obtaining accurate silicon carbide isomer energies, including the use of frozen natural orbital coupled-cluster theory and several rungs of standard and double-hybrid density functional theory. Frozen natural orbitals as a way to compute post-MBPT(2) correlation energy are found to be an excellent balance between efficiency and accuracy.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICPMS) coupling to assess pentavalent actinides thermodynamic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topin, S.; Baglan, N.; Aupiais, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Aiming to investigate plutonium speciation at trace levels, we coupled capillary electrophoresis, a high resolution separation technique with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, a detector with high sensitivity for plutonium. The research work performed to optimize the coupling is discussed based on the following criteria: the migration time, the resolution and the detection limit. The capabilities of the analytical tool are demonstrated by determining thermodynamic constants for pentavalent plutonium, and neptunium as a reference, in the presence of inorganic ligands. (author)

  5. Determination of bismuth by dielectric barrier discharge atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation: Method optimization and evaluation of analytical performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratzer, Jan; Boušek, J.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Mester, Z.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 19 (2014), s. 9620-9625 ISSN 0003-2700 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * hydride generation * atomic absorption spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  6. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, Ivana; Horáček, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 418, JUN 2013 (2013), s. 8-13 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/12/0665 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : analytic continuation * resonances * vertical attachment energy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.028, year: 2013

  7. Coupling limit equilibrium analyses and real-time monitoring to refine a landslide surveillance system in Calabria (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, G. G. R.; Lollino, P.; Gariano, S. L.; Terranova, O. G.

    2010-11-01

    On 28 January 2009, a large debris slide was triggered by prolonged rainfalls at the southern suburbs of San Benedetto Ullano (Northern Calabria). The slope movement affected fractured and weathered migmatitic gneiss and biotitic schist, and included a pre-existing landslide. A detailed geomorphologic field survey, carried out during the whole phase of mobilization, allowed to recognize the evolution of the phenomenon. A set of datum points was located along the borders of the landslide and frequent hand-made measurements of surface displacements were performed. Since 11 February, a basic real-time monitoring system of meteoric parameters and of surface displacements, measured by means of high-precision extensometers, was also implemented. Based on the data gained through the monitoring system, and on field surveying, a basic support system for emergency management could be defined since the first phases of activation of the phenomenon. The evolution of the landslide was monitored during the following months: as a consequence, evidence of retrogressive distribution could be recognized, with initial activation in the middle sector of the slope, where new temporary springs were observed. During early May, the activity reduced to displacements of a few millimetres per month and the geo-hydrological crisis seemed to be concluded. Afterwards, the geological scheme of the slope was refined based on the data collected through a set of explorative boreholes, equipped with inclinometers and piezometers: according to the stratigraphic and inclinometric data, the depth of the mobilized body resulted in varying between 15 and 35 m along a longitudinal section. A parametric limit equilibrium analysis was carried out to explore the stability conditions of the slope affected by the landslide as well as to quantify the role of the water table in destabilizing the slope. The interpretation of the process based on field observations was confirmed by the limit equilibrium analysis

  8. Coupling limit equilibrium analyses and real-time monitoring to refine a landslide surveillance system in Calabria (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. R. Iovine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available On 28 January 2009, a large debris slide was triggered by prolonged rainfalls at the southern suburbs of San Benedetto Ullano (Northern Calabria. The slope movement affected fractured and weathered migmatitic gneiss and biotitic schist, and included a pre-existing landslide. A detailed geomorphologic field survey, carried out during the whole phase of mobilization, allowed to recognize the evolution of the phenomenon. A set of datum points was located along the borders of the landslide and frequent hand-made measurements of surface displacements were performed. Since 11 February, a basic real-time monitoring system of meteoric parameters and of surface displacements, measured by means of high-precision extensometers, was also implemented.

    Based on the data gained through the monitoring system, and on field surveying, a basic support system for emergency management could be defined since the first phases of activation of the phenomenon. The evolution of the landslide was monitored during the following months: as a consequence, evidence of retrogressive distribution could be recognized, with initial activation in the middle sector of the slope, where new temporary springs were observed. During early May, the activity reduced to displacements of a few millimetres per month and the geo-hydrological crisis seemed to be concluded.

    Afterwards, the geological scheme of the slope was refined based on the data collected through a set of explorative boreholes, equipped with inclinometers and piezometers: according to the stratigraphic and inclinometric data, the depth of the mobilized body resulted in varying between 15 and 35 m along a longitudinal section. A parametric limit equilibrium analysis was carried out to explore the stability conditions of the slope affected by the landslide as well as to quantify the role of the water table in destabilizing the slope. The interpretation of the process based on field observations was confirmed

  9. Zγ production in p bar p collisions at √ (s) =1.8TeV and limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Butler, J.M.; Fatyga, M.; Gibbard, B.; Gordon, H.; Graf, N.; Kahn, S.; Kotcher, J.; Protopopescu, S.; Rajagopalan, S.; Bantly, J.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cutts, D.; Guida, J.M.; Hoftun, J.S.; Partridge, R.; Grinstein, S.; Piegaia, R.; Bloom, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Glenn, S.; Grim, G.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lander, R.; Mani, S.; Fahland, T.; Hall, R.E.; Boswell, C.; Choudhary, B.C.; Cochran, J.; Ellison, J.; Gartung, P.; Gounder, K.; Heinson, A.P.; Huehn, T.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Adam, I.; Kotwal, A.V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Ahn, S.; Baldin, B.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bhat, P.C.; Boehnlein, A.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Bross, A.; Christenson, J.H.; Cooper, W.E.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Feher, S.; Fisk, H.E.; Flattum, E.; Fuess, S.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Green, D.R.; Greenlee, H.; Grossman, N.; Haggerty, H.; Hansen, S.; Heintz, U.; Hobbs, J.D.; Ito, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    We present a study of Zγ+X production in p bar p collisions at √ (s) =1.8TeV from 97 (87)pb -1 of data collected in the eeγ (μmuγ) decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The event yield and kinematic characteristics are consistent with the standard model predictions. We obtain limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings for form factor scales Λ=500GeV and Λ=750GeV. Combining this analysis with our previous results yields 95% C.L. limits [h 30 Z ] 40 Z ] 30 γ ] 40 γ ]<0.05 for a form factor scale Λ=750GeV. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at √(s) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Michael P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW → ee/eμ/μμ events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity at √s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8± 3.8 total background expected, consistent with σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW) = 11.6 ± 1.8(stat) ± 0.7(syst) ± 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2)L Ⓧ U(1)Y conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < Δκγ< 0.99, -0.15 < Λγ < 0.19, and -0.14 < Δg1Z < 0.34.

  11. Measurement of the pp¯→WZ+X cross section at s=1.96TeV and limits on WWZ trilinear gauge couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L. S.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Arthaud, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Jesus, A. C. S. Assis; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, P.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Biscarat, C.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, S.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chan, K.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, J.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hansson, P.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hossain, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kalk, J. M.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Kirsch, M.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lacroix, F.; Lam, D.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lellouch, J.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, L.; Lietti, S. M.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martin, B.; McCarthy, R.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, A.; Michaut, M.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mommsen, R. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Nogima, H.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Ochando, C.; Onoprienko, D.; Oshima, N.; Osta, J.; Otec, R.; Y Garzón, G. J. Otero; Owen, M.; Padley, P.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Pope, B. G.; Popov, A. V.; Potter, C.; da Silva, W. L. Prado; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rakitine, A.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Renkel, P.; Reucroft, S.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schliephake, T.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Siccardi, V.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, J.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strauss, E.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Svoisky, P.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Temple, J.; Tiller, B.; Tissandier, F.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Toole, T.; Torchiani, I.; Trefzger, T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Unalan, R.; Uvarov, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; von Toerne, E.; Voutilainen, M.; Wagner, R.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, L.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weber, G.; Wenger, A.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zivkovic, L.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2007-12-01

    We present measurements of the process pp¯→WZ+X→ℓ'νℓ'ℓℓ¯ at s=1.96TeV, where ℓ and ℓ' are electrons or muons. Using 1fb-1 of data from the D0 experiment, we observe 13 candidates with an expected background of 4.5±0.6 events and measure a cross section σ(WZ)=2.7-1.3+1.7pb. From the number of observed events and the Z boson transverse momentum distribution, we limit the trilinear WWZ gauge couplings to -0.17≤λZ≤0.21(ΔκZ=0) at the 95% C.L. for a form factor scale Λ=2TeV. Further, assuming that Δg1Z=ΔκZ, we find -0.12≤ΔκZ≤0.29(λZ=0) at the 95% C.L. These are the most restrictive limits on the WWZ couplings available to date.

  12. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section and limits to the anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings with forward electrons with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Lopez, Deywis

    2014-06-24

    Measurements of the self coupling between bosons are important to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model (SM). The production of pairs of Z bosons through the s-channel is forbidden in the SM. The presence of physics, beyond the SM, could lead to a deviation of the expected production cross section of pairs of Z bosons due to the so called anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings (aTGC). Proton-proton data collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded by the ATLAS detector at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV were analyzed corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1}. Pairs of Z bosons decaying into two electron-positron pairs are searched for in the data sample. The effect of the inclusion of detector regions corresponding to high values of the pseudorapidity was studied to enlarge the phase space available for the measurement of the ZZ production. The number of ZZ candidates was determined and the ZZ production cross section was measured to be: 7.3±1.0(Stat.)±0.4(Sys.)±0.2(lumi.) pb, which is consistent with the SM expectation value of 7.2{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} pb. Limits on the aTGCs were derived using the observed yield, which are twice as stringent as previous limits obtained by ATLAS at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV.

  13. Measurement of the $W^{+}W^{-} \\gamma$ Cross-section and First direct Limits on Anomalous Electroweak Quartic Gauge Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    A study of W+W- events accompanied by hard photon radiation produced in e+e- collisions at LEP is presented. Events consistent with two on-shell W-bosons and an isolated photon are selected from 183pb^-1 of data recorded at root{s}=189GeV. From these data, 17 W+W-gamma candidates are selected with photon energy greater than 10GeV, consistent with the Standard Model expectation. These events are used to measure the e+e- to W+W-gamma cross-section within a set of geometric and kinematic cuts; sigma{W+W-gamma} = 136+-37+-8 fb, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The photon energy spectrum is used to set the first direct, albeit weak, limits on possible anomalous contributions to the {W+ W- gamma gamma} and {W+ W- gamma Z0} vertices: -0.070GeV^{-2} < a_0/Lambda^2 < 0.070GeV^{-2}, -0.13GeV^{-2} < a_c/Lambda^2 < 0.19GeV^{-2}, -0.61GeV^{-2} < a_n/Lambda^2 < 0.57GeV^{-2}, where Lambda represents the energy scale for new physics.

  14. Effects of the limited analyte solubility on its mobility and zone shapes: Electrophoretic behavior of sanguinarine and chelerythrine around pH 7

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vespalec, Radim; Vlčková, M.; Kubáň, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 17 (2005), s. 3265-3272 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0023; GA ČR GA525/01/0823; GA AV ČR IAA4031103 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * solvent effects * sanguinarine Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.850, year: 2005

  15. Resurgence and the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit: connecting weak and strong coupling in the Mathieu and Lamé systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Başar, Gökçe [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD, 20742 (United States); Dunne, Gerald V. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut,Storrs CT 06269 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit for the low-energy behavior of N=2 and N=2{sup ∗} supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theories is encoded in the spectrum of the Mathieu and Lamé equations, respectively. This correspondence is usually expressed via an all-orders Bohr-Sommerfeld relation, but this neglects non-perturbative effects, the nature of which is very different in the electric, magnetic and dyonic regions. In the gauge theory dyonic region the spectral expansions are divergent, and indeed are not Borel-summable, so they are more properly described by resurgent trans-series in which perturbative and non-perturbative effects are deeply entwined. In the gauge theory electric region the spectral expansions are convergent, but nevertheless there are non-perturbative effects due to poles in the expansion coefficients, and which we associate with worldline instantons. This provides a concrete analog of a phenomenon found recently by Drukker, Mariño and Putrov in the large N expansion of the ABJM matrix model, in which non-perturbative effects are related to complex space-time instantons. In this paper we study how these very different regimes arise from an exact WKB analysis, and join smoothly through the magnetic region. This approach also leads to a simple proof of a resurgence relation found recently by Dunne and Ünsal, showing that for these spectral systems all non-perturbative effects are subtly encoded in perturbation theory, and identifies this with the Picard-Fuchs equation for the quantized elliptic curve.

  16. Microwave assisted solvent extraction and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection use of an analytical restricted-access-medium column for the efficient multi-residue analysis of acidic pesticides in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoom, E A; Huls, R; Dijkman, E; Hoogerbrugge, R

    2001-12-14

    A screening method has been developed for the determination of acidic pesticides in various types of soils. Methodology is based on the use of microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE) for fast and efficient extraction of the analytes from the soils and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC-LC) with UV detection at 228 nm for the instrumental analysis of uncleaned extracts. Four types of soils, including sand, clay and peat, with a range in organic matter content of 0.3-13% and ten acidic pesticides of different chemical families (bentazone, bromoxynil, metsulfuron-methyl, 2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, 2,4-DP, 2,4,5-T, 2,4-DB and MCPB) were selected as matrices and analytes, respectively. The method developed included the selection of suitable MASE and LC-LC conditions. The latter consisted of the selection of a 5-microm GFF-II internal surface reversed-phase (ISRP, Pinkerton) analytical column (50 x 4.6 mm, I.D.) as the first column in the RAM-C18 configuration in combination with an optimised linear gradient elution including on-line cleanup of sample extracts and reconditioning of the columns. The method was validated with the analysis of freshly spiked samples and samples with aged residues (120 days). The four types of soils were spiked with the ten acidic pesticides at levels between 20 and 200 microg/kg. Weighted regression of the recovery data showed for most analyte-matrix combinations, including freshly spiked samples and aged residues, that the method provides overall recoveries between 60 and 90% with relative standard deviations of the intra-laboratory reproducibility's between 5 and 25%; LODs were obtained between 5 and 50 microg/kg. Evaluation of the data set with principal component analysis revealed that the parameters (i) increase of organic matter content of the soil samples and (ii) aged residues negatively effect the recovery of the analytes.

  17. Analytic nuclear scattering theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marzio, F.; University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC

    1999-01-01

    A wide range of nuclear reactions are examined in an analytical version of the usual distorted wave Born approximation. This new approach provides either semi analytic or fully analytic descriptions of the nuclear scattering processes. The resulting computational simplifications, when used within the limits of validity, allow very detailed tests of both nuclear interaction models as well as large basis models of nuclear structure to be performed

  18. Comparison of the quench and fault current limiting characteristics of the flux-coupling type SFCL with single and three-phase transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Byung Ik; Cho, Yong Sun; Park, Hyoung Min; Chung, Dong Chul; Choi, Hyo Sang

    2013-01-01

    The South Korean power grid has a network structure for the flexible operation of the system. The continuously increasing power demand necessitated the increase of power facilities, which decreased the impedance in the power system. As a result, the size of the fault current in the event of a system fault increased. As this increased fault current size is threatening the breaking capacity of the circuit breaker, the main protective device, a solution to this problem is needed. The superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) has been designed to address this problem. SFCL supports the stable operation of the circuit breaker through its excellent fault-current-limiting operation [1-5]. In this paper, the quench and fault current limiting characteristics of the flux-coupling-type SFCL with one three-phase transformer were compared with those of the same SFCL type but with three single-phase transformers. In the case of the three-phase transformers, both the superconducting elements of the fault and sound phases were quenched, whereas in the case of the single-phase transformer, only that of the fault phase was quenched. For the fault current limiting rate, both cases showed similar rates for the single line-to-ground fault, but for the three-wire earth fault, the fault current limiting rate of the single-phase transformer was over 90% whereas that of the three-phase transformer was about 60%. It appears that when the three-phase transformer was used, the limiting rate decreased because the fluxes by the fault current of each phase were linked in one core. When the power loads of the superconducting elements were compared by fault type, the initial (half-cycle) load was great when the single-phase transformer was applied, whereas for the three-phase transformer, its power load was slightly lower at the initial stage but became greater after the half fault cycle.

  19. Analytical chemistry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, H.; Marty, P.

    2001-01-01

    Different characterization methods specifically applied to the actinides are presented in this review such as ICP/OES (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry), ICP/MS (inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy-mass spectrometry), TIMS (thermal ionization-mass spectrometry) and GD/OES (flow discharge optical emission). Molecular absorption spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis are also available to complete the excellent range of analytical tools at our disposal. (authors)

  20. Multiple analyte adduct formation in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry - Advantages and limitations in the analysis of biologically-related samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadosz, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Multiple analyte adduct formation was examined and discussed in the context of reproducible signal detection in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry applied in the analysis of biologically-related samples. Appropriate infusion solutions were prepared in H 2 O/methanol (3/97, v/v) with 1 mM sodium acetate and 10 mM acetic acid. An API 4000 QTrap tandem mass spectrometer was used for experiments performed in the negative scan mode (-Q1 MS) and the negative enhanced product ion mode (-EPI). γ‑Hydroxybutyrate and its deuterated form were used as model compounds to highlight both the complexity of adduct formation in popular mobile phases used and the effective signal compensation by the application of isotope-labelled analytes as internal standards. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Partial microwave-assisted wet digestion of animal tissue using a baby-bottle sterilizer for analyte determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Wladiana O.; Menezes, Eveline A.; Gonzalez, Mario H.; Costa, Leticia M.; Trevizan, Lilian C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    A procedure for partial digestion of bovine tissue is proposed using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) micro-vessels inside a baby-bottle sterilizer under microwave radiation for multi-element determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Samples were directly weighed in laboratory-made polytetrafluoroethylene vessels. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide were added to the uncovered vessels, which were positioned inside the baby-bottle sterilizer, containing 500 mL of water. The hydrogen peroxide volume was fixed at 100 μL. The system was placed in a domestic microwave oven and partial digestion was carried out for the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The single-vessel approach was used in the entire procedure, to minimize contamination in trace analysis. Better recoveries and lower residual carbon content (RCC) levels were obtained under the conditions established through a 2 4-1 fractional factorial design: 650 W microwave power, 7 min digestion time, 50 μL nitric acid and 50 mg sample mass. The digestion efficiency was ascertained according to the residual carbon content determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked against two certified reference materials.

  2. Coupling of analytical and numerical methods for the analysis of line start permanent magnet synchronous motors; Kopplung numerischer und analytischer Verfahren zur Berechnung von permanenterregten Synchronmaschinen fuer Selbstanlauf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, Eva; Stuebig, Cornelia; Tegeler, Sebastian; Wehner, Meike; Ponick, Bernd [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Antriebssysteme und Leistungselektronik

    2011-07-01

    Due to stricter efficiency legislation for electrical machines, it becomes increasingly important to predict a motor's performance with regard to start and operational behaviour correctly. In consequence of the higher efficiency required for electrical machines, permanent magnet synchronous machines become an interesting alternative also for motors with direct on-line starting. This paper describes a method to calculate these motor's behaviour reliably and accurately based on a combined analytical and numerical approach developed at the Institute for Drive Systems and Power Electronics of Leibniz Universitaet Hannover. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the diboson production cross section at 8TeV and 13TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buttinger, William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of heavy di-boson pairs in fully-leptonic and semi-leptonic final states at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. We present in particular new measurements of WW and WZ in semi-leptonic or hadronic decays using standard or boosted technologies and new measurements of the inclusive and differential ZZ cross section at 13 TeV in various decay modes. The results are compared to predictions at NLO (and NNLO) in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  4. Growth of a delta-doped silicon layer by molecular beam epitaxy on a charge-coupled device for reflection-limited ultraviolet quantum efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Terhune, R. W.; Fattahi, Masoud; Tseng, Hsin-Fu

    1992-01-01

    Low-temperature silicon molecular beam epitaxy is used to grow a delta-doped silicon layer on a fully processed charge-coupled device (CCD). The measured quantum efficiency of the delta-doped backside-thinned CCD is in agreement with the reflection limit for light incident on the back surface in the spectral range of 260-600 nm. The 2.5 nm silicon layer, grown at 450 C, contained a boron delta-layer with surface density of about 2 x 10 exp 14/sq cm. Passivation of the surface was done by steam oxidation of a nominally undoped 1.5 nm Si cap layer. The UV quantum efficiency was found to be uniform and stable with respect to thermal cycling and illumination conditions.

  5. New analytical methods for materials characterization using the techniques of nuclear activation reactions induced by thermal neutrons and accelerated ion beams, coupled to gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cincu, Emanuela

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is a comprehensive collection of the author's works in the field of 'Nuclear Activation Techniques with accelerated Charged Particles and Thermal Neutrons' carried out within the framework of the research contracts the author initiated and performed in the period 1990 - 1999. The works objective was to achieve a consistent and complete methodological and instrumental assembly for accurate elemental analysis of technological samples of interest for industry, medicine, and monitoring of the environmental radioactivity. The experiments were carried out using the IFIN-HH facilities: U-120 Cyclotron, 8 MV Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator, and the WWR-S nuclear reactor. Part of the reported works were initiated and performed in collaboration with partners from the chemical industry and metallurgic industry, wishing to employ the sensitive nuclear analytical techniques, which are able to put in evidence simultaneously major, minor elements, and impurities in the investigated samples. The impact with the challenging topics and the characteristics of some investigated technological samples, generated the studies having both theoretical and experimental features, presented in this thesis, as well as the original analytical and methodological solutions. The thesis structure has two parts: The 1st part (Chapter 1) is a survey of the literature until 1999, that concerns the theory of nuclear activation reactions with accelerated charged particles (CPAA) and thermal neutrons (NAA), evidencing the analytical performance of both techniques; details are also given about the 'critical' phenomena encountered in CPAA, whose origin is still under discussion in the literature. The 2 nd part of the thesis contains the original contributions of the author in the theoretical, methodological, and software fields (Chapters 2-8), the experimental results obtained, and the nuclear database software based on the 'Fox-Pro' operation system, conceived for processing the experimental

  6. Analytical spectroscopy. Analytical Chemistry Symposia Series, Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains papers covering several fields in analytical chemistry including lasers, mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma, activation analysis and emission spectroscopy. Separate abstracting and indexing was done for 64 papers in this book

  7. Comparison of the quench and fault current limiting characteristics of the flux-coupling type SFCL with single and three-phase transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Byung Ik; Cho, Yong Sun; Park, Hyoung Min; Chung, Dong Chul; Choi, Hyo Sang

    2013-01-01

    Highlight: ► Comparison of quench and fault-current-limiting behavior of SFCLs by Tr type. -- Abstract: The South Korean power grid has a network structure for the flexible operation of the system. The continuously increasing power demand necessitated the increase of power facilities, which decreased the impedance in the power system. As a result, the size of the fault current in the event of a system fault increased. As this increased fault current size is threatening the breaking capacity of the circuit breaker, the main protective device, a solution to this problem is needed. The superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) has been designed to address this problem. SFCL supports the stable operation of the circuit breaker through its excellent fault-current-limiting operation [1–5]. In this paper, the quench and fault current limiting characteristics of the flux-coupling-type SFCL with one three-phase transformer were compared with those of the same SFCL type but with three single-phase transformers. In the case of the three-phase transformers, both the superconducting elements of the fault and sound phases were quenched, whereas in the case of the single-phase transformer, only that of the fault phase was quenched. For the fault current limiting rate, both cases showed similar rates for the single line-to-ground fault, but for the three-wire earth fault, the fault current limiting rate of the single-phase transformer was over 90% whereas that of the three-phase transformer was about 60%. It appears that when the three-phase transformer was used, the limiting rate decreased because the fluxes by the fault current of each phase were linked in one core. When the power loads of the superconducting elements were compared by fault type, the initial (half-cycle) load was great when the single-phase transformer was applied, whereas for the three-phase transformer, its power load was slightly lower at the initial stage but became greater after the half fault cycle

  8. Improvements in the analytical methodology for the residue determination of the herbicide glyphosate in soils by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero-Coy, A M; Ibáñez, M; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F

    2013-05-31

    The determination of glyphosate (GLY) in soils is of great interest due to the widespread use of this herbicide and the need of assessing its impact on the soil/water environment. However, its residue determination is very problematic especially in soils with high organic matter content, where strong interferences are normally observed, and because of the particular physico-chemical characteristics of this polar/ionic herbicide. In the present work, we have improved previous LC-MS/MS analytical methodology reported for GLY and its main metabolite AMPA in order to be applied to "difficult" soils, like those commonly found in South-America, where this herbicide is extensively used in large areas devoted to soya or maize, among other crops. The method is based on derivatization with FMOC followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, using triple quadrupole. After extraction with potassium hydroxide, a combination of extract dilution, adjustment to appropriate pH, and solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was applied to minimize the strong interferences observed. Despite the clean-up performed, the use of isotope labelled glyphosate as internal standard (ILIS) was necessary for the correction of matrix effects and to compensate for any error occurring during sample processing. The analytical methodology was satisfactorily validated in four soils from Colombia and Argentina fortified at 0.5 and 5mg/kg. In contrast to most LC-MS/MS methods, where the acquisition of two transitions is recommended, monitoring all available transitions was required for confirmation of positive samples, as some of them were interfered by unknown soil components. This was observed not only for GLY and AMPA but also for the ILIS. Analysis by QTOF MS was useful to confirm the presence of interferent compounds that shared the same nominal mass of analytes as well as some of their main product ions. Therefore, the selection of specific transitions was crucial to avoid interferences. The methodology developed

  9. Computing dispersion curves of elastic/viscoelastic transversely-isotropic bone plates coupled with soft tissue and marrow using semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Tran, Tho N H T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Naili, Salah; Le, Lawrence H

    2017-08-01

    We present a semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) scheme for accurately computing the velocity dispersion and attenuation in a trilayered system consisting of a transversely-isotropic (TI) cortical bone plate sandwiched between the soft tissue and marrow layers. The soft tissue and marrow are mimicked by two fluid layers of finite thickness. A Kelvin-Voigt model accounts for the absorption of all three biological domains. The simulated dispersion curves are validated by the results from the commercial software DISPERSE and published literature. Finally, the algorithm is applied to a viscoelastic trilayered TI bone model to interpret the guided modes of an ex-vivo experimental data set from a bone phantom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of the WZ production cross section and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Michael

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the W±Z production cross section and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV using data produced by LHC collisions and acquired by the ATLAS detector in 2011. The measurement and limits probe the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at high energies and allow for generic tests for new physics that could be present at high energy scales. This analysis is also useful for understanding the ATLAS detector response in the presence of multi-lepton signatures. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1.02 fb−1. The measurement relies on the leptonic decay modes of the W and Z, resulting in final states with electrons, muons, and missing energy. Events are selected by requiring three high momentum leptons, a large missing transverse energy, a Z candidate (reconstructed from two of the leptons) with a mass consistent with the Z pole mass, and a W candidate (reconstructed from the thi...

  11. Analytic trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, William J; Maxwell, E A; Sneddon, I N

    1963-01-01

    Analytic Trigonometry details the fundamental concepts and underlying principle of analytic geometry. The title aims to address the shortcomings in the instruction of trigonometry by considering basic theories of learning and pedagogy. The text first covers the essential elements from elementary algebra, plane geometry, and analytic geometry. Next, the selection tackles the trigonometric functions of angles in general, basic identities, and solutions of equations. The text also deals with the trigonometric functions of real numbers. The fifth chapter details the inverse trigonometric functions

  12. Development of NUFREQ-N, an analytical model for the stability analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations in boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time-dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this mode, NUFREQ-N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparison were made with existing in-core and out-of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ-N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis

  13. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  14. Semi-permeable surface analytical reversed-phase column for the improved trace analysis of acidic pesticides in water with coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection. Determination of bromoxynil and bentazone in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoorn, E A; Westhuis, K; Dijkman, E; Heusinkveld, H A; den Boer, A C; Evers, E A; Baumann, R A

    1999-10-08

    The coupled-column (LC-LC) configuration consisting of a 3 microm C18 column (50 x 4.6 mm I.D.) as the first column and a 5 microm C18 semi-permeable-surface (SPS) column (150 x 4.6 mm I.D.) as the second column appeared to be successful for the screening of acidic pesticides in surface water samples. In comparison to LC-LC employing two C18 columns, the combination of C18/SPS-C18 significantly decreased the baseline deviation caused by the hump of the co-extracted humic substances when using UV detection (217 nm). The developed LC-LC procedure allowed the simultaneous determination of the target analytes bentazone and bromoxynil in uncleaned extracts of surface water samples to a level of 0.05 microg/l in less than 15 min. In combination with a simple solid-phase extraction step (200 ml of water on a 500 mg C18-bonded silica) the analytical procedure provides a high sample throughput. During a period of about five months more than 200 ditch-water samples originating from agricultural locations were analyzed with the developed procedure. Validation of the method was performed by randomly analyzing recoveries of water samples spiked at levels of 0.1 microg/l (n=10), 0.5 microg/l (n=7) and 2.5 microg/l (n=4). Weighted regression of the recovery data showed that the method provides overall recoveries of 95 and 100% for bentazone and bromoxynil, respectively, with corresponding intra-laboratory reproducibilities of 10 and 11%, respectively. Confirmation of the analytes in part of the samples extracts was carried out with GC-negative ion chemical ionization MS involving a derivatization step with bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl bromide. No false negatives or positives were observed.

  15. Evaluation of analytical procedures for the determination of cadmium, boron and lithium in UALx samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Kakazu, Mauricio H.; Cotrim, Marycel Elena Barboza; Pires, Maria Aparecida Faustino; Souza, Alexandre Luiz de

    2013-01-01

    Used in over 80% of the worldwide diagnostic procedures, Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), which is obtained from the decay of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo), is the most important radioisotope in nuclear medicine. IPEN/CNEN-SP has been developing technologies in order to produce Mo-99 by the irradiation of low-enriched uranium (LEU < 20% of 235U) targets in its research reactor IEA-R1 (IPEN, Sao Paulo/Brazil). These targets consist of low enriched uranium dispersed in a matrix of aluminum (UAlx-Al). Several impurities may be incorporated during the target's production process, such as boron, cadmium and lithium, which have a high capture cross section that may reduce the irradiation's efficiency. This study describes a simple and rapid inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric method for the determination of cadmium, boron and lithium in uranium aluminum (UAlx) dispersion targets. The method involves a previous separation step, in which uranium gets removed from the matrix by chromatographic extraction with the use of a divinylbenzene resin Amberlite XAD - 4 doped with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). TBP selectively separates the uranium, leaving behind the impurities in an aqueous medium for a further quantification by ICP OES. Possible spectroscopic interferences are also discussed in this article, because of the high amount of aluminum in the remaining solution. Experimental and instrumental conditions, such as initial mass, acid solution ratio and amount, resin mass, emission lines and interfering concentrations are carefully established. This method is to be applied for the determination of several others impurities in UAlx in the future, providing means to verify the UAlx targets' compliance to the current established specifications through routine laboratory analysis. (author)

  16. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, Nina; Flecken, Mirkko; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2016-02-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation in reaction center II (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5-fold changes in the conversion factor between ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Kc / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light and correlates with the increased expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and Kc / nPSII requires further validation but has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  17. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.

    2015-01-01

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (∼1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ∼2.2 kA/cm 2 threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed

  18. Measurement of the $WZ$ production cross section at 8 TeV and 13 TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gutschow, Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of $WZ$ pairs in fully leptonic final states using data corresponding to 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. These measurements include ratios of $WZ$ pairs separated by the charge of the $W$ boson for the first time. The results are compared to predictions at NLO in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings. Finally, a first measurement of $WZ$ cross sections at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV using data corresponding to 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ will be presented including the ratios to previous ATLAS measurements at 8 TeV and between $W$ charges.

  19. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Awad, Adel; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sudhakar, Katta; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Du Pree, Tristan; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Ferro, Cristina; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Thomas, Laurent; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Yin, Hang; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mareskas-palcek, Darren; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Demortier, Luc; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Christian, Allison; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Gomber, Bhawna; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-07-15

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV is presented. The data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb$^{-1}$. The $\\mathrm{W}^{+} \\mathrm{W}^{-}$ candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured $\\mathrm{W}^{+} \\mathrm{W}^{-}$ cross section is 60.1 $\\pm$ 0.9 (stat) $\\pm$ 3.2 (exp) $\\pm$ 3.1 (theo) $\\pm$ 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 $\\pm$ 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction.The $\\mathrm{W}^{+} \\mathrm{W}^{-}$ cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field the...

  20. Improved Analytical Method for Determination of Cholesterol-Oxidation Products in Meat and Animal Fat by QuEChERS Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Che-Wei; Kao, Tsai-Hua; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2018-04-04

    Cholesterol is widely present in animal fats and meat products and can undergo oxidation to form cholesterol-oxidation products (COPs) during heating. The objective of this study was to develop a QuEChERS method for the determination of COPs in edible animal fats and meat products via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in which the required solvent volume and extraction time were reduced. By employing a DB-5MS capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d., 0.25 μm film thickness) and a temperature-programming method, seven COPs, cholesterol, and the internal standard 5α-cholestane could be separated within 19 min. The limits of detection and limits of quantitation based on the COP standards ranged from 0.16 to 180 ng/mL and from 0.32 to 400 ng/mL, respectively, and the recoveries ranged from 89.1 to 107.6% for boiled pork and from 80.5 to 105.6% for lard. The intraday variabilities for boiled pork and lard ranged from 2.27 to 6.87% and from 1.52 to 9.78%, respectively, whereas the interday variabilities ranged from 1.81 to 7.89% and from 3.57 to 9.26%, respectively. Among the various meat samples, fish showed the highest level of COPs (31.84 μg/g). For the edible fats, the COP contents in tallow (22.79-60.15 μg/g) were much higher than those in lard (0.152-2.55 μg/g) and butter (0.526-1.36 μg/g). Collectively, this method can be applied to determine COPs in cholesterol-containing foodstuffs.

  1. High efficiency nebulization for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; McCormick, Ryan; Levine, Jonathan A.; Liu Huiying; Nam, S.-H.; Montaser, Akbar

    2006-01-01

    A pneumatically-driven, high efficiency nebulizer is explored for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The aerosol characteristics and analyte transport efficiencies of the high efficiency nebulizer for nebulization with helium are measured and compared to the results obtained with argon. Analytical performance indices of the helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are evaluated in terms of detection limits and precision. The helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection limits obtained with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min are higher than those achieved with the ultrasonic nebulizer consuming 2 mL/min solution, however, precision is generally better with high efficiency nebulizer (1-4% vs. 3-8% with ultrasonic nebulizer). Detection limits with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min solution uptake rate approach those using ultrasonic nebulizer upon efficient desolvation with a heated spray chamber followed by a Peltier-cooled multipass condenser

  2. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  3. Contribution to the development of new analytical methods by the coupling between capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and ESI-MS): applications to the nuclear and biological fields; Contribution au developpement de nouvelles methodes analytiques par le couplage entre l'electrophorese capillaire et la spectrometrie de masse (ICP-MS et ESI-MS): applications dans les domaines nucleaires et biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitois, A

    2006-04-15

    The coupling between chromatographic and electrophoretic separation techniques and mass spectrometry is used to combine the efficiency of the separation technique to the selectivity and sensitivity of the detectors. In this work, the number of applications of the CE-MS couplings has been increased. New analytical methods have been set up in the nuclear and biological fields. New analytical methods for the determination of fission products (cesium and lanthanides) have been developed by CE-ICP-MS. They enable to determine both concentration and isotopic composition of the fission products for very low detection limits (ng/mL by CE-Q-ICPMS, pg/mL by CE-HR-ICP-MS), since all the isobaric interferences are resolved. Moreover, only some nano-liters of sample are necessary to perform the analysis. These method have been applied with success to a simulated sample of spent fuel, to a nuclear sample from PUREX process and to a leaching of MOX fuel. Then, lanthanides have been analysed by CE-ESI-MS and the capability of ESI-MS to provide structural information has been studied. Elementary information has been obtained for strong potentials. Structural information has been obtained for low potentials. Finally, a new analytical method by CE-ESI-MS for the determination of 10B-boronophenylalanine (10B-BPA) has been developed for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It has been applied to the cellular lines F98 and HUVEC. This CE-ESI-MS method has been validated by HR-ICP-MS. It enables a direct quantification of the chemical form 10B-BPA in samples of limited size (some nano-liters) and for low concentrations (ng/mL). As a consequence, this CE-ESI-MS method has enabled the study of the kinetics of 10B-BPA release and uptake for the F98 cells. (author)

  4. Solid-phase extraction of polar pesticides from environmental water samples on graphitized carbon and Empore-activated carbon disks and on-line coupling to octadecyl-bonded silica analytical columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodník, J; Oztezkizan, O; Lingeman, H; Brinkman, U A

    1996-10-25

    The suitability of Empore-activated carbon disks (EACD), Envi-Carb graphitized carbon black (GCB) and CPP-50 graphitized carbon for the trace enrichment of polar pesticides from water samples was studied by means of off-line and on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). In the off-line procedure, 0.5-2 l samples spiked with a test mixture of oxamyl, methomyl and aldicarb sulfoxide were enriched on EnviCarb SPE cartridges or 47 mm diameter EACD and eluted with dichloromethane-methanol. After evaporation, a sample was injected onto a C18-bonded silica column and analysed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet (LC-UV) detection. EACD performed better than EnviCarb cartridges in terms of breakthrough volumes (> 2 l for all test analytes), reproducibility (R.S.D. of recoveries, 4-8%, n = 3) and sampling speed (100 ml/min); detection limits in drinking water were 0.05-0.16 microgram/l. In the on-line experiments, 4.6 mm diameter pieces cut from original EACD and stacked onto each other in a 9 mm long precolumn, and EnviCarb and CPP-50 packed in 10 x 2.0 mm I.D. precolumn, were tested, and 50-200 ml spiked water samples were preconcentrated. Because of the peak broadening caused by the strong sorption of the analytes on carbon, the carbon-packed precolumns were eluted by a separate stream of 0.1 ml/min acetonitrile which was mixed with the gradient LC eluent in front of the C18 analytical column. The final on-line procedure was also applied for the less polar propoxur, carbaryl and methiocarb. EnviCarb could not be used due to its poor pressure resistance. CPP-50 provided less peak broadening than EACD: peak widths were 0.1-0.3 min and R.S.D. of peak heights 4-14% (n = 3). In terms of analyte trapping efficiency on-line SPE-LC-UV with a CPP-50 precolumn also showed better performance than when Bondesil C18/OH or polymeric PLRP-S was used, but chromatographic resolution was similar. With the CPP-50-based system, detection limits of the test compounds were 0.05-1 microgram

  5. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    with a selected set of comparable firms and couples. We find evidence that couples often establish a business together because one spouse – most commonly the female – has limited outside opportunities in the labor market. However, the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the female......We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and postdissolution private and financial outcomes......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound investment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of non...

  6. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    with a selected set of comparable firms and couples. We find evidence that couples often establish a business together because one spouse - most commonly the female - has limited outside opportunities in the labor market. However, the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the female......We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, us-ing a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and post-dissolution private and financial outcomes......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound in-vestment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of non...

  7. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-15

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  8. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-01

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  9. Analytical method for the determination of various arsenic species in rice, rice food products, apple juice, and other juices by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, David; Zywicki, Richard; Sullivan, Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there are detectable levels of arsenic (As) in rice, rice food products, and apple juice. This has created significant concern to the public, the food industry, and various regulatory bodies. Classic test methods typically measure total As and are unable to differentiate the various As species. Since different As species have greatly different toxicities, an analytical method was needed to separate and quantify the different inorganic and organic species of As. The inorganic species arsenite [As(+3)] and arsenate [As(+5)] are highly toxic. With this in mind, an ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma (IC-ICP/MS) method was developed and validated for rice and rice food products that can separate and individually measure multiple inorganic and organic species of As. This allows for the evaluation of the safety or risk associated with any product analyzed. The IC-ICP/MS method was validated on rice and rice food products, and it has been used successfully on apple juice. This paper provides details of the validated method as well as some lessons learned during its development. Precision and accuracy data are presented for rice, rice food products, and apple juice.

  10. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, Nivaldo A

    2018-01-01

    Analytical mechanics is the foundation of many areas of theoretical physics including quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and has wide-ranging applications in engineering and celestial mechanics. This introduction to the basic principles and methods of analytical mechanics covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, rigid bodies, small oscillations, canonical transformations and Hamilton–Jacobi theory. This fully up-to-date textbook includes detailed mathematical appendices and addresses a number of advanced topics, some of them of a geometric or topological character. These include Bertrand's theorem, proof that action is least, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, constrained Hamiltonian systems, non-integrability criteria, KAM theory, classical field theory, Lyapunov functions, geometric phases and Poisson manifolds. Providing worked examples, end-of-chapter problems, and discussion of ongoing research in the field, it is suitable for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students studying analyt...

  11. Many-polaron theory for superconductivity and charge-density waves in a strongly coupled electron-phonon system with quasi-two-dimensionality: An interpolation between the adiabatic limit and the inverse-adiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, K.

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of a two-dimensional N-site N-electron system (N>>1) with site-diagonal electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling is studied in the context of polaron theory, so as to clarify the competition between the superconducting (SC) state and the charge-density wave (CDW) state. The Fermi surface of noninteracting electrons is assumed to be a complete circle with no nesting-type instability in the case of weak e-ph coupling, so as to focus on such a strong coupling that even the standard ''strong-coupling theory'' for superconductivity breaks down. Phonon clouds moving with electrons as well as a frozen phonon are taken into account by a variational method, combined with a mean-field theory. It covers the whole region of three basic parameters characterizing the system: the intersite transfer energy of electron T, the e-ph coupling energy S, and the phonon energy ω. The resultant phase diagram is given in a triangular coordinate space spanned by T, S, and ω. In the adiabatic region ω >(T,S) near the ω vertex of the triangle, on the other hand, each electron becomes a small polaron, and the SC state is always more stable than the CDW state, because the retardation effect is absent

  12. Analytical quadrics

    CERN Document Server

    Spain, Barry; Ulam, S; Stark, M

    1960-01-01

    Analytical Quadrics focuses on the analytical geometry of three dimensions. The book first discusses the theory of the plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, straight line, and central quadrics in their standard forms. The idea of the plane at infinity is introduced through the homogenous Cartesian coordinates and applied to the nature of the intersection of three planes and to the circular sections of quadrics. The text also focuses on paraboloid, including polar properties, center of a section, axes of plane section, and generators of hyperbolic paraboloid. The book also touches on homogenous coordi

  13. A validated analytical method to study the long-term stability of natural and synthetic glucocorticoids in livestock urine using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Nathalie; Julie, Vanden Bussche; Croubels, Siska; Delahaut, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2013-08-02

    Due to their growth-promoting effects, the use of synthetic glucocorticoids is strictly regulated in the European Union (Council Directive 2003/74/EC). In the frame of the national control plans, which should ensure the absence of residues in food products of animal origin, in recent years, a higher frequency of prednisolone positive bovine urines has been observed. This has raised questions with respect to the stability of natural corticoids in the respective urine samples and their potential to be transformed into synthetic analogs. In this study, a ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) methodology was developed to examine the stability of glucocorticoids in bovine urine under various storage conditions (up to 20 weeks) and to define suitable conditions for sample handling and storage, using an Orbitrap Exactive™. To this end, an extraction procedure was optimized using a Plackett-Burman experimental design to determine the key conditions for optimal extraction of glucocorticoids from urine. Next, the analytical method was successfully validated according to the guidelines of CD 2002/657/EC. Decision limits and detection capabilities for prednisolone, prednisone and methylprednisolone ranged, respectively, from 0.1 to 0.5μgL(-1) and from 0.3 to 0.8μgL(-1). For the natural glucocorticoids limits of detection and limits of quantification for dihydrocortisone, cortisol and cortisone ranged, respectively, from 0.1 to 0.2μgL(-1) and from 0.3 to 0.8μgL(-1). The stability study demonstrated that filter-sterilization of urine, storage at -80°C, and acidic conditions (pH 3) were optimal for preservation of glucocorticoids in urine and able to significantly limit degradation up to 20 weeks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Schedule Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    Warfare, Naval Sea Systems Command Acquisition Cycle Time : Defining the Problem David Tate, Institute for Defense Analyses Schedule Analytics Jennifer...research was comprised of the following high- level steps :  Identify and review primary data sources 1...research. However, detailed reviews of the OMB IT Dashboard data revealed that schedule data is highly aggregated. Program start date and program end date

  15. Nonlinear transient waves in coupled phase oscillators with inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, David J

    2015-05-01

    Like the inertia of a physical body describes its tendency to resist changes of its state of motion, inertia of an oscillator describes its tendency to resist changes of its frequency. Here, we show that finite inertia of individual oscillators enables nonlinear phase waves in spatially extended coupled systems. Using a discrete model of coupled phase oscillators with inertia, we investigate these wave phenomena numerically, complemented by a continuum approximation that permits the analytical description of the key features of wave propagation in the long-wavelength limit. The ability to exhibit traveling waves is a generic feature of systems with finite inertia and is independent of the details of the coupling function.

  16. On-line solid-phase enrichment coupled to packed reactor flow injection analysis in a green analytical procedure to determine low levels of folic acid using fluorescence detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emara Samy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of folic acid (FA is not an easy task because of its presence in lower concentrations, its lower stability under acidic conditions, and its sensitiveness against light and high temperature. The present study is concerned with the development and validation of an automated environmentally friendly pre-column derivatization combined by solid-phase enrichment (SPEn to determine low levels of FA. Results Cerium (IV trihydroxyhydroperoxide (CTH as a packed oxidant reactor has been used for oxidative cleavage of FA into highly fluorescent product, 2-amino-4-hydroxypteridine-6-carboxylic acid. FA was injected into a carrier stream of 0.04 M phosphate buffer, pH 3.4 at a flow-rate of 0.25 mL/min. The sample zone containing the analyte was passed through the CTH reactor thermostated at 40°C, and the fluorescent product was trapped and enriched on a head of small ODS column (10 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm particle size. The enriched product was then back-flush eluted by column-switching from the small ODS column to the detector with a greener mobile phase consisting of ethanol and phosphate buffer (0.04M, pH 3.4 in the ratio of 5:95 (v/v. The eluent was monitored fluorimetrically at emission and excitation wavelengths of 463 and 367 nm, respectively. The calibration graph was linear over concentrations of FA in the range of 1.25-50 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.49 ng/mL. Conclusion A new simple and sensitive green analytical procedure including on-line pre-column derivatization combined by SPEn has been developed for the routine quality control and dosage form assay of FA at very low concentration level. The method was a powerful analytical technique that had excellent sensitivity, sufficient accuracy and required relatively simple and inexpensive instrumentation.

  17. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-15

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  18. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-01

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  19. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  20. Development of a two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system coupled with on-line reduction as a new efficient analytical method of 3-nitrobenzanthrone, a potential human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasei, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Haruka; Toda, Yumiko; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2012-08-31

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is an extremely strong mutagen and carcinogen in rats inducing squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. We developed a new sensitive analytical method, a two-dimensional HPLC system coupled with on-line reduction, to quantify non-fluorescent 3-NBA as fluorescent 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA). The two-dimensional HPLC system consisted of reversed-phase HPLC and normal-phase HPLC, which were connected with a switch valve. 3-NBA was purified by reversed-phase HPLC and reduced to 3-ABA with a catalyst column, packed with alumina coated with platinum, in ethanol. An alcoholic solvent is necessary for reduction of 3-NBA, but 3-ABA is not fluorescent in the alcoholic solvent. Therefore, 3-ABA was separated from alcohol and impurities by normal-phase HPLC and detected with a fluorescence detector. Extracts from surface soil, airborne particles, classified airborne particles, and incinerator dust were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after clean-up with a silica gel column. 3-NBA, detected as 3-ABA, in the extracts was found as a single peak on the chromatograms without any interfering peaks. 3-NBA was detected in 4 incinerator dust samples (n=5). When classified airborne particles, that is, those 7.0 μm in size, were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after purified using a silica gel column, 3-NBA was detected in those particles with particle sizes NBA in airborne particles and the detection of 3-NBA in incinerator dust. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The analytic gradient with a reduced molecular orbital space for the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory: systematic study of the magnitudes and trends in simple molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeck, Kyoung K.; Jeon, Sang Il

    2000-01-01

    The analytic gradient method for the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) energy has been extended to employ a reduced molecular orbital (MO) space. Not only the innermost core MO s but also some of the outermost virtual MO s can be dropped in the reduced MO space, and a substantial amount of computation time can be reduced without deteriorating the results. In order to study the magnitudes and trends of the effects of the dropped MO s , the geometries and vibrational properties of the ground and excited states of BF, CO, CN, N 2 , AlCl, SiS, P 2 , BCl, AlF, CS, SiO, PN and GeSe are calculated with different sizes of molecular orbital space. The 6-31G and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets are employed for all molecules except GeSe for which the 6-311 G and the TZV+f basis sets are used. It is shown that the magnitudes of the drop MO effects are about 0.005 A in bond lengths and about 1% on harmonic frequencies and IR intensities provided that the dropped MO s correspond to (1s), (1s,2s,2p), and (1s,2s,2p,3s,3p) atomic orbitals of the first, the second, and the third row atoms, respectively. The geometries and vibrational properties of the first and the second excited states of HCN and HCN are calculated by using a drastically reduced virtual MO space as well as with the well defined frozen core MO space. The results suggest the possibility of using a very small MO space for qualitative study of valence excited states

  2. Web-based Visual Analytics for Extreme Scale Climate Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Harney, John F [ORNL; Jewell, Brian C [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Web-based visual analytics framework for democratizing advanced visualization and analysis capabilities pertinent to large-scale earth system simulations. We address significant limitations of present climate data analysis tools such as tightly coupled dependencies, ineffi- cient data movements, complex user interfaces, and static visualizations. Our Web-based visual analytics framework removes critical barriers to the widespread accessibility and adoption of advanced scientific techniques. Using distributed connections to back-end diagnostics, we minimize data movements and leverage HPC platforms. We also mitigate system dependency issues by employing a RESTful interface. Our framework embraces the visual analytics paradigm via new visual navigation techniques for hierarchical parameter spaces, multi-scale representations, and interactive spatio-temporal data mining methods that retain details. Although generalizable to other science domains, the current work focuses on improving exploratory analysis of large-scale Community Land Model (CLM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) simulations.

  3. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuta, Jan [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Lubomír [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kynický, Jindřich [Department of Pedology and Geology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases.

  4. Advanced analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrochek, J.E.; Shumate, S.E.; Genung, R.K.; Bahner, C.T.; Lee, N.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    The development of several new analytical techniques for use in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research is reported. These include: high-resolution liquid chromatographic systems for the early detection of pathological molecular constituents in physiologic body fluids; gradient elution chromatography for the analysis of protein-bound carbohydrates in blood serum samples, with emphasis on changes in sera from breast cancer patients; electrophoretic separation techniques coupled with staining of specific proteins in cellular isoenzymes for the monitoring of genetic mutations and abnormal molecular constituents in blood samples; and the development of a centrifugal elution chromatographic technique for the assay of specific proteins and immunoglobulins in human blood serum samples

  5. Biosensors: Future Analytical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors offer considerable promises for attaining the analytic information in a faster, simpler and cheaper manner compared to conventional assays. Biosensing approach is rapidly advancing and applications ranging from metabolite, biological/ chemical warfare agent, food pathogens and adulterant detection to genetic screening and programmed drug delivery have been demonstrated. Innovative efforts, coupling micromachining and nanofabrication may lead to even more powerful devices that would accelerate the realization of large-scale and routine screening. With gradual increase in commercialization a wide range of new biosensors are thus expected to reach the market in the coming years.

  6. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  7. On analytical justification of phase synchronization in different chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erjaee, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    In analytical or numerical synchronizations studies of coupled chaotic systems the phase synchronizations have less considered in the leading literatures. This article is an attempt to find a sufficient analytical condition for stability of phase synchronization in some coupled chaotic systems. The method of nonlinear feedback function and the scheme of matrix measure have been used to justify this analytical stability, and tested numerically for the existence of the phase synchronization in some coupled chaotic systems.

  8. Extension-twist coupling of composite circular tubes with application to tilt rotor blade design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1987-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine if twist deformation required for the design of full-scale extension-twist-coupled tilt-rotor blades can be achieved within material design limit loads, and to demonstrate the accuracy of a coupled-beam analysis in predicting twist deformations. Two extension-twist-coupled tilt-rotor blade designs were developed based on theoretically optimum aerodynamic twist distributions. The designs indicated a twist rate requirement of between .216 and .333 deg/in. Agreement between axial tests and analytical predictions was within 10 percent at design limit loads. Agreement between the torsion tests and predictions was within 11 percent.

  9. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate textbook begins with the Lagrangian formulation of Analytical Mechanics and then passes directly to the Hamiltonian formulation and the canonical equations, with constraints incorporated through Lagrange multipliers. Hamilton's Principle and the canonical equations remain the basis of the remainder of the text. Topics considered for applications include small oscillations, motion in electric and magnetic fields, and rigid body dynamics. The Hamilton-Jacobi approach is developed with special attention to the canonical transformation in order to provide a smooth and logical transition into the study of complex and chaotic systems. Finally the text has a careful treatment of relativistic mechanics and the requirement of Lorentz invariance. The text is enriched with an outline of the history of mechanics, which particularly outlines the importance of the work of Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton and Jacobi. Numerous exercises with solutions support the exceptionally clear and concise treatment...

  10. Hydromechanical coupling in geologic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Earth's porous crust and the fluids within it are intimately linked through their mechanical effects on each other. This paper presents an overview of such "hydromechanical" coupling and examines current understanding of its role in geologic processes. An outline of the theory of hydromechanics and rheological models for geologic deformation is included to place various analytical approaches in proper context and to provide an introduction to this broad topic for nonspecialists. Effects of hydromechanical coupling are ubiquitous in geology, and can be local and short-lived or regional and very long-lived. Phenomena such as deposition and erosion, tectonism, seismicity, earth tides, and barometric loading produce strains that tend to alter fluid pressure. Resulting pressure perturbations can be dramatic, and many so-called "anomalous" pressures appear to have been created in this manner. The effects of fluid pressure on crustal mechanics are also profound. Geologic media deform and fail largely in response to effective stress, or total stress minus fluid pressure. As a result, fluid pressures control compaction, decompaction, and other types of deformation, as well as jointing, shear failure, and shear slippage, including events that generate earthquakes. By controlling deformation and failure, fluid pressures also regulate states of stress in the upper crust. Advances in the last 80 years, including theories of consolidation, transient groundwater flow, and poroelasticity, have been synthesized into a reasonably complete conceptual framework for understanding and describing hydromechanical coupling. Full coupling in two or three dimensions is described using force balance equations for deformation coupled with a mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Fully coupled analyses allow hypothesis testing and conceptual model development. However, rigorous application of full coupling is often difficult because (1) the rheological behavior of geologic media is complex

  11. Qubit absorption refrigerator at strong coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Anqi; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Schaller, Gernot; Segal, Dvira

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate that a quantum absorption refrigerator (QAR) can be realized from the smallest quantum system, a qubit, by coupling it in a non-additive (strong) manner to three heat baths. This function is un-attainable for the qubit model under the weak system-bath coupling limit, when the dissipation is additive. In an optimal design, the reservoirs are engineered and characterized by a single frequency component. We then obtain closed expressions for the cooling window and refrigeration efficiency, as well as bounds for the maximal cooling efficiency and the efficiency at maximal power. Our results agree with macroscopic designs and with three-level models for QARs, which are based on the weak system-bath coupling assumption. Beyond the optimal limit, we show with analytical calculations and numerical simulations that the cooling efficiency varies in a non-universal manner with model parameters. Our work demonstrates that strongly-coupled quantum machines can exhibit function that is un-attainable under the weak system-bath coupling assumption.

  12. Perturbation theory for arbitrary coupling strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Bimal P.; Pradhan, Noubihary

    2018-03-01

    We present a new formulation of perturbation theory for quantum systems, designated here as: “mean field perturbation theory” (MFPT), which is free from power-series-expansion in any physical parameter, including the coupling strength. Its application is thereby extended to deal with interactions of arbitrary strength and to compute system-properties having non-analytic dependence on the coupling, thus overcoming the primary limitations of the “standard formulation of perturbation theory” (SFPT). MFPT is defined by developing perturbation about a chosen input Hamiltonian, which is exactly solvable but which acquires the nonlinearity and the analytic structure (in the coupling strength) of the original interaction through a self-consistent, feedback mechanism. We demonstrate Borel-summability of MFPT for the case of the quartic- and sextic-anharmonic oscillators and the quartic double-well oscillator (QDWO) by obtaining uniformly accurate results for the ground state of the above systems for arbitrary physical values of the coupling strength. The results obtained for the QDWO may be of particular significance since “renormalon”-free, unambiguous results are achieved for its spectrum in contrast to the well-known failure of SFPT in this case.

  13. Nuclear analytical methods for platinum group elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Platinum group elements (PGE) are of special interest for analytical research due to their economic importance like chemical peculiarities as catalysts, medical applications as anticancer drugs, and possible environmental detrimental impact as exhaust from automobile catalyzers. Natural levels of PGE are so low in concentration that most of the current analytical techniques approach their limit of detection capacity. In addition, Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt analyses still constitute a challenge in accuracy and precision of quantification in natural matrices. Nuclear analytical techniques, such as neutron activation analysis, X ray fluorescence, or proton-induced X ray emission (PIXE), which are generally considered as reference methods for many analytical problems, are useful as well. However, due to methodological restrictions, they can, in most cases, only be applied after pre-concentration and under special irradiation conditions. This report was prepared following a coordinated research project and a consultants meeting addressing the subject from different viewpoints. The experts involved suggested to discuss the issue according to the (1) application, hence, the concentration levels encountered, and (2) method applied for analysis. Each of the different fields of application needs special consideration for sample preparation, PGE pre-concentration, and determination. Additionally, each analytical method requires special attention regarding the sensitivity and sample type. Quality assurance/quality control aspects are considered towards the end of the report. It is intended to provide the reader of this publication with state-of-the-art information on the various aspects of PGE analysis and to advise which technique might be most suitable for a particular analytical problem related to platinum group elements. In particular, many case studies described in detail from the authors' laboratory experience might help to decide which way to go. As in many cases

  14. Two strongly correlated electron systems: the Kondo mode in the strong coupling limit and a 2-D model of electrons close to an electronic topological transition; Deux systemes d'electrons fortement correles: le modele de reseau Kondo dans la limite du couplage fort et un modele bidimensionnel d'electrons au voisinage d'une transition topologique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouis, F

    1999-10-14

    Two strongly correlated electron systems are considered in this work, Kondo insulators and high Tc cuprates. Experiments and theory suggest on one hand that the Kondo screening occurs on a rather short length scale and on the other hand that the Kondo coupling is renormalized to infinity in the low energy limit. The strong coupling limit is then the logical approach although the real coupling is moderate. A systematic development is performed around this limit in the first part. The band structure of these materials is reproduced within this scheme. Magnetic fluctuations are also studied. The antiferromagnetic transition is examined in the case where fermionic excitations are shifted to high energy. In the second part, the Popov and Fedotov representation of spins is used to formulate the Kondo and the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model in terms of a non-polynomial action of boson fields. In the third part the properties of high Tc cuprates are explained by a change of topology of the Fermi surface. This phenomenon would happen near the point of optimal doping and zero temperature. It results in the appearance of a density wave phase in the under-doped regime. The possibility that this phase has a non-conventional symmetry is considered. The phase diagram that described the interaction and coexistence of density wave and superconductivity is established in the mean-field approximation. The similarities with the experimental observations are numerous in particular those concerning the pseudo-gap and the behavior of the resistivity near optimal doping. (author)

  15. High-energy scattering in strongly coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprenger, Martin

    2014-11-01

    This thesis concerns itself with the analytic structure of scattering amplitudes in strongly coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills theory (abbreviated N = 4 SYM) in the multi-Regge limit. Through the AdS/CFT-correspondence observables in strongly coupled N = 4 SYM are accessible via dual calculations in a weakly coupled string theory on an AdS 5 x S 5 -geometry, in which observables can be calculated using standard perturbation theory. In particular, the calculation of the leading order of the n-gluon amplitude in N = 4 SYM at strong coupling corresponds to the calculation of a minimal surface embedded into AdS 5 . This surface ends on the concatenation of the gluon momenta, which is a light-like curve. The calculation of the minimal surface area can be reduced to finding the solution of a set of non-linear, coupled integral equations, which have no analytic solution in arbitrary kinematics. In this thesis, we therefore specialise to the multi-Regge limit, the n-particle generalisation of the Regge limit. This limit is especially interesting as even in the description of scattering amplitudes in weakly coupled N = 4 SYM in this limit a certain set of Feynman diagrams has to be resummed. This description organises itself into orders of logarithms of the energy involved in the scattering process. In this expansion each order in logarithms includes terms from every order in the coupling constant and therefore contains information about the strong coupling sector of the theory, albeit in a very specific way. This raises the central question of this thesis, which is how much of the analytic structure of the scattering amplitudes in the multi-Regge limit is preserved as we go to the strong coupling regime. We show that the equations governing the area of the minimal surface simplify drastically in the multi-Regge limit, which allows us to obtain analytic results for the scattering amplitudes. We develop an algorithm for the calculation of scattering amplitudes in the multi

  16. ElectroWeak Bosons Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Ouraou, Ahmimed; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Latest results on the measurement of gauge boson couplings, from ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, are presented. This review starts with an introduction to boson couplings, then the measurements of Triple and Quartic Couplings are described. And finally, limits on anomalous couplings are summarized.

  17. Multispectral analytical image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbings, T.C.

    2000-04-01

    With new and advanced analytical imaging methods emerging, the limits of physical analysis capabilities and furthermore of data acquisition quantities are constantly pushed, claiming high demands to the field of scientific data processing and visualisation. Physical analysis methods like Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) or Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and others are capable of delivering high-resolution multispectral two-dimensional and three-dimensional image data; usually this multispectral data is available in form of n separate image files with each showing one element or other singular aspect of the sample. There is high need for digital image processing methods enabling the analytical scientist, confronted with such amounts of data routinely, to get rapid insight into the composition of the sample examined, to filter the relevant data and to integrate the information of numerous separate multispectral images to get the complete picture. Sophisticated image processing methods like classification and fusion provide possible solution approaches to this challenge. Classification is a treatment by multivariate statistical means in order to extract analytical information. Image fusion on the other hand denotes a process where images obtained from various sensors or at different moments of time are combined together to provide a more complete picture of a scene or object under investigation. Both techniques are important for the task of information extraction and integration and often one technique depends on the other. Therefore overall aim of this thesis is to evaluate the possibilities of both techniques regarding the task of analytical image processing and to find solutions for the integration and condensation of multispectral analytical image data in order to facilitate the interpretation of the enormous amounts of data routinely acquired by modern physical analysis instruments. (author)

  18. On the longitudinal coupling impedance of a toroidal beam tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Tepikian, S.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the longitudinal coupling impedance of a smooth toroidal beam tube is derived. By treating the torus as a slow-wave structure, the well-known method of describing the impedance in terms of cavity resonances can be used. A simple analytical expression for the coupling impedance of a toroidal beam tube with square cross section valid in the low-frequency limit is obtained. The results from the present study are compared with previously published solutions and qualitative differences are pointed out. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Experiment and theory at the convergence limit: accurate equilibrium structure of picolinic acid by gas-phase electron diffraction and coupled-cluster computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Natalja; Marochkin, Ilya I; Rykov, Anatolii N

    2018-04-18

    The accurate molecular structure of picolinic acid has been determined from experimental data and computed at the coupled cluster level of theory. Only one conformer with the O[double bond, length as m-dash]C-C-N and H-O-C[double bond, length as m-dash]O fragments in antiperiplanar (ap) positions, ap-ap, has been detected under conditions of the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) experiment (Tnozzle = 375(3) K). The semiexperimental equilibrium structure, rsee, of this conformer has been derived from the GED data taking into account the anharmonic vibrational effects estimated from the ab initio force field. The equilibrium structures of the two lowest-energy conformers, ap-ap and ap-sp (with the synperiplanar H-O-C[double bond, length as m-dash]O fragment), have been fully optimized at the CCSD(T)_ae level of theory in conjunction with the triple-ζ basis set (cc-pwCVTZ). The quality of the optimized structures has been improved due to extrapolation to the quadruple-ζ basis set. The high accuracy of both GED determination and CCSD(T) computations has been disclosed by a correct comparison of structures having the same physical meaning. The ap-ap conformer has been found to be stabilized by the relatively strong NH-O hydrogen bond of 1.973(27) Å (GED) and predicted to be lower in energy by 16 kJ mol-1 with respect to the ap-sp conformer without a hydrogen bond. The influence of this bond on the structure of picolinic acid has been analyzed within the Natural Bond Orbital model. The possibility of the decarboxylation of picolinic acid has been considered in the GED analysis, but no significant amounts of pyridine and carbon dioxide could be detected. To reveal the structural changes reflecting the mesomeric and inductive effects due to the carboxylic substituent, the accurate structure of pyridine has been also computed at the CCSD(T)_ae level with basis sets from triple- to 5-ζ quality. The comprehensive structure computations for pyridine as well as for

  20. Analytic Potentials for Realistic Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Taylor, Aimee E.; Swanson, Kenneth R.

    2002-01-01

    Finite difference algorithms are widely used to numerically solve Laplace's equation for electrode structures that are not amendable to analytic treatment. This includes essentially all real situations. However, in many cases, it is desirable to have the solution in an analytic form. A common practice is to 'fit' the numerical solution either by least squares or cubic spline approach. Neither of these approaches is really accurate, nor do they produce unique results. These limitations are avoided by our approach.

  1. Analysis of semen parameters in male referrals: impact of reference limits, stratification by fertility categories, predictors of change, and comparison of normal semen parameters in subfertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karen; Li, Jianbo; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    To [1] determine the impact of semen reference limits on referrals for male fertility evaluations, [2] analyze the stratification of subjects based on published "normal" thresholds, [3] analyze the odds of changing fertility categories during serial tests and thereby the potential impact of inherent variability of semen parameters on referrals, and [4] determine variable(s) predictive of change. Retrospective chart review. Academic referral center for male fertility. New encounters in a male fertility clinic over a 5-year period that straddles the publication of World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 reference values. None. Demographic and clinical variables, semen values, and fertility categories as follows: BE (below WHO 2010 criteria), BTWN (above WHO 2010 but below WHO 1999 criteria), and N (above WHO 1999 criteria). A total of 82.3% of initial semen tests were categorized as BE, and the predominance of this category was unchanged by publication of the WHO 2010 criteria. Men with initial semen analysis categorized as BTWN or N represented 16.2% and 1.5% of the referral population, respectively. Subjects initially categorized as BTWN were more likely to change fertility categories, and overwhelmingly this migration was downward. Analysis of normal individual semen parameters revealed statistically worse mean concentration and motility when at least one other parameter fell below the WHO 2010 criteria. Men with semen results above reference criteria are underrepresented, indicating that reference limits influence referral patterns for male fertility evaluations. Normal mean concentration and motility were lower in men with at least one other individual semen parameter below the 2010 criteria, suggesting global dysfunction in spermatogenesis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The LHC Transverse Coupled-Bunch Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Mounet, Nicolas; Métral, Elias

    In this thesis, the problem of the transverse coupled-bunch instabilities created by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam-coupling impedance, that can possibly limit the machine operation, is addressed thanks to several new theories and tools. A rather complete vision of the problem is proposed here, going from the calculation of the impedances and wake functions of individual machine elements, to the beam dynamics study. Firstly, new results are obtained in the theory of the beam-coupling impedance for an axisymmetric two-dimensional structure, generalizing Zotter's theories, and a new general theory is derived for the impedance of an infinite flat two-dimensional structure. Then, a new approach has been found to compute the wake functions from such analytically obtained beam-coupling impedances, over-coming limitations that could be met with standard discrete Fourier transform procedures. Those results are then used to obtain an impedance and wake function model of the LHC, based on the (resistive-) wall im...

  3. Analysis of some coplanar transmission lines: coplanar coupled lines, coplanar coupled striplines, and coplanar coupled lines with rectangular microshield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Naichang; He, Jianguo; Yao, Demiao; Dai, Qin; Lin, Weigan

    1995-06-01

    Two types of coplanar transmission lines, rectangular microshield coplanar coupled lines (RMCCL) and coplanar coupled rectangular microshield lines (CCRML), are proposed for MMIC applications. These are developed from coplanar coupled lines (CCL) and coplanar coupled strip lines (CCS). Analytic formulas are presented for calculating the quasistatic TEM parameters of these coupled lines by means of exact conformal mapping techniques. Numerical results are also presented to illustrate the properties of these coplanar transmission lines.

  4. Analytic continuation in perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprini, Irinel

    2002-01-01

    We discuss some attempts to improve standard perturbative expansion in QCD by using the analytic continuation in the momentum and the Borel complex planes. We first analyse the momentum-plane analyticity properties of the Borel-summed Green functions in perturbative QCD and the connection between the Landau singularities and the infrared renormalons. By using the analytic continuation in the Borel complex plane, we propose a new perturbative series replacing the standard expansion in powers of the normalized coupling constant a. The new expansion functions have branch point and essential singularities at the origin of the complex a-plane and divergent Taylor expansions in powers of a. On the other hand the modified expansion of the QCD correlators is convergent under rather conservative conditions. (author)

  5. An analytical study of non-linear behaviour of coupled 2+2x0.5 DOF electro-magneto-mechanical system by a method of multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    An electro-magneto-mechanical system combines three physical domains - a mechanical structure, a magnetic field and an electric circuit. The interaction between these domains is analysed for a structure with two degrees of freedom (translational and rotational) and two electrical circuits. Each...... electrical circuit is described by a differential equation of the 1st order, which is considered to contribute to the coupled system by 0.5 DOF. The electrical and mechanical systems are coupled via a magnetic circuit, which is inherently non-linear, due to a non-linear nature of the electro-magnetic force...

  6. From strong to weak coupling in holographic models of thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Kaplis, Nikolaos [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University,Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden 2333 CA (Netherlands); Starinets, Andrei O. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-29

    We investigate the analytic structure of thermal energy-momentum tensor correlators at large but finite coupling in quantum field theories with gravity duals. We compute corrections to the quasinormal spectra of black branes due to the presence of higher derivative R{sup 2} and R{sup 4} terms in the action, focusing on the dual to N=4 SYM theory and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We observe the appearance of new poles in the complex frequency plane at finite coupling. The new poles interfere with hydrodynamic poles of the correlators leading to the breakdown of hydrodynamic description at a coupling-dependent critical value of the wave-vector. The dependence of the critical wave vector on the coupling implies that the range of validity of the hydrodynamic description increases monotonically with the coupling. The behavior of the quasinormal spectrum at large but finite coupling may be contrasted with the known properties of the hierarchy of relaxation times determined by the spectrum of a linearized kinetic operator at weak coupling. We find that the ratio of a transport coefficient such as viscosity to the relaxation time determined by the fundamental non-hydrodynamic quasinormal frequency changes rapidly in the vicinity of infinite coupling but flattens out for weaker coupling, suggesting an extrapolation from strong coupling to the kinetic theory result. We note that the behavior of the quasinormal spectrum is qualitatively different depending on whether the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density is greater or less than the universal, infinite coupling value of ℏ/4πk{sub B}. In the former case, the density of poles increases, indicating a formation of branch cuts in the weak coupling limit, and the spectral function shows the appearance of narrow peaks. We also discuss the relation of the viscosity-entropy ratio to conjectured bounds on relaxation time in quantum systems.

  7. Measurement of the W$^\\pm$Z production cross section and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Imbault, Didier; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; 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    2013-07-16

    This Letter presents a measurement of W$^\\pm$Z production in 1.02 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2011. Doubly leptonic decay events are selected with electrons, muons and missing transverse momentum in the final state. In total 71 candidates are observed, with a background expectation of 12.1$\\pm$1.4(stat.)$^{+4.1}_{-2.0}$(syst.) events. The total cross section for W$^\\pm$Z production for $Z/\\gamma^*$ masses within the range 66 GeV to 116 GeV is determined to be $\\sigma_{WZ}^{tot}$ = 20.5$^{+3.1}_{-2.8}$(stat.)$^{+1.4}_{-1.3}$(syst.)$^{+0.9}_{-0.8}$(lumi.) pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation of 17.3$^{+1.3}_{-0.8}$ pb. Limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings are extracted.

  8. Measurement of $W^+W^-$ production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous WWZ and WW$_{\\gamma}$ couplings

    CERN Document Server

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Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Byszewski, Marcin; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-06-03

    This paper presents a measurement of the $W^+W^-$ production cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV. The leptonic decay channels are analyzed using data corresponding to an integrated 4.6 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The $W^+W^-$ production cross section $\\sigma(pp -> W^+W^- + X)$ is measured to be 51.9 $\\pm$ 2.0 (stat) $\\pm$ 3.9 (syst) $\\pm$ 2.0 (lumi) pb, compatible with the Standard Model prediction of 44.7 $^{+2.1}_{-1.9}$ pb. A measurement of the normalized fiducial cross section as a function of the leading lepton transverse momentum is also presented. The reconstructed transverse momentum distribution of the leading lepton is used to extract limits on anomalous WWZ and WW$\\gamma$ couplings.

  9. The analytic Lanczos method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, N.S.

    1998-01-01

    The classical formalism of the Moment Problem has been combined with a cumulant approach and applied to the extensive many-body problem. This has yielded many new exact results for many-body systems in the thermodynamic limit - for the ground state energy, for excited state gaps, and for arbitrary ground state averages. The method applies to any extensive Hamiltonian system, for any phase or symmetry arising in the model, whether on a lattice or in the continuum, and for any dimensionality. The theorems are of a nonperturbative nature with respect to any couplings occuring in the model. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  10. Spectral asymptotic in the large coupling limit

    CERN Document Server

    Bruneau, V

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study a singular perturbation of an eigenvalues problem related to supra-conductor wave guides. Using boundary layer tools we perform a complete asymptotic expansion of the eigenvalues as the conductivity tends to $+\\infty$.

  11. Frequency analysis of a tower-cable coupled system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moo Yeol [Young Sin Precision Engineering Ltd., Gyungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seock Hyun; Park, In Su [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cui, Chengxun [Yanbian University, Yangji (China)

    2013-06-15

    This study considers the prediction of natural frequency to avoid resonance in a wind turbine tower- cable coupled system. An analytical model based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method is proposed to predict the resonance frequency of a wind turbine tower structure supported by four guy cables. To verify the validity of the analytical model, a small tower-cable model is manufactured and tested. The frequency and mode data of the tower model are obtained by modal testing and finite element analysis. The validity of the proposed method is verified through the comparison of the frequency analysis results. Finally, using a parametric study with the analytical model, we identified how the cable tension and cable angle affect the resonance frequency of the wind turbine tower structure. From the analysis results, the tension limit and optimal angle of the cable are identified.

  12. Large exchange-dominated domain wall velocities in antiferromagnetically coupled nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteifan, Majd; Lubarda, M. V.; Fu, S.; Chang, R.; Escobar, M. A.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Lomakin, V.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanowires supporting field- and current-driven domain wall motion are envisioned for methods of information storage and processing. A major obstacle for their practical use is the domain-wall velocity, which is traditionally limited for low fields and currents due to the Walker breakdown occurring when the driving component reaches a critical threshold value. We show through numerical and analytical modeling that the Walker breakdown limit can be extended or completely eliminated in antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic nanowires. These coupled nanowires allow for large domain-wall velocities driven by field and/or current as compared to conventional nanowires.

  13. Let's Talk... Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  14. Analytics for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  15. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In nine sections, 48 chapters cover 1) analytical chemistry and the environment 2) environmental radiochemistry 3) automated instrumentation 4) advances in analytical mass spectrometry 5) fourier transform spectroscopy 6) analytical chemistry of plutonium 7) nuclear analytical chemistry 8) chemometrics and 9) nuclear fuel technology

  16. Multielement analytical procedure coupling INAA, ICP-MS and ICP-AES: Application to the determination of major and trace elements in sediment samples of the Bouregreg river (Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounouira, H.; CEA - CNRS/UMR, Centre de Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette; Choukri, A.; Hakam, O.K.; Cherkaoui, R.; Gaudry, A.; Delmas, R.; Mariet, C.; Chakiri, S.

    2008-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were used for the determination of major and trace elements in sediment samples of the Bouregreg river (Morocco). The reliability of the results was checked, by using IAEA Soil-7 certified reference material. Results obtained by the three techniques were compared to control digestions efficiencies. A general good agreement was found between INAA and both ICP-MS and ICP-AES after alkaline fusion (ICPf). The ICP-MS technique used after acid attack (ICPa) was satisfactory for a few elements. A principal component analysis (PCA) has been used for analyzing the variability of concentrations, and defining the most influential sites with respect to the general variation trends. Three groups of elements could be distinguished. For these groups a normalization of concentrations to the central element concentration (that means Mn, Si or Al) is proposed. (author)

  17. Mars Analytical Microimager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, Krzysztof J.; Govindjee; Andersen, Dale; Presley, John; Lucas, John M.; Sears, S. Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah

    analytical components for enhanced detection are: fluorescence anisotropy which analyzes chromophore-based proteins, anisotropy depletion to detect the presence of a fluid environment, anisotropy excitation spectrum for augmented characterization, and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism. Because all its analytical components are independent of chirality and amino acid types, life detection ability of the MAM is not limited to the terrestrial core biomolecular subsets.

  18. Analytical Solution for the Anisotropic Rabi Model: Effects of Counter-Rotating Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhu, Hanjie

    2015-03-01

    The anisotropic Rabi model, which was proposed recently, differs from the original Rabi model: the rotating and counter-rotating terms are governed by two different coupling constants. This feature allows us to vary the counter-rotating interaction independently and explore the effects of it on some quantum properties. In this paper, we eliminate the counter-rotating terms approximately and obtain the analytical energy spectrums and wavefunctions. These analytical results agree well with the numerical calculations in a wide range of the parameters including the ultrastrong coupling regime. In the weak counter-rotating coupling limit we find out that the counter-rotating terms can be considered as the shifts to the parameters of the Jaynes-Cummings model. This modification shows the validness of the rotating-wave approximation on the assumption of near-resonance and relatively weak coupling. Moreover, the analytical expressions of several physics quantities are also derived, and the results show the break-down of the U(1)-symmetry and the deviation from the Jaynes-Cummings model.

  19. Smart city analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper; Hansen, Christian; Alstrup, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    We present an ensemble learning method that predicts large increases in the hours of home care received by citizens. The method is supervised, and uses different ensembles of either linear (logistic regression) or non-linear (random forests) classifiers. Experiments with data available from 2013 ...... is very useful when full records are not accessible or available. Smart city analytics does not necessarily require full city records. To our knowledge this preliminary study is the first to predict large increases in home care for smart city analytics.......We present an ensemble learning method that predicts large increases in the hours of home care received by citizens. The method is supervised, and uses different ensembles of either linear (logistic regression) or non-linear (random forests) classifiers. Experiments with data available from 2013...... to 2017 for every citizen in Copenhagen receiving home care (27,775 citizens) show that prediction can achieve state of the art performance as reported in similar health related domains (AUC=0.715). We further find that competitive results can be obtained by using limited information for training, which...

  20. Classical integrability for three-point functions: cognate structure at weak and strong couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazama, Yoichi [Research Center for Mathematical Physics, Rikkyo University,Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Quantum Hadron Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Komatsu, Shota [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Nishimura, Takuya [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, we develop a new method of computing three-point functions in the SU(2) sector of the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory in the semi-classical regime at weak coupling, which closely parallels the strong coupling analysis. The structure threading two disparate regimes is the so-called monodromy relation, an identity connecting the three-point functions with and without the insertion of the monodromy matrix. We shall show that this relation can be put to use directly for the semi-classical regime, where the dynamics is governed by the classical Landau-Lifshitz sigma model. Specifically, it reduces the problem to a set of functional equations, which can be solved once the analyticity in the spectral parameter space is specified. To determine the analyticity, we develop a new universal logic applicable at both weak and strong couplings. As a result, compact semi-classical formulas are obtained for a general class of three-point functions at weak coupling including the ones whose semi-classical behaviors were not known before. In addition, the new analyticity argument applied to the strong coupling analysis leads to a modification of the integration contour, producing the results consistent with the recent hexagon bootstrap approach. This modification also makes the Frolov-Tseytlin limit perfectly agree with the weak coupling form.

  1. Core monitoring with analytical model adaption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.B.; Martin, C.L.; Parkos, G.R.; Rahnema, F.; Williams, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of BWR cores has evolved rapidly due to more capable computer systems, improved analytical models and new types of core instrumentation. Coupling of first principles diffusion theory models such as applied to design to the core instrumentation has been achieved by GE with an adaptive methodology in the 3D Minicore system. The adaptive methods allow definition of 'leakage parameters' which are incorporated directly into the diffusion models to enhance monitoring accuracy and predictions. These improved models for core monitoring allow for substitution of traversing in-core probe (TIP) and local power range monitor (LPRM) with calculations to continue monitoring with no loss of accuracy or reduction of thermal limits. Experience in small BWR cores has shown that with one out of three TIP machines failed there was no operating limitation or impact from the substitute calculations. Other capabilities exist in 3D Monicore to align TIPs more accurately and accommodate other types of system measurements or anomalies. 3D Monicore also includes an accurate predictive capability which uses the adaptive results from previous monitoring calculations and is used to plan and optimize reactor maneuvers/operations to improve operating efficiency and reduce support requirements

  2. Transient Dynamics of Double Quantum Dots Coupled to Two Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukadai, Takahisa; Sasamoto, Tomohiro

    2018-05-01

    We study the time-dependent properties of double quantum dots coupled to two reservoirs using the nonequilibrium Green function method. For an arbitrary time-dependent bias, we derive an expression for the time-dependent electron density of a dot and several currents, including the current between the dots in the wide-band-limit approximation. For the special case of a constant bias, we calculate the electron density and the currents numerically. As a result, we find that these quantities oscillate and that the number of crests in a single period of the current from a dot changes with the bias voltage. We also obtain an analytical expression for the relaxation time, which expresses how fast the system converges to its steady state. From the expression, we find that the relaxation time becomes constant when the coupling strength between the dots is sufficiently large in comparison with the difference of coupling strength between the dots and the reservoirs.

  3. Regge meets collinear in strongly-coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprenger, Martin [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich,Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-10

    We revisit the calculation of the six-gluon remainder function in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills theory from the strong coupling TBA in the multi-Regge limit and identify an infinite set of kinematically subleading terms. These new terms can be compared to the strong coupling limit of the finite-coupling expressions for the impact factor and the BFKL eigenvalue proposed by Basso et al. in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP01(2015)027, which were obtained from an analytic continuation of the Wilson loop OPE. After comparing the results order by order in those subleading terms, we show that it is possible to precisely map both formalisms onto each other. A similar calculation can be carried out for the seven-gluon amplitude, the result of which shows that the central emission vertex does not become trivial at strong coupling.

  4. Analytical method validation of GC-FID for the simultaneous measurement of hydrocarbons (C2-C4) in their gas mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Oman Zuas; Harry budiman; Muhammad Rizky Mulyana

    2016-01-01

    An accurate gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) method was validated for the simultaneous analysis of light hydrocarbons (C2-C4) in their gas mixture. The validation parameters were evaluated based on the ISO/IEC 17025 definition including method selectivity, repeatability, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), and ruggedness. Under the optimum analytical conditions, the analysis of gas mixture revealed that each target comp...

  5. a cross-sectional analytic study 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of HIV/AIDS comprehensive correct knowledge among Sudanese university: a cross-sectional analytic study 2014. ... There are limited studies on this topic in Sudan. In this study we investigated the Comprehensive correct ...

  6. Comparison of coupled mode theory and FDTD simulations of coupling between bent and straight optical waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertolotti, M.; Symes, W.W.; Stoffer, Remco; Hiremath, K.R.; Driessen, A.; Michelotti, F; Hammer, Manfred

    Analysis of integrated optical cylindrical microresonators involves the coupling between a straight waveguide and a bent waveguide. Our (2D) variant of coupled mode theory is based on analytically represented mode profiles. With the bend modes expressed in Cartesian coordinates, coupled mode

  7. Determination of trace impurities in uranium-transition metal alloy fuels by ICP-MS using extended common analyte internal standardization (ECAIS) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S.B.; Nagar, B.K.; Saxena, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed for the determination of eight trace impurities viz, Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn and Ni in three different uranium-transition metal alloy fuels (U-Me; Me = Ti, Zr and Mo) employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The well known common analyte internal standardization (CAIS) chemometric technique was modified and then employed to minimize and account for the matrix effect on analyte intensity. Standard addition of analytes to the pure synthetic U-Me sample solutions and subsequently their ≥ 94% recovery by the ICP-MS measurement validates the proposed methodology. One real sample of each of these alloys was analyzed by the developed analytical methodology and the %RSD observed was in the range of 5-8%. The method detection limits were found to be within 4-10 μg L -1 . (author)

  8. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the